Science.gov

Sample records for 3-d finite element

  1. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  2. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, T.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories, and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  3. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  4. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1991-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  5. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  6. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  7. Stabilized Finite Elements in FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Newman, James C.; Karman, Steve L.

    2017-01-01

    A Streamlined Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilized finite-element discretization has been implemented as a library into the FUN3D unstructured-grid flow solver. Motivation for the selection of this methodology is given, details of the implementation are provided, and the discretization for the interior scheme is verified for linear and quadratic elements by using the method of manufactured solutions. A methodology is also described for capturing shocks, and simulation results are compared to the finite-volume formulation that is currently the primary method employed for routine engineering applications. The finite-element methodology is demonstrated to be more accurate than the finite-volume technology, particularly on tetrahedral meshes where the solutions obtained using the finite-volume scheme can suffer from adverse effects caused by bias in the grid. Although no effort has been made to date to optimize computational efficiency, the finite-element scheme is competitive with the finite-volume scheme in terms of computer time to reach convergence.

  8. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  9. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  10. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  11. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  12. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  13. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  14. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  15. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  16. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  17. 3D Finite Element Trajectory Code with Adaptive Meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Bauer, Andy; Shephard, Mark; Beal, Mark; Tran, Hien

    2004-11-01

    Beam Optics Analysis, a new, 3D charged particle program is available and in use for the design of complex, 3D electron guns and charged particle devices. The code reads files directly from most CAD and solid modeling programs, includes an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI), and a robust mesh generator that is fully automatic. Complex problems can be set up, and analysis initiated in minutes. The program includes a user-friendly post processor for displaying field and trajectory data using 3D plots and images. The electrostatic solver is based on the standard nodal finite element method. The magnetostatic field solver is based on the vector finite element method and is also called during the trajectory simulation process to solve for self magnetic fields. The user imports the geometry from essentially any commercial CAD program and uses the GUI to assign parameters (voltages, currents, dielectric constant) and designate emitters (including work function, emitter temperature, and number of trajectories). The the mesh is generated automatically and analysis is performed, including mesh adaptation to improve accuracy and optimize computational resources. This presentation will provide information on the basic structure of the code, its operation, and it's capabilities.

  18. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  19. 3D finite element modeling of pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuo; Hayes, Jaclyn; Krishnamurty, Sundar; Grosse, Ian R

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a validated 3D finite element model of the pelvic floor system which can offer insights into the mechanics of anterior vaginal wall prolapse and have the ability to assess biomedical device treatment methods. The finite element results should accurately mimic the clinical findings of prolapse due to intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and soft tissues impairment conditions. A 3D model of pelvic system was created in Creo Parametric 2.0 based on MRI Images, which included uterus, cervix, vagina, cardinal ligaments, uterosacral ligaments, and a simplified levator plate and rectum. The geometrical model was imported into ANSYS Workbench 14.5. Mechanical properties of soft tissues were based on experimental data of tensile test results from current literature. Studies were conducted for IAP loadings on the vaginal wall and uterus, increasing from lowest to extreme values. Anterior vaginal wall collapse occurred at an IAP value corresponding to maximal valsalva and showed similar collapsed shape as clinical findings. Prolapse conditions exhibited high sensitivity to vaginal wall stiffness, whereas healthy tissues was found to support the vagina against prolapse. Ligament impairment was found to have only a secondary effect on prolapse.

  20. 3D Finite Element Meshing of Stromboli and Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianetti, S.; Casarotti, E.; Giunchi, C.

    2008-12-01

    The development of monitoring networks both at Mount Etna and Stromboli provided a fairly detailed database of geodetic and seismological observations during the unrest and eruptive/explosive phases of the last few years. These data reveal a tight interaction between magmatic and seismic activities. Their interpretation requires a new generation of numerical models of the volcanic edifices, based on the finite element method and characterized by realistic topography, anelastic rheology, internal discontinuities and lateral variations of mechanical parameters. We focus on the problem to make a flawless spatial discretization, which is an essential step for an accurate finite element simulation. If 3D unstructured tetrahedral meshes can be achieved quite easily with commercial or non-commercial algorithms, the creation of 3D non-structured hexahedral meshes is still recognized as a challenging issue. For complex models, as in the case of realistic geological volumes, generating a hexahedral mesh with the available meshing algorithms can require weeks or even months. Nevertheless, all-hexahedral meshes are still eagerly requested and, in some cases, preferred to all-tetrahedral ones, mainly because of the superior numerical accuracy and stability, but also for the lower computational cost. Taking advantage of CUBIT (www.cubit.sandia.gov) and of the expertise acquired in the meshing process for seismological problem, we present the mesh of the two most active italian volcanoes: Stromboli and Mount Etna. The grids are based upon updated and detailed digital elevation models with a resolution of tenth of meters in the zones where the most significant deformations are observed and include the major structural discontinuities. An unstructured scheme is implemented in order to obtain a lower resolution away from the volcano summit.

  1. TAURUS96. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.; Hallquist, J.O.; Spelce, T.E.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  2. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  3. 3D finite element simulation of TIG weld pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Asserin, O.; Gounand, S.; Gilles, P.; Bergheau, J. M.; Medale, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a three-dimensional weld pool model for the moving gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, in order to understand the main factors that limit the weld quality and improve the productivity, especially with respect to the welding speed. Simulation is a very powerful tool to help in understanding the physical phenomena in the weld process. A 3D finite element model of heat and fluid flow in weld pool considering free surface of the pool and traveling speed has been developed for the GTAW process. Cast3M software is used to compute all the governing equations. The free surface of the weld pool is calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. The combined effects of surface tension gradient, buoyancy force, arc pressure, arc drag force to drive the fluid flow is included in our model. The deformation of the weld pool surface and the welding speed affect fluid flow, heat flow and thus temperature gradients and molten pool dimensions. Welding trials study is presented to compare our numerical results with macrograph of the molten pool.

  4. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  5. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  6. Modeling electromagnetic rail launchers at speed using 3D finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P.J.; Eastham, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in moving conductors is described. This has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis. The application of the technique to railgun launchers is illustrated.

  7. BOPACE 3-D (the Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for 3-dimensional Solids Using Isoparametric Finite Elements)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The BOPACE 3-D is a finite element computer program, which provides a general family of three-dimensional isoparametric solid elements, and includes a new algorithm for improving the efficiency of the elastic-plastic-creep solution procedure. Theoretical, user, and programmer oriented sections are presented to describe the program.

  8. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Moeller, Knut

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT.

  9. An efficient finite-element algorithm for 3D layered complex structure modelling.

    PubMed

    Sahalos, J N; Kyriacou, G A; Vafiadis, E

    1994-05-01

    In this paper an efficient finite-element method (FEM) algorithm for complicated three-dimensional (3D) layered type models has been developed. Its unique feature is that it can handle, with memory requirements within the abilities of a simple PC, arbitrarily shaped 3D elements. This task is achieved by storing only the non-zero coefficients of the sparse FEM system of equations. The algorithm is applied to the solution of the Laplace equation in models with up to 79 layers of trilinear general hexahedron elements. The system of equations is solved with the Gauss-Seidel iterative technique.

  10. 3D engineered fiberboard : finite element analysis of a new building product

    Treesearch

    John F. Hunt

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents finite element analyses that are being used to analyze and estimate the structural performance of a new product called 3D engineered fiberboard in bending and flat-wise compression applications. A 3x3x2 split-plot experimental design was used to vary geometry configurations to determine their effect on performance properties. The models are based on...

  11. An augmented Lagrangian finite element formulation for 3D contact of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongqiang; Spilker, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic contact analysis is essential to obtain a complete understanding of soft tissue biomechanics, and the importance of physiological structure on the joint biomechanics has long been recognised; however, up to date, there are no successful developments of biphasic finite element contact analysis for three-dimensional (3D) geometries of physiological joints. The aim of this study was to develop a finite element formulation for biphasic contact of 3D physiological joints. The augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The biphasic contact method was implemented in the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2(®) (COMSOL, Inc., Burlington, MA). The accuracy of the implementation was verified using 3D biphasic contact problems, including indentation with a flat-ended indenter and contact of glenohumeral cartilage layers. The ability of the method to model multibody biphasic contact of physiological joints was proved by a 3D knee model. The 3D biphasic finite element contact method developed in this study can be used to study the biphasic behaviours of the physiological joints.

  12. A finite element analysis of a 3D auxetic textile structure for composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhaoyang; Hu, Hong; Liu, Yanping

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the finite element analysis of an innovative 3D auxetic textile structure consisting of three yarn systems (weft, warp and stitch yarns). Different from conventional 3D textile structures, the proposed structure exhibits an auxetic behaviour under compression and can be used as a reinforcement to manufacture auxetic composites. The geometry of the structure is first described. Then a 3D finite element model is established using ANSYS software and validated by the experimental results. The deformation process of the structure at different compression strains is demonstrated, and the validated finite element model is finally used to simulate the auxetic behaviour of the structure with different structural parameters and yarn properties. The results show that the auxetic behaviour of the proposed structure increases with increasing compression strain, and all the structural parameters and yarn properties have significant effects on the auxetic behaviour of the structure. It is expected that the study could provide a better understanding of 3D auxetic textile structures and could promote their application in auxetic composites.

  13. 3D hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method: Implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Ahmadian, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method (HIFEM) is proposed for the mesh-independent treatment of 3D problems with intricate morphologies. The HIFEM implements a recursive algorithm for creating enrichment functions that capture gradient discontinuities in nonconforming finite elements cut by arbitrary number and configuration of materials interfaces. The method enables the mesh-independent simulation of multiphase problems with materials interfaces that are in close proximity or contact while providing a straightforward general approach for evaluating the enrichments. In this manuscript, we present a detailed discussion on the implementation issues and required computational geometry considerations associated with the HIFEM approximation of thermal and mechanical responses of 3D problems. A convergence study is provided to investigate the accuracy and convergence rate of the HIFEM and compare them with standard FEM benchmark solutions. We will also demonstrate the application of this mesh-independent method for simulating the thermal and mechanical responses of two composite materials systems with complex microstructures.

  14. Heat analysis of thermal overload relays using 3-D finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Yoshihiro; Ichihashi, Takayuki . Dept. of Information Science); Ito, Shokichi . Dept. of Electronics)

    1999-05-01

    In designing a thermal overload relay, it is necessary to analyze thermal characteristics of several trial models. Up to now, this has been done by measuring the temperatures on a number of positions in the trial models. This experimental method is undoubtedly expensive. In this paper, the temperature distribution of a thermal overload relay is obtained by using 3-D finite element analysis taking into account the current distribution in current-carrying conductors. It is shown that the 3-D analysis is capable of evaluating a new design of thermal overload relays.

  15. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  16. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  17. Content-Adaptive Finite Element Mesh Generation of 3-D Complex MR Volumes for Bioelectromagnetic Problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kim, T-S; Cho, M; Lee, S

    2005-01-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element method offers several advantages over other conventional methods such as boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropy. Mesh generation is the first requirement in the finite element analysis and there are many different approaches in mesh generation. However conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes, resulting in numerous elements in the smaller volume regions, thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present an improved content-adaptive mesh generation scheme that is efficient and fast along with options to change the contents of meshes. For demonstration, mesh models of the head from a volume MRI are presented in 2-D and 3-D.

  18. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  19. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  20. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  1. 3D finite element analysis of porous Ti-based alloy prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mircheski, Ile; Gradišar, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, novel designs of porous acetabular cups are created and tested with 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The aim is to develop a porous acetabular cup with low effective radial stiffness of the structure, which will be near to the architectural and mechanical behavior of the natural bone. For the realization of this research, a 3D-scanner technology was used for obtaining a 3D-CAD model of the pelvis bone, a 3D-CAD software for creating a porous acetabular cup, and a 3D-FEA software for virtual testing of a novel design of the porous acetabular cup. The results obtained from this research reveal that a porous acetabular cup from Ti-based alloys with 60 ± 5% porosity has the mechanical behavior and effective radial stiffness (Young's modulus in radial direction) that meet and exceed the required properties of the natural bone. The virtual testing with 3D-FEA of a novel design with porous structure during the very early stage of the design and the development of orthopedic implants, enables obtaining a new or improved biomedical implant for a relatively short time and reduced price.

  2. Parallel goal-oriented adaptive finite element modeling for 3D electromagnetic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Key, K.; Ovall, J.; Holst, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a parallel goal-oriented adaptive finite element method for accurate and efficient electromagnetic (EM) modeling of complex 3D structures. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh allows this approach to accommodate arbitrarily complex 3D conductivity variations and a priori known boundaries. The total electric field is approximated by the lowest order linear curl-conforming shape functions and the discretized finite element equations are solved by a sparse LU factorization. Accuracy of the finite element solution is achieved through adaptive mesh refinement that is performed iteratively until the solution converges to the desired accuracy tolerance. Refinement is guided by a goal-oriented error estimator that uses a dual-weighted residual method to optimize the mesh for accurate EM responses at the locations of the EM receivers. As a result, the mesh refinement is highly efficient since it only targets the elements where the inaccuracy of the solution corrupts the response at the possibly distant locations of the EM receivers. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of two approaches for estimating the primary residual error required at the core of this method: one uses local element and inter-element residuals and the other relies on solving a global residual system using a hierarchical basis. For computational efficiency our method follows the Bank-Holst algorithm for parallelization, where solutions are computed in subdomains of the original model. To resolve the load-balancing problem, this approach applies a spectral bisection method to divide the entire model into subdomains that have approximately equal error and the same number of receivers. The finite element solutions are then computed in parallel with each subdomain carrying out goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement independently. We validate the newly developed algorithm by comparison with controlled-source EM solutions for 1D layered models and with 2D results from our earlier 2D goal oriented

  3. Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-in-Cell Simulations with Pic3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code Pic3P. Designed for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space charge effects, Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations self-consistently and includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects from first principles. Higher-order Finite Element methods with adaptive refinement on conformal unstructured meshes lead to highly efficient use of computational resources. Massively parallel processing with dynamic load balancing enables large-scale modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of next-generation accelerator facilities. Applications include the LCLS RF gun and the BNL polarized SRF gun.

  4. Finite-Element-Based Discretization and Regularization Strategies for 3D Inverse Electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dafang; Kirby, Robert M.; Johnson, Chris R.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the inverse electrocardiographic problem of computing epicardial potentials from a body-surface potential map. We study how to improve numerical approximation of the inverse problem when the finite element method is used. Being ill-posed, the inverse problem requires different discretization strategies from its corresponding forward problem. We propose refinement guidelines that specifically address the ill-posedness of the problem. The resulting guidelines necessitate the use of hybrid finite elements composed of tetrahedra and prism elements. Also in order to maintain consistent numerical quality when the inverse problem is discretized into different scales, we propose a new family of regularizers using the variational principle underlying finite element methods. These variational-formed regularizers serve as an alternative to the traditional Tikhonov regularizers, but preserves the L2 norm and thereby achieves consistent regularization in multi-scale simulations. The variational formulation also enables a simple construction of the discrete gradient operator over irregular meshes, which is difficult to define in traditional discretization schemes. We validated our hybrid element technique and the variational regularizers by simulations on a realistic 3D torso/heart model with empirical heart data. Results show that discretization based on our proposed strategies mitigates the ill-conditioning and improves the inverse solution, and that the variational formulation may benefit a broader range of potential-based bioelectric problems. PMID:21382763

  5. Finite element 3D reconstruction of the pulmonary acinus imaged by synchrotron X-ray tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, A.; Filipovic, N.; Haberthür, D.; Dickie, R.; Matsui, Y.; Stampanoni, M.; Schittny, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The alveolated structure of the pulmonary acinus plays a vital role in gas exchange function. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the parenchymal region is fundamental to understanding this structure-function relationship, but only a limited number of attempts have been conducted in the past because of technical limitations. In this study, we developed a new image processing methodology based on finite element (FE) analysis for accurate 3D structural reconstruction of the gas exchange regions of the lung. Stereologically well characterized rat lung samples (Pediatr Res 53: 72–80, 2003) were imaged using high-resolution synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy. A stack of 1,024 images (each slice: 1024 × 1024 pixels) with resolution of 1.4 μm3 per voxel were generated. For the development of FE algorithm, regions of interest (ROI), containing ∼7.5 million voxels, were further extracted as a working subunit. 3D FEs were created overlaying the voxel map using a grid-based hexahedral algorithm. A proper threshold value for appropriate segmentation was iteratively determined to match the calculated volume density of tissue to the stereologically determined value (Pediatr Res 53: 72–80, 2003). The resulting 3D FEs are ready to be used for 3D structural analysis as well as for subsequent FE computational analyses like fluid dynamics and skeletonization. PMID:18583378

  6. Characteristics Analysis on Various Kinds of Hybrid Stepping Motors Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Maki, Kohji; Miyata, Kenji; Oonishi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Masafumi; Abukawa, Toshimi

    We have presented a powerful scheme of investigating hybrid stepping motor characteristics by using 3D finite element method. A linear magnetic field analysis is effectively applicable to predict relative performance of several motors in an extremely short computing time. The waveforms of cogging torque by linear and nonlinear analysis resemble each other, while the wave amplitude in the linear analysis is about 2 times larger than one in the nonlinear analysis in the presented example. The overestimation factor of cogging torque is approximately constant for the same material composition.

  7. Method for measuring compliances and crack length by strain gauge and 3D finite element calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Riedle, J.; Wulf, J.; Schmauder, S.

    1995-05-01

    A method for determining compliances and crack lengths of round CT specimen geometries (RCT) by measuring the notch opening displacement (NOD) with strain gauges, combined with 3D finite element calculations to correlate the NOD to the loading point displacements, is presented. The method has been verified for tungsten and it is shown that measured and calculated compliances are in excellent agreement. A general equation is presented correlating compliances and NOD which allows to implicitly determine crack lengths by simply measuring the NOD of RCT specimens. 5 refs.

  8. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  9. Least-squares finite element solution of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, Tsung-Liang; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the finite element solution of incompressible viscous flow problems. Development of more efficient methods is still needed before large-scale computation of 3D problems becomes feasible. This paper presents such a development. The most popular finite element method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is the classic Galerkin mixed method based on the velocity-pressure formulation. The mixed method requires the use of different elements to interpolate the velocity and the pressure in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for the existence of the solution. On the other hand, due to the lack of symmetry and positive definiteness of the linear equations arising from the mixed method, iterative methods for the solution of linear systems have been hard to come by. Therefore, direct Gaussian elimination has been considered the only viable method for solving the systems. But, for three-dimensional problems, the computer resources required by a direct method become prohibitively large. In order to overcome these difficulties, a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) has been developed. This method is based on the first-order velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. In this paper the LSFEM is extended for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the following first-order quasi-linear velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation.

  10. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  11. 3-D finite element modelling of facial soft tissue and preliminary application in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Lou, Hangdi; Guo, Liang; Rong, Qiguo; Liu, Yi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of soft tissue aesthetics is important for achieving an optimal outcome in orthodontic treatment planning. Previously, applicable procedures were mainly restricted to 2-D profile prediction. In this study, a generic 3-D finite element (FE) model of the craniofacial soft and hard tissue was constructed, and individualisation of the generic model based on cone beam CT data and mathematical transformation was investigated. The result indicated that patient-specific 3-D facial FE model including different layers of soft tissue could be obtained through mathematical model transformation. Average deviation between the transformed model and the real reconstructed one was 0.47 ± 0.77 mm and 0.75 ± 0.84 mm in soft and hard tissue, respectively. With boundary condition defined according to treatment plan, such FE model could be used to predict the result of orthodontic treatment on facial soft tissue.

  12. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  13. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  14. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  15. Parallel 3D Finite Element Numerical Modelling of DC Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Prudencio, E.; Candel, A.; Ge, L.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; /SLAC

    2008-02-04

    In this paper we present Gun3P, a parallel 3D finite element application that the Advanced Computations Department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is developing for the analysis of beam formation in DC guns and beam transport in klystrons. Gun3P is targeted specially to complex geometries that cannot be described by 2D models and cannot be easily handled by finite difference discretizations. Its parallel capability allows simulations with more accuracy and less processing time than packages currently available. We present simulation results for the L-band Sheet Beam Klystron DC gun, in which case Gun3P is able to reduce simulation time from days to some hours.

  16. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  17. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  18. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  19. A detailed 3D finite element analysis of the peeling behaviour of a gecko spatula.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Roger A; Holl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed finite element analysis of the adhesion of a gecko spatula. The gecko spatulae form the tips of the gecko foot hairs that transfer the adhesional and frictional forces between substrate and foot. The analysis is based on a parameterised description of the 3D geometry of the spatula that only requires 12 parameters. The adhesion is described by a nonlinear computational contact formulation that accounts for the van der Waals interaction between spatula and substrate. The spatula adhesion model is implemented using an enriched contact finite element formulation recently developed by the first author. The finite element model is then used to simulate the peeling behaviour of the gecko spatula under applied vertical and rotational loading for various model parameters. Variations of the material stiffness, adhesional strength and range, stiction, spatula size and spatula inclination are considered to account for the natural variation of spatula properties. The study demonstrates that the spatula can function over a wide range of conditions. The computed pull-off forces are in agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The study also examines the energy required for the spatula pull-off. The proposed model is ideal to study the influence of substrate roughness on the spatula adhesion, as is finally demonstrated.

  20. 3D Finite Element Study on: Bar Splinted Implants Supporting Partial Denture in the Reconstructed Mandible

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed; Ghali, Rami; Aboelnagga, Mona

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to estimate the stress patterns induced by the masticatory loads on a removable prosthesis supported and retained by bar splinted implants placed in the reconstructed mandible with two different clip materials and without clip, in the fibula-jaw bone and prosthesis using finite element analysis. METHODS: Two 3D finite element models were constructed, that models components were modeled on commercial CAD/CAM software then assembled into finite element package. Vertical loads were applied simulating the masticatory forces unilaterally in the resected site and bilaterally in the central fossa of the lower first molar as 100N (tension and compression). Analysis was based on the assumption full osseointegration between different types of bones, and between implants and fibula while fixing the top surface of the TMJ in place. RESULTS: The metallic bar connecting the three implants is insensitive to the clips material. Its supporting implants showed typical behavior with maximum stress values at the neck region. Fibula and jaw bone showed stresses within physiologic, while clips material effect seems to be very small due to its relatively small size. CONCLUSION: Switching loading force direction from tensile to compression did-not change the stresses and deformations distribution, but reversed their sign from positive to negative. PMID:27275353

  1. A 3D finite element model for the vibration analysis of asymmetric rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, A.; Prabel, B.; Combescure, D.

    2010-08-01

    This paper suggests a 3D finite element method based on the modal theory in order to analyse linear periodically time-varying systems. Presentation of the method is given through the particular case of asymmetric rotating machines. First, Hill governing equations of asymmetric rotating oscillators with two degrees of freedom are investigated. These differential equations with periodic coefficients are solved with classic Floquet theory leading to parametric quasimodes. These mathematical entities are found to have the same fundamental properties as classic eigenmodes, but contain several harmonics possibly responsible for parametric instabilities. Extension to the vibration analysis (stability, frequency spectrum) of asymmetric rotating machines with multiple degrees of freedom is achieved with a fully 3D finite element model including stator and rotor coupling. Due to Hill expansion, the usual degrees of freedom are duplicated and associated with the relevant harmonic of the Floquet solutions in the frequency domain. Parametric quasimodes as well as steady-state response of the whole system are ingeniously computed with a component-mode synthesis method. Finally, experimental investigations are performed on a test rig composed of an asymmetric rotor running on nonisotropic supports. Numerical and experimental results are compared to highlight the potential of the numerical method.

  2. Description of a parallel, 3D, finite element, hydrodynamics-diffusion code

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J L; Prasad, M K; Shestakov, A I

    1999-04-11

    We describe a parallel, 3D, unstructured grid finite element, hydrodynamic diffusion code for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications and the ancillary software used to run it. The code system is divided into two entities, a controller and a stand-alone physics code. The code system may reside on different computers; the controller on the user's workstation and the physics code on a supercomputer. The physics code is composed of separate hydrodynamic, equation-of-state, laser energy deposition, heat conduction, and radiation transport packages and is parallelized for distributed memory architectures. For parallelization, a SPMD model is adopted; the domain is decomposed into a disjoint collection of subdomains, one per processing element (PE). The PEs communicate using MPI. The code is used to simulate the hydrodynamic implosion of a spherical bubble.

  3. 3D CSEM inversion based on goal-oriented adaptive finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Key, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present a parallel 3D frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic inversion code name MARE3DEM. Non-linear inversion of observed data is performed with the Occam variant of regularized Gauss-Newton optimization. The forward operator is based on the goal-oriented finite element method that efficiently calculates the responses and sensitivity kernels in parallel using a data decomposition scheme where independent modeling tasks contain different frequencies and subsets of the transmitters and receivers. To accommodate complex 3D conductivity variation with high flexibility and precision, we adopt the dual-grid approach where the forward mesh conforms to the inversion parameter grid and is adaptively refined until the forward solution converges to the desired accuracy. This dual-grid approach is memory efficient, since the inverse parameter grid remains independent from fine meshing generated around the transmitter and receivers by the adaptive finite element method. Besides, the unstructured inverse mesh efficiently handles multiple scale structures and allows for fine-scale model parameters within the region of interest. Our mesh generation engine keeps track of the refinement hierarchy so that the map of conductivity and sensitivity kernel between the forward and inverse mesh is retained. We employ the adjoint-reciprocity method to calculate the sensitivity kernels which establish a linear relationship between changes in the conductivity model and changes in the modeled responses. Our code uses a direcy solver for the linear systems, so the adjoint problem is efficiently computed by re-using the factorization from the primary problem. Further computational efficiency and scalability is obtained in the regularized Gauss-Newton portion of the inversion using parallel dense matrix-matrix multiplication and matrix factorization routines implemented with the ScaLAPACK library. We show the scalability, reliability and the potential of the algorithm to deal with

  4. Pathophysiological aspects of cystocele with a 3D finite elements model.

    PubMed

    Lamblin, Géry; Mayeur, Olivier; Giraudet, Géraldine; Jean Dit Gautier, Estelle; Chene, Gautier; Brieu, Mathias; Rubod, Chrystèle; Cosson, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to design a 3D biomechanical model of the female pelvic system to assess pelvic organ suspension theories and understand cystocele mechanisms. A finite elements (FE) model was constructed to calculate the impact of suspension structure geometry on cystocele. The sample was a geometric model of a control patient's pelvic organs. The method used geometric reconstruction, implemented by the biomechanical properties of each anatomic structure. Various geometric configurations were simulated on the FE method to analyse the role of each structure and compare the two main anatomic theories. The main outcome measure was a 3D biomechanical model of the female pelvic system. The various configurations of bladder displacement simulated mechanisms underlying medial, lateral and apical cystocele. FE simulation revealed that pubocervical fascia is the most influential structure in the onset of median cystocele (essentially after 40 % impairment). Lateral cystocele showed a stronger influence of arcus tendineus fasciae pelvis (ATFP) on vaginal wall displacement under short ATFP lengthening. In apical cystocele, the uterosacral ligament showed greater influence than the cardinal ligament. Suspension system elongation increased displacement by 25 % in each type of cystocele. A 3D digital model enabled simulations of anatomic structures underlying cystocele to better understand cystocele pathophysiology. The model could be used to predict cystocele surgery results and personalising technique by preoperative simulation.

  5. 3D finite element models of shoulder muscles for computing lines of actions and moment arms.

    PubMed

    Webb, Joshua D; Blemker, Silvia S; Delp, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Accurate representation of musculoskeletal geometry is needed to characterise the function of shoulder muscles. Previous models of shoulder muscles have represented muscle geometry as a collection of line segments, making it difficult to account for the large attachment areas, muscle-muscle interactions and complex muscle fibre trajectories typical of shoulder muscles. To better represent shoulder muscle geometry, we developed 3D finite element models of the deltoid and rotator cuff muscles and used the models to examine muscle function. Muscle fibre paths within the muscles were approximated, and moment arms were calculated for two motions: thoracohumeral abduction and internal/external rotation. We found that muscle fibre moment arms varied substantially across each muscle. For example, supraspinatus is considered a weak external rotator, but the 3D model of supraspinatus showed that the anterior fibres provide substantial internal rotation while the posterior fibres act as external rotators. Including the effects of large attachment regions and 3D mechanical interactions of muscle fibres constrains muscle motion, generates more realistic muscle paths and allows deeper analysis of shoulder muscle function.

  6. A 3D moving mesh Finite Element Method for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, G. R.; Borhani, N.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Thome, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    A 3D ALE Finite Element Method is developed to study two-phase flow phenomena using a new discretization method to compute the surface tension forces. The computational method is based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) and the Finite Element Method (FEM), creating a two-phase method with an improved model for the liquid-gas interface. An adaptive mesh update procedure is also proposed for effective management of the mesh to remove, add and repair elements, since the computational mesh nodes move according to the flow. The ALE description explicitly defines the two-phase interface position by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The proposed methodology for computing the curvature leads to accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational cost. Static and dynamic tests have been carried out to validate the method and the results have compared well to analytical solutions and experimental results found in the literature, demonstrating that the new proposed methodology provides good accuracy to describe the interfacial forces and bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on the description of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the discretization of the surface tension force, the new remeshing technique, and the validation results. Additionally, a microchannel simulation in complex geometry is presented for two elongated bubbles.

  7. A 3D finite element model to investigate prosthetic interface stresses of different posterior tibial slope.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaomiao; Fu, Xiaodong; Wang, Weili

    2015-11-01

    Posterior tibial slope that is created during proximal tibial resection in total knee arthroplasty has emerged as an important factor in the mechanics of the knee joint and the surgical outcome. But the ideal degree of posterior tibial slope for recovery of the knee joint function and preventions of complications remains controversial and should vary in different racial groups. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of posterior tibial slope on contact stresses in the tibial polyethylene component of total knee prostheses. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to calculate contact stresses in tibial polyethylene component of total knee prostheses subjected to a compressive load. The 3D finite element model of total knee prosthesis was constructed from the images produced by 3D scanning technology. Stresses in tibial polyethylene component were calculated with four different posterior tibial slopes (0°, 3°, 6° and 9°). The 3D finite element model of total knee prosthesis we presented was well validated. We found that the stress distribution in the polythene as evaluated by the distributions of the von Mises stress, the maximum principle stress, the minimum principle stress and the Cpress were more uniform with 3° and 6° posterior tibial slopes than with 0° and 9° posterior tibial slopes. Moreover, the peaks of the above stresses and trends of changes with increasing degree of knee flexion were more ideal with 3° and 6° posterior slopes. The results suggested that the tibial component inclination might be favourable to 7°-10° so far as the stress distribution is concerned. The range of the tibial component inclination also can decrease the wear of polyethylene. Chinese posterior tibial slope is bigger than in the West, and the current domestic use of prostheses is imported from the West, so their demands to tilt back bone cutting can lead to shorten the service life of prostheses; this experiment result is of important

  8. GENSURF: A mesh generator for 3D finite element analysis of surface and corner cracks in finite thickness plates subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program that generates three-dimensional (3D) finite element models for cracked 3D solids was written. This computer program, gensurf, uses minimal input data to generate 3D finite element models for isotropic solids with elliptic or part-elliptic cracks. These models can be used with a 3D finite element program called surf3d. This report documents this mesh generator. In this manual the capabilities, limitations, and organization of gensurf are described. The procedures used to develop 3D finite element models and the input for and the output of gensurf are explained. Several examples are included to illustrate the use of this program. Several input data files are included with this manual so that the users can edit these files to conform to their crack configuration and use them with gensurf.

  9. The modelling of VLF Trimpis using both finite element and 3D Born Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, K.; Nunn, D.; Hayakawa, M.

    This paper investigates the numerical modelling of VLF Trimpis produced by a D region inhomogeneity on the Great Circle Path. Two different codes are used. The first is a 2D finite element method (FEM) code, whose solutions are valid in the non-Born limit. The second is a 3D model that invokes the Born approximation. The predicted Trimpis from these codes compare closely, thus confirming the validity of both models. The modal scattering matrices have a comparable structure, and indicate strong scattering between the dominant TM modes. Analysis of the scattering matrix from the FEM code delineates the Born regime. For a LIE with a radius of 100kms, the Born approximation becomes invalid at an electron density perturbation of about 8 el/cc.

  10. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  11. Towards automated 3D finite element modeling of direct fiber reinforced composite dental bridge.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing; Steven, Grant P

    2005-07-01

    An automated 3D finite element (FE) modeling procedure for direct fiber reinforced dental bridge is established on the basis of computer tomography (CT) scan data. The model presented herein represents a two-unit anterior cantilever bridge that includes a maxillary right incisor as an abutment and a maxillary left incisor as a cantilever pontic bonded by adhesive and reinforced fibers. The study aims at gathering fundamental knowledge for design optimization of this type of innovative composite dental bridges. To promote the automatic level of numerical analysis and computational design of new dental biomaterials, this report pays particular attention to the mathematical modeling, mesh generation, and validation of numerical models. To assess the numerical accuracy and to validate the model established, a convergence test and experimental verification are also presented.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Meniscal Anatomical 3D Scaffolds: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, L; Lambers, F.M; Wilson, W; van Donkelaar, C.C; de Wijn, JR; Huiskesb, R; van Blitterswijk, C.A

    2007-01-01

    Solid Free-Form Fabrication (SFF) technologies allow the fabrication of anatomical 3D scaffolds from computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients’ dataset. These structures can be designed and fabricated with a variable, interconnected and accessible porous network, resulting in modulable mechanical properties, permeability, and architecture that can be tailored to mimic a specific tissue to replace or regenerate. In this study, we evaluated whether anatomical meniscal 3D scaffolds with matching mechanical properties and architecture are beneficial for meniscus replacement as compared to meniscectomy. After acquiring CT and MRI of porcine menisci, 3D fiber-deposited (3DF) scaffolds were fabricated with different architectures by varying the deposition pattern of the fibers comprising the final structure. The mechanical behaviour of 3DF scaffolds with different architectures and of porcine menisci was measured by static and dynamic mechanical analysis and the effect of these tissue engineering templates on articular cartilage was assessed by finite element analysis (FEA) and compared to healthy conditions or to meniscectomy. Results show that 3DF anatomical menisci scaffolds can be fabricated with pore different architectures and with mechanical properties matching those of natural menisci. FEA predicted a beneficial effect of meniscus replacement with 3D scaffolds in different mechanical loading conditions as compared to meniscectomy. No influence of the internal scaffold architecture was found on articular cartilage damage. Although FEA predictions should be further confirmed by in vitro and in vivo experiments, this study highlights meniscus replacement by SFF anatomical scaffolds as a potential alternative to meniscectomy. PMID:19662124

  13. Efficient 3D finite element analysis of dental restorative procedures using micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal

    2007-05-01

    This investigation describes a rapid method for the generation of finite element models of dental structures and restorations. An intact mandibular molar was digitized with a micro-CT scanner. Surface contours of enamel and dentin were fitted following tooth segmentation based on pixel density using an interactive medical image control system. Stereolithography (STL) files of enamel and dentin surfaces were then remeshed to reduce mesh density and imported in a rapid prototyping software, where Boolean operations were used to assure the interfacial mesh congruence (dentinoenamel junction) and simulate different cavity preparations (MO/MOD preparations, endodontic access) and restorations (feldspathic porcelain and composite resin inlays). The different tooth parts were then imported in a finite element software package to create 3D solid models. The potential use of the model was demonstrated using nonlinear contact analysis to simulate occlusal loading. Cuspal deformation was measured at different restorative steps and correlated with existing experimental data for model validation and optimization. Five different models were validated by existing experimental data. Cuspal widening (between mesial cusps) at 100 N load ranged from 0.4 microm for the unrestored tooth, 9-12 microm for MO, MOD cavities, to 12-21 microm for endodontic access cavities. Placement of an MOD adhesive restoration in porcelain resulted in 100% cuspal stiffness recovery (0.4 microm of cuspal widening at 100 N) while the composite resin inlay allowed for a partial recuperation of cusp stabilization (1.3 microm of cuspal widening at 100 N). The described method can generate detailed and valid three dimensional finite element models of a molar tooth with different cavities and restorative materials. This method is rapid and can readily be used for other medical (and dental) applications.

  14. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  15. Unilateral Outer Bow Expanded Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Mortezai, Omid; Esmaily, Masomeh; Darvishpour, Hojat

    2015-04-01

    Headgears are among the effective orthodontic appliances to achieve treatment goals. Unilateral molar distal movement is sometimes needed during an orthodontic treatment, which can be achieved by an asymmetric headgear. Different unilateral headgears have been introduced. The main goal of this study was to analyze the force system of unilateral expanded outer bow asymmetric headgears by the finite element method (FEM). Six 3D finite element models of a mesiodistal slice of the maxilla containing upper first molars, their periodontal ligaments (PDLs), cancellous bone, cortical bone, and a cervical headgear with expanded outer bow attached to maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 and meshed in ANSYS Workbench ver. 12.1. The models were the same except for the degree of outer bow expansion. The outer bow ends were loaded with 2 N force. The distal driving force and the net moment were evaluated. A decrease in the distalizing force in the normal side molar from 1.69 N to 1.37 N was shown by increasing the degree of unilateral expansion. At the same time, the force increased from 2.19 N to 2.49 N in the expanded side molar. A net moment increasing from 2.26 N.mm to 4.64 N.mm was also shown. Unilateral outer bow expansion can produce different distalizing forces in molars, which increase by increasing the expansion.

  16. Unilateral Outer Bow Expanded Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Mortezai, Omid; Esmaily, Masomeh; Darvishpour, Hojat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Headgears are among the effective orthodontic appliances to achieve treatment goals. Unilateral molar distal movement is sometimes needed during an orthodontic treatment, which can be achieved by an asymmetric headgear. Different unilateral headgears have been introduced. The main goal of this study was to analyze the force system of unilateral expanded outer bow asymmetric headgears by the finite element method (FEM). Materials and Methods: Six 3D finite element models of a mesiodistal slice of the maxilla containing upper first molars, their periodontal ligaments (PDLs), cancellous bone, cortical bone, and a cervical headgear with expanded outer bow attached to maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 and meshed in ANSYS Workbench ver. 12.1. The models were the same except for the degree of outer bow expansion. The outer bow ends were loaded with 2 N force. The distal driving force and the net moment were evaluated. Results: A decrease in the distalizing force in the normal side molar from 1.69 N to 1.37 N was shown by increasing the degree of unilateral expansion. At the same time, the force increased from 2.19 N to 2.49 N in the expanded side molar. A net moment increasing from 2.26 N.mm to 4.64 N.mm was also shown. Conclusion: Unilateral outer bow expansion can produce different distalizing forces in molars, which increase by increasing the expansion. PMID:26622282

  17. Finite Element Based Anisotropic 3D Inversion of Marine CSEM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Y.; Byun, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order to interpret three-dimensional (3D) marine controlled-source electromagnetic (MCSEM) data, it is critical to accurately determine electrical anisotropy because ignoring anisotropy can produce misleading artifacts. In this study, we present an inversion method for 3D subsurface imaging in media with an inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution. Direct solvers are incorporated both in the forward and inverse problems, For the forward problem, the vector Helmholtz equation for the secondary electric field is discretized on a hexahedral mesh using edge finite elements, then a direct sparse-matrix solver is chosen to effectively reuse its factorization both in the survey simulation and Jacobian computation. The inversion method is formulated as a functional optimization with an objective functional containing terms measuring data misfit and model structure by means of smoothness and anisotropy. These measures are efficiently incorporated through the use of an iteratively reweighted least-squares scheme. The objective functional is minimized by a Gauss-Newton approach using a direct dense-matrix solver. We demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of the algorithm by testing it on synthetic data sets.

  18. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  19. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z.

    2016-01-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa - a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis. PMID:26785845

  20. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  1. A NURBS-based generalized finite element scheme for 3D simulation of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Masoud; Najafi, Ahmad R.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Geubelle, Philippe H.

    2016-08-01

    A 3D NURBS-based interface-enriched generalized finite element method (NIGFEM) is introduced to solve problems with complex discontinuous gradient fields observed in the analysis of heterogeneous materials. The method utilizes simple structured meshes of hexahedral elements that do not necessarily conform to the material interfaces in heterogeneous materials. By avoiding the creation of conforming meshes used in conventional FEM, the NIGFEM leads to significant simplification of the mesh generation process. To achieve an accurate solution in elements that are crossed by material interfaces, the NIGFEM utilizes Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) to enrich the solution field locally. The accuracy and convergence of the NIGFEM are tested by solving a benchmark problem. We observe that the NIGFEM preserves an optimal rate of convergence, and provides additional advantages including the accurate capture of the solution fields in the vicinity of material interfaces and the built-in capability for hierarchical mesh refinement. Finally, the use of the NIGFEM in the computational analysis of heterogeneous materials is discussed.

  2. Finite Element Methods and Multiphase Continuum Theory for Modeling 3D Air-Water-Sediment Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Miller, C. T.; Dimakopoulos, A.; Farthing, M.

    2016-12-01

    The last decade has seen an expansion in the development and application of 3D free surface flow models in the context of environmental simulation. These models are based primarily on the combination of effective algorithms, namely level set and volume-of-fluid methods, with high-performance, parallel computing. These models are still computationally expensive and suitable primarily when high-fidelity modeling near structures is required. While most research on algorithms and implementations has been conducted in the context of finite volume methods, recent work has extended a class of level set schemes to finite element methods on unstructured methods. This work considers models of three-phase flow in domains containing air, water, and granular phases. These multi-phase continuum mechanical formulations show great promise for applications such as analysis of coastal and riverine structures. This work will consider formulations proposed in the literature over the last decade as well as new formulations derived using the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory, an approach to deriving and closing macroscale continuum models for multi-phase and multi-component processes. The target applications require the ability to simulate wave breaking and structure over-topping, particularly fully three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic flows that drive these phenomena. A conservative level set scheme suitable for higher-order finite element methods is used to describe the air/water phase interaction. The interaction of these air/water flows with granular materials, such as sand and rubble, must also be modeled. The range of granular media dynamics targeted including flow and wave transmision through the solid media as well as erosion and deposition of granular media and moving bed dynamics. For the granular phase we consider volume- and time-averaged continuum mechanical formulations that are discretized with the finite element method and coupled to the underlying air

  3. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  4. A 3D discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method for teleseismic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    monteiller, vadim; Beller, Stephen; Nolet, Guust; Operto, Stephane; Virieux, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapide increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modelling of short period telesismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method, opennig the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. In order to reduce the computational cost of the forward-problem, we developed a method that relies on multi-core parallel computing and computational-domain reduction. We defined two nested levels for parallelism based on MPI library, which are managed by two MPI communicators. Firstly, we use a domain partitionning strategy, assigning one subdomain to one cpu and, secondly we distribute telesismic sources on different copies of the partitioned domain. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive for telesismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We defined a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embeded in a background homogeneous or axisymetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique (Alterman & Karal (1968),Taflove & Hagness (2005)), which relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided intro three subdomains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-mathed absorbing layers, an intermediate zone in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the

  5. [A primary construction of the 3D finite element model for fixed edgewise appliance].

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-qing; Yan, He-qing; Cai, Zhong; Wang, Dong-mei; Qian, Yu-fen; Wang, Cheng-tao

    2005-06-01

    To construct a three-dimensional finite element model (3D-FEM) of the fixed appliance for mechanical analysis. The figures of the brackets and the edgewise wire were constructed at the platform of powerSHAPE3040, based on a male's figures of mandibular dentition and alveolar bone. First, the bracket slot center plane (H plane) was lined, which was 4.3mm under the mesial buccal cusp of the 2nd molar and parallel to the XY plane. The point that each tooth's axis of buccal surface (line A) crossed the H plane was at the bracket's center (point O). Second, on the basis of H plane, line A, and point O, 0.018 inchx0.025 inch brackets were constructed on the teeth. All the slots were on the H plane.Then, according to the brackets' slots, plane f was gotten, which went through every slot smoothly and was perpendicular to the XY plane. At the base of slots' basal wall and gingival wall, the 0.016 inchx0.022 inch wire was constructed on the plane f. The figures of edgewise wire, teeth, alveolar bone, and brackets were transferred to ANSYS5.5 system in the IGES format. The teeth, periodontal membrane (PDM), alveolar bone, and brackets were broken down to 4-node tetrahedron element. The 10-node tetrahedron element was chosen to make the model of edgewise wire. The 3D-FEM of the brackets with teeth, PDM, alveolar, and the edgewise wire about the mandible were obtained. This kind of bracket was torqued slot bracket, which is similar to the preadjusted appliance. The edgewise wire was not as same as catenary curve or parabola completely. There were inset and offset on the wire following the dentition model. When the plain edgewise wire was inserted in the brackets, there was no force between the wire and brackets. If the wire was deformed as designed, the action could be analyzed. 3D mechanical analysis about the fixed appliance could be done on the model.

  6. Efficient finite element modeling of scattering for 2D and 3D problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Velichko, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    The scattering of waves by defects is central to ultrasonic NDE and SHM. In general, scattering problems must be modeled using direct numerical methods such as finite elements (FE), which is very computationally demanding. The most efficient way is to only model the scatterer itself and a minimal region of the surrounding host medium, and this was previously demonstrated for 2-dimensional (2D) bulk wave scattering problems in isotropic media. An encircling array of monopole and dipole sources is used to inject an arbitrary wavefront onto the scatterer and the scattered field is monitored by a second encircling array of monitoring points. From this data, the scattered field can be projected out to any point in space. If the incident wave is chosen to be a plane wave incident from a given angle and the scattered field is projected to distant points in the far-field of the scatterer, the far-field scattering or S-matrix may be obtained, which encodes all the available scattering information. In this paper, the technique is generalized to any elastic wave geometry in both 2D and 3D, where the latter can include guided wave scattering problems. A further refinement enables the technique to be employed with free FE meshes of triangular or tetrahedral elements.

  7. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  8. A goal-oriented adaptive finite-element approach for plane wave 3-D electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a novel goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement approach for finite-element methods to model plane wave electromagnetic (EM) fields in 3-D earth models based on the electric field differential equation. To handle complicated models of arbitrary conductivity, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity involving curved boundaries and surface topography, we employ an unstructured grid approach. The electric field is approximated by linear curl-conforming shape functions which guarantee the divergence-free condition of the electric field within each tetrahedron and continuity of the tangential component of the electric field across the interior boundaries. Based on the non-zero residuals of the approximated electric field and the yet to be satisfied boundary conditions of continuity of both the normal component of the total current density and the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior interfaces, three a-posterior error estimators are proposed as a means to drive the goal-oriented adaptive refinement procedure. The first a-posterior error estimator relies on a combination of the residual of the electric field, the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density and the discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior faces shared by tetrahedra. The second a-posterior error estimator is expressed in terms of the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density (conduction plus displacement current). The discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field forms the third a-posterior error estimator. Analytical solutions for magnetotelluric (MT) and radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) fields impinging on a homogeneous half-space model are used to test the performances of the newly developed goal-oriented algorithms using the above three a-posterior error estimators. A trapezoidal topographical model, using normally incident EM waves

  9. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  10. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  11. 3D viscous time dependent analysis of a slow moving landslide by finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, Guadalupe; Fernández-Merodo, Josè Antonio; García-Davalillo, Juan Carlos; Herrera, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    A methodology to study the cinematic behavior in time and 3D effects of slow moving landslides is presented by its application to the Portalet landslide, located in the Spanish Central Pyrenees. The area is characterize by the presence of several complex landslides triggered by glacial retreat and developed in weathered Devonian and Carboniferous slate materials. In summer 2004, the toe of two paleolanslides was excavated in order to construct a parking area, which reactivated the preexistent rupture surfaces and generated a new and smaller roto-translational landslide of about 5·105m3. Works were paralyzed and the road A-136 connecting Spain and France was temporary closed. In 2006 stabilizing solutions were performed, although surface and deep monitoring data reveal that the landslide is currently active. In this work the cinematic behavior of the Portalet parking landslide has been reproduced since the excavation in 2004 until 2016 by an advanced 3D finite element model (FEM) analysis. A detailed 3D litho-stratigraphic geometry has been defined using the information available from previous works(1-3): real topography, geological profiles, ground water level and material properties. The first step has been a stability analysis using the shear stress reduction (SSR) technique to calibrate the value of the friction angle of the soil layer where the rupture surface develops. In this step the sensibility of the mesh size has been studied, as is a critical parameter. Secondly, stability analysis results have been verified by simulating the parking excavation with a static analysis using Mohr-Coulomb elastoplastic failure criteria. In the last step the behavior of the landslide has been recreated using a hydromechanic coupled formulation for displacements and interstitial water pressure (u-pw), a simple elevation ground water model calculated from daily rainfall and a Perzyna viscous constitutive model of the solid skeleton which represent the creep detected by

  12. Feeding biomechanics of Late Triassic metoposaurids (Amphibia: Temnospondyli): a 3D finite element analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Josep; Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Konietzko-Meier, Dorota

    2017-03-29

    The Late Triassic freshwater ecosystems were occupied by different tetrapod groups including large-sized anamniotes, such as metoposaurids. Most members of this group of temnospondyls acquired gigantic sizes (up to 5 m long) with a nearly worldwide distribution. The paleoecology of metoposaurids is controversial; they have been historically considered passive, bottom-dwelling animals, waiting for prey on the bottom of rivers and lakes, or they have been suggested to be active mid-water feeders. The present study aims to expand upon the paleoecological interpretations of these animals using 3D finite element analyses (FEA). Skulls from two taxa, Metoposaurus krasiejowensis, a gigantic taxon from Europe, and Apachesaurus gregorii, a non-gigantic taxon from North America, were analyzed under different biomechanical scenarios. Both 3D models of the skulls were scaled to allow comparisons between them and reveal that the general stress distribution pattern found in both taxa is clearly similar in all scenarios. In light of our results, both previous hypotheses about the paleoecology of these animals can be partly merged: metoposaurids probably were ambush and active predators, but not the top predators of these aquatic environments. The FEA results demonstrate that they were particularly efficient at bilateral biting, and together with their characteristically anteropositioned orbits, optimal for an ambush strategy. Nonetheless, the results also show that these animals were capable of lateral strikes of the head, suggesting active hunting of prey. Regarding the important skull size differences between the taxa analyzed, our results suggest that the size reduction in the North American taxon could be related to drastic environmental changes or the increase of competitors. The size reduction might have helped them expand into new ecological niches, but they likely remained fully aquatic, as are all other metoposaurids.

  13. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  14. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30-50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in treating

  15. A Multi-Compartment 3-D Finite Element Model of Rectocele and Its Interaction with Cystocele

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as POP-Q point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment. PMID:25757664

  16. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  17. A majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian-based finite element method for 3D restoration of geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peipei; Wang, Chengjing; Dai, Xiaoxia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian-based finite element method for 3D elastic frictionless contact problems. In this scheme, we discretize the restoration problem via the finite element method and reformulate it to a constrained optimization problem. Then we apply the majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian method to solve the optimization problem, which is very suitable for the ill-conditioned case. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method is a very efficient algorithm for various large-scale 3D restorations of geological models, especially for the restoration of geological models with complicated faults.

  18. Plasmonics of 3-D Nanoshell Dimers Using Multipole Expansion and Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Christopher G.; Norton, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and spectral responses of the plasmonic fields induced in the gap of 3-D Nanoshell Dimers of gold and silver are comprehensively investigated and compared via theory and simulation, using the Multipole Expansion (ME) and the Finite Element Method (FEM) in COMSOL, respectively. The E-field in the dimer gap was evaluated and compared as a function of shell thickness, inter-particle distance, and size. The E-field increased with decreasing shell thickness, decreasing interparticle distance, and increasing size, with the error between the two methods ranging from 1 to 10%, depending on the specific combination of these three variables. This error increases several fold with increasing dimer size, as the quasi-static approximation breaks down. A consistent overestimation of the plasmon’s FWHM and red-shifting of the plasmon peak occurs with FEM, relative to ME, and it increases with decreasing shell thickness and inter-particle distance. The size-effect that arises from surface scattering of electrons is addressed and shown to be especially prominent for thin shells, for which significant damping, broadening and shifting of the plasmon band is observed; the size-effect also affects large nanoshell dimers, depending on their relative shell thickness, but to a lesser extent. This study demonstrates that COMSOL is a promising simulation environment to quantitatively investigate nanoscale electromagnetics for the modeling and designing of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrates. PMID:19678677

  19. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military.

  20. Asymmetric Outer Bow Length and Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to assess distal and lateral forces and moments of asymmetric headgears by variable outer bow lengths. Four 3D finite element method (FEM) models of a cervical headgear attached to the maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 software and transferred to ANSYS Workbench ver. 11 software. Models contained the first molars, their periodontal ligament (PDL), cancellous and cortical bones, a mesiodistal slice of the maxillae and the headgear. Models were the same except for the outer bow length in headgears. The headgear was symmetric in model 1. In models 2 to 4, the headgears were asymmetric in length with differences of 5mm, 10mm and 15mm, respectively. A 2.5 N force in horizontal plane was applied and the loading manner of each side of the outer bow was calculated trigonometrically using data from a volunteer. The 15mm difference in outer bow length caused the greatest difference in lateral (=0.21 N) and distal (= 1.008 N) forces and also generated moments (5.044 N.mm). As the difference in outer bow length became greater, asymmetric effects increased. Greater distal force in the longer arm side was associated with greater lateral force towards the shorter arm side and more net yawing moment. A difference range of 1mm to 15 mm of length in cervical headgear can be considered as a safe length of outer bow shortening in clinical use.

  1. Asymmetric Outer Bow Length and Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Emadian Razavi, Elham sadat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess distal and lateral forces and moments of asymmetric headgears by variable outer bow lengths. Materials and Methods: Four 3D finite element method (FEM) models of a cervical headgear attached to the maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 software and transferred to ANSYS Workbench ver. 11 software. Models contained the first molars, their periodontal ligament (PDL), cancellous and cortical bones, a mesiodistal slice of the maxillae and the headgear. Models were the same except for the outer bow length in headgears. The headgear was symmetric in model 1. In models 2 to 4, the headgears were asymmetric in length with differences of 5mm, 10mm and 15mm, respectively. A 2.5 N force in horizontal plane was applied and the loading manner of each side of the outer bow was calculated trigonometrically using data from a volunteer. Results: The 15mm difference in outer bow length caused the greatest difference in lateral (=0.21 N) and distal (= 1.008 N) forces and also generated moments (5.044 N.mm). Conclusion: As the difference in outer bow length became greater, asymmetric effects increased. Greater distal force in the longer arm side was associated with greater lateral force towards the shorter arm side and more net yawing moment. Clinical Relevance: A difference range of 1mm to 15 mm of length in cervical headgear can be considered as a safe length of outer bow shortening in clinical use. PMID:26622275

  2. Finite element simulation of HIP-process to produce 3d near net shape parts

    SciTech Connect

    Zadeh, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    One of the major problems when producing powder metallurgy parts through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the non homogeneous shrinkage of HIP-capsule during the process. This leads to time and cost consuming machining of the HIP parts. In order to reduce the machining to a minimum, one can try to simulate the HIP-process by means of numerical methods. Hereby, the part distortion can be predicted, and hence a new HIP-capsule can be designed in such a way to prevent the distortion partly or even completely. In the following, a finite element method is used, on one hand, to simulate part shrinkage during HIP process; on the other hand a method is integrated in this simulation to optimize the HIP-capsule geometry. For the determination of material dependent parameters, a mixture of theoretical and experimental methods is used. Results of simulation are verified for a complex 3d HIP part out of TiAl6V4.

  3. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  4. Three-dimensional quantification of vorticity and helicity from 3D cine PC-MRI using finite-element interpolations.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio; Urbina, Jesús; Valverde, Israel; Mura, Joaquín; Tejos, Cristián; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Andia, Marcelo E; Hurtado, Daniel E; Uribe, Sergio

    2017-03-31

    We propose a 3D finite-element method for the quantification of vorticity and helicity density from 3D cine phase-contrast (PC) MRI. By using a 3D finite-element method, we seamlessly estimate velocity gradients in 3D. The robustness and convergence were analyzed using a combined Poiseuille and Lamb-Ossen equation. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was used to compared our method with others available in the literature. Additionally, we computed 3D maps for different 3D cine PC-MRI data sets: phantom without and with coarctation (18 healthy volunteers and 3 patients). We found a good agreement between our method and both the analytical solution of the combined Poiseuille and Lamb-Ossen. The computational fluid dynamics results showed that our method outperforms current approaches to estimate vorticity and helicity values. In the in silico model, we observed that for a tetrahedral element of 2 mm of characteristic length, we underestimated the vorticity in less than 5% with respect to the analytical solution. In patients, we found higher values of helicity density in comparison to healthy volunteers, associated with vortices in the lumen of the vessels. We proposed a novel method that provides entire 3D vorticity and helicity density maps, avoiding the used of reformatted 2D planes from 3D cine PC-MRI. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  6. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  7. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  8. Robust and scalable 3-D geo-electromagnetic modelling approach using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Bürg, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We present a robust and scalable solver for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations for problems with large conductivity contrasts, wide range of frequencies, stretched grids and locally refined meshes. The solver is part of the fully distributed adaptive 3-D electromagnetic modelling scheme which employs the finite element method and unstructured non-conforming hexahedral meshes for spatial discretization using the open-source software deal.II. We use the complex-valued electric field formulation and split it into two real-valued equations for which we utilize an optimal block-diagonal pre-conditioner. Application of this pre-conditioner requires the solution of two smaller real-valued symmetric problems. We solve them by using either a direct solver or the conjugate gradient method pre-conditioned with the recently introduced auxiliary space technique. The auxiliary space pre-conditioner reformulates the original problem in form of several simpler ones, which are then solved using highly efficient algebraic multigrid methods. In this paper, we consider the magnetotelluric case and verify our numerical scheme by using COMMEMI 3-D models. Afterwards, we run a series of numerical experiments and demonstrate that the solver converges in a small number of iterations for a wide frequency range and variable problem sizes. The number of iterations is independent of the problem size, but exhibits a mild dependency on frequency. To test the stability of the method on locally refined meshes, we have implemented a residual-based a posteriori error estimator and compared it with uniform mesh refinement for problems up to 200 million unknowns. We test the scalability of the most time consuming parts of our code and show that they fulfill the strong scaling assumption as long as each MPI process possesses enough degrees of freedom to alleviate communication overburden. Finally, we refer back to a direct solver-based pre-conditioner and analyse its complexity in time. The results show

  9. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  10. 3-d finite element model development for biomechanics: a software demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Ashby, E.

    1997-03-01

    Finite element analysis is becoming an increasingly important part of biomechanics and orthopedic research, as computational resources become more powerful, and data handling algorithms become more sophisticated. Until recently, tools with sufficient power did not exist or were not accessible to adequately model complicated, three-dimensional, nonlinear biomechanical systems. In the past, finite element analyses in biomechanics have often been limited to two-dimensional approaches, linear analyses, or simulations of single tissue types. Today, we have the resources to model fully three-dimensional, nonlinear, multi-tissue, and even multi-joint systems. The authors will present the process of developing these kinds of finite element models, using human hand and knee examples, and will demonstrate their software tools.

  11. DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C R

    2007-01-18

    The objective of this brief report is to document the ESBWR pedestal wall finite element analyses that were performed as a quick turnaround effort in July 2005 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and describe the assumptions and failure criteria used for these analyses [Ref 4]. The analyses described within are for the pedestal wall design that included an internal steel liner. The goal of the finite element analyses was to assist in determining the load carrying capacity of the ESBWR pedestal wall subjected to an impulsive pressure generated by a steam explosion.

  12. Edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs applied to 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    An edge based finite element formulation with vector absorbing boundary conditions is presented for scattering by composite structures having boundaries satisfying impedance and/or transition conditions. Remarkably accurate results are obtained by placing the mesh a small fraction of a wavelength away from the scatterer.

  13. Fixed versus Removable Appliance for Palatal Expansion; A 3D Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several appliances have been used for palatal expansion for treatment of posterior cross bite. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress induced in the apical and crestal alveolar bone and the pattern of tooth displacement following expansion via removable expansion plates or fixed-banded palatal expander using the finite element method (FEM) analysis. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM models were designed from a mesio-distal slice of the maxilla containing the upper first molars, their periodontium and alveolar bone. Two palatal expanders (removable and fixed) were modeled. The models were designed in SolidWorks 2006 and then transferred to ANSYS Workbench. The appliance halves were displaced 0.1 mm laterally. The von Mises stress in the apical, crestal, and PDL areas and also the vertical displacement of the cusps (palatal and buccal) was were evaluated. Results: The total PDL stress was 0.40003 MPa in the removable appliance (RA) model and 4.88e-2 MPa in the fixed appliance (FA) model and the apical stress was 9.9e-2 and 1.17e-2 MPa, respectively. The crestal stress was 2.99e-1 MPa in RA and 7.62e-2 MPa in the FA. The stress in the cortical bone crest was 0.30327 and 7.9244e-2 MPa for RA and FA, respectively and 3.7271 and 7.4373e-2 MPa in crestal area of spongy bone, respectively. The vertical displacement of the buccal cusp and palatal cusp was 1.64e-2 and 5.90e-2 mm in RA and 1.05e-4 and 1.7e-4 mm in FA, respectively. Conclusion: The overall stress as well as apical and crestal stress in periodontium of anchor teeth was higher in RA than FA; RA elicited higher stress in both cortical and spongy bone. The vertical displacement of molar cusps was more in removable than fixed palatal expander model. PMID:24910679

  14. Simulation of 3-D viscous compressible flow in multistage turbomachinery by finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleiman, Mohamad

    1999-11-01

    The flow in a multistage turbomachinery blade row is compressible, viscous, and unsteady. Complex flow features such as boundary layers, wake migration from upstream blade rows, shocks, tip leakage jets, and vortices interact together as the flow convects through the stages. These interactions contribute significantly to the aerodynamic losses of the system and degrade the performance of the machine. The unsteadiness also leads to blade vibration and a shortening of its life. It is therefore difficult to optimize the design of a blade row, whether aerodynamically or structurally, in isolation, without accounting for the effects of the upstream and downstream rows. The effects of axial spacing, blade count, clocking (relative position of follow-up rotors with respect to wakes shed by upstream ones), and levels of unsteadiness may have a significance on performance and durability. In this Thesis, finite element formulations for the simulation of multistage turbomachinery are presented in terms of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for three-dimensional steady or unsteady, viscous, compressible, turbulent flows. Three methodologies are presented and compared. First, a steady multistage analysis using a a-mixing- plane model has been implemented and has been validated against engine data. For axial machines, it has been found that the mixing plane simulation methods match very well the experimental data. However, the results for a centrifugal stage, consisting of an impeller followed by a vane diffuser of equal pitch, show flagrant inconsistency with engine performance data, indicating that the mixing plane method has been found to be inappropriate for centrifugal machines. Following these findings, a more complete unsteady multistage model has been devised for a configuration with equal number of rotor and stator blades (equal pitches). Non-matching grids are used at the rotor-stator interface and an implicit interpolation procedure devised to ensure

  15. An electron emission model for use with 3D electromagnetic finite element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, A. R.; Asenov, A.; Lowe, A. C.

    2001-06-01

    Using commercial 3D finite element (FE) simulation packages it is now possible to model the self-consistent behaviour of charged particle beams in electromagnetic fields within a complex problem geometry. However, in many cases the accuracy of the simulation is restricted by the accuracy of the particle emission models traditionally in use. Most such models date back to the time when problem complexity was limited by what could be solved. Artifacts of this early work in, for example, vacuum tubes, led to the development of simplified models like those by Child and Langmuir aiming to describe space charge limited electron emission from thermionic cathodes. Such models, which are still in use, have the twin disadvantages of their formulation being dependent on the problem geometry and their reliance on a "characteristic dimension" to specify the distance over which the space charge limited flow is to be computed. These disadvantages can make their application to general problem geometry in a FE simulation environment difficult and in some cases misleading. With the recent introduction of facilities to specify the initial particle dynamics in commercial space charge solvers there is no longer a need to rely on the above traditional but restricted emission models. This paper describes one method of implementing a completely general model for thermionic electron emission which utilizes the new facilities. The new methodology is applicable to any type of electron emission including thermionic, field and photoemission and depends only on the ability of the user to specify the starting conditions of the particle trajectories. The details of our approach are illustrated in the simulation of initial beam formation from a thermionic cathode in a thin CRT. In the example simulations, the use of a characteristic dimension is precluded. The emission characteristics are derived solely from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution which provides the electron velocities, and the

  16. Fixed versus Removable Appliance for Palatal Expansion; A 3D Analysis Using the Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar

    2014-01-01

    Several appliances have been used for palatal expansion for treatment of posterior cross bite. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress induced in the apical and crestal alveolar bone and the pattern of tooth displacement following expansion via removable expansion plates or fixed-banded palatal expander using the finite element method (FEM) analysis. Two 3D FEM models were designed from a mesio-distal slice of the maxilla containing the upper first molars, their periodontium and alveolar bone. Two palatal expanders (removable and fixed) were modeled. The models were designed in SolidWorks 2006 and then transferred to ANSYS Workbench. The appliance halves were displaced 0.1 mm laterally. The von Mises stress in the apical, crestal, and PDL areas and also the vertical displacement of the cusps (palatal and buccal) was were evaluated. The total PDL stress was 0.40003 MPa in the removable appliance (RA) model and 4.88e-2 MPa in the fixed appliance (FA) model and the apical stress was 9.9e-2 and 1.17e-2 MPa, respectively. The crestal stress was 2.99e-1 MPa in RA and 7.62e-2 MPa in the FA. The stress in the cortical bone crest was 0.30327 and 7.9244e-2 MPa for RA and FA, respectively and 3.7271 and 7.4373e-2 MPa in crestal area of spongy bone, respectively. The vertical displacement of the buccal cusp and palatal cusp was 1.64e-2 and 5.90e-2 mm in RA and 1.05e-4 and 1.7e-4 mm in FA, respectively. The overall stress as well as apical and crestal stress in periodontium of anchor teeth was higher in RA than FA; RA elicited higher stress in both cortical and spongy bone. The vertical displacement of molar cusps was more in removable than fixed palatal expander model.

  17. Low-Velocity Impact Response and Finite Element Analysis of Four-Step 3-D Braided Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhong; Zhang, Yan; Gu, Bohong

    2013-08-01

    The low-velocity impact characters of 3-D braided carbon/epoxy composites were investigated from experimental and finite element simulation approaches. The quasi-static tests were carried out at a constant velocity of 2 mm/min on MTS 810.23 material tester system to obtain the indentation load-displacement curves and indentation damages. The low-velocity tests were conducted at the velocities from 1 m/s to 6 m/s (corresponding to the impact energy from 3.22 J to 116 J) on Instron Dynatup 9250 impact tester. The peak force, energy for peak force, time to peak force, and total energy absorption were obtained to determine the impact responses of 3-D braided composites. A unit cell model was established according to the microstructure of 3-D braided composites to derive the constitutive equation. Based on the model, a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT) has been compiled by FORTRAN and connected with commercial finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit to calculate the impact damage. The unit cell model successfully predicted the impact response of 3-D braided composites. Furthermore, the stress wave propagation and failure mechanisms have been revealed from the finite element simulation results and ultimate damage morphologies of specimens.

  18. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  19. 3D finite element modeling and analysis of dynamic force in bone drilling for orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin; Wang, Xiaona; Meng, Max Q

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional finite element modeling and analysis are made to simulate the dynamic process of bone drilling during the orthopedic surgery. This study is proposed to evaluate the performance of various surgical tools and the possible pre-operative biohazard. In the simulation, the strain-stress curve of the bone is divided into linear elastic region and nonlinear plastic region according to the strain range. Rigid-plasticity and elasto-plasticity are used as bone material. The performances of twist drill bit and hollow drill bit are evaluated. The results of finite element analysis give different patterns of stress distribution on the two types of bone models and drill bits. The FE simulations show dynamic drilling process that the drill bit penetrates through the bone model. In vitro drilling experiment on porcine femur is conducted to measure the drilling force for the validation of the FEM. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Superconvergence of mixed finite element approximations to 3-D Maxwell's equations in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunqing; Li, Jichun; Yang, Wei; Sun, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation of metamaterials has attracted more and more attention since 2000, after the first metamaterial with negative refraction index was successfully constructed. In this paper we construct a fully-discrete leap-frog type finite element scheme to solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Maxwell's equations when metamaterials are involved. First, we obtain some superclose results between the interpolations of the analytical solutions and finite element solutions obtained using arbitrary orders of Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec mixed spaces on regular cubic meshes. Then we prove the superconvergence result in the discrete l2 norm achieved for the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec space. To our best knowledge, such superconvergence results have never been obtained elsewhere. Finally, we implement the leap-frog scheme and present numerical results justifying our theoretical analysis.

  1. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1991-05-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1991 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as an interim User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems. 73 refs., 49 figs.

  2. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  3. An efficient 3D finite element method model based on the T-A formulation for superconducting coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiming; Zhang, Min; Yuan, Weijia

    2017-02-01

    An efficient three dimensional (3D) finite element method numerical model is proposed for superconducting coated conductors. The model is based on the T-A formulation and can be used to tackle 3D computational challenges for superconductors with high aspect ratios. By assuming a sheet approximation for the conductors, the model can speed up the computational process. The model has been validated by established analytical solutions. Two examples with complex geometries, which can hardly be simulated by the 2D model, are given. The model could be used to characterise and design large-scale applications using superconducting coated conductors, such as high field magnets and other electrical devices.

  4. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  5. Evaluation of the 3D Finite Element Method Using a Tantalum Rod for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jingsheng; Chen, Jie; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Huang, Gangyong; Wang, Zhan; Zhao, Guanglei; Wei, Yibing; Wang, Siqun

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to contrast the collapse values of the postoperative weight-bearing areas of different tantalum rod implant positions, fibula implantation, and core decompression model and to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of tantalum rod implantation in different ranges of osteonecrosis in comparison with other methods. Material/Methods The 3D finite element method was used to establish the 3D finite element model of normal upper femur, 3D finite element model after tantalum rod implantation into different positions of the upper femur in different osteonecrosis ranges, and other 3D finite element models for simulating fibula implant and core decompression. Results The collapse values in the weight-bearing area of the femoral head of the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area, implant model in the middle of the osteonecrosis area, fibula implant model, and shortening implant model exhibited no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) when the osteonecrosis range was small (60°). The stress values on the artificial bone surface for the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area and the shortening implant model exhibited statistical significance (p<0.01). Conclusions Tantalum rod implantation into the osteonecrosis area can reduce the collapse values in the weight-bearing area when osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) was in a certain range, thereby obtaining better clinical effects. When ONFH was in a large range (120°), the tantalum rod implantation inside the osteonecrosis area, shortening implant or fibula implant can reduce the collapse values of the femoral head, as assessed by other methods. PMID:25479830

  6. Evaluation of the 3D finite element method using a tantalum rod for osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingsheng; Chen, Jie; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Huang, Guangyong; Wang, Zhan; Zhao, Guanglei; Wei, Yibing; Wang, Siqun

    2014-12-06

    The aim of this study was to contrast the collapse values of the postoperative weight-bearing areas of different tantalum rod implant positions, fibula implantation, and core decompression model and to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of tantalum rod implantation in different ranges of osteonecrosis in comparison with other methods. The 3D finite element method was used to establish the 3D finite element model of normal upper femur, 3D finite element model after tantalum rod implantation into different positions of the upper femur in different osteonecrosis ranges, and other 3D finite element models for simulating fibula implant and core decompression. The collapse values in the weight-bearing area of the femoral head of the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area, implant model in the middle of the osteonecrosis area, fibula implant model, and shortening implant model exhibited no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) when the osteonecrosis range was small (60°). The stress values on the artificial bone surface for the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area and the shortening implant model exhibited statistical significance (p<0.01). Tantalum rod implantation into the osteonecrosis area can reduce the collapse values in the weight-bearing area when osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) was in a certain range, thereby obtaining better clinical effects. When ONFH was in a large range (120°), the tantalum rod implantation inside the osteonecrosis area, shortening implant or fibula implant can reduce the collapse values of the femoral head, as assessed by other methods.

  7. Visualization methods for high-resolution, transient, 3-D, finite element situations

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-01-10

    Scientific visualization is the process whereby numerical data is transformed into a visual form to augment the process of discovery and understanding. Visualizing the data generated by large-scale, transient, three-dimensional finite element simulations poses many challenges due to geometric complexity, the presence of multiple materials and multiple element types, and the inherent unstructured nature of the meshes. In this paper, the direct use of finite element data structures, nodal assembly procedures, and element interpolants for volumetric adaptive surface extraction, surface rendering, vector grids and particle tracing is discussed. A brief description of a {open_quotes}direct-to-disk{close_quotes} animation system is presented, and case studies which demonstrate the use of isosurfaces, vector plots, cutting planes, reference surfaces and particle tracing are then discussed in the context of several case studies for transient incompressible viscous flow, and acoustic fluid-structure interaction simulations. An overview of the implications of massively parallel computers on visualization is presented to highlight the issues in parallel visualization methodology, algorithms. data locality and the ultimate requirements for temporary and archival data storage and network bandwidth.

  8. 3D Finite Element Modeling of the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake Deformation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, M.; Casarotti, E.; Piersanti, A.

    2009-12-01

    The L'Aquila earthquake (Mw 6.3) occurred on April 6th at 01:32 UTC in the Central Appennines at a depth of about 9 km and was felt all over Central Italy. The main shock was preceded by a long seismic sequence started several months before and was followed by thousands of aftershocks, some of them with Mw>4. We built up a high resolution three-dimensional model, incorporating surface topography, which was discretized using 20-nodes brick elements. The element horizontal size is biased from 500 m to 2 km using the paving meshing algorithm in combination with an appropriate adaptive sizing function. A realistic rheology was introduced from a vp/vpvs travel time tomographic model. We computed the co-seismic deformation induced by the earthquake by means of a recently developed finite elements simulation tool, FEMSA (Finite Element Modeling for Seismic Applications). We used different seismic source models obtained from fault inversion of GPS measurements, joint inversion of strong motion and GPS data and from inversion of DInSAR displacements. The synthetic deformation patterns were compared with the experimental results in order to evaluate which source model better reconciles the data and quantify the trade off introduced by 1D simulations.

  9. Microseismic Monitoring and 3D Finite Element Analysis of the Right Bank Slope, Dagangshan Hydropower Station, during Reservoir Impounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingzong; Tang, Chun'an; Li, Lianchong; Lv, Pengfei; Liu, Hongyuan

    2017-07-01

    The right bank slope of Dagangshan hydropower station in China has complex geological conditions and is subjected to high in situ stress. Notably, microseismic activities in the right bank slope occurred during reservoir impounding. This paper describes the microseismic monitoring technology, and three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis is used to explore the microseismic activities and damage mechanisms in the right bank slope during reservoir impounding. Based on data obtained from microseismic monitoring, a progressive microseismic damage model is proposed and implemented for 3D finite element analysis. The safety factor for the right bank slope after reservoir impoundment obtained from the 3D finite element analysis, which included the effects of progressive microseismic damage, was 1.10, indicating that the slope is stable. The microseismic monitoring system is able to capture the slope disturbance during reservoir impounding in real time and is a powerful tool for qualitatively assessing changes in slope stability over time. The proposed progressive microseismic damage model adequately simulates the changes in the slope during the impoundment process and provides a valuable tool for evaluating slope stability.

  10. 3D finite element analysis to detect stress distribution: spiral family implants.

    PubMed

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Paracchini, Luigi; Riccardo, Guidi; Fanali, Stefano; Carinci, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Spiral family implants are a root-form fixtures with increasing thickness of tread. This characteristic gives a self-tapping and self-condensing bone properties to implants. To study spiral family implant inserted in different bone quality and connected with abutments of different angulations a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed. Once drawn the systems that were object of the study by CAD (Computer Aided Design), the FEA discretized solids composing the system in many infinitesimal little elementary solids defined finite elements. This lead to a mesh formation where the single finite elements were connected among them by nodes. For the 3 units bone-implant-abutments several thousand of tetrahedral elements having 10 parabolic nodes were employed. The biomechanical behaviour of 4.2 mm × 13 mm dental implants, connecting screw, straight and 15° and 25° angulated abutment subjected to static loads, in contact with high and poor bone quality was evaluated by FEA. A double system was analyzed: a) FY strength acting along Y axis and having 200 N intensity; b) FY and FZ couple of strengths applied along Y and Z directions and having respectively 200N and 140N intensity. The materials were considered as homogeneous, linear and isotropic. Then the FEA simulation was performed hypothesizing a linearity between loads and deformations. The lowest stress value was found in the system composed by implants and straight abutments loaded with a vertical strength, while the highest stress value were found in implants and 15° angulated abutment loaded with a angulated strength. In addition, the lower is the bone quality (i.e. D4) the higher is the distribution of the stress within the bone. Spiral family implants can be used successfully in low bone quality but a straight force is recommended.

  11. C(1) finite elements on non-tensor-product 2d and 3d manifolds.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Geometrically continuous (G(k) ) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are C(k) also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C(1) geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G(1) surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson's equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O(h(3)) convergence in the L(∞) norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis.

  12. C1 finite elements on non-tensor-product 2d and 3d manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Geometrically continuous (Gk) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are Ck also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C1 geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G1 surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson’s equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O(h3) convergence in the L∞ norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis. PMID:26594070

  13. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  14. Splinting effect on posterior implants under various loading modes: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Hauchard, Erwan; Fournier, Benjamin Philippe; Jacq, Romain; Bouton, Antoine; Pierrisnard, Laurent; Naveau, Adrien

    2011-09-01

    This three-dimensional finite element study compared stresses, intensities and displacements of three mandibular posterior implants restored with cemented crowns (two molars and a premolar in straight line), splinted versus non-splinted. Hundred newton occlusal loads were vertically or horizontally applied, either on one single crown or on all of them. Maximal stresses and implants displacements were higher under horizontal loading. Splinting major effects appeared under single horizontal load with a decrease in stresses (34-49%) and displacements (16-19%) of the loaded crown. Splinting seems more appropriate for implant-supported restorations submitted to frequent single horizontal or oblique loads than vertical ones.

  15. Finite Element Treatment of Vortex States in 3D Cubic Superconductors in a Tilted Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Cai, Chuanbing

    2017-03-01

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations have been solved numerically by a finite element analysis for superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field. We obtain different vortex patterns as a function of the external magnetic field. With a magnetic field not parallel to the x- or y-axis, the vortices attempt to change their orientation accordingly. Our analysis of the corresponding changes in the magnetic response in different directions can provide information not only about vorticity but also about the three-dimensional vortex arrangement, even about the very subtle changes for the superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field.

  16. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  17. Efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method for 3D groundwater flow simulation in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yifan; Wu, Jichun; Nan, Tongchao; Xue, Yuqun; Xie, Chunhong; Ji, Haifeng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method (ETMSFEM) is proposed for 3D groundwater simulation in heterogeneous porous media. The main idea of this method is to employ new 3D linear base functions and the domain decomposition technique to solve the local reduced elliptical problem, thereby simplifying the base function construction process and improving the efficiency. Furthermore, by using the ETMSFEM base functions, this method can solve Darcy's equation with high efficiency to obtain a continuous velocity field. Therefore, this method can considerably reduce the computational cost of solving for heads and velocities, which is crucial for large-scale 3D groundwater simulations. In the application section, we present numerical examples to compare the ETMSFEM with several classical methods to demonstrate its efficiency and effectiveness.

  18. A method to generate conformal finite-element meshes from 3D measurements of microstructurally small fatigue-crack propagation: 3D Meshes of Microstructurally Small Crack Growth

    DOE PAGES

    Spear, A. D.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Cerrone, A. R.; ...

    2016-04-27

    In an effort to reproduce computationally the observed evolution of microstructurally small fatigue cracks (MSFCs), a method is presented for generating conformal, finite-element (FE), volume meshes from 3D measurements of MSFC propagation. The resulting volume meshes contain traction-free surfaces that conform to incrementally measured 3D crack shapes. Grain morphologies measured using near-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy are also represented within the FE volume meshes. Proof-of-concept simulations are performed to demonstrate the utility of the mesh-generation method. The proof-of-concept simulations employ a crystal-plasticity constitutive model and are performed using the conformal FE meshes corresponding to successive crack-growth increments. Although the simulationsmore » for each crack increment are currently independent of one another, they need not be, and transfer of material-state information among successive crack-increment meshes is discussed. The mesh-generation method was developed using post-mortem measurements, yet it is general enough that it can be applied to in-situ measurements of 3D MSFC propagation.« less

  19. Finite element modeling of quasi-brittle cracks in 2D and 3D with enhanced strain accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, M.; Barbat, G. B.; Chiumenti, M.

    2017-07-01

    This paper discusses the finite element modeling of cracking in quasi-brittle materials. The problem is addressed via a mixed strain/displacement finite element formulation and an isotropic damage constitutive model. The proposed mixed formulation is fully general and is applied in 2D and 3D. Also, it is independent of the specific finite element discretization considered; it can be equally used with triangles/tetrahedra, quadrilaterals/hexahedra and prisms. The feasibility and accuracy of the method is assessed through extensive comparison with experimental evidence. The correlation with the experimental tests shows the capacity of the mixed formulation to reproduce the experimental crack path and the force-displacement curves with remarkable accuracy. Both 2D and 3D examples produce results consistent with the documented data. Aspects related to the discrete solution, such as convergence regarding mesh resolution and mesh bias, as well as other related to the physical model, like structural size effect and the influence of Poisson's ratio, are also investigated. The enhanced accuracy of the computed strain field leads to accurate results in terms of crack paths, failure mechanisms and force displacement curves. Spurious mesh dependency suffered by both continuous and discontinuous irreducible formulations is avoided by the mixed FE, without the need of auxiliary tracking techniques or other computational schemes that alter the continuum mechanical problem.

  20. 3-D finite element cyclic symmetric and contact stress analysis for a complete gear train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zeyong; Xu, Youliang; Gao, Xiangqun; Wei, Gang

    1992-10-01

    A complete gear train of a reduction gearbox is the object of finite element stress analysis. One of the basic segments of the complete gear train is taken as the computational model in the light of the cyclic symmetry of the gear train; meanwhile, the contact transmission forces between the corresponding meshed teeth are considered in the analysis of the model. For simplicity, the corresponding meshed lines are used instead of the actual contact surfaces. Both torque and centrifugal loads are involved in the analysis. The stresses in all the parts of a complete gear train can be determined by one analysis. The computed results show that the contact force on a meshed tooth is correlative not only to the length of the meshed line, but also to its position. It is shown that the neglect of the stress resulted from centrifugal load is inappropriate to a high speed gear train.

  1. 3D finite element modelling of guided wave scattering at delaminations in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murat, Bibi Intan Suraya; Fromme, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Carbon fiber laminate composites are increasingly used for aerospace structures as they offer a number of advantages including a good strength to weight ratio. However, impact during the operation and servicing of the aircraft can lead to barely visible and difficult to detect damage. Depending on the severity of the impact, delaminations can occur, reducing the load carrying capacity of the structure. Efficient nondestructive testing of composite panels can be achieved using guided ultrasonic waves propagating along the structure. The guided wave (A0 Lamb wave mode) scattering at delaminations was modeled using full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) simulations. The influence of the delamination size was systematically investigated from a parameter study. A significant influence of the delamination width on the guided wave scattering was found, especially on the angular dependency of the scattered guided wave amplitude. The sensitivity of guided ultrasonic waves for the detection of delamination damage in composite panels is discussed.

  2. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  3. 3D simulations of electromagnetic fields in nanostructures using the time-harmonic finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Sven; Zschiedrich, Lin; Schmidt, Frank; Köhle, Roderick; Henkel, Thomas; Küchler, Bernd; Nölscher, Christoph

    2007-06-01

    Rigorous computer simulations of propagating electromagnetic fields have become an important tool for optical metrology and optics design of nanostructured components. As has been shown in previous benchmarks some of the presently used methods suffer from low convergence rates and/or low accuracy of the results and exhibit very long computation times 1, 2 which makes application to extended 2D layout patterns impractical. We address 3D simulation tasks by using a finite-element solver which has been shown to be superior to competing methods by several orders of magnitude in accuracy and computational time for typical microlithography simulations.2 We report on the current status of the solver, incorporating higher order edge elements, adaptive refinement methods, and fast solution algorithms. Further, we investigate the performance of the solver in the 3D simulation project of light diffraction off an alternating phase-shift contact-hole mask.

  4. Parallelized 3D CSEM modeling using edge-based finite element with total field formulation and unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Hu, Xiangyun; Li, Jianhui; Endo, Masashi; Xiong, Bin

    2017-02-01

    We solve the 3D controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) problem using the edge-based finite element method. The modeling domain is discretized using unstructured tetrahedral mesh. We adopt the total field formulation for the quasi-static variant of Maxwell's equation and the computation cost to calculate the primary field can be saved. We adopt a new boundary condition which approximate the total field on the boundary by the primary field corresponding to the layered earth approximation of the complicated conductivity model. The primary field on the modeling boundary is calculated using fast Hankel transform. By using this new type of boundary condition, the computation cost can be reduced significantly and the modeling accuracy can be improved. We consider that the conductivity can be anisotropic. We solve the finite element system of equations using a parallelized multifrontal solver which works efficiently for multiple source and large scale electromagnetic modeling.

  5. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  6. Dynamic Characteristics Analysis of a Small-Sized Linear Oscillatory Actuator Employing the 3-D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Noritaka; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Ueyama, Kenji; Hashimoto, Eiichiro; Takagi, Takahiro

    Recently, linear oscillatory actuators have been used in a wide range of applications because of their advantages, such as high efficiency, simple structure, and easy control. Small linear oscillatory actuators are expected to be used in haptic devices and the vibration system of mobile phones. In this paper, we propose a new structure of a small linear oscillatory actuator. The static and dynamic characteristics of the actuator are calculated by the 3-D finite element method. The effectiveness of this method is shown by the comparison of the calculated results with the experimental results.

  7. Development of a 3D finite element model evaluating air-coupled ultrasonic measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrig, Matthias P.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a 3D numerical finite element (FE) model which, previously developed, precisely simulates non-contact, air-coupled measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh wave propagation. The commercial FE-solver ABAQUS is used to perform the simulations. First, frequency dependent pressure wave attenuation is investigated numerically to reconstruct the sound pressure distribution along the active surface of the non-contact receiver. Second, constitutive law and excitation source properties are optimized to match nonlinear ultrasonic experimental data. Finally, the FE-model data are fit with analytical solutions showing a good agreement and thus, indicating the significance of the study performed.

  8. 3D Finite Element Models of Shoulder Muscles for Computing Lines of Actions and Moment Arms

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Joshua D.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Delp, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate representation of musculoskeletal geometry is needed to characterize the function of shoulder muscles. Previous models of shoulder muscles have represented muscle geometry as a collection of line segments, making it difficult to account the large attachment areas, muscle-muscle interactions, and complex muscle fiber trajectories typical of shoulder muscles. To better represent shoulder muscle geometry we developed three-dimensional finite element models of the deltoid and rotator cuff muscles and used the models to examine muscle function. Muscle fiber paths within the muscles were approximated, and moment arms were calculated for two motions: thoracohumeral abduction and internal/external rotation. We found that muscle fiber moment arms varied substantially across each muscle. For example, supraspinatus is considered a weak external rotator, but the three-dimensional model of supraspinatus showed that the anterior fibers provide substantial internal rotation while the posterior fibers act as external rotators. Including the effects of large attachment regions and three-dimensional mechanical interactions of muscle fibers constrains muscle motion, generates more realistic muscle paths, and allows deeper analysis of shoulder muscle function. PMID:22994141

  9. Bone stress and strain modification in diastema closure: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Bouserhal, Joseph; Martin, Domingo; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the stress and strain distribution in the alveolar bone between two central incisors in the process of diastema closure with a constant force. A 3-dimensional computer modeling based on finite element techniques was used for this purpose. A model of an anterior segment of the mandible containing cortical bone, spongy bone, gingivae, PDL and two central incisors with a bracket in the labial surface of each tooth were designed. The von Mises stress and strain was evaluated in alveolar bone along a path of nodes defined in a cresto-apical direction in the midline between two teeth. It was observed that stress and strain of alveolar bone increased in midline with a constant force to close the diastema regardless of the type of movement in gradual steps of diastema closure, however the stress was higher in the tipping movement than the bodily so it can be suggested that a protocol of force system modification should be introduced to compensate for the stress and strain changes caused by the reduced distance to avoid the unwanted stress alteration during the diastema closure.

  10. 3D finite element simulation of non-crimp fabric composites ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-05-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness of less than a millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g., fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The influence of porosity in the epoxy matrix as a typical manufacturing defect on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation has been studied.

  11. Simulation of ultrasonic NCF composites testing using 3D finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-04-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness in the order of millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g. fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The effect of porosity as a typical manufacturing imperfection has been considered. The potential for the detection and quantification of such defects is discussed based on the observed influence on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation.

  12. Study of Multi Pass Equal Channel Angular Pressing Using 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setia, Rajat; Sharma, Rahul Swarup; Sharma, Shanti Swarup; Raj, K. Hans

    2011-01-01

    Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) has emerged as most prominent Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) technique used to produce an ultrafine grained (UFG) structure in metals in order to improve their mechanical and physical properties. In this work Finite Element modeling of ECAP is attempted in FORGE 2007 environment. Four passes of the ECAP process of 10mm square shaped AL 6061 billet were carried out for routes A, BA and C for different channel angles and values of coefficient of friction to investigate their influence on the billet. The models were developed assuming a range of friction conditions at the billet-die contact region considering eight distinct friction coefficient (μ) values of 0.0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, 0.35 and 0.40, respectively. The simulations are carried out using three distinct situations of die channel angles (Φ), 90°, 105°, and 120° respectively. Route `BA' emerged as a better method among the three routes studied and 90° channel angle appeared to be optimal in terms of producing high equivalent strain.

  13. Mapping 3D breast lesions from full-field digital mammograms using subject-specific finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, E.; Oliver, A.; Diaz, O.; Diez, Y.; Gubern-Mérida, A.; Martí, R.; Martí, J.

    2017-03-01

    Patient-specific finite element (FE) models of the breast have received increasing attention due to the potential capability of fusing images from different modalities. During the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to X-ray mammography registration procedure, the FE model is compressed mimicking the mammographic acquisition. Subsequently, suspicious lesions in the MRI volume can be projected into the 2D mammographic space. However, most registration algorithms do not provide the reverse information, avoiding to obtain the 3D geometrical information from the lesions localized in the mammograms. In this work we introduce a fast method to localize the 3D position of the lesion within the MRI, using both cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) mammographic projections, indexing the tetrahedral elements of the biomechanical model by means of an uniform grid. For each marked lesion in the Full-Field Digital Mammogram (FFDM), the X-ray path from source to the marker is calculated. Barycentric coordinates are computed in the tetrahedrons traversed by the ray. The list of elements and coordinates allows to localize two curves within the MRI and the closest point between both curves is taken as the 3D position of the lesion. The registration errors obtained in the mammographic space are 9.89 +/- 3.72 mm in CC- and 8.04 +/- 4.68 mm in MLO-projection and the error in the 3D MRI space is equal to 10.29 +/- 3.99 mm. Regarding the uniform grid, it is computed spending between 0.1 and 0.7 seconds. The average time spent to compute the 3D location of a lesion is about 8 ms.

  14. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  15. On domain decomposition preconditioner of BPS type for finite element discretizations of 3D elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2012-09-01

    BPS is a well known an efficient and rather general domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioner, suggested in the famous series of papers Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz (1986-1989). Since then, it has been serving as the origin for the whole family of domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioners-solvers as for h so hp discretizations of elliptic problems. For its original version, designed for h discretizations, the named authors proved the bound O(1 + log2 H/ h) for the relative condition number under some restricting conditions on the domain decomposition and finite element discretization. Here H/ h is the maximal relation of the characteristic size H of a decomposition subdomain to the mesh parameter h of its discretization. It was assumed that subdomains are images of the reference unite cube by trilinear mappings. Later similar bounds related to h discretizations were proved for more general domain decompositions, defined by means of coarse tetrahedral meshes. These results, accompanied by the development of some special tools of analysis aimed at such type of decompositions, were summarized in the book of Toselli and Widlund (2005). This paper is also confined to h discretizations. We further expand the range of admissible domain decompositions for constructing BPS preconditioners, in which decomposition subdomains can be convex polyhedrons, satisfying some conditions of shape regularity. We prove the bound for the relative condition number with the same dependence on H/ h as in the bound given above. Along the way to this result, we simplify the proof of the so called abstract bound for the relative condition number of the domain decomposition preconditioner. In the part, related to the analysis of the interface sub-problem preconditioning, our technical tools are generalization of those used by Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz.

  16. Bodily labializing lateral incisors: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar

    2013-01-01

    Among all tooth types and movements, bodily labializing the upper lateral incisors is a challenging one. The main goal of this study is to introduce and analyze a method to labialize palatally erupted lateral incisors. Five three dimensional finite element models were designed in SolidWorks 2010 of a segment of maxilla containing the upper left anterior teeth (with the lateral incisor in palatal position), their brackets, their PDLs, the spongy and cortical bone. A segment of 0.016 wire passing through the central incisor and canine brackets (bypassing the lateral incisor bracket) and a designed hook in the lateral incisor bracket (which comprises an inventory approach/design to treat a palatally erupted tooth). The hook and vertical bypassed segment height were 8, 10, 11.5 (stage 1), 9.5 (stage 2) and 9.45 mm (stage 3). Two equal forces (0.15 N each) were applied. Tooth displacements were recorded. A hook length of 8 mm resulted in a tipping movement (apical = -7.78 × 10(-5) mm; incisal = 3.8 × 10(4) mm). The other two caused root movement. Stage 2 (hook = 9.5 mm) resulted in root movement (-1.4 × 10(-4) mm in incisal; 1.58 × 10(4) mm in apical area). Hook length = 9.45 produced bodily movement (incisal = 7.1 × 10(5) mm; apical = 6.9 × 10(5) mm). A definite length of the hook was shown to produce bodily movement. This definite length of hook in combination with the same length of bypassed wire can be applied to produce bodily movement of the lateral incisor. An intrusive component can also be added.

  17. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  18. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  19. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  20. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  1. Simulating hydroplaning of submarine landslides by quasi 3D depth averaged finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Blasio, Fabio; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    G.B. Crosta, H. J. Chen, and F.V. De Blasio Dept. Of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Milano, Italy Klohn Crippen Berger, Calgary, Canada Subaqueous debris flows/submarine landslides, both in the open ocean as well as in fresh waters, exhibit extremely high mobility, quantified by a ratio between vertical to horizontal displacement of the order 0.01 or even much less. It is possible to simulate subaqueous debris flows with small-scale experiments along a flume or a pool using a cohesive mixture of clay and sand. The results have shown a strong enhancement of runout and velocity compared to the case in which the same debris flow travels without water, and have indicated hydroplaning as a possible explanation (Mohrig et al. 1998). Hydroplaning is started when the snout of the debris flow travels sufficiently fast. This generates lift forces on the front of the debris flow exceeding the self-weight of the sediment, which so begins to travel detached from the bed, literally hovering instead of flowing. Clearly, the resistance to flow plummets because drag stress against water is much smaller than the shear strength of the material. The consequence is a dramatic increase of the debris flow speed and runout. Does the process occur also for subaqueous landslides and debris flows in the ocean, something twelve orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones? Obviously, no experiment will ever be capable to replicate this size, one needs to rely on numerical simulations. Results extending a depth-integrated numerical model for debris flows (Imran et al., 2001) indicate that hydroplaning is possible (De Blasio et al., 2004), but more should be done especially with alternative numerical methodologies. In this work, finite element methods are used to simulate hydroplaning using the code MADflow (Chen, 2014) adopting a depth averaged solution. We ran some simulations on the small scale of the laboratory experiments, and secondly

  2. Response of corrugated fiberboard to moisture flow : a 3-D finite element transient nonlinear analysis

    Treesearch

    Adeeb A. Rahman; Thomas J. Urbanik; Mustafa Mahamid

    2003-01-01

    Collapse of fiberboard packaging boxes, in the shipping industry, due to rise in humidity conditions is common and very costly. A 3D FE nonlinear model is developed to predict the moisture flow throughout a corrugated packaging fiberboard sandwich structure. The model predicts how the moisture diffusion will permeate through the layers of a fiberboard (medium and...

  3. Experimental validation of 3D printed patient-specific implants using digital image correlation and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Miller, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    With the dawn of 3D printing technology, patient-specific implant designs are set to have a paradigm shift. A topology optimization method in designing patient-specific craniofacial implants has been developed to ensure adequate load transfer mechanism and restore the form and function of the mid-face. Patient-specific finite element models are used to design these implants and to validate whether they are viable for physiological loading such as mastication. Validation of these topology optimized finite element models using mechanical testing is a critical step. Instead of inserting the implants into a cadaver or patient, we embed the implants into the computer-aided skull model of a patient and, fuse them together to 3D print the complete skull model with the implant. Masticatory forces are applied in the molar region to simulate chewing and measure the stress-strain trajectory. Until recently, strain gages have been used to measure strains for validation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method is a relatively new technique for full-field strain measurement which provides a continuous deformation field data. The main objective of this study is to validate the finite element model of patient-specific craniofacial implants against the strain data from the DIC obtained during the mastication simulation and show that the optimized shapes provide adequate load-transfer mechanism. Patient-specific models are obtained from CT scans. The principal maximum and minimum strains are compared. The computational and experimental approach to designing patient-specific implants proved to be a viable technique for mid-face craniofacial reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  5. Effect of Framework in an Implant-Supported Full-Arch Fixed Prosthesis: 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Menini, Maria; Pesce, Paolo; Bevilacqua, Marco; Pera, Francesco; Tealdo, Tiziano; Barberis, Fabrizio; Pera, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze through a three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA) stress distribution on four implants supporting a full-arch implant-supported fixed prosthesis (FFP) using different prosthesis designs. A 3D edentulous maxillary model was created and four implants were virtually placed into the maxilla and splinted, simulating an FFP without framework, with a cast metal framework, and with a carbon fiber framework. An occlusal load of 150 N was applied, stresses were transmitted into peri-implant bone, and prosthodontic components were recorded. 3D-FEA revealed higher stresses on the implants (up to +55.16%), on peri-implant bone (up to +56.93%), and in the prosthesis (up to +70.71%) when the full-acrylic prosthesis was simulated. The prosthesis with a carbon fiber framework showed an intermediate behavior between that of the other two configurations. This study suggests that the presence of a rigid framework in full-arch fixed prostheses provides a better load distribution that decreases the maximum values of stress at the levels of implants, prosthesis, and maxillary bone.

  6. The Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method applied to the Study of Rock Fracturing Behavior in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, Esteban; Bradley, Christopher R.; Broom, Scott T.; Knight, Earl E.; Munjiza, Ante; Sussman, Aviva J.; Swift, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction the combined finite-discrete element method (FEM/DEM), has become an excellent tool to address a wide range of problems involving fracturing and fragmentation of solids. Within the context of rock mechanics, the FEM/DEM method has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques, rock blasting, seismic waves, packing problems, rock crushing problems, etc. In the real world most of the problems involving fracture and fragmentation of solids are three dimensional problems. With the aim of addressing these problems an improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM capability has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These capabilities include state of the art 3D contact detection, contact interaction, constitutive material models, and fracture models. In this paper, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) Brazilian experiments are simulated using this improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM approach which is implemented in LANL's MUNROU (Munjiza-Rougier) code. The results presented in this work show excellent agreement with both the SHPB experiments and previous 2D numerical simulations performed by other FEM/DEM research groups.

  7. Incisor compliance following operative procedures: a rapid 3-D finite element analysis using micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Tan, Derek T

    2008-02-01

    New methods are available for the rapid generation of 3-D finite element models of dental structures and restorations. Validation of these methods are required. The aim of the present study is to utilize stereolithography and surface-driven automatic meshing to generate models of specific restorative conditions, and to examine these models under loading. The data generated are compared to existing experimental data in an attempt to validate the model. An intact maxillary central incisor was digitized with a micro-CT scanner. Surface contours of enamel and dentin were fitted following tooth segmentation based on pixel density using an interactive medical image control system. Stereolithography (STL) files of enamel and dentin surfaces were then remeshed to reduce mesh density and imported in a rapid prototyping software, where Boolean operations were used to assure the interfacial mesh congruence (dentinoenamel junction) and simulate different tooth preparations (endodontic access, veneer, proximal, and Class III preparations) and restorations (Class III composites). The different parts were then imported in a finite element software package to create 3D solid models. A 50-N point load perpendicular to the tooth's long axis and centered on the incisal edge was applied either on the buccal or palatal surface. The surface strain was obtained from selected nodes corresponding to the location of the strain gauges in the validation experiments. The increase in crown flexure (compared to the unaltered tooth) ranged from near zero values (conservative endodontic access, removal of proximal enamel) to ca 10% (aggressive endodontic access, conservative Class III preparations), 23% and 34% (moderate and aggressive Class III preparations, respectively), and 91% (veneer preparation). Placement of Class III composite resin restorations resulted in 85% recovery of the original crown stiffness. 3D FEA data correlated well with existing experimental data. In two situations, smaller

  8. Stresses around a miniscrew. 3-D analysis with the finite element method (FEM).

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar

    2009-11-01

    Miniscrews used for absolute anchorage may induce stresses in the surrounding tissues that are dependent on their proximity to the miniscrew. To determine the stresses in the buccal walls of the sockets of lower molars adjacent to a miniscrew under load when the position and angulation of the miniscrew are changed. Five 3-D FEM models containing the first and second lower molars, their periodontal ligaments and the surrounding spongy and cortical bone, were modelled in SolidWorks 2006 (SolidWorks, Concord, MA, USA) and transferred to the ANSYS Workbench (ANSYS Inc., Southpointe, Canonsburg, PA, U.S.A.). A tensile force of 2 N, decomposed in 3-D space, was applied to a miniscrew inserted between the lower first and second molars. The von Mises (equivalent) stresses along the buccal walls of the sockets of the first and second molars were derived following changes in miniscrew position and angulation. No direct force was applied to the molars. When the miniscrew was inserted at right angles to the bone and midway between the molars the stress in the crestal area was 0.093 MPa. This stress increased proportionally in the first molar socket as the miniscrew was moved towards the first molar and declined when the miniscrew was tipped towards the second molar. Stresses also decreased in the crestal area of the second molar as the miniscrew was moved towards the first molar, but increased when it was tipped towards the second molar. A 30-55 per cent increase in crestal stress in the first molar socket was detected. Stress occurred in the tissues surrounding a miniscrew subjected to a force vector. Changes in the position or angulation of a miniscrew can affect the stress in the socket walls of adjacent teeth.

  9. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear: II. Experimental and numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; De Arcas, Guillermo; Alonso, Jesus

    2012-12-01

    In part I, the feasibility of using three-dimensional (3D) finite elements (FEs) to model the acoustic behaviour of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear was studied and the numerical approach compared with classical lumped elements modelling. It was shown that by using a more complex acoustic model that took account of thermo-viscous effects, geometric shapes and dimensions, it was possible to develop a realistic model. This model then had clear advantages in comparison with the models based on equivalent circuits using lumped parameters. In fact results from FE modelling produce a better understanding about the physical phenomena produced inside ear simulator couplers, facilitating spatial and temporal visualization of the sound fields produced. The objective of this study (part II) is to extend the investigation by validating the numerical calculations against measurements on an ear simulator conforming to IEC 60318-1. For this purpose, an appropriate commercially available device is taken and a complete 3D FE model developed for it. The numerical model is based on key dimensional data obtained with a non-destructive x-ray inspection technique. Measurements of the acoustic transfer impedance have been carried out on the same device at a national measurement institute using the method embodied in IEC 60318-1. Having accounted for the actual device dimensions, the thermo-viscous effects inside narrow slots and holes and environmental conditions, the results of the numerical modelling were found to be in good agreement with the measured values.

  10. Stress distribution on external hexagon implant system using 3d finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo, Regênio M H; Oshima, Hugo M S; Silva, Isaac N L; Júnior, Luis H B; Mota, Eduardo G; Coelho, Luiz F B

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate strain distribution on dental implant, abutment, screw and crown virtual models in the posterior region. The analysis was performed by means of a 3D virtual model developed by the PRO-ENGINEER System (PRO-ENGINEER, PTC, Needham, MA, USA ) with an external butt joint (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), square headed Gold Tite abutment retainer screw (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), STA abutment (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), metal infrastructure of Ag-Pd alloy and feldspatic ceramic. The standard load was 382N at 15 degree angle to the implant axis, applied at 6 mm from the implant center at different observation points on the implant-screw set. The data showed that on the implant virtual model, the highest strain concentration was found at the interface between the implant platform and the abutment, and in the middle point of the 1st screw thread internal diameter on the load application side.

  11. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  12. VLF Trimpi modelling on the path NWC-Dunedin using both finite element and 3D Born modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, D.; Hayakawa, K. B. M.

    1998-10-01

    This paper investigates the numerical modelling of VLF Trimpis, produced by a D region inhomogeneity on the great circle path. Two different codes are used to model Trimpis on the path NWC-Dunedin. The first is a 2D Finite Element Method Code (FEM), whose solutions are rigorous and valid in the strong scattering or non-Born limit. The second code is a 3D model that invokes the Born approximation. The predicted Trimpis from these codes compare very closely, thus confirming the validity of both models. The modal scattering matrices for both codes are analysed in some detail and are found to have a comparable structure. They indicate strong scattering between the dominant TM modes. Analysis of the scattering matrix from the FEM code shows that departure from linear Born behaviour occurs when the inhomogeneity has a horizontal scale size of about 100 km and a maximum electron density enhancement at 75 km altitude of about 6 electrons.

  13. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  14. 3D Finite Element Modelling of Cutting Forces in Drilling Fibre Metal Laminates and Experimental Hole Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giasin, Khaled; Ayvar-Soberanis, Sabino; French, Toby; Phadnis, Vaibhav

    2017-02-01

    Machining Glass fibre aluminium reinforced epoxy (GLARE) is cumbersome due to distinctively different mechanical and thermal properties of its constituents, which makes it challenging to achieve damage-free holes with the acceptable surface quality. The proposed work focuses on the study of the machinability of thin ( 2.5 mm) GLARE laminate. Drilling trials were conducted to analyse the effect of feed rate and spindle speed on the cutting forces and hole quality. The resulting hole quality metrics (surface roughness, hole size, circularity error, burr formation and delamination) were assessed using surface profilometry and optical scanning techniques. A three dimensional (3D) finite-element (FE) model of drilling GLARE laminate was also developed using ABAQUS/Explicit to help understand the mechanism of drilling GLARE. The homogenised ply-level response of GLARE laminate was considered in the FE model to predict cutting forces in the drilling process.

  15. 3D Finite Element Model for Writing Long-Period Fiber Gratings by CO2 Laser Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, João M. P.; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented. PMID:23941908

  16. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  17. 3D finite element model for writing long-period fiber gratings by CO2 laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-08-12

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented.

  18. 3D Finite Element Electrical Model of Larval Zebrafish ECG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Crowcombe, James; Dhillon, Sundeep Singh; Hurst, Rhiannon Mary; Egginton, Stuart; Müller, Ferenc; Sík, Attila; Tarte, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of heart function in zebrafish larvae using electrocardiography (ECG) is a potentially useful tool in developing cardiac treatments and the assessment of drug therapies. In order to better understand how a measured ECG waveform is related to the structure of the heart, its position within the larva and the position of the electrodes, a 3D model of a 3 days post fertilisation (dpf) larval zebrafish was developed to simulate cardiac electrical activity and investigate the voltage distribution throughout the body. The geometry consisted of two main components; the zebrafish body was modelled as a homogeneous volume, while the heart was split into five distinct regions (sinoatrial region, atrial wall, atrioventricular band, ventricular wall and heart chambers). Similarly, the electrical model consisted of two parts with the body described by Laplace’s equation and the heart using a bidomain ionic model based upon the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. Each region of the heart was differentiated by action potential (AP) parameters and activation wave conduction velocities, which were fitted and scaled based on previously published experimental results. ECG measurements in vivo at different electrode recording positions were then compared to the model results. The model was able to simulate action potentials, wave propagation and all the major features (P wave, R wave, T wave) of the ECG, as well as polarity of the peaks observed at each position. This model was based upon our current understanding of the structure of the normal zebrafish larval heart. Further development would enable us to incorporate features associated with the diseased heart and hence assist in the interpretation of larval zebrafish ECGs in these conditions. PMID:27824910

  19. 3D Finite Element Electrical Model of Larval Zebrafish ECG Signals.

    PubMed

    Crowcombe, James; Dhillon, Sundeep Singh; Hurst, Rhiannon Mary; Egginton, Stuart; Müller, Ferenc; Sík, Attila; Tarte, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of heart function in zebrafish larvae using electrocardiography (ECG) is a potentially useful tool in developing cardiac treatments and the assessment of drug therapies. In order to better understand how a measured ECG waveform is related to the structure of the heart, its position within the larva and the position of the electrodes, a 3D model of a 3 days post fertilisation (dpf) larval zebrafish was developed to simulate cardiac electrical activity and investigate the voltage distribution throughout the body. The geometry consisted of two main components; the zebrafish body was modelled as a homogeneous volume, while the heart was split into five distinct regions (sinoatrial region, atrial wall, atrioventricular band, ventricular wall and heart chambers). Similarly, the electrical model consisted of two parts with the body described by Laplace's equation and the heart using a bidomain ionic model based upon the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. Each region of the heart was differentiated by action potential (AP) parameters and activation wave conduction velocities, which were fitted and scaled based on previously published experimental results. ECG measurements in vivo at different electrode recording positions were then compared to the model results. The model was able to simulate action potentials, wave propagation and all the major features (P wave, R wave, T wave) of the ECG, as well as polarity of the peaks observed at each position. This model was based upon our current understanding of the structure of the normal zebrafish larval heart. Further development would enable us to incorporate features associated with the diseased heart and hence assist in the interpretation of larval zebrafish ECGs in these conditions.

  20. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  1. Effect of surface treatment on stress distribution in immediately loaded dental implants--a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Babak; Shahrbaf, Shirin; Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Ghalichi, Farzan; Ashtiani, Mohammed; Martin, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    To investigate, by means of FE analysis, the effect of surface roughness treatments on the distribution of stresses at the bone-implant interface in immediately loaded mandibular implants. An accurate, high resolution, digital replica model of bone structure (cortical and trabecular components) supporting an implant was created using CT scan data and image processing software (Mimics 13.1; Materialize, Leuven, Belgium). An anatomically accurate 3D model of a mandibular-implant complex was created using a professional 3D-CAD modeller (SolidWorks, DassaultSystèmes Solid Works Corp; 2011). Finite element models were created with one of the four roughness treatments on the implant fixture surface. Of these, three were surface treated to create a uniform coating determined by the coefficient of friction (μ); these were either (1) plasma sprayed or porous-beaded (μ=1.0), (2) sandblasted (μ=0.68) or (3) polished (μ=0.4). The fourth implant had a novel two-part surface roughness consisting of a coronal polished component (μ=0.4) interfacing with the cortical bone, and a body plasma treated surface component (μ=1) interfacing with the trabecular bone. Finite element stress analysis was carried out under vertical and lateral forces. This investigation showed that the type of surface treatment on the implant fixture affects the stress at the bone-implant interface of an immediately loaded implant complex. Von Mises stress data showed that the two-part surface treatment created the better stress distribution at the implant-bone interface. The results from this FE computational analysis suggest that the proposed two-part surface treatment for IL implants creates lower stresses than single uniform treatments at the bone-implant interface, which might decrease peri-implant bone loss. Future investigations should focus on mechanical and clinical validation of these FE results. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  3. 3D reconstruction of bony elements of the knee joint and finite element analysis of total knee prosthesis obtained from the reconstructed model.

    PubMed

    Djoudi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Two separate themes are presented in this paper. The first theme is to present a graphical modeling approach of human anatomical structures namely, the femur and the tibia. The second theme involves making a finite element analysis of stresses, displacements and deformations in prosthetic implants (the femoral implant and the polyethylene insert). The graphical modeling approach comes in two parts. The first is the segmentation of MRI scanned images, retrieved in DICOM format for edge detection. In the second part, 3D-CAD models are generated from the results of the segmentation stage. The finite element analysis is done by first extracting the prosthetic implants from the reconstructed 3D-CAD model, then do a finite element analysis of these implants under objectively determined conditions such as; forces, allowed displacements, the materials composing implant, and the coefficient of friction. The objective of this work is to implement an interface for exchanging data between 2D MRI images obtained from a medical diagnosis of a patient and the 3D-CAD model used in various applications, such as; the extraction of the implants, stress analysis at the knee joint and can serve as an aid to surgery, also predict the behavior of the prosthetic implants vis-a-vis the forces acting on the knee joints.

  4. 3D reconstruction of bony elements of the knee joint and finite element analysis of total knee prosthesis obtained from the reconstructed model

    PubMed Central

    Djoudi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Two separate themes are presented in this paper. Aims The first theme is to present a graphical modeling approach of human anatomical structures namely, the femur and the tibia. The second theme involves making a finite element analysis of stresses, displacements and deformations in prosthetic implants (the femoral implant and the polyethylene insert). Objectives The graphical modeling approach comes in two parts. The first is the segmentation of MRI scanned images, retrieved in DICOM format for edge detection. In the second part, 3D-CAD models are generated from the results of the segmentation stage. The finite element analysis is done by first extracting the prosthetic implants from the reconstructed 3D-CAD model, then do a finite element analysis of these implants under objectively determined conditions such as; forces, allowed displacements, the materials composing implant, and the coefficient of friction. Conclusion The objective of this work is to implement an interface for exchanging data between 2D MRI images obtained from a medical diagnosis of a patient and the 3D-CAD model used in various applications, such as; the extraction of the implants, stress analysis at the knee joint and can serve as an aid to surgery, also predict the behavior of the prosthetic implants vis-a-vis the forces acting on the knee joints. PMID:24396234

  5. 3D finite element analysis of nutrient distributions and cell viability in the intervertebral disc: effects of deformation and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alicia R; Huang, Chun-Yuh C; Brown, Mark D; Gu, Wei Yong

    2011-09-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) receives important nutrients, such as glucose, from surrounding blood vessels. Poor nutritional supply is believed to play a key role in disc degeneration. Several investigators have presented finite element models of the IVD to investigate disc nutrition; however, none has predicted nutrient levels and cell viability in the disc with a realistic 3D geometry and tissue properties coupled to mechanical deformation. Understanding how degeneration and loading affect nutrition and cell viability is necessary for elucidating the mechanisms of disc degeneration and low back pain. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of disc degeneration and static deformation on glucose distributions and cell viability in the IVD using finite element analysis. A realistic 3D finite element model of the IVD was developed based on mechano-electrochemical mixture theory. In the model, the cellular metabolic activities and viability were related to nutrient concentrations, and transport properties of nutrients were dependent on tissue deformation. The effects of disc degeneration and mechanical compression on glucose concentrations and cell density distributions in the IVD were investigated. To examine effects of disc degeneration, tissue properties were altered to reflect those of degenerated tissue, including reduced water content, fixed charge density, height, and endplate permeability. Two mechanical loading conditions were also investigated: a reference (undeformed) case and a 10% static deformation case. In general, nutrient levels decreased moving away from the nutritional supply at the disc periphery. Minimum glucose levels were at the interface between the nucleus and annulus regions of the disc. Deformation caused a 6.2% decrease in the minimum glucose concentration in the normal IVD, while degeneration resulted in an 80% decrease. Although cell density was not affected in the undeformed normal disc, there was a decrease in cell

  6. Scaling/LER study of Si GAA nanowire FET using 3D finite element Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmessary, Muhammad A.; Nagy, Daniel; Aldegunde, Manuel; Seoane, Natalia; Indalecio, Guillermo; Lindberg, Jari; Dettmer, Wulf; Perić, Djordje; García-Loureiro, Antonio J.; Kalna, Karol

    2017-02-01

    3D Finite Element (FE) Monte Carlo (MC) simulation toolbox incorporating 2D Schrödinger equation quantum corrections is employed to simulate ID-VG characteristics of a 22 nm gate length gate-all-around (GAA) Si nanowire (NW) FET demonstrating an excellent agreement against experimental data at both low and high drain biases. We then scale the Si GAA NW according to the ITRS specifications to a gate length of 10 nm predicting that the NW FET will deliver the required on-current of above 1 mA/ μ m and a superior electrostatic integrity with a nearly ideal sub-threshold slope of 68 mV/dec and a DIBL of 39 mV/V. In addition, we use a calibrated 3D FE quantum corrected drift-diffusion (DD) toolbox to investigate the effects of NW line-edge roughness (LER) induced variability on the sub-threshold characteristics (threshold voltage (VT), OFF-current (IOFF), sub-threshold slope (SS) and drain-induced-barrier-lowering (DIBL)) for the 22 nm and 10 nm gate length GAA NW FETs at low and high drain biases. We simulate variability with two LER correlation lengths (CL = 20 nm and 10 nm) and three root mean square values (RMS = 0.6, 0.7 and 0.85 nm).

  7. Influence of bicortical techniques in internal connection placed in premaxillary area by 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araújo; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2017-02-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the stress distribution in implant-supported prostheses and peri-implant bone using internal hexagon (IH) implants in the premaxillary area, varying surgical techniques (conventional, bicortical and bicortical in association with nasal floor elevation), and loading directions (0°, 30° and 60°) by three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. Three models were designed with Invesalius, Rhinoceros 3D and Solidworks software. Each model contained a bone block of the premaxillary area including an implant (IH, Ø4 × 10 mm) supporting a metal-ceramic crown. 178 N was applied in different inclinations (0°, 30°, 60°). The results were analyzed by von Mises, maximum principal stress, microstrain and displacement maps including ANOVA statistical test for some situations. Von Mises maps of implant, screws and abutment showed increase of stress concentration as increased loading inclination. Bicortical techniques showed reduction in implant apical area and in the head of fixation screws. Bicortical techniques showed slight increase stress in cortical bone in the maximum principal stress and microstrain maps under 60° loading. No differences in bone tissue regarding surgical techniques were observed. As conclusion, non-axial loads increased stress concentration in all maps. Bicortical techniques showed lower stress for implant and screw; however, there was slightly higher stress on cortical bone only under loads of higher inclinations (60°).

  8. Elasto-Plastic 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Elasto–Plastic 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon...primarily concerned with the results of a three-dimensional elasto– plastic finite element contact analysis of a typical aluminium fatigue test coupon...Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon Executive Summary Aerospace Division has been deeply involved

  9. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  10. A 3D finite element model of an implanted scapula: importance of a multiparametric validation using experimental data.

    PubMed

    Maurel, N; Diop, A; Grimberg, J

    2005-09-01

    In order to help to understand the loosening phenomenon around glenoïd prostheses, a 3D finite element model of a previously tested implanted scapula has been developed. The construction of the model was done using CT scans of the tested scapula. Different bone material properties were tested and shell elements or 8 nodes hexaedric elements were used to model the cortical bone. Surface contact elements were introduced on one hand between the bone and the lower part of the plate of the implant, and on the other, between the loading metallic ball and the upper surface of the implant. The results of the model were compared with those issued from in vitro experiments carried out on the same scapula. The evaluation of the model was done for nine cases of loading of 500 N distributed on the implant, in terms of strains (principal strains of six spots around peripheral cortex of the glenoïd) and displacement of four points positioned on the implant. The best configuration of the model presented here, fits with experiments for most of the strains (difference lower than 150microdef) but it seems to be still too stiff (mainly in the lower part). Nevertheless, we want, in this paper, to underline the importance of doing a multiparametric validation for such a model. Indeed, some models can give correct results for one case of loading but bad results for another kind of loading, some others can give good results for one kind of compared parameters (like strains for instance) but bad results for the other one (like displacements).

  11. The Distributed Lambda (?) Model (DLM): A 3-D, Finite-Element Muscle Model Based on Feldman's ? Model; Assessment of Orofacial Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. Method: A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the ? model along the muscle fibers, together…

  12. The Distributed Lambda (?) Model (DLM): A 3-D, Finite-Element Muscle Model Based on Feldman's ? Model; Assessment of Orofacial Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. Method: A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the ? model along the muscle fibers, together…

  13. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  14. Effects of different ceramic and composite materials on stress distribution in inlay and onlay cavities: 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamanel, Kivanç; Caglar, Alper; Gülsahi, Kamran; Ozden, Utku Ahmet

    2009-11-01

    To reduce loss of tooth tissue and to improve esthetic results, inlay and onlay restorations are good treatment choices for extensive cavities in posterior teeth. The aim of this paper was to evaluate, by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis, the effects of restorative material and cavity design on stress distribution in the tooth structures and restorative materials. Two different nanofilled composites and two different all-ceramic materials were used in this study. A permanent molar tooth was modeled with enamel and dentin structures. 3-D inlay and onlay cavity designs were created. Von Mises, compressive, and tensile stresses on the restorative materials, core materials, enamel, and dentin were evaluated separately. On the effect of restorative material, results showed that in the case of materials with low elastic moduli, more stress was transferred to the tooth structures. Therefore, compared to the nanofilled composites, the all-ceramic inlay and onlay materials tested transferred less stress to the tooth structures. On the effect of cavity design, the onlay design was more efficacious in protecting the tooth structures than the inlay design.

  15. Loading and composite restoration assessment of various non-carious cervical lesions morphologies - 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Soares, P V; Machado, A C; Zeola, L F; Souza, P G; Galvão, A M; Montes, T C; Pereira, A G; Reis, B R; Coleman, T A; Grippo, J O

    2015-09-01

    The present study analysed the effects of different occlusal loading on premolars displaying various non-carious cervical lesions morphologies, restored (or not) with composites, by 3D finite element analysis. A three-dimensional digital model of a maxillary premolar was generated using CAD software. Three non-carious cervical lesions morphological types were simulated: wedged-shaped, saucer and mixed. All virtual models underwent three loading types (100 N): vertical, buccal and palatal loading. The simulated non-carious cervical lesions morphologies were analysed with and without restorations to consider specific regions, such as the occlusal and gingival walls as well as the depth of the lesions. Data summarizing the stress distribution were obtained in MPa using Maximum Principal Stress. Palatal loads were responsible for providing the highest values of accumulated tensile stress on the buccal wall; 27.66 MPa and 25.76 MPa for mixed and wedged-shaped morphologies, respectively. The highest tensile values found on non-carious cervical lesions morphologies restored with composite resin were 5.9 MPa in the mixed morphology, similar to those found on sound models despite their morphologies and occlusal loading. The various non-carious cervical lesions morphologies had little effect on stress distribution patterns, whereas the loading type and presence of composite restorations influenced the biomechanical behaviour of the maxillary premolars. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  16. Stress-strain distribution at bone-implant interface of two splinted overdenture systems using 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mostafa Omran

    2013-08-01

    This study was accomplished to assess the biomechanical state of different retaining methods of bar implant-overdenture. Two 3D finite element models were designed. The first model included implant overdenture retained by Hader-clip attachment, while the second model included two extracoronal resilient attachment (ERA) studs added distally to Hader splint bar. A non-linear frictional contact type was assumed between overdentures and mucosa to represent sliding and rotational movements among different attachment components. A 200 N was applied at the molar region unilaterally and perpendicular to the occlusal plane. Additionally, the mandible was restrained at their ramus ends. The maximum equivalent stress and strain (von Mises) were recorded and analyzed at the bone-implant interface level. The values of von Mises stress and strain of the first model at bone-implant interface were higher than their counterparts of the second model. Stress concentration and high value of strain were recognized surrounding implant of the unloaded side in both models. There were different patterns of stress-strain distribution at bone-implant interface between the studied attachment designs. Hader bar-clip attachment showed better biomechanical behavior than adding ERA studs distal to hader bar.

  17. Stress-strain distribution at bone-implant interface of two splinted overdenture systems using 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was accomplished to assess the biomechanical state of different retaining methods of bar implant-overdenture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two 3D finite element models were designed. The first model included implant overdenture retained by Hader-clip attachment, while the second model included two extracoronal resilient attachment (ERA) studs added distally to Hader splint bar. A non-linear frictional contact type was assumed between overdentures and mucosa to represent sliding and rotational movements among different attachment components. A 200 N was applied at the molar region unilaterally and perpendicular to the occlusal plane. Additionally, the mandible was restrained at their ramus ends. The maximum equivalent stress and strain (von Mises) were recorded and analyzed at the bone-implant interface level. RESULTS The values of von Mises stress and strain of the first model at bone-implant interface were higher than their counterparts of the second model. Stress concentration and high value of strain were recognized surrounding implant of the unloaded side in both models. CONCLUSION There were different patterns of stress-strain distribution at bone-implant interface between the studied attachment designs. Hader bar-clip attachment showed better biomechanical behavior than adding ERA studs distal to hader bar. PMID:24049576

  18. Finite element analysis of a 3D moving vacuum arc for transverse magnetic field contacts based on Gundlach's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chang-Seob; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Se-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A systematic numerical method for analyzing a 3D moving vacuum arc was proposed and tested in this research by using a transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact. The analysis was carried out by employing the finite element method and the experimental energy equation defined by Gundlach's formula. In the literature, the vacuum interrupter has been widely applied to medium-voltage switching circuits. TMF-type contacts use the Lorentz force density to move a high-temperature arc so as to prevent the contacts from being melted and damaged. The material erosion caused by the arc on the electrode's surface is an important process that results in the interruptive capabilities of these vacuum interrupters. In a classical arc model, to move the vacuum arc, it is required that the magneto-hydrodynamics be analyzed in the arc region at each step. However, with this approach convergence is difficult, resulting in a very time-consuming. Therefore, we propose a new technique to predict the behaviors of vacuum arc between two electrodes. This new approach adopts the experimental arc voltage equation between two electrodes defined by Gundlach's formula. We verify our proposed model by comparing its results with the arcing behaviors obtained from earlier experiments.

  19. Stress analysis in bone tissue around single implants with different diameters and veneering materials: a 3-D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution on bone tissue with a single prosthesis supported by implants of large and conventional diameter and presenting different veneering materials using the 3-D finite element method. Sixteen models were fabricated to reproduce a bone block with implants, using two diameters (3.75×10 mm and 5.00×10 mm), four different veneering materials (composite resin, acrylic resin, porcelain, and NiCr crown), and two loads (axial (200 N) and oblique (100 N)). For data analysis, the maximum principal stress and von Mises criterion were used. For the axial load, the cortical bone in all models did not exhibit significant differences, and the trabecular bone presented higher tensile stress with reduced implant diameter. For the oblique load, the cortical bone presented a significant increase in tensile stress on the same side as the loading for smaller implant diameters. The trabecular bone showed a similar but more discreet trend. There was no difference in bone tissue with different veneering materials. The veneering material did not influence the stress distribution in the supporting tissues of single implant-supported prostheses. The large-diameter implants improved the transference of occlusal loads to bone tissue and decreased stress mainly under oblique loads. Oblique loading was more detrimental to distribution stresses than axial loading. © 2013.

  20. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  1. Linear-Elastic 2D and 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    approximate 3D solution for the stress distribution around a circular cylindrical hole in an infinite plate of arbitrary thickness. They did this by...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Linear-Elastic 2D and 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test...large numbers of circular holes that are fitted with fasteners such as bolts or rivets. During the service life of aircraft, fatigue damage often occurs

  2. 3D Finite Element Modelling for the investigation of the cavity effect in extensometric rock-deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, M.; Detzky, G.; Koppán, A.

    2012-04-01

    phenomenon in general. Authors calculated the deformations of a simple-geometry 3D cavity, which is caused by variable gravity loads. Dependence of the cavity effect on changing of distinct elastic properties in categorized models has been investigated. Authors introduced qualifying parameter fields calculated using the results of the FE modelling (nodal displacements as a model answer for the gravity load), in order to characterize the effect. Modelling results can be used as an estimation not only for the absolute cavity effect rate of the intended arrangement, furthermore the sensitivity of the given system against a particular geometric property. As an application example finite element modelling were carried out in order to estimate the influence of the complicated cavity system surrounding the "Budapest-Matyashegy" Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of the Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary.

  3. Response of river networks at active continental margins to aseismic ridge subduction: a 3D finite-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges causes considerable uplift and deformation of the upper continental plate and may therefore ultimately affect also coastal drainage systems. To investigate the impact of a subducting ridge on the river network of the upper plate, we link a landscape evolution model with 3D finite-element models of ridge subduction. The landscape evolution model includes diffusive hillslope processes and fluvial erosion and deposition. The finite-element model represents a deformable forearc and a rigid oceanic plate, which carries the model ridge beneath the upper plate (cf. Zeumann and Hampel, 2015, 2016). Our model results show that as long as the forearc is unaffected by the ridge, rivers flow more or less straight toward the model coast. Once the ridge tip has arrived at a position beneath the coast, the uplift caused by the ridge changes the flow direction of the rivers. If the slope at the ridge tip exceeds the slope of the forearc wedge, the flow direction of rivers above the ridge crest is inversed, i.e. the rivers flow away from the coast. Once the main part of the ridge (with constant maximum elevation of the ridge crest) has arrived beneath the coast, the rivers inverse their flow direction once more and flow toward the coast again. At this stage, rivers flowing above the ridge flanks are deflected away from the ridge crest. This deflection gets more pronounced during further subduction of the ridge. In case of a stationary subducting ridge, no further drainage reorganization takes place after the ridge tip has passed and the main part of the ridge with its constant crest height has arrived beneath the forearc. For a migrating ridge, further reorganization of the drainage network takes place as the ridge moves along the margin. We compare the modelled deflection of rivers during stationary ridge subduction with the flow direction of rivers in Costa Rica and Panama, which are affected by the subduction of the approximately stationary

  4. Coupled 2D-3D finite element method for analysis of a skin panel with a discontinuous stiffener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Lotts, C. G.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient analysis method which was used to predict detailed stress states in a typical composite compression panel with a discontinuous hat stiffener. A global-local approach was used. The global model incorporated both 2D shell and 3D brick elements connected by newly developed transition elements. Most of the panel was modeled with 2D elements, while 3D elements were employed to model the stiffener flange and the adjacent skin. Both linear and geometrically nonlinear analyses were performed on the global model. The effect of geometric nonlinearity induced by the eccentric load path due to the discontinuous hat stiffener was significant. The local model used a fine mesh of 3D brick elements to model the region at the end of the stiffener. Boundary conditions of the local 3D model were obtained by spline interpolation of the nodal displacements from the global analysis. Detailed in-plane and through-the-thickness stresses were calculated in the flange-skin interface near the end of the stiffener.

  5. Elastic Properties of Lithium Disilicate Versus Feldspathic Inlays: Effect on the Bonding by 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Flávia Zardo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; de Jager, Niek; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Kleverlaan, Cornelis Johannes

    2016-10-03

    To determine the elastic properties of five ceramic systems with different compositions (lithium disilicate vs. feldspathic ceramics) and processing methods and compare the stress distribution in premolars in the interface with inlays made with these systems loaded with the maximum normal bite force (665 N) using 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The elastic properties of five ceramic restoration materials (IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, Vita PM9, Vita Mark II, Vita VM7) were obtained using the ultrasonic pulse-echo method. Three-dimensional FEA simplified models of maxillary premolars restored with these ceramic materials were created. The models were loaded with a load at the two nodes on the occlusal surface in the middle of the tooth, 2 mm from the outside of the tooth, simulating a loading ball with a radius of 6 mm. The means values of density (g/cm³), Young's modulus (GPa), and Poison's ratio was 2.6 ± 0.3, 82.3 ± 18.3, and 0.22 ± 0.01 for IPS e.max Press; 2.3 ± 0.1, 83.5 ± 15.0, and 0.21 ± 0.01 for IPS e.max CAD; 2.5 ± 0.1, 44.4 ± 11.5, and 0.26 ± 0.08 for PM9; 2.4 ± 0.1, 70.6 ± 4.9, and 0.22 ± 0.01 for Vitamark II; 2.4 ± 0.1, 63.3 ± 3.9, and 0.23 ± 0.01 for VM7, respectively. The 3D FEA showed the tensile stress at the interface between the tooth and the inlay was dependent on the elastic properties of the materials, since the Vita PM9 and IPS e.max CAD ceramics presented the lowest and the highest stress concentration in the interface, respectively. The elastic properties of ceramic materials were influenced by composition and processing methods, and these differences influenced the stress concentration at the bonding interface between tooth and restoration. The lower the elastic modulus of inlays, the lower is the stress concentration at the bonding interfaces. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Structural stability of posterior retainer design for resin-bonded prostheses: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Shinya, Akikazu; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Botelho, Michael George; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the stress distribution and natural frequency of different shape and thickness retainer designs for maxillary posterior resin-bonded prostheses using finite element (FE) method. A 3D FE model of a three unit posterior resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was generated. Three different shaped retainer designs, viz. C-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds), D-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds with central groove) and O-shaped (360° wraparounds), and three different thicknesses, viz., 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mm, resin-bonded prostheses were used in this study. The resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was imported into an FE analysis software (ANSYS 10.0, ANSYS, USA) and attribution of material properties. The nodes at the bottom surface of the roots were assigned fixed zero displacement in the three spatial dimensions. A simulated angle of 45° loading of a 100 N force was applied to the node of the pontic lingual cusp surface. The stress distributions and corresponding natural frequencies were analyzed and resolved. The C-shaped retainer for 0.4 mm thickness recorded the greatest von Mises stresses of 71.4 MPa for all three groups. C-shaped, D-shaped and O-shaped retainer presented natural frequencies 3,988, 7,754, and 10,494 Hz, respectively. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer. The maximum von Mises stresses values of the remaining tooth and prosthesis decreased with greater retainer thickness. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer.

  7. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures

    PubMed Central

    Pavarino, E.; Neves, L. A.; Machado, J. M.; de Godoy, M. F.; Shiyou, Y.; Momente, J. C.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; Pinto, A. R.; Valêncio, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  8. 3D finite element prediction of chip flow, burr formation, and cutting forces in micro end-milling of aluminum 6061-T6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudinejad, A.; Parenti, P.; Annoni, M.

    2017-06-01

    Predictive models for machining operations have been significantly improved through numerous methods in recent decades. This study proposed a 3D finite element modeling (3D FEM) approach for the micro end-milling of Al6061-T6. Finite element (FE) simulations were performed under different cutting conditions to obtain realistic numerical predictions of chip flow, burr formation, and cutting forces. FE modeling displayed notable advantages, such as capability to easily handle any type of tool geometry and any side effect on chip formation, including thermal aspect and material property changes. The proposed 3D FE model considers the effects of mill helix angle and cutting edge radius on the chip. The prediction capability of the FE model was validated by comparing numerical model and experimental test results. Burr dimension trends were correlated with force profile shapes. However, the FE predictions overestimated the real force magnitude. This overestimation indicates that the model requires further development.

  9. Biomechanical assessment and 3D finite element analysis of the treatment of tibial fractures using minimally invasive percutaneous plates

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin-Jia; Wang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of varying the length of a limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) and the number and position of screws on middle tibial fractures, and to provide biomechanical evidence regarding minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO). For biomechanical testing, 60 tibias from cadavers (age at mortality, 20–40 years) were used to create middle and diagonal fracture models without defects. Tibias were randomly grouped and analyzed by biomechanic and three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. The differences among LC-DCPs of different lengths (6-, 10- and 14-hole) with 6 screws, 14-hole LC-DCPs with different numbers of screws (6, 10 and 14), and 14-hole LC-DCPs with 6 screws at different positions with regard to mechanical characteristics, including compressing, torsion and bending, were examined. The 6-hole LC-DCP had greater vertical compression strain compared with the 10- and 14-hole LC-DCPs (P<0.01), and the 14-hole LC-DCP had greater lateral strain than the 6- and 10-hole LC-DCPs (P<0.01). Furthermore, significant differences in torque were observed among the LC-DPs of different lengths (P<0.01). For 14-hole LC-DCPs with different numbers of screws, no significant differences in vertical strain, lateral strain or torque were detected (P>0.05). However, plates with 14 screws had greater vertical strain compared with those fixed with 6 or 10 screws (P<0.01). For 4-hole LC-DCPs with screws at different positions, vertical compression strain values were lowest for plates with screws at positions 1, 4, 7, 8, 11 and 14 (P<0.01). The lateral strain values and vertical strain values for plates with screws at positions 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 14 were significantly lower compared with those at the other positions (P<0.01), and torque values were also low. Thus, the 14-hole LC-DCP was the most stable against vertical compression, torsion and bending, and the 6-hole LC-DCP was the least stable

  10. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. User`s manual, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user`s manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water.

  11. Feasibility of rapid and automated importation of 3D echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) geometry into a finite element (FEM) analysis model

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, Janko F; Nathan, Nadia S

    2004-01-01

    Background Finite element method (FEM) analysis for intraoperative modeling of the left ventricle (LV) is presently not possible. Since 3D structural data of the LV is now obtainable using standard transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) devices intraoperatively, the present study describes a method to transfer this data into a commercially available FEM analysis system: ABAQUS©. Methods In this prospective study TomTec LV Analysis TEE© Software was used for semi-automatic endocardial border detection, reconstruction, and volume-rendering of the clinical 3D echocardiographic data. A newly developed software program MVCP FemCoGen©, written in Delphi, reformats the TomTec file structures in five patients for use in ABAQUS and allows visualization of regional deformation of the LV. Results This study demonstrates that a fully automated importation of 3D TEE data into FEM modeling is feasible and can be efficiently accomplished in the operating room. Conclusion For complete intraoperative 3D LV finite element analysis, three input elements are necessary: 1. time-gaited, reality-based structural information, 2. continuous LV pressure and 3. instantaneous tissue elastance. The first of these elements is now available using the methods presented herein. PMID:15473901

  12. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics, User manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.

  13. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  14. NIKE3D a nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics user's manual update summary

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Maker, B N; Ferencz, R M; Hallquist, J O

    2000-03-24

    This report provides the NIKE3D user's manual update summary for changes made from version 3.0.0 April 24, 1995 to version 3.3.6 March 24,2000. The updates are excerpted directly from the code printed output file (hence the Courier font and formatting), are presented in chronological order and delineated by NIKE3D version number. NIKE3D is a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Thirty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a direct factorization method.

  15. Stress analysis of a rectangular implant in laminated composites using 2-D and 3-D finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Wai T.; Graves, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis method using the FEM based on the Hellinger-Reissner variation principle has been developed to determine the 3-D stresses and displacements near a rectangular implant inside a laminated composite material. Three-dimensional elements are employed in regions where the interlaminar stress is considered to be significant; 2-D elements are used in other areas. Uniaxially loaded graphite-epoxy laminates have been analyzed; the implant was modeled as four plies of 3501/6 epoxy located in the middle of the laminate. It is shown that the interlaminar stresses are an order of magnitude lower than the stress representing the applied far-field load. The stress concentration factors of both the interlaminar and in-plane stresses depend on the stacking sequence of the laminate.

  16. Stress analysis of a rectangular implant in laminated composites using 2-D and 3-D finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Wai T.; Graves, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis method using the FEM based on the Hellinger-Reissner variation principle has been developed to determine the 3-D stresses and displacements near a rectangular implant inside a laminated composite material. Three-dimensional elements are employed in regions where the interlaminar stress is considered to be significant; 2-D elements are used in other areas. Uniaxially loaded graphite-epoxy laminates have been analyzed; the implant was modeled as four plies of 3501/6 epoxy located in the middle of the laminate. It is shown that the interlaminar stresses are an order of magnitude lower than the stress representing the applied far-field load. The stress concentration factors of both the interlaminar and in-plane stresses depend on the stacking sequence of the laminate.

  17. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. During the pulse buckling tests, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using PRONTO, a Sandia developed transient dynamics analysis code, and ABAQUS/Explicit with both shell and continuum elements. The calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history.

  18. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  19. A 3-D Finite Element Model of Anterior Vaginal Wall Support to Evaluate Mechanisms Underlying Cystocele Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luyun; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To develop a 3D computer model of the anterior vaginal wall and its supports, validate that model, and then use it to determine the combinations of muscle and connective tissue impairments that result in cystocele formation, as observed on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A subject-specific 3D model of the anterior vaginal wall and its supports was developed based on MRI geometry from a healthy nulliparous woman. It included simplified representations of the anterior vaginal wall, levator muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, arcus tendineus fascia pelvis and levator ani, paravaginal attachments, and the posterior compartment. This model was then imported into ABAQUS™ and tissue properties were assigned from the literature. An iterative process was used to refine anatomical assumptions until convergence was obtained between model behavior under increases of abdominal pressure up to 168 cmH2O and deformations observed on dynamic MRI. Results Cystocele size was sensitive to abdominal pressure and impairment of connective tissue and muscle. Larger cystocele formed in the presence of impairments in muscular and apical connective tissue support compared to either support element alone. Apical impairment resulted in a larger cystocele than paravaginal impairment. Levator ani muscle impairment caused a larger urogenital hiatus size, longer length of the distal vagina exposed to a pressure differential, larger apical descent and resulted in a larger cystocele size. Conclusions Development of a cystocele requires a levator muscle impairment, an increase in abdominal pressure, and apical and paravaginal support defects. PMID:19481208

  20. A Generalized Finite Element Formulation for 3D Microscale Simulation of the Response of Heterogeneous Materials to Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Most engineering materials exhibit significant heterogeneity at the microscale due to polycrystalline and/or multi-phase structure, inclusions, voids, and micro-cracks. Much of the complex, nonlinear response observed in these materials originates at this length scale. The Generalized Finite Element Method (GFEM) greatly simplifies explicit treatment of material microstructure [1] by allowing for non-conformal discretization without loss of accuracy. We present our application of the GFEM to examine the dynamic response of polycrystalline materials at the microscale. The microstructure is approximated with a Voronoi tessellation, and the material basis of each resulting grain is selected randomly. An anisotropic single crystal constitutive model is applied in the local basis. The method has been implemented for massively parallel computation using a geometric decomposition and the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. [1] Simone A., Duarte C.A., Van der Giessen E., 2006, ``A generalized finite element method for polycrystals with discontinuous grain boundaries,'' Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng., 67, pp. 1122-1145. (Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.)

  1. A method to generate conformal finite-element meshes from 3D measurements of microstructurally small fatigue-crack propagation [A method to generate conformal finite-element meshes from 3D measurements of microstructurally small fatigue-crack propagation: 3D Meshes of Microstructurally Small Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, Ashley D.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Cerrone, Albert R.; Li, Shiu Fai; Lind, Jonathan F.; Suter, Robert M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2016-04-27

    In an effort to reproduce computationally the observed evolution of microstructurally small fatigue cracks (MSFCs), a method is presented for generating conformal, finite-element (FE), volume meshes from 3D measurements of MSFC propagation. The resulting volume meshes contain traction-free surfaces that conform to incrementally measured 3D crack shapes. Grain morphologies measured using near-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy are also represented within the FE volume meshes. Proof-of-concept simulations are performed to demonstrate the utility of the mesh-generation method. The proof-of-concept simulations employ a crystal-plasticity constitutive model and are performed using the conformal FE meshes corresponding to successive crack-growth increments. Although the simulations for each crack increment are currently independent of one another, they need not be, and transfer of material-state information among successive crack-increment meshes is discussed. The mesh-generation method was developed using post-mortem measurements, yet it is general enough that it can be applied to in-situ measurements of 3D MSFC propagation.

  2. A method to generate conformal finite-element meshes from 3D measurements of microstructurally small fatigue-crack propagation [A method to generate conformal finite-element meshes from 3D measurements of microstructurally small fatigue-crack propagation: 3D Meshes of Microstructurally Small Crack Growth

    DOE PAGES

    Spear, Ashley D.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Cerrone, Albert R.; ...

    2016-04-27

    In an effort to reproduce computationally the observed evolution of microstructurally small fatigue cracks (MSFCs), a method is presented for generating conformal, finite-element (FE), volume meshes from 3D measurements of MSFC propagation. The resulting volume meshes contain traction-free surfaces that conform to incrementally measured 3D crack shapes. Grain morphologies measured using near-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy are also represented within the FE volume meshes. Proof-of-concept simulations are performed to demonstrate the utility of the mesh-generation method. The proof-of-concept simulations employ a crystal-plasticity constitutive model and are performed using the conformal FE meshes corresponding to successive crack-growth increments. Although the simulationsmore » for each crack increment are currently independent of one another, they need not be, and transfer of material-state information among successive crack-increment meshes is discussed. The mesh-generation method was developed using post-mortem measurements, yet it is general enough that it can be applied to in-situ measurements of 3D MSFC propagation.« less

  3. The distributed lambda (λ) model (DLM): a 3-D, finite-element muscle model based on Feldman's λ model; assessment of orofacial gestures.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-12-01

    The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the λ model along the muscle fibers, together with the passive properties of muscle tissues in the 3-D space. The muscle element was first assessed using simple geometrical representations of muscles in the form of rectangular bars. It was then included in a 3-D face model, and its impact on lip protrusion was compared with the impact of a Hill-type muscle model. The force-length characteristic associated with the muscle elements matched well with the invariant characteristics of the λ model. The impact of the passive properties was assessed. Isometric force variation and isotonic displacements were modeled. The comparison with a Hill-type model revealed strong similarities in terms of global stress and strain. The DLM accounted for the characteristics of the λ model. Biomechanically, no clear differences were found between the DLM and a Hill-type model. Accurate evaluations of the λ model, based on the comparison between data and simulations, are now possible with 3-D biomechanical descriptions of the speech articulators because of the DLM.

  4. A 3-D hp finite/infinite element method to calculate power deposition in the human head.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Demkowicz, Leszek; Hao, Ling

    2007-04-01

    The electromagnetic power deposition and transfer properties of a G1 continuous head model reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data are investigated by using the coupled hp finite/infinite element (FE/IE) method. The discretization error is controlled by a self-adaptive process driven by an explicit a posteriori error estimate. Based on the benchmark problem of reproducing the Mie series solution, the scattering of a plane wave on the curvilinear head model is used to evaluate the hp FE/IE approach and calibrate the error bound. The radiation pattern from a short dipole antenna modeling a cell phone, is analyzed in terms of the level and distribution of the specific absorption rates (SAR). The numerical experiments show that the hybrid hp FE/IE implementation is a competitive tool for accurate assessment of human electromagnetic exposure.

  5. Effect of connector width on stress distribution in all ceramic fixed partial dentures (a 3D finite element study).

    PubMed

    Mokhtarikhoee, Sepideh; Jannesari, Alireza; Behroozi, Hamid; Mokhtarikhoee, Saeedeh

    2008-01-01

    Connectors in fixed partial dentures (FPDs) are the weakest areas and responsible for failure in most cases. Optimizing the design of connectors will lead to higher strength and better performance of all-ceramic FPDs. The aim of this study was to use the finite element method in order to simulate the effect of connector width on stress distribution in all-ceramic FPDs. Three 3-dimensional finite element models for a 3-unit FPD made of IPS-Empress 2 representing a lower first molar were created and a static load of 500 N was applied axially at mid pontic area. By choosing three different widths, 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm for connectors, three models I,II, and III for complete assembly of teeth and connectors were created. Maximum stress occurred in the connector area in all models. Compared to model I, stress decreased 24% in model III; so the wider connector lead to lower stress values. Connectors are the most regular area for the fracture in all-ceramic FPDs because of high concentration of stress. Decreasing the width of connector raises the stress and increases the risk for fracture. Also, maximum stress in bridges is less than half of the strength of IPS-Empress2 and no failure is expected for all cases. This in vitro study of 3-unit all ceramicFPDs made with IPS-Empress2 shows that an increase in the width of connector reduces the stress concentration and improves the likelihood of long-term prognosis. Also, IPS-Empress2 can be used in posterior regions in many cases.

  6. Comparison of the linear finite element prediction of deformation and strain of human cancellous bone to 3D digital volume correlation measurements.

    PubMed

    Zauel, R; Yeni, Y N; Bay, B K; Dong, X N; Fyhrie, D P

    2006-02-01

    The mechanical properties of cancellous bone and the biological response of the tissue to mechanical loading are related to deformation and strain in the trabeculae during function. Due to the small size of trabeculae, their motion is difficult to measure. To avoid the need to measure trabecular motions during loading the finite element method has been used to estimate trabecular level mechanical deformation. This analytical approach has been empirically successful in that the analytical models are solvable and their results correlate with the macroscopically measured stiffness and strength of bones. The present work is a direct comparison of finite element predictions to measurements of the deformation and strain at near trabecular level. Using the method of digital volume correlation, we measured the deformation and calculated the strain at a resolution approaching the trabecular level for cancellous bone specimens loaded in uniaxial compression. Smoothed results from linearly elastic finite element models of the same mechanical tests were correlated to the empirical three-dimensional (3D) deformation in the direction of loading with a coefficient of determination as high as 97% and a slope of the prediction near one. However, real deformations in the directions perpendicular to the loading direction were not as well predicted by the analytical models. Our results show, that the finite element modeling of the internal deformation and strain in cancellous bone can be accurate in one direction but that this does not ensure accuracy for all deformations and strains.

  7. Bone stress for a mini-implant close to the roots of adjacent teeth--3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, M; Ueno, S; Okazaki, K; Shimizu, N

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate stress in the bone when an orthodontic mini-implant is close to the roots of adjacent teeth using finite element models (FEMs), and to investigate the causes of the high implant failure rate in the mandible. Four FEMs were used: the implant touches nothing; the implant touches the surface of the periodontal membrane; part of the screw thread is embedded in the periodontal membrane; and the implant touches the root. The effect of cortical bone thickness was evaluated using values of 1, 2 and 3 mm. Maximum stress value and stress distribution on the bone elements was determined. Maximum stress on the bone increased when the mini-implant was close to the root. When the implant touched the root, stress increased to 140 MPa or more, and bone resorption could be predicted. Stress was higher for a cortical bone thickness of 2 mm than for other thicknesses. Cortical bone 2 mm thick had a higher risk for bone resorption. A mandible with an average cortical bone thickness of 2 mm may have a higher risk for implant loosening than a maxilla with the same degree of root proximity, which may be related to the lower success rate in the mandible.

  8. A gauged finite-element potential formulation for accurate inductive and galvanic modelling of 3-D electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S. M.; Farquharson, C. G.; MacLachlan, S. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a new finite-element solution to the potential formulation of the geophysical electromagnetic (EM) problem that explicitly implements the Coulomb gauge, and that accurately computes the potentials and hence inductive and galvanic components, is proposed. The modelling scheme is based on using unstructured tetrahedral meshes for domain subdivision, which enables both realistic Earth models of complex geometries to be considered and efficient spatially variable refinement of the mesh to be done. For the finite-element discretization edge and nodal elements are used for approximating the vector and scalar potentials respectively. The issue of non-unique, incorrect potentials from the numerical solution of the usual incomplete-gauged potential system is demonstrated for a benchmark model from the literature that uses an electric-type EM source, through investigating the interface continuity conditions for both the normal and tangential components of the potential vectors, and by showing inconsistent results obtained from iterative and direct linear equation solvers. By explicitly introducing the Coulomb gauge condition as an extra equation, and by augmenting the Helmholtz equation with the gradient of a Lagrange multiplier, an explicitly gauged system for the potential formulation is formed. The solution to the discretized form of this system is validated for the above-mentioned example and for another classic example that uses a magnetic EM source. In order to stabilize the iterative solution of the gauged system, a block diagonal pre-conditioning scheme that is based upon the Schur complement of the potential system is used. For all examples, both the iterative and direct solvers produce the same responses for the potentials, demonstrating the uniqueness of the numerical solution for the potentials and fixing the problems with the interface conditions between cells observed for the incomplete-gauged system. These solutions of the gauged system also

  9. Dynamic analysis of centrifugal machines rotors supported on ball bearings by combined application of 3D and beam finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, I. V.; Simonovskiy, V. I.; Demianenko, M. M.

    2017-08-01

    This research paper is aimed to investigating rotor dynamics of multistage centrifugal machines with ball bearings by using the computer programs “Critical frequencies of the rotor” and “Forced oscillations of the rotor,” which are implemented the mathematical model based on the use of beam finite elements. Free and forces oscillations of the rotor for the multistage centrifugal oil pump NPS 200-700 are observed by taking into account the analytical dependence of bearing stiffness on rotor speed, which is previously defined on the basis of results’ approximation for the numerical simulation in ANSYS by applying 3D finite elements. The calculations found that characteristic and constrained oscillations of rotor and corresponded to them forms of vibrations, as well as the form of constrained oscillation on the actual frequency for acceptable residual unbalance are determined.

  10. A combined dislocation fan-finite element (DF-FE) method for stress field simulation of dislocations emerging at the free surfaces of 3D elastically anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balusu, K.; Huang, H.

    2017-04-01

    A combined dislocation fan-finite element (DF-FE) method is presented for efficient and accurate simulation of dislocation nodal forces in 3D elastically anisotropic crystals with dislocations intersecting the free surfaces. The finite domain problem is decomposed into half-spaces with singular traction stresses, an infinite domain, and a finite domain with non-singular traction stresses. As such, the singular and non-singular parts of the traction stresses are addressed separately; the dislocation fan (DF) method is introduced to balance the singular traction stresses in the half-spaces while the finite element method (FEM) is employed to enforce the non-singular boundary conditions. The accuracy and efficiency of the DF method is demonstrated using a simple isotropic test case, by comparing it with the analytical solution as well as the FEM solution. The DF-FE method is subsequently used for calculating the dislocation nodal forces in a finite elastically anisotropic crystal, which produces dislocation nodal forces that converge rapidly with increasing mesh resolutions. In comparison, the FEM solution fails to converge, especially for nodes closer to the surfaces.

  11. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  12. Investigating the Mechanical Function of the Cervix during Pregnancy using Finite Element Models derived from High Resolution 3D MRI

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M.; House, M.; Jambawalikar, S.; Zork, N.; Vink, J.; Wapner, R.; Myers, K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is a strong contributor to perinatal mortality, and preterm infants that survive are at risk for long-term morbidities. During most of pregnancy appropriate mechanical function of the cervix is required to maintain the developing fetus in utero. Premature cervical softening and subsequent cervical shortening are hypothesized to cause preterm birth. Presently, there is a lack of understanding of the structural and material factors that influence the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy. In this study we build finite element (FE) models of the pregnant uterus, cervix, and fetal membrane based on magnetic resonance imagining (MRI) data in order to examine the mechanical function of the cervix under the physiologic loading conditions of pregnancy. We calculate the mechanical loading state of the cervix for two pregnant patients: 22 weeks gestational age with a normal cervical length and 28 weeks with a short cervix. We investigate the influence of 1) anatomical geometry 2) cervical material properties, and 3) fetal membrane material properties, including its adhesion properties, on the mechanical loading state of the cervix under physiologically relevant intrauterine pressures. Our study demonstrates that membrane-uterus interaction, cervical material modeling, and membrane mechanical properties are factors that must be deliberately and carefully handled in order to construct a high quality mechanical simulation of pregnancy. PMID:25970655

  13. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics.

  14. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life.

  15. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D’Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate ‘space-frame’ skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics. PMID:18510503

  16. Influence of 3D QCT scan protocol on the QCT-based finite element models of human vertebral cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Engelke, Klaus; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-based finite element (FE) models provide a better prediction of vertebral strength than dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. However, FE models are often created from datasets acquired at different CT scan protocols and it is unclear whether this influences the FE results. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether there was an effect of the CT scan protocol on the FE models. 12 human thoracolumbar vertebrae were scanned on top of a calcium hydroxyapatite calibration phantom using a standard QCT scan protocol - 120kV, 100mAs (PA); and a low dose protocol - 90kV, 150mAs (PB). FE cancellous models with cuboid volume of interest and inhomogeneous nonlinear bone properties were created. Axial compression was simulated. The apparent BMD, modulus and yield strength showed significant differences between the two scan protocols. The apparent BMD, the modulus and yield strength between the two groups were highly linearly correlated. This paper indicated that the FE models created from image datasets acquired at different X-ray tube voltage settings would give significantly different results and this effect could be possibly corrected using a linear correction approach. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Registration of 3-D intraoperative MR images of the brain using a finite-element biomechanical model.

    PubMed

    Ferrant, M; Nabavi, A; Macq, B; Jolesz, F A; Kikinis, R; Warfield, S K

    2001-12-01

    We present a new algorithm for the nonrigid registration of three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) intraoperative image sequences showing brain shift. The algorithm tracks key surfaces of objects (cortical surface and the lateral ventricles) in the image sequence using a deformable surface matching algorithm. The volumetric deformation field of the objects is then inferred from the displacements at the boundary surfaces using a linear elastic biomechanical finite-element model. Two experiments on synthetic image sequences are presented, as well as an initial experiment on intraoperative MR images showing brain shift. The results of the registration algorithm show a good correlation of the internal brain structures after deformation, and a good capability of measuring surface as well as subsurface shift. We measured distances between landmarks in the deformed initial image and the corresponding landmarks in the target scan. Cortical surface shifts of up to 10 mm and subsurface shifts of up to 6 mm were recovered with an accuracy of 1 mm or less and 3 mm or less respectively.

  18. 3-D diffusion tensor MRI anisotropy content-adaptive finite element head model generation for bioelectromagnetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Kim, T S; Kim, Andrew T; Lee, S Y

    2008-01-01

    Realistic finite element (FE) head models have been successfully applied to bioelectromagnetic problems due to a realistic representation of arbitrary head geometry with inclusion of anisotropic material properties. In this paper, we propose a new automatic FE mesh generation scheme to generate a diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) white matter anisotropy content-adaptive FE head model. We term this kind of mesh as wMesh. With this meshing technique, the anisotropic electrical conductivities derived from DT-MRIs can be best incorporated into the model. The influence of the white matter anisotropy on the EEG forward solutions has been studied via our wMesh head models. The scalp potentials computed from the anisotropic wMesh models against those of the isotropic models have been compared. The results describe that there are substantial changes in the scalp electrical potentials between the isotropic and anisotropic models, indicating that the inclusion of the white matter anisotropy is critical for accurate computation of E/MEG forward and inverse solutions. This fully automatic anisotropy-adaptive wMesh meshing scheme could be useful for modeling of individual-specific FE head models with better incorporation of the white matter anisotropic property towards bioelectromagnetic imaging.

  19. Calibration of 3D ALE finite element model from experiments on friction stir welding of lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourment, Lionel; Gastebois, Sabrina; Dubourg, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    In order to support the design of such a complex process like Friction Stir Welding (FSW) for the aeronautic industry, numerical simulation software requires (1) developing an efficient and accurate Finite Element (F.E.) formulation that allows predicting welding defects, (2) properly modeling the thermo-mechanical complexity of the FSW process and (3) calibrating the F.E. model from accurate measurements from FSW experiments. This work uses a parallel ALE formulation developed in the Forge® F.E. code to model the different possible defects (flashes and worm holes), while pin and shoulder threads are modeled by a new friction law at the tool / material interface. FSW experiments require using a complex tool with scroll on shoulder, which is instrumented for providing sensitive thermal data close to the joint. Calibration of unknown material thermal coefficients, constitutive equations parameters and friction model from measured forces, torques and temperatures is carried out using two F.E. models, Eulerian and ALE, to reach a satisfactory agreement assessed by the proper sensitivity of the simulation to process parameters.

  20. Cancer cell mechanics with altered cytoskeletal behavior and substrate effects: A 3D finite element modeling study.

    PubMed

    Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S

    2017-05-23

    A robust computational model of a cancer cell is presented using finite element modeling. The model accurately captures nuances of the various components of the cellular substructure. The role of degradation of cytoskeleton on overall elastic properties of the cancer cell is reported. The motivation for degraded cancer cellular substructure, the cytoskeleton is the observation that the innate mechanics of cytoskeleton is disrupted by various anti-cancer drugs as therapeutic treatments for the destruction of the cancer tumors. We report a significant influence on the degradation of the cytoskeleton on the mechanics of cancer cell. Further, a simulations based study is reported where we evaluate mechanical properties of the cancer cell attached to a variety of substrates. The loading of the cancer cell is less influenced by nature of the substrate, but low modulus substrates such as osteoblasts and hydrogels indicate a significant change in unloading behavior and also the plastic deformation. Overall, softer substrates such as osteoblasts and other bone cells result in a much altered unloading response as well as significant plastic deformation. These substrates are relevant to metastasis wherein certain type of cancers such as prostate and breast cancer cells migrate to the bone and colonize through mesenchymal to epithelial transition. The modeling study presented here is an important first step in the development of strong predictive methodologies for cancer progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Comprehensive 3D Finite Element Model of a Thermoelectric Module Used in a Power Generator: A Transient Performance Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangxi; Yu, Xiong

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric power generator has potential for small-scale and distributed power generation because of its high durability and scalability. It is very important to realize that the transient behavior of thermoelectric modules (TEM) affects a thermoelectric generator's response to dynamic working environments. Traditionally, researchers have used simplified models to describe the behavior of thermoelectric modules. In this paper we propose a comprehensive mathematical model that considers the effect of variations of chemical potential and carrier density, which are ignored by traditional models. Finite element models based on this new model are used to simulate the transient behavior of a thermoelectric module subjected to rapid changes in boundary temperature or working load. Simulation results show that transition times of thermoelectric modules affected by temperature change are much longer than those of modules affected by changes in electrical load resistance. Sudden changes in working temperature cause voltage overshoot of the TEM output, which, however, is not observed in responses to sudden changes of load resistance. Comparisons also show there are significant differences between the behavior of TEM predicted by use of this new comprehensive model and that predicted by use of traditional models, particularly for the high-temperature intrinsic ionization region and the low-temperature weak ionization region. This implies that chemical potential and carrier density variations, which are taken into account by this new model but ignored by traditional models, have major effects on the performance of TEM.

  2. BOPACE 3-D addendum: The Boeing plastic analysis capabilities for 3-dimensional solids using isoparametric finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications and additions incorporated into the BOPACE 3-D program are described. Updates to the program input data formats, error messages, file usage, size limitations, and overlay schematic are included.

  3. A reduced-order model based on the coupled 1D-3D finite element simulations for an efficient analysis of hemodynamics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudah, Eduardo; Rossi, Riccardo; Idelsohn, Sergio; Oñate, Eugenio

    2014-10-01

    A reduced-order model for an efficient analysis of cardiovascular hemodynamics problems using multiscale approach is presented in this work. Starting from a patient-specific computational mesh obtained by medical imaging techniques, an analysis methodology based on a two-step automatic procedure is proposed. First a coupled 1D-3D Finite Element Simulation is performed and the results are used to adjust a reduced-order model of the 3D patient-specific area of interest. Then, this reduced-order model is coupled with the 1D model. In this way, three-dimensional effects are accounted for in the 1D model in a cost effective manner, allowing fast computation under different scenarios. The methodology proposed is validated using a patient-specific aortic coarctation model under rest and non-rest conditions.

  4. High-Fidelity RF Gun Simulations with the Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code Pic3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the first parallel Finite Element 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, Pic3P, for simulations of RF guns and other space-charge dominated beam-cavity interactions. Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations and thus includes space charge, retardation and wakefield effects from first principles. Pic3P uses higher-order Finite Elementmethods on unstructured conformal meshes. A novel scheme for causal adaptive refinement and dynamic load balancing enable unprecedented simulation accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Application to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun is presented.

  5. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  6. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-02-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  7. Development of Femoral Head Interior Supporting Device and 3D Finite Element Analysis of its Application in the Treatment of Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongmin; Ye, Ming; Li, Xinfa; Yang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and perform the 3D finite element analysis of a femoral head interior supporting device (FHISD). Material/Methods The 3D finite element model was developed to analyze the surface load of femoral head and analyze the stress and strain of the femoral neck, using the normal femoral neck, decompressed bone graft, and FHISD-implanted bone graft models. Results The stress in the normal model concentrated around the femoral calcar, with displacement of 0.3556±0.1294 mm. In the decompressed bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the femur calcar and top and lateral sides of femoral head, with the displacement larger than the normal (0.4163±0.1310 mm). In the FHISD-implanted bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the segment below the lesser trochanter superior to the femur, with smaller displacement than the normal (0.1856±0.0118 mm). Conclusions FHISD could effectively maintain the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck. PMID:26010078

  8. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  9. Role of gastrocnemius-soleus muscle in forefoot force transmission at heel rise - A 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Park, Jaeyoung; Park, Seung-Bum; Shim, Victor Phyau-Wui; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-06-26

    The functions of the gastrocnemius-soleus (G-S) complex and other plantar flexor muscles are to stabilize and control major bony joints, as well as to provide primary coordination of the foot during the stance phase of gait. Geometric positioning of the foot and transferring of plantar loads can be adversely affected when muscular control is abnormal (e.g., equinus contracture). Although manipulation of the G-S muscle complex by surgical intervention (e.g., tendo-Achilles lengthening) is believed to be effective in restoring normal plantar load transfer in the foot, there is lack of quantitative data supporting that notion. Thus, the objective of this study is to formulate a three-dimensional musculoskeletal finite element model of the foot to quantify the precise role of the G-S complex in terms of biomechanical response of the foot. The model established corresponds to a muscle-demanding posture during heel rise, with simulated activation of major extrinsic plantar flexors. In the baseline (reference) case, required muscle forces were determined from what would be necessary to generate the targeted resultant ground reaction forces. The predicted plantar load transfer through the forefoot plantar surface, as indicated by plantar pressure distribution, was verified by comparison with experimental observations. This baseline model served as a reference for subsequent parametric analysis, where muscle forces applied by the G-S complex were decreased in a step-wise manner. Adaptive changes of the foot mechanism, in terms of internal joint configurations and plantar stress distributions, in response to altered muscular loads were analyzed. Movements of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as forefoot plantar pressure peaks and pressure distribution under the metatarsal heads (MTHs), were all found to be extremely sensitive to reduction in the muscle load in the G-S complex. A 40% reduction in G-S muscle stabilization can result in dorsal-directed rotations

  10. FEMFLOW3D; a finite-element program for the simulation of three-dimensional aquifers; version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durbin, Timothy J.; Bond, Linda D.

    1998-01-01

    This document also includes model validation, source code, and example input and output files. Model validation was performed using four test problems. For each test problem, the results of a model simulation with FEMFLOW3D were compared with either an analytic solution or the results of an independent numerical approach. The source code, written in the ANSI x3.9-1978 FORTRAN standard, and the complete input and output of an example problem are listed in the appendixes.

  11. 3-D thermal analysis using finite difference technique with finite element model for improved design of components of rocket engine turbomachines for Space Shuttle Main Engine SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Kiho D.; Ip, Shek-Se P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element models were generated and transferred into three-dimensional finite difference models to perform transient thermal analyses for the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump's first stage nozzles and rotor blades. STANCOOL was chosen to calculate the heat transfer characteristics (HTCs) around the airfoils, and endwall effects were included at the intersections of the airfoils and platforms for the steady-state boundary conditions. Free and forced convection due to rotation effects were also considered in hollow cores. Transient HTCs were calculated by taking ratios of the steady-state values based on the flow rates and fluid properties calculated at each time slice. Results are presented for both transient plots and three-dimensional color contour isotherm plots; they were also converted into universal files to be used for FEM stress analyses.

  12. Biomechanical influence of crown-to-implant ratio on stress distribution over internal hexagon short implant: 3-D finite element analysis with statistical test.

    PubMed

    Ramos Verri, Fellippo; Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Oliveira, Guilherme Bérgamo Brandão; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Marques Honório, Heitor; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2015-01-02

    The study of short implants is relevant to the biomechanics of dental implants, and research on crown increase has implications for the daily clinic. The aim of this study was to analyze the biomechanical interactions of a singular implant-supported prosthesis of different crown heights under vertical and oblique force, using the 3-D finite element method. Six 3-D models were designed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 3D 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. Each model was constructed with a mandibular segment of bone block, including an implant supporting a screwed metal-ceramic crown. The crown height was set at 10, 12.5, and 15 mm. The applied force was 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique). We performed an ANOVA statistical test and Tukey tests; p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The increase of crown height did not influence the stress distribution on screw prosthetic (p>0.05) under axial load. However, crown heights of 12.5 and 15 mm caused statistically significant damage to the stress distribution of screws and to the cortical bone (p<0.001) under oblique load. High crown to implant (C/I) ratio harmed microstrain distribution on bone tissue under axial and oblique loads (p<0.001). Crown increase was a possible deleterious factor to the screws and to the different regions of bone tissue.

  13. Can the modeling for simplification of a dental implant surface affect the accuracy of 3D finite element analysis?

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido de Araújo; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess stress/strain of different implant modeling simplifications by 3D-FEA. Three variation of external hexagon implant (Ø3.75 × 10 mm) supporting one molar crown were simulated: A (no threads); B (slightly threads simplification); C (original design). 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique) were applied. Cortical bone was evaluated by maximum principal stress and microstrain qualitatively and quantitatively (ANOVA and Tukey post hoc (p < 0.05)). Higher stress levels (p < 0.05) were observed in model A. Models B and C presented similar stress transmission. It was possible to conclude that slightly simplification should be used for studies evaluating stress transferring for bone tissue.

  14. Mechanical performance of endodontic restorations with prefabricated posts: sensitivity analysis of parameters with a 3D finite element model.

    PubMed

    González-Lluch, Carmen; Pérez-González, Antonio; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo-Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of different parameters of the endodontically restored tooth on its final strength, using in vitro tests and model simulations. However, the differences in the experimental set-up or modelling conditions and the limited number of parameters studied in each case prevent us from obtaining clear conclusions about the relative importance of each parameter. In this study, a validated 3D biomechanical model of the restored tooth was used for an exhaustive sensitivity analysis. The individual influence of 20 different parameters on the mechanical performance of an endodontic restoration with prefabricated posts was studied. The results bring up the remarkable importance of the loading angle on the final restoration strength. Flexural loads are more critical than compressive or tensile loads. Young's modulus of the post and its length and diameter are the most influential parameters for strength, whereas other parameters such as ferrule geometry or core and crown characteristics are less significant.

  15. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  16. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  17. Non-invasive measurement of cholesterol in human blood by impedance technique: an investigation by 3D finite element field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, Ekaterina; Khan, Sanowar

    2013-06-01

    This paper concerns detection of particle concentration (e.g. cholesterol) in conductive media (e.g. human blood) by impedance technique. The technique is based on changes in the impedance measurement across a given conducting medium due to changes in the particle concentration. The impedance is calculated by calculating the current through the conducting media produced by electric field distribution between two electrodes. This is done by modelling and computation of 3D electric fields between the electrodes for known voltages applied between them using the well-known finite element method (FEM). The complexity of such FE models is attributed to particle distribution, their geometric and material parameters, and their shape and size which can be of many orders of magnitude smaller than the overall problem domain under investigation. This paper overcomes this problem by adopting an effective particle coagulation (aggregation) strategy in FE modelling without significantly affecting the accuracy of field computation.

  18. Modeling and simulation of argon laser iridectomy based on a 3D finite-element method; influence of laser parameters and pathological eye situation on temperature history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apiou-Sbirlea, Gabriela; L'Huillier, Jean P.

    1997-12-01

    A 3D finite element model is developed to study the conduction and convection heat transfer due to an argon laser iridectomy in the human eye. The objective is to explain the appearance of two important postoperative complications reported by ophthalmologists: corneal burns and lens opacities. Contraction burn is studied using simple shot of 1 s in duration, 0.5 mm in size, 0.4 W in power and double laser shot of 0.5 s in duration, 0.5 mm in size, 0.4 W in power and 0.5 s of relaxation time. Iris tissue pyrolisis temperature threshold is included as onset of tissue removal. Two laser spot positions on the iris circumference are considered. The phenomena of cornea and lens overheating for both normal and pathological human eyes are presented and discussed.

  19. In vitro assessment of Function Graded (FG) artificial Hip joint stem in terms of bone/cement stresses: 3D Finite Element (FE) study.

    PubMed

    Al-Jassir, Fawzi F; Fouad, H; Alothman, Othaman Y

    2013-01-16

    Stress shielding in the cemented hip prosthesis occurs due to the mismatching in the mechanical properties of metallic stem and bone. This mismatching in properties is considered as one of the main reasons for implant loosening. Therefore, a new stem material in orthopedic surgery is still required. In the present study, 3D finite element modeling is used for evaluating the artificial hip joint stem that is made of Function Graded (FG) material in terms of joint stress distributions and stem length. 3D finite element models of different stems made of two types of FG materials and traditional stems made of Cobalt Chromium alloy (CoCrMo) and Titanium alloy (Ti) were developed using the ANSYS Code. The effects on the total artificial hip joint stresses (Shear stress and Von Mises stresses at bone cement, Von Mises stresses at bone and stem) due to using the proposed FG materials stems were investigated. The effects on the total artificial hip joint system stresses due to using different stem lengths were investigated. Using FG stem (with low stiffness at stem distal end and high stiffness at its proximal end) resulted in a significant reduction in shear stress at the bone cement/stem interface. Also, the Von Mises stresses at the bone cement and stem decrease significantly when using FG material instead of CoCrMo and Ti alloy. The stresses' distribution along the bone cement length when using FG material was found to be more uniform along the whole bone cement compared with other stem materials. These more uniform stresses will help in the reduction of the artificial hip joint loosening rate and improve its short and long term performance. FE results showed that using FG stem increases the resultant stresses at the femur bone (reduces stress shielding) compared to metallic stem. The results showed that the stem length has significant effects on the resultant shear and Von Mises stresses at bone, stem and bone cement for all types of stem materials.

  20. Modelling the oscillations of the thermocline in a lake by means of a fully consistent and conservative 3D finite-element model with a vertically adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delandmeter, Philippe; Lambrechts, Jonathan; Vallaeys, Valentin; Naithani, Jaya; Remacle, Jean-François; Legat, Vincent; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Vertical discretisation is crucial in the modelling of lake thermocline oscillations. For finite element methods, a simple way to increase the resolution close to the oscillating thermocline is to use vertical adaptive coordinates. With an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation, the mesh can be adapted to increase the resolution in regions with strong shear or stratification. In such an application, consistency and conservativity must be strictly enforced. SLIM 3D, a discontinuous-Galerkin finite element model for shallow-water flows (www.climate.be/slim, e.g. Kärnä et al., 2013, Delandmeter et al., 2015), was designed to be strictly consistent and conservative in its discrete formulation. In this context, special care must be paid to the coupling of the external and internal modes of the model and the moving mesh algorithm. In this framework, the mesh can be adapted arbitrarily in the vertical direction. Two moving mesh algorithms were implemented: the first one computes an a-priori optimal mesh; the second one diffuses vertically the mesh (Burchard et al., 2004, Hofmeister et al., 2010). The criteria used to define the optimal mesh and the diffusion function are related to a suitable measure of shear and stratification. We will present in detail the design of the model and how the consistency and conservativity is obtained. Then we will apply it to both idealised benchmarks and the wind-forced thermocline oscillations in Lake Tanganyika (Naithani et al. 2002). References Tuomas Kärnä, Vincent Legat and Eric Deleersnijder. A baroclinic discontinuous Galerkin finite element model for coastal flows, Ocean Modelling, 61:1-20, 2013. Philippe Delandmeter, Stephen E Lewis, Jonathan Lambrechts, Eric Deleersnijder, Vincent Legat and Eric Wolanski. The transport and fate of riverine fine sediment exported to a semi-open system. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 167:336-346, 2015. Hans Burchard and Jean-Marie Beckers. Non-uniform adaptive vertical grids in

  1. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  2. 3-D finite-difference, finite-element, discontinuous-Galerkin and spectral-element schemes analysed for their accuracy with respect to P-wave to S-wave speed ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Galis, Martin; Chaljub, Emmanuel; Etienne, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    We analyse 13 3-D numerical time-domain explicit schemes for modelling seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion for their behaviour with a varying P-wave to S-wave speed ratio (VP/VS). The second-order schemes include three finite-difference, three finite-element and one discontinuous-Galerkin schemes. The fourth-order schemes include three finite-difference and two spectral-element schemes. All schemes are second-order in time. We assume a uniform cubic grid/mesh and present all schemes in a unified form. We assume plane S-wave propagation in an unbounded homogeneous isotropic elastic medium. We define relative local errors of the schemes in amplitude and the vector difference in one time step and normalize them for a unit time. We also define the equivalent spatial sampling ratio as a ratio at which the maximum relative error is equal to the reference maximum error. We present results of the extensive numerical analysis. We theoretically (i) show how a numerical scheme sees the P and S waves if the VP/VS ratio increases, (ii) show the structure of the errors in amplitude and the vector difference and (iii) compare the schemes in terms of the truncation errors of the discrete approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives. We find that four of the tested schemes have errors in amplitude almost independent on the VP/VS ratio. The homogeneity of the approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives in terms of the coefficients of the leading terms of their truncation errors as well as the absolute values of the coefficients are key factors for the behaviour of the schemes with increasing VP/VS ratio. The dependence of the errors in the vector difference on the VP/VS ratio should be accounted for by a proper (sufficiently dense) spatial sampling.

  3. DynEarthSol3D: An Efficient and Flexible Unstructured Finite Element Method to Study Long-Term Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Choi, E.; Lavier, L. L.; Calo, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many tectonic problems treat the lithosphere as a compressible elastic material, which can also flow viscously or break in a brittle fashion depending on the stress level applied and the temperature conditions. We present a flexible methodology to address the resulting complex material response, which imposes severe challenges on the discretization and rheological models used. This robust, adaptive, multidimensional, finite element method solves the momentum balance and the heat equation in Lagrangian form with unstructured simplicial mesh (triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D). The mesh locking problem is avoided by using averaged volumetric strain rate to update the stress. The solver uses contingent mesh adaptivity in places where shear strain is focused (localization) during remeshing. A simple scheme of mesh coarsening is employed to prevent tiny elements during remeshing. Lagrangian markers are used to track multiple compositions of rocks. The code is parallelized via OpenMP with graph coloring. We detail the solver and verify it in a number of benchmark problems against analytic and numerical solutions from the literature.

  4. In vitro assessment of Function Graded (FG) artificial Hip joint stem in terms of bone/cement stresses: 3D Finite Element (FE) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress shielding in the cemented hip prosthesis occurs due to the mismatching in the mechanical properties of metallic stem and bone. This mismatching in properties is considered as one of the main reasons for implant loosening. Therefore, a new stem material in orthopedic surgery is still required. In the present study, 3D finite element modeling is used for evaluating the artificial hip joint stem that is made of Function Graded (FG) material in terms of joint stress distributions and stem length. Method 3D finite element models of different stems made of two types of FG materials and traditional stems made of Cobalt Chromium alloy (CoCrMo) and Titanium alloy (Ti) were developed using the ANSYS Code. The effects on the total artificial hip joint stresses (Shear stress and Von Mises stresses at bone cement, Von Mises stresses at bone and stem) due to using the proposed FG materials stems were investigated. The effects on the total artificial hip joint system stresses due to using different stem lengths were investigated. Results Using FG stem (with low stiffness at stem distal end and high stiffness at its proximal end) resulted in a significant reduction in shear stress at the bone cement/stem interface. Also, the Von Mises stresses at the bone cement and stem decrease significantly when using FG material instead of CoCrMo and Ti alloy. The stresses’ distribution along the bone cement length when using FG material was found to be more uniform along the whole bone cement compared with other stem materials. These more uniform stresses will help in the reduction of the artificial hip joint loosening rate and improve its short and long term performance. Conclusion FE results showed that using FG stem increases the resultant stresses at the femur bone (reduces stress shielding) compared to metallic stem. The results showed that the stem length has significant effects on the resultant shear and Von Mises stresses at bone, stem and bone cement for all types

  5. 3-D finite element analysis of the influence of synovial condition in sacroiliac joint on the load transmission in human pelvic system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dufang; Wang, Fang; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Xiaoqin; Wang, Qiugen

    2014-06-01

    The anterior part of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a synovial joint, with little gliding and rotary movement between the contact surfaces of SIJ during locomotion. Due to its complex structure, especially when considering the surrounding ligaments, it is difficult to construct an accurate three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model for the human pelvis. Most of the pelvic models in the previous studies were simplified with either SIJ fusing together or without the sacral bone. However, the influence of those simplifications on the load transmission in human pelvis has not been studied, so the reliability of those studies remains unclear. In this study, two 3-D pelvic models were constructed: an SIJ fusing model and an SIJ contacting model. In the SIJ fusing model, the SIJ interfaces were fused together. In the SIJ contacting model, the SIJ interfaces were just in contact with each other without fusion. Compared with the SIJ contacting model, the SIJ fusing model have smaller movements in the SIJ. The stress distribution area in the SIJ fusing model on sacroiliac cartilages was also different. Those differences contributed to the decline of tensile force in the SIJ surrounding ligaments and the re-distribution of stress in the pelvic bones. In addition, the SIJ fusing model was far less sensitive to the increase in modulus of the sacroiliac cartilages, and decrease in stiffness of the ligaments surrounding the SIJ. The presence of synovia in the SIJ had greater influence on the load transmission in the human pelvic system. Therefore, the effect of the presence of synovia should not be neglected when the biomechanical behavior of human pelvis is being studied, especially for those studies related to clinical applications.

  6. Comparison of the biomechanical 3D efficiency of different brace designs for the treatment of scoliosis using a finite element model

    PubMed Central

    Clin, Julien; Parent, Stefan; Sangole, Archana; Labelle, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    The biomechanical influence of thoraco-lumbo-sacral bracing, a commonly employed treatment in scoliosis, is still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the immediate corrections generated by different virtual braces using a patient-specific finite element model (FEM) and to analyze the most influential design factors. The 3D geometry of three patients presenting different types of curves was acquired with a multi-view X-ray technique and surface topography. A personalized FEM of the patients’ trunk and a parametric model of a virtual custom-fit brace were then created. The installation of the braces on the patients was simulated. The influence of 15 design factors on the 3D correction generated by the brace was evaluated following a design of experiments simulation protocol allowing computing the main and two-way interaction effects of the design factors. A total of 12,288 different braces were tested. Results showed a great variability of the braces effectiveness. Of the 15 design factors investigated, according to the 2 modalities chosen for each one, the 5 most influential design factors were the position of the brace opening (posterior vs. anterior), the strap tension, the trochanter extension side, the lordosis design and the rigid shell shape. The position of the brace opening modified the correction mechanism. The trochanter extension position influenced the efficiency of the thoracic and lumbar pads by modifying their lever arm. Increasing the strap tension improved corrections of coronal curves. The lordosis design had an influence in the sagittal plane but not in the coronal plane. This study could help to better understand the brace biomechanics and to rationalize and optimize their design. PMID:20094736

  7. A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations simulating dynamic pulse buckling tests of cylindrical shells under axial impact

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1993-08-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the study is to compare the performance of the various analysis codes and element types with respect to a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry.

  8. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Tooth Restored with High Performance Polymer PEKK Post-Core System: A 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Sun; Shin, Joo-Hee; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Won-Chang; Shin, Sang-Wan; Lee, Jeong-Yol

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior and long-term safety of high performance polymer PEKK as an intraradicular dental post-core material through comparative finite element analysis (FEA) with other conventional post-core materials. A 3D FEA model of a maxillary central incisor was constructed. A cyclic loading force of 50 N was applied at an angle of 45° to the longitudinal axis of the tooth at the palatal surface of the crown. For comparison with traditionally used post-core materials, three materials (gold, fiberglass, and PEKK) were simulated to determine their post-core properties. PEKK, with a lower elastic modulus than root dentin, showed comparably high failure resistance and a more favorable stress distribution than conventional post-core material. However, the PEKK post-core system showed a higher probability of debonding and crown failure under long-term cyclic loading than the metal or fiberglass post-core systems.

  9. Simulation of hip fracture in sideways fall using a 3D finite element model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified representation of whole body.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2007-12-01

    Hip fractures due to sideways falls are a worldwide health problem, especially among the elderly population. The objective of this study was to simulate a real life sideways fall leading to hip fracture. To achieve this a computed tomography (CT) scan based three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the pelvis-femur complex was developed using a wide range of mechanical properties in the bone of the complex. For impact absorption through large deformation, surrounding soft tissue was also included in the FE model from CT scan data. To incorporate the inertia effect, the whole body was represented by a spring-mass-dashpot system. For trochanteric soft tissue thickness of 14 mm, body weight of 77.47 kg and average hip impact velocity of 3.17 m/s, this detailed FE model could approximately simulate a sideways fall configuration and examine femoral fracture situation. At the contact surface, the peak impact load was 8331 N. In spite of the presence of 14 mm thick trochanteric soft tissue, within the trochanteric zone the most compressive peak principal strain was 3.5% which exceeds ultimate compressive strain. The modeled trochanteric fracture was consistent with clinical findings and with the findings of previous studies. Further, this detailed FE model may be used to find the effect of trochanteric soft tissue thickness variations on peak impact force, peak strain in sideways fall, and to simulate automobile side impact and backward fall situations.

  10. Effects of body configuration on pelvic injury in backward fall simulation using 3D finite element models of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2009-07-22

    Injuries due to backward fall apart from sideways fall are a major health problem, particularly among the aged populations. The objectives of this study was to evaluate the responses to changing body configurations (angle between the trunk and impacting floor as 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 45 degrees and 80 degrees) during backward fall, based on a previously developed CT-scan-derived 3D non-linear and non-homogeneous finite element (FE) model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified biomechanical representation of the whole body. Under constant impact energy, these FE models evaluated the pelvic injury situations on the basis of peak impact force (7.64-16.74 kN) and peak principal compressive strain (more than 1.5%), consistent with the clinically observed injuries (sacral insufficiency, coccydynia). Also the change in location of peak strain and increase in peak impact force for changing configurations from 0 degrees to 80 degrees indicated the effect of whole body inertia during backward fall. It was also concluded that the inclusion of sacro-iliac and acetabular cartilages in the above FE models will further reduce above findings marginally (9.2% for 15 degrees fall). These quantifications would also be helpful for a better design and development of safety structures such as safety floor for the nursing home or home for the aged persons.

  11. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Tooth Restored with High Performance Polymer PEKK Post-Core System: A 3D Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joo-Hee; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Won-Chang; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior and long-term safety of high performance polymer PEKK as an intraradicular dental post-core material through comparative finite element analysis (FEA) with other conventional post-core materials. A 3D FEA model of a maxillary central incisor was constructed. A cyclic loading force of 50 N was applied at an angle of 45° to the longitudinal axis of the tooth at the palatal surface of the crown. For comparison with traditionally used post-core materials, three materials (gold, fiberglass, and PEKK) were simulated to determine their post-core properties. PEKK, with a lower elastic modulus than root dentin, showed comparably high failure resistance and a more favorable stress distribution than conventional post-core material. However, the PEKK post-core system showed a higher probability of debonding and crown failure under long-term cyclic loading than the metal or fiberglass post-core systems. PMID:28386547

  12. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  13. 3D numerical simulation for the transient electromagnetic field excited by the central loop based on the vector finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Zeng, S. H.

    2011-12-01

    Based on the principle of abnormal field algorithms, Helmholtz equations for electromagnetic field have been deduced. We made the electric field Helmholtz equation the governing equation, and derived the corresponding system of vector finite element method equations using the Galerkin method. For solving the governing equation using the vector finite element method, we divided the computing domain into homogenous brick elements, and used Whitney-type vector basis functions. After obtaining the electric field's anomaly field in the Laplace domain using the vector finite element method, we used the Gaver-Stehfest algorithm to transform the electric field's anomaly field to the time domain, and obtained the impulse response of magnetic field's anomaly field through the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction. By comparing 1D analytic solutions of quasi-H-type geoelectric models, the accuracy of the vector finite element method is tested. For the low resistivity brick geoelectric model, the plot shape of electromotive force computed using the vector finite element method coincides with that of the integral equation method and finite difference in time domain solutions.

  14. Development of a 3D finite element acoustic model to predict the sound reduction index of stud based double-leaf walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, A.; Wang, C. J.; Yahiaoui, K.; Mynors, D. J.; Morgan, T.; Nguyen, V. B.; English, M.

    2014-11-01

    Building standards incorporating quantitative acoustical criteria to ensure adequate sound insulation are now being implemented. Engineers are making great efforts to design acoustically efficient double-wall structures. Accordingly, efficient simulation models to predict the acoustic insulation of double-leaf wall structures are needed. This paper presents the development of a numerical tool that can predict the frequency dependent sound reduction index R of stud based double-leaf walls at one-third-octave band frequency range. A fully vibro-acoustic 3D model consisting of two rooms partitioned using a double-leaf wall, considering the structure and acoustic fluid coupling incorporating the existing fluid and structural solvers are presented. The validity of the finite element (FE) model is assessed by comparison with experimental test results carried out in a certified laboratory. Accurate representation of the structural damping matrix to effectively predict the R values are studied. The possibilities of minimising the simulation time using a frequency dependent mesh model was also investigated. The FEA model presented in this work is capable of predicting the weighted sound reduction index Rw along with A-weighted pink noise C and A-weighted urban noise Ctr within an error of 1 dB. The model developed can also be used to analyse the acoustically induced frequency dependent geometrical behaviour of the double-leaf wall components to optimise them for best acoustic performance. The FE modelling procedure reported in this paper can be extended to other building components undergoing fluid-structure interaction (FSI) to evaluate their acoustic insulation.

  15. 3D-Finite-Element Modelling of Coseismic and Postseismic Coulomb Stress Changes on Intra-Continental Dip-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, M.; Hampel, A.

    2015-12-01

    Investigating the interaction of faults plays a crucial role for assessing seismic hazard. The calculation of Coulomb stress changes allows quantifying stress changes on so-called receiver faults in the surrounding of a source fault that was ruptured during an earthquake. Positive Coulomb stress changes bring receiver faults closer to failure, while a negative value indicates a delay of the next earthquake. Besides the coseismic ('static') stress changes, postseismic ('transient') stress changes induced by postseismic relaxation occur. Here we use 3D finite-element models with arrays of normal or thrust faults to study the coseismic stress changes and the stress changes arising from postseismic relaxation in the lower crust. The results show that synthetic receiver faults in the hanging wall and footwall of the source fault exhibit a symmetric distribution of the coseismic Coulomb stress changes on each fault, with large areas of negative stress changes but also some smaller areas of positive values. In contrast, faults positioned in along-strike prolongation of the source fault and outside of its hanging wall and footwall undergo mostly positive stress changes. Postseismic stress changes caused by viscous flow modify the static stress changes in a way that the net Coulomb stress changes on the receiver faults change significantly through space and time. Our models also allow deciphering the combined effect of stress changes caused by the ongoing extension or shortening (leading to an interseismic stress increase) and by the postseismic relaxation (leading to stress increase or decrease). Depending on the viscosity and the dip and position of the receiver fault, stress changes induced by postseismic relaxation can outweigh the interseismic stress increase such that negative Coulomb stress changes can persist for decades. On other faults, the interseismic stress increase is further increased by postseismic relaxation.

  16. 3D-Finite-Element Modelling of Coseismic and Postseismic Coulomb Stress Changes on Intra-Continental Dip-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, M.; Hampel, A.

    2014-12-01

    Investigating the interaction of faults plays a crucial role for assessing seismic hazard. The calculation of Coulomb stress changes allows quantifying stress changes on so-called receiver faults in the surrounding of a source fault that was ruptured during an earthquake. Positive Coulomb stress changes bring receiver faults closer to failure, while a negative value indicates a delay of the next earthquake. Besides the coseismic ('static') stress changes, postseismic ('transient') stress changes induced by postseismic relaxation occur. Here we use 3D finite-element models with arrays of normal or thrust faults to study the coseismic stress changes and the stress changes arising from postseismic relaxation in the lower crust. The results show that synthetic receiver faults in the hanging wall and footwall of the source fault exhibit a symmetric distribution of the coseismic Coulomb stress changes on each fault, with large areas of negative stress changes but also some smaller areas of positive values. In contrast, faults positioned in along-strike prolongation of the source fault and outside of its hanging wall and footwall undergo mostly positive stress changes. Postseismic stress changes caused by viscous flow modify the static stress changes in a way that the net Coulomb stress changes on the receiver faults change significantly through space and time. Our models also allow deciphering the combined effect of stress changes caused by the ongoing extension or shortening (leading to an interseismic stress increase) and by the postseismic relaxation (leading to stress increase or decrease). Depending on the viscosity and the dip and position of the receiver fault, stress changes induced by postseismic relaxation can outweigh the interseismic stress increase such that negative Coulomb stress changes can persist for decades. On other faults, the interseismic stress increase is further increased by postseismic relaxation.

  17. Effect of fibre posts, bone losses and fibre content on the biomechanical behaviour of endodontically treated teeth: 3D-finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Pagano, Stefano; Cianetti, Stefano; Lombardo, Guido; Kenny, José M; Torre, Luigi

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the stress distribution inside endodontically treated teeth restored with different posts (glass fibre, carbon fibre and steel posts) under different loading conditions by using a 3D-finite element analysis. The effect of masticatory and impact forces on teeth with different degrees of bone loss was analysed. The model consists of: dentine, post, cement, gutta-percha, core and crown. Four simulations were conducted with two static forces (170N horizontal and 100N oblique) and two sections constrained: 1mm (alveolar bone position in a normal periodontium) and 6mm (middle of root) below the crown. Von Mises and the principal stresses were evaluated and analysed with a 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05) and the effect of fibre percentage analysed. Significant differences were found among the stress values for all conditions (p<0.05). Impact load was always responsible for the most critical situation especially when the bone loss was more evident. The system with steel posts showed the highest principal stresses at the post-cement interface with horizontal load and top constraints (compressive stress of 121MPa and tensile stress of 115MPa). The use of glass posts provides a more homogeneous behaviour of the system with lower stresses. Higher fibre percentages gave higher stress in the posts. Moreover, larger bone losses are responsible for important increase in stress. Thus, this work demonstrated that periodontal disease has an important role in the success of tooth restoration after endodontic therapy, influencing the choice of post material and depth.

  18. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  19. A comparison of 1D analytical model and 3D finite element analysis with experiments for a rosen-type piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Boukazouha, F; Poulin-Vittrant, G; Tran-Huu-Hue, L P; Bavencoffe, M; Boubenider, F; Rguiti, M; Lethiecq, M

    2015-07-01

    This article is dedicated to the study of Piezoelectric Transformers (PTs), which offer promising solutions to the increasing need for integrated power electronics modules within autonomous systems. The advantages offered by such transformers include: immunity to electromagnetic disturbances; ease of miniaturisation for example, using conventional micro fabrication processes; and enhanced performance in terms of voltage gain and power efficiency. Central to the adequate description of such transformers is the need for complex analytical modeling tools, especially if one is attempting to include combined contributions due to (i) mechanical phenomena owing to the different propagation modes which differ at the primary and secondary sides of the PT; and (ii) electrical phenomena such as the voltage gain and power efficiency, which depend on the electrical load. The present work demonstrates an original one-dimensional (1D) analytical model, dedicated to a Rosen-type PT and simulation results are successively compared against that of a three-dimensional (3D) Finite Element Analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics software) and experimental results. The Rosen-type PT studied here is based on a single layer soft PZT (P191) with corresponding dimensions 18 mm × 3 mm × 1.5 mm, which operated at the second harmonic of 176 kHz. Detailed simulational and experimental results show that the presented 1D model predicts experimental measurements to within less than 10% error of the voltage gain at the second and third resonance frequency modes. Adjustment of the analytical model parameters is found to decrease errors relative to experimental voltage gain to within 1%, whilst a 2.5% error on the output admittance magnitude at the second resonance mode were obtained. Relying on the unique assumption of one-dimensionality, the present analytical model appears as a useful tool for Rosen-type PT design and behavior understanding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  1. Numerical integration of structural elements in NIKE3D and DYNA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maker, B. N.; Whirley, R. G.; Engelmann, B. E.

    1992-08-01

    The beam and shell elements found in many linear elastic finite element codes accept integrated cross sectional properties as input, and produce solutions using classical beam and shell theory. These theories are built upon the equation of resultant forces and moments with integrals of assumed stress distributions over the cross section. In contrast, the structural elements in NIKE3D and DYNA3D are formulated to represent nonlinear geometric and material behavior. Thus stress distributions may not necessarily be representable by simple functions of cross section variables. In NIKE3D and DYNA3D, the Hughes-Liu beam element and all shell elements accommodate these more general stress distributions by computing stresses at various points in the cross section. The integration of stresses within each element is then performed numerically, using a variety of methods. This report describes these numerical integration procedures in detail, and highlights their application to engineering problems. Several other features of the structural elements are also described, including force and moment resultants, user-defined reference surfaces, and user-defined integration rules. Finally, the shear correction factor is described in a section which relates results from NIKE3D and DYNA3D to those obtained from classical beam theory.

  2. A penetration-based finite element method for hyperelastic 3D biphasic tissues in contact: Part 1--Derivation of contact boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Un, Kerem; Spilker, Robert L

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we extend the penetration method, previously introduced to simulate contact of linear hydrated tissues in an efficient manner with the finite element method, to problems of nonlinear biphasic tissues in contact. This paper presents the derivation of contact boundary conditions for a biphasic tissue with hyperelastic solid phase using experimental kinematics data. Validation of the method for calculating these boundary conditions is demonstrated using a canonical biphasic contact problem. The method is then demonstrated on a shoulder joint model with contacting humerus and glenoid tissues. In both the canonical and shoulder examples, the resulting boundary conditions are found to satisfy the kinetic continuity requirements of biphasic contact. These boundary conditions represent input to a three-dimensional nonlinear biphasic finite element analysis; details of that finite element analysis will be presented in a manuscript to follow.

  3. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  4. Modeling the steady-state ISV (in situ vitrification) process: A 3-D finite element analysis of coupled thermal-electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Langerman, M.A.

    1990-09-01

    Steady-state modeling considerations for simulating the in situ vitrification (ISV) process are documented based upon the finite element numerical approach. Recommendations regarding boundary condition specifications and mesh discretization are presented. The effects of several parameters on the ISV process response are calculated and the results discussed. The parameters investigated include: (1) electrode depth, (2) ambient temperature, (3) supplied current, (4) electrical conductivity, (5) electrode separation, and (6) soil/waste characterization. 13 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

  5. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  6. A stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent non-Newtonian fluids: 3D benchmark problems and application to blood flow in bifurcating arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwack, JaeHyuk; Masud, Arif

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a stabilized mixed finite element method for shear-rate dependent fluids. The nonlinear viscosity field is a function of the shear-rate and varies uniformly in space and in time. The stabilized form is developed via application of Variational Multiscale (VMS) framework to the underlying generalized Navier-Stokes equation. Linear and quadratic tetrahedral and hexahedral elements are employed with equal-order interpolations for the velocity and pressure fields. A variety of benchmark problems are solved to assess the stability and accuracy properties of the resulting method. The method is then applied to non-Newtonian shear-rate dependent flows in bifurcating artery geometry, and significant non-Newtonian fluid effects are observed. A comparative study of the proposed method shows that the additional computational costs due to the nonlinear shear-rate dependent viscosity are only ten percent more than the computational cost for a Newtonian model.

  7. A new 3-D finite-element model based on thin-film approximation for microelectrode array recording of extracellular action potential.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Céline; Glière, Alain; Barbier, Daniel; Joucla, Sebastien; Yvert, Blaise; Mailley, Pascal; Guillemaud, Régis

    2008-02-01

    A transient finite-element model has been developed to simulate an extracellular action potential recording in a tissue slice by a planar microelectrode array. The thin-film approximation of the active neuron membrane allows the simulation within single finite-element software of the intracellular and extracellular potential fields. In comparison with a compartmental neuron model, it is shown that the thin-film approximation-based model is able to properly represent the neuron bioelectrical behavior in terms of transmembrane current and potential. Moreover, the model is able to simulate extracellular action potential recordings with properties similar to those observed in biological experiments. It is demonstrated that an ideal measurement system model can be used to represent the recording microelectrode, provided that the electronic recording system adapts to the electrode-tissue interface impedance. By comparing it with a point source approximated neuron, it is also shown that the neuron three-dimensional volume should be taken into account to simulate the extracellular action potential recording. Finally, the influence of the electrode size on the signal amplitude is evaluated. This parameter, together with the microelectrode noise, should be taken into account in order to optimize future microelectrode designs in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  9. On the importance of 3D, geometrically accurate, and subject-specific finite element analysis for evaluation of in-vivo soft tissue loads.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Kevin M; van Vijven, Marc; Solis, Leandro R; van Haaften, Eline E; Loenen, Arjan C Y; Mushahwar, Vivian K; Oomens, Cees W J

    2017-04-01

    Pressure ulcers are a type of local soft tissue injury due to sustained mechanical loading and remain a common issue in patient care. People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are especially at risk of pressure ulcers due to impaired mobility and sensory perception. The development of load improving support structures relies on realistic tissue load evaluation e.g. using finite element analysis (FEA). FEA requires realistic subject-specific mechanical properties and geometries. This study focuses on the effect of geometry. MRI is used for the creation of geometrically accurate models of the human buttock for three able-bodied volunteers and three volunteers with SCI. The effect of geometry on observed internal tissue deformations for each subject is studied by comparing FEA findings for equivalent loading conditions. The large variations found between subjects confirms the importance of subject-specific FEA.

  10. Mechanical characterisation of in vivo human skin using a 3D force-sensitive micro-robot and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cormac; Taberner, Andrew; Nielsen, Poul

    2011-02-01

    The complex mechanical properties of skin have been the subject of much study in recent years. Several experimental methods developed to measure the mechanical properties of skin in vivo, such as suction or torsion, are unable to measure skin's anisotropic characteristics. An experiment characterising the mechanical properties of in vivo human skin using a novel force-sensitive micro-robot is presented. The micro-robot applied in-plane deformations to the anterior forearm and the posterior upper arm. The behaviour of the skin in each area is highly nonlinear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic. The response of the upper arm skin is very dependent on the orientation of the arm. A finite element model consisting of an Ogden strain energy function and quasi-linear viscoelasticity was developed to simulate the experiments. An orthogonal initial stress field, representing the in vivo skin tension, was used as an additional model parameter. The model simulated the experiments accurately with an error-of-fit of 17.5% for the anterior lower forearm area, 6.5% for the anterior upper forearm and 9.3% for the posterior upper arm. The maximum in vivo tension in each area determined by the model was 6.2 Nm(-1) in the anterior lower forearm, 11.4 Nm(-1) in anterior upper forearm and 5.6 Nm(-1) in the posterior upper arm. The results also show that a finite element model with a neo-Hookean strain energy function cannot simulate the experiments with the same accuracy.

  11. Stress distribution on a three-unit implant-supported zirconia framework. A 3D finite element analysis and fatigue test

    PubMed Central

    SANNINO, G.; POZZI, A.; SCHIAVETTI, R.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate, by finite element analysis (FEA) and fatigue analysis, the influence of different loading conditions on the stress distribution in a 3-unit implant-supported Y-TZP fixed partial denture (FPD). Material and methods A three-dimensional FEM model was developed. The materials used in this study were assumed to be linearly elastic, homogeneous and isotropic. 100 N and 300 N loads over a 0,5 mm2 areas with different angles (0°, 15° and 35°) and locations were applied on the prosthesis and the distribution of equivalent von Mises stress was investigated. A fatigue analysis was carried out too. Results Maximum stresses were found at the connector region of the framework when the intermediate element is loaded (100 N load pattern: 32,9 MPa, 33 MPa and 51,8 MPa; 300 N load pattern: 98,6 MPa, 102,8 MPa and 155,7 MPa, respectively with 0°, 15° and 35° of inclination). Results confirmed the vulnerability of both connector areas even if just one pillar was loaded with an increase in stress when angle of load inclination is larger. The cyclic fatigue evaluation indicates a strong propensity for fatigue behavior, presenting a considerable range of loading conditions. No fracture fatigue occurred with a 100 N force. A 300 N force applied to the pontic produces no fatigue problems because the load is equally shared by whole system. A 300 N force applied to one of the two pillars, or to both implants generates fatigue problems. Conclusion F.E.M. analysis of a 3-unit implant-supported Y-TZPFPD, give accurate information about loading conditions for clinical success over time. Fatigue analysis results show structural reliability of the Y-TZP as framework material for 3-unit posterior FPDs. PMID:23285401

  12. Evaluation of the effect of the residual bone angulation on implant-supported fixed prosthesis in mandibular posterior edentulism. Part II: 3-D finite element stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Akça, K; Iplikçioğlu, H

    2001-01-01

    Buccolingual angulation of the mandibular posterior edentulous region may affect the prosthetic load conditions, so as to cause high stress concentrated areas that may easily lead to failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various predetermined buccolingual angulation values on stress distribution in the mandibular posterior edentulous region restored with implant-supported fixed partial dentures, using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Stress analyses were performed applying 400N oblique force to implant-supported fixed prosthesis. Stress analyses indicated tensile stress values on the buccal surface and compressive stress values on the lingual surface of cortical bone were increased as the angulation of the edentulous bone increased (especially corresponding to the cervical region of the implants). Compressive stress values, observed where two implants were placed at the second premolar and second molar regions (5-7 design) and first and second molar regions (6-7 design), respectively, were very close to or even exceeded the ultimate compressive strength of bone. It is concluded that when a definite buccolingual angulation is added to other existing risk factors such as bruxism, placing an implant for every missing tooth might reduce the high stress concentration areas.

  13. A Novel Rat Model of Orthodontic Tooth Movement Using Temporary Skeletal Anchorage Devices: 3D Finite Element Analysis and In Vivo Validation.

    PubMed

    Kaipatur, Neelambar; Wu, Yuchin; Adeeb, Samer; Stevenson, Thomas; Major, Paul; Doschak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this animal study was to develop a model of orthodontic tooth movement using a microimplant as a TSAD in rodents. A finite element model of the TSAD in alveolar bone was built using μCT images of rat maxilla to determine the von Mises stresses and displacement in the alveolar bone surrounding the TSAD. For in vivo validation of the FE model, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 25) were used and a Stryker 1.2 × 3 mm microimplant was inserted in the right maxilla and used to protract the right first permanent molar using a NiTi closed coil spring. Tooth movement measurements were taken at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. At 8 weeks, animals were euthanized and tissues were analyzed by histology and EPMA. FE modeling showed maximum von Mises stress of 45 Mpa near the apex of TSAD but the average von Mises stress was under 25 Mpa. Appreciable tooth movement of 0.62 ± 0.04 mm at 4 weeks and 1.99 ± 0.14 mm at 8 weeks was obtained. Histological and EPMA results demonstrated no active bone remodeling around the TSAD at 8 weeks depicting good secondary stability. This study provided evidence that protracted tooth movement is achieved in small animals using TSADs.

  14. The electric field induced in the brain by magnetic stimulation: a 3-D finite-element analysis of the effect of tissue heterogeneity and anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Pedro C; Hallett, Mark; Basser, Peter J

    2003-09-01

    We investigate the effect of tissue heterogeneity and anisotropy on the electric field and current density distribution induced in the brain during magnetic stimulation. Validation of the finite-element (FE) calculations in a homogeneous isotropic sphere showed that the magnitude of the total electric field can be calculated to within an error of approximately 5% in the region of interest, even in the presence of a significant surface charge contribution. We used a high conductivity inclusion within a sphere of lower conductivity to simulate a lesion due to an infarct. Its effect is to increase the electric field induced in the surrounding low conductivity region. This boost is greatest in the vicinity of interfaces that lie perpendicular to the current flow. For physiological values of the conductivity distribution, it can reach a factor of 1.6 and extend many millimeters from the interface. We also show that anisotropy can significantly alter the electric field and current density distributions. Either heterogeneity or anisotropy can introduce a radial electric field component, not present in a homogeneous isotropic conductor. Heterogeneity and anisotropy are predicted to significantly affect the distribution of the electric field induced in the brain. It is, therefore, expected that anatomically faithful FE models of individual brains which incorporate conductivity tensor data derived from diffusion tensor measurements, will provide a better understanding of the location of possible stimulation sites in the brain.

  15. Investigating the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy using finite element models derived from high-resolution 3D MRI.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M; House, M; Jambawalikar, S; Zork, N; Vink, J; Wapner, R; Myers, K

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is a strong contributor to perinatal mortality, and preterm infants that survive are at risk for long-term morbidities. During most of pregnancy, appropriate mechanical function of the cervix is required to maintain the developing fetus in utero. Premature cervical softening and subsequent cervical shortening are hypothesized to cause preterm birth. Presently, there is a lack of understanding of the structural and material factors that influence the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy. In this study we build finite element models of the pregnant uterus, cervix, and fetal membrane based on magnetic resonance imagining data in order to examine the mechanical function of the cervix under the physiologic loading conditions of pregnancy. We calculate the mechanical loading state of the cervix for two pregnant patients: 22 weeks gestational age with a normal cervical length and 28 weeks with a short cervix. We investigate the influence of (1) anatomical geometry, (2) cervical material properties, and (3) fetal membrane material properties, including its adhesion properties, on the mechanical loading state of the cervix under physiologically relevant intrauterine pressures. Our study demonstrates that membrane-uterus interaction, cervical material modeling, and membrane mechanical properties are factors that must be deliberately and carefully handled in order to construct a high quality mechanical simulation of pregnancy.

  16. Analysis of surface deformation patterns using 3D finite element method: A case study in the Skåne area, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiamehr, R.; Sjöberg, L. E.

    2005-05-01

    The application of geodetic techniques to study crustal deformations associated with the geodynamic activity of a region is considered as a fundamental tool in seismic risk mitigation and in earthquake prediction research. In principle, the crustal deformation analysis is a purely geodetic problem as it concerns alteration of the Earth shape, so that deformations of the crust are directly connected with geodetic observables. The Tornquist zone across Skåne in southern Sweden is a classical fault zone that separates the Precambrium gneisses of the Baltic shield in the north from Phanerozoic Europe to the south. In this region, a Global Positioning Network (GPS) was established to study possible crustal motions. The aim of this article is to improve on previous study in to estimate the possible crustal strains and dilation parameters by a finite element analysis. Results show that the areas with maximum shear strain and dilation are located exactly in the active fault zones and their intersections. However, further observations in a dense network as well as integration with geological and geophysical data are needed to fully explore the recent crustal motions over the Tornquist zone.

  17. A Novel Rat Model of Orthodontic Tooth Movement Using Temporary Skeletal Anchorage Devices: 3D Finite Element Analysis and In Vivo Validation

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Thomas; Doschak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this animal study was to develop a model of orthodontic tooth movement using a microimplant as a TSAD in rodents. A finite element model of the TSAD in alveolar bone was built using μCT images of rat maxilla to determine the von Mises stresses and displacement in the alveolar bone surrounding the TSAD. For in vivo validation of the FE model, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 25) were used and a Stryker 1.2 × 3 mm microimplant was inserted in the right maxilla and used to protract the right first permanent molar using a NiTi closed coil spring. Tooth movement measurements were taken at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. At 8 weeks, animals were euthanized and tissues were analyzed by histology and EPMA. FE modeling showed maximum von Mises stress of 45 Mpa near the apex of TSAD but the average von Mises stress was under 25 Mpa. Appreciable tooth movement of 0.62 ± 0.04 mm at 4 weeks and 1.99 ± 0.14 mm at 8 weeks was obtained. Histological and EPMA results demonstrated no active bone remodeling around the TSAD at 8 weeks depicting good secondary stability. This study provided evidence that protracted tooth movement is achieved in small animals using TSADs. PMID:25295060

  18. Implementation of Deterministically-Derived Hydrostatigraphic Units into a 3D Finite Element Model at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mansoor, K; Maley, M; Demir, Z; Hoffman, F

    2001-08-08

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large Superfund site in California that is implementing an extensive ground water remediation program. The site is underlain by a thick sequence of heterogeneous alluvial sediments. Defining ground-water flow pathways in this complex geologic setting is difficult. To better evaluate these pathways, a deterministic approach was applied to define hydrostratigraphic units (HSUS) on the basis of identifiable hydraulic behavior and contaminant migration trends. The conceptual model based on this approach indicates that groundwater flow and contaminant transport occurs within packages of sediments bounded by thin, low-permeability confining layers. To aid in the development of the remediation program, a three-dimensional finite-element model was developed for two of the HSUS at LLNL. The primary objectives of this model are to test the conceptual model with a numerical model, and provide well field management support for the large ground-water remediation system. The model was successfully calibrated to 12 years of ground water flow and contaminant transport data. These results confirm that the thin, low-permeability confining layers within the heterogeneous alluvial sediments are the dominant hydraulic control to flow and transport. This calibrated model is currently being applied to better manage the large site-wide ground water extraction system by optimizing the location of new extraction wells, managing pumping rates for extraction wells, and providing performance estimates for long-term planning and budgeting.

  19. Thermal-stress analysis of ceramic laminate veneer restorations with different incisal preparations using micro-computed tomography-based 3D finite element models.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Alper Tunga; Icer, Esra; Eren, Meltem Mert; Baykasoglu, Cengiz; Mugan, Ata; Yildiz, Esra

    2017-11-01

    Main objective of this study is to investigate the thermal behavior of ceramic laminate veneer restorations of the maxillary central incisor with different incisal preparations such as butt joint and palatinal chamfer using finite element method. In addition, it is also aimed to understand the effect of different thermal loads which simulates hot and cold liquid imbibing in the mouth. Three-dimensional solid models of the sound tooth and prepared veneer restorations were obtained using micro-computed tomography images. Each ceramic veneer restoration was made up of ceramic, luting resin cement and adhesive layer which were generated based on the scanned images using computer-aided design software. Our solid model also included the remaining dental tissues such as periodontal ligament and surrounding cortical and spongy bones. Time-dependent linear thermal analyses were carried out to compare temperature changes and stress distributions of the sound and restored tooth models. The liquid is firstly in contact with the crown area where the maximum stresses were obtained. For the restorations, stresses on palatinal surfaces were found larger than buccal surfaces. Through interior tissues, the effect of thermal load diminished and smaller stress distributions were obtained near pulp and root-dentin regions. We found that the palatinal chamfer restoration presents comparatively larger stresses than the butt joint preparation. In addition, cold thermal loading showed larger temperature changes and stress distributions than those of hot thermal loading independent from the restoration technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress Distribution in Bone and Implants in Mandibular 6-Implant-Supported Cantilevered Fixed Prosthesis: A 3D Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Padhye, Omkar Vinayak; Herekar, Manisha; Patil, Viraj; Mulani, Shahnawaz; Sethi, Megha; Fernandes, Aquaviva

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate by a 3-dimensional finite element analysis the load transmission to periimplant bone by a framework supported by 6 implants placed in an edentulous mandible and to compare the stress distribution for varying cantilever lengths. A computerized model of the anterior segment of a mandible with a 6-implant-supported bridge was created in software. The length of the cantilever segment was considered as 10, 15, and 20 mm. A 150 N load was applied to the terminal point of the cantilever segment, and Von Mises stresses were analyzed along implants, framework, and bone. When the cantilever length was increased from 10 to 20 mm, the stress increased 79.66% in the framework, 68.16% in implants, and 59.96% and 52.81% in cortical and cancellous bones, respectively. The greatest amount of stress was seen around the distal-most region of the distal-most implant. The framework absorbed the maximum amount of stresses followed by the implants, cortical bone, and cancellous bone. Extension of the cantilever beyond 15 mm could lead to greater stress in the lingual cortical plate, which could compromise the integrity of the implants.

  1. Modeling the impact of prostate edema on LDR brachytherapy: a Monte Carlo dosimetry study based on a 3D biphasic finite element biomechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountris, K. A.; Bert, J.; Noailly, J.; Rodriguez Aguilera, A.; Valeri, A.; Pradier, O.; Schick, U.; Promayon, E.; Gonzalez Ballester, M. A.; Troccaz, J.; Visvikis, D.

    2017-03-01

    Prostate volume changes due to edema occurrence during transperineal permanent brachytherapy should be taken under consideration to ensure optimal dose delivery. Available edema models, based on prostate volume observations, face several limitations. Therefore, patient-specific models need to be developed to accurately account for the impact of edema. In this study we present a biomechanical model developed to reproduce edema resolution patterns documented in the literature. Using the biphasic mixture theory and finite element analysis, the proposed model takes into consideration the mechanical properties of the pubic area tissues in the evolution of prostate edema. The model’s computed deformations are incorporated in a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate their effect on post-operative dosimetry. The comparison of Day1 and Day30 dosimetry results demonstrates the capability of the proposed model for patient-specific dosimetry improvements, considering the edema dynamics. The proposed model shows excellent ability to reproduce previously described edema resolution patterns and was validated based on previous findings. According to our results, for a prostate volume increase of 10-20% the Day30 urethra D10 dose metric is higher by 4.2%-10.5% compared to the Day1 value. The introduction of the edema dynamics in Day30 dosimetry shows a significant global dose overestimation identified on the conventional static Day30 dosimetry. In conclusion, the proposed edema biomechanical model can improve the treatment planning of transperineal permanent brachytherapy accounting for post-implant dose alterations during the planning procedure.

  2. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Krisna C.; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry. PMID:25246553

  3. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Krisna C; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-10-21

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry.

  4. Simulation of 3D Resistivity Logging Measurements with a Parallel Implementation of 2D hp-Adaptive Goal-Oriented Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszyński, Maciej; Pardo, David; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2007-09-01

    The paper presents parallel simulations of 3D resistivity logging measurements. These simulations are performed with a new geometry-based formulation with a 2D self-adaptive goal-oriented hp-adaptive strategy combined with a Fourier series expansion in a non-orthogonal system of coordinates. Numerical simulations analyze 3D resistivity effects occuring on deviated wells. We present a parallel implementation based on both domain decomposition and functional decomposition paradigms.

  5. Shell Element Verification & Regression Problems for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E

    2008-02-01

    A series of quasi-static regression/verification problems were developed for the triangular and quadrilateral shell element formulations contained in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's explicit finite element program DYNA3D. Each regression problem imposes both displacement- and force-type boundary conditions to probe the five independent nodal degrees of freedom employed in the targeted formulation. When applicable, the finite element results are compared with small-strain linear-elastic closed-form reference solutions to verify select aspects of the formulations implementation. Although all problems in the suite depict the same geometry, material behavior, and loading conditions, each problem represents a unique combination of shell formulation, stabilization method, and integration rule. Collectively, the thirty-six new regression problems in the test suite cover nine different shell formulations, three hourglass stabilization methods, and three families of through-thickness integration rules.

  6. A 2D magnetic and 3D mechanical coupled finite element model for the study of the dynamic vibrations in the stator of induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.; Belahcen, A.; Detoni, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled Finite Element Model in order to study the vibrations in induction motors under steady-state. The model utilizes a weak coupling strategy between both magnetic and elastodynamic fields on the structure. Firstly, the problem solves the magnetic vector potential in an axial cut and secondly the former solution is coupled to a three dimensional model of the stator. The coupling is performed using projection based algorithms between the computed magnetic solution and the three-dimensional mesh. The three-dimensional model of the stator includes both end-windings and end-shields in order to give a realistic picture of the motor. The present model is validated using two steps. Firstly, a modal analysis hammer test is used to validate the material characteristic of this complex structure and secondly an array of accelerometer sensors is used in order to study the rotating waves using multi-dimensional spectral techniques. The analysis of the radial vibrations presented in this paper firstly concludes that slot harmonic components are visible when the motor is loaded. Secondly, the multidimensional spectrum presents the most relevant mechanical waves on the stator such as the ones produced by the space harmonics or the saturation of the iron core. The direct retrieval of the wave-number in a multi-dimensional spectrum is able to show the internal current distribution in a non-intrusive way. Experimental results for healthy induction motors are showing mechanical imbalances in a multi-dimensional spectrum in a more straightforward form.

  7. Holographic Interferometry based on photorefractive crystal to measure 3D thermo-elastic distortion of composite structures and comparison with finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thizy, C.; Eliot, F.; Ballhause, D.; Olympio, K. R.; Kluge, R.; Shannon, A.; Laduree, G.; Logut, D.; Georges, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    Thermo-elastic distortions of composite structures have been measured by a holographic camera using a BSO photorefractive crystal as the recording medium. The first test campaign (Phase 1) was performed on CFRP struts with titanium end-fittings glued to the tips of the strut. The samples were placed in a vacuum chamber. The holographic camera was located outside the chamber and configured with two illuminations to measure the relative out-of-plane and in-plane (in one direction) displacements. The second test campaign (Phase 2) was performed on a structure composed of a large Silicon Carbide base plate supported by 3 GFRP struts with glued Titanium end-fittings. Thermo-elastic distortions have been measured with the same holographic camera used in phase 1, but four illuminations, instead of two, have been used to provide the three components of displacement. This technique was specially developed and validated during the phase 2 in CSL laboratory. The system has been designed to measure an object size of typically 250x250 mm2; the measurement range is such that the sum of the largest relative displacements in the three measurement directions is maximum 20 μm. The validation of the four-illuminations technique led to measurement uncertainties of 120 nm for the relative in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, 230 nm for the absolute in-plane displacement and 400 nm for the absolute out-of-plane displacement. For both campaigns, the test results have been compared to the predictions obtained by finite element analyses and the correlation of these results was good.

  8. Influence of substructure design and occlusal reduction on the stress distribution in metal ceramic complete crowns: 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Motta, Andréa Barreira; Pereira, Luiz Carlos; Duda, Fernando Pereira; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2014-07-01

    Occlusal reduction is considered a fundamental step for providing adequate and uniform space for the ceramic prosthesis; however, a flat occlusal surface is usually found. The prosthesis design influences the resistance to deformation and the stress state within the ceramic. This finite element (FE) study analyzes the influence of changing the substructure design on the stress distribution of a metal-ceramic crown in a premolar tooth with three types of occlusal reduction. Each part of three-dimensional metal ceramic complete crown models was designed according to the space provided by different levels of occlusal reduction and the same external morphology of the tooth. Three models were designed: (1) correct occlusal reduction with a uniform thickness of the substructure (0.3 mm) and the veneering porcelain (1.5 mm); (2) flat occlusal reduction with different thicknesses of veneering porcelain to produce a uniform substructure; and (3) a flat occlusal reduction with different thicknesses of substructure for a uniform thickness of veneering porcelain. Stress distributions were very similar in the three models. The highest tensile stresses were concentrated immediately below the midline fissure in both the veneering porcelain and the metal alloy substructure. Although models with flat occlusal reduction had lower stress values, this preparation results from a reduction that removes a greater amount of sound tissue, which may increase the probability of dental pulp injury. Occlusal reduction must be anatomic; however, when a flat occlusal reduction already exists, the substructure must reproduce the correct anatomic form to allow a uniform thickness of the veneering porcelain. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. 3D finite element analysis of electrostatic deflection of commercial and FIB-modified cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy: I. Triangular shaped cantilevers with symmetric pyramidal tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdrè, Giovanni; Moro, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    The investigation of the nanoscale distribution of electrostatic forces on material surfaces is of paramount importance for the development of nanotechnology, since these confined forces govern many physical processes on which a large number of technological applications are based. For instance, electric force microscopy (EFM) and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) are technologies based on an electrostatic interaction between a cantilever and a specimen. In the present work we report on a 3D finite element analysis of the electrostatic deflection of cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy. A commercial triangular shaped cantilever with a symmetric pyramidal tip was modelled. In addition, the cantilever was modified by a focused ion beam (FIB) in order to reduce its parasitic electrostatic force, and its behaviour was studied by computation analysis. 3D modelling of the electrostatic deflection was realized by using a multiphysics finite element analysis software and it was applied to the real geometry of the cantilevers and probes obtained by using basic CAD tools. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): A 3D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on Amplitude-modulated (AM) - Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module, and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework in order to 1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and 2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6, and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69, 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19, 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28, and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s, and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was also found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm2) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm2). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo. PMID:22036637

  11. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a 3-D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-12-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on amplitude-modulated (AM) - harmonic motion imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework to (1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and (2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6 and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69 and 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19 and 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28 and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm(2)) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm(2)). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  12. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  13. 3D mechanical analysis of aeronautical plain bearings: Validation of a finite element model from measurement of displacement fields by digital volume correlation and optical scanning tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Peyruseigt, F.; Mistou, S.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    On Airbus aircraft, spherical plain bearings are used on many components; in particular to link engine to pylon or pylon to wing. Design of bearings is based on contact pressure distribution on spherical surfaces. To determine this distribution, a 3D analysis of the mechanical behaviour of aeronautical plain bearing is presented in this paper. A numerical model has been built and validated from a comparison with 3D experimental measurements of kinematic components. For that, digital volume correlation (DVC) coupled with optical scanning tomography (OST) is employed to study the mechanical response of a plain bearing model made in epoxy resin. Experimental results have been compared with the ones obtained from the simulated model. This comparison enables us to study the influence of various boundary conditions to build the FE model. Some factors have been highlighted like the fitting behaviour which can radically change contact pressure distribution. This work shows the contribution of a representative mechanical environment to study precisely mechanical response of aeronautical plain bearings.

  14. Some remarks on shell element analysis with DYNA3D and NIKE3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whirley, R. G.; Engelmann, B. E.; Maker, B. N.; Spelce, T. E.

    1992-03-01

    There has been some confusion in the user community recently regarding the various shell element formulations now available in DYNA3D (Whirley and Hadlquist, 1991) and NIKE3D (Maker, Ferencz, and Hallquist, 1991). In particular, questions have been raised about the behavior of these elements under large strain, and the display of meaningful results from such problems using TAURUS (Spelce and Hallquist, 1991). This brief report is intended to aid the DYNA/NIKE user community by elaborating on the formulation of the DYNA3D/NIKE3D shell elements and on the display of shell data using TAURUS. In the following discussion no attempt is made to give a complete description of the theoretical development or implementation of any of the elements. Readers interested in a more complete discussion of the shell elements in DYNA3D and NIKE3D are directed to the published papers cited in the code User Manuals.

  15. A Preliminary Investigation of Traumatically Induced Axonal Injury in a Three-Dimensional (3-D) Finite Element Model (FEM) of the Human Head During Blast-Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    874,788 nodal-based tetrahedral elements, including 358,948 elements in the cerebrum and cerebellum. Simulations ran on 128 processors for...2000 kg/m 3 E = 6.0e9 Pa  = 0.229 Cerebrum and Cerebellum White Matter Transversely Isotropic hyperelastic  = 1040 kg/m 3 C10 = 1500 Pa...C01 = 1700 Pa C3 = 2700 Pa K = 2.1e9 Pa Cerebrum and Cerebellum Gray Matter Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic  = 1040 kg/m 3 C10 = 1500 Pa C01

  16. Form finding and analysis of extensible membranes attached to 2-D and 3-D frames intended for micro air vehicles via experimentally validated finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaram, Yaakov Jack

    This work is concerned with a new method to apply consistent and known pretension to silicone rubber membranes intended for micro air vehicles as well as an understanding in the science of developed pre-tension in membranes constrained by 2- D and 3-D frames and structures. Pre-tension has a marked effect on the static and dynamic response of membrane wings and controls the overall deflections, as such control and measurement of the membrane pre-tension is important. Two different 2-D frame geometries were fabricated to evaluate the technique. For open-cell frames, the pretension was not uniform, whereas it was for closed-cell frames. Results show developed full-field stress and strain fields as a function of membrane attachment temperature and frame geometry along with experimental iterations to prove repeatability. The membranes can be stretched to a specific pretension according to the temperature at which it adheres to frames. Strain fields in membranes attached to 3-D frames at various temperatures are modeled through FEA utilizing Abaqus to be able to predict the developed membrane deformations, stresses, and strains. Rigid frames with various curvatures are built via appropriate molds and then adhered to silicone rubber membranes and elevated to various temperatures to achieve different pre-strains for experimental validation. Additional experiments are conducted for more complex frame geometries involving both convex and concave topologies embedded within frames. Results are then compared with the Abaqus outputs to validate the accuracy of the FEA model. Highly compliant wings have been used for MAV platforms, where the wing structure is determined by some combination of carbon fiber composites and a membrane skin, adhered in between the layers of composite material. Another new technique of attaching membranes firmly on wing structures is introduced, which involves the application of a technology known as corona treatment coupled with another method of

  17. Evaluation of the biomechanical behavior of maxillary central incisors restored by means of endocrowns compared to a natural tooth: a 3D static linear finite elements analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarone, Fernando; Sorrentino, Roberto; Apicella, Davide; Valentino, Bartolomeo; Ferrari, Marco; Aversa, R; Apicella, A

    2006-11-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating different restoring configurations of a crownless maxillary central incisor, in order to compare the biomechanical behavior of the restored tooth with that of a sound tooth. A 3D FE model of a maxillary central incisor is presented. An arbitrary static force of 10 N was applied with an angulation of 125 degrees to the tooth longitudinal axis at level of the palatal surface of the crown. Different material configurations were tested: composite, syntered alumina, feldspathic ceramic endocrowns and glass post resorations with syntered alumina and feldspathic ceramic crown. High modulus materials used for the restoration strongly alter the natural biomechanical behavior of the tooth. Critical areas of high stress concentration are the restoration-cement-dentin interface both in the root canal and on the buccal and lingual aspects of the tooth-restoration interface. Materials with mechanical properties underposable to that of dentin or enamel improve the biomechanical behavior of the restored tooth reducing the areas of high stress concentration. The use of endocrown restorations present the advantage of reducing the interfaces of the restorative system. The choice of the restorative materials should be carefully evaluated. Materials with mechanical properties similar to those of sound teeth improve the reliability of the restoartive system.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Three-Dimensional Cervical Behaviors in Posterior-Oblique Car Collisions Using 3-D Human Whole Body Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yu-Bong; Jung, Duk-Young; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Ikeuchi, Ken

    Whiplash injuries are most common disorders in rear-end car accidents, while the injury mechanism is yet unknown. Many numerical and experimental approaches have conducted to investigate the cervical behaviors with solely two-dimensional analyses in the sagittal plane. In real accidents, however, as impacts may affect several directions, the cervical behaviors should be evaluated three-dimensionally. Therefore, we evaluated the cervical behaviors under assumption of the posterior-oblique impacts depending on the impact angles with 3-D FE analysis. In addition, we analyzed the stresses occurred in the facet joints considering the relationship with a whiplash disorders. The cervical behaviors showed complex motion combined with axial torsion and lateral bending. The bending angle peaked in the impact at the angle of 15°, and the peak compressive and shear stress on the facet cartilage at C6-C7 increased by 11% and 14%. In the impact at the angle of 30°, the torsion angle peaked at C2-C3, the peak shear stress in the facet cartilage increased by 27%. It showed that the torsion and lateral bending affected the cervical behaviors, and caused the increase of peak stresses on the soft tissues. It is assumed as one of important causes of whiplash injury.

  19. Implementation of 3-D isoparametric finite elements on supercomputer for the formulation of recursive dynamical equations of multi-body systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shareef, N. H.; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1991-01-01

    A computational algorithmic procedure is developed and implemented for the dynamic analysis of a multibody system with rigid/flexible interconnected bodies. The algorithm takes into consideration the large rotation/translation and small elastic deformations associated with the rigid-body degrees of freedom and the flexibility of the bodies in the system respectively. Versatile three-dimensional isoparametric brick elements are employed for the modeling of the geometric configurations of the bodies. The formulation of the recursive dynamical equations of motion is based on the recursive Kane's equations, strain energy concepts, and the techniques of component mode synthesis. In order to minimize CPU-intensive matrix multiplication operations and speed up the execution process, the concepts of indexed arrays is utilized in the formulation of the equations of motion. A spin-up maneuver of a space robot with three flexible links carrying a solar panel is used as an illustrative example.

  20. Parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    Computational power has advanced to a state where we can begin to perform wavefield simulations for realistic (complex) 3-D earth models at frequencies of interest to both seismologists and engineers. On serial platforms, however, 3-D calculations are still limited to small grid sizes and short seismic wave traveltimes. To make use of the efficiency of network computers a parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference (FD) code is implemented which allows to distribute the work on several PCs or workstations connected via standard ethernet in an in-house network. By using the portable message passing interface standard (MPI) for the communication between processors, running times can be reduced and grid sizes can be increased significantly. Furthermore, the code shows good performance on massive parallel supercomputers which makes the computation of very large grids feasible. This implementation greatly expands the applicability of the 3-D elastic/viscoelastic finite-difference modelling technique by providing an efficient, portable and practical C-program.

  1. Finite element micro-modelling of a human ankle bone reveals the importance of the trabecular network to mechanical performance: new methods for the generation and comparison of 3D models.

    PubMed

    Parr, W C H; Chamoli, U; Jones, A; Walsh, W R; Wroe, S

    2013-01-04

    Most modelling of whole bones does not incorporate trabecular geometry and treats bone as a solid non-porous structure. Some studies have modelled trabecular networks in isolation. One study has modelled the performance of whole human bones incorporating trabeculae, although this required considerable computer resources and purpose-written code. The difference between mechanical behaviour in models that incorporate trabecular geometry and non-porous models has not been explored. The ability to easily model trabecular networks may shed light on the mechanical consequences of bone loss in osteoporosis and remodelling after implant insertion. Here we present a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of a human ankle bone that includes trabecular network geometry. We compare results from this model with results from non-porous models and introduce protocols achievable on desktop computers using widely available softwares. Our findings show that models including trabecular geometry are considerably stiffer than non-porous whole bone models wherein the non-cortical component has the same mass as the trabecular network, suggesting inclusion of trabecular geometry is desirable. We further present new methods for the construction and analysis of 3D models permitting: (1) construction of multi-property, non-porous models wherein cortical layer thickness can be manipulated; (2) maintenance of the same triangle network for the outer cortical bone surface in both 3D reconstruction and non-porous models allowing exact replication of load and restraint cases; and (3) creation of an internal landmark point grid allowing direct comparison between 3D FE Models (FEMs).

  2. Non-planar interconnects in double-sided flexible Cu-PET substrates using a laser-assisted maskless microdeposition process: 3D finite element modeling and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabari, Elahe; Tong, Steven; Azhari, Amir; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    Non-planar (3D) interconnects have an important role in the electronic packaging industry these days. These unconventional interconnects allow manufacturers to save materials and space while connecting circuit components on flexible and non-planar substrates. Among a variety of flexible boards, double-sided flexible substrates have attracted the electronic industry to effectively and compactly develop miniaturized flexible devices such as sensors-on-chips. This study reports our developmental procedure for the creation of non-planar silver interconnects on the edge of double-sided copper substrates separated by a layer of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using laser-assisted maskless microdeposition (LAMM). The article consists of the characterization of the LAMM process to effectively deposit Ag nanoparticles for production of conductive interconnects. Several parameters, including the deposition and laser processing parameters, are optimized to achieve interconnects free of pores, cracks and delamination. For investigating the topography and microstructure of interconnects, various analytical tools, such as SEM, XRD, Profilometery, and EDS were used. Furthermore, a 3D finite element numerical model was developed to predict the laser processing of silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The model includes a coupled thermal and structural governing physics to derive the temperature history throughout the simulation as well as strain/displacement within the substrate, which is identified the major source of cark formation in Ag tracks. The SEM micrographs of the laser processed nanoparticles suggest that a minimum of 1.24 W laser power was needed for an effective nanoparticles sintering to obtain conductive 3D interconnects with minimum amount of cracks whereas a 1.7 W laser power caused PET to decompose.

  3. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  4. DYNA3D Material Model 71 - Solid Element Test Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E

    2008-01-24

    A general phenomenological-based elasto-plastic nonlinear isotropic strain hardening material model was implemented in DYNA3D for use in solid, beam, truss, and shell elements. The constitutive model, Model 71, is based upon conventional J2 plasticity and affords optional temperature and rate dependence (visco-plasticity). The expressions for strain hardening, temperature dependence, and rate dependence allow it to represent a wide variety of material responses. Options to capture temperature changes due to adiabatic heating and thermal straining are incorporated into the constitutive framework as well. The verification problem developed for this constitutive model consists of four uni-axial right cylinders subject to constant true strain-rate boundary conditions. Three of the specimens have different constant strain rates imposed, while the fourth specimen is subjected to several strain rate jumps. The material parameters developed by Fehlmann (2005) for 21-6-9 Nitronic steel are utilized. As demonstrated below, the finite element (FE) simulations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical responses and indicated the model is functioning as desired. Consequently, this problem serves as both a verification problem and regression test problem for DYNA3D.

  5. 3D Dynamic Crack Rupture by a Finite Volume Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Jemaa, M.; Glinsky-Olivier, N.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.

    2007-12-01

    Dynamic rupture of a 3D spontaneous crack of arbitrary shape has been investigated using a Finite Volume (FV) approach. The full domain is decomposed in tetrahedra while the surface on which the rupture is supposed to take place is discretized with triangles which are faces of tetrahedra. Because of this meshing strategy, any shape of the rupture surface could be designed and is performed once before simulations start. First of all, the elastodynamic equations are described into a pseudo-conservative form for easy application of the FV discretisation. Explicit boundary conditions are given using criteria based on the conservation of discrete energy through the crack surface. Using a stress-threshold criterion, these conditions specify fluxes through those triangles which have suffered rupture. On these broken surfaces, stress follows A linear slip-weakening law although other friction laws can be implemented as well. Numerical solutions on a planar fault are achieved for the problem version 3 of the SCEC community dynamic-rupture benchmark exercise (Harris and Archuleta, 2004) and compared with those provided by a Finite Difference (FD) technique (Day et al, 2005). Another benchmark problem is also tackled involving a nonplanar curved fault (Cruz-Atienza et al, 2007). Solutions for this difficult exercise are compared with those computed with a Boundary Integral (BI) method (Aochi et al, 2000). In both benchmarck problems, comparisons show that rupture fronts are well modelled with a slight delay in time especially along the antiplane direction related to the low-order interpolation of the FV approach which requires further mesh refinement or/and an higher-order interpolation strategy as for Galerkin Discontinuous approach. Slip-rate and shear stress amplitudes are well modelled as well as stopping phases and stress overshoots. We expect this method, which is well adapted to multi-preocessor parallel computing to be competitive with others for solving large scale

  6. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  7. 3D finite-difference seismic migration with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Gjertsen, R.; Minkoff, S.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is essential for reducing the risk associated with oil exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive as datasets can be terabytes in size. Traditional ray-tracing migration methods cannot handle complex velocity variations commonly found near such salt structures. Instead the authors use the full 3D acoustic wave equation, discretized via a finite difference algorithm. They reduce the cost of solving the apraxial wave equation by a number of numerical techniques including the method of fractional steps and pipelining the tridiagonal solves. The imaging code, Salvo, uses both frequency parallelism (generally 90% efficient) and spatial parallelism (65% efficient). Salvo has been tested on synthetic and real data and produces clear images of the subsurface even beneath complicated salt structures.

  8. 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm and anomaly features of ZTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tan, Han-Dong; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Peng; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Zhang, Xing-Dong

    2016-09-01

    The Z-Axis tipper electromagnetic (ZTEM) technique is based on a frequency-domain airborne electromagnetic system that measures the natural magnetic field. A survey area was divided into several blocks by using the Maxwell's equations, and the magnetic components at the center of each edge of the grid cell are evaluated by applying the staggered-grid finite-difference method. The tipper and its divergence are derived to complete the 3D ZTEM forward modeling algorithm. A synthetic model is then used to compare the responses with those of 2D finite-element forward modeling to verify the accuracy of the algorithm. ZTEM offers high horizontal resolution to both simple and complex distributions of conductivity. This work is the theoretical foundation for the interpretation of ZTEM data and the study of 3D ZTEM inversion.

  9. Coseismic and postseismic Coulomb stress changes on intra-continental dip-slip faults and the role of viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust: insights from 3D finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, Meike; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Investigating the stress interaction of faults plays a crucial role for assessing seismic hazard of a region. The calculation of Coulomb stress changes allows quantifying stress changes on so-called receiver faults in the surrounding of a source fault that was ruptured during an earthquake. Positive Coulomb stress changes bring receiver faults closer to failure, while a negative value indicates a delay of the next earthquake. Besides the coseismic ('static') stress changes, postseismic ('transient') stress changes induced by postseismic viscoelastic relaxation occur. Here we use 3D finite-element models with arrays of normal or thrust faults to study the coseismic stress changes and the stress changes arising from postseismic relaxation in the lower crust. The lithosphere is divided into an elastic upper crust, a viscoelastic lower crust and a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle. Gravity is included in the models. Driven by extension or shortening of the model, slip on the fault planes develops in a self-consistent way. We modelled an earthquake on a 40-km-long source fault with a coseismic slip of 2 m and calculated the displacement fields and Coulomb stress changes during the coseismic and postseismic phases. The results for the coseismic phase (Bagge and Hampel, Tectonophysics in press) show that synthetic receiver faults in the hanging wall and footwall of the source fault exhibit a symmetric distribution of the coseismic Coulomb stress changes on each fault, with large areas of negative stress changes but also some smaller areas of positive values. In contrast, faults positioned in along-strike prolongation of the source fault and outside of its hanging wall and footwall undergo mostly positive stress changes. Postseismic stress changes caused by viscous flow modify the static stress changes in a way that the net Coulomb stress changes on the receiver faults change significantly through space and time. Our models allow deciphering the combined effect of stress

  10. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, Lynn

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.

  11. FEHM. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.

  12. 3D Finite Difference Modelling of Basaltic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell-Sørensen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of the work was to generate realistic data to be applied for testing of processing and migration tools for basaltic regions. The project is based on the three - dimensional finite difference code (FD), TIGER, made by Sintef. The FD code was optimized (parallelized) by the author, to run on parallel computers. The parallel code enables us to model large-scale realistic geological models and to apply traditional seismic and micro seismic sources. The parallel code uses multiple processors in order to manipulate subsets of large amounts of data simultaneously. The general anisotropic code uses 21 elastic coefficients. Eight independent coefficients are needed as input parameters for the general TI medium. In the FD code, the elastic wave field computation is implemented by a higher order FD solution to the elastic wave equation and the wave fields are computed on a staggered grid, shifted half a node in one or two directions. The geological model is a gridded basalt model, which covers from 24 km to 37 km of a real shot line in horizontal direction and from the water surface to the depth of 3.5 km. The 2frac {1}{2}D model has been constructed using the compound modeling software from Norsk Hydro. The vertical parameter distribution is obtained from observations in two wells. At The depth of between 1100 m to 1500 m, a basalt horizon covers the whole sub surface layers. We have shown that it is possible to simulate a line survey in realistic (3D) geological models in reasonable time by using high performance computers. The author would like to thank Norsk Hydro, Statoil, GEUS, and SINTEF for very helpful discussions and Parallab for being helpful with the new IBM, p690 Regatta system.

  13. A new elastoplastic shell element formulation for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, B.E.; Whirley, R.G.

    1990-08-01

    The analysis of shell structures undergoing dynamic elastoplastic deformation is an important capability of DYNA3D. This paper presents an improved formulation for a 4-node quadrilateral shell element for explicit dynamic analysis. The proposed element is derived from a three-field weak form, and incorporates recently developed assumed strain methods for improved accuracy. In addition, the element is formulated in a large-displacement small-strain setting for minimum cost. Complex nonlinear constitutive models are easily incorporated into this formulation. Numerical examples illustrating the accuracy, robustness, and speed of the new element are shown. 13 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Finite element analysis of bolted flange connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, D. Y.; Stallings, J. M.

    1994-06-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric finite element model and a 3-D solid finite element model of a high pressure bolted flange joint were generated to investigate the stress behaviors. This investigation includes comparisons for axisymmetric loading of both the 2-D and 3-D models, the effects of non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions in the 3-D models, and the differences between 2-D and 3-D models subjected to non-axisymmetric loading. Comparisons indicated differences in von Mises stress up to 12% at various points due to the non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions. Applied bending moments were converted to equivalent axial forces for use in the 2-D model. It was found that the largest von Mises stresses in 3-D model did not occur on the side of the connection where the bending stresses and applied axial stresses were additive. Hence, in the 2-D model where the equivalent axial force (for bending moment) and applied axial forces were added, the 2-D model under estimated the maximum von Mises stress obtained from the 3-D model by 30%.

  15. The GPRIME approach to finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, D. R.; Mckee, J. H.; Hurwitz, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    GPRIME, an interactive modeling system, runs on the CDC 6000 computers and the DEC VAX 11/780 minicomputer. This system includes three components: (1) GPRIME, a user friendly geometric language and a processor to translate that language into geometric entities, (2) GGEN, an interactive data generator for 2-D models; and (3) SOLIDGEN, a 3-D solid modeling program. Each component has a computer user interface of an extensive command set. All of these programs make use of a comprehensive B-spline mathematics subroutine library, which can be used for a wide variety of interpolation problems and other geometric calculations. Many other user aids, such as automatic saving of the geometric and finite element data bases and hidden line removal, are available. This interactive finite element modeling capability can produce a complete finite element model, producing an output file of grid and element data.

  16. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  17. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  18. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  19. Elemental concentration distribution in human fingernails - A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Mars, J. A.; Gihwala, D.

    2012-02-01

    The verification of pathologies has normally been based on analysis of blood (serum and plasma), and physiological tissue. Recently, nails and in particular human fingernails have become an important medium for pathological studies, especially those of environmental origin. The analytical technique of PIXE has been used extensively in the analysis of industrial samples and human tissue specimens. The application of the analytical technique to nails has been mainly to bulk samples. In this study we use micro-PIXE and -RBS, as both complementary and supplementary, to determine the elemental concentration distribution of human fingernails of individuals. We report on the 3D quantitative elemental concentration distributions (QECDs) of various elements that include C, N and O as major elements (10-20%), P, S, Cl, K and Ca as minor elements (1-10%) and Fe, Mn, Zn, Ti, Na, Mg, Cu, Ni, Cr, Rb, Br, Sr and Se as trace elements (less than 1%). For PIXE and RBS the specimens were bombarded with a 3 MeV proton beam. To ascertain any correlations in the quantitative elemental concentration distributions, a linear traverse analysis was performed across the width of the nail. Elemental distribution correlations were also obtained.

  20. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  1. Large Scale Finite Element Modeling Using Scalable Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D.; Zuffada, C.; Jamnejad, V.

    1995-01-01

    An iterative solver for use with finite element codes was developed for the Cray T3D massively parallel processor at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Finite element modeling is useful for simulating scattered or radiated electromagnetic fields from complex three-dimensional objects with geometry variations smaller than an electrical wavelength.

  2. Quasimodes instability analysis of uncertain asymmetric rotor system based on 3D solid element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yanfei; Wang, Jianjun; Ma, Weimeng

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainties are considered in the equation of motion of an asymmetric rotor system. Based on Hill's determinant method, quasimodes stability analysis with uncertain parameters is used to get stochastic boundaries of unstable regions. Firstly, A 3D finite element rotor model was built in rotating frame with four parameterized coefficients, which is assumed as random parameters representing the uncertainties existing in the rotor system. Then the influences of uncertain coefficients on the distribution of the unstable region boundaries are analyzed. The results show that uncertain parameters have various influences on the size, boundary and number of unstable regions. At last, the statistic results of the minimum and maximum spin speeds of unstable regions were got by Monte Carlo simulation. The used method is suitable for real engineering rotor system, because arbitrary configuration of rotors can be modeled by 3D finite element.

  3. Intersecting D 3 -D3 ' -brane system at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, William; Hanson, James; Hashimoto, Akikazu; Loveridge, Andrew; Pettengill, Duncan

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the intersecting D 3 -D3 ' -brane system overlapping in 1 +1 dimensions, in a holographic treatment where N D3 branes are manifested as anti-de Sitter Schwartzschild geometry, and the D3 ' brane is treated as a probe. We extract the thermodynamic equation of state from the set of embedding solutions, and analyze the stability at the perturbative and the nonperturbative level. We review a systematic procedure to resolve local instabilities and multivaluedness in the equations of state based on classic ideas of convexity in the microcanonical ensemble. We then identify a runaway behavior which was not noticed previously for this system.

  4. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  5. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  6. Full-Scale 3-D Finite Element Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor for Heat Transfer, Thermal-Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Life Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2015-12-15

    This paper discusses a system-level finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of example components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in US-NRC report: NUREG-6909.

  7. Accelerating a 3D finite-difference wave propagation code by a factor of 50 and a spectral-element code by a factor of 25 using a cluster of GPU graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Michéa, David; Erlebacher, Gordon; Göddeke, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    We first accelerate a three-dimensional finite-difference in the time domain (FDTD) wave propagation code by a factor of about 50 using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computing on a cheap NVIDIA graphics card with the CUDA programming language. We implement the code in CUDA in the case of the fully heterogeneous elastic wave equation. We also implement Convolution Perfectly Matched Layers (CPMLs) on the graphics card to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid. We show that the code that runs on the graphics card gives the expected results by comparing our results to those obtained by running the same simulation on a classical processor core. The methodology that we present can be used for Maxwell's equations as well because their form is similar to that of the seismic wave equation written in velocity vector and stress tensor. We then implement a high-order finite-element (spectral-element) application, which performs the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation resulting for instance from earthquakes at the scale of a continent or from active seismic acquisition experiments in the oil industry, on a cluster of NVIDIA Tesla graphics cards using the CUDA programming language and non blocking message passing based on MPI. We compare it to the implementation in C language and MPI on a classical cluster of CPU nodes. We use mesh coloring to efficiently handle summation operations over degrees of freedom on an unstructured mesh, and we exchange information between nodes using non blocking MPI messages. Using non-blocking communications allows us to overlap the communications across the network and the data transfer between the GPU card and the CPU node on which it is installed with calculations on that GPU card. We perform a number of numerical tests to validate the single-precision CUDA and MPI implementation and assess its accuracy. We then analyze performance measurements and in average we obtain a speedup of 20x to 25x.

  8. Finite elements of nonlinear continua.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to a broad class of practical nonlinear problems, treating both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view. The thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method are outlined, and are brought together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of the models are analyzed, and the numerical solution of the equations governing the discrete models is examined. The application of the models to nonlinear problems in finite elasticity, viscoelasticity, heat conduction, and thermoviscoelasticity is discussed. Other specific topics include the topological properties of finite element models, applications to linear and nonlinear boundary value problems, convergence, continuum thermodynamics, finite elasticity, solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete models of the nonlinear thermomechanical behavior of dissipative media.

  9. Finite elements of nonlinear continua.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to a broad class of practical nonlinear problems, treating both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view. The thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method are outlined, and are brought together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of the models are analyzed, and the numerical solution of the equations governing the discrete models is examined. The application of the models to nonlinear problems in finite elasticity, viscoelasticity, heat conduction, and thermoviscoelasticity is discussed. Other specific topics include the topological properties of finite element models, applications to linear and nonlinear boundary value problems, convergence, continuum thermodynamics, finite elasticity, solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete models of the nonlinear thermomechanical behavior of dissipative media.

  10. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  11. Second order tensor finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  12. Electronic structure of 3d metals at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Delgadillo, I.; Gollisch, H.; Feder, R.

    1996-07-01

    A theoretical approach to the electronic structure of crystalline solids at finite temperature has been developed on the basis of the adiabatic approximation. For any given temperature, correlated ion core displacement configurations on large clusters with periodic boundary conditions are determined such that they are consistent with experimental phonon dispersion relations. Total and {ital k}{searrow}-resolved densities of states are obtained by a tight-binding recursion method for each configuration followed by a configurational average. In the case of ferromagnetic crystals, the above treatment is augmented by including the influence of spin fluctuations. The local magnetic moments associated with the atomic sites are assumed to fluctuate subject to an average magnetization and a short-range order specific for the given temperature. The spin-resolved electronic structure for temperatures up to the Curie temperature and beyond can thus be obtained. Numerical calculations are performed on Cu and Ni and the results compared to experimental photoemission data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Postseismic Coulomb stress changes on intra-continental dip-slip faults due to viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust and lithospheric mantle: insights from 3D finite-element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, Meike; Hampel, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Earthquakes in the brittle upper crust induce viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and lithospheric mantle, which can persist for decades and lead to significant Coulomb stress changes on receiver faults located in the surrounding of the source fault. As most previous studies calculated the Coulomb stress changes for a specific earthquake in nature, a general investigation of postseismic Coulomb stress changes independent of local geological conditions is still lacking for intra-continental dip-slip faults. Here we use finite-element models with normal and thrust fault arrays, respectively, to show that postseismic viscoelastic flow considerably modifies the original coseismic Coulomb stress patterns through space and time. Depending on the position of the receiver fault relative to the source fault, areas with negative coseismic stress changes may exhibit positive postseismic stress changes and vice versa. The lower the viscosity of the lower crust or lithospheric mantle, the more pronounced are the transient stress changes in the 1st years, with the lowest viscosity having the largest effect on the stress changes. The evolution of postseismic Coulomb stress changes is further controlled by the superposition of transient stress changes caused by viscoelastic relaxation (leading to stress increase or decrease) and the interseismic strain accumulation (leading to a stress increase). Stress changes induced by viscoelastic relaxation can outweigh the interseismic stress increase such that negative Coulomb stress changes can persist for decades. On some faults, postseismic relaxation and interseismic strain accumulation can act in concert to enhance already positive Coulomb stress changes.

  14. Finite element shell instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formulation procedures and the associated computer program for finite element thin shell instability analysis are discussed. Data cover: (1) formulation of basic element relationships, (2) construction of solution algorithms on both the conceptual and algorithmic levels, and (3) conduction of numerical analyses to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the theory and related programs therein are described.

  15. THERM3D -- A boundary element computer program for transient heat conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ingber, M.S.

    1994-02-01

    The computer code THERM3D implements the direct boundary element method (BEM) to solve transient heat conduction problems in arbitrary three-dimensional domains. This particular implementation of the BEM avoids performing time-consuming domain integrations by approximating a ``generalized forcing function`` in the interior of the domain with the use of radial basis functions. An approximate particular solution is then constructed, and the original problem is transformed into a sequence of Laplace problems. The code is capable of handling a large variety of boundary conditions including isothermal, specified flux, convection, radiation, and combined convection and radiation conditions. The computer code is benchmarked by comparisons with analytic and finite element results.

  16. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Karunakaran, C.; Lu, Y.; Hormes, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Obst, M.

    2011-09-09

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  17. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Karunakaran, C.; Prange, A.; Franz, B.; Harkness, T.; Lu, Y.; Obst, M.; Hormes, J.

    2011-09-01

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  18. Does matching relation exist between the length and the tilting angle of terminal implants in the all-on-four protocol? stress distributions by 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomei; Cao, Zhizhong; Qiu, Xiaoqian; Tang, Zhen; Gong, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To explore whether there is matching relation between the length and the tilting angle of terminal implants in the All-on-Four protocol by studying the effects of different implant configurations on stress distributions of implant, bone, and framework. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four implants were employed to support a full-arch fixed prosthesis and five three-dimensional finite element models were established with CT images, based on the length (S and L) and distal tilt angle (0°, 30° and 45°) of terminal implants for an edentulous mandible, which named: Tilt0-S, Tilt30-S, Tilt30-L, Tilt45-S and Tilt45-L. An oblique 240 N was loaded at second molar. The von Mises Stresses were analyzed. The implants were consecutively named #1 to #4 from the loading point. RESULTS 1) Tilt0-S had the greatest stress on the implants, with the other groups exhibiting variable reductions; the four implants of Tilt45-L demonstrated the greatest reduction in stress. 2) Tilt0-S had the greatest stress at bone around #1 implant neck, and Tilt45-L exhibited the least stress, which was a 36.3% reduction compared to Tilt0-S. 3) The greatest stress in the framework was found on the cantilevers distal to #1 implant. Tilt45-S exhibited the least stress. CONCLUSION Matching different length and tilting angle of the terminal implants led to variable stress reductions on implants, bone and the superstructure. By optimizing implant configuration, the reduction of stress on implants and surrounding bone could be maximized. Under the present condition, Tilt45-L was the preferred configuration. Further clinical testings are required. PMID:26140176

  19. Micro structured coupling elements for 3D silicon optical interposer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charania, Sujay; Lüngen, Sebastian; Al-Husseini, Zaid; Killge, Sebastian; Nieweglowski, Krzysztof; Neumann, Niels; Plettemeier, Dirk; Bock, Karlheinz; Bartha, Johann W.

    2017-05-01

    Current trends in electronic industry, such as Internet of Things (IoT) and Cloud Computing call for high interconnect bandwidth, increased number of active devices and high IO count. Hence the integration of on silicon optical waveguides becomes an alternative approach to cope with the performance demands. The application and fabrication of horizontal (planar) and vertical (Through Silicon Vias - TSVs) optical waveguides are discussed here. Coupling elements are used to connect both waveguide structures. Two micro-structuring technologies for integration of coupling elements are investigated: μ-mirror fabrication by nanoimprint (i) and dicing technique (ii). Nanoimprint technology creates highly precise horizontal waveguides with polymer (refractive index nC = 1.56 at 650 nm) as core. The waveguide ends in reflecting facets aligned to the optical TSVs. To achieve Total Internal Reflection (TIR), SiO2 (nCl = 1.46) is used as cladding. TSVs (diameter 20-40μm in 200-380μm interposer) are realized by BOSCH process1, oxidation and SU-8 filling techniques. To carry out the imprint, first a silicon structure is etched using a special plasma etching process. A polymer stamp is then created from the silicon template. Using this polymer stamp, SU-8 is imprinted aligned to vertical TSVs over Si surface.Waveguide dicing is presented as a second technology to create coupling elements on polymer waveguides. The reflecting mirror is created by 45° V-shaped dicing blade. The goal of this work is to develop coupling elements to aid 3D optical interconnect network on silicon interposer, to facilitate the realization of the emerging technologies for the upcoming years.

  20. Toward Verification of USM3D Extensions for Mixed Element Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Ding, Ejiang; Parlette, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    The unstructured tetrahedral grid cell-centered finite volume flow solver USM3D has been recently extended to handle mixed element grids composed of hexahedral, prismatic, pyramidal, and tetrahedral cells. Presently, two turbulence models, namely, baseline Spalart-Allmaras (SA) and Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), support mixed element grids. This paper provides an overview of the various numerical discretization options available in the newly enhanced USM3D. Using the SA model, the flow solver extensions are verified on three two-dimensional test cases available on the Turbulence Modeling Resource website at the NASA Langley Research Center. The test cases are zero pressure gradient flat plate, planar shear, and bump-inchannel. The effect of cell topologies on the flow solution is also investigated using the planar shear case. Finally, the assessment of various cell and face gradient options is performed on the zero pressure gradient flat plate case.

  1. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  2. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  3. A single element 3D ultrasound tomography system.

    PubMed

    Xiang Zhang; Fincke, Jonathan; Kuzmin, Andrey; Lempitsky, Victor; Anthony, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, substantial effort has been directed toward developing ultrasonic systems for medical imaging. With advances in computational power, previously theorized scanning methods such as ultrasound tomography can now be realized. In this paper, we present the design, error analysis, and initial backprojection images from a single element 3D ultrasound tomography system. The system enables volumetric pulse-echo or transmission imaging of distal limbs. The motivating clinical applications include: improving prosthetic fittings, monitoring bone density, and characterizing muscle health. The system is designed as a flexible mechanical platform for iterative development of algorithms targeting imaging of soft tissue and bone. The mechanical system independently controls movement of two single element ultrasound transducers in a cylindrical water tank. Each transducer can independently circle about the center of the tank as well as move vertically in depth. High resolution positioning feedback (~1μm) and control enables flexible positioning of the transmitter and the receiver around the cylindrical tank; exchangeable transducers enable algorithm testing with varying transducer frequencies and beam geometries. High speed data acquisition (DAQ) through a dedicated National Instrument PXI setup streams digitized data directly to the host PC. System positioning error has been quantified and is within limits for the imaging requirements of the motivating applications.

  4. Parallel, Implicit, Finite Element Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, Weston; Shumlak, Uri; Meier, Eric; Marklin, George

    2007-11-01

    A parallel, implicit, finite element solver is described for solutions to the ideal MHD equations and the Pseudo-1D Euler equations. The solver uses the conservative flux source form of the equations. This helps simplify the discretization of the finite element method by keeping the specification of the physics separate. An implicit time advance is used to allow sufficiently large time steps. The Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is implemented for parallel matrix solvers and parallel data structures. Results for several test cases are described as well as accuracy of the method.

  5. Primary cilium mechanotransduction of tensile strain in 3D culture: Finite element analyses of strain amplification caused by tensile strain applied to a primary cilium embedded in a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Pattie S; Bodle, Josephine C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-06-27

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes in hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150% to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70%. Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  6. Primary Cilium Mechanotransduction of Tensile Strain in 3D Culture: Finite Element Analyses of Strain Amplification Caused by 10% Tensile Strain Applied to a Primary Cilium Embedded in a Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Pattie S.; Bodle, Josephine C.; Loboa, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes on hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150 to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70% . Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  7. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  8. Spectral element method for band-structure calculations of 3D phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linlin; Liu, Na; Zhou, Jianyang; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jiamin; Huo Liu, Qing

    2016-11-01

    The spectral element method (SEM) is a special kind of high-order finite element method (FEM) which combines the flexibility of a finite element method with the accuracy of a spectral method. In contrast to the traditional FEM, the SEM exhibits advantages in the high-order accuracy as the error decreases exponentially with the increase of interpolation degree by employing the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) polynomials as basis functions. In this study, the spectral element method is developed for the first time for the determination of band structures of 3D isotropic/anisotropic phononic crystals (PCs). Based on the Bloch theorem, we present a novel, intuitive discretization formulation for Navier equation in the SEM scheme for periodic media. By virtue of using the orthogonal Legendre polynomials, the generalized eigenvalue problem is converted to a regular one in our SEM implementation to improve the efficiency. Besides, according to the specific geometry structure, 8-node and 27-node hexahedral elements as well as an analytic mesh have been used to accurately capture curved PC models in our SEM scheme. To verify its accuracy and efficiency, this study analyses the phononic-crystal plates with square and triangular lattice arrangements, and the 3D cubic phononic crystals consisting of simple cubic (SC), bulk central cubic (BCC) and faced central cubic (FCC) lattices with isotropic or anisotropic scatters. All the numerical results considered demonstrate that SEM is superior to the conventional FEM and can be an efficient alternative method for accurate determination of band structures of 3D phononic crystals.

  9. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  10. 3D strain measurement in soft tissue: demonstration of a novel inverse finite element model algorithm on MicroCT images of a tissue phantom exposed to negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, R; Zhao, Y; Cunningham, K; Kieswetter, K; Haridas, B

    2009-07-01

    This study describes a novel system for acquiring the 3D strain field in soft tissue at sub-millimeter spatial resolution during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Recent research in advanced wound treatment modalities theorizes that microdeformations induced by the application of sub-atmospheric (negative) pressure through V.A.C. GranuFoam Dressing, a reticulated open-cell polyurethane foam (ROCF), is instrumental in regulating the mechanobiology of granulation tissue formation [Saxena, V., Hwang, C.W., Huang, S., Eichbaum, Q., Ingber, D., Orgill, D.P., 2004. Vacuum-assisted closure: Microdeformations of wounds and cell proliferation. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114, 1086-1096]. While the clinical response is unequivocal, measurement of deformations at the wound-dressing interface has not been possible due to the inaccessibility of the wound tissue beneath the sealed dressing. Here we describe the development of a bench-test wound model for microcomputed tomography (microCT) imaging of deformation induced by NPWT and an algorithm set for quantifying the 3D strain field at sub-millimeter resolution. Microdeformations induced in the tissue phantom revealed average tensile strains of 18%-23% at sub-atmospheric pressures of -50 to -200 mmHg (-6.7 to -26.7 kPa). The compressive strains (22%-24%) and shear strains (20%-23%) correlate with 2D FEM studies of microdeformational wound therapy in the reference cited above. We anticipate that strain signals quantified using this system can then be used in future research aimed at correlating the effects of mechanical loading on the phenotypic expression of dermal fibroblasts in acute and chronic ulcer models. Furthermore, the method developed here can be applied to continuum deformation analysis in other contexts, such as 3D cell culture via confocal microscopy, full scale CT and MRI imaging, and in machine vision.

  11. A 3D staggered-grid finite difference scheme for poroelastic wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijie; Gao, Jinghuai

    2014-10-01

    Three dimensional numerical modeling has been a viable tool for understanding wave propagation in real media. The poroelastic media can better describe the phenomena of hydrocarbon reservoirs than acoustic and elastic media. However, the numerical modeling in 3D poroelastic media demands significantly more computational capacity, including both computational time and memory. In this paper, we present a 3D poroelastic staggered-grid finite difference (SFD) scheme. During the procedure, parallel computing is implemented to reduce the computational time. Parallelization is based on domain decomposition, and communication between processors is performed using message passing interface (MPI). Parallel analysis shows that the parallelized SFD scheme significantly improves the simulation efficiency and 3D decomposition in domain is the most efficient. We also analyze the numerical dispersion and stability condition of the 3D poroelastic SFD method. Numerical results show that the 3D numerical simulation can provide a real description of wave propagation.

  12. High resolution finite volume parallel simulations of mould filling and binary alloy solidification on unstructured 3-D meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.V.; Kothe, D.B.; Lam, K.L.

    1997-06-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently developing a new casting simulation tool (known as Telluride) that employs robust, high-resolution finite volume algorithms for incompressible fluid flow, volume tracking of interfaces, and solidification physics on three-dimensional (3-D) unstructured meshes. Their finite volume algorithms are based on colocated cell-centered schemes that are formally second order in time and space. The flow algorithm is a 3-D extension of recent work on projection method solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Their volume tracking algorithm can accurately track topologically complex interfaces by approximating the interface geometry as piecewise planar. Coupled to their fluid flow algorithm is a comprehensive binary alloy solidification model that incorporates macroscopic descriptions of heat transfer, solute redistribution, and melt convection as well as a microscopic description of segregation. The finite volume algorithms, which are efficient, parallel, and robust, can yield high-fidelity solutions on a variety of meshes, ranging from those that are structured orthogonal to fully unstructured (finite element). The authors discuss key computer science issues that have enabled them to efficiently parallelize their unstructured mesh algorithms on both distributed and shared memory computing platforms. These include their functionally object-oriented use of Fortran 90 and new parallel libraries for gather/scatter functions (PGSLib) and solutions of linear systems of equations (JTpack90). Examples of their current capabilities are illustrated with simulations of mold filling and solidification of complex 3-D components currently being poured in LANL foundries.

  13. 3D non-Planar Finite Difference Dynamic Rupture: Application to the Landers Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.; Aochi, H.; Peyrat, S.

    2004-12-01

    Many aspects of seismic complexity have been explained in the last thirty years thanks to the development of numerical approaches allowing seismologists to simulate the dynamic rupture of earthquakes. Heterogeneities in both the initial stress field and the surrounding medium are extremely important elements. The constitutive law describing the physics of the breakdown process which relates the fault friction to fault kinematics is also determinant. However, given the increasing amount of high quality seismological data, more sophisticated approaches are needed to explain observations so that others important physical factors, such as the real fault geometry, could be integrated into simulations. Bearing in mind these new high quality observations along with the current computational power, a great interest has arisen in the last five years to develop 3D numerical codes to simulate earthquakes with real fault geometries. Recently, Cruz-Atienza and Virieux (2004) have introduced a 2D finite difference (FD) approach for modeling the dynamic rupture of non-planar faults. In this work we analyze the 3D extension of such an approach. On that account, the new 3D code may consider arbitrary heterogeneous media, composite friction laws and non-planar fault geometries. The numerical criteria for rupture boundary conditions to model rupture processes accurately were determined experimentally finding consistency with those determined for the 2D case: the source is discretized by a set of numerical cells. Given a spatial grid step for wave propagation, the number of grid nodes contained in each cell should be adapted accordingly. The smaller the spatial step the greater the number of nodes. We have performed dynamic rupture simulations for different curved 3D faults and compared results with those given by a BIE method (Aochi et al., 2000). Consistency between solutions yielded by different numerical approaches is essential since it is the only way to have confidence in these

  14. Influence of 3D Teleseismic Body Waves in the Finite-Fault Source Inversion of Subduction Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladen, A.; Monteiller, V.

    2014-12-01

    Most large earthquakes are generated in subduction zones. To study the complexity of these events, teleseismic body waves offer many advantages over other types of data: they allow to study both the temporal and spatial evolution of slip during the rupture, they don't depend on the presence of nearby land and they allow to study earthquakes regardless of their location. Since the development of teleseismic finite-fault inversion in the 1980th, teleseismic body waves have been simulated using 1D velocity models to take into account propagation effects at the source. Yet, subduction zones are known to be highly heterogeneous: they are characterized by curved and dipping structures, strong seismic velocity contrasts, strong variations of topography and height of the water column. The main reason for relying on a 1D approximation is the computational cost of 3D simulations. And while forward simulations of teleseismic waves in a 3D Earth are only starting to be tractable on modern computers at the frequency range of interest (0.1Hz or shorter), finite-fault source studies require a large number of these simulations. In this work, we present a new and efficient approach to compute 3D teleseismic body waves, in which the full 3D propagation is only computed in a regional domain using discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method, while the rest of the seismic wave field is propagated in a background axisymmetric Earth. The regional and global wave fields are matched using the so-called Total-Field/Scattered-Field technique. This new simulation approach allows us to study the waveform complexities resulting from 3D propagation and investigate how they could improve the resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness of finite-fault inversions.

  15. Validation of 3D Seismic Velocity Models Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Larmat, C. S.; Porritt, R. W.; Higdon, D.; Allen, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    For over a decade now, many research institutions have been focusing on addressing the Earth's 3D heterogeneities and complexities by improving tomographic methods. Utilizing dense array datasets, these efforts have led to unprecedented 3D seismic images, but little is done in terms of model validation or to provide any absolute assessment of model uncertainty. Furthermore, the question of "How good is a 3D geophysical model at representing the Earth's true physics? " remains largely not addressed in a time when 3D Earth models are used for societal and energy security. In the last few years, new horizons have opened up in earth structure imaging, with the advent of new numerical and mathematical methods in computational seismology and statistical sciences. We use these methods to tackle the question of model validation taking advantage of unique and extensive High Performance Computing resources available at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We present results from a study focused on validating 3D models for the Western USA generated using both ray-theoretical and finite-frequency approximations. In this manner we do not validate just the model but also the imaging technique. For this test case, we utilize the Dynamic North America (DNA) model family of UC Berkeley, as they are readily available in both formulations. We evaluate model performances by comparing observed and synthetic seismograms generated using the Spectral Element Method. Results show that both, finite-frequency and ray-theoretical DNA09 models, predict the observations well. Waveform cross-correlation coefficients show a difference in performance between models obtained with the finite-frequency or ray-theory limited to smallest periods (<15s), with no perceptible difference at longer periods (50-200s). At those shortest periods, and based on statistical analyses on S-wave phase delay measurements, finite-frequency shows an improvement over ray theory. We are also investigating the breakdown of ray

  16. Comparison of Gap Elements and Contact Algorithm for 3D Contact Analysis of Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Tiku, K.; Kumar, A.; Handschuh, R.

    1994-01-01

    Three dimensional stress analysis of spiral bevel gears in mesh using the finite element method is presented. A finite element model is generated by solving equations that identify tooth surface coordinates. Contact is simulated by the automatic generation of nonpenetration constraints. This method is compared to a finite element contact analysis conducted with gap elements.

  17. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  18. Semi-implicit finite volume scheme for image processing in 3D cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikula, Karol; Sgallari, Fiorella

    2003-12-01

    Nowadays, 3D echocardiography is a well-known technique in medical diagnosis. Inexpensive echocardiographic acquisition devices are applied to scan 2D slices rotated along a prescribed direction. Then the discrete 3D image information is given on a cylindrical grid. Usually, this original discrete image intensity function is interpolated to a uniform rectangular grid and then numerical schemes for 3D image processing operations (e.g. nonlinear smoothing) in the uniform rectangular geometry are used. However, due to the generally large amount of noise present in echocardiographic images, the interpolation step can yield undesirable results. In this paper, we avoid this step and suggest a 3D finite volume method for image selective smoothing directly in the cylindrical image geometry. Specifically, we study a semi-implicit 3D cylindrical finite volume scheme for solving a Perona-Malik-type nonlinear diffusion equation and apply the scheme to 3D cylindrical echocardiographic images. The L∞-stability and convergence of the scheme to the weak solution of the regularized Perona-Malik equation is proved.

  19. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  20. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  1. Assessment of SPAR elements and formulation of some basic 2-D and 3-D elements for use with testbed generic element processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The initial Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed was based on Level 13 of the SPAR finite element computer program. Until recently, the element library of the Testbed has been limited to those elements in Level 13 of SPAR. The development of a generic element processor has enabled element researchers to develop, implement and assess element formulations with relative ease. An assessment of new elements as well as the existing SPAR Level 13 elements has revealed some definite shortcomings with the SPAR Level 13 2-D and 3-D elements. The SPAR S81 solid element does not pass the patch test problem proposed by MacNeal-Harder. These deficiencies are identified here. The 2-D elements, however, seem to perform well taking into account the limitations imposed by the theory used to formulate them, (i.e., thin plates only). Common deficiencies of the 2-D and 3-D elements in SPAR have to do with their adaptability to the nonlinear analysis utilities developed by Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab. Also, the EFIL format of the SPAR element data does not conform to the standard format of the Testbed.

  2. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  3. Finite element model and identification procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Blackwood, Gary; Anderson, Eric; Balmes, Etienne

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on finite element model and identification procedure are presented. Topics covered include: interferometer finite element model; testbed mode shapes; finite element model update; identification procedure; shaker locations; data analysis; modal frequency and damping comparison; computational procedure; fit comparison; residue analysis; typical residues; identification/FEM residual comparison; and pathlength control using isolation mounts.

  4. HEMP 3D -- a finite difference program for calculating elastic-plastic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.

    1993-05-26

    The HEMP 3D program can be used to solve problems in solid mechanics involving dynamic plasticity and time dependent material behavior and problems in gas dynamics. The equations of motion, the conservation equations, and the constitutive relations are solved by finite difference methods following the format of the HEMP computer simulation program formulated in two space dimensions and time. Presented here is an update of the 1975 report on the HEMP 3D numerical technique. The present report includes the sliding surface routines programmed by Robert Gulliford.

  5. Finite element simulation of microindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, D. I.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Perlovich, Yu. A.; Krymskaya, O. A.

    2017-05-01

    Finite element models are created to describe the testing of a material by a Berkovich indenter. The results of calculations by these models are compared to experimental data on indentation of the same material (grade 10 steel). The experimental and calculated data agree well with each other. The developed models for an indenter and the material to be tested are used to find the laws of behavior of a material during indentation. The state of stress in the material under an indenter is studied by various methods. The indentation results are plotted versus the mechanical properties of a material.

  6. The program FANS-3D (finite analytic numerical simulation 3-dimensional) and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravo, Ramiro H.; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the program named FANS-3D (Finite Analytic Numerical Simulation-3 Dimensional) is presented. FANS-3D was designed to solve problems of incompressible fluid flow and combined modes of heat transfer. It solves problems with conduction and convection modes of heat transfer in laminar flow, with provisions for radiation and turbulent flows. It can solve singular or conjugate modes of heat transfer. It also solves problems in natural convection, using the Boussinesq approximation. FANS-3D was designed to solve heat transfer problems inside one, two and three dimensional geometries that can be represented by orthogonal planes in a Cartesian coordinate system. It can solve internal and external flows using appropriate boundary conditions such as symmetric, periodic and user specified.

  7. Application of Mass Lumped Higher Order Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Strauss, H. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Park, W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; G. Fu; Breslau, J.

    2005-11-01

    There are many interesting phenomena in extended-MHD such as anisotropic transport, mhd, 2-fluid effects stellarator and hot particles. Any one of them challenges numerical analysts, and researchers are seeking for higher order methods, such as higher order finite difference, higher order finite elements and hp/spectral elements. It is true that these methods give more accurate solution than their linear counterparts. However, numerically they are prohibitively expensive. Here we give a successful solution of this conflict by applying mass lumped higher order finite elements. This type of elements not only keep second/third order accuracy but also scale closely to linear elements by doing mass lumping. This is especially true for second order lump elements. Full M3D and anisotropic transport models are studied.

  8. 3D Finite Amplitude Folding: Implications for the Stress Evolution During Crustal and Lithospheric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Schmalholz, S.

    2006-12-01

    Compression of the lithosphere, sedimentary sequences or quartz veins may all result in a folding instability, provided that the effective viscosity contrast between "strong" and "weak" layers is sufficiently large. Whereas this process is relatively well understood in 2D, little is known about the finite amplitude instability in 3D. We perform 3D numerical simulations of viscous single-layer folding to study the growth of the fold amplitude during progressive shortening for different amounts of shortening in the two horizontal directions. We demonstrate that existing, linear theories correctly describe the behavior of the instability for small amplitudes. For larger amplitudes, however, numerical results strongly deviate from the linear theory. Therefore, we present a new nonlinear amplification equation that successfully describes folding up to finite amplitudes. Numerical simulations of folding of an initially horizontal layer, perturbed with random noise, demonstrate that in most cases fold axes form perpendicular to the main shortening direction. Aspect ratios of folds are finite and the patterns are relatively insensitive to the applied background shortening directions. Furthermore, the 3D folding instability reduces the averaged differential stress within the folded ("strong") layer, in agreement with 2D results. This implies that the Christmas-tree approach to represent the strength of the crust and lithosphere may be invalid if folding occurs during the deformation.

  9. Spatial Parallelism of a 3D Finite Difference, Velocity-Stress Elastic Wave Propagation Code

    SciTech Connect

    MINKOFF,SUSAN E.

    1999-12-09

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately. finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. We model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MP1 library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speed up. Because i/o is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) we have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle i/o. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ''ghost cells''. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, we observe excellent scaled speed up. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, we achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  10. 3D Finite Element Modeling of Sliding Wear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    observed in a micrograph of the recovered slipper. This methodology assumes that one can correlate the number of asperities per unit of area on the...thickness along its length (Figure IV-17) correlate to the three sled system acceleration stages. The higher the slipper acceleration the greater...can conclude that the greater the speed the greater the strain rate contribution. However, higher speeds typically correlate with higher skin

  11. Selective surface smoothening of 3D micro-optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut; Chidambaram, Nachiappan; Altana, Mirco; Kirchner, Robert

    2017-03-01

    We have established a non-contact polishing process for thermoplastic, polymeric microlenses and -prisms with dimensions of up to 50 μm, including sharp convex tips and rims with sub-μm details. The required 3D master structures were fabricated using direct laser-writing lithography with two-photon absorption. Master structures were replicated into poly(methyl methacrylate) through a poly(dimethyl siloxane) intermediate copying step and exposed with 172 nm UV light. Due to the reduction of glass transition temperature in a surface-confined layer, roughness in the range of more than 100 nm could subsequently be smoothed-out to below 10 nm by annealing the surface by heating.

  12. Ground motion simulations in Marmara (Turkey) region from 3D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ulrich, Thomas; Douglas, John

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European project MARSite (2012-2016), one of the main contributions from our research team was to provide ground-motion simulations for the Marmara region from various earthquake source scenarios. We adopted a 3D finite difference code, taking into account the 3D structure around the Sea of Marmara (including the bathymetry) and the sea layer. We simulated two moderate earthquakes (about Mw4.5) and found that the 3D structure improves significantly the waveforms compared to the 1D layer model. Simulations were carried out for different earthquakes (moderate point sources and large finite sources) in order to provide shake maps (Aochi and Ulrich, BSSA, 2015), to study the variability of ground-motion parameters (Douglas & Aochi, BSSA, 2016) as well as to provide synthetic seismograms for the blind inversion tests (Diao et al., GJI, 2016). The results are also planned to be integrated in broadband ground-motion simulations, tsunamis generation and simulations of triggered landslides (in progress by different partners). The simulations are freely shared among the partners via the internet and the visualization of the results is diffused on the project's homepage. All these simulations should be seen as a reference for this region, as they are based on the latest knowledge that obtained during the MARSite project, although their refinement and validation of the model parameters and the simulations are a continuing research task relying on continuing observations. The numerical code used, the models and the simulations are available on demand.

  13. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  14. 3D finite amplitude folding: Implications for stress evolution during crustal and lithospheric deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, Boris J. P.; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2006-07-01

    Compression of the lithosphere, sedimentary sequences or quartz veins may result in a folding instability. We perform numerical simulations of viscous single-layer folding to study this instability in 3D. It is demonstrated that linear theories correctly describe the instability for small amplitudes. At larger amplitudes, however, the theory breaks down. For these stages we present a new nonlinear amplification equation. Numerical simulations of folding of an initially horizontal layer, perturbed with random noise, demonstrate that in most cases fold axes form perpendicular to the main shortening direction. Aspect ratios of folds are finite and the patterns are relatively insensitive to the applied background shortening directions. Furthermore, the 3D folding instability reduces the averaged differential stress within the folded (``strong'') layer, in agreement with 2D results. This implies that the Christmas-tree approach to represent the strength of the crust and lithosphere may be invalid if folding occurs during the deformation.

  15. A finite element implementation for biphasic contact of hydrated porous media under finite deformation and sliding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Shah, Mitul; Spilker, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The study of biphasic soft tissues contact is fundamental to understanding the biomechanical behavior of human diarthrodial joints. However, to date, few biphasic finite element contact analysis for 3D physiological geometries under finite deformation has been developed. The objective of this paper is to develop a hyperelastic biphasic contact implementation for finite deformation and sliding problem. An augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The finite element implementation was based on a general purpose software, COMSOL Multiphysics. The accuracy of the implementation is verified using example problems, for which solutions are available by alternative analyses. The implementation was proven to be robust and able to handle finite deformation and sliding. PMID:24496915

  16. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  17. A shell element for computing 3D eddy currents -- Applications to transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, C.; Tanneau, G.; Meunier, G.; Labie, P.; Ngnegueu, T.; Sacotte, M.

    1995-05-01

    A skin depth-independent shell element to model thin conducting sheets is described in a finite element context. This element takes into account the field variation through depth due to skin effect. The finite element formulation is first described, then boundary conditions at the edge of conducting shells and the possibility of describing non conducting line gaps and holes are discussed. Finally, a computation of an earthing transformer model with an aluminium shield modelled with shell elements is presented.

  18. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  19. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  20. A new formulation of hybrid/mixed finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.; Kang, D.; Chen, D.-P.

    1983-01-01

    A new formulation of finite element method is accomplished by the Hellinger-Reissner principle for which the stress equilibrium conditions are not introduced initially but are brought-in through the use of additional internal displacement parameters. The method can lead to the same result as the assumed stress hybrid model. However, it is more general and more flexible. The use of natural coordinates for stress assumptions leads to elements which are less sensitive to the choice of reference coordinates. Numerical solutions by 3-D solid element indicate that more efficient elements can be constructed by assumed stresses which only partially satisfy the equilibrium conditions.

  1. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  2. Implicit finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin methods for multicomponent flow in unstructured 3D fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Amooie, Mohammad Amin; Soltanian, Mohamad Reza

    2016-10-01

    We present a new implicit higher-order finite element (FE) approach to efficiently model compressible multicomponent fluid flow on unstructured grids and in fractured porous subsurface formations. The scheme is sequential implicit: pressures and fluxes are updated with an implicit Mixed Hybrid Finite Element (MHFE) method, and the transport of each species is approximated with an implicit second-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) FE method. Discrete fractures are incorporated with a cross-flow equilibrium approach. This is the first investigation of all-implicit higher-order MHFE-DG for unstructured triangular, quadrilateral (2D), and hexahedral (3D) grids and discrete fractures. A lowest-order implicit finite volume (FV) transport update is also developed for the same grid types. The implicit methods are compared to an Implicit-Pressure-Explicit-Composition (IMPEC) scheme. For fractured domains, the unconditionally stable implicit transport update is shown to increase computational efficiency by orders of magnitude as compared to IMPEC, which has a time-step constraint proportional to the pore volume of discrete fracture grid cells. However, when lowest-order Euler time-discretizations are used, numerical errors increase linearly with the larger implicit time-steps, resulting in high numerical dispersion. Second-order Crank-Nicolson implicit MHFE-DG and MHFE-FV are therefore presented as well. Convergence analyses show twice the convergence rate for the DG methods as compared to FV, resulting in two to three orders of magnitude higher computational efficiency. Numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness in modeling compressible multicomponent flow on irregular and fractured 2D and 3D grids, even in the presence of fingering instabilities.

  3. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  4. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  5. Finite-Element Composite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, special-purpose finite-element program for analyzing behavior of composite material with microcomputer. Procedure leads to set of linear simultaneous equations relating unknown nodal displacement to applied loads. Written in HP BASIC 3.0.

  6. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  7. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Treesearch

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  8. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  9. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  10. Pavement nondestructive evaluation using finite-element dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, W.; Hackett, R. M.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes the nondestructive evaluation devices, visual distress survey and coring used to investigate jointed concrete pavement performance in northern Mississippi. 3D finite-element models were developed to simulate in-service conditions and to characterize in-situ material properties. Reasonable good agreement is found between in-situ moduli backcalculated from the dynamic analysis of falling weight deflectometer (FWD) deflections measured on selected pavements and laboratory moduli. Effects of load pulse shape, cracking, and discontinuities on the surface deflection response of pavements subjected to FWD load wee also investigated. It is shown that 3D analysis of temperature distribution and resulting thermal stresses play a significant role int he performance of concrete pavements. The study results demonstrated the extensive usefulness of the finite-element dynamic analysis and limitations of the static multilayered analysis and other pavement analysis programs which do not allow for crack modeling and dynamic analysis.

  11. Elastoplastic notch root strains - Measurements versus finite-element predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tregoning, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A study intended to experimentally and computationally probe the nature of the elastoplastic strain fields created by notches with various levels of constraint is presented. An interferometric strain/displacement gage is used to measure both the axial and lateral strain at the center of a machined and polished notch. The monotonic response of various notches is determined using 3D finite-element calculations.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Intermuscular Interactions and Myofascial Force Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    modeling study aims at providing such analysis of local strain to enhance understanding of this concept. II. METHODOLOGY A 3D-finite element muscle model...is used for the analysis and presentation of the results. In the present study, using the same methods, a model representing whole EDL isolated from...to as lengthened muscle) was lengthened from this low length up to 1.5 mm over the original length (Fig. 1). Throughout the analysis , both modeled

  13. Transient Finite Element Computations on a Variable Transputer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolinski, Patrick J.; Lapczyk, Ireneusz

    1993-01-01

    A parallel program to analyze transient finite element problems was written and implemented on a system of transputer processors. The program uses the explicit time integration algorithm which eliminates the need for equation solving, making it more suitable for parallel computations. An interprocessor communication scheme was developed for arbitrary two dimensional grid processor configurations. Several 3-D problems were analyzed on a system with a small number of processors.

  14. Parallel finite element simulation of large ram-air parachutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalro, V.; Aliabadi, S.; Garrard, W.; Tezduyar, T.; Mittal, S.; Stein, K.

    1997-06-01

    In the near future, large ram-air parachutes are expected to provide the capability of delivering 21 ton payloads from altitudes as high as 25,000 ft. In development and test and evaluation of these parachutes the size of the parachute needed and the deployment stages involved make high-performance computing (HPC) simulations a desirable alternative to costly airdrop tests. Although computational simulations based on realistic, 3D, time-dependent models will continue to be a major computational challenge, advanced finite element simulation techniques recently developed for this purpose and the execution of these techniques on HPC platforms are significant steps in the direction to meet this challenge. In this paper, two approaches for analysis of the inflation and gliding of ram-air parachutes are presented. In one of the approaches the point mass flight mechanics equations are solved with the time-varying drag and lift areas obtained from empirical data. This approach is limited to parachutes with similar configurations to those for which data are available. The other approach is 3D finite element computations based on the Navier-Stokes equations governing the airflow around the parachute canopy and Newtons law of motion governing the 3D dynamics of the canopy, with the forces acting on the canopy calculated from the simulated flow field. At the earlier stages of canopy inflation the parachute is modelled as an expanding box, whereas at the later stages, as it expands, the box transforms to a parafoil and glides. These finite element computations are carried out on the massively parallel supercomputers CRAY T3D and Thinking Machines CM-5, typically with millions of coupled, non-linear finite element equations solved simultaneously at every time step or pseudo-time step of the simulation.

  15. Development of a CAD Model Simplification Framework for Finite Element Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    97 4.20 Von Mises Stress distribution on the unsimplified boom assembly . . 97 vii List of Abbreviations CAD Computer Aided Design FEA Finite Element...Element Analysis viii Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Motivation Engineering models today are mainly developed within a 3D computer aided design ( CAD ) software...and manufac- turability. The generated 3D CAD models are used for downstream applications within the design and manufacturing process. Finite

  16. A σ-coordinate model for 3D free-surface flows using an unstructured finite-volume technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uh Zapata, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a numerical solution of three-dimensional free-surface flows using a σ-coordinate model, a projection method and an unstructured finite-volume technique. The coordinate transformation is used in order to overcome difficulties arising from free surface elevation and irregular geometry. The projection method consists to combine the momentum and continuity equations in order to establish a Poisson-type equation for the non-hydrostatic pressure. A cell-centered finite volume method with a triangular mesh in the horizontal direction is used to simulate the flows with free-surfaces, in which the average values of conserved variables are stored at the centre of each element. A parallel algorithm is also presented for the finite volume discretization of the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The proposed parallel method is formulated by using a multi-color SOR method, a block domain decomposition and interprocessor data communication techniques with Message Passing Interface. The model has been validated by several benchmarks which numerical simulations are in good agreement with the corresponding analytical and existing experimental results.

  17. Comparison of hexahedral and tetrahedral elements in finite element analysis of the foot and footwear.

    PubMed

    Tadepalli, Srinivas C; Erdemir, Ahmet; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2011-08-11

    Finite element analysis has been widely used in the field of foot and footwear biomechanics to determine plantar pressures as well as stresses and strains within soft tissue and footwear materials. When dealing with anatomical structures such as the foot, hexahedral mesh generation accounts for most of the model development time due to geometric complexities imposed by branching and embedded structures. Tetrahedral meshing, which can be more easily automated, has been the approach of choice to date in foot and footwear biomechanics. Here we use the nonlinear finite element program Abaqus (Simulia, Providence, RI) to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tetrahedral and hexahedral elements under compression and shear loading, material incompressibility, and frictional contact conditions, which are commonly seen in foot and footwear biomechanics. This study demonstrated that for a range of simulation conditions, hybrid hexahedral elements (Abaqus C3D8H) consistently performed well while hybrid linear tetrahedral elements (Abaqus C3D4H) performed poorly. On the other hand, enhanced quadratic tetrahedral elements with improved stress visualization (Abaqus C3D10I) performed as well as the hybrid hexahedral elements in terms of contact pressure and contact shear stress predictions. Although the enhanced quadratic tetrahedral element simulations were computationally expensive compared to hexahedral element simulations in both barefoot and footwear conditions, the enhanced quadratic tetrahedral element formulation seems to be very promising for foot and footwear applications as a result of decreased labor and expedited model development, all related to facilitated mesh generation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. 3D Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents in a left ventricle laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Badas, Maria; Espa, Stefania; Fortini, Stefania; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLEs) are a powerful means to infer characteristic features of the flow that cannot be revealed by other Eulerian criteria. Recently FTLEs are becoming popular also in the medical context, for instance in the analysis of vascular flow measured by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, many of the FTLE experimental works are based only on two-dimensional velocity fields, moreover those computed on in-vivo data cannot be obtained under controlled and repeatable conditions. Here we present the 3D FTLE evolution inside a Left Ventricle (LV) laboratory model mimicking physiological human conditions. The investigation of FTLE fields highlights distinctive features of the cardiac flow and gives an insight on the physiological development of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) that optimize the LV refill.

  19. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2012-07-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  20. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  1. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  2. Multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering simulations using 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2012-02-01

    We have implemented three-dimensional (3D) elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations to model Lamb wave scattering for two flaw-types in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate, a rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole and a disbond of the same shape. The plate thickness and flaws explored in this work include frequency-thickness regions where several Lamb wave modes exist and sometimes overlap in phase and/or group velocity. For the case of the flat-bottom hole the depth was incrementally increased to explore progressive changes in multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering due to the damage. The flat-bottom hole simulation results have been compared to experimental data and are shown to provide key insight for this well-defined experimental case by explaining unexpected results in experimental waveforms. For the rounded rectangle disbond flaw, which would be difficult to implement experimentally, we found that Lamb wave behavior differed significantly from the flat-bottom hole flaw. Most of the literature in this field is restricted to low frequency-thickness regions due to difficulties in interpreting data when multiple modes exist. We found that benchmarked 3D EFIT simulations can yield an understanding of scattering behavior for these higher frequency-thickness regions and in cases that would be difficult to set up experimentally. Additionally, our results show that 2D simulations would not have been sufficient for modeling the complicated scattering that occurred. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  4. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  5. Optimizing header strength utilizing finite element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, S. N.

    Finite element techniques have been successfully applied as a design tool in the optimization of high strength headers for pyrotechnic-driven actuators. These techniques have been applied to three aspects of the design process of a high strength header. The design process was a joint effort of experts from several disciplines including design engineers, material scientists, test engineers, manufacturing engineers, and structural analysts. Following material selection, finite element techniques were applied to evaluate the residual stresses due to manufacturing which were developed in the high strength glass ceramic-to-metal seal headers. Results from these finite element analyses were used to identify header designs which were manufacturable and had a minimum residual stress state. Finite element techniques were than applied to obtain the response of the header due to pyrotechnic burn. The results provided realistic upper bounds on the pressure containment ability of various preliminary header designs and provided a quick and inexpensive method of strengthening and refining the designs. Since testing of the headers was difficult and sometimes destructive, results of the analyses were also used to interpret test results and identify failure modes. In this paper, details of the finite element element techniques including the models used, material properties, material failure models, and loading will be presented. Results from the analyses showing the header failure process will also be presented. This paper will show that significant gains in capability and understanding can result when finite element techniques are included as an integral part of the design process of complicated high strength headers.

  6. 3D micro-crack propagation simulation at enamel/adhesive interface using FE submodeling and element death techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng-Liang; Lin, Chun-Li; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Yen-Hsiang

    2010-06-01

    This study investigates micro-crack propagation at the enamel/adhesive interface using finite element (FE) submodeling and element death techniques. A three-dimensional (3D) FE macro-model of the enamel/adhesive/ceramic subjected to shear bond testing was generated and analyzed. A 3D micro-model with interfacial bonding structure was constructed at the upper enamel/adhesive interface where the stress concentration was found from the macro-model results. The morphology of this interfacial bonding structure (i.e., resin tag) was assigned based on resin tag geometry and enamel rod arrangement from a scanning electron microscopy micrograph. The boundary conditions for the micro-model were determined from the macro-model results. A custom iterative code combined with the element death technique was used to calculate the micro-crack propagation. Parallel experiments were performed to validate this FE simulation. The stress concentration within the adhesive occurred mainly at the upper corner near the enamel/adhesive interface and the resin tag base. A simulated fracture path was found at the resin tag base along the enamel/adhesive interface. A morphological observation of the fracture patterns obtained from in vitro testing corresponded with the simulation results. This study shows that the FE submodeling and element death techniques could be used to simulate the 3D micro-stress pattern and the crack propagation noted at the enamel/adhesive interface.

  7. DNS of Sheared Particulate Flows with a 3D Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Andrew; Hu, Howard

    2007-11-01

    A 3D explicit finite-difference code for direct simulation of the motion of solid particulates in fluids has been developed, and a periodic boundary condition implemented to study the effective viscosity of suspensions in shear. The code enforces the no-slip condition on the surface of spherical particles in a uniform Cartesian grid with a special particle boundary condition based on matching the Stokes flow solutions next to the particle surface with a numerical solution away from it. The method proceeds by approximating the flow next to the particle surface as a Stokes flow in the particle's local coordinates, which is then matched to the finite difference update in the bulk fluid on a ``cage'' of grid points near the particle surface. (The boundary condition is related to the PHYSALIS method (2003), but modified for explicit schemes and with an iterative process removed.) Advantages of the method include superior accuracy of the scheme on a relatively coarse grid for intermediate particle Reynolds numbers, ease of implementation, and the elimination of the need to track the particle surface. For the sheared suspension, the effects of fluid and solid inertia and solid volume fraction on effective viscosity at moderate particle Reynolds numbers and concentrated suspensions will be discussed.

  8. Visualization of higher order finite elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Crawford, Richard H.; Khardekar, Rahul Vinay

    2004-04-01

    Finite element meshes are used to approximate the solution to some differential equation when no exact solution exists. A finite element mesh consists of many small (but finite, not infinitesimal or differential) regions of space that partition the problem domain, {Omega}. Each region, or element, or cell has an associated polynomial map, {Phi}, that converts the coordinates of any point, x = ( x y z ), in the element into another value, f(x), that is an approximate solution to the differential equation, as in Figure 1(a). This representation works quite well for axis-aligned regions of space, but when there are curved boundaries on the problem domain, {Omega}, it becomes algorithmically much more difficult to define {Phi} in terms of x. Rather, we define an archetypal element in a new coordinate space, r = ( r s t ), which has a simple, axis-aligned boundary (see Figure 1(b)) and place two maps onto our archetypal element:

  9. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  10. Finite element schemes for Fermi equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, M.; Beilina, L.; Naseer, M.; Standar, C.

    2017-07-01

    A priori error estimates are derived for the streamline diffusion (SD) finite element methods for the Fermi pencil-beam equation. Two-dimensional numerical examples confirm our theoretical investigations.

  11. A time-space domain stereo finite difference method for 3D scalar wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yushu; Yang, Guangwen; Ma, Xiao; He, Conghui; Song, Guojie

    2016-11-01

    The time-space domain finite difference methods reduce numerical dispersion effectively by minimizing the error in the joint time-space domain. However, their interpolating coefficients are related with the Courant numbers, leading to significantly extra time costs for loading the coefficients consecutively according to velocity in heterogeneous models. In the present study, we develop a time-space domain stereo finite difference (TSSFD) method for 3D scalar wave equation. The method propagates both the displacements and their gradients simultaneously to keep more information of the wavefields, and minimizes the maximum phase velocity error directly using constant interpolation coefficients for different Courant numbers. We obtain the optimal constant coefficients by combining the truncated Taylor series approximation and the time-space domain optimization, and adjust the coefficients to improve the stability condition. Subsequent investigation shows that the TSSFD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively with high computational efficiency. The maximum phase velocity error of the TSSFD is just 3.09% even with only 2 sampling points per minimum wavelength when the Courant number is 0.4. Numerical experiments show that to generate wavefields with no visible numerical dispersion, the computational efficiency of the TSSFD is 576.9%, 193.5%, 699.0%, and 191.6% of those of the 4th-order and 8th-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method, the 4th-order staggered grid method (SG), and the 8th-order optimal finite difference method (OFD), respectively. Meanwhile, the TSSFD is compatible to the unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) boundary condition for absorbing artificial boundaries. The efficiency and capability to handle complex velocity models make it an attractive tool in imaging methods such as acoustic reverse time migration (RTM).

  12. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  13. Quadratic finite elements and incompressible viscous flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, Clark R.; Gartling, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure stabilization methods are applied to higher-order velocity finite elements for application to viscous incompressible flows. Both a standard pressure stabilizing Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) method and a new polynomial pressure projection stabilization (PPPS) method have been implemented and tested for various quadratic elements in two dimensions. A preconditioner based on relaxing the incompressibility constraint is also tested for the iterative solution of saddle point problems arising from mixed Galerkin finite element approximations to the Navier-Stokes equations. The preconditioner is demonstrated for BB stable elements with discontinuous pressure approximations in two and three dimensions.

  14. Design of extended viewing zone at autostereoscopic 3D display based on diffusing optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Chang; Hwang, Yong Seok; Hong, Suk-Pyo; Kim, Eun Soo

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, to realize a non-glasses type 3D display as next step from the current glasses-typed 3D display, it is suggested that a viewing zone is designed for the 3D display using DOE (Diffusing Optical Element). Viewing zone of proposed method is larger than that of the current parallax barrier method or lenticular method. Through proposed method, it is shown to enable the expansion and adjustment of the area of viewing zone according to viewing distance.

  15. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  16. iBem3D, a three-dimensional iterative boundary element method using angular dislocations for modeling geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, F.; Maerten, L.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-11-01

    Most analytical solutions to engineering or geological problems are limited to simple geometries. For example, analytical solutions have been found to solve for stresses around a circular hole in a plate. To solve more complex problems, mathematicians and engineers have developed powerful computer-aided numerical methods, which can be categorized into two main types: differential methods and integral methods. The finite element method (FEM) is a differential method that was developed in the 1950s and is one of the most commonly used numerical methods today. Since its development, other differential methods, including the boundary element method (BEM), have been developed to solve different types of problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe iBem3D, formally called Poly3D, a C++ and modular 3D boundary element computer program based on the theory of angular dislocations for modeling three-dimensional (3D) discontinuities in an elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. After 20 years and more than 150 scientific publications, we present in detail the formulation behind this method, its enhancements over the years as well as some important applications in several domains of the geosciences. The main advantage of using this formulation, for describing geological objects such as faults, resides in the possibility of modeling complex geometries without gaps and overlaps between adjacent triangular dislocation elements, which is a significant shortcoming for models using rectangular dislocation elements. Reliability, speed, simplicity, and accuracy are enhanced in the latest version of the computer code. Industrial applications include subseismic fault modeling, fractured reservoir modeling, interpretation and validation of fault connectivity and reservoir compartmentalization, depleted area and fault reactivation, and pressurized wellbore stability. Academic applications include earthquake and volcano monitoring, hazard mitigation, and slope

  17. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  18. Recent advances in hybrid/mixed finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    In formulations of Hybrid/Mixed finite element methods respectively by the Hellinger-Reissner principle and the Hu-Washizu principle, the stress equilibrium equations are brought in as conditions of constraint through the introduction of additional internal displacement parameters. These two approaches are more flexible and have better computing efficiencies. A procedure for the choice of assumed stress terms for 3-D solids is suggested. Example solutions are given for plates and shells using the present formulations and the idea of semiloof elements.

  19. Wave dispersion properties of compound finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, Thomas; Thuburn, John

    2017-06-01

    Mixed finite elements use different approximation spaces for different dependent variables. Certain classes of mixed finite elements, called compatible finite elements, have been shown to exhibit a number of desirable properties for a numerical weather prediction model. In two-dimensions the lowest order element of the Raviart-Thomas based mixed element is the finite element equivalent of the widely used C-grid staggering, which is known to possess good wave dispersion properties, at least for quadrilateral grids. It has recently been proposed that building compound elements from a number of triangular Raviart-Thomas sub-elements, such that both the primal and (implied) dual grid are constructed from the same sub-elements, would allow greater flexibility in the use of different advection schemes along with the ability to build arbitrary polygonal elements. Although the wave dispersion properties of the triangular sub-elements are well understood, those of the compound elements are unknown. It would be useful to know how they compare with the non-compound elements and what properties of the triangular sub-grid elements are inherited? Here a numerical dispersion analysis is presented for the linear shallow water equations in two dimensions discretised using the lowest order compound Raviart-Thomas finite elements on regular quadrilateral and hexagonal grids. It is found that, in comparison with the well known C-grid scheme, the compound elements exhibit a more isotropic dispersion relation, with a small over estimation of the frequency for short waves compared with the relatively large underestimation for the C-grid. On a quadrilateral grid the compound elements are found to differ from the non-compound Raviart-Thomas quadrilateral elements even for uniform elements, exhibiting the influence of the underlying sub-elements. This is shown to lead to small improvements in the accuracy of the dispersion relation: the compound quadrilateral element is slightly better for

  20. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Model Reduction of Viscoelastic Finite Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. H.; Inman, D. J.; Lam, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines a method of adding viscoelastic properties to finite element models by using additional co-ordinates to account for the frequency dependence usually associated with such damping materials. Several such methods exist and all suffer from an increase in order of the final finite model which is undesirable in many applications. Here we propose to combine one of these methods, the GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, with model reduction techniques to remove the objection of increased model order. The result of combining several methods is an ability to add the effects of visoelastic components to finite element or other analytical models without increasing the order of the system. The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example. The method proposed here results in a viscoelastic finite element of a structure without increasing the order of the original model.

  2. An Interactive Preprocessor Program with Graphics for a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Claude Hayden, III

    The development and capabilities of an interactive preprocessor program with graphics for an existing three-dimensional finite element code is presented. This preprocessor program, EDGAP3D, is designed to be used in conjunction with the Texas Three Dimensional Grain Analysis Program (TXCAP3D). The code presented in this research is capable of the…

  3. Modelling the electromagnetic performance of moving rail gun launchers using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in 'smooth rotor' conductors moving at constant velocity is described. A method for joining discontinuous A fields at the interface between conductors in sliding electrical contact has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis.

  4. A 3-D implicit finite-volume model of shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiming; Lin, Qianru

    2015-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed to simulate shallow water flows in large water bodies, such as coastal and estuarine waters. The eddy viscosity is determined using a newly modified mixing length model that uses different mixing length functions for the horizontal and vertical shear strain rates. The 3-D shallow water flow equations with the hydrostatic pressure assumption are solved using an implicit finite-volume method based on a quadtree (telescoping) rectangular mesh on the horizontal plane and the sigma coordinate in the vertical direction. The quadtree technique can locally refine the mesh around structures or in high-gradient regions by splitting a coarse cell into four child cells. The grid nodes are numbered with a one-dimensional index system that has unstructured grid feature for better grid flexibility. All the primary variables are arranged in a non-staggered grid system. Fluxes at cell faces are determined using a Rhie and Chow-type momentum interpolation, to avoid the possible spurious checkerboard oscillations caused by linear interpolation. Each of the discretized governing equations is solved iteratively using the flexible GMRES method with ILUT preconditioning, and coupling of water level and velocity among these equations is achieved by using the SIMPLEC algorithm with under-relaxation. The model has been tested in four cases, including steady flow near a spur-dyke, tidal flows in San Francisco Bay and Gironde Estuary, and wind-induced current in a flume. The calculated water levels and velocities are in good agreement with the measured values.

  5. Accurate, finite-volume methods for 3D MHD on unstructured Lagrangian meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Rousculp, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Previous 2D methods for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) have contributed both to development of core code capability and to physics applications relevant to AGEX pulsed-power experiments. This strategy is being extended to 3D by development of a modular extension of an ASCI code. Extension to 3D not only increases complexity by problem size, but also introduces new physics, such as magnetic helicity transport. The authors have developed a method which incorporates all known conservation properties into the difference scheme on a Lagrangian unstructured mesh. Because the method does not depend on the mesh structure, mesh refinement is possible during a calculation to prevent the well known problem of mesh tangling. Arbitrary polyhedral cells are decomposed into tetrahedrons. The action of the magnetic vector potential, A {center_dot} {delta}l, is centered on the edges of this extended mesh. For ideal flow, this maintains {del} {center_dot} B = 0 to round-off error. Vertex forces are derived by the variation of magnetic energy with respect to vertex positions, F = {minus}{partial_derivative}W{sub B}/{partial_derivative}r. This assures symmetry as well as magnetic flux, momentum, and energy conservation. The method is local so that parallelization by domain decomposition is natural for large meshes. In addition, a simple, ideal-gas, finite pressure term has been included. The resistive diffusion part is calculated using the support operator method, to obtain an energy conservative, symmetric method on an arbitrary mesh. Implicit time difference equations are solved by preconditioned, conjugate gradient methods. Results of convergence tests are presented. Initial results of an annular Z-pinch implosion problem illustrate the application of these methods to multi-material problems.

  6. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element solution for poromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruijie

    This dissertation focuses on applying discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods to poromechanics problems. A few challenges have been presented in traditional and popular continuous Galerkin (CG) finite element methods for solving complex coupled thermal, flow and solid mechanics. For example, nonphysical pore pressure oscillations often occur in CG solutions for poroelasticity problems with low permeability. A robust and practical numerical scheme for removing or alleviating the oscillation is not available. In modeling thermoporoelastoplasticity, CG methods require the use of very small time steps to obtain a convergent solution. The temperature profile predicted by CG methods in the fine mesh zones is often seriously polluted by large errors produced in coarse mesh zones in the case where the convection dominates the thermal process. The nonphysical oscillations in pore pressure and temperature solutions induced by CG methods at very early time stages seriously corrupt the solutions at longer time. We propose DG methods to handle these challenges because they are physics driven, provide local conservation of mass and momentum, have high stability and robustness, are locking-free, and because of their meshing and implementation capabilities. We first apply a family of DG methods, including Oden-Babuska-Baumann (OBB), Nonsymmetric Interior Penalty Galerkin (NIPG), Symmetric Interior Penalty Galerkin (SIPG) and Incomplete Interior Penalty Galerkin (IIPG), to 3D linear elasticity problems. This family of DG methods is tested and evaluated by using a cantilever beam problem with nearly incompressible materials. It is shown that DG methods are simple, robust and locking-free in dealing with nearly incompressible materials. Based on the success of DG methods in elasticity, we extend the DG theory into plasticity problems. A DG formulation has been implemented for solving 3D poroelasticity problems with low permeability. Numerical examples solved by DG methods demonstrate

  7. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  8. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudospectral/spectral-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34 s down to 11 s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  9. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  10. BEST3D user's manual: Boundary Element Solution Technology, 3-Dimensional Version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical basis and programming strategy utilized in the construction of the computer program BEST3D (boundary element solution technology - three dimensional) and detailed input instructions are provided for the use of the program. An extensive set of test cases and sample problems is included in the manual and is also available for distribution with the program. The BEST3D program was developed under the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components contract (NAS3-23697). The overall objective of this program was the development of new computer programs allowing more accurate and efficient three-dimensional thermal and stress analysis of hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The BEST3D program allows both linear and nonlinear analysis of static and quasi-static elastic problems and transient dynamic analysis for elastic problems. Calculation of elastic natural frequencies and mode shapes is also provided.

  11. Waveguide finite elements for curved structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnveden, Svante; Fraggstedt, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A waveguide finite element formulation for the analysis of curved structures is introduced. The formulation is valid for structures that along one axis have constant properties. It is based on a modified Hamilton's principle valid for general linear viscoelastic motion, which is derived here. Using this principle, material properties such as losses may be distributed in the system and may vary with frequency. Element formulations for isoparametric solid elements and deep shell elements are presented for curved waveguides as well as for straight waveguides. In earlier works, the curved elements have successfully been used to model a passenger car tyre. Here a simple validation example and convergence study is presented, which considers a finite length circular cylinder and all four elements presented are used, in turn, to model this structure. Calculated results compare favourably to those in the literature.

  12. EIT image interpretation based on a 3D finite-difference thorax model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Patterson, Robert P.

    2003-05-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT), can produce a cross-sectional image that allows non-invasive assessment of resistivity distribution in a measured object. Since its introduction more than two decades ago, EIT has attracted considerable interests. However, its clinical application has been constrained, to some extent, by the difficulties in interpreting the reconstructed images, due to their low resolution. To facilitate the application of EIT to modeling human physiological functions, in this study, we proposed a method to quantify the changes of EIT images relative to anatomical structure. Based on ECG-gated MRI images, a 3D human thorax model was developed. EIT measurements of the thorax model were simulated by finite difference method and images were reconstructed using the filtered back projection algorithm. By varying the resistivities of the lungs, the ventricles and the atria in the thorax model, changes in the images were derived by computing the average resistivity change in the regions of interest. The results show there is a very strong relationship between organ volme and the magnitude of the observed resistivity change in the image. All the organs show a nearly linear change in the observed resistivity as a function of the resistivity change in the model.

  13. A 3-D finite difference time domain investigation of microwave propagation through inhomogeneous biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, David B., Jr.

    1994-12-01

    This paper extends past analysis of an optimal source distribution around a homogeneous sphere of muscle tissue by using a 3-D finite difference time domain (FDTD) scenario in which an anatomically correct human head model is irradiated. It first duplicates the analytical solution within an FDTD space using an FDTD computer code developed at Penn State University. This duplication uses a 9.45 cm radius sphere represented in an FDTD space of 2.35 mm cubic cells. FDTD simulations are then performed on four, three, and two layer laminated spheres, designed to provide simple models of a head. Finally, four simulations were performed in FDTD on the human head model developed at Penn State from an MRI scan of an actual human head. The comparison of analytic simulations to the FDTD simulations on a homogeneous sphere showed a pixel by pixel average of 5.34% error between the two with a standard deviation of 7.84%. The layered sphere models showed considerable spiking at the two poles along with a small amount of spiking due to the stair-step approximation of the spheres. None of these spikes increased the power beyond that at the surface and hence were not critical. The simulations on a true human head showed improvement in depth due to the low-loss of the bone tissue. This study demonstrates that microwave hyperthermia with good resolution is possible in an anatomically correct head model.

  14. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Scattered Teleseismic Wavefields in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, I. B.; Zheng, H.

    2005-12-01

    For a teleseismic array targeting subducting crust in a zone of active subduction, scattering from the zone underlying the trench result in subhorizontally-propagating waves that could be difficult to distinguish from converted P- and S- wave backscattered from the surface. Because back-scattered modes often provide the most spectacular images of subducting slabs, it is important to understand their differences from the arrivals scattered from the trench zone. To investigate the detailed teleseismic wavefield in a subduction zone environment, we performed a full-waveform, 3-D visco-elastic finite-difference modeling of teleseismic wave propagation using a Beowulf cluster. The synthetics show strong scattering from the trench zone, dominated by the mantle and crustal P-waves propagating at 6.2-8.1.km/s and slower. These scattered waves occupy the same time and moveout intervals as the backscattered modes, and also have similar amplitudes. Although their amplitude decay characters are different, with the uncertainties in the velocity and density structure of the subduction zone, unambiguous distinguishing of these modes appears difficult. However, under minimal assumptions (in particular, without invoking slab dehydration), recent observations of receiver function amplitudes decreasing away from the trench favor the interpretation of trench-zone scattering.

  15. Exact finite elements for conduction and convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An appproach for developing exact one dimensional conduction-convection finite elements is presented. Exact interpolation functions are derived based on solutions to the governing differential equations by employing a nodeless parameter. Exact interpolation functions are presented for combined heat transfer in several solids of different shapes, and for combined heat transfer in a flow passage. Numerical results demonstrate that exact one dimensional elements offer advantages over elements based on approximate interpolation functions. Previously announced in STAR as N81-31507

  16. Exact finite elements for conduction and convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An appproach for developing exact one dimensional conduction-convection finite elements is presented. Exact interpolation functions are derived based on solutions to the governing differential equations by employing a nodeless parameter. Exact interpolation functions are presented for combined heat transfer in several solids of different shapes, and for combined heat transfer in a flow passage. Numerical results demonstrate that exact one dimensional elements offer advantages over elements based on approximate interpolation functions. Previously announced in STAR as N81-31507

  17. Exact finite elements for conduction and convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An approach for developing exact one dimensional conduction-convection finite elements is presented. Exact interpolation functions are derived based on solutions to the governing differential equations by employing a nodeless parameter. Exact interpolation functions are presented for combined heat transfer in several solids of different shapes, and for combined heat transfer in a flow passage. Numerical results demonstrate that exact one dimensional elements offer advantages over elements based on approximate interpolation functions.

  18. Structure and properties of small clusters of transition 3d-element oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. V.

    2011-03-15

    The results of calculations of the parameters of the equilibrium structures of small clusters of transition 3d-element oxides are presented. The calculations are performed by the spin-unrestricted Hartree-Fock method. The properties of the most stable structures, i.e., those with the lowest total energies among all those obtained, are discussed.

  19. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Lin, Xue; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-09-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces.

  20. Finite element modeling and analysis of tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Predicting the response of tires under various loading conditions using finite element technology is addressed. Some of the recent advances in finite element technology which have high potential for application to tire modeling problems are reviewed. The analysis and modeling needs for tires are identified. Reduction methods for large-scale nonlinear analysis, with particular emphasis on treatment of combined loads, displacement-dependent and nonconservative loadings; development of simple and efficient mixed finite element models for shell analysis, identification of equivalent mixed and purely displacement models, and determination of the advantages of using mixed models; and effective computational models for large-rotation nonlinear problems, based on a total Lagrangian description of the deformation are included.

  1. Finite element model calibration of a nonlinear perforated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.; Beberniss, Timothy J.; Neild, Simon A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a case study in which the finite element model for a curved circular plate is calibrated to reproduce both the linear and nonlinear dynamic response measured from two nominally identical samples. The linear dynamic response is described with the linear natural frequencies and mode shapes identified with a roving hammer test. Due to the uncertainty in the stiffness characteristics from the manufactured perforations, the linear natural frequencies are used to update the effective modulus of elasticity of the full order finite element model (FEM). The nonlinear dynamic response is described with nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) measured using force appropriation and high speed 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC). The measured NNMs are used to update the boundary conditions of the full order FEM through comparison with NNMs calculated from a nonlinear reduced order model (NLROM). This comparison revealed that the nonlinear behavior could not be captured without accounting for the small curvature of the plate from manufacturing as confirmed in literature. So, 3D-DIC was also used to identify the initial static curvature of each plate and the resulting curvature was included in the full order FEM. The updated models are then used to understand how the stress distribution changes at large response amplitudes providing a possible explanation of failures observed during testing.

  2. Finite-Difference Algorithm for Simulating 3D Electromagnetic Wavefields in Conductive Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wavefields are routinely used in geophysical exploration for detection and characterization of subsurface geological formations of economic interest. Recorded EM signals depend strongly on the current conductivity of geologic media. Hence, they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of saturated porous bodies. In order to enhance understanding of field-recorded data, we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating three-dimensional (3D) EM wave propagation and diffusion in heterogeneous conductive materials. Maxwell's equations are combined with isotropic constitutive relations to obtain a set of six, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing the electric and magnetic vectors. An advantage of this system is that it does not contain spatial derivatives of the three medium parameters electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and current conductivity. Numerical solution methodology consists of explicit, time-domain finite-differencing on a 3D staggered rectangular grid. Temporal and spatial FD operators have order 2 and N, where N is user-selectable. We use an artificially-large electric permittivity to maximize the FD timestep, and thus reduce execution time. For the low frequencies typically used in geophysical exploration, accuracy is not unduly compromised. Grid boundary reflections are mitigated via convolutional perfectly matched layers (C-PMLs) imposed at the six grid flanks. A shared-memory-parallel code implementation via OpenMP directives enables rapid algorithm execution on a multi-thread computational platform. Good agreement is obtained in comparisons of numerically-generated data with reference solutions. EM wavefields are sourced via point current density and magnetic dipole vectors. Spatially-extended inductive sources (current carrying wire loops) are under development. We are particularly interested in accurate representation of high-conductivity sub-grid-scale features that are common

  3. Rayleigh Wave Numerical Dispersion in a 3D Finite-Difference Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.; Aldridge, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    A Rayleigh wave propagates laterally without dispersion in the vicinity of the plane stress-free surface of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic halfspace. The phase speed is independent of frequency and depends only on the Poisson ratio of the medium. However, after temporal and spatial discretization, a Rayleigh wave simulated by a 3D staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) seismic wave propagation algorithm suffers from frequency- and direction-dependent numerical dispersion. The magnitude of this dispersion depends critically on FD algorithm implementation details. Nevertheless, proper gridding can control numerical dispersion to within an acceptable level, leading to accurate Rayleigh wave simulations. Many investigators have derived dispersion relations appropriate for body wave propagation by various FD algorithms. However, the situation for surface waves is less well-studied. We have devised a numerical search procedure to estimate Rayleigh phase speed and group speed curves for 3D O(2,2) and O(2,4) staggered-grid FD algorithms. In contrast with the continuous time-space situation (where phase speed is obtained by extracting the appropriate root of the Rayleigh cubic), we cannot develop a closed-form mathematical formula governing the phase speed. Rather, we numerically seek the particular phase speed that leads to a solution of the discrete wave propagation equations, while holding medium properties, frequency, horizontal propagation direction, and gridding intervals fixed. Group speed is then obtained by numerically differentiating the phase speed with respect to frequency. The problem is formulated for an explicit stress-free surface positioned at two different levels within the staggered spatial grid. Additionally, an interesting variant involving zero-valued medium properties above the surface is addressed. We refer to the latter as an implicit free surface. Our preliminary conclusion is that an explicit free surface, implemented with O(4) spatial FD

  4. 3D Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Simulation of Acoustic Waves in Turbulent Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, N. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Marlin, D.; Wilson, D. K.; Sullivan, P.; Ostashev, V.

    2003-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a three-dimensional heterogeneous moving atmosphere is accurately simulated with a numerical algorithm recently developed under the DOD Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). Sound waves within such a dynamic environment are mathematically described by a set of four, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing small-amplitude fluctuations in pressure and particle velocity. The system is rigorously derived from fundamental principles of continuum mechanics, ideal-fluid constitutive relations, and reasonable assumptions that the ambient atmospheric motion is adiabatic and divergence-free. An explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) numerical scheme is used to solve the system for both pressure and particle velocity wavefields. The atmosphere is characterized by 3D gridded models of sound speed, mass density, and the three components of the wind velocity vector. Dependent variables are stored on staggered spatial and temporal grids, and centered FD operators possess 2nd-order and 4th-order space/time accuracy. Accurate sound wave simulation is achieved provided grid intervals are chosen appropriately. The gridding must be fine enough to reduce numerical dispersion artifacts to an acceptable level and maintain stability. The algorithm is designed to execute on parallel computational platforms by utilizing a spatial domain-decomposition strategy. Currently, the algorithm has been validated on four different computational platforms, and parallel scalability of approximately 85% has been demonstrated. Comparisons with analytic solutions for uniform and vertically stratified wind models indicate that the FD algorithm generates accurate results with either a vanishing pressure or vanishing vertical-particle velocity boundary condition. Simulations are performed using a kinematic turbulence wind profile developed with the quasi-wavelet method. In addition, preliminary results are presented

  5. 3-D Finite-Difference Modeling of Earthquakes in the City of Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, A.; Olsen, K. B.; Rovelli, A.; Marra, F.; Malagnini, L.

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate 3-D amplification effects from regional and local earthquakes in the city of Rome. Mainly, two distinct seismogenic districts may affect the city of Rome: the (1) Alban Hills region, located about 25 km from downtown Rome, and (2) the Central Apennines, located 80-100 km from Rome where the most recent event occurred on January 13, 1915 (M=6.8) which was felt in Rome with a VII degree intensity. To address the seismic hazard in Rome from such sources we have simulated 0-1 Hz viscoelastic wave propagation in a three-dimensional model of the Tiber Valley, Rome, for an M5.5 scenario earthquake (1 Hz) in the seismogenic area of Alban Hills about 25 km from downtown Rome and an M7.0 earthquake (0.5 Hz) about 100 km east of the valley using a fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference method. We used a basin model (~ 6 km by 6 km by 0.050 km) which includes sediments with shear-wave velocities as low as 250 m/s in the Tiber River sediments, constrained by more than 3000 borehole measurements. We have also estimated the amplification of the 3D model due to a 1-Hz vertically-incident planar SH wave. Our results suggest that the strongest ground motion amplification in Rome is restricted to the Holocene alluvial areas with a significant concentration close to the edges of the Tiber River valley, in agreement with the results by Tertulliani and Riguzzi (1995). In particular, the fill deposits in the Tiber River generate amplification by up to a factor of 2 with respect to the surrounding volcanics, largest near the contact between the alluvial sediments and the surrounding volcanic deposits for the incident plane wave source. We find 1-Hz peak ground velocities of up to 30 cm/sec for the M5.5, Alban Hills earthquake, largest near the northwestern edges of the Tiber River. The largest 0.5-Hz peak velocity is 24 cm/s for the M7.0 earthquake with extended durations up to about 1 min. The lower maximum frequency for this scenario is

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Extrusion of Multifilamentary Superconductor Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, X.; Sumption, M.D.; Collings, E.W.

    2004-06-28

    The extrusion of multifilamentary superconductor precursor billets has been modeled using finite element analysis. The billet configuration was 6 around 1, with the subelement consisting of Nb rods, and the outer can or sleeve was Cu. Two general cases were investigated, those in which the re-stack rods were initially; (i) round, and (ii) hexed. A thermo-mechanical, elasto-plastic, finite-element method was used to analyze the extrusion process. In this 3D FEM model, the initial state of the billet was assumed to be absent of bonding. A typical die angle (2{alpha}=45 deg.) and a series of extrusion ratios were selected to perform the simulation and the corresponding stress and strain distributions of the two billet variants processed were compared. Based on the stress and deformation created at the rod/rod and rod/sleeve interfaces, the bonding conditions generated through the extrusion were investigated.

  7. Visualizing higher order finite elements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elements into regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which the algorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomial approximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analytical solution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and momentum. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate. Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and these coefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of freedom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution. Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increasing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number of finite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some types of simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedom than increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation has determined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools do not exist for visual inspection of the solution. This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finite element simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicial regions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. The requirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the places where the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacing algorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.

  8. 3-D Waveguide Effects of Topographical Structural Variation on Full Waveform Propagation: 3-D Finite Difference Modeling Comparisons with Field Data From Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. S.; Miller, R.; Greenfield, R.; Fisk, D.

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through regions of complex topography is not thoroughly understood. Surface waves, are of particular interest, as they are large in amplitude and can characterize the source depth, magnitude, and frequency content. The amplitude and frequency content of seismic waves that propagate in regions with large topographical variations are affected by both the scattering and blockage of the wave energy. The ability to predict the 3-d scattering due to topography will improve the understanding of both regional scale surface wave magnitudes, and refine surface wave discriminants as well as at the local scale (<2 km ) where it will aid in the development of rule of thumb guide lines for array sensor placement for real time sensing technologies. Ideally, when validating the numerical accuracy of a propagation model against field data, the input geologic parameters would be known and thus eliminates geology as a source of error in the calculation. In March of 2001, Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) performed a detailed seismic site characterization at the Smart Weapons Test Range, Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The result of the KGS characterization study is a high-resolution 3-d model that is used in our seismic simulations. The velocities Vs, Vp are calculated by tomography and refraction, attenuation coefficients estimated from the surface wave and from p-waves and are provided in a model with attributes resolved in 3-d to 0.5 meters. In the present work, we present comparisons of synthetic data with seismic data collected at the Smart Weapons Test Range to benchmark the accuracy achieved in simulating 3-d wave propagation in the vicinity of a topographical anomaly (trench). Synthetic seismograms are generated using a 3-d 8th order staggered grid visco-elastic finite difference code that accounts for topography. The geologic model is based on the Yuma site characterization. The size of these calculations required use of the DoD High Performance

  9. Handling realistic assumptions in hypothesis testing of 3D co-localization of genomic elements.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jonas; Lien, Tonje G; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Holden, Lars; Borgan, Ornulf; Glad, Ingrid K; Hovig, Eivind

    2013-05-01

    The study of chromatin 3D structure has recently gained much focus owing to novel techniques for detecting genome-wide chromatin contacts using next-generation sequencing. A deeper understanding of the architecture of the DNA inside the nucleus is crucial for gaining insight into fundamental processes such as transcriptional regulation, genome dynamics and genome stability. Chromatin conformation capture-based methods, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, are now paving the way for routine genome-wide studies of chromatin 3D structure in a range of organisms and tissues. However, appropriate methods for analyzing such data are lacking. Here, we propose a hypothesis test and an enrichment score of 3D co-localization of genomic elements that handles intra- or interchromosomal interactions, both separately and jointly, and that adjusts for biases caused by structural dependencies in the 3D data. We show that maintaining structural properties during resampling is essential to obtain valid estimation of P-values. We apply the method on chromatin states and a set of mutated regions in leukemia cells, and find significant co-localization of these elements, with varying enrichment scores, supporting the role of chromatin 3D structure in shaping the landscape of somatic mutations in cancer.

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Pipe Elbows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-AO81 077 DAVD TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CE--ETC F/B 13/11 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PIPE ELBOWS .(U) FE SO M S MARCUS, B C...TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP i RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER Bethesda, Md. 20084 4 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PIPE ELBOWS by 0 Melvyn S. Marcus and Gordon C...a 90-degree pipe elbow to determine principal stresses due to internal pressure, inplane bending, out-of-plane bending, and torsion moment loadings

  11. Finite element methods for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    An explicit finite element based solution procedure for solving the equations of compressible viscous high speed flow is presented. The method uses domain splitting to advance the solution with different timesteps on different portions of the mesh. For steady inviscid flows, adaptive mesh refinement procedures are successfully employed to enhance the definition of discontinuities. Preliminary ideas on the application of adaptive mesh refinement to the solution of problems involving steady viscous flow are presented. Sample timings are given for the performance of the finite element code on modern supercomputers.

  12. Poroelastic Wave Propagation With a 3D Velocity-Stress-Pressure Finite-Difference Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.; Bartel, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation within a three-dimensional, heterogeneous, isotropic poroelastic medium is numerically simulated with an explicit, time-domain, finite-difference algorithm. A system of thirteen, coupled, first-order, partial differential equations is solved for the particle velocity vector components, the stress tensor components, and the pressure associated with solid and fluid constituents of the two-phase continuum. These thirteen dependent variables are stored on staggered temporal and spatial grids, analogous to the scheme utilized for solution of the conventional velocity-stress system of isotropic elastodynamics. Centered finite-difference operators possess 2nd-order accuracy in time and 4th-order accuracy in space. Seismological utility is enhanced by an optional stress-free boundary condition applied on a horizontal plane representing the earth's surface. Absorbing boundary conditions are imposed on the flanks of the 3D spatial grid via a simple wavefield amplitude taper approach. A massively parallel computational implementation, utilizing the spatial domain decomposition strategy, allows investigation of large-scale earth models and/or broadband wave propagation within reasonable execution times. Initial algorithm testing indicates that a point force density and/or moment density source activated within a poroelastic medium generates diverging fast and slow P waves (and possibly an S-wave)in accord with Biot theory. Solid and fluid particle velocities are in-phase for the fast P-wave, whereas they are out-of-phase for the slow P-wave. Conversions between all wave types occur during reflection and transmission at interfaces. Thus, although the slow P-wave is regarded as difficult to detect experimentally, its presence is strongly manifest within the complex of waves generated at a lithologic or fluid boundary. Very fine spatial and temporal gridding are required for high-fidelity representation of the slow P-wave, without inducing excessive

  13. [Three dimensional mathematical model of tooth for finite element analysis].

    PubMed

    Puskar, Tatjana; Vasiljević, Darko; Marković, Dubravka; Jevremović, Danimir; Pantelić, Dejan; Savić-Sević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka

    2010-01-01

    The mathematical model of the abutment tooth is the starting point of the finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. The simplest and easiest way is to form a model according to the literature data of dimensions and morphological characteristics of teeth. Our method is based on forming 3D models using standard geometrical forms (objects) in programmes for solid modeling. Forming the mathematical model of abutment of the second upper premolar for finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. The abutment tooth has a form of a complex geometric object. It is suitable for modeling in programs for solid modeling SolidWorks. After analysing the literature data about the morphological characteristics of teeth, we started the modeling dividing the tooth (complex geometric body) into simple geometric bodies (cylinder, cone, pyramid,...). Connecting simple geometric bodies together or substricting bodies from the basic body, we formed complex geometric body, tooth. The model is then transferred into Abaqus, a computational programme for finite element analysis. Transferring the data was done by standard file format for transferring 3D models ACIS SAT. Using the programme for solid modeling SolidWorks, we developed three models of abutment of the second maxillary premolar: the model of the intact abutment, the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining cavity walls and the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining walls and inserted post. Mathematical models of the abutment made according to the literature data are very similar with the real abutment and the simplifications are minimal. These models enable calculations of stress and deformation of the dental structures. The finite element analysis provides useful information in understanding biomechanical problems and gives guidance for clinical research.

  14. Studies of finite element analysis of composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, D. O.; Holzmacher, D. E.; Lane, Z. C.; Thornton, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Research in the area of finite element analysis is summarized. Topics discussed include finite element analysis of a picture frame shear test, BANSAP (a bandwidth reduction program for SAP IV), FEMESH (a finite element mesh generation program based on isoparametric zones), and finite element analysis of a composite bolted joint specimens.

  15. Finite-Difference Algorithm for 3D Orthorhombic Elastic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, R.; Preston, L. A.; Aldridge, D. F.

    2016-12-01

    Many geophysicists concur that an orthorhombic elastic medium, characterized by three mutually orthogonal symmetry planes, constitutes a realistic representation of seismic anisotropy in shallow crustal rocks. This symmetry condition typically arises via a dense system of vertically-aligned microfractures superimposed on a finely-layered horizontal geology. Mathematically, the elastic stress-strain constitutive relations for an orthorhombic body contain nine independent moduli. In turn, these moduli can be determined by observing (or prescribing) nine independent P-wave and S-wave phase speeds along different propagation directions. We are developing an explicit time-domain finite-difference (FD) algorithm for simulating 3D elastic wave propagation in a heterogeneous orthorhombic medium. The components of the particle velocity vector and the stress tensor are governed by a set of nine, coupled, first-order, linear, partial differential equations (PDEs) called the velocity-stress system. All time and space derivatives are discretized with centered and staggered FD operators possessing second- and fourth-order numerical accuracy, respectively. Simplified FD updating formulae (with significantly reduced operation counts) for stress components are obtained by restricting the principle axes of the modulus tensor to be parallel to the global rectangular coordinate axes. Moreover, restriction to a piecewise homogeneous earth model reduces computational memory demand for storing the ten (including mass density) model parameters. These restrictions will be relaxed in the future. Novel perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary conditions, specifically designed for orthorhombic media, effectively suppress grid boundary reflections. Initial modeling results reveal the well-established anisotropic seismic phenomena of complex wavefront shapes, split (fast and slow) S-waves, and shear waves generated by a spherically-symmetric explosion in a homogeneous body.

  16. Finite element modelling of buried structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Playdon, D. K.; Simmonds, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    In many structures the final stress states are dependent on the sequence of construction or the stress states at various stages of construction are of interest. Such problems can be analyzed using finite element programs that have the capability of adding (birthing) elements to simulate the progress of construction. However, the usual procedure of assembling elements may lead to numerical instabilities or stress states that are unrealistic. Both problems are demonstrated in the analysis of a structure using the program ADINA. A technique which combines application of a preload with element birthing to overcome these problems is described and illustrated.

  17. Towards Computing Full 3D Seismic Sensitivity: The Axisymmetric Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; Fournier, A.; Dahlen, F. A.

    2004-12-01

    Finite frequency tomography has recently provided detailed images of the Earth's deep interior. However, the Fréchet sensitivity kernels used in these inversions are calculated using ray theory and can therefore not account for D''-diffracted phases or any caustics in the wavefield, as e.g. occurring in phases used to map boundary layer topography. Our objective is to compile an extensive set of full sensitivity kernels based on seismic forward modeling to allow for inversion of any seismic phase. The sensitivity of the wavefield due to a scatterer off the theoretical ray path is generally determined by the convolution of the source-to-scatterer response with, using reciprocity, the receiver-to-scatterer response. Thus, exact kernels require the knowledge of the Green's function for the full moment tensor (i.e., source) and body forces (i.e., receiver components) throughout the model space and time. We develop an axisymmetric spectral element method for elastodynamics to serve this purpose. The axisymmetric approach takes advantage of the fact that kernels are computed upon a spherically symmetric Earth model. In this reduced dimension formulation, all moment tensor elements and single forces can be included and collectively unfold in six different 2D problems to be solved separately. The efficient simulations on a 2D mesh then allow for currently una