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Sample records for 3-d finite-element method

  1. 3D hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method: Implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Ahmadian, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method (HIFEM) is proposed for the mesh-independent treatment of 3D problems with intricate morphologies. The HIFEM implements a recursive algorithm for creating enrichment functions that capture gradient discontinuities in nonconforming finite elements cut by arbitrary number and configuration of materials interfaces. The method enables the mesh-independent simulation of multiphase problems with materials interfaces that are in close proximity or contact while providing a straightforward general approach for evaluating the enrichments. In this manuscript, we present a detailed discussion on the implementation issues and required computational geometry considerations associated with the HIFEM approximation of thermal and mechanical responses of 3D problems. A convergence study is provided to investigate the accuracy and convergence rate of the HIFEM and compare them with standard FEM benchmark solutions. We will also demonstrate the application of this mesh-independent method for simulating the thermal and mechanical responses of two composite materials systems with complex microstructures.

  2. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  3. Characteristics Analysis on Various Kinds of Hybrid Stepping Motors Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Maki, Kohji; Miyata, Kenji; Oonishi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Masafumi; Abukawa, Toshimi

    We have presented a powerful scheme of investigating hybrid stepping motor characteristics by using 3D finite element method. A linear magnetic field analysis is effectively applicable to predict relative performance of several motors in an extremely short computing time. The waveforms of cogging torque by linear and nonlinear analysis resemble each other, while the wave amplitude in the linear analysis is about 2 times larger than one in the nonlinear analysis in the presented example. The overestimation factor of cogging torque is approximately constant for the same material composition.

  4. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  5. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  6. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    This annual status report presents the results of work performed during the fourth year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes permitting more accurate and efficient 3-D analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of math models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. Volume 1 of this report discusses the special finite element models developed during the fourth year of the contract.

  7. A 3D moving mesh Finite Element Method for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, G. R.; Borhani, N.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Thome, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    A 3D ALE Finite Element Method is developed to study two-phase flow phenomena using a new discretization method to compute the surface tension forces. The computational method is based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) and the Finite Element Method (FEM), creating a two-phase method with an improved model for the liquid-gas interface. An adaptive mesh update procedure is also proposed for effective management of the mesh to remove, add and repair elements, since the computational mesh nodes move according to the flow. The ALE description explicitly defines the two-phase interface position by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The proposed methodology for computing the curvature leads to accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational cost. Static and dynamic tests have been carried out to validate the method and the results have compared well to analytical solutions and experimental results found in the literature, demonstrating that the new proposed methodology provides good accuracy to describe the interfacial forces and bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on the description of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the discretization of the surface tension force, the new remeshing technique, and the validation results. Additionally, a microchannel simulation in complex geometry is presented for two elongated bubbles.

  8. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  9. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  10. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  11. Unilateral Outer Bow Expanded Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Mortezai, Omid; Esmaily, Masomeh; Darvishpour, Hojat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Headgears are among the effective orthodontic appliances to achieve treatment goals. Unilateral molar distal movement is sometimes needed during an orthodontic treatment, which can be achieved by an asymmetric headgear. Different unilateral headgears have been introduced. The main goal of this study was to analyze the force system of unilateral expanded outer bow asymmetric headgears by the finite element method (FEM). Materials and Methods: Six 3D finite element models of a mesiodistal slice of the maxilla containing upper first molars, their periodontal ligaments (PDLs), cancellous bone, cortical bone, and a cervical headgear with expanded outer bow attached to maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 and meshed in ANSYS Workbench ver. 12.1. The models were the same except for the degree of outer bow expansion. The outer bow ends were loaded with 2 N force. The distal driving force and the net moment were evaluated. Results: A decrease in the distalizing force in the normal side molar from 1.69 N to 1.37 N was shown by increasing the degree of unilateral expansion. At the same time, the force increased from 2.19 N to 2.49 N in the expanded side molar. A net moment increasing from 2.26 N.mm to 4.64 N.mm was also shown. Conclusion: Unilateral outer bow expansion can produce different distalizing forces in molars, which increase by increasing the expansion. PMID:26622282

  12. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Special finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    This Annual Status Report presents the results of work performed during the third year of the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components program (NASA Contract NAS3-23697). The objective of the program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional analysis of selected hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The computer codes embody a progression of mathematical models and are streamlined to take advantage of geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of material response that distinguish each group of selected components. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 describes effort performed under Task 4B, Special Finite Element Special Function Models, while Volume 2 concentrates on Task 4C, Advanced Special Functions Models.

  13. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  14. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  15. A majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian-based finite element method for 3D restoration of geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peipei; Wang, Chengjing; Dai, Xiaoxia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian-based finite element method for 3D elastic frictionless contact problems. In this scheme, we discretize the restoration problem via the finite element method and reformulate it to a constrained optimization problem. Then we apply the majorized Newton-CG augmented Lagrangian method to solve the optimization problem, which is very suitable for the ill-conditioned case. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method is a very efficient algorithm for various large-scale 3D restorations of geological models, especially for the restoration of geological models with complicated faults.

  16. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  17. Plasmonics of 3-D Nanoshell Dimers Using Multipole Expansion and Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Christopher G.; Norton, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and spectral responses of the plasmonic fields induced in the gap of 3-D Nanoshell Dimers of gold and silver are comprehensively investigated and compared via theory and simulation, using the Multipole Expansion (ME) and the Finite Element Method (FEM) in COMSOL, respectively. The E-field in the dimer gap was evaluated and compared as a function of shell thickness, inter-particle distance, and size. The E-field increased with decreasing shell thickness, decreasing interparticle distance, and increasing size, with the error between the two methods ranging from 1 to 10%, depending on the specific combination of these three variables. This error increases several fold with increasing dimer size, as the quasi-static approximation breaks down. A consistent overestimation of the plasmon’s FWHM and red-shifting of the plasmon peak occurs with FEM, relative to ME, and it increases with decreasing shell thickness and inter-particle distance. The size-effect that arises from surface scattering of electrons is addressed and shown to be especially prominent for thin shells, for which significant damping, broadening and shifting of the plasmon band is observed; the size-effect also affects large nanoshell dimers, depending on their relative shell thickness, but to a lesser extent. This study demonstrates that COMSOL is a promising simulation environment to quantitatively investigate nanoscale electromagnetics for the modeling and designing of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrates. PMID:19678677

  18. A 3D discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method for teleseismic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    monteiller, vadim; Beller, Stephen; Nolet, Guust; Operto, Stephane; Virieux, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapide increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modelling of short period telesismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method, opennig the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. In order to reduce the computational cost of the forward-problem, we developed a method that relies on multi-core parallel computing and computational-domain reduction. We defined two nested levels for parallelism based on MPI library, which are managed by two MPI communicators. Firstly, we use a domain partitionning strategy, assigning one subdomain to one cpu and, secondly we distribute telesismic sources on different copies of the partitioned domain. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive for telesismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We defined a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embeded in a background homogeneous or axisymetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique (Alterman & Karal (1968),Taflove & Hagness (2005)), which relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided intro three subdomains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-mathed absorbing layers, an intermediate zone in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the

  19. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  20. Stabilized Finite Elements in FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Newman, James C.; Karman, Steve L.

    2017-01-01

    A Streamlined Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilized finite-element discretization has been implemented as a library into the FUN3D unstructured-grid flow solver. Motivation for the selection of this methodology is given, details of the implementation are provided, and the discretization for the interior scheme is verified for linear and quadratic elements by using the method of manufactured solutions. A methodology is also described for capturing shocks, and simulation results are compared to the finite-volume formulation that is currently the primary method employed for routine engineering applications. The finite-element methodology is demonstrated to be more accurate than the finite-volume technology, particularly on tetrahedral meshes where the solutions obtained using the finite-volume scheme can suffer from adverse effects caused by bias in the grid. Although no effort has been made to date to optimize computational efficiency, the finite-element scheme is competitive with the finite-volume scheme in terms of computer time to reach convergence.

  1. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  2. Fixed versus Removable Appliance for Palatal Expansion; A 3D Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Geramy, Allahyar; Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several appliances have been used for palatal expansion for treatment of posterior cross bite. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress induced in the apical and crestal alveolar bone and the pattern of tooth displacement following expansion via removable expansion plates or fixed-banded palatal expander using the finite element method (FEM) analysis. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM models were designed from a mesio-distal slice of the maxilla containing the upper first molars, their periodontium and alveolar bone. Two palatal expanders (removable and fixed) were modeled. The models were designed in SolidWorks 2006 and then transferred to ANSYS Workbench. The appliance halves were displaced 0.1 mm laterally. The von Mises stress in the apical, crestal, and PDL areas and also the vertical displacement of the cusps (palatal and buccal) was were evaluated. Results: The total PDL stress was 0.40003 MPa in the removable appliance (RA) model and 4.88e-2 MPa in the fixed appliance (FA) model and the apical stress was 9.9e-2 and 1.17e-2 MPa, respectively. The crestal stress was 2.99e-1 MPa in RA and 7.62e-2 MPa in the FA. The stress in the cortical bone crest was 0.30327 and 7.9244e-2 MPa for RA and FA, respectively and 3.7271 and 7.4373e-2 MPa in crestal area of spongy bone, respectively. The vertical displacement of the buccal cusp and palatal cusp was 1.64e-2 and 5.90e-2 mm in RA and 1.05e-4 and 1.7e-4 mm in FA, respectively. Conclusion: The overall stress as well as apical and crestal stress in periodontium of anchor teeth was higher in RA than FA; RA elicited higher stress in both cortical and spongy bone. The vertical displacement of molar cusps was more in removable than fixed palatal expander model. PMID:24910679

  3. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  4. An efficient 3D finite element method model based on the T-A formulation for superconducting coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiming; Zhang, Min; Yuan, Weijia

    2017-02-01

    An efficient three dimensional (3D) finite element method numerical model is proposed for superconducting coated conductors. The model is based on the T-A formulation and can be used to tackle 3D computational challenges for superconductors with high aspect ratios. By assuming a sheet approximation for the conductors, the model can speed up the computational process. The model has been validated by established analytical solutions. Two examples with complex geometries, which can hardly be simulated by the 2D model, are given. The model could be used to characterise and design large-scale applications using superconducting coated conductors, such as high field magnets and other electrical devices.

  5. Efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method for 3D groundwater flow simulation in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yifan; Wu, Jichun; Nan, Tongchao; Xue, Yuqun; Xie, Chunhong; Ji, Haifeng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an efficient triple-grid multiscale finite element method (ETMSFEM) is proposed for 3D groundwater simulation in heterogeneous porous media. The main idea of this method is to employ new 3D linear base functions and the domain decomposition technique to solve the local reduced elliptical problem, thereby simplifying the base function construction process and improving the efficiency. Furthermore, by using the ETMSFEM base functions, this method can solve Darcy's equation with high efficiency to obtain a continuous velocity field. Therefore, this method can considerably reduce the computational cost of solving for heads and velocities, which is crucial for large-scale 3D groundwater simulations. In the application section, we present numerical examples to compare the ETMSFEM with several classical methods to demonstrate its efficiency and effectiveness.

  6. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  7. Dynamic Characteristics Analysis of a Small-Sized Linear Oscillatory Actuator Employing the 3-D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Noritaka; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Ueyama, Kenji; Hashimoto, Eiichiro; Takagi, Takahiro

    Recently, linear oscillatory actuators have been used in a wide range of applications because of their advantages, such as high efficiency, simple structure, and easy control. Small linear oscillatory actuators are expected to be used in haptic devices and the vibration system of mobile phones. In this paper, we propose a new structure of a small linear oscillatory actuator. The static and dynamic characteristics of the actuator are calculated by the 3-D finite element method. The effectiveness of this method is shown by the comparison of the calculated results with the experimental results.

  8. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  9. Visualization methods for high-resolution, transient, 3-D, finite element situations

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-01-10

    Scientific visualization is the process whereby numerical data is transformed into a visual form to augment the process of discovery and understanding. Visualizing the data generated by large-scale, transient, three-dimensional finite element simulations poses many challenges due to geometric complexity, the presence of multiple materials and multiple element types, and the inherent unstructured nature of the meshes. In this paper, the direct use of finite element data structures, nodal assembly procedures, and element interpolants for volumetric adaptive surface extraction, surface rendering, vector grids and particle tracing is discussed. A brief description of a {open_quotes}direct-to-disk{close_quotes} animation system is presented, and case studies which demonstrate the use of isosurfaces, vector plots, cutting planes, reference surfaces and particle tracing are then discussed in the context of several case studies for transient incompressible viscous flow, and acoustic fluid-structure interaction simulations. An overview of the implications of massively parallel computers on visualization is presented to highlight the issues in parallel visualization methodology, algorithms. data locality and the ultimate requirements for temporary and archival data storage and network bandwidth.

  10. Finite element methods of analysis for 3D inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime

    1990-01-01

    The applicants have developed a finite element based approach for the solution of three-dimensional compressible flows. The procedure enables flow solutions to be obtained on tetrahedral discretizations of computational domains of complex form. A further development was the incorporation of a solution adaptive mesh strategy in which the adaptivity is achieved by complete remeshing of the solution domain. During the previous year, the applicants were working with the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center with an implementation of the basic meshing and solution procedure. The objective of the work to be performed over this twelve month period was the transfer of the adaptive mesh technology and also the undertaking of basic research into alternative flow algorithms for the Euler equations on unstructured meshes.

  11. Bone stress and strain modification in diastema closure: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Bouserhal, Joseph; Martin, Domingo; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the stress and strain distribution in the alveolar bone between two central incisors in the process of diastema closure with a constant force. A 3-dimensional computer modeling based on finite element techniques was used for this purpose. A model of an anterior segment of the mandible containing cortical bone, spongy bone, gingivae, PDL and two central incisors with a bracket in the labial surface of each tooth were designed. The von Mises stress and strain was evaluated in alveolar bone along a path of nodes defined in a cresto-apical direction in the midline between two teeth. It was observed that stress and strain of alveolar bone increased in midline with a constant force to close the diastema regardless of the type of movement in gradual steps of diastema closure, however the stress was higher in the tipping movement than the bodily so it can be suggested that a protocol of force system modification should be introduced to compensate for the stress and strain changes caused by the reduced distance to avoid the unwanted stress alteration during the diastema closure.

  12. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  13. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  14. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  15. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  16. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  17. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  18. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  19. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  20. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  1. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  2. A combined dislocation fan-finite element (DF-FE) method for stress field simulation of dislocations emerging at the free surfaces of 3D elastically anisotropic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balusu, K.; Huang, H.

    2017-04-01

    A combined dislocation fan-finite element (DF-FE) method is presented for efficient and accurate simulation of dislocation nodal forces in 3D elastically anisotropic crystals with dislocations intersecting the free surfaces. The finite domain problem is decomposed into half-spaces with singular traction stresses, an infinite domain, and a finite domain with non-singular traction stresses. As such, the singular and non-singular parts of the traction stresses are addressed separately; the dislocation fan (DF) method is introduced to balance the singular traction stresses in the half-spaces while the finite element method (FEM) is employed to enforce the non-singular boundary conditions. The accuracy and efficiency of the DF method is demonstrated using a simple isotropic test case, by comparing it with the analytical solution as well as the FEM solution. The DF-FE method is subsequently used for calculating the dislocation nodal forces in a finite elastically anisotropic crystal, which produces dislocation nodal forces that converge rapidly with increasing mesh resolutions. In comparison, the FEM solution fails to converge, especially for nodes closer to the surfaces.

  3. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  4. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  5. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  6. Component mode synthesis methods applied to 3D heterogeneous core calculations, using the mixed dual finite element solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new technique for determining the pin power in heterogeneous core calculations. It is based on a domain decomposition with overlapping sub-domains and a component mode synthesis technique for the global flux determination. Local basis functions are used to span a discrete space that allows fundamental global mode approximation through a Galerkin technique. Two approaches are given to obtain these local basis functions: in the first one (Component Mode Synthesis method), the first few spatial eigenfunctions are computed on each sub-domain, using periodic boundary conditions. In the second one (Factorized Component Mode Synthesis method), only the fundamental mode is computed, and we use a factorization principle for the flux in order to replace the higher order Eigenmodes. These different local spatial functions are extended to the global domain by defining them as zero outside the sub-domain. These methods are well-fitted for heterogeneous core calculations because the spatial interface modes are taken into account in the domain decomposition. Although these methods could be applied to higher order angular approximations - particularly easily to a SPN approximation - the numerical results we provide are obtained using a diffusion model. We show the methods' accuracy for reactor cores loaded with UOX and MOX assemblies, for which standard reconstruction techniques are known to perform poorly. Furthermore, we show that our methods are highly and easily parallelizable. (authors)

  7. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  8. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  9. 3D numerical simulation for the transient electromagnetic field excited by the central loop based on the vector finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Zeng, S. H.

    2011-12-01

    Based on the principle of abnormal field algorithms, Helmholtz equations for electromagnetic field have been deduced. We made the electric field Helmholtz equation the governing equation, and derived the corresponding system of vector finite element method equations using the Galerkin method. For solving the governing equation using the vector finite element method, we divided the computing domain into homogenous brick elements, and used Whitney-type vector basis functions. After obtaining the electric field's anomaly field in the Laplace domain using the vector finite element method, we used the Gaver-Stehfest algorithm to transform the electric field's anomaly field to the time domain, and obtained the impulse response of magnetic field's anomaly field through the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction. By comparing 1D analytic solutions of quasi-H-type geoelectric models, the accuracy of the vector finite element method is tested. For the low resistivity brick geoelectric model, the plot shape of electromotive force computed using the vector finite element method coincides with that of the integral equation method and finite difference in time domain solutions.

  10. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  11. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  12. DynEarthSol3D: An Efficient and Flexible Unstructured Finite Element Method to Study Long-Term Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Choi, E.; Lavier, L. L.; Calo, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many tectonic problems treat the lithosphere as a compressible elastic material, which can also flow viscously or break in a brittle fashion depending on the stress level applied and the temperature conditions. We present a flexible methodology to address the resulting complex material response, which imposes severe challenges on the discretization and rheological models used. This robust, adaptive, multidimensional, finite element method solves the momentum balance and the heat equation in Lagrangian form with unstructured simplicial mesh (triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D). The mesh locking problem is avoided by using averaged volumetric strain rate to update the stress. The solver uses contingent mesh adaptivity in places where shear strain is focused (localization) during remeshing. A simple scheme of mesh coarsening is employed to prevent tiny elements during remeshing. Lagrangian markers are used to track multiple compositions of rocks. The code is parallelized via OpenMP with graph coloring. We detail the solver and verify it in a number of benchmark problems against analytic and numerical solutions from the literature.

  13. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  14. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  15. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  16. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  17. TAURUS96. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.; Hallquist, J.O.; Spelce, T.E.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  18. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  19. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Moeller, Knut

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT.

  20. An augmented Lagrangian finite element formulation for 3D contact of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongqiang; Spilker, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic contact analysis is essential to obtain a complete understanding of soft tissue biomechanics, and the importance of physiological structure on the joint biomechanics has long been recognised; however, up to date, there are no successful developments of biphasic finite element contact analysis for three-dimensional (3D) geometries of physiological joints. The aim of this study was to develop a finite element formulation for biphasic contact of 3D physiological joints. The augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The biphasic contact method was implemented in the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2(®) (COMSOL, Inc., Burlington, MA). The accuracy of the implementation was verified using 3D biphasic contact problems, including indentation with a flat-ended indenter and contact of glenohumeral cartilage layers. The ability of the method to model multibody biphasic contact of physiological joints was proved by a 3D knee model. The 3D biphasic finite element contact method developed in this study can be used to study the biphasic behaviours of the physiological joints.

  1. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  2. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  3. An efficient finite-element algorithm for 3D layered complex structure modelling.

    PubMed

    Sahalos, J N; Kyriacou, G A; Vafiadis, E

    1994-05-01

    In this paper an efficient finite-element method (FEM) algorithm for complicated three-dimensional (3D) layered type models has been developed. Its unique feature is that it can handle, with memory requirements within the abilities of a simple PC, arbitrarily shaped 3D elements. This task is achieved by storing only the non-zero coefficients of the sparse FEM system of equations. The algorithm is applied to the solution of the Laplace equation in models with up to 79 layers of trilinear general hexahedron elements. The system of equations is solved with the Gauss-Seidel iterative technique.

  4. Content-Adaptive Finite Element Mesh Generation of 3-D Complex MR Volumes for Bioelectromagnetic Problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kim, T-S; Cho, M; Lee, S

    2005-01-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element method offers several advantages over other conventional methods such as boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropy. Mesh generation is the first requirement in the finite element analysis and there are many different approaches in mesh generation. However conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes, resulting in numerous elements in the smaller volume regions, thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present an improved content-adaptive mesh generation scheme that is efficient and fast along with options to change the contents of meshes. For demonstration, mesh models of the head from a volume MRI are presented in 2-D and 3-D.

  5. Least-squares finite element solution of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, Tsung-Liang; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the finite element solution of incompressible viscous flow problems. Development of more efficient methods is still needed before large-scale computation of 3D problems becomes feasible. This paper presents such a development. The most popular finite element method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is the classic Galerkin mixed method based on the velocity-pressure formulation. The mixed method requires the use of different elements to interpolate the velocity and the pressure in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for the existence of the solution. On the other hand, due to the lack of symmetry and positive definiteness of the linear equations arising from the mixed method, iterative methods for the solution of linear systems have been hard to come by. Therefore, direct Gaussian elimination has been considered the only viable method for solving the systems. But, for three-dimensional problems, the computer resources required by a direct method become prohibitively large. In order to overcome these difficulties, a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) has been developed. This method is based on the first-order velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. In this paper the LSFEM is extended for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the following first-order quasi-linear velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation.

  6. Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-in-Cell Simulations with Pic3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code Pic3P. Designed for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space charge effects, Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations self-consistently and includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects from first principles. Higher-order Finite Element methods with adaptive refinement on conformal unstructured meshes lead to highly efficient use of computational resources. Massively parallel processing with dynamic load balancing enables large-scale modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of next-generation accelerator facilities. Applications include the LCLS RF gun and the BNL polarized SRF gun.

  7. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  8. 3D Finite Element Study on: Bar Splinted Implants Supporting Partial Denture in the Reconstructed Mandible

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed; Ghali, Rami; Aboelnagga, Mona

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to estimate the stress patterns induced by the masticatory loads on a removable prosthesis supported and retained by bar splinted implants placed in the reconstructed mandible with two different clip materials and without clip, in the fibula-jaw bone and prosthesis using finite element analysis. METHODS: Two 3D finite element models were constructed, that models components were modeled on commercial CAD/CAM software then assembled into finite element package. Vertical loads were applied simulating the masticatory forces unilaterally in the resected site and bilaterally in the central fossa of the lower first molar as 100N (tension and compression). Analysis was based on the assumption full osseointegration between different types of bones, and between implants and fibula while fixing the top surface of the TMJ in place. RESULTS: The metallic bar connecting the three implants is insensitive to the clips material. Its supporting implants showed typical behavior with maximum stress values at the neck region. Fibula and jaw bone showed stresses within physiologic, while clips material effect seems to be very small due to its relatively small size. CONCLUSION: Switching loading force direction from tensile to compression did-not change the stresses and deformations distribution, but reversed their sign from positive to negative. PMID:27275353

  9. Finite Element Methods: Principles for Their Selection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    the finite element methods. 39 Various statements in the literature that certain mixed methods work well inspite of the fact that the LBB (BB...method, displacement and mixed methods , various adaptive approaches, etc. The examples discussed in Sections 2 and 3 show that the same computational...performance and their relation to mixed methods , SIAM J. Num. Anal., to appear. 5. F. Brezzi, On the existence uniqueness and approximation of saddle-point

  10. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  11. Gauge finite element method for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Weinan; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2000-12-01

    A finite element method for computing viscous incompressible flows based on the gauge formulation introduced in [Weinan E, Liu J-G. Gauge method for viscous incompressible flows. Journal of Computational Physics (submitted)] is presented. This formulation replaces the pressure by a gauge variable. This new gauge variable is a numerical tool and differs from the standard gauge variable that arises from decomposing a compressible velocity field. It has the advantage that an additional boundary condition can be assigned to the gauge variable, thus eliminating the issue of a pressure boundary condition associated with the original primitive variable formulation. The computational task is then reduced to solving standard heat and Poisson equations, which are approximated by straightforward, piecewise linear (or higher-order) finite elements. This method can achieve high-order accuracy at a cost comparable with that of solving standard heat and Poisson equations. It is naturally adapted to complex geometry and it is much simpler than traditional finite element methods for incompressible flows. Several numerical examples on both structured and unstructured grids are presented. Copyright

  12. Modeling electromagnetic rail launchers at speed using 3D finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P.J.; Eastham, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in moving conductors is described. This has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis. The application of the technique to railgun launchers is illustrated.

  13. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  14. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  15. Mixed Finite Element Method for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Arbogast, T.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium. Therefore, a numerical method must also carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. The finite element framework provides support for additional analysis of error and convergence. Moreover, both mesh refinement and anisotropy are naturally incorporated into finite elements. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. Mixed methods also produce discretely conservative fluxes that are required for the transport problem to remains stable without violating conservation of mass. Based preliminary investigations in 1D and derived energy estimates, we present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, using novel elements of lowest order and

  16. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  17. BOPACE 3-D (the Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for 3-dimensional Solids Using Isoparametric Finite Elements)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The BOPACE 3-D is a finite element computer program, which provides a general family of three-dimensional isoparametric solid elements, and includes a new algorithm for improving the efficiency of the elastic-plastic-creep solution procedure. Theoretical, user, and programmer oriented sections are presented to describe the program.

  18. The modelling of VLF Trimpis using both finite element and 3D Born Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, K.; Nunn, D.; Hayakawa, M.

    This paper investigates the numerical modelling of VLF Trimpis produced by a D region inhomogeneity on the Great Circle Path. Two different codes are used. The first is a 2D finite element method (FEM) code, whose solutions are valid in the non-Born limit. The second is a 3D model that invokes the Born approximation. The predicted Trimpis from these codes compare closely, thus confirming the validity of both models. The modal scattering matrices have a comparable structure, and indicate strong scattering between the dominant TM modes. Analysis of the scattering matrix from the FEM code delineates the Born regime. For a LIE with a radius of 100kms, the Born approximation becomes invalid at an electron density perturbation of about 8 el/cc.

  19. Mixed Finite Element Methods for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium so must carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. We present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, we present novel elements of lowest order and compatible with both Darcy and Stokes flow Finally, we present our 2D mixed FEM code result for solving Stokes and Darcy flow as well as the coupled Darcy-Stokes system the mid-ocean ridge or corner flow problem.

  20. Finite element micro-modelling of a human ankle bone reveals the importance of the trabecular network to mechanical performance: new methods for the generation and comparison of 3D models.

    PubMed

    Parr, W C H; Chamoli, U; Jones, A; Walsh, W R; Wroe, S

    2013-01-04

    Most modelling of whole bones does not incorporate trabecular geometry and treats bone as a solid non-porous structure. Some studies have modelled trabecular networks in isolation. One study has modelled the performance of whole human bones incorporating trabeculae, although this required considerable computer resources and purpose-written code. The difference between mechanical behaviour in models that incorporate trabecular geometry and non-porous models has not been explored. The ability to easily model trabecular networks may shed light on the mechanical consequences of bone loss in osteoporosis and remodelling after implant insertion. Here we present a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of a human ankle bone that includes trabecular network geometry. We compare results from this model with results from non-porous models and introduce protocols achievable on desktop computers using widely available softwares. Our findings show that models including trabecular geometry are considerably stiffer than non-porous whole bone models wherein the non-cortical component has the same mass as the trabecular network, suggesting inclusion of trabecular geometry is desirable. We further present new methods for the construction and analysis of 3D models permitting: (1) construction of multi-property, non-porous models wherein cortical layer thickness can be manipulated; (2) maintenance of the same triangle network for the outer cortical bone surface in both 3D reconstruction and non-porous models allowing exact replication of load and restraint cases; and (3) creation of an internal landmark point grid allowing direct comparison between 3D FE Models (FEMs).

  1. Finite Element Based Anisotropic 3D Inversion of Marine CSEM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Y.; Byun, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order to interpret three-dimensional (3D) marine controlled-source electromagnetic (MCSEM) data, it is critical to accurately determine electrical anisotropy because ignoring anisotropy can produce misleading artifacts. In this study, we present an inversion method for 3D subsurface imaging in media with an inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution. Direct solvers are incorporated both in the forward and inverse problems, For the forward problem, the vector Helmholtz equation for the secondary electric field is discretized on a hexahedral mesh using edge finite elements, then a direct sparse-matrix solver is chosen to effectively reuse its factorization both in the survey simulation and Jacobian computation. The inversion method is formulated as a functional optimization with an objective functional containing terms measuring data misfit and model structure by means of smoothness and anisotropy. These measures are efficiently incorporated through the use of an iteratively reweighted least-squares scheme. The objective functional is minimized by a Gauss-Newton approach using a direct dense-matrix solver. We demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of the algorithm by testing it on synthetic data sets.

  2. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  3. Finite element simulation of HIP-process to produce 3d near net shape parts

    SciTech Connect

    Zadeh, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    One of the major problems when producing powder metallurgy parts through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the non homogeneous shrinkage of HIP-capsule during the process. This leads to time and cost consuming machining of the HIP parts. In order to reduce the machining to a minimum, one can try to simulate the HIP-process by means of numerical methods. Hereby, the part distortion can be predicted, and hence a new HIP-capsule can be designed in such a way to prevent the distortion partly or even completely. In the following, a finite element method is used, on one hand, to simulate part shrinkage during HIP process; on the other hand a method is integrated in this simulation to optimize the HIP-capsule geometry. For the determination of material dependent parameters, a mixture of theoretical and experimental methods is used. Results of simulation are verified for a complex 3d HIP part out of TiAl6V4.

  4. Improved finite-element methods for rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the research directed at improving finite-element methods for rotorcraft airframes is presented. The development of a modification to the finite element method which eliminates interelement discontinuities is covered. The following subject areas are discussed: geometric entities, interelement continuity, dependent rotational degrees of freedom, and adaptive numerical integration. This new methodology is being implemented as an anisotropic, curvilinear, p-version, beam, shell, and brick finite element program.

  5. A goal-oriented adaptive finite-element approach for plane wave 3-D electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a novel goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement approach for finite-element methods to model plane wave electromagnetic (EM) fields in 3-D earth models based on the electric field differential equation. To handle complicated models of arbitrary conductivity, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity involving curved boundaries and surface topography, we employ an unstructured grid approach. The electric field is approximated by linear curl-conforming shape functions which guarantee the divergence-free condition of the electric field within each tetrahedron and continuity of the tangential component of the electric field across the interior boundaries. Based on the non-zero residuals of the approximated electric field and the yet to be satisfied boundary conditions of continuity of both the normal component of the total current density and the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior interfaces, three a-posterior error estimators are proposed as a means to drive the goal-oriented adaptive refinement procedure. The first a-posterior error estimator relies on a combination of the residual of the electric field, the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density and the discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior faces shared by tetrahedra. The second a-posterior error estimator is expressed in terms of the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density (conduction plus displacement current). The discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field forms the third a-posterior error estimator. Analytical solutions for magnetotelluric (MT) and radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) fields impinging on a homogeneous half-space model are used to test the performances of the newly developed goal-oriented algorithms using the above three a-posterior error estimators. A trapezoidal topographical model, using normally incident EM waves

  6. Leapfrog/Finite Element Method for Fractional Diffusion Equation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhengang; Zheng, Yunying

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a fully discrete leapfrog/Galerkin finite element method for the numerical solution of the space fractional order (fractional for simplicity) diffusion equation. The generalized fractional derivative spaces are defined in a bounded interval. And some related properties are further discussed for the following finite element analysis. Then the fractional diffusion equation is discretized in space by the finite element method and in time by the explicit leapfrog scheme. For the resulting fully discrete, conditionally stable scheme, we prove an L 2-error bound of finite element accuracy and of second order in time. Numerical examples are included to confirm our theoretical analysis. PMID:24955431

  7. Efficient finite element modeling of scattering for 2D and 3D problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Velichko, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    The scattering of waves by defects is central to ultrasonic NDE and SHM. In general, scattering problems must be modeled using direct numerical methods such as finite elements (FE), which is very computationally demanding. The most efficient way is to only model the scatterer itself and a minimal region of the surrounding host medium, and this was previously demonstrated for 2-dimensional (2D) bulk wave scattering problems in isotropic media. An encircling array of monopole and dipole sources is used to inject an arbitrary wavefront onto the scatterer and the scattered field is monitored by a second encircling array of monitoring points. From this data, the scattered field can be projected out to any point in space. If the incident wave is chosen to be a plane wave incident from a given angle and the scattered field is projected to distant points in the far-field of the scatterer, the far-field scattering or S-matrix may be obtained, which encodes all the available scattering information. In this paper, the technique is generalized to any elastic wave geometry in both 2D and 3D, where the latter can include guided wave scattering problems. A further refinement enables the technique to be employed with free FE meshes of triangular or tetrahedral elements.

  8. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  9. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  10. A detailed 3D finite element analysis of the peeling behaviour of a gecko spatula.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Roger A; Holl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed finite element analysis of the adhesion of a gecko spatula. The gecko spatulae form the tips of the gecko foot hairs that transfer the adhesional and frictional forces between substrate and foot. The analysis is based on a parameterised description of the 3D geometry of the spatula that only requires 12 parameters. The adhesion is described by a nonlinear computational contact formulation that accounts for the van der Waals interaction between spatula and substrate. The spatula adhesion model is implemented using an enriched contact finite element formulation recently developed by the first author. The finite element model is then used to simulate the peeling behaviour of the gecko spatula under applied vertical and rotational loading for various model parameters. Variations of the material stiffness, adhesional strength and range, stiction, spatula size and spatula inclination are considered to account for the natural variation of spatula properties. The study demonstrates that the spatula can function over a wide range of conditions. The computed pull-off forces are in agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The study also examines the energy required for the spatula pull-off. The proposed model is ideal to study the influence of substrate roughness on the spatula adhesion, as is finally demonstrated.

  11. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  12. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  13. Parallelized 3D CSEM modeling using edge-based finite element with total field formulation and unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Hu, Xiangyun; Li, Jianhui; Endo, Masashi; Xiong, Bin

    2017-02-01

    We solve the 3D controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) problem using the edge-based finite element method. The modeling domain is discretized using unstructured tetrahedral mesh. We adopt the total field formulation for the quasi-static variant of Maxwell's equation and the computation cost to calculate the primary field can be saved. We adopt a new boundary condition which approximate the total field on the boundary by the primary field corresponding to the layered earth approximation of the complicated conductivity model. The primary field on the modeling boundary is calculated using fast Hankel transform. By using this new type of boundary condition, the computation cost can be reduced significantly and the modeling accuracy can be improved. We consider that the conductivity can be anisotropic. We solve the finite element system of equations using a parallelized multifrontal solver which works efficiently for multiple source and large scale electromagnetic modeling.

  14. 3D finite element analysis of porous Ti-based alloy prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mircheski, Ile; Gradišar, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, novel designs of porous acetabular cups are created and tested with 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The aim is to develop a porous acetabular cup with low effective radial stiffness of the structure, which will be near to the architectural and mechanical behavior of the natural bone. For the realization of this research, a 3D-scanner technology was used for obtaining a 3D-CAD model of the pelvis bone, a 3D-CAD software for creating a porous acetabular cup, and a 3D-FEA software for virtual testing of a novel design of the porous acetabular cup. The results obtained from this research reveal that a porous acetabular cup from Ti-based alloys with 60 ± 5% porosity has the mechanical behavior and effective radial stiffness (Young's modulus in radial direction) that meet and exceed the required properties of the natural bone. The virtual testing with 3D-FEA of a novel design with porous structure during the very early stage of the design and the development of orthopedic implants, enables obtaining a new or improved biomedical implant for a relatively short time and reduced price.

  15. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  16. 3-D finite element modelling of facial soft tissue and preliminary application in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Lou, Hangdi; Guo, Liang; Rong, Qiguo; Liu, Yi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of soft tissue aesthetics is important for achieving an optimal outcome in orthodontic treatment planning. Previously, applicable procedures were mainly restricted to 2-D profile prediction. In this study, a generic 3-D finite element (FE) model of the craniofacial soft and hard tissue was constructed, and individualisation of the generic model based on cone beam CT data and mathematical transformation was investigated. The result indicated that patient-specific 3-D facial FE model including different layers of soft tissue could be obtained through mathematical model transformation. Average deviation between the transformed model and the real reconstructed one was 0.47 ± 0.77 mm and 0.75 ± 0.84 mm in soft and hard tissue, respectively. With boundary condition defined according to treatment plan, such FE model could be used to predict the result of orthodontic treatment on facial soft tissue.

  17. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  18. Adaptive finite element methods in electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gavaghan, David J; Gillow, Kathryn; Süli, Endre

    2006-12-05

    In this article, we review some of our previous work that considers the general problem of numerical simulation of the currents at microelectrodes using an adaptive finite element approach. Microelectrodes typically consist of an electrode embedded (or recessed) in an insulating material. For all such electrodes, numerical simulation is made difficult by the presence of a boundary singularity at the electrode edge (where the electrode meets the insulator), manifested by the large increase in the current density at this point, often referred to as the edge effect. Our approach to overcoming this problem has involved the derivation of an a posteriori bound on the error in the numerical approximation for the current that can be used to drive an adaptive mesh-generation algorithm, allowing calculation of the quantity of interest (the current) to within a prescribed tolerance. We illustrate the generic applicability of the approach by considering a broad range of steady-state applications of the technique.

  19. Finite element 3D reconstruction of the pulmonary acinus imaged by synchrotron X-ray tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, A.; Filipovic, N.; Haberthür, D.; Dickie, R.; Matsui, Y.; Stampanoni, M.; Schittny, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The alveolated structure of the pulmonary acinus plays a vital role in gas exchange function. Three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the parenchymal region is fundamental to understanding this structure-function relationship, but only a limited number of attempts have been conducted in the past because of technical limitations. In this study, we developed a new image processing methodology based on finite element (FE) analysis for accurate 3D structural reconstruction of the gas exchange regions of the lung. Stereologically well characterized rat lung samples (Pediatr Res 53: 72–80, 2003) were imaged using high-resolution synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy. A stack of 1,024 images (each slice: 1024 × 1024 pixels) with resolution of 1.4 μm3 per voxel were generated. For the development of FE algorithm, regions of interest (ROI), containing ∼7.5 million voxels, were further extracted as a working subunit. 3D FEs were created overlaying the voxel map using a grid-based hexahedral algorithm. A proper threshold value for appropriate segmentation was iteratively determined to match the calculated volume density of tissue to the stereologically determined value (Pediatr Res 53: 72–80, 2003). The resulting 3D FEs are ready to be used for 3D structural analysis as well as for subsequent FE computational analyses like fluid dynamics and skeletonization. PMID:18583378

  20. Optimal least-squares finite element method for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal least squares finite element method is proposed for two dimensional and three dimensional elliptic problems and its advantages are discussed over the mixed Galerkin method and the usual least squares finite element method. In the usual least squares finite element method, the second order equation (-Delta x (Delta u) + u = f) is recast as a first order system (-Delta x p + u = f, Delta u - p = 0). The error analysis and numerical experiment show that, in this usual least squares finite element method, the rate of convergence for flux p is one order lower than optimal. In order to get an optimal least squares method, the irrotationality Delta x p = 0 should be included in the first order system.

  1. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  2. Cracked finite elements proposed for NASTRAN. [based on application of finite element method to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberson, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The recent introduction of special crack-tip singularity elements, usually referred to as cracked elements, has brought the power and flexibility of the finite-element method to bear much more effectively on fracture mechanics problems. This paper recalls the development of two cracked elements and presents the results of some applications proving their accuracy and economy. Judging from the available literature on numerical methods in fracture mechanics, it seems clear that the elements described have been used more extensively than any others in practical fracture mechanics applications.

  3. Parallel 3D Finite Element Numerical Modelling of DC Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Prudencio, E.; Candel, A.; Ge, L.; Kabel, A.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; /SLAC

    2008-02-04

    In this paper we present Gun3P, a parallel 3D finite element application that the Advanced Computations Department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is developing for the analysis of beam formation in DC guns and beam transport in klystrons. Gun3P is targeted specially to complex geometries that cannot be described by 2D models and cannot be easily handled by finite difference discretizations. Its parallel capability allows simulations with more accuracy and less processing time than packages currently available. We present simulation results for the L-band Sheet Beam Klystron DC gun, in which case Gun3P is able to reduce simulation time from days to some hours.

  4. Towards automated 3D finite element modeling of direct fiber reinforced composite dental bridge.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing; Steven, Grant P

    2005-07-01

    An automated 3D finite element (FE) modeling procedure for direct fiber reinforced dental bridge is established on the basis of computer tomography (CT) scan data. The model presented herein represents a two-unit anterior cantilever bridge that includes a maxillary right incisor as an abutment and a maxillary left incisor as a cantilever pontic bonded by adhesive and reinforced fibers. The study aims at gathering fundamental knowledge for design optimization of this type of innovative composite dental bridges. To promote the automatic level of numerical analysis and computational design of new dental biomaterials, this report pays particular attention to the mathematical modeling, mesh generation, and validation of numerical models. To assess the numerical accuracy and to validate the model established, a convergence test and experimental verification are also presented.

  5. Experimental validation of 3D printed patient-specific implants using digital image correlation and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Miller, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    With the dawn of 3D printing technology, patient-specific implant designs are set to have a paradigm shift. A topology optimization method in designing patient-specific craniofacial implants has been developed to ensure adequate load transfer mechanism and restore the form and function of the mid-face. Patient-specific finite element models are used to design these implants and to validate whether they are viable for physiological loading such as mastication. Validation of these topology optimized finite element models using mechanical testing is a critical step. Instead of inserting the implants into a cadaver or patient, we embed the implants into the computer-aided skull model of a patient and, fuse them together to 3D print the complete skull model with the implant. Masticatory forces are applied in the molar region to simulate chewing and measure the stress-strain trajectory. Until recently, strain gages have been used to measure strains for validation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method is a relatively new technique for full-field strain measurement which provides a continuous deformation field data. The main objective of this study is to validate the finite element model of patient-specific craniofacial implants against the strain data from the DIC obtained during the mastication simulation and show that the optimized shapes provide adequate load-transfer mechanism. Patient-specific models are obtained from CT scans. The principal maximum and minimum strains are compared. The computational and experimental approach to designing patient-specific implants proved to be a viable technique for mid-face craniofacial reconstruction.

  6. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  7. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  8. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  9. Analysis of the Performance of Mixed Finite Element Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    October 1986 SUMMARY The initial goal of this project is to analyze various mixed methods based on the p- and h-p versions of the finite element methods...The convergence of mixed methods depends on two factors: (1) Approximability of polynomial spaces used (2) Stability. In the past year, the question...significant portion of the research is geared towards the investigation of mixed methods based on the ’p’ and ’h-p’ versions of the finite element method

  10. The Distributed Lambda (?) Model (DLM): A 3-D, Finite-Element Muscle Model Based on Feldman's ? Model; Assessment of Orofacial Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Mohammad Ali; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors aimed to design a distributed lambda model (DLM), which is well adapted to implement three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element descriptions of muscles. Method: A muscle element model was designed. Its stress-strain relationships included the active force-length characteristics of the ? model along the muscle fibers, together…

  11. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  12. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  13. A weak Galerkin generalized multiscale finite element method

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we propose a general framework for weak Galerkin generalized multiscale (WG-GMS) finite element method for the elliptic problems with rapidly oscillating or high contrast coefficients. This general WG-GMS method features in high order accuracy on general meshes and can work with multiscale basis derived by different numerical schemes. A special case is studied under this WG-GMS framework in which the multiscale basis functions are obtained by solving local problem with the weak Galerkin finite element method. Convergence analysis and numerical experiments are obtained for the special case.

  14. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military.

  15. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  16. Finite element methods on supercomputers - The scatter-problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Certain problems arise in connection with the use of supercomputers for the implementation of finite-element methods. These problems are related to the desirability of utilizing the power of the supercomputer as fully as possible for the rapid execution of the required computations, taking into account the gain in speed possible with the aid of pipelining operations. For the finite-element method, the time-consuming operations may be divided into three categories. The first two present no problems, while the third type of operation can be a reason for the inefficient performance of finite-element programs. Two possibilities for overcoming certain difficulties are proposed, giving attention to a scatter-process.

  17. Radiosity algorithms using higher order finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Troutman, R.; Max, N.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the current radiosity algorithms create a piecewise constant approximation to the actual radiosity. Through interpolation and extrapolation, a continuous solution is obtained. An accurate solution is found by increasing the number of patches which describe the scene. This has the effect of increasing the computation time as well as the memory requirements. By using techniques found in the finite element method, we can incorporate an interpolation function directly into our form factor computation. We can then use less elements to achieve a more accurate solution. Two algorithms, derived from the finite element method, are described and analyzed.

  18. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  19. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30-50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in treating

  20. Feeding biomechanics of Late Triassic metoposaurids (Amphibia: Temnospondyli): a 3D finite element analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Josep; Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Konietzko-Meier, Dorota

    2017-03-29

    The Late Triassic freshwater ecosystems were occupied by different tetrapod groups including large-sized anamniotes, such as metoposaurids. Most members of this group of temnospondyls acquired gigantic sizes (up to 5 m long) with a nearly worldwide distribution. The paleoecology of metoposaurids is controversial; they have been historically considered passive, bottom-dwelling animals, waiting for prey on the bottom of rivers and lakes, or they have been suggested to be active mid-water feeders. The present study aims to expand upon the paleoecological interpretations of these animals using 3D finite element analyses (FEA). Skulls from two taxa, Metoposaurus krasiejowensis, a gigantic taxon from Europe, and Apachesaurus gregorii, a non-gigantic taxon from North America, were analyzed under different biomechanical scenarios. Both 3D models of the skulls were scaled to allow comparisons between them and reveal that the general stress distribution pattern found in both taxa is clearly similar in all scenarios. In light of our results, both previous hypotheses about the paleoecology of these animals can be partly merged: metoposaurids probably were ambush and active predators, but not the top predators of these aquatic environments. The FEA results demonstrate that they were particularly efficient at bilateral biting, and together with their characteristically anteropositioned orbits, optimal for an ambush strategy. Nonetheless, the results also show that these animals were capable of lateral strikes of the head, suggesting active hunting of prey. Regarding the important skull size differences between the taxa analyzed, our results suggest that the size reduction in the North American taxon could be related to drastic environmental changes or the increase of competitors. The size reduction might have helped them expand into new ecological niches, but they likely remained fully aquatic, as are all other metoposaurids.

  1. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  2. A multi-compartment 3-D finite element model of rectocele and its interaction with cystocele.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiajia; Chen, Luyun; Fenner, Dee E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-06-25

    We developed a subject-specific 3-D finite element model to understand the mechanics underlying formation of female pelvic organ prolapse, specifically a rectocele and its interaction with a cystocele. The model was created from MRI 3-D geometry of a healthy 45 year-old multiparous woman. It included anterior and posterior vaginal walls, levator ani muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, anterior and posterior arcus tendineus fascia pelvis, arcus tendineus levator ani, perineal body, perineal membrane and anal sphincter. Material properties were mostly from the literature. Tissue impairment was modeled as decreased tissue stiffness based on previous clinical studies. Model equations were solved using Abaqus v 6.11. The sensitivity of anterior and posterior vaginal wall geometry was calculated for different combinations tissue impairments under increasing intraabdominal pressure. Prolapse size was reported as pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) point at point Bp for rectocele and point Ba for cystocele. Results show that a rectocele resulted from impairments of the levator ani and posterior compartment support. For 20% levator and 85% posterior support impairments, simulated rectocele size (at POP-Q point: Bp) increased 0.29 mm/cm H2O without apical impairment and 0.36 mm/cm H2O with 60% apical impairment, as intraabdominal pressures increased from 0 to 150 cm H2O. Apical support impairment could result in the development of either a cystocele or rectocele. Simulated repair of posterior compartment support decreased rectocele but increased a preexisting cystocele. We conclude that development of rectocele and cystocele depend on the presence of anterior, posterior, levator and/or or apical support impairments, as well as the interaction of the prolapse with the opposing compartment.

  3. Superconvergence in the Generalized Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Galerkin method for elliptic equations based on tensor products of piecewise polynomials. RAIRO Anal. Numer., 8:61– 66, 1974. [19] M. Kř́ıžek...London, 1986. [22] P. Lesaint and M. Zlámal. Superconvergence of the gradient of finite ele- ment solutions. RAIRO Anal. Numer., 13:139–166, 1979. [23] Q

  4. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    SciTech Connect

    Garikipati, Krishna.; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  5. Engineering and Design: Geotechnical Analysis by the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    used it to determine stresses and movements in embank- ments, and Reyes and Deer described its application to analysis of underground openings in rock...36 Hughes, T. J. R. (1987). The Finite Element Reyes , S. F., and Deene, D. K. (1966). “Elastic Method, Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element...SM4), 1,435-1,457. Fernando Dams During the Earthquakes of February Davis, E. H., and Poulos, H. G. (1972). “Rate of Report EERC-73-2, Berkeley, CA

  6. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  7. VLF Trimpi modelling on the path NWC-Dunedin using both finite element and 3D Born modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, D.; Hayakawa, K. B. M.

    1998-10-01

    This paper investigates the numerical modelling of VLF Trimpis, produced by a D region inhomogeneity on the great circle path. Two different codes are used to model Trimpis on the path NWC-Dunedin. The first is a 2D Finite Element Method Code (FEM), whose solutions are rigorous and valid in the strong scattering or non-Born limit. The second code is a 3D model that invokes the Born approximation. The predicted Trimpis from these codes compare very closely, thus confirming the validity of both models. The modal scattering matrices for both codes are analysed in some detail and are found to have a comparable structure. They indicate strong scattering between the dominant TM modes. Analysis of the scattering matrix from the FEM code shows that departure from linear Born behaviour occurs when the inhomogeneity has a horizontal scale size of about 100 km and a maximum electron density enhancement at 75 km altitude of about 6 electrons.

  8. Scripted Finite Element Methods Applied to Global Geomagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, J.; Constable, C.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic field observations from CHAMP, Ø rsted and SAC-C and improved techniques for comprehensive geomagnetic field modeling have generated renewed interest in using satellite and observatory data to study global scale electromagnetic induction in Earth's crust and mantle. The primary external source field derives from variations in the magnetospheric ring current, and recent studies show that over-simplified assumptions about its spatial structure lead to biased estimates of the frequency-dependent electromagnetic response functions generally used in inversions for mantle conductivity. The bias takes the form of local time dependence in the C- response estimates and highlights the need for flexible forward modeling tools for the global induction problem to accommodate 3D time-varying structure in both primary and induced fields. We are developing such tools using FlexPDE, a commercially available script-based finite element method (FEM) package for partial differential equations. Our strategy is to model the vector potential \\mathbf{A}, where \\mathbf{B} = \

  9. Coupling finite element and spectral methods: First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardi, Christine; Debit, Naima; Maday, Yvon

    1987-01-01

    A Poisson equation on a rectangular domain is solved by coupling two methods: the domain is divided in two squares, a finite element approximation is used on the first square and a spectral discretization is used on the second one. Two kinds of matching conditions on the interface are presented and compared. In both cases, error estimates are proved.

  10. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  11. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  12. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  13. 3-d finite element model development for biomechanics: a software demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Ashby, E.

    1997-03-01

    Finite element analysis is becoming an increasingly important part of biomechanics and orthopedic research, as computational resources become more powerful, and data handling algorithms become more sophisticated. Until recently, tools with sufficient power did not exist or were not accessible to adequately model complicated, three-dimensional, nonlinear biomechanical systems. In the past, finite element analyses in biomechanics have often been limited to two-dimensional approaches, linear analyses, or simulations of single tissue types. Today, we have the resources to model fully three-dimensional, nonlinear, multi-tissue, and even multi-joint systems. The authors will present the process of developing these kinds of finite element models, using human hand and knee examples, and will demonstrate their software tools.

  14. Study of Multi Pass Equal Channel Angular Pressing Using 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setia, Rajat; Sharma, Rahul Swarup; Sharma, Shanti Swarup; Raj, K. Hans

    2011-01-01

    Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) has emerged as most prominent Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) technique used to produce an ultrafine grained (UFG) structure in metals in order to improve their mechanical and physical properties. In this work Finite Element modeling of ECAP is attempted in FORGE 2007 environment. Four passes of the ECAP process of 10mm square shaped AL 6061 billet were carried out for routes A, BA and C for different channel angles and values of coefficient of friction to investigate their influence on the billet. The models were developed assuming a range of friction conditions at the billet-die contact region considering eight distinct friction coefficient (μ) values of 0.0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, 0.35 and 0.40, respectively. The simulations are carried out using three distinct situations of die channel angles (Φ), 90°, 105°, and 120° respectively. Route `BA' emerged as a better method among the three routes studied and 90° channel angle appeared to be optimal in terms of producing high equivalent strain.

  15. Least-squares finite element methods for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Carey, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    A method based on backward finite differencing in time and a least-squares finite element scheme for first-order systems of partial differential equations in space is applied to the Euler equations for gas dynamics. The scheme minimizes the L-sq-norm of the residual within each time step. The method naturally generates numerical dissipation proportional to the time step size. An implicit method employing linear elements has been implemented and proves robust. For high-order elements, computed solutions based on the L-sq method may have oscillations for calculations at similar time step sizes. To overcome this difficulty, a scheme which minimizes the weighted H1-norm of the residual is proposed and leads to a successful scheme with high-degree elements. Finally, a conservative least-squares finite element method is also developed. Numerical results for two-dimensional problems are given to demonstrate the shock resolution of the methods and compare different approaches.

  16. Transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Koji; Nishio, Takayuki; Yamada, Takashi ); Kawase, Yoshihiro . Dept. of Information Science)

    1999-05-01

    For the next generation of high speed railway systems and automobiles new braking systems are currently under development. These braking systems take into account the eddy currents, which are produced by the movement of the conductor in the magnetic field. For their optimum design, it is necessary to know the distribution of eddy currents in the moving conductor. The finite element method (FEM) is often used to simulate them. Here, transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor is presented. Here the magnetic vector potential is interpolated at the upwind position and the time derivative term is discretized by the backward difference method. As a result, the system matrix becomes symmetric and the ICCG method is applicable to solve the matrix. This method is used to solve an eddy current rail brake system. The results demonstrate that this approach is suitable to solve transient problems involving movement.

  17. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  18. Finite Element Method for Capturing Ultra-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    While finite element methods are used extensively by researchers solving computational fluid dynamics in fields other than astrophysics, their use in astrophysical fluid simulations has been predominantly overlooked. Current simulations using other methods such as finite difference and finite volume (based on finite difference) have shown remarkable results, but these methods are limited by their fundamental properties in aspects that are important for simulations with complex geometries and widely varying spatial and temporal scale differences. We have explored the use of finite element methods for astrophysical fluids in order to establish the validity of using such methods in astrophysical environments. We present our numerical technique applied to solving ultra-relativistic (Lorentz Factor Gamma >> 1) shocks which are prevalent in astrophysical studies including relativistic jets and gamma-ray burst studies. We show our finite element formulation applied to simulations where the Lorentz factor ranges up to 2236 and demonstrate its stability in solving ultra-relativistic flows. Our numerical method is based on the Flowfield Dependent Variation (FDV) Method, unique in that numerical diffusion is derived from physical parameters rather than traditional artificial viscosity methods. Numerical instabilities account for most of the difficulties when capturing shocks in this regime. Our method results in stable solutions and accurate results as compared with other methods.

  19. Low-Velocity Impact Response and Finite Element Analysis of Four-Step 3-D Braided Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhong; Zhang, Yan; Gu, Bohong

    2013-08-01

    The low-velocity impact characters of 3-D braided carbon/epoxy composites were investigated from experimental and finite element simulation approaches. The quasi-static tests were carried out at a constant velocity of 2 mm/min on MTS 810.23 material tester system to obtain the indentation load-displacement curves and indentation damages. The low-velocity tests were conducted at the velocities from 1 m/s to 6 m/s (corresponding to the impact energy from 3.22 J to 116 J) on Instron Dynatup 9250 impact tester. The peak force, energy for peak force, time to peak force, and total energy absorption were obtained to determine the impact responses of 3-D braided composites. A unit cell model was established according to the microstructure of 3-D braided composites to derive the constitutive equation. Based on the model, a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT) has been compiled by FORTRAN and connected with commercial finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit to calculate the impact damage. The unit cell model successfully predicted the impact response of 3-D braided composites. Furthermore, the stress wave propagation and failure mechanisms have been revealed from the finite element simulation results and ultimate damage morphologies of specimens.

  20. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  1. PWSCC Assessment by Using Extended Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Suk

    2015-12-01

    The head penetration nozzle of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) is known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) due to the welding-induced residual stress. Especially, the J-groove dissimilar metal weld regions have received many attentions in the previous studies. However, even though several advanced techniques such as weight function and finite element alternating methods have been introduced to predict the occurrence of PWSCC, there are still difficulties in respect of applicability and efficiency. In this study, the extended finite element method (XFEM), which allows convenient crack element modeling by enriching degree of freedom (DOF) with special displacement function, was employed to evaluate structural integrity of the CRDM head penetration nozzle. The resulting stress intensity factors of surface cracks were verified for the reliability of proposed method through the comparison with those suggested in the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) code. The detailed results from the FE analyses are fully discussed in the manuscript.

  2. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  3. Edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs applied to 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    An edge based finite element formulation with vector absorbing boundary conditions is presented for scattering by composite structures having boundaries satisfying impedance and/or transition conditions. Remarkably accurate results are obtained by placing the mesh a small fraction of a wavelength away from the scatterer.

  4. Finite element methods for integrated aerodynamic heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, J.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past few years finite element based procedures for the solution of high speed viscous compressible flows were developed. The objective of this research is to build upon the finite element concepts which have already been demonstrated and to develop these ideas to produce a method which is applicable to the solution of large scale practical problems. The problems of interest range from three dimensional full vehicle Euler simulations to local analysis of three-dimensional viscous laminar flow. Transient Euler flow simulations involving moving bodies are also to be included. An important feature of the research is to be the coupling of the flow solution methods with thermal/structural modeling techniques to provide an integrated fluid/thermal/structural modeling capability. The progress made towards achieving these goals during the first twelve month period of the research is presented.

  5. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear: II. Experimental and numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; De Arcas, Guillermo; Alonso, Jesus

    2012-12-01

    In part I, the feasibility of using three-dimensional (3D) finite elements (FEs) to model the acoustic behaviour of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear was studied and the numerical approach compared with classical lumped elements modelling. It was shown that by using a more complex acoustic model that took account of thermo-viscous effects, geometric shapes and dimensions, it was possible to develop a realistic model. This model then had clear advantages in comparison with the models based on equivalent circuits using lumped parameters. In fact results from FE modelling produce a better understanding about the physical phenomena produced inside ear simulator couplers, facilitating spatial and temporal visualization of the sound fields produced. The objective of this study (part II) is to extend the investigation by validating the numerical calculations against measurements on an ear simulator conforming to IEC 60318-1. For this purpose, an appropriate commercially available device is taken and a complete 3D FE model developed for it. The numerical model is based on key dimensional data obtained with a non-destructive x-ray inspection technique. Measurements of the acoustic transfer impedance have been carried out on the same device at a national measurement institute using the method embodied in IEC 60318-1. Having accounted for the actual device dimensions, the thermo-viscous effects inside narrow slots and holes and environmental conditions, the results of the numerical modelling were found to be in good agreement with the measured values.

  6. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  7. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  8. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  9. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  10. Crystal level simulations using Eulerian finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Barton, N R; Benson, D J

    2004-02-06

    Over the last several years, significant progress has been made in the use of crystal level material models in simulations of forming operations. However, in Lagrangian finite element approaches simulation capabilities are limited in many cases by mesh distortion associated with deformation heterogeneity. Contexts in which such large distortions arise include: bulk deformation to strains approaching or exceeding unity, especially in highly anisotropic or multiphase materials; shear band formation and intersection of shear bands; and indentation with sharp indenters. Investigators have in the past used Eulerian finite element methods with material response determined from crystal aggregates to study steady state forming processes. However, Eulerian and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element methods have not been widely utilized for simulation of transient deformation processes at the crystal level. The advection schemes used in Eulerian and ALE codes control mesh distortion and allow for simulation of much larger total deformations. We will discuss material state representation issues related to advection and will present results from ALE simulations.

  11. Superconvergence of mixed finite element approximations to 3-D Maxwell's equations in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunqing; Li, Jichun; Yang, Wei; Sun, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation of metamaterials has attracted more and more attention since 2000, after the first metamaterial with negative refraction index was successfully constructed. In this paper we construct a fully-discrete leap-frog type finite element scheme to solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Maxwell's equations when metamaterials are involved. First, we obtain some superclose results between the interpolations of the analytical solutions and finite element solutions obtained using arbitrary orders of Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec mixed spaces on regular cubic meshes. Then we prove the superconvergence result in the discrete l2 norm achieved for the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec space. To our best knowledge, such superconvergence results have never been obtained elsewhere. Finally, we implement the leap-frog scheme and present numerical results justifying our theoretical analysis.

  12. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  13. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures

    PubMed Central

    Pavarino, E.; Neves, L. A.; Machado, J. M.; de Godoy, M. F.; Shiyou, Y.; Momente, J. C.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; Pinto, A. R.; Valêncio, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  14. Tissue Modeling and Analyzing with Finite Element Method: A Review for Cranium Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xianfang; Wang, Li; Wang, Ruonan

    2013-01-01

    For the structure mechanics of human body, it is almost impossible to conduct mechanical experiments. Then the finite element model to simulate mechanical experiments has become an effective tool. By introducing several common methods for constructing a 3D model of cranial cavity, this paper carries out systematically the research on the influence law of cranial cavity deformation. By introducing the new concepts and theory to develop the 3D cranial cavity model with the finite-element method, the cranial cavity deformation process with the changing ICP can be made the proper description and reasonable explanation. It can provide reference for getting cranium biomechanical model quickly and efficiently and lay the foundation for further biomechanical experiments and clinical applications. PMID:23476630

  15. Finite element analysis of a 3D moving vacuum arc for transverse magnetic field contacts based on Gundlach's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chang-Seob; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Se-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A systematic numerical method for analyzing a 3D moving vacuum arc was proposed and tested in this research by using a transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact. The analysis was carried out by employing the finite element method and the experimental energy equation defined by Gundlach's formula. In the literature, the vacuum interrupter has been widely applied to medium-voltage switching circuits. TMF-type contacts use the Lorentz force density to move a high-temperature arc so as to prevent the contacts from being melted and damaged. The material erosion caused by the arc on the electrode's surface is an important process that results in the interruptive capabilities of these vacuum interrupters. In a classical arc model, to move the vacuum arc, it is required that the magneto-hydrodynamics be analyzed in the arc region at each step. However, with this approach convergence is difficult, resulting in a very time-consuming. Therefore, we propose a new technique to predict the behaviors of vacuum arc between two electrodes. This new approach adopts the experimental arc voltage equation between two electrodes defined by Gundlach's formula. We verify our proposed model by comparing its results with the arcing behaviors obtained from earlier experiments.

  16. Dual Methods for Optimizing Finite Element Flexural Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    ADAIO2. T.7 LIEGE UNIV -(BEL-GIUM) LABORATOIRE DE TECHNIQUES AERON--ETC F/B 13/13 DUAL METHODS FOR OPTIMIZING FINITE ELEMENT FLEXURAL SYSTEMS. (U...FEB 81 C FLEURY. G SANDER AFOSR-80-0060 UNLSSIFIED LTASSA-87 AFOSR-TR-8 -0601 NL *soonmmnmi GRANT AFOSR - 80 - 000 REPORT SA-87 DUAL METHODS FOR...block number) Modern numerical methods for the optimization of large discretized systems are now well developed and highly efficient in the case of

  17. Efficient finite element method for grating profile reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruming; Sun, Jiguang

    2015-12-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of grating profiles from scattering data. The inverse problem is formulated as an optimization problem with a regularization term. We devise an efficient finite element method (FEM) and employ a quasi-Newton method to solve it. For the direct problems, the FEM stiff and mass matrices are assembled once at the beginning of the numerical procedure. Then only minor changes are made to the mass matrix at each iteration, which significantly saves the computation cost. Numerical examples show that the method is effective and robust.

  18. Analysis of Waveguide Junction Discontinuities Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.

    1997-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine reflection and transmission coefficients of rectangular waveguide junction discontinuities. An H-plane discontinuity, an E-plane ridge discontinuity, and a step discontinuity in a concentric rectangular waveguide junction are analyzed using the FEM procedure. Also, reflection and transmission coefficients due to presence of a gap between two sections of a rectangular waveguide are determined using the FEM. The numerical results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the earlier published results. The numerical results obtained by the FEM are compared with the numerical results obtained using the Mode Matching Method (MMM) and also with the measured data.

  19. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  20. Finite Element Treatment of Vortex States in 3D Cubic Superconductors in a Tilted Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Cai, Chuanbing

    2017-03-01

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations have been solved numerically by a finite element analysis for superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field. We obtain different vortex patterns as a function of the external magnetic field. With a magnetic field not parallel to the x- or y-axis, the vortices attempt to change their orientation accordingly. Our analysis of the corresponding changes in the magnetic response in different directions can provide information not only about vorticity but also about the three-dimensional vortex arrangement, even about the very subtle changes for the superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field.

  1. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  2. Splinting effect on posterior implants under various loading modes: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Hauchard, Erwan; Fournier, Benjamin Philippe; Jacq, Romain; Bouton, Antoine; Pierrisnard, Laurent; Naveau, Adrien

    2011-09-01

    This three-dimensional finite element study compared stresses, intensities and displacements of three mandibular posterior implants restored with cemented crowns (two molars and a premolar in straight line), splinted versus non-splinted. Hundred newton occlusal loads were vertically or horizontally applied, either on one single crown or on all of them. Maximal stresses and implants displacements were higher under horizontal loading. Splinting major effects appeared under single horizontal load with a decrease in stresses (34-49%) and displacements (16-19%) of the loaded crown. Splinting seems more appropriate for implant-supported restorations submitted to frequent single horizontal or oblique loads than vertical ones.

  3. GENSURF: A mesh generator for 3D finite element analysis of surface and corner cracks in finite thickness plates subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program that generates three-dimensional (3D) finite element models for cracked 3D solids was written. This computer program, gensurf, uses minimal input data to generate 3D finite element models for isotropic solids with elliptic or part-elliptic cracks. These models can be used with a 3D finite element program called surf3d. This report documents this mesh generator. In this manual the capabilities, limitations, and organization of gensurf are described. The procedures used to develop 3D finite element models and the input for and the output of gensurf are explained. Several examples are included to illustrate the use of this program. Several input data files are included with this manual so that the users can edit these files to conform to their crack configuration and use them with gensurf.

  4. Generalization of mixed multiscale finite element methods with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C S

    2016-08-01

    Many science and engineering problems exhibit scale disparity and high contrast. The small scale features cannot be omitted in the physical models because they can affect the macroscopic behavior of the problems. However, resolving all the scales in these problems can be prohibitively expensive. As a consequence, some types of model reduction techniques are required to design efficient solution algorithms. For practical purpose, we are interested in mixed finite element problems as they produce solutions with certain conservative properties. Existing multiscale methods for such problems include the mixed multiscale finite element methods. We show that for complicated problems, the mixed multiscale finite element methods may not be able to produce reliable approximations. This motivates the need of enrichment for coarse spaces. Two enrichment approaches are proposed, one is based on generalized multiscale finte element metthods (GMsFEM), while the other is based on spectral element-based algebraic multigrid (rAMGe). The former one, which is called mixed GMsFEM, is developed for both Darcy’s flow and linear elasticity. Application of the algorithm in two-phase flow simulations are demonstrated. For linear elasticity, the algorithm is subtly modified due to the symmetry requirement of the stress tensor. The latter enrichment approach is based on rAMGe. The algorithm differs from GMsFEM in that both of the velocity and pressure spaces are coarsened. Due the multigrid nature of the algorithm, recursive application is available, which results in an efficient multilevel construction of the coarse spaces. Stability, convergence analysis, and exhaustive numerical experiments are carried out to validate the proposed enrichment approaches. iii

  5. Modeling of coal stockpiles using a finite elements method

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Sensogut, C.

    2008-07-01

    In the case of coal stockpiles finding suitable environmental conditions, spontaneous combustion phenomenon will be unavoidable. In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile having a shape of triangle prism was constituted in a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC), Turkey. The parameters of time, humidity and temperature of air, atmospheric pressure, velocity and direction of wind values that are effective on coal stockpile were measured in a continuous manner. These experimental works were transferred into a computer media in order to obtain similar outcomes by carrying out 2-dimensional analysis of the stockpile with Finite Elements Method (FEM). The performed experimental studies and obtained results were then compared.

  6. The sensitivity method in finite element model updating: A tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Link, Michael; Friswell, Michael I.

    2011-10-01

    The sensitivity method is probably the most successful of the many approaches to the problem of updating finite element models of engineering structures based on vibration test data. It has been applied successfully to large-scale industrial problems and proprietary codes are available based on the techniques explained in simple terms in this article. A basic introduction to the most important procedures of computational model updating is provided, including tutorial examples to reinforce the reader's understanding and a large scale model updating example of a helicopter airframe.

  7. 3D Finite Element Modelling for the investigation of the cavity effect in extensometric rock-deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, M.; Detzky, G.; Koppán, A.

    2012-04-01

    phenomenon in general. Authors calculated the deformations of a simple-geometry 3D cavity, which is caused by variable gravity loads. Dependence of the cavity effect on changing of distinct elastic properties in categorized models has been investigated. Authors introduced qualifying parameter fields calculated using the results of the FE modelling (nodal displacements as a model answer for the gravity load), in order to characterize the effect. Modelling results can be used as an estimation not only for the absolute cavity effect rate of the intended arrangement, furthermore the sensitivity of the given system against a particular geometric property. As an application example finite element modelling were carried out in order to estimate the influence of the complicated cavity system surrounding the "Budapest-Matyashegy" Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of the Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary.

  8. 3D finite element modelling of guided wave scattering at delaminations in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murat, Bibi Intan Suraya; Fromme, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Carbon fiber laminate composites are increasingly used for aerospace structures as they offer a number of advantages including a good strength to weight ratio. However, impact during the operation and servicing of the aircraft can lead to barely visible and difficult to detect damage. Depending on the severity of the impact, delaminations can occur, reducing the load carrying capacity of the structure. Efficient nondestructive testing of composite panels can be achieved using guided ultrasonic waves propagating along the structure. The guided wave (A0 Lamb wave mode) scattering at delaminations was modeled using full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) simulations. The influence of the delamination size was systematically investigated from a parameter study. A significant influence of the delamination width on the guided wave scattering was found, especially on the angular dependency of the scattered guided wave amplitude. The sensitivity of guided ultrasonic waves for the detection of delamination damage in composite panels is discussed.

  9. 3-D finite element cyclic symmetric and contact stress analysis for a complete gear train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zeyong; Xu, Youliang; Gao, Xiangqun; Wei, Gang

    1992-10-01

    A complete gear train of a reduction gearbox is the object of finite element stress analysis. One of the basic segments of the complete gear train is taken as the computational model in the light of the cyclic symmetry of the gear train; meanwhile, the contact transmission forces between the corresponding meshed teeth are considered in the analysis of the model. For simplicity, the corresponding meshed lines are used instead of the actual contact surfaces. Both torque and centrifugal loads are involved in the analysis. The stresses in all the parts of a complete gear train can be determined by one analysis. The computed results show that the contact force on a meshed tooth is correlative not only to the length of the meshed line, but also to its position. It is shown that the neglect of the stress resulted from centrifugal load is inappropriate to a high speed gear train.

  10. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  11. Accurate optical CD profiler based on specialized finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrero, Jesus; Perçin, Gökhan

    2012-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry is moving to very low-k1 patterning solutions, the metrology problems facing process engineers are becoming much more complex. Choosing the right optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology technique is essential for bridging the metrology gap and achieving the required manufacturing volume throughput. The critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) measurement is usually distorted by the high aspect ratio of the photoresist and hard mask layers. CD-SEM measurements cease to correlate with complex three-dimensional profiles, such as the cases for double patterning and FinFETs, thus necessitating sophisticated, accurate and fast computational methods to bridge the gap. In this work, a suite of computational methods that complement advanced OCD equipment, and enabling them to operate at higher accuracies, are developed. In this article, a novel method for accurately modeling OCD profiles is presented. A finite element formulation in primal form is used to discretize the equations. The implementation uses specialized finite element spaces to solve Maxwell equations in two dimensions.

  12. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  13. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Zapp, John; Hsa, Chang-Yu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    An extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. With the introduction of a Fourier expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields, a coupled two dimensional system is generated and solved via the finite element method. An exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh and the fast fourier transformation (FFT) is used to evaluate the boundary integrals for low O(n) memory demand when an iterative solution algorithm is used. By virtue of the finite element method, the algorithm is applicable to structures of arbitrary material composition. Several improvements to the two dimensional algorithm are also described. These include: (1) modifications for terminating the mesh at circular boundaries without distorting the convolutionality of the boundary integrals; (2) the development of nonproprietary mesh generation routines for two dimensional applications; (3) the development of preprocessors for interfacing SDRC IDEAS with the main algorithm; and (4) the development of post-processing algorithms based on the public domain package GRAFIC to generate two and three dimensional gray level and color field maps.

  14. Simulating Space Capsule Water Landing with Explicit Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    A study of using an explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element code for simulating the water landing of a space capsule was performed. The finite element model contains Lagrangian shell elements for the space capsule and Eulerian solid elements for the water and air. An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) solver and a penalty coupling method were used for predicting the fluid and structure interaction forces. The space capsule was first assumed to be rigid, so the numerical results could be correlated with closed form solutions. The water and air meshes were continuously refined until the solution was converged. The converged maximum deceleration predicted is bounded by the classical von Karman and Wagner solutions and is considered to be an adequate solution. The refined water and air meshes were then used in the models for simulating the water landing of a capsule model that has a flexible bottom. For small pitch angle cases, the maximum deceleration from the flexible capsule model was found to be significantly greater than the maximum deceleration obtained from the corresponding rigid model. For large pitch angle cases, the difference between the maximum deceleration of the flexible model and that of its corresponding rigid model is smaller. Test data of Apollo space capsules with a flexible heat shield qualitatively support the findings presented in this paper.

  15. C1 finite elements on non-tensor-product 2d and 3d manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Geometrically continuous (Gk) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are Ck also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C1 geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G1 surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson’s equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O(h3) convergence in the L∞ norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis. PMID:26594070

  16. C(1) finite elements on non-tensor-product 2d and 3d manifolds.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Geometrically continuous (G(k) ) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are C(k) also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C(1) geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G(1) surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson's equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O(h(3)) convergence in the L(∞) norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis.

  17. Methods and framework for visualizing higher-order finite elements.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, William J; Bertel, François; Malaterre, Mathieu; Thompson, David; Pébay, Philippe P; O'Bara, Robert; Tendulkar, Saurabh

    2006-01-01

    The finite element method is an important, widely used numerical technique for solving partial differential equations. This technique utilizes basis functions for approximating the geometry and the variation of the solution field over finite regions, or elements, of the domain. These basis functions are generally formed by combinations of polynomials. In the past, the polynomial order of the basis has been low-typically of linear and quadratic order. However, in recent years so-called p and hp methods have been developed, which may elevate the order of the basis to arbitrary levels with the aim of accelerating the convergence of the numerical solution. The increasing complexity of numerical basis functions poses a significant challenge to visualization systems. In the past, such systems have been loosely coupled to simulation packages, exchanging data via file transfer, and internally reimplementing the basis functions in order to perform interpolation and implement visualization algorithms. However, as the basis functions become more complex and, in some cases, proprietary in nature, it becomes increasingly difficult if not impossible to reimplement them within the visualization system. Further, most visualization systems typically process linear primitives, in part to take advantage of graphics hardware and, in part, due to the inherent simplicity of the resulting algorithms. Thus, visualization of higher-order finite elements requires tessellating the basis to produce data compatible with existing visualization systems. In this paper, we describe adaptive methods that automatically tessellate complex finite element basis functions using a flexible and extensible software framework. These methods employ a recursive, edge-based subdivision algorithm driven by a set of error metrics including geometric error, solution error, and error in image space. Further, we describe advanced pretessellation techniques that guarantees capture of the critical points of the

  18. Numerical Analysis of a Finite Element/Volume Penalty Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, Bertrand

    The penalty method makes it possible to incorporate a large class of constraints in general purpose Finite Element solvers like freeFEM++. We present here some contributions to the numerical analysis of this method. We propose an abstract framework for this approach, together with some general error estimates based on the discretization parameter ɛ and the space discretization parameter h. As this work is motivated by the possibility to handle constraints like rigid motion for fluid-particle flows, we shall pay a special attention to a model problem of this kind, where the constraint is prescribed over a subdomain. We show how the abstract estimate can be applied to this situation, in the case where a non-body-fitted mesh is used. In addition, we describe how this method provides an approximation of the Lagrange multiplier associated to the constraint.

  19. Modified Immersed Finite Element Method For Fully-Coupled Fluid-Structure Interations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a “modified” immersed finite element method (mIFEM), a non-boundary-fitted numerical technique, to study fluid-structure interactions. Using this method, we can more precisely capture the solid dynamics by solving the solid governing equation instead of imposing it based on the fluid velocity field as in the original immersed finite element (IFEM). Using the IFEM may lead to severe solid mesh distortion because the solid deformation is been over-estimated, especially for high Reynolds number flows. In the mIFEM, the solid dynamics is solved using appropriate boundary conditions generated from the surrounding fluid, therefore produces more accurate and realistic coupled solutions. We show several 2-D and 3-D testing cases where the mIFEM has a noticeable advantage in handling complicated fluid-structure interactions when the solid behavior dominates the fluid flow. PMID:24223445

  20. HIFU Induced Heating Modelling by Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R.; Vera, A.; Leija, L.

    High intensity focused ultrasound is a thermal therapy method used to treat malignant tumors and other medical conditions. Focused ultrasound concentrates acoustic energy at a focal zone. There, temperature rises rapidly over 56 °C to provoke tissue necrosis. Device performance depends on its fabrication placing computational modeling as a powerful tool to anticipate experimentation results. Finite element method allows modeling of multiphysics systems. Therefore, induced heating was modeled considering the acoustic field produced by a concave radiator excited with electric potentials from 5 V to 20 V. Nonlinear propagation was neglected and a linear response between the acoustic fields and pressure distribution was obtained. Finally, the results showed that acoustic propagation and heating models should be improved and validated with experimental measurements.

  1. Multiscale finite-element method for linear elastic geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, Nicola; Hajibeygi, Hadi; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-02-01

    The demand for accurate and efficient simulation of geomechanical effects is widely increasing in the geoscience community. High resolution characterizations of the mechanical properties of subsurface formations are essential for improving modeling predictions. Such detailed descriptions impose severe computational challenges and motivate the development of multiscale solution strategies. We propose a multiscale solution framework for the geomechanical equilibrium problem of heterogeneous porous media based on the finite-element method. After imposing a coarse-scale grid on the given fine-scale problem, the coarse-scale basis functions are obtained by solving local equilibrium problems within coarse elements. These basis functions form the restriction and prolongation operators used to obtain the coarse-scale system for the displacement-vector. Then, a two-stage preconditioner that couples the multiscale system with a smoother is derived for the iterative solution of the fine-scale linear system. Various numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate accuracy and robustness of the method.

  2. Least-squares finite element methods for quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Christian; Brannick, J; Manteuffel, T; Mccormick, S

    2008-01-01

    A significant amount of the computational time in large Monte Carlo simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is spent inverting the discrete Dirac operator. Unfortunately, traditional covariant finite difference discretizations of the Dirac operator present serious challenges for standard iterative methods. For interesting physical parameters, the discretized operator is large and ill-conditioned, and has random coefficients. More recently, adaptive algebraic multigrid (AMG) methods have been shown to be effective preconditioners for Wilson's discretization of the Dirac equation. This paper presents an alternate discretization of the Dirac operator based on least-squares finite elements. The discretization is systematically developed and physical properties of the resulting matrix system are discussed. Finally, numerical experiments are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of adaptive smoothed aggregation ({alpha}SA ) multigrid as a preconditioner for the discrete field equations resulting from applying the proposed least-squares FE formulation to a simplified test problem, the 2d Schwinger model of quantum electrodynamics.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of structures. [within framework of finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H.; Pifko, A.; Levy, A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of nonlinear analysis techniques within the framework of the finite-element method is reported. Although the emphasis is concerned with those nonlinearities associated with material behavior, a general treatment of geometric nonlinearity, alone or in combination with plasticity is included, and applications presented for a class of problems categorized as axisymmetric shells of revolution. The scope of the nonlinear analysis capabilities includes: (1) a membrane stress analysis, (2) bending and membrane stress analysis, (3) analysis of thick and thin axisymmetric bodies of revolution, (4) a general three dimensional analysis, and (5) analysis of laminated composites. Applications of the methods are made to a number of sample structures. Correlation with available analytic or experimental data range from good to excellent.

  4. A responsive finite element method to aid interactive geometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Umetani, N; Takayama, K; Mitani, J; Igarashi, T

    2011-01-01

    Current computer-aided engineering systems use numerical-simulation methods mainly as offline verification tools to reject designs that don't satisfy the required constraints, rather than as tools to guide users toward better designs. However, integrating real-time finite element method (FEM) into interactive geometric modeling can provide user guidance. During interactive editing, real-time feedback from numerical simulation guides users toward an improved design without tedious trial-and-error iterations. Careful reuse of previous computation results, such as meshes and matrices, on the basis of speed and accuracy trade-offs, have helped produce fast FEM analysis during interactive editing. Several 2D example applications and informal user studies show this approach's effectiveness. Such tools could help nonexpert users design objects that satisfy physical constraints and help those users understand the underlying physical properties.

  5. Structural stability of posterior retainer design for resin-bonded prostheses: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Shinya, Akikazu; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Botelho, Michael George; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the stress distribution and natural frequency of different shape and thickness retainer designs for maxillary posterior resin-bonded prostheses using finite element (FE) method. A 3D FE model of a three unit posterior resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was generated. Three different shaped retainer designs, viz. C-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds), D-shaped (three axial surface wraparounds with central groove) and O-shaped (360° wraparounds), and three different thicknesses, viz., 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mm, resin-bonded prostheses were used in this study. The resin-bonded prosthesis analysis model was imported into an FE analysis software (ANSYS 10.0, ANSYS, USA) and attribution of material properties. The nodes at the bottom surface of the roots were assigned fixed zero displacement in the three spatial dimensions. A simulated angle of 45° loading of a 100 N force was applied to the node of the pontic lingual cusp surface. The stress distributions and corresponding natural frequencies were analyzed and resolved. The C-shaped retainer for 0.4 mm thickness recorded the greatest von Mises stresses of 71.4 MPa for all three groups. C-shaped, D-shaped and O-shaped retainer presented natural frequencies 3,988, 7,754, and 10,494 Hz, respectively. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer. The maximum von Mises stresses values of the remaining tooth and prosthesis decreased with greater retainer thickness. D-shaped retainer and O-shaped retainer increased natural frequencies and structural rigidity over the traditional C-shaped retainer.

  6. On domain decomposition preconditioner of BPS type for finite element discretizations of 3D elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2012-09-01

    BPS is a well known an efficient and rather general domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioner, suggested in the famous series of papers Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz (1986-1989). Since then, it has been serving as the origin for the whole family of domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioners-solvers as for h so hp discretizations of elliptic problems. For its original version, designed for h discretizations, the named authors proved the bound O(1 + log2 H/ h) for the relative condition number under some restricting conditions on the domain decomposition and finite element discretization. Here H/ h is the maximal relation of the characteristic size H of a decomposition subdomain to the mesh parameter h of its discretization. It was assumed that subdomains are images of the reference unite cube by trilinear mappings. Later similar bounds related to h discretizations were proved for more general domain decompositions, defined by means of coarse tetrahedral meshes. These results, accompanied by the development of some special tools of analysis aimed at such type of decompositions, were summarized in the book of Toselli and Widlund (2005). This paper is also confined to h discretizations. We further expand the range of admissible domain decompositions for constructing BPS preconditioners, in which decomposition subdomains can be convex polyhedrons, satisfying some conditions of shape regularity. We prove the bound for the relative condition number with the same dependence on H/ h as in the bound given above. Along the way to this result, we simplify the proof of the so called abstract bound for the relative condition number of the domain decomposition preconditioner. In the part, related to the analysis of the interface sub-problem preconditioning, our technical tools are generalization of those used by Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz.

  7. Method for patient-specific finite element modeling and simulation of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Zrinzo, Ludvic U; Tisch, Stephen; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I; Wårdell, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. Success of DBS is highly dependent on electrode location and electrical parameter settings. The aim of this study was to develop a general method for setting up patient-specific 3D computer models of DBS, based on magnetic resonance images, and to demonstrate the use of such models for assessing the position of the electrode contacts and the distribution of the electric field in relation to individual patient anatomy. A software tool was developed for creating finite element DBS-models. The electric field generated by DBS was simulated in one patient and the result was visualized with isolevels and glyphs. The result was evaluated and it corresponded well with reported effects and side effects of stimulation. It was demonstrated that patient-specific finite element models and simulations of DBS can be useful for increasing the understanding of the clinical outcome of DBS.

  8. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  9. Large-eddy simulation using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Gresho, P.M.; Leone, J.M. Jr.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-10-01

    In a large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows, the large-scale motion is calculated explicitly (i.e., approximated with semi-empirical relations). Typically, finite difference or spectral numerical schemes are used to generate an LES; the use of finite element methods (FEM) has been far less prominent. In this study, we demonstrate that FEM in combination with LES provides a viable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a two-dimensional backward-facing step. The combination of these methodologies brings together the advantages of each: LES provides a high degree of accuracy with a minimum of empiricism for turbulence modeling and FEM provides a robust way to simulate flow in very complex domains of practical interest. Such a combination should prove very valuable to the engineering community.

  10. A feasibility study of a 3-D finite element solution scheme for aeroengine duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The advantage from development of a 3-D model of aeroengine duct acoustics is the ability to analyze axial and circumferential liner segmentation simultaneously. The feasibility of a 3-D duct acoustics model was investigated using Galerkin or least squares element formulations combined with Gaussian elimination, successive over-relaxation, or conjugate gradient solution algorithms on conventional scalar computers and on a vector machine. A least squares element formulation combined with a conjugate gradient solver on a CDC Star vector computer initially appeared to have great promise, but severe difficulties were encountered with matrix ill-conditioning. These difficulties in conditioning rendered this technique impractical for realistic problems.

  11. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  12. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  13. A method for determining spiral-bevel gear tooth geometry for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical method was developed to determine gear tooth surface coordinates of face-milled spiral bevel gears. The method uses the basic gear design parameters in conjunction with the kinematical aspects of spiral bevel gear manufacturing machinery. A computer program, SURFACE, was developed. The computer program calculates the surface coordinates and outputs 3-D model data that can be used for finite element analysis. Development of the modeling method and an example case are presented. This analysis method could also find application for gear inspection and near-net-shape gear forging die design.

  14. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  15. An approach to parameter estimation for breast tumor by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, A.-qing; Yang, Hong-qin; Ye, Zhen; Su, Yi-ming; Xie, Shu-sen

    2009-02-01

    The temperature of human body on the surface of the skin depends on the metabolic activity, the blood flow, and the temperature of the surroundings. Any abnormality in the tissue, such as the presence of a tumor, alters the normal temperature on the skin surface due to increased metabolic activity of the tumor. Therefore, abnormal skin temperature profiles are an indication of diseases such as tumor or cancer. This study is to present an approach to detect the female breast tumor and its related parameter estimations by combination the finite element method with infrared thermography for the surface temperature profile. A 2D simplified breast embedded a tumor model based on the female breast anatomical structure and physiological characteristics was first established, and then finite element method was used to analyze the heat diffuse equation for the surface temperature profiles of the breast. The genetic optimization algorithm was used to estimate the tumor parameters such as depth, size and blood perfusion by minimizing a fitness function involving the temperature profiles simulated data by finite element method to the experimental data obtained by infrared thermography. This preliminary study shows it is possible to determine the depth and the heat generation rate of the breast tumor by using infrared thermography and the optimization analysis, which may play an important role in the female breast healthcare and diseases evaluation or early detection. In order to develop the proposed methodology to be used in clinical, more accurate anatomy 3D breast geometry should be considered in further investigations.

  16. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  17. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  18. 3D Finite Element Modelling of Cutting Forces in Drilling Fibre Metal Laminates and Experimental Hole Quality Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giasin, Khaled; Ayvar-Soberanis, Sabino; French, Toby; Phadnis, Vaibhav

    2017-02-01

    Machining Glass fibre aluminium reinforced epoxy (GLARE) is cumbersome due to distinctively different mechanical and thermal properties of its constituents, which makes it challenging to achieve damage-free holes with the acceptable surface quality. The proposed work focuses on the study of the machinability of thin ( 2.5 mm) GLARE laminate. Drilling trials were conducted to analyse the effect of feed rate and spindle speed on the cutting forces and hole quality. The resulting hole quality metrics (surface roughness, hole size, circularity error, burr formation and delamination) were assessed using surface profilometry and optical scanning techniques. A three dimensional (3D) finite-element (FE) model of drilling GLARE laminate was also developed using ABAQUS/Explicit to help understand the mechanism of drilling GLARE. The homogenised ply-level response of GLARE laminate was considered in the FE model to predict cutting forces in the drilling process.

  19. 3D finite element model for writing long-period fiber gratings by CO2 laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-08-12

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented.

  20. 3D Finite Element Model for Writing Long-Period Fiber Gratings by CO2 Laser Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, João M. P.; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented. PMID:23941908

  1. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  2. 3D finite element analysis of nutrient distributions and cell viability in the intervertebral disc: effects of deformation and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alicia R; Huang, Chun-Yuh C; Brown, Mark D; Gu, Wei Yong

    2011-09-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) receives important nutrients, such as glucose, from surrounding blood vessels. Poor nutritional supply is believed to play a key role in disc degeneration. Several investigators have presented finite element models of the IVD to investigate disc nutrition; however, none has predicted nutrient levels and cell viability in the disc with a realistic 3D geometry and tissue properties coupled to mechanical deformation. Understanding how degeneration and loading affect nutrition and cell viability is necessary for elucidating the mechanisms of disc degeneration and low back pain. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of disc degeneration and static deformation on glucose distributions and cell viability in the IVD using finite element analysis. A realistic 3D finite element model of the IVD was developed based on mechano-electrochemical mixture theory. In the model, the cellular metabolic activities and viability were related to nutrient concentrations, and transport properties of nutrients were dependent on tissue deformation. The effects of disc degeneration and mechanical compression on glucose concentrations and cell density distributions in the IVD were investigated. To examine effects of disc degeneration, tissue properties were altered to reflect those of degenerated tissue, including reduced water content, fixed charge density, height, and endplate permeability. Two mechanical loading conditions were also investigated: a reference (undeformed) case and a 10% static deformation case. In general, nutrient levels decreased moving away from the nutritional supply at the disc periphery. Minimum glucose levels were at the interface between the nucleus and annulus regions of the disc. Deformation caused a 6.2% decrease in the minimum glucose concentration in the normal IVD, while degeneration resulted in an 80% decrease. Although cell density was not affected in the undeformed normal disc, there was a decrease in cell

  3. The mixed finite element multigrid method for stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Muzhinji, K; Shateyi, S; Motsa, S S

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results.

  4. Architecting the Finite Element Method Pipeline for the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhisong; Lewis, T. James; Kirby, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a widely employed numerical technique for approximating the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) in various science and engineering applications. Many of these applications benefit from fast execution of the FEM pipeline. One way to accelerate the FEM pipeline is by exploiting advances in modern computational hardware, such as the many-core streaming processors like the graphical processing unit (GPU). In this paper, we present the algorithms and data-structures necessary to move the entire FEM pipeline to the GPU. First we propose an efficient GPU-based algorithm to generate local element information and to assemble the global linear system associated with the FEM discretization of an elliptic PDE. To solve the corresponding linear system efficiently on the GPU, we implement a conjugate gradient method preconditioned with a geometry-informed algebraic multi-grid (AMG) method preconditioner. We propose a new fine-grained parallelism strategy, a corresponding multigrid cycling stage and efficient data mapping to the many-core architecture of GPU. Comparison of our on-GPU assembly versus a traditional serial implementation on the CPU achieves up to an 87 × speedup. Focusing on the linear system solver alone, we achieve a speedup of up to 51 × versus use of a comparable state-of-the-art serial CPU linear system solver. Furthermore, the method compares favorably with other GPU-based, sparse, linear solvers. PMID:25202164

  5. Architecting the Finite Element Method Pipeline for the GPU.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhisong; Lewis, T James; Kirby, Robert M; Whitaker, Ross T

    2014-02-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a widely employed numerical technique for approximating the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) in various science and engineering applications. Many of these applications benefit from fast execution of the FEM pipeline. One way to accelerate the FEM pipeline is by exploiting advances in modern computational hardware, such as the many-core streaming processors like the graphical processing unit (GPU). In this paper, we present the algorithms and data-structures necessary to move the entire FEM pipeline to the GPU. First we propose an efficient GPU-based algorithm to generate local element information and to assemble the global linear system associated with the FEM discretization of an elliptic PDE. To solve the corresponding linear system efficiently on the GPU, we implement a conjugate gradient method preconditioned with a geometry-informed algebraic multi-grid (AMG) method preconditioner. We propose a new fine-grained parallelism strategy, a corresponding multigrid cycling stage and efficient data mapping to the many-core architecture of GPU. Comparison of our on-GPU assembly versus a traditional serial implementation on the CPU achieves up to an 87 × speedup. Focusing on the linear system solver alone, we achieve a speedup of up to 51 × versus use of a comparable state-of-the-art serial CPU linear system solver. Furthermore, the method compares favorably with other GPU-based, sparse, linear solvers.

  6. The Mixed Finite Element Multigrid Method for Stokes Equations

    PubMed Central

    Muzhinji, K.; Shateyi, S.; Motsa, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results. PMID:25945361

  7. Nitsche Extended Finite Element Methods for Earthquake Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Ethan T.

    Modeling earthquakes and geologically short-time-scale events on fault networks is a difficult problem with important implications for human safety and design. These problems demonstrate a. rich physical behavior, in which distributed loading localizes both spatially and temporally into earthquakes on fault systems. This localization is governed by two aspects: friction and fault geometry. Computationally, these problems provide a stern challenge for modelers --- static and dynamic equations must be solved on domains with discontinuities on complex fault systems, and frictional boundary conditions must be applied on these discontinuities. The most difficult aspect of modeling physics on complicated domains is the mesh. Most numerical methods involve meshing the geometry; nodes are placed on the discontinuities, and edges are chosen to coincide with faults. The resulting mesh is highly unstructured, making the derivation of finite difference discretizations difficult. Therefore, most models use the finite element method. Standard finite element methods place requirements on the mesh for the sake of stability, accuracy, and efficiency. The formation of a mesh which both conforms to fault geometry and satisfies these requirements is an open problem, especially for three dimensional, physically realistic fault. geometries. In addition, if the fault system evolves over the course of a dynamic simulation (i.e. in the case of growing cracks or breaking new faults), the geometry must he re-meshed at each time step. This can be expensive computationally. The fault-conforming approach is undesirable when complicated meshes are required, and impossible to implement when the geometry is evolving. Therefore, meshless and hybrid finite element methods that handle discontinuities without placing them on element boundaries are a desirable and natural way to discretize these problems. Several such methods are being actively developed for use in engineering mechanics involving crack

  8. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin P.; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Gillette, Andrew K.; Villongco, Christopher T.; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Holst, Michael J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  9. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Kevin P; Gonzales, Matthew J; Gillette, Andrew K; Villongco, Christopher T; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H; Holst, Michael J; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori.

  10. Numerical simulation and design of a fluxset sensor by finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Preis, K.; Bardi, I.; Biro, O.; Richter, K.R.; Pavo, J.; Gasparics, A.; Ticar, I.

    1998-09-01

    A 3D model of a fluxset sensor serving to measure magnetic fields arising in Eddy Current Nondestructive Testing applications is analyzed by the finite element method. The voltage induced in the pick-up coil is obtained by computing the flux of the core of the sensor for several values of the exciting current at various external fields. It is shown that the time shift of the ensuing voltage impulse depends linearly on the external field in a wide range. The behavior of the sensor is furthermore simulated in a real nondestructive testing arrangement consisting of an exciting coil located above a conducting plate with a crack.

  11. Stress distribution on external hexagon implant system using 3d finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo, Regênio M H; Oshima, Hugo M S; Silva, Isaac N L; Júnior, Luis H B; Mota, Eduardo G; Coelho, Luiz F B

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate strain distribution on dental implant, abutment, screw and crown virtual models in the posterior region. The analysis was performed by means of a 3D virtual model developed by the PRO-ENGINEER System (PRO-ENGINEER, PTC, Needham, MA, USA ) with an external butt joint (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), square headed Gold Tite abutment retainer screw (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), STA abutment (3i Implant Innovations, Palm Beach, Florida), metal infrastructure of Ag-Pd alloy and feldspatic ceramic. The standard load was 382N at 15 degree angle to the implant axis, applied at 6 mm from the implant center at different observation points on the implant-screw set. The data showed that on the implant virtual model, the highest strain concentration was found at the interface between the implant platform and the abutment, and in the middle point of the 1st screw thread internal diameter on the load application side.

  12. A Successive Selection Method for finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Baiyong; Zhang, Weijie; Lu, Qiuhai; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Finite Element (FE) model can be updated effectively and efficiently by using the Response Surface Method (RSM). However, it often involves performance trade-offs such as high computational cost for better accuracy or loss of efficiency for lots of design parameter updates. This paper proposes a Successive Selection Method (SSM), which is based on the linear Response Surface (RS) function and orthogonal design. SSM rewrites the linear RS function into a number of linear equations to adjust the Design of Experiment (DOE) after every FE calculation. SSM aims to interpret the implicit information provided by the FE analysis, to locate the Design of Experiment (DOE) points more quickly and accurately, and thereby to alleviate the computational burden. This paper introduces the SSM and its application, describes the solution steps of point selection for DOE in detail, and analyzes SSM's high efficiency and accuracy in the FE model updating. A numerical example of a simply supported beam and a practical example of a vehicle brake disc show that the SSM can provide higher speed and precision in FE model updating for engineering problems than traditional RSM.

  13. 3D Finite Element Electrical Model of Larval Zebrafish ECG Signals.

    PubMed

    Crowcombe, James; Dhillon, Sundeep Singh; Hurst, Rhiannon Mary; Egginton, Stuart; Müller, Ferenc; Sík, Attila; Tarte, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of heart function in zebrafish larvae using electrocardiography (ECG) is a potentially useful tool in developing cardiac treatments and the assessment of drug therapies. In order to better understand how a measured ECG waveform is related to the structure of the heart, its position within the larva and the position of the electrodes, a 3D model of a 3 days post fertilisation (dpf) larval zebrafish was developed to simulate cardiac electrical activity and investigate the voltage distribution throughout the body. The geometry consisted of two main components; the zebrafish body was modelled as a homogeneous volume, while the heart was split into five distinct regions (sinoatrial region, atrial wall, atrioventricular band, ventricular wall and heart chambers). Similarly, the electrical model consisted of two parts with the body described by Laplace's equation and the heart using a bidomain ionic model based upon the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. Each region of the heart was differentiated by action potential (AP) parameters and activation wave conduction velocities, which were fitted and scaled based on previously published experimental results. ECG measurements in vivo at different electrode recording positions were then compared to the model results. The model was able to simulate action potentials, wave propagation and all the major features (P wave, R wave, T wave) of the ECG, as well as polarity of the peaks observed at each position. This model was based upon our current understanding of the structure of the normal zebrafish larval heart. Further development would enable us to incorporate features associated with the diseased heart and hence assist in the interpretation of larval zebrafish ECGs in these conditions.

  14. 3D Finite Element Electrical Model of Larval Zebrafish ECG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Crowcombe, James; Dhillon, Sundeep Singh; Hurst, Rhiannon Mary; Egginton, Stuart; Müller, Ferenc; Sík, Attila; Tarte, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of heart function in zebrafish larvae using electrocardiography (ECG) is a potentially useful tool in developing cardiac treatments and the assessment of drug therapies. In order to better understand how a measured ECG waveform is related to the structure of the heart, its position within the larva and the position of the electrodes, a 3D model of a 3 days post fertilisation (dpf) larval zebrafish was developed to simulate cardiac electrical activity and investigate the voltage distribution throughout the body. The geometry consisted of two main components; the zebrafish body was modelled as a homogeneous volume, while the heart was split into five distinct regions (sinoatrial region, atrial wall, atrioventricular band, ventricular wall and heart chambers). Similarly, the electrical model consisted of two parts with the body described by Laplace’s equation and the heart using a bidomain ionic model based upon the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. Each region of the heart was differentiated by action potential (AP) parameters and activation wave conduction velocities, which were fitted and scaled based on previously published experimental results. ECG measurements in vivo at different electrode recording positions were then compared to the model results. The model was able to simulate action potentials, wave propagation and all the major features (P wave, R wave, T wave) of the ECG, as well as polarity of the peaks observed at each position. This model was based upon our current understanding of the structure of the normal zebrafish larval heart. Further development would enable us to incorporate features associated with the diseased heart and hence assist in the interpretation of larval zebrafish ECGs in these conditions. PMID:27824910

  15. Vibration band gaps for elastic metamaterial rods using wave finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, E. D.; Gautier, F.; Pelat, A.; Dos Santos, J. M. C.

    2016-10-01

    Band gaps in elastic metamaterial rods with spatial periodic distribution and periodically attached local resonators are investigated. New techniques to analyze metamaterial systems are using a combination of analytical or numerical method with wave propagation. One of them, called here wave spectral element method (WSEM), consists of combining the spectral element method (SEM) with Floquet-Bloch's theorem. A modern methodology called wave finite element method (WFEM), developed to calculate dynamic behavior in periodic acoustic and structural systems, utilizes a similar approach where SEM is substituted by the conventional finite element method (FEM). In this paper, it is proposed to use WFEM to calculate band gaps in elastic metamaterial rods with spatial periodic distribution and periodically attached local resonators of multi-degree-of-freedom (M-DOF). Simulated examples with band gaps generated by Bragg scattering and local resonators are calculated by WFEM and verified with WSEM, which is used as a reference method. Results are presented in the form of attenuation constant, vibration transmittance and frequency response function (FRF). For all cases, WFEM and WSEM results are in agreement, provided that the number of elements used in WFEM is sufficient to convergence. An experimental test was conducted with a real elastic metamaterial rod, manufactured with plastic in a 3D printer, without local resonance-type effect. The experimental results for the metamaterial rod with band gaps generated by Bragg scattering are compared with the simulated ones. Both numerical methods (WSEM and WFEM) can localize the band gap position and width very close to the experimental results. A hybrid approach combining WFEM with the commercial finite element software ANSYS is proposed to model complex metamaterial systems. Two examples illustrating its efficiency and accuracy to model an elastic metamaterial rod unit-cell using 1D simple rod element and 3D solid element are

  16. Hierarchical flux-based thermal-structural finite element analysis method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polesky, Sandra P.

    1992-01-01

    A hierarchical flux-based finite element method is developed for both a one and two dimensional thermal structural analyses. Derivation of the finite element equations is presented. The resulting finite element matrices associated with the flux based formulation are evaluated in a closed form. The hierarchical finite elements include additional degrees of freedom in the approximation of the element variable distributions by the use of nodeless variables. The nodeless variables offer increased solution accuracy without the need for defining actual nodes and rediscretizing the finite element model. Thermal and structural responses are obtained from a conventional linear finite element method and exact solutions. Results show that the hierarchical flux-based method can provide improved thermal and structural solution accuracy with fewer elements when compared to results for the conventional linear element method.

  17. Optimization design of thumbspica splint using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tz-How; Feng, Chi-Kung; Gung, Yih-Wen; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Lin

    2006-12-01

    De Quervain's tenosynovitis is often observed on repetitive flexion of the thumb. In the clinical setting, the conservative treatment is usually an applied thumbspica splint to immobilize the thumb. However, the traditional thumbspica splint is bulky and heavy. Thus, this study used the finite element (FE) method to remove redundant material in order to reduce the splint's weight and increase ventilation. An FE model of a thumbspica splint was constructed using ANSYS9.0 software. A maximum lateral thumb pinch force of 98 N was used as the input loading condition for the FE model. This study implemented topology optimization and design optimization to seek the optimal thickness and shape of the splint. This new design was manufactured and compared with the traditional thumbspica splint. Ten thumbspica splints were tested in a materials testing system, and statistically analyzed using an independent t test. The optimal thickness of the thumbspica splint was 3.2 mm. The new design is not significantly different from the traditional splint in the immobilization effect. However, the volume of this new design has been reduced by about 35%. This study produced a new thumbspica splint shape with less volume, but had a similar immobilization effect compared to the traditional shape. In a clinical setting, this result can be used by the occupational therapist as a reference for manufacturing lighter thumbspica splints for patients with de Quervain's tenosynovitis.

  18. Discontinuous finite element method for vector radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cun-Hai; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2017-03-01

    The discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) is applied to solve the vector radiative transfer in participating media. The derivation in a discrete form of the vector radiation governing equations is presented, in which the angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach with a local refined modification, and the spatial domain is discretized into finite non-overlapped discontinuous elements. The elements in the whole solution domain are connected by modelling the boundary numerical flux between adjacent elements, which makes the DFEM numerically stable for solving radiative transfer equations. Several various problems of vector radiative transfer are tested to verify the performance of the developed DFEM, including vector radiative transfer in a one-dimensional parallel slab containing a Mie/Rayleigh/strong forward scattering medium and a two-dimensional square medium. The fact that DFEM results agree very well with the benchmark solutions in published references shows that the developed DFEM in this paper is accurate and effective for solving vector radiative transfer problems.

  19. Structural optimization of thin shells using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the structural optimization of thin shell structures that are subjected to stress and displacement constraints. In order to accomplish this, the structural optimization computer program DESAP1 was modified and improved. In the static analysis part of the DESAP1 computer program the torsional spring elements, which are used to analyze thin, shallow shell structures, were eliminated by modifying the membrane stiffness matrix of the triangular elements in the local coordinate system and adding a fictitious rotational stiffness matrix. This simplified the DESAP1 program input, improved the accuracy of the analysis, and saved computation time. In the optimization part of the DESAP1 program the stress ratio formula, which redesigns the thickness of each finite element of the structure, was solved by an analytical method. This scheme replaced the iterative solution that was previously used in the DESAP1 program, thus increasing the accuracy and speed of the design. The modified program was used to design a thin, cylindrical shell structure with optimum weight, and the results are reported in this paper.

  20. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  1. Cognitive-graphic method for constructing of hierarchical forms of basic functions of biquadratic finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astionenko, I. O.; Litvinenko, O. I.; Osipova, N. V.; Tuluchenko, G. Ya.; Khomchenko, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Recently the interpolation bases of the hierarchical type have been used for the problem solving of the approximation of multiple arguments functions (such as in the finite-element method). In this work the cognitive graphical method of constructing of the hierarchical form bases on the serendipity finite elements is suggested, which allowed to get the alternative bases on a biquadratic finite element from the serendipity family without internal knots' inclusion. The cognitive-graphic method allowed to improve the known interpolation procedure of Taylor and to get the modified elements with irregular arrangement of knots. The proposed procedures are universal and are spread in the area of finite-elements.

  2. Influence of bicortical techniques in internal connection placed in premaxillary area by 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araújo; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2017-02-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the stress distribution in implant-supported prostheses and peri-implant bone using internal hexagon (IH) implants in the premaxillary area, varying surgical techniques (conventional, bicortical and bicortical in association with nasal floor elevation), and loading directions (0°, 30° and 60°) by three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. Three models were designed with Invesalius, Rhinoceros 3D and Solidworks software. Each model contained a bone block of the premaxillary area including an implant (IH, Ø4 × 10 mm) supporting a metal-ceramic crown. 178 N was applied in different inclinations (0°, 30°, 60°). The results were analyzed by von Mises, maximum principal stress, microstrain and displacement maps including ANOVA statistical test for some situations. Von Mises maps of implant, screws and abutment showed increase of stress concentration as increased loading inclination. Bicortical techniques showed reduction in implant apical area and in the head of fixation screws. Bicortical techniques showed slight increase stress in cortical bone in the maximum principal stress and microstrain maps under 60° loading. No differences in bone tissue regarding surgical techniques were observed. As conclusion, non-axial loads increased stress concentration in all maps. Bicortical techniques showed lower stress for implant and screw; however, there was slightly higher stress on cortical bone only under loads of higher inclinations (60°).

  3. Scaling/LER study of Si GAA nanowire FET using 3D finite element Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmessary, Muhammad A.; Nagy, Daniel; Aldegunde, Manuel; Seoane, Natalia; Indalecio, Guillermo; Lindberg, Jari; Dettmer, Wulf; Perić, Djordje; García-Loureiro, Antonio J.; Kalna, Karol

    2017-02-01

    3D Finite Element (FE) Monte Carlo (MC) simulation toolbox incorporating 2D Schrödinger equation quantum corrections is employed to simulate ID-VG characteristics of a 22 nm gate length gate-all-around (GAA) Si nanowire (NW) FET demonstrating an excellent agreement against experimental data at both low and high drain biases. We then scale the Si GAA NW according to the ITRS specifications to a gate length of 10 nm predicting that the NW FET will deliver the required on-current of above 1 mA/ μ m and a superior electrostatic integrity with a nearly ideal sub-threshold slope of 68 mV/dec and a DIBL of 39 mV/V. In addition, we use a calibrated 3D FE quantum corrected drift-diffusion (DD) toolbox to investigate the effects of NW line-edge roughness (LER) induced variability on the sub-threshold characteristics (threshold voltage (VT), OFF-current (IOFF), sub-threshold slope (SS) and drain-induced-barrier-lowering (DIBL)) for the 22 nm and 10 nm gate length GAA NW FETs at low and high drain biases. We simulate variability with two LER correlation lengths (CL = 20 nm and 10 nm) and three root mean square values (RMS = 0.6, 0.7 and 0.85 nm).

  4. Finite element methods of studying mechanical factors in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Davids, N

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews some biomechanical analyses of blood flow in large arteries based on a general computer modeling using the finite element method. We study the following question: What is the role played by the interrelated factors of mechanical stress, flow irregularities, and diffusion through the endothelium on the etiology of atherosclerosis or the aggravation of vascular injury. It presents the computational features of the method and stresses the physiological significance of the results, such as the effect of geometric complexities, material nonlinearities, and non-Newtonian rheology of the blood. The specific mechanical and fluid dynamic factors analyzed are wall shear stress, flow profiles, and pressure variations. After simulating tubes of circular cross section, we apply the analysis to a number of physiological situations of significance, including blood flow in the entrance region, at bifurcations, in the annular region between an inserted catheter of varying diameter and the vessel. A model study of pulsatile flow in a 60 degree bifurcated channel of velocity profiles provided corroborative measurements of these processes with special emphasis on reversed or distributed flow conditions. The corresponding analysis was extended to the situation in which flow separates and reverses in the neighborhood of stagnation points. This required developing the nonlinear expression for the convective velocity change in the medium. A computer algorithm was developed to handle simultaneous effects of pressure and viscous forces on velocity change across the element and applied to the canine prebranch arterial segment. For mean physiological flow conditions, low shear stresses (0-10 dynes/cm2) are predicted near the wall in the diverging plane, higher values (50 dynes/cm2) along the converging sides of the wall. Backflow is predicted along the outer wall, pressure recovery prior to and into the branches, and a peak shear at the divider lip.

  5. High-order finite element methods for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Basabe Delgado, Jonas De Dios

    Purely numerical methods based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) are becoming increasingly popular in seismic modeling for the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in geophysical models. These methods offer a better control on the accuracy and more geometrical flexibility than the Finite Difference methods that have been traditionally used for the generation of synthetic seismograms. However, the success of these methods has outpaced their analytic validation. The accuracy of the FEMs used for seismic wave propagation is unknown in most cases and therefore the simulation parameters in numerical experiments are determined by empirical rules. I focus on two methods that are particularly suited for seismic modeling: the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and the Interior-Penalty Discontinuous Galerkin Method (IP-DGM). The goals of this research are to investigate the grid dispersion and stability of SEM and IP-DGM, to implement these methods and to apply them to subsurface models to obtain synthetic seismograms. In order to analyze the grid dispersion and stability, I use the von Neumann method (plane wave analysis) to obtain a generalized eigenvalue problem. I show that the eigenvalues are related to the grid dispersion and that, with certain assumptions, the size of the eigenvalue problem can be reduced from the total number of degrees of freedom to one proportional to the number of degrees of freedom inside one element. The grid dispersion results indicate that SEM of degree greater than 4 is isotropic and has a very low dispersion. Similar dispersion properties are observed for the symmetric formulation of IP-DGM of degree greater than 4 using nodal basis functions. The low dispersion of these methods allows for a sampling ratio of 4 nodes per wavelength to be used. On the other hand, the stability analysis shows that, in the elastic case, the size of the time step required in IP-DGM is approximately 6 times smaller than that of SEM. The results from the analysis

  6. High-Order Curvilinear Finite Element Methods for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics [High Order Curvilinear Finite Elements for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, Veselin A.; Kolev, Tzanio V.; Rieben, Robert N.

    2012-09-20

    The numerical approximation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a movingLagrangian frame is at the heart of many multiphysics simulation algorithms. Here, we present a general framework for high-order Lagrangian discretization of these compressible shock hydrodynamics equations using curvilinear finite elements. This method is an extension of the approach outlined in [Dobrev et al., Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 65 (2010), pp. 1295--1310] and can be formulated for any finite dimensional approximation of the kinematic and thermodynamic fields, including generic finite elements on two- and three-dimensional meshes with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, or hexahedral zones. We discretize the kinematic variables of position and velocity using a continuous high-order basis function expansion of arbitrary polynomial degree which is obtained via a corresponding high-order parametric mapping from a standard reference element. This enables the use of curvilinear zone geometry, higher-order approximations for fields within a zone, and a pointwise definition of mass conservation which we refer to as strong mass conservation. Moreover, we discretize the internal energy using a piecewise discontinuous high-order basis function expansion which is also of arbitrary polynomial degree. This facilitates multimaterial hydrodynamics by treating material properties, such as equations of state and constitutive models, as piecewise discontinuous functions which vary within a zone. To satisfy the Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions at a shock boundary and generate the appropriate entropy, we introduce a general tensor artificial viscosity which takes advantage of the high-order kinematic and thermodynamic information available in each zone. Finally, we apply a generic high-order time discretization process to the semidiscrete equations to develop the fully discrete numerical algorithm. Our method can be viewed as the high-order generalization of the so-called staggered

  7. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  8. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-02-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  9. Fracture Capabilities in Grizzly with the extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbow, John; Zhang, Ziyu; Spencer, Benjamin; Jiang, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Efforts are underway to develop fracture mechanics capabilities in the Grizzly code to enable it to be used to perform deterministic fracture assessments of degraded reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). A capability was previously developed to calculate three-dimensional interaction- integrals to extract mixed-mode stress-intensity factors. This capability requires the use of a finite element mesh that conforms to the crack geometry. The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) provides a means to represent a crack geometry without explicitly fitting the finite element mesh to it. This is effected by enhancing the element kinematics to represent jump discontinuities at arbitrary locations inside of the element, as well as the incorporation of asymptotic near-tip fields to better capture crack singularities. In this work, use of only the discontinuous enrichment functions was examined to see how accurate stress intensity factors could still be calculated. This report documents the following work to enhance Grizzly’s engineering fracture capabilities by introducing arbitrary jump discontinuities for prescribed crack geometries; X-FEM Mesh Cutting in 3D: to enhance the kinematics of elements that are intersected by arbitrary crack geometries, a mesh cutting algorithm was implemented in Grizzly. The algorithm introduces new virtual nodes and creates partial elements, and then creates a new mesh connectivity; Interaction Integral Modifications: the existing code for evaluating the interaction integral in Grizzly was based on the assumption of a mesh that was fitted to the crack geometry. Modifications were made to allow for the possibility of a crack front that passes arbitrarily through the mesh; and Benchmarking for 3D Fracture: the new capabilities were benchmarked against mixed-mode three-dimensional fracture problems with known analytical solutions.

  10. Relation between finite element methods and nodal methods in transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between nodal methods and finite-element methods for solving the discrete-ordinates form of the transport equation in x-y geometry. Specifically, we will examine the relation of three finite-element schemes to the linear-linear (LL) and linear-nodal (LN) nodal schemes. The three finite-element schemes are the linear-continuous-diamond-difference (DD) scheme, the linear-discontinuous (LD) scheme, and the quadratic-discontinuous (QD) scheme. A brief derivation of the (LL) and (LN) nodal schemes is given in the third section of this paper. The approximations that cause the LL scheme to reduce to the DD, LD, and QD schemes are then indicated. An extremely simple method of deriving the finite-element schemes is then introduced.

  11. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  12. Finite element methods for the nonlinear motion of flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Victor P.

    Conventional strategies in aeroelasticity and flight dynamics for studying aircraft involve making broad assumptions based more on analytical or computational convenience rather than on physical reality. Typically in aeroelastic analyses, the study of the interaction between aircraft flexibility and aerodynamic forces, the aircraft or structural component in question is constrained in a way that is not representative of realistic flight conditions. In flight dynamics, the study of the maneuvering of aircraft, it is common to consider the vehicle as perfectly rigid. In both disciplines it is well known that such contrivances can produce incorrect results. To address these shortcomings, a finite element formulation is developed for analyzing the dynamics of flexible aircraft undergoing arbitrarily large rotation and translation. The formulation is derived in a set of body-attached axes, a frame of reference conducive to analyzing the motion and control of aircraft, and considers the structure as a whole. Several implementation issues are addressed and mitigated, including finite element interpolating functions, the use of eigenvectors as the basis for nonlinear deformation, inclusion of geometrically nonlinear effects in the strain energy, and enforcement of kinematic constraints. Numerical examples illustrate the capabilities of the latter two aspects, and a free-flying aeroelastic model problem demonstrates the overall potential of the proposed formulation. The development is approached in a general way so that the methodology can be applied to any structure that may be modeled by finite elements.

  13. An implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, T. L.

    2013-07-01

    This paper provides an implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method (LD-FEM) that spans the space of (l, x, y, z). A practical implementation of LD includes 1) selecting a computationally efficient algorithm to solve the 4 x 4 matrix system Ax = b that describes the angular flux in a mesh element, and 2) choosing how to store the data used to construct the matrix A and the vector b to either reduce memory consumption or increase computational speed. To analyze the first of these, three algorithms were selected to solve the 4 x 4 matrix equation: Cramer's rule, a streamlined implementation of Gaussian elimination, and LAPACK's Gaussian elimination subroutine dgesv. The results indicate that Cramer's rule and the streamlined Gaussian elimination algorithm perform nearly equivalently and outperform LAPACK's implementation of Gaussian elimination by a factor of 2. To analyze the second implementation detail, three formulations of the discretized LD-FEM equations were provided for implementation in a transport solver: 1) a low-memory formulation, which relies heavily on 'on-the-fly' calculations and less on the storage of pre-computed data, 2) a high-memory formulation, which pre-computes much of the data used to construct A and b, and 3) a reduced-memory formulation, which lies between the low - and high-memory formulations. These three formulations were assessed in the Jaguar transport solver based on relative memory footprint and computational speed for increasing mesh size and quadrature order. The results indicated that the memory savings of the low-memory formulation were not sufficient to warrant its implementation. The high-memory formulation resulted in a significant speed advantage over the reduced-memory option (10-50%), but also resulted in a proportional increase in memory consumption (5-45%) for increasing quadrature order and mesh count; therefore, the practitioner should weigh the system memory constraints against any

  14. Simulation of Satellite Observations of Induced Magnetic Fields using Scripted Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, J. T.; Constable, C.; Parker, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Scripted finite element methods allow flexible investigations of the influence of asymmetric external source fields and 3-dimensional (3D) internal electrical conductivity structure in the problem of global geomagnetic depth sounding. Our forward modeling is performed in the time and frequency domains via FlexPDE, a commercial finite element modeling package, and the technique has been validated against known solutions to 3D steady state and time-dependent problems. The induction problem is formulated in terms of the magnetic vector potential and electric scalar potential, and mesh density is managed both explicitly and through adaptive mesh refinement. We investigate the effects of 3D Earth conductivity on both satellite and ground-based magnetic field observations in the form of a geographically varying conductance map of the crust and oceans overlying a radially symmetric core and mantle. This map is used in conjunction with a novel boundary condition based on Ampere's Law to model variable near-surface induction without the computational expense of a 3D crust/ocean mesh and is valid for magnetic signals in the frequency range of interest for satellite induction studies. The simulated external magnetic field is aligned with Earth's magnetic pole, rather than its rotational pole, and increases in magnitude along the Earth/Sun axis. Earth rotates through this field with a period of 24 hours. Electromagnetic c-responses estimated from satellite data under the assumption that the primary and induced fields are dipolar in structure are known to be biased with respect to local time. We investigate the influence of Earth's rotation through the non-uniform external field on these c-responses, to determine whether this can explain the observed local time bias.

  15. Finite Element Method for Thermal Analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, J.

    1973-01-01

    A two- and three-dimensional, finite-element thermal-analysis program which handles conduction with internal heat generation, convection, radiation, specified flux, and specified temperature boundary conditions is presented. Elements used in the program are the triangle and tetrahedron for two- and three-dimensional analysis, respectively. The theory used in the program is developed, and several sample problems demonstrating the capability and reliability of the program are presented. A guide to using the program, description of the input cards, and program listing are included.

  16. Edge-based finite element method for shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, F. L. B.; Galeão, A. C.; Landau, L.

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes an edge-based implementation of the generalized residual minimum (GMRES) solver for the fully coupled solution of non-linear systems arising from finite element discretization of shallow water equations (SWEs). The gain in terms of memory, floating point operations and indirect addressing is quantified for semi-discrete and space-time analyses. Stabilized formulations, including Petrov-Galerkin models and discontinuity-capturing operators, are also discussed for both types of discretization. Results illustrating the quality of the stabilized solutions and the advantages of using the edge-based approach are presented at the end of the paper. Copyright

  17. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  18. Reliability of elasto-plastic structure using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Liu; Wilson H, Tang; Jiashou, Zhuo

    2002-02-01

    A solution of probabilistic FEM for elastic-plastic materials is presented based on the incremental theory of plasticity and a modified initial stress method. The formulations are deduced through a direct differentiation scheme. Partial differentiation of displacement, stress and the performance function can be iteratively performed with the computation of the mean values of displacement and stress. The presented method enjoys the efficiency of both the perturbation method and the finite difference method, but avoids the approximation during the partial differentiation calculation. In order to improve the efficiency, the adjoint vector method is introduced to calculate the differentiation of stress and displacement with respect to random variables. In addition, a time-saving computational method for reliability index of elastic-plastic materials is suggested based upon the advanced First Order Second Moment (FOSM) and by the usage of Taylor expansion for displacement. The suggested method is also applicable to 3-D cases.

  19. Non-invasive measurement of cholesterol in human blood by impedance technique: an investigation by 3D finite element field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, Ekaterina; Khan, Sanowar

    2013-06-01

    This paper concerns detection of particle concentration (e.g. cholesterol) in conductive media (e.g. human blood) by impedance technique. The technique is based on changes in the impedance measurement across a given conducting medium due to changes in the particle concentration. The impedance is calculated by calculating the current through the conducting media produced by electric field distribution between two electrodes. This is done by modelling and computation of 3D electric fields between the electrodes for known voltages applied between them using the well-known finite element method (FEM). The complexity of such FE models is attributed to particle distribution, their geometric and material parameters, and their shape and size which can be of many orders of magnitude smaller than the overall problem domain under investigation. This paper overcomes this problem by adopting an effective particle coagulation (aggregation) strategy in FE modelling without significantly affecting the accuracy of field computation.

  20. One-dimensional finite-elements method for the analysis of whispering gallery microresonators.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Korani, Ebrahim; Mohammad-Taheri, Mahmoud; Shahabadi, Mahmoud

    2014-07-01

    By taking advantage of axial symmetry of the planar whispering gallery microresonators, the three-dimensional (3D) problem of the resonator is reduced to a two-dimensional (2D) one; thus, only the cross section of the resonator needs to be analyzed. Then, the proposed formulation, which works based on a combination of the finite-elements method (FEM) and Fourier expansion of the fields, can be applied to the 2D problem. First, the axial field variation is expressed in terms of a Fourier series. Then, a FEM method is applied to the radial field variation. This formulation yields an eigenvalue problem with sparse matrices and can be solved using a well-known numerical technique. This method takes into account both the radiation loss and the dielectric loss; hence, it works efficiently either for high number or low number modes. Efficiency of the method was investigated by comparison of the results with those of commercial software.

  1. NIKE3D a nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics user's manual update summary

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Maker, B N; Ferencz, R M; Hallquist, J O

    2000-03-24

    This report provides the NIKE3D user's manual update summary for changes made from version 3.0.0 April 24, 1995 to version 3.3.6 March 24,2000. The updates are excerpted directly from the code printed output file (hence the Courier font and formatting), are presented in chronological order and delineated by NIKE3D version number. NIKE3D is a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Thirty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a direct factorization method.

  2. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  3. A 3D finite element model of an implanted scapula: importance of a multiparametric validation using experimental data.

    PubMed

    Maurel, N; Diop, A; Grimberg, J

    2005-09-01

    In order to help to understand the loosening phenomenon around glenoïd prostheses, a 3D finite element model of a previously tested implanted scapula has been developed. The construction of the model was done using CT scans of the tested scapula. Different bone material properties were tested and shell elements or 8 nodes hexaedric elements were used to model the cortical bone. Surface contact elements were introduced on one hand between the bone and the lower part of the plate of the implant, and on the other, between the loading metallic ball and the upper surface of the implant. The results of the model were compared with those issued from in vitro experiments carried out on the same scapula. The evaluation of the model was done for nine cases of loading of 500 N distributed on the implant, in terms of strains (principal strains of six spots around peripheral cortex of the glenoïd) and displacement of four points positioned on the implant. The best configuration of the model presented here, fits with experiments for most of the strains (difference lower than 150microdef) but it seems to be still too stiff (mainly in the lower part). Nevertheless, we want, in this paper, to underline the importance of doing a multiparametric validation for such a model. Indeed, some models can give correct results for one case of loading but bad results for another kind of loading, some others can give good results for one kind of compared parameters (like strains for instance) but bad results for the other one (like displacements).

  4. The constraint method: A new finite element technique. [applied to static and dynamic loads on plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C.; Szabo, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    An approch to the finite element method which utilizes families of conforming finite elements based on complete polynomials is presented. Finite element approximations based on this method converge with respect to progressively reduced element sizes as well as with respect to progressively increasing orders of approximation. Numerical results of static and dynamic applications of plates are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. Comparisons are made with plate elements in NASTRAN and the high-precision plate element developed by Cowper and his co-workers. Some considerations are given to implementation of the constraint method into general purpose computer programs such as NASTRAN.

  5. Optimization of the sources in local hyperthermia using a combined finite element-genetic algorithm method.

    PubMed

    Siauve, N; Nicolas, L; Vollaire, C; Marchal, C

    2004-12-01

    This article describes an optimization process specially designed for local and regional hyperthermia in order to achieve the desired specific absorption rate in the patient. It is based on a genetic algorithm coupled to a finite element formulation. The optimization method is applied to real human organs meshes assembled from computerized tomography scans. A 3D finite element formulation is used to calculate the electromagnetic field in the patient, achieved by radiofrequency or microwave sources. Space discretization is performed using incomplete first order edge elements. The sparse complex symmetric matrix equation is solved using a conjugate gradient solver with potential projection pre-conditionning. The formulation is validated by comparison of calculated specific absorption rate distributions in a phantom to temperature measurements. A genetic algorithm is used to optimize the specific absorption rate distribution to predict the phases and amplitudes of the sources leading to the best focalization. The objective function is defined as the specific absorption rate ratio in the tumour and healthy tissues. Several constraints, regarding the specific absorption rate in tumour and the total power in the patient, may be prescribed. Results obtained with two types of applicators (waveguides and annular phased array) are presented and show the faculties of the developed optimization process.

  6. Numerical simulation of pressure therapy glove by using Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Annie; Yick, Kit Lun; Ng, Sun Pui; Yip, Joanne; Chan, Ying Fan

    2016-02-01

    Pressure therapy garments apply pressure to suppress the growth and flatten hypertrophic scars caused by serious burns. The amount of pressure given by the pressure garments is critical to the treatment adherence and outcomes. In the present study, a biomechanical model for simulating the pressure magnitudes and distribution over hand dorsum given by a pressure glove was developed by using finite element method. In this model, the shape geometry of the hand, the mechanical properties of the glove and human body tissues were incorporated in the numerical stress analyses. The geometry of the hand was obtained by a 3D laser scanner. The material properties of two warp knitted fabrics were considered in the glove fabric model that developed from the glove production pattern with 10% size reduction in circumferential dimensions. The glove was regarded an isotropic elastic shell and the hand was assumed to be a homogeneous, isotropic and linearly elastic body. A glove wearing process was carried in the finite element analysis and the surface-to-surface contact pressure between hand and glove fabric was hence obtained. Through validation, the simulated contact pressure showed a good agreement with the experimental interface pressure measurement. The simulation model can be used to predict and visualise the pressure distribution exerted by a pressure therapy glove onto hand dorsum. It can provide information for optimising the material mechanical properties in pressure garment design and development, give a clue to understand the mechanisms of pressure action on hypertrophic scars and ultimately improve the medical functions of pressure garment.

  7. Integrated force method versus displacement method for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel formulation termed the integrated force method (IFM) has been developed in recent years for analyzing structures. In this method all the internal forces are taken as independent variables, and the system equilibrium equations (EE's) are integrated with the global compatibility conditions (CC's) to form the governing set of equations. In IFM the CC's are obtained from the strain formulation of St. Venant, and no choices of redundant load systems have to be made, in constrast to the standard force method (SFM). This property of IFM allows the generation of the governing equation to be automated straightforwardly, as it is in the popular stiffness method (SM). In this report IFM and SM are compared relative to the structure of their respective equations, their conditioning, required solution methods, overall computational requirements, and convergence properties as these factors influence the accuracy of the results. Overall, this new version of the force method produces more accurate results than the stiffness method for comparable computational cost.

  8. Development and Application of the p-version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-21

    this property hierarchic families of finite elements. The h-version of the finite element method has been the subject of inten- sive study since the...early 1950’s and perhaps even earlier. Study of the p-version of the finite element method, on the other hand, began at Washington University in St...Louis in the early 1970’s and led to a more recent study of * .the h-p version. Research in the p-version (formerly called The Constraint Method) has

  9. An Error Analysis for the Finite Element Method Applied to Convection Diffusion Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    D TFhG-]NOLOGY k 4b 00 \\" ) ’b Technical Note BN-962 AN ERROR ANALYSIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD APPLIED TO CONVECTION DIFFUSION PROBLEM by I...Babu~ka and W. G. Szym’czak March 1981 V.. UNVI I Of- ’i -S AN ERROR ANALYSIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD P. - 0 w APPLIED TO CONVECTION DIFFUSION ...AOAO98 895 MARYLAND UNIVYCOLLEGE PARK INST FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE--ETC F/G 12/I AN ERROR ANALYIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD APPLIED TO CONV..ETC (U

  10. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  11. Rapid simulation of electromagnetic telemetry using an axisymmetric semianalytical finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiefu; Zeng, Shubin; Dong, Qiuzhao; Huang, Yueqin

    2017-02-01

    An axisymmetric semianalytical finite element method is proposed and employed for rapid simulations of electromagnetic telemetry in layered underground formation. In this method, the layered media is decomposed into several subdomains and the interfaces between subdomains are discretized by conventional finite elements. Then a Riccati equation based high precision integration scheme is applied to exploit the homogeneity along the vertical direction in each layer. This semianalytical finite element scheme is very efficient in modeling electromagnetic telemetry in layered formation. Numerical examples as well as a field case with water based mud as drilling fluid are given to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this method.

  12. Multi-level adaptive finite element methods. 1: Variation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, A.

    1979-01-01

    A general numerical strategy for solving partial differential equations and other functional problems by cycling between coarser and finer levels of discretization is described. Optimal discretization schemes are provided together with very fast general solvers. It is described in terms of finite element discretizations of general nonlinear minimization problems. The basic processes (relaxation sweeps, fine-grid-to-coarse-grid transfers of residuals, coarse-to-fine interpolations of corrections) are directly and naturally determined by the objective functional and the sequence of approximation spaces. The natural processes, however, are not always optimal. Concrete examples are given and some new techniques are reviewed. Including the local truncation extrapolation and a multilevel procedure for inexpensively solving chains of many boundary value problems, such as those arising in the solution of time-dependent problems.

  13. Finite element methods for integrated aerodynamic heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1991-01-01

    This report gives a description of the work which has been undertaken during the second year of a three year research program. The objectives of the program are to produce finite element based procedures for the solution of the large scale practical problems which are of interest to the Aerothermal Loads Branch (ALB) at NASA Langley Research Establishment. The problems of interest range from Euler simulations of full three dimensional vehicle configurations to local analyses of three dimensional viscous laminar flow. Adaptive meshes produced for both steady state and transient problems are to be considered. An important feature of the work is the provision of specialized techniques which can be used at ALB for the development of an integrated fluid/thermal/structural modeling capability.

  14. A Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Changqing; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi equations. This method is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving conservation laws. The method has the flexibility of treating complicated geometry by using arbitrary triangulation, can achieve high order accuracy with a local, compact stencil, and are suited for efficient parallel implementation. One and two dimensional numerical examples are given to illustrate the capability of the method.

  15. Biomechanical influence of crown-to-implant ratio on stress distribution over internal hexagon short implant: 3-D finite element analysis with statistical test.

    PubMed

    Ramos Verri, Fellippo; Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Oliveira, Guilherme Bérgamo Brandão; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Marques Honório, Heitor; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2015-01-02

    The study of short implants is relevant to the biomechanics of dental implants, and research on crown increase has implications for the daily clinic. The aim of this study was to analyze the biomechanical interactions of a singular implant-supported prosthesis of different crown heights under vertical and oblique force, using the 3-D finite element method. Six 3-D models were designed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 3D 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. Each model was constructed with a mandibular segment of bone block, including an implant supporting a screwed metal-ceramic crown. The crown height was set at 10, 12.5, and 15 mm. The applied force was 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique). We performed an ANOVA statistical test and Tukey tests; p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The increase of crown height did not influence the stress distribution on screw prosthetic (p>0.05) under axial load. However, crown heights of 12.5 and 15 mm caused statistically significant damage to the stress distribution of screws and to the cortical bone (p<0.001) under oblique load. High crown to implant (C/I) ratio harmed microstrain distribution on bone tissue under axial and oblique loads (p<0.001). Crown increase was a possible deleterious factor to the screws and to the different regions of bone tissue.

  16. A finite element method for analysis of vibration induced by maglev trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, S. H.; Ho, Y. S.; Leong, C. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper developed a finite element method to perform the maglev train-bridge-soil interaction analysis with rail irregularities. An efficient proportional integral (PI) scheme with only a simple equation is used to control the force of the maglev wheel, which is modeled as a contact node moving along a number of target nodes. The moving maglev vehicles are modeled as a combination of spring-damper elements, lumped mass and rigid links. The Newmark method with the Newton-Raphson method is then used to solve the nonlinear dynamic equation. The major advantage is that all the proposed procedures are standard in the finite element method. The analytic solution of maglev vehicles passing a Timoshenko beam was used to validate the current finite element method with good agreements. Moreover, a very large-scale finite element analysis using the proposed scheme was also tested in this paper.

  17. Domain decomposition based iterative methods for nonlinear elliptic finite element problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, X.C.

    1994-12-31

    The class of overlapping Schwarz algorithms has been extensively studied for linear elliptic finite element problems. In this presentation, the author considers the solution of systems of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the finite element discretization of some nonlinear elliptic equations. Several overlapping Schwarz algorithms, including the additive and multiplicative versions, with inexact Newton acceleration will be discussed. The author shows that the convergence rate of the Newton`s method is independent of the mesh size used in the finite element discretization, and also independent of the number of subdomains into which the original domain in decomposed. Numerical examples will be presented.

  18. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  19. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  20. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life.

  1. A Study on Embedding Genetic Algorithm to Three-Dimensional Finite Element Method by Using Shell Script

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Wataru; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Takaharu

    This paper presents one of the embedding methods for a genetic algorithm (GA) in the three-dimensional finite element method (3-D FEM). We use a shell script to automate the preprocesses of the 3-D FEM and to perform the genetic operation for the GA. In this paper, a surface permanent-magnet synchronous motor (SPMSM) was selected as a simple model for optimizing the shape. The capability of this method was confirmed by decreasing the cogging torque. Moreover, the evaluation of GA was performed by distributing the analytical model to several PCs for parallel processing, and the computing time was thus shortened.

  2. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  3. The simulation of Lamb waves in a cracked plate using the scaled boundary finite element method.

    PubMed

    Gravenkamp, Hauke; Prager, Jens; Saputra, Albert A; Song, Chongmin

    2012-09-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method is applied to the simulation of Lamb waves for ultrasonic testing applications. With this method, the general elastodynamic problem is solved, while only the boundary of the domain under consideration has to be discretized. The reflection of the fundamental Lamb wave modes from cracks of different geometry in a steel plate is modeled. A test problem is compared with commercial finite element software, showing the efficiency and convergence of the scaled boundary finite element method. A special formulation of this method is utilized to calculate dispersion relations for plate structures. For the discretization of the boundary, higher-order elements are employed to improve the efficiency of the simulations. The simplicity of mesh generation of a cracked plate for a scaled boundary finite element analysis is illustrated.

  4. Large-eddy simulation in complex domains using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Kornblum, B.T.; Kollman, W.

    1996-11-12

    Finite element methods (FEM) are demonstrated in combination with large-eddy simulations (LES) as a valuable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a backward facing step.

  5. POSTPROCESSING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR SOLVING CAHN-HILLIARD EQUATION: METHODS AND ERROR ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wansheng; Chen, Long; Zhou, Jie

    2016-05-01

    A postprocessing technique for mixed finite element methods for the Cahn-Hilliard equation is developed and analyzed. Once the mixed finite element approximations have been computed at a fixed time on the coarser mesh, the approximations are postprocessed by solving two decoupled Poisson equations in an enriched finite element space (either on a finer grid or a higher-order space) for which many fast Poisson solvers can be applied. The nonlinear iteration is only applied to a much smaller size problem and the computational cost using Newton and direct solvers is negligible compared with the cost of the linear problem. The analysis presented here shows that this technique remains the optimal rate of convergence for both the concentration and the chemical potential approximations. The corresponding error estimate obtained in our paper, especially the negative norm error estimates, are non-trivial and different with the existing results in the literatures.

  6. The h-p Version of the Finite Element Method with Quasiuniform Meshes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    Noetic Technologies, St. Louis).1 The theoretical aspects have been studied only recently. The first theoretical paper appeared in 1981 (see [6...Research Reports :~ :~THE h-p VERSION OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD WITH QUASIUNIFORM MESHES I. Babuska Institute for Physical Science and Technology...p VERSION OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD > ’ WITH QUASIUNIFORM MESHES t. Ba bus aka1 Institute for Physical Science and Technology University of

  7. Indentation testing and optimized property identification for viscoelastic materials using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resapu, Rajeswara Reddy

    tested in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) via indentation. Two dimensional finite element models are developed to characterize the optimal material properties of PVC film and wire from the experimental load-displacement data. The aging of the PVC film is studied by characterizing the optimal material properties at different aging times; it is demonstrated that the thermally aged film and wires show degradation effects in terms of increased modulus with aging (i.e. increasingly brittle response). This indentation-finite element analysis approach has also been used to characterize the properties of pristine high and low density polyethylene (PE) films using both sharp (Vickers) and spherical indenters; the comparison of the results from both the indenters is performed. The mechanical properties of lamb and cow liver tissue have also been investigated by indentation. Specifically, tests using a spherical indenter is carried out on liver using both DMA (displacement controlled) and dead-weight loading (force controlled) in a Micro Computed Tomography (Micro-CT) chamber. Material properties are initially calculated using the 2D model from the DMA tests. The material properties are later validated by a 3D finite element model generated by image reconstruction through the X-Ray images of the specimen taken by the Micro-CT. These studies used a hyperelastic (Neo-Hookean) viscoelasticity material model to account for large strain effects. The approach used in this study successfully characterizes mechanical properties of polymers and tissues using non-destructive test methods. The properties obtained are validated by predicting the response of the material under other loading conditions. Good correlation between the experimental and finite element results has been obtained. The study also provides ideas for future work which can lead to improvements to this new technique.

  8. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  9. A new approach in cascade flow analysis using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, E.; Hamed, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new approach in analyzing the potential flow past cascades and single airfoils using the finite element method is developed. In this analysis the circulation around the airfoil is not externally imposed but is directly computed in the numerical solution. Different finite element discretization patterns, orders of piecewise approximation, and grid sizes are used in the solution. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental measurements and exact solutions in cascades and single airfoils.

  10. A parallel implementation of an EBE solver for the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.P.; Las Casas, E.B.; Carvalho, M.L.B.

    1994-12-31

    A parallel implementation using PVM on a cluster of workstations of an Element By Element (EBE) solver using the Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) method is described, along with an application in the solution of the linear systems generated from finite element analysis of a problem in three dimensional linear elasticity. The PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) system, developed at the Oak Ridge Laboratory, allows the construction of a parallel MIMD machine by connecting heterogeneous computers linked through a network. In this implementation, version 3.1 of PVM is used, and 11 SLC Sun workstations and a Sun SPARC-2 model are connected through Ethernet. The finite element program is based on SDP, System for Finite Element Based Software Development, developed at the Brazilian National Laboratory for Scientific Computation (LNCC). SDP provides the basic routines for a finite element application program, as well as a standard for programming and documentation, intended to allow exchanges between research groups in different centers.

  11. 3D reconstruction of bony elements of the knee joint and finite element analysis of total knee prosthesis obtained from the reconstructed model

    PubMed Central

    Djoudi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Two separate themes are presented in this paper. Aims The first theme is to present a graphical modeling approach of human anatomical structures namely, the femur and the tibia. The second theme involves making a finite element analysis of stresses, displacements and deformations in prosthetic implants (the femoral implant and the polyethylene insert). Objectives The graphical modeling approach comes in two parts. The first is the segmentation of MRI scanned images, retrieved in DICOM format for edge detection. In the second part, 3D-CAD models are generated from the results of the segmentation stage. The finite element analysis is done by first extracting the prosthetic implants from the reconstructed 3D-CAD model, then do a finite element analysis of these implants under objectively determined conditions such as; forces, allowed displacements, the materials composing implant, and the coefficient of friction. Conclusion The objective of this work is to implement an interface for exchanging data between 2D MRI images obtained from a medical diagnosis of a patient and the 3D-CAD model used in various applications, such as; the extraction of the implants, stress analysis at the knee joint and can serve as an aid to surgery, also predict the behavior of the prosthetic implants vis-a-vis the forces acting on the knee joints. PMID:24396234

  12. Computer Simulation of Blood Flow, Left Ventricular Wall Motion and Their Interrelationship by Fluid-Structure Interaction Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Fukunari, Hiroshi

    To simulate fluid-structure interaction involved in the contraction of a human left ventricle, a 3D finite element based simulation program incorporating the propagation of excitation and excitation-contraction coupling mechanisms was developed. An ALE finite element method with automatic mesh updating was formulated for large domain changes, and a strong coupling strategy was taken. Under the assumption that the inertias of both fluid and structure are negligible and fluid-structure interaction is restricted to the pressure on the interface, the fluid dynamics part was eliminated from the FSI program, and a static structural FEM code corresponding to the cardiac muscles was also developed. The simulations of the contraction of the left ventricle in normal excitation and arrhythmia demonstrated the capability of the proposed method. Also, the results obtained by the two methods are compared. These simulators can be powerful tools in the clinical practice of heart disease.

  13. Enrichment of the finite element method with reproducing kernel particle method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Liu, W.K.; Uras, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    Based on the reproducing kernel particle method on enrichment procedure is introduced to enhance the effectiveness of the finite element method. The basic concepts for the reproducing kernel particle method are briefly reviewed. By adopting the well-known completeness requirements, a generalized form of the reproducing kernel particle method is developed. Through a combination of these two methods their unique advantages can be utilized. An alternative approach, the multiple field method is also introduced.

  14. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  15. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  16. In vitro assessment of Function Graded (FG) artificial Hip joint stem in terms of bone/cement stresses: 3D Finite Element (FE) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress shielding in the cemented hip prosthesis occurs due to the mismatching in the mechanical properties of metallic stem and bone. This mismatching in properties is considered as one of the main reasons for implant loosening. Therefore, a new stem material in orthopedic surgery is still required. In the present study, 3D finite element modeling is used for evaluating the artificial hip joint stem that is made of Function Graded (FG) material in terms of joint stress distributions and stem length. Method 3D finite element models of different stems made of two types of FG materials and traditional stems made of Cobalt Chromium alloy (CoCrMo) and Titanium alloy (Ti) were developed using the ANSYS Code. The effects on the total artificial hip joint stresses (Shear stress and Von Mises stresses at bone cement, Von Mises stresses at bone and stem) due to using the proposed FG materials stems were investigated. The effects on the total artificial hip joint system stresses due to using different stem lengths were investigated. Results Using FG stem (with low stiffness at stem distal end and high stiffness at its proximal end) resulted in a significant reduction in shear stress at the bone cement/stem interface. Also, the Von Mises stresses at the bone cement and stem decrease significantly when using FG material instead of CoCrMo and Ti alloy. The stresses’ distribution along the bone cement length when using FG material was found to be more uniform along the whole bone cement compared with other stem materials. These more uniform stresses will help in the reduction of the artificial hip joint loosening rate and improve its short and long term performance. Conclusion FE results showed that using FG stem increases the resultant stresses at the femur bone (reduces stress shielding) compared to metallic stem. The results showed that the stem length has significant effects on the resultant shear and Von Mises stresses at bone, stem and bone cement for all types

  17. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  18. Applications of Parallel and Vector Algorithms in Nonlinear Structural Dynamics Using the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    the 3D isoparametric family of elements, and using a Total Lagrangian formulation and implicit integration of the global equations of motion. The...to be observed. NLDFEP, a NonLinear Dynamic Finite Element Program, is designed around the I three dimensional isoparametric family of elements...implemented in NLDFEP are the 8 and 20 node bricks. The program is structured so that additional elements, such as the 27 node brick or another family of

  19. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  20. A time domain vector finite element method for the full wave simulation of nonlinear photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aaron C.

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with third order polarization terms. The method allows for discretization of complicated device geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields, and up to 4th order accurate time discretization. Additionally we have implemented a series of computational optimizations that significantly increase the scale of simulations that can be performed with this method. Among these optimizations is a new generalized mass lumping method that we developed which reduces the computational cost of the finite element system solve by a factor of 10x. In this dissertation we will present the Vector Finite Element Method, and the computational optimizations that we employed. Additionally, we will present a series of analyses and simulations that were performed to validate the method. Finally, we will present some production runs using this method, including nonlinear mode mixing in waveguides and supercontinuum generation in a photonic crystal fiber.

  1. An enriched finite element method to fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shengzhi; Lian, Yanping; Ying, Yuping; Tang, Shaoqiang; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an enriched finite element method with fractional basis [ 1,x^{α }] for spatial fractional partial differential equations is proposed to obtain more stable and accurate numerical solutions. For pure fractional diffusion equation without advection, the enriched Galerkin finite element method formulation is demonstrated to simulate the exact solution successfully without any numerical oscillation, which is advantageous compared to the traditional Galerkin finite element method with integer basis [ 1,x] . For fractional advection-diffusion equation, the oscillatory behavior becomes complex due to the introduction of the advection term which can be characterized by a fractional element Peclet number. For the purpose of addressing the more complex numerical oscillation, an enriched Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is developed by using a dimensionless fractional stabilization parameter, which is formulated through a minimization of the residual of the nodal solution. The effectiveness and accuracy of the enriched finite element method are demonstrated by a series of numerical examples of fractional diffusion equation and fractional advection-diffusion equation, including both one-dimensional and two-dimensional, steady-state and time-dependent cases.

  2. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. During the pulse buckling tests, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using PRONTO, a Sandia developed transient dynamics analysis code, and ABAQUS/Explicit with both shell and continuum elements. The calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history.

  3. A class of hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetics: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, J. L.; Chatterjee, A.; Gong, J.

    1993-01-01

    Integral equation methods have generally been the workhorse for antenna and scattering computations. In the case of antennas, they continue to be the prominent computational approach, but for scattering applications the requirement for large-scale computations has turned researchers' attention to near neighbor methods such as the finite element method, which has low O(N) storage requirements and is readily adaptable in modeling complex geometrical features and material inhomogeneities. In this paper, we review three hybrid finite element methods for simulating composite scatterers, conformal microstrip antennas, and finite periodic arrays. Specifically, we discuss the finite element method and its application to electromagnetic problems when combined with the boundary integral, absorbing boundary conditions, and artificial absorbers for terminating the mesh. Particular attention is given to large-scale simulations, methods, and solvers for achieving low memory requirements and code performance on parallel computing architectures.

  4. Two-scale extended finite element method for studying crack propagation of porous bioceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Wang, Mingguo; Zhan, Nan; Ji, Xinhua

    2008-11-01

    Extended finite element method (X-FEM) is a new method to solve the discontinuous problems, the basic theory of XFEM is presented in this paper, then the X-FEM is used to simulate the crack growth process of the hydroxyapatite material by three points bending test, and its deformation and stress field distribution is analyzed. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the method, the mesh in extended finite element method is independent of the internal geometry and physical interfaces, such that the trouble of high density meshing and re-meshing in the discontinuous field can be avoided. This greatly simplifies the analysis of the crack propagation process, showing the unique advantages of the extended finite element method in fracture expansion analysis of bioceramic. We also propose a two-scale strategy for crack propagation which enables one to use a refined mesh only in the crack's vicinity where it is required.

  5. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  6. Domain decomposition methods for nonconforming finite element spaces of Lagrange-type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsar, Lawrence C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we consider the application of three popular domain decomposition methods to Lagrange-type nonconforming finite element discretizations of scalar, self-adjoint, second order elliptic equations. The additive Schwarz method of Dryja and Widlund, the vertex space method of Smith, and the balancing method of Mandel applied to nonconforming elements are shown to converge at a rate no worse than their applications to the standard conforming piecewise linear Galerkin discretization. Essentially, the theory for the nonconforming elements is inherited from the existing theory for the conforming elements with only modest modification by constructing an isomorphism between the nonconforming finite element space and a space of continuous piecewise linear functions.

  7. A simple finite element method for non-divergence form elliptic equation

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2017-03-01

    Here, we develop a simple finite element method for solving second order elliptic equations in non-divergence form by combining least squares concept with discontinuous approximations. This simple method has a symmetric and positive definite system and can be easily analyzed and implemented. We could have also used general meshes with polytopal element and hanging node in the method. We prove that our finite element solution approaches to the true solution when the mesh size approaches to zero. Numerical examples are tested that demonstrate the robustness and flexibility of the method.

  8. Efficient Finite Element Methods for Transient Analysis of Shells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    classified as (1) implicit projection methods, such as reduced integration, and (2) explicit projection methods, such as -’. mixed methods and mode...PROJECTION METHODS In this Section a simple form of the element stiffness matrix for mixed methods will be developed and then compared to the explicit...decomposition V.’... projection methods and mixed methods appears straightforward, establishing the exact equivalence is not possible in some elements

  9. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  10. The use of Galerkin finite-element methods to solve mass-transport equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.

    1977-01-01

    The partial differential equation that describes the transport and reaction of chemical solutes in porous media was solved using the Galerkin finite-element technique. These finite elements were superimposed over finite-difference cells used to solve the flow equation. Both convection and flow due to hydraulic dispersion were considered. Linear and Hermite cubic approximations (basis functions) provided satisfactory results: however, the linear functions were computationally more efficient for two-dimensional problems. Successive over relaxation (SOR) and iteration techniques using Tchebyschef polynomials were used to solve the sparce matrices generated using the linear and Hermite cubic functions, respectively. Comparisons of the finite-element methods to the finite-difference methods, and to analytical results, indicated that a high degree of accuracy may be obtained using the method outlined. The technique was applied to a field problem involving an aquifer contaminated with chloride, tritium, and strontium-90. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  13. A Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Key, S.W.

    1998-11-12

    A method is presented for connecting dissimilar finite element meshes in three dimensions. The method combines the concept of master and slave surfaces with the uniform strain approach for surface, corrections finite elements- By modifyhg the are made to element formulations boundaries of elements on the slave such that first-order patch tests are passed. The method can be used to connect meshes which use different element types. In addition, master and slave surfaces can be designated independently of relative mesh resolutions. Example problems in three-dimensional linear elasticity are presented.

  14. Inversion of potential field data using the finite element method on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, L.; Altinay, C.; Shaw, S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a formulation of the joint inversion of potential field anomaly data as an optimization problem with partial differential equation (PDE) constraints. The problem is solved using the iterative Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method with the Hessian operator of the regularization and cross-gradient component of the cost function as preconditioner. We will show that each iterative step requires the solution of several PDEs namely for the potential fields, for the adjoint defects and for the application of the preconditioner. In extension to the traditional discrete formulation the BFGS method is applied to continuous descriptions of the unknown physical properties in combination with an appropriate integral form of the dot product. The PDEs can easily be solved using standard conforming finite element methods (FEMs) with potentially different resolutions. For two examples we demonstrate that the number of PDE solutions required to reach a given tolerance in the BFGS iteration is controlled by weighting regularization and cross-gradient but is independent of the resolution of PDE discretization and that as a consequence the method is weakly scalable with the number of cells on parallel computers. We also show a comparison with the UBC-GIF GRAV3D code.

  15. Locally Conservative, Stabilized Finite Element Methods for Variably Saturated Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-06

    mixed methods for Richards’ equation. The effectiveness of the multiscale stabilization strategy varied somewhat. For a steady-state, variably...Arbogast, Z. Chen, On the implementation of mixed methods as non- conforming methods for second order elliptic problems, Mathematics of Computation 64...211) (1995) 943–972. [53] Z. Chen, Equivalence between and multigrid algorithms for nonconform- ing and mixed methods for second order elliptic

  16. A variational method for finite element stress recovery and error estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, A.; Riggs, H. R.; Macy, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    A variational method for obtaining smoothed stresses from a finite element derived nonsmooth stress field is presented. The method is based on minimizing a functional involving discrete least-squares error plus a penalty constraint that ensures smoothness of the stress field. An equivalent accuracy criterion is developed for the smoothing analysis which results in a C sup 1-continuous smoothed stress field possessing the same order of accuracy as that found at the superconvergent optimal stress points of the original finite element analysis. Application of the smoothing analysis to residual error estimation is also demonstrated.

  17. P1 Nonconforming Finite Element Method for the Solution of Radiation Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Kab S.

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of radiation transport in the optically thick flux-limited diffusion regime has been identified as one of the most time-consuming tasks within large simulation codes. Due to multimaterial complex geometry, the radiation transport system must often be solved on unstructured grids. In this paper, we investigate the behavior and the benefits of the unstructured P(sub 1) nonconforming finite element method, which has proven to be flexible and effective on related transport problems, in solving unsteady implicit nonlinear radiation diffusion problems using Newton and Picard linearization methods. Key words. nonconforrning finite elements, radiation transport, inexact Newton linearization, multigrid preconditioning

  18. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    High pressure gas sealing involves not only balancing the viscous force with the pressure gradient force but also accounting for fluid inertia--especially for choked flow. The conventional finite element method which uses a Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is not convenient for nonlinear problems. For these problems, a finite element method with a Galerkin solution technique (FEMGST) was formulated. One example, a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow formulation has nonlinearities due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia. Solutions agree with classical results in the limiting cases. The development of the choked flow velocity profile is shown.

  19. Development of K-Version of the Finite Element Method: A Robust Mathematical and Computational Procedure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    International Journal of Computational Methods for...Fluids, in review. "* V. Prabhakar and J. N. Reddy, "Orthogonality of Modal Bases," International Journal of Computational Methods for Fluids...Least-Squares Finite Element Model for Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations," International Journal of Computational Methods for Fluids, in review.

  20. Cyclic-stress analysis of notches for supersonic transport conditions. [using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using the finite element method to account for the effects of cyclic load and temperature on local stresses and strains at a notch was demonstrated. The behavior of a notched titanium panel was studied under variable loads and temperatures representative of flight conditions for the lower wing surface of a Supersonic Transport (SST). The analysis was performed with the use of the BOPACE finite-element computer program which provides capability to determine high temperature and large viscoplastic effects caused by cyclic thermal and mechanical loads. The analysis involves the development of the finite-element model as well as determination of the structural behavior of the notched panel. Results are presented for twelve SST flights comprised of five different load-temperature cycles. The results show the approach is feasible, but material response to cyclic loads, temperatures, and hold times requires improved understanding to allow proper modeling of the material.

  1. A finite element-boundary integral method for cavities in a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. However, due to a lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, antenna designers resort to measurement and planar antenna concepts for designing non-planar conformal antennas. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We extend this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this report, we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the shape functions, the resulting finite elements and the boundary integral equations, and the solution of the conformal finite element-boundary integral system. Some validation results are presented and we further show how this formulation can be applied with minimal computational and memory resources.

  2. A 3-D Finite Element Model of Anterior Vaginal Wall Support to Evaluate Mechanisms Underlying Cystocele Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luyun; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To develop a 3D computer model of the anterior vaginal wall and its supports, validate that model, and then use it to determine the combinations of muscle and connective tissue impairments that result in cystocele formation, as observed on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A subject-specific 3D model of the anterior vaginal wall and its supports was developed based on MRI geometry from a healthy nulliparous woman. It included simplified representations of the anterior vaginal wall, levator muscle, cardinal and uterosacral ligaments, arcus tendineus fascia pelvis and levator ani, paravaginal attachments, and the posterior compartment. This model was then imported into ABAQUS™ and tissue properties were assigned from the literature. An iterative process was used to refine anatomical assumptions until convergence was obtained between model behavior under increases of abdominal pressure up to 168 cmH2O and deformations observed on dynamic MRI. Results Cystocele size was sensitive to abdominal pressure and impairment of connective tissue and muscle. Larger cystocele formed in the presence of impairments in muscular and apical connective tissue support compared to either support element alone. Apical impairment resulted in a larger cystocele than paravaginal impairment. Levator ani muscle impairment caused a larger urogenital hiatus size, longer length of the distal vagina exposed to a pressure differential, larger apical descent and resulted in a larger cystocele size. Conclusions Development of a cystocele requires a levator muscle impairment, an increase in abdominal pressure, and apical and paravaginal support defects. PMID:19481208

  3. Phased Array Antenna Analysis Using Hybrid Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Waveguide ; (b) Geometry Model for Method of Moments ........................ 4 2. Printed Dipole Radiator: (a) Actual Geometry with Microstrip Balun and...Finite Elem ents . ............................................. 19 11. Equivalence Model for Waveguide /Cavity Problem: (a) Original Problem; (b... Waveguide Array Active Reflection Coefficient - Comparison of Results Uscig Cavity Array (CAVIARR) and General Array (PARANA) Models . 76 45. Rectangular

  4. A robust finite element method for nonhomogeneous Dirichlet problems in domains with curved boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; King, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper the authors consider a simple finite element method on an approximately polygonal domain using linear elements. The Dirichlet data are transferred in a natural way and the resulting linear system can be solved using multigrid techniques. Their analysis takes into account the change in domain and data transfer, and optimal-error estimates are obtained that are robust in the regularity of the boundary data provided they are at least square integrable. It is proved that the natural extension of this finite element approximation to the original domain is optimal-order accurate.

  5. Error analysis of finite element method for Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuzhou; Sun, Pengtao; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang

    2016-08-01

    A priori error estimates of finite element method for time-dependent Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations are studied in this work. We obtain the optimal error estimates in L∞(H1) and L2(H1) norms, and suboptimal error estimates in L∞(L2) norm, with linear element, and optimal error estimates in L∞(L2) norm with quadratic or higher-order element, for both semi- and fully discrete finite element approximations. Numerical experiments are also given to validate the theoretical results.

  6. Visualization of High-Order Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    Peters , Valerio Pascucci, Robert M. Kirby and Claudio T. Silva, "Topology Verification for Isosurface Extraction", IEEE Transactions on Visualization...Visualization of High-Order Methods Professor Robert M. Kirby , Mr. Robert Haimes University of Utah Office of Sponsored Programs University of Utah Salt Lake...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER Robert Kirby 801-585-3421 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26-Sep-2008

  7. Unconstrained paving and plastering method for generating finite element meshes

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven J.; Blacker, Teddy D.; Kerr, Robert

    2010-03-02

    Computer software for and a method of generating a conformal all quadrilateral or hexahedral mesh comprising selecting an object with unmeshed boundaries and performing the following while unmeshed voids are larger than twice a desired element size and unrecognizable as either a midpoint subdividable or pave-and-sweepable polyhedra: selecting a front to advance; based on sizes of fronts and angles with adjacent fronts, determining which adjacent fronts should be advanced with the selected front; advancing the fronts; detecting proximities with other nearby fronts; resolving any found proximities; forming quadrilaterals or unconstrained columns of hexahedra where two layers cross; and establishing hexahedral elements where three layers cross.

  8. A bibliography on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations (1971--1997)

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This bibliography provides a list of references on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations. These references have been published in scientific journals, conference proceedings, technical reports, thesis/dissertations and as chapters in reference books from 1971 to the present. Both English and non-English references are included. All references contained in the bibliography are sorted alphabetically by the first author`s name and a subsort by date of publication. The majority of the references relate to reactor physics analysis using the finite element method. Related topics include the boundary element method, the boundary integral method, and the global element method. All aspects of reactor physics computations relating to these methods are included: diffusion theory, deterministic radiation and neutron transport theory, kinetics, fusion research, particle tracking in finite element grids, and applications. For user convenience, many of the listed references have been categorized. The list of references is not all inclusive. In general, nodal methods were purposely excluded, although a few references do demonstrate characteristics of finite element methodology using nodal methods (usually as a non-conforming element basis). This area could be expanded. The author is aware of several other references (conferences, thesis/dissertations, etc.) that were not able to be independently tracked using available resources and thus were not included in this listing.

  9. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number, laminar flows are presented. In both of the methods, the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element. The triangular element is contained inside the bi-quadratic isoparametric element. It has been reported previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in the velocity-pressure integrated method, yielded accurate computational results for high Reynolds number flows. It is shown that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yielded accurate velocity and pressure fields which were comparable to those obtained using the velocity-pressure integrated method. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine-grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow for Reynolds number of 10,000, a laminar backward-facing step flow, a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders, and a channel flow with an internal blockage. A finite element computer program (NSFLOW/P) for the 2-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented.

  10. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  11. A variational method for finite element stress recovery: Applications in one-dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, H. Ronald

    1992-01-01

    It is well-known that stresses (and strains) calculated by a displacement-based finite element analysis are generally not as accurate as the displacements. In addition, the calculated stress field is typically discontinuous at element interfaces. Because the stresses are typically of more interest than the displacements, several procedures have been proposed to obtain a smooth stress field, given the finite element stresses, and to improve the accuracy. Hinton and Irons introduced global least squares smoothing of discrete data defined on a plane using a finite element formulation. Tessler and co-workers recently developed a conceptually similar formulation for smoothing of two-dimensional data based on a discrete least square approximation with a penalty constraint. The penalty constraint results in a stress field which is C(exp 1)-continuous, a result not previously obtained. The approach requires additional, 'smoothing' finite element analysis and for their two-dimensional application, they used a conforming C(exp 0)-continuous triangular finite element based on a conforming plate element. This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation into the application of Tessler's smoothing procedure to the smoothing of finite element stresses from one-dimensional problems. Although the one-dimensional formulation has some practical applicability, such as in truss, beam, axisymmetric mechanics, and one-dimensional heat conduction, the primary motivation for developing the one-dimensional smoothing case is to explore the characteristics of the general smoothing strategy. In particular, it is used to describe the behavior of the method and to explore the suitability of criteria proposed for the smoothing analysis. Prior to presenting numerical results, the variational formulation of the smoothing strategy is presented and a criterion for the smoothing analysis is described.

  12. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  13. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  14. Stress analysis of a rectangular implant in laminated composites using 2-D and 3-D finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Wai T.; Graves, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis method using the FEM based on the Hellinger-Reissner variation principle has been developed to determine the 3-D stresses and displacements near a rectangular implant inside a laminated composite material. Three-dimensional elements are employed in regions where the interlaminar stress is considered to be significant; 2-D elements are used in other areas. Uniaxially loaded graphite-epoxy laminates have been analyzed; the implant was modeled as four plies of 3501/6 epoxy located in the middle of the laminate. It is shown that the interlaminar stresses are an order of magnitude lower than the stress representing the applied far-field load. The stress concentration factors of both the interlaminar and in-plane stresses depend on the stacking sequence of the laminate.

  15. System and Method for Finite Element Simulation of Helicopter Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, R. E. (Inventor); Dulsenberg, Ken (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a turbulence model that has been developed for blade-element helicopter simulation. This model uses an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserves the statistical characteristics of the turbulence spectra over the rotor disc, while providing velocity components in real time to each of five blade-element stations along each of four blades. for a total of twenty blade-element stations. The simulator system includes a software implementation of flight dynamics that adheres to the guidelines for turbulence set forth in military specifications. One of the features of the present simulator system is that it applies simulated turbulence to the rotor blades of the helicopter, rather than to its center of gravity. The simulator system accurately models the rotor penetration into a gust field. It includes time correlation between the front and rear of the main rotor, as well as between the side forces felt at the center of gravity and at the tail rotor. It also includes features for added realism, such as patchy turbulence and vertical gusts in to which the rotor disc penetrates. These features are realized by a unique real time implementation of the turbulence filters. The new simulator system uses two arrays one on either side of the main rotor to record the turbulence field and to produce time-correlation from the front to the rear of the rotor disc. The use of Gaussian Interpolation between the two arrays maintains the statistical properties of the turbulence across the rotor disc. The present simulator system and method may be used in future and existing real-time helicopter simulations with minimal increase in computational workload.

  16. Numerical solution of an elastic and viscoelastic gravitational models by the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjona Almodóvar, A.; Chacón Rebollo, T.; Gómez Marmol, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. Both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models allow the computation of gravity, deformation, and gravitational potential changes in order to investigate crustal deformations of Earth (see for instance Battaglia & Segall, 2004; Fernández et al. 1999, 2001; Rundle 1980 and 1983). These models can be represented by a coupled system of linear parabolic (for the elastic deformations), hyperbolic (for the viscoelastic deformations) and elliptic partial differential equations (for gravitational potential changes) (see for instance Arjona et al. 2008 and 2010). The existence and uniqueness of weak solutions for both the elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational problem was demonstrated in Arjona et al. (2008 and 2014). The stabilization to solutions of the associated stationary system was proved in Arjona and Díaz (2007). Here we consider the internal source as response to the effect of a pressurized magma reservoir into a multilayered, elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational earth model. We introduce the numerical analysis of a simplified steady elastic-gravitational model, solved by means of the finite element method. We also present some numerical tests in realistic situations that confirm the predictions of theoretical order of convergence. Finally, we describe the methodology for both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models using 2D and 3D test examples performed with FreeFEM++.

  17. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, G.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Di Donato, L.; Sorbello, G.; Isernia, T.

    2014-02-12

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  18. A Modified Method for Evaluating the Invariant J-Integral in Finite-Element Models of Prismatic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, V. A.; Sakharov, A. S.; Maksimyuk, Yu. V.; Shkryl', A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical experiments are performed to analyze the invariance and reliability of the results of evaluation of the J-integral by the modified method of reactions in problems of mixed fracture. Bodies with cracks undergoing elastoplastic deformation under static loading are considered. To demonstrate the universality of the method to finite-element schemes, prismatic bodies are considered. This allows using not only conventional finite-element schemes, but also the semi-analytical finite-element method

  19. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics, User manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.

  20. An extended finite element method for dislocations in arbitrary three-dimensional entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Jay

    A finite element method is developed for dislocations in arbitrary, three-dimensional bodies, including micro-/nano-devices, and layered materials, such as thin films. The method is also compatible with anisotropic materials, and can readily be applied to non-linear media. In this method, dislocation are modeled by adding discontinuities to extend the conventional finite element basis. Two approaches for adding discontinuities to the conventional finite element basis are proposed. In the first, a simple discontinuous enrichment imposes a constant jump in displacement across dislocation glide planes. In the second approach, the enrichments more accurately approximate the dislocations by capture the singular asymptotic behavior near the dislocation core. A basis of singular enrichments are formed from the analytical solutions to straight dislocation lines, but are applicable for more general, curved dislocation configurations. Methods for computing the configurational forces on dislocation lines within the XFEM framework have also been developed. For jump enrichments, an approach based on an energy release rate or J-integral is proposed. When singular enrichments are available, it is shown that the Peach-Koehler equation can be used to compute forces directly. This new approach differs from many existing methods for studying dislocations because it does not rely on superposition of solutions derived analytically or through Green's functions. This extended finite element approach is suitable to study dislocations in micro- and nano-devices, and in specific material micro-structures, where complicated boundaries and material interfaces are pervasive.

  1. A new strategy for stress analysis using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.; Vandenbrink, D.

    1983-01-01

    In the paper the authors examine the effectiveness of the Powell-Toint strategy for evaluating the Hessian of the potential energy surface of a finite element model that can be used for linear stress analysis and transient response predictions of structures. Cases for which the Powell-Toint strategy may be cost-effective with the conventional method of stress analysis are identified.

  2. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2016-11-01

    A new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method is introduced and analyzed in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. Extensive numerical experiments have been conducted to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.

  3. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments in order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.

  4. An Introduction of Finite Element Method in the Engineering Teaching at the University of Camaguey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoles, Elsa; Blanco, Ramon; Jimenez, Rafael; Mc.Pherson, Yoanka

    This paper illuminates experiences related to introducing finite element methods (FEM) in mechanical and civil engineering courses at the University of Camaguey in Cuba and provides discussion on using FEM in postgraduate courses for industry engineers. Background information on the introduction of FEM in engineering teaching is focused on…

  5. A Stimulating Approach To Teaching, Learning and Assessing Finite Element Methods: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadelis, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the benefits of introducing finite element methods into the curriculum of undergraduate courses. Analyzes the structure of the computer-assisted-design module and the extent to which it fulfills its main objectives. Discusses the efficiency of modern teaching and learning techniques used to develop skills for solving engineering problems;…

  6. Highly Accurate Beam Torsion Solutions Using the p-Version Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1996-01-01

    A new treatment of the classical beam torsion boundary value problem is applied. Using the p-version finite element method with shape functions based on Legendre polynomials, torsion solutions for generic cross-sections comprised of isotropic materials are developed. Element shape functions for quadrilateral and triangular elements are discussed, and numerical examples are provided.

  7. SQA of finite element method (FEM) codes used for analyses of pit storage/transport packages

    SciTech Connect

    Russel, E.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the software quality assurance of finite element method codes used for analyses of pit storage and transport projects. This methodology utilizes the ISO 9000-3: Guideline for application of 9001 to the development, supply, and maintenance of software, for establishing well-defined software engineering processes to consistently maintain high quality management approaches.

  8. Advanced finite-element methods for design and analysis of nanooptical structures: applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Sven; Zschiedrich, Lin; Pomplun, Jan; Blome, Mark; Schmidt, Frank

    2013-03-01

    An overview on recent applications of the finite-element method Maxwell-solver JCMsuite to simulation tasks in nanooptics is given. Numerical achievements in the fields of optical metamaterials, plasmonics, photonic crystal fibers, light emitting devices, solar cells, optical lithography, optical metrology, integrated optics, and photonic crystals are summarized.

  9. Optimizing the seamless tube extrusion process using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Li, Li; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Xu Liang

    2010-03-01

    In order to reveal the mechanism of extrusion forming for large-scale aluminum alloy seamless pipe, in this research the rigid-viscous plastic finite element method was used to analyze the effect of the technological parameters of the aluminum alloy pipe extrusion process, consistent with the use requirements.

  10. Error analysis of mixed finite element methods for wave propagation in double negative metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jichun

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we develop both semi-discrete and fully discrete mixed finite element methods for modeling wave propagation in three-dimensional double negative metamaterials. Optimal error estimates are proved for Nedelec spaces under the assumption of smooth solutions. To our best knowledge, this is the first error analysis obtained for Maxwell's equations when metamaterials are involved.

  11. Applications of Taylor-Galerkin finite element method to compressible internal flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.; Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element method with Lapidus' artificial viscosity scheme is applied to several test cases for internal compressible inviscid flow problems. Investigations for the effect of supersonic/subsonic inlet and outlet boundary conditions on computational results are particularly emphasized.

  12. Simulation of wind effects on tall structures by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Masood

    2016-06-01

    In the present study finite element method is used to predict the wind forces on a tall structure. The governing equations of mass and momentum with boundary conditions are solved. The κ- ɛ turbulence model is utilized to calculate the turbulence viscosity. The results are independent from the generated mesh. The numerical results are validated with American Society of Civil Engineering standards.

  13. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; ...

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments inmore » order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.« less

  14. A Comprehensive 3D Finite Element Model of a Thermoelectric Module Used in a Power Generator: A Transient Performance Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangxi; Yu, Xiong

    2015-06-01

    Thermoelectric power generator has potential for small-scale and distributed power generation because of its high durability and scalability. It is very important to realize that the transient behavior of thermoelectric modules (TEM) affects a thermoelectric generator's response to dynamic working environments. Traditionally, researchers have used simplified models to describe the behavior of thermoelectric modules. In this paper we propose a comprehensive mathematical model that considers the effect of variations of chemical potential and carrier density, which are ignored by traditional models. Finite element models based on this new model are used to simulate the transient behavior of a thermoelectric module subjected to rapid changes in boundary temperature or working load. Simulation results show that transition times of thermoelectric modules affected by temperature change are much longer than those of modules affected by changes in electrical load resistance. Sudden changes in working temperature cause voltage overshoot of the TEM output, which, however, is not observed in responses to sudden changes of load resistance. Comparisons also show there are significant differences between the behavior of TEM predicted by use of this new comprehensive model and that predicted by use of traditional models, particularly for the high-temperature intrinsic ionization region and the low-temperature weak ionization region. This implies that chemical potential and carrier density variations, which are taken into account by this new model but ignored by traditional models, have major effects on the performance of TEM.

  15. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D’Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate ‘space-frame’ skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics. PMID:18510503

  16. Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Karen; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip; McHenry, Colin; D'Amore, Domenic C; Rayfield, Emily J; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2008-06-01

    The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) displays a unique hold and pull-feeding technique. Its delicate 'space-frame' skull morphology differs greatly from that apparent in most living large prey specialists and is suggestive of a high degree of optimization, wherein use of materials is minimized. Here, using high-resolution finite element modelling based on dissection and in vivo bite and pull data, we present results detailing the mechanical performance of the giant lizard's skull. Unlike most modern predators, V. komodoensis applies minimal input from the jaw muscles when butchering prey. Instead it uses series of actions controlled by postcranial muscles. A particularly interesting feature of the performance of the skull is that it reveals considerably lower overall stress when these additional extrinsic forces are added to those of the jaw adductors. This remarkable reduction in stress in response to additional force is facilitated by both internal and external bone anatomy. Functional correlations obtained from these analyses also provide a solid basis for the interpretation of feeding ecology in extinct species, including dinosaurs and sabre-tooth cats, with which V. komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics.

  17. Calibration of 3D ALE finite element model from experiments on friction stir welding of lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourment, Lionel; Gastebois, Sabrina; Dubourg, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    In order to support the design of such a complex process like Friction Stir Welding (FSW) for the aeronautic industry, numerical simulation software requires (1) developing an efficient and accurate Finite Element (F.E.) formulation that allows predicting welding defects, (2) properly modeling the thermo-mechanical complexity of the FSW process and (3) calibrating the F.E. model from accurate measurements from FSW experiments. This work uses a parallel ALE formulation developed in the Forge® F.E. code to model the different possible defects (flashes and worm holes), while pin and shoulder threads are modeled by a new friction law at the tool / material interface. FSW experiments require using a complex tool with scroll on shoulder, which is instrumented for providing sensitive thermal data close to the joint. Calibration of unknown material thermal coefficients, constitutive equations parameters and friction model from measured forces, torques and temperatures is carried out using two F.E. models, Eulerian and ALE, to reach a satisfactory agreement assessed by the proper sensitivity of the simulation to process parameters.

  18. 3-D diffusion tensor MRI anisotropy content-adaptive finite element head model generation for bioelectromagnetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Kim, T S; Kim, Andrew T; Lee, S Y

    2008-01-01

    Realistic finite element (FE) head models have been successfully applied to bioelectromagnetic problems due to a realistic representation of arbitrary head geometry with inclusion of anisotropic material properties. In this paper, we propose a new automatic FE mesh generation scheme to generate a diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) white matter anisotropy content-adaptive FE head model. We term this kind of mesh as wMesh. With this meshing technique, the anisotropic electrical conductivities derived from DT-MRIs can be best incorporated into the model. The influence of the white matter anisotropy on the EEG forward solutions has been studied via our wMesh head models. The scalp potentials computed from the anisotropic wMesh models against those of the isotropic models have been compared. The results describe that there are substantial changes in the scalp electrical potentials between the isotropic and anisotropic models, indicating that the inclusion of the white matter anisotropy is critical for accurate computation of E/MEG forward and inverse solutions. This fully automatic anisotropy-adaptive wMesh meshing scheme could be useful for modeling of individual-specific FE head models with better incorporation of the white matter anisotropic property towards bioelectromagnetic imaging.

  19. A reduced-order model based on the coupled 1D-3D finite element simulations for an efficient analysis of hemodynamics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudah, Eduardo; Rossi, Riccardo; Idelsohn, Sergio; Oñate, Eugenio

    2014-10-01

    A reduced-order model for an efficient analysis of cardiovascular hemodynamics problems using multiscale approach is presented in this work. Starting from a patient-specific computational mesh obtained by medical imaging techniques, an analysis methodology based on a two-step automatic procedure is proposed. First a coupled 1D-3D Finite Element Simulation is performed and the results are used to adjust a reduced-order model of the 3D patient-specific area of interest. Then, this reduced-order model is coupled with the 1D model. In this way, three-dimensional effects are accounted for in the 1D model in a cost effective manner, allowing fast computation under different scenarios. The methodology proposed is validated using a patient-specific aortic coarctation model under rest and non-rest conditions.

  20. Geometric Aspects of Discretized Classical Field Theories: Extensions to Finite Element Exterior Calculus, Noether Theorems, and the Geodesic Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, Joe

    In this dissertation, I will discuss and explore the various theoretical pillars re- quired to investigate the world of discretized gauge theories in a purely classical setting, with the long-term aim of achieving a fully-fledged discretization of General Relativity (GR). I will start with a brief review of differential forms, then present some results on the geometric framework of finite element exterior calculus (FEEC); in particular, I will elaborate on integrating metric structures within the framework and categorize the dual spaces of the various spaces of polynomial differential forms P rLambdak(R n). After a brief pedagogical detour on Noether's two theorems, I will apply all of the above into discretizations of electromagnetism and linearized GR. I will conclude with an excursion into the geodesic finite element method (GFEM) as a way to generalize some of the above notions to curved manifolds.

  1. Body-oriented coordinates applied to the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.A.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this research is to increase the accuracy of the finite-element method using coordinates intrinsic to the shape of the body being analyzed. We refer to these coordinates as body coordinates. Existing finite elements use Cartesian coordinates and are more accurate for solving rectangular-shaped problems than for solving nonrectangular-shaped problems. To check the feasibility of this research, we developed finite-element codes that used both cylindrical and Cartesian coordinates to solve problems in which the bodies were cylindrical-shaped. We obtained the most accurate solutions using the code that used cylindrical coordinates. Body coordinates become Cartesian coordinates for rectangular-shaped bodies and cylindrical coordinates for circular-shaped bodies. The body coordinate's finite-element formulation uses coordinate transformations from the body to the Cartesian coordinates. These transformations are developed using blending functions and boundary functions. Gradients of the Cartesian coordinates, with respect to body coordinates, are needed for stiffness calculations. Thus, the criterion for the blending function derivation is ''the nearest boundaries dominate,'' both for coordinate transformations and for gradient of coordinate transformations. For our studies, we developed two codes, one that uses body coordinates and one that uses Cartesian coordinates. These codes have been used to solve six example problems. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  2. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  3. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  4. Multigrid finite element method in stress analysis of three-dimensional elastic bodies of heterogeneous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    To calculate the three-dimensional elastic body of heterogeneous structure under static loading, a method of multigrid finite element is provided, when implemented on the basis of algorithms of finite element method (FEM), using homogeneous and composite threedimensional multigrid finite elements (MFE). Peculiarities and differences of MFE from the currently available finite elements (FE) are to develop composite MFE (without increasing their dimensions), arbitrarily small basic partition of composite solids consisting of single-grid homogeneous FE of the first order can be used, i.e. in fact, to use micro approach in finite element form. These small partitions allow one to take into account in MFE, i.e. in the basic discrete models of composite solids, complex heterogeneous and microscopically inhomogeneous structure, shape, the complex nature of the loading and fixation and describe arbitrarily closely the stress and stain state by the equations of three-dimensional elastic theory without any additional simplifying hypotheses. When building the m grid FE, m of nested grids is used. The fine grid is generated by a basic partition of MFE, the other m —1 large grids are applied to reduce MFE dimensionality, when m is increased, MFE dimensionality becomes smaller. The procedures of developing MFE of rectangular parallelepiped, irregular shape, plate and beam types are given. MFE generate the small dimensional discrete models and numerical solutions with a high accuracy. An example of calculating the laminated plate, using three-dimensional 3-grid FE and the reference discrete model is given, with that having 2.2 milliards of FEM nodal unknowns.

  5. Topology Optimization using the Level Set and eXtended Finite Element Methods: Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva Perez, Carlos Hernan

    Computational design optimization provides designers with automated techniques to develop novel and non-intuitive optimal designs. Topology optimization is a design optimization technique that allows for the evolution of a broad variety of geometries in the optimization process. Traditional density-based topology optimization methods often lack a sufficient resolution of the geometry and physical response, which prevents direct use of the optimized design in manufacturing and the accurate modeling of the physical response of boundary conditions. The goal of this thesis is to introduce a unified topology optimization framework that uses the Level Set Method (LSM) to describe the design geometry and the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) to solve the governing equations and measure the performance of the design. The methodology is presented as an alternative to density-based optimization approaches, and is able to accommodate a broad range of engineering design problems. The framework presents state-of-the-art methods for immersed boundary techniques to stabilize the systems of equations and enforce the boundary conditions, and is studied with applications in 2D and 3D linear elastic structures, incompressible flow, and energy and species transport problems to test the robustness and the characteristics of the method. A comparison of the framework against density-based topology optimization approaches is studied with regards to convergence, performance, and the capability to manufacture the designs. Furthermore, the ability to control the shape of the design to operate within manufacturing constraints is developed and studied. The analysis capability of the framework is validated quantitatively through comparison against previous benchmark studies, and qualitatively through its application to topology optimization problems. The design optimization problems converge to intuitive designs and resembled well the results from previous 2D or density-based studies.

  6. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system.

  7. The least-squares finite element method for low-mach-number compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the development of the Least-Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) for simulating compressible viscous flows at low Mach numbers in which the incompressible flows pose as an extreme. Conventional approach requires special treatments for low-speed flows calculations: finite difference and finite volume methods are based on the use of the staggered grid or the preconditioning technique; and, finite element methods rely on the mixed method and the operator-splitting method. In this paper, however, we show that such difficulty does not exist for the LSFEM and no special treatment is needed. The LSFEM always leads to a symmetric, positive-definite matrix through which the compressible flow equations can be effectively solved. Two numerical examples are included to demonstrate the method: first, driven cavity flows at various Reynolds numbers; and, buoyancy-driven flows with significant density variation. Both examples are calculated by using full compressible flow equations.

  8. A finite-element alternating method for two-dimensional Mode-1 crack configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Fichter, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-element alternating method is presented for 2-D Mode-1 crack problems. An analytical solution for an arbitrary polynomial normal pressure distribution applied to the crack faces is obtained and used as the basic solution in the method. The method is applied to several crack problems to study its efficiency and the results are compared to accurate stress-intensity factor solutions in the literature. The method gave reasonably accurate stress-intensity factors and crack opening displacements with minimal computing effort. Because the method must model only the uncracked body, finite-element models with many degrees of freedom are not warranted and therefore, the method has been implemented on personal computers.

  9. Role of gastrocnemius-soleus muscle in forefoot force transmission at heel rise - A 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Park, Jaeyoung; Park, Seung-Bum; Shim, Victor Phyau-Wui; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-06-26

    The functions of the gastrocnemius-soleus (G-S) complex and other plantar flexor muscles are to stabilize and control major bony joints, as well as to provide primary coordination of the foot during the stance phase of gait. Geometric positioning of the foot and transferring of plantar loads can be adversely affected when muscular control is abnormal (e.g., equinus contracture). Although manipulation of the G-S muscle complex by surgical intervention (e.g., tendo-Achilles lengthening) is believed to be effective in restoring normal plantar load transfer in the foot, there is lack of quantitative data supporting that notion. Thus, the objective of this study is to formulate a three-dimensional musculoskeletal finite element model of the foot to quantify the precise role of the G-S complex in terms of biomechanical response of the foot. The model established corresponds to a muscle-demanding posture during heel rise, with simulated activation of major extrinsic plantar flexors. In the baseline (reference) case, required muscle forces were determined from what would be necessary to generate the targeted resultant ground reaction forces. The predicted plantar load transfer through the forefoot plantar surface, as indicated by plantar pressure distribution, was verified by comparison with experimental observations. This baseline model served as a reference for subsequent parametric analysis, where muscle forces applied by the G-S complex were decreased in a step-wise manner. Adaptive changes of the foot mechanism, in terms of internal joint configurations and plantar stress distributions, in response to altered muscular loads were analyzed. Movements of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as forefoot plantar pressure peaks and pressure distribution under the metatarsal heads (MTHs), were all found to be extremely sensitive to reduction in the muscle load in the G-S complex. A 40% reduction in G-S muscle stabilization can result in dorsal-directed rotations

  10. Recent Progress in the p and h-p Version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    THE p AND h-p VERSION OF THE FINITE ELDIEr METHOD I. Babu~ka Institute tor Physical Science and Technology University of Maryland, College Park, MD...85-K-0169 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME ANO ADDRESS 1* -PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT . T ASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBE RS University of Maryland Institute ...METHOD by I. Babu~ka Institute for Physical Science and Technology University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 1. INTRODUCTION finite element method

  11. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  12. A numerical investigation of the finite element method in compressible primitive variable Navier-Stokes flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive numerical investigation of the basic capabilities of the finite element method (FEM) for numerical solution of compressible flow problems governed by the two-dimensional and axis-symmetric Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are presented. The strong and weak points of the method as a tool for computational fluid dynamics are considered. The relation of the linear element finite element method to finite difference methods (FDM) is explored. The calculation of free shear layer and separated flows over aircraft boattail afterbodies with plume simulators indicate the strongest assets of the method are its capabilities for reliable and accurate calculation employing variable grids which readily approximate complex geometry and capably adapt to the presence of diverse regions of large solution gradients without the necessity of domain transformation.

  13. FEMFLOW3D; a finite-element program for the simulation of three-dimensional aquifers; version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durbin, Timothy J.; Bond, Linda D.

    1998-01-01

    This document also includes model validation, source code, and example input and output files. Model validation was performed using four test problems. For each test problem, the results of a model simulation with FEMFLOW3D were compared with either an analytic solution or the results of an independent numerical approach. The source code, written in the ANSI x3.9-1978 FORTRAN standard, and the complete input and output of an example problem are listed in the appendixes.

  14. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  15. Discrete-ordinates finite-element method for atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstl, S. A. W.; Zardecki, A.

    1985-01-01

    The principal features of the discrete-ordinates finite-element method are reviewed, and the applicability of general-purpose discrete-ordinates codes to atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing problems is demonstrated. In particular, numerical results for typical problems arising in meteorology, climatology, and remote sensing are shown to be in good agreement with results from other methods and measurements. A sample two-dimensional calculation demonstrates that specific capabilities available in the discrete-ordinates code TWOTRAN can produce new results that are valuable in the characterization of atmospheric effects on remote sensing (e.g., the adjacency effect). The intrinsic limitations of the method are also considered, and it is concluded that the strengths of the discrete-ordinates finite-element method outweigh its weaknesses.

  16. Tree stability under wind: simulating uprooting with root breakage using a finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Défossez, Pauline; Danjon, Frédéric; Fourcaud, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Windstorms are the major natural hazard affecting European forests, causing tree damage and timber losses. Modelling tree anchorage mechanisms has progressed with advances in plant architectural modelling, but it is still limited in terms of estimation of anchorage strength. This paper aims to provide a new model for root anchorage, including the successive breakage of roots during uprooting. Methods The model was based on the finite element method. The breakage of individual roots was taken into account using a failure law derived from previous work carried out on fibre metal laminates. Soil mechanical plasticity was considered using the Mohr–Coulomb failure criterion. The mechanical model for roots was implemented in the numerical code ABAQUS using beam elements embedded in a soil block meshed with 3-D solid elements. The model was tested by simulating tree-pulling experiments previously carried out on a tree of Pinus pinaster (maritime pine). Soil mechanical parameters were obtained from laboratory tests. Root system architecture was digitized and imported into ABAQUS while root material properties were estimated from the literature. Key Results Numerical simulations of tree-pulling tests exhibited realistic successive root breakages during uprooting, which could be seen in the resulting response curves. Broken roots could be visually located within the root system at any stage of the simulations. The model allowed estimation of anchorage strength in terms of the critical turning moment and accumulated energy, which were in good agreement with in situ measurements. Conclusions This study provides the first model of tree anchorage strength for P. pinaster derived from the mechanical strength of individual roots. The generic nature of the model permits its further application to other tree species and soil conditions. PMID:25006178

  17. Finite elements analysis of an underground collector installed by pipe-jacking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Díaz-Díaz, Luis; Omer, Joshua; Arias, Daniel; Pando, Luis

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a useful analysis method for estimating simultaneously the stability, stress distribution and groundwater seepage as micro - tunnel is being advanced into the ground. The research is mainly concerned with the results of a case study conducted on a project to create a long industrial collector of effluent network in the east bank of the river Avilés (north coast of Spain). This coastal city has significant port and industrial installations in its environs. The geology of the location comprises Quaternary deposits on both flanks of the estuary and includes different highly variable geotechnical behavior. The industrial effluent network, constructed in the year 2010, has a length of 13.087 km and consists of 1.5 m diameter pipes, reaching a maximum depth of 5.8 m below the surface. Only the first 7.0 km of the collector (south area) were formed using pipe-jacking method whilst the rest were formed in open excavations or surface laid. Using the commercial software RS2, a 2D finite element program for soil and rock application, the ground response to pipe jacking in pipeline installation in Avilés was analyzed. Both axi-symmetric and plane strain analyses were carried out in RS2 to simulate in 3D the ground response to pipe advancement. The results demonstrate how much of deformation there is at ground surface in the immediate vicinity of the pipeline. The main objective is to show the possible patterns of ground subsidence and tunnel stresses to inform designers as to whether the tunnel will be stable and safe.

  18. A p-version finite element method for steady incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterscheidt, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A new p-version finite element formulation for steady, incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer problems is presented. The steady-state residual equations are obtained by considering a limiting case of the least-squares formulation for the transient problem. The method circumvents the Babuska-Brezzi condition, permitting the use of equal-order interpolation for velocity and pressure, without requiring the use of arbitrary parameters. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and generality of the method.

  19. A stable cutting method for finite elements based virtual surgery simulation.

    PubMed

    Jerábková, Lenka; Jerábek, Jakub; Chudoba, Rostislav; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach for stable interactive cutting of deformable objects in virtual environments. Our method is based on the extended finite elements method, allowing for a modeling of discontinuities without remeshing. As no new elements are created, the impact on simulation performance is minimized. We also propose an appropriate mass lumping technique to guarantee for the stability of the simulation regardless of the position of the cut.

  20. RCS Predictions From a Method of Moments and a Finite-Element Code for Several Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    01803 14. ABSTRACT This report presents results of radar cross section (RCS) calculations for several interesting targets using a method-of-moments...TERMS radar cross section, method of moments, finite element, modeling 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18... radar cross section (RCS) simulation that require an exact code for solution. In this report, we compare RCS calculations with two very different

  1. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method applied to the 1-D spherical neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, Eric . E-mail: machorro@amath.washington.edu

    2007-04-10

    Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods are used to estimate solutions to the non-scattering 1-D spherical neutron transport equation. Various trial and test spaces are compared in the context of a few sample problems whose exact solution is known. Certain trial spaces avoid unphysical behaviors that seem to plague other methods. Comparisons with diamond differencing and simple corner-balancing are presented to highlight these improvements.

  2. On Computing the Pressure by the p Version of the Finite Element Method for Stokes Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-15

    approximation of saddlepoint prob- lems arising from Lagrangian multipliers. RAIRO , 8:129-151, 1974. [9] M. Dauge. Stationary Stokes and Navier-Stokes systems...Jensen and M. Vogelius. Divergence stability in connection with the p version of the finite element method. RAIRO , Modelisation Math. Anal. Numer., 1990...element method for elliptic problems of order 2 1. RAIRO , Modelisation Math. Anal. Numer., 24:107-146, 1990. 1261 M. Suri. On the stability and convergence

  3. A finite element method for the thermochemical decomposition of polymeric materials. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. M.; Salamon, N. J.

    1992-01-01

    The governing differential equations are developed to model the thermomechanical behavior of chemically decomposing, polymeric materials. These equations account for thermal and gaseous diffusion through a poroelastic, transversely isotropic solid. The Bubnov-Galerkin finite element method is applied to the governing equations to cast the coupled set into a single matrix equation. A method for solving these equations simultaneously at each time step is discussed.

  4. The L sub 1 finite element method for pure convection problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The least squares (L sub 2) finite element method is introduced for 2-D steady state pure convection problems with smooth solutions. It is proven that the L sub 2 method has the same stability estimate as the original equation, i.e., the L sub 2 method has better control of the streamline derivative. Numerical convergence rates are given to show that the L sub 2 method is almost optimal. This L sub 2 method was then used as a framework to develop an iteratively reweighted L sub 2 finite element method to obtain a least absolute residual (L sub 1) solution for problems with discontinuous solutions. This L sub 1 finite element method produces a nonoscillatory, nondiffusive and highly accurate numerical solution that has a sharp discontinuity in one element on both coarse and fine meshes. A robust reweighting strategy was also devised to obtain the L sub 1 solution in a few iterations. A number of examples solved by using triangle and bilinear elements are presented.

  5. Finite element evaluation of three methods of stable fixation of condyle base fractures.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, G P; Vaz, L G; Gabrielli, M F R; Passeri, L A; V Oliveira, T; Noritomi, P Y; Jürgens, P

    2014-10-01

    The surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures currently offers several possibilities for stable internal fixation. In this study, a finite element model evaluation was performed of three different methods for osteosynthesis of low subcondylar fractures: (1) two four-hole straight plates, (2) one seven-hole lambda plate, and (3) one four-hole trapezoidal plate. The finite element model evaluation considered a load applied to the first molar on the contralateral side to the fracture. Results showed that, although the three methods are capable of withstanding functional loading, the lambda plate displayed a more homogeneous stress distribution for both osteosynthesis material and bone and may be a better method when single-plate fixation is the option.

  6. A proposed method for enhanced eigen-pair extraction using finite element methods: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Mitchell, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    The paper covers two distinct parts: theory and application. The goal of this work was the reduction of model size with an increase in eigenvalue/vector accuracy. This method is ideal for the condensation of large truss- or beam-type structures. The theoretical approach involves the conversion of a continuum transfer matrix beam element into an 'Exact' dynamic stiffness element. This formulation is implemented in a finite element environment. This results in the need to solve a transcendental eigenvalue problem. Once the eigenvalue is determined the eigenvectors can be reconstructed with any desired spatial precision. No discretization limitations are imposed on the reconstruction. The results of such a combined finite element and transfer matrix formulation is a much smaller FEM eigenvalue problem. This formulation has the ability to extract higher eigenvalues as easily and as accurately as lower eigenvalues. Moreover, one can extract many more eigenvalues/vectors from the model than the number of degrees of freedom in the FEM formulation. Typically, the number of eigenvalues accurately extractable via the 'Exact' element method are at least 8 times the number of degrees of freedom. In contrast, the FEM usually extracts one accurate (within 5 percent) eigenvalue for each 3-4 degrees of freedom. The 'Exact' element results in a 20-30 improvement in the number of accurately extractable eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  7. Coupling equivalent plate and finite element formulations in multiple-method structural analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Norwood, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A coupled multiple-method analysis procedure for use late in conceptual design or early in preliminary design of aircraft structures is described. Using this method, aircraft wing structures are represented with equivalent plate models, and structural details such as engine/pylon structure, landing gear, or a 'stick' model of a fuselage are represented with beam finite element models. These two analysis methods are implemented in an integrated multiple-method formulation that involves the assembly and solution of a combined set of linear equations. The corresponding solution vector contains coefficients of the polynomials that describe the deflection of the wing and also the components of translations and rotations at the joints of the beam members. Two alternative approaches for coupling the methods are investigated; one using transition finite elements and the other using Lagrange multipliers. The coupled formulation is applied to the static analysis and vibration analysis of a conceptual design model of a fighter aircraft. The results from the coupled method are compared with corresponding results from an analysis in which the entire model is composed of finite elements.

  8. Finite-Element Methods for Real-Time Simulation of Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay

    2003-01-01

    Two finite-element methods have been developed for mathematical modeling of the time-dependent behaviors of deformable objects and, more specifically, the mechanical responses of soft tissues and organs in contact with surgical tools. These methods may afford the computational efficiency needed to satisfy the requirement to obtain computational results in real time for simulating surgical procedures as described in Simulation System for Training in Laparoscopic Surgery (NPO-21192) on page 31 in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Simulation of the behavior of soft tissue in real time is a challenging problem because of the complexity of soft-tissue mechanics. The responses of soft tissues are characterized by nonlinearities and by spatial inhomogeneities and rate and time dependences of material properties. Finite-element methods seem promising for integrating these characteristics of tissues into computational models of organs, but they demand much central-processing-unit (CPU) time and memory, and the demand increases with the number of nodes and degrees of freedom in a given finite-element model. Hence, as finite-element models become more realistic, it becomes more difficult to compute solutions in real time. In both of the present methods, one uses approximate mathematical models trading some accuracy for computational efficiency and thereby increasing the feasibility of attaining real-time up36 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 date rates. The first of these methods is based on modal analysis. In this method, one reduces the number of differential equations by selecting only the most significant vibration modes of an object (typically, a suitable number of the lowest-frequency modes) for computing deformations of the object in response to applied forces.

  9. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  10. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  11. 2-D magnetotelluric modeling using finite element method incorporating unstructured quadrilateral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakorn, Weerachai

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the finite element (FE) method incorporating quadrilateral elements for solving 2-D MT modeling was presented. The finite element software was developed, employing a paving algorithm to generate the unstructured quadrilateral mesh. The accuracy, efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of our FE forward modeling are presented, compared and discussed. The numerical results indicate that our FE codes using an unstructured quadrilateral mesh provide good accuracy when the local mesh refinement is applied around sites and in the area of interest, with superior results when compared to other FE methods. The reliability of the developed codes was also confirmed when comparing both analytical solutions and COMMEMI2D model. Furthermore, our developed FE codes incorporating an unstructured quadrilateral mesh showed useful and powerful features such as handling irregular and complex subregions and providing local refinement of the mesh for a 2-D domain as closely as unstructured triangular mesh but it requires less number of elements in a mesh.

  12. Three dimensional finite element methods: Their role in the design of DC accelerator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podaru, Nicolae C.; Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2013-04-01

    High Voltage Engineering has designed, built and tested a 2 MV dual irradiation system that will be applied for radiation damage studies and ion beam material modification. The system consists of two independent accelerators which support simultaneous proton and electron irradiation (energy range 100 keV - 2 MeV) of target sizes of up to 300 × 300 mm2. Three dimensional finite element methods were used in the design of various parts of the system. The electrostatic solver was used to quantify essential parameters of the solid-state power supply generating the DC high voltage. The magnetostatic solver and ray tracing were used to optimize the electron/ion beam transport. Close agreement between design and measurements of the accelerator characteristics as well as beam performance indicate the usefulness of three dimensional finite element methods during accelerator system design.

  13. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  14. A hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-01-14

    This paper presents a hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method (WG-MFEM) which was introduced and analyzed in Wang and Ye (2014) for second order elliptic equations. The WG-MFEM method was designed by using discontinuous piecewise polynomials on finite element partitions consisting of polygonal or polyhedral elements of arbitrary shape. The key to WG-MFEM is the use of a discrete weak divergence operator which is defined and computed by solving inexpensive problems locally on each element. The hybridized formulation of this paper leads to a significantly reduced system of linear equations involving only the unknowns arising from the Lagrange multiplier in hybridization. Optimal-order error estimates are derived for the hybridized WG-MFEM approximations. In conclusion, some numerical results are reported to confirm the theory and a superconvergence for the Lagrange multiplier.

  15. A hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-01-14

    This paper presents a hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method (WG-MFEM) which was introduced and analyzed in Wang and Ye (2014) for second order elliptic equations. The WG-MFEM method was designed by using discontinuous piecewise polynomials on finite element partitions consisting of polygonal or polyhedral elements of arbitrary shape. The key to WG-MFEM is the use of a discrete weak divergence operator which is defined and computed by solving inexpensive problems locally on each element. The hybridized formulation of this paper leads to a significantly reduced system of linear equations involving only the unknowns arising frommore » the Lagrange multiplier in hybridization. Optimal-order error estimates are derived for the hybridized WG-MFEM approximations. In conclusion, some numerical results are reported to confirm the theory and a superconvergence for the Lagrange multiplier.« less

  16. XFEM: Exploratory Research into the Extended Finite-Element Method, FY02 LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    MISH, K

    2003-02-26

    This report is one of two components, the first an overview document outlining the goals and results of the XFEM LDRD project, and the other (titled ''Structured Extended Finite Element Methods of Solids defined by Implicit Surfaces'') detailing the scientific advances developed under FY01/FY02 LDRD funding. The XFEM (Extended Finite-Element Method) Engineering LDRD/ER Project was motivated by three research and development goals: (1) the extensions of standard finite-element technology into important new research venues of interest to the Engineering Directorate, (2) the automation of much of the engineering analysis workflow, so as to improve the productivity of mesh-generation and problem setup processes, and (3) the development of scalable software tools to facilitate innovation in XFEM analysis and methods development. The driving principle behind this LDRD project was to demonstrate the computational technology required to perform mechanical analysis of complex solids, with minimal extra effort required on the part of mechanical analysts. This need arises both from the growing workload of LLNL analysts in problem setup and mesh generation, and from the requirement that actual as-built mechanical configurations be analyzed. Many of the most important programmatic drivers for mechanical analysis require that the actual (e.g., deformed, aged, damaged) geometric configuration of the solid be deduced and then accurately modeled: for this programmatic need, XFEM provides one of the only accurate methods available that can provide high-fidelity results.

  17. The finite element method for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Vafaeian, B; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative ultrasound for bone assessment is based on the correlations between ultrasonic parameters and the properties (mechanical and physical) of cancellous bone. To elucidate the correlations, understanding the physics of ultrasound in cancellous bone is demanded. Micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been so far utilized as one of the approaches in this regard. However, the FDTD method accompanies two disadvantages: staircase sampling of cancellous bone by finite difference grids leads to generation of wave artifacts at the solid-fluid interface inside the bone; additionally, this method cannot explicitly satisfy the needed perfect-slip conditions at the interface. To overcome these disadvantages, the finite element method (FEM) is proposed in this study. Three-dimensional finite element models of six water-saturated cancellous bone samples with different bone volume were created. The values of speed of sound (SOS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) were calculated through the finite element simulations of ultrasound propagation in each sample. Comparing the results with other experimental and simulation studies demonstrated the capabilities of the FEM for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound in water-saturated cancellous bone.

  18. The Optimal Convergence Rate of the p-Version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    pSFOBSOLETE. THE OPTIMAL CONVERGENCE RATE OF THE p-VERSION OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD I. Babu’ka 1 Institute for Physical Science and Technology...commercial and research codes. The p-version and h-p versions are new developments. There is only one commercial code, the system PROBE ( Noetic Tech, St...Louis). The theoretical aspects have been studied only recently. The first theoretical paper appeared in 1981 (see [7)). See also [1), [7], [81, [9

  19. Implementation of Nonhomogeneous Dirichlet Boundary Conditions in the p- Version of the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Institute for Physical Science and Teennology rUniversity of Maryland o College Park, MD 20742 B. Gix) Engineering Mechanics Research Corporation Troy...OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD by Ivo Babuska Institute for Physical Science and Technology University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 B. Guo 2...2Research partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DMS-85-16191 during the stay at the Institute for Physical Science and

  20. Viscoplastic and Creep Crack Growth Analysis by the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Strain Matrix and Its Application for the Solution of Elastic- Plastic Problems by the Finite Element Method," Int’l Journ. of Mechani- cal Sciences, Vol...constant. Therefore only one solution is required to obtain displacements for the elastic structure. However, for elastic- plastic problems the...form as dP= ;I.3 deP~i dEYi.. (A-28) 4. ELASTIC-PLASTIC SOLUTION TECHNIQUES The procedures used to solve small displacement elastic- plastic problems incrementally

  1. Error estimations of mixed finite element methods for nonlinear problems of shallow shell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karchevsky, M.

    2016-11-01

    The variational formulations of problems of equilibrium of a shallow shell in the framework of the geometrically and physically nonlinear theory by boundary conditions of different main types, including non-classical, are considered. Necessary and sufficient conditions for their solvability are derived. Mixed finite element methods for the approximate solutions to these problems based on the use of second derivatives of the bending as auxiliary variables are proposed. Estimations of accuracy of approximate solutions are established.

  2. Optical tomography reconstruction algorithm with the finite element method: An optimal approach with regularization tools

    SciTech Connect

    Balima, O.; Favennec, Y.; Rousse, D.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •New strategies to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction through mesh and finite element parameterization. •Use of gradient filtering through an alternative inner product within the adjoint method. •An integral form of the cost function is used to make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. •Gradient-based algorithm with the adjoint method is used for the reconstruction. -- Abstract: Optical tomography is mathematically treated as a non-linear inverse problem where the optical properties of the probed medium are recovered through the minimization of the errors between the experimental measurements and their predictions with a numerical model at the locations of the detectors. According to the ill-posed behavior of the inverse problem, some regularization tools must be performed and the Tikhonov penalization type is the most commonly used in optical tomography applications. This paper introduces an optimized approach for optical tomography reconstruction with the finite element method. An integral form of the cost function is used to take into account the surfaces of the detectors and make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. Through a gradient-based algorithm where the adjoint method is used to compute the gradient of the cost function, an alternative inner product is employed for preconditioning the reconstruction algorithm. Moreover, appropriate re-parameterization of the optical properties is performed. These regularization strategies are compared with the classical Tikhonov penalization one. It is shown that both the re-parameterization and the use of the Sobolev cost function gradient are efficient for solving such an ill-posed inverse problem.

  3. A Mass Conservation Algorithm for Adaptive Unrefinement Meshes Used by Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    dimensional mesh generation. In: Proc. 4th ACM-SIAM Symp. on Disc. Algorithms. (1993) 83–92 [9] Weatherill, N., Hassan, O., Marcum, D., Marchant, M.: Grid ...Conference on Computational Science, ICCS 2012 A Mass Conservation Algorithm For Adaptive Unrefinement Meshes Used By Finite Element Methods Hung V. Nguyen...velocity fields, and chemical distribution, as well as conserve mass, especially for water quality applications. Solution accuracy depends highly on mesh

  4. A Stochastic Mixed Finite Element Heterogeneous Multiscale Method for Flow in Porous Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    quickly. However, for reservoir simulation the most crucial factor is the transport prop- erties of a velocity field. That is, a large local error in the...streamline methods for reservoir simulation of large geomodels, Advances in Water Resources 28 (2005) 257 – 271. [11] P. Jenny, S. H. Lee, H. A. Tchelepi... Reservoir Simulation , 2003, pp. 23–27. [53] R. Ghanem, P. D. Spanos, Stochastic Finite Elements: A Spectral Approach, Springer - Verlag, New York

  5. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  6. Mechanical performance of endodontic restorations with prefabricated posts: sensitivity analysis of parameters with a 3D finite element model.

    PubMed

    González-Lluch, Carmen; Pérez-González, Antonio; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo-Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of different parameters of the endodontically restored tooth on its final strength, using in vitro tests and model simulations. However, the differences in the experimental set-up or modelling conditions and the limited number of parameters studied in each case prevent us from obtaining clear conclusions about the relative importance of each parameter. In this study, a validated 3D biomechanical model of the restored tooth was used for an exhaustive sensitivity analysis. The individual influence of 20 different parameters on the mechanical performance of an endodontic restoration with prefabricated posts was studied. The results bring up the remarkable importance of the loading angle on the final restoration strength. Flexural loads are more critical than compressive or tensile loads. Young's modulus of the post and its length and diameter are the most influential parameters for strength, whereas other parameters such as ferrule geometry or core and crown characteristics are less significant.

  7. Can the modeling for simplification of a dental implant surface affect the accuracy of 3D finite element analysis?

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido de Araújo; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess stress/strain of different implant modeling simplifications by 3D-FEA. Three variation of external hexagon implant (Ø3.75 × 10 mm) supporting one molar crown were simulated: A (no threads); B (slightly threads simplification); C (original design). 200 N (axial) and 100 N (oblique) were applied. Cortical bone was evaluated by maximum principal stress and microstrain qualitatively and quantitatively (ANOVA and Tukey post hoc (p < 0.05)). Higher stress levels (p < 0.05) were observed in model A. Models B and C presented similar stress transmission. It was possible to conclude that slightly simplification should be used for studies evaluating stress transferring for bone tissue.

  8. Distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P; Hanson, Floyd B

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we present a distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method. The dynamic model comprises system of three coupled reaction-diffusion models, involving the tumor cells, the normal tissues and the drug concentration. An optimal control problem is formulated with the goal of minimizing the tumor cell density and reducing the side effects of the drug. A distributed parameters method based on the application of variational calculus is used on an integral-Hamiltonian, which is then used to obtain an optimal coupled system of forward state equations and backward co-state equations. The Galerkin finite element method is used to realistically represent the brain structure as well as to facilitate computation. Finally a three-dimensional test case is considered and partitioned into a set of spherical finite elements, using tri-linear basis functions, except for the elements affected by singularities of polar and azimuthal angles, as well as the origin.

  9. Sensitivity analysis based preform die shape design using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Hufi, R.; Hutter, A.; Grandhi, R. V.

    1997-06-01

    This paper uses a finite element-based sensitivity analysis method to design the preform die shape for metal forming processes. The sensitivity analysis was developed using the rigid visco-plastic finite element method. The preform die shapes are represented by cubic B-spline curves. The control points or coefficients of the B-spline are used as the design variables. The optimization problem is to minimize the difference between the realized and the desired final forging shapes. The sensitivity analysis includes the sensitivities of the objective function, nodal coordinates, and nodal velocities with respect to the design variables. The remeshing procedure and the interpolation/transfer of the history/dependent parameters are considered. An adjustment of the volume loss resulting from the finite element analysis is used to make the workpiece volume consistent in each optimization iteration and improve the optimization convergence. In addition, a technique for dealing with fold-over defects during the forming simulation is employed in order to continue the optimization procedures of the preform die shape design. The method developed in this paper is used to design the preform die shape for both plane strain and axisymmetric deformations with shaped cavities. The analysis shows that satisfactory final forging shapes are obtained using the optimized preform die shapes.

  10. Application of Finite Element Method to the structure design of the Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Shi-Mo

    2005-12-01

    Finite Element Method (FEM), the primary numerical means to process structure analysis in the modern engineering field, is adopted widely in the design of astronomical instruments at present. It can help designers to find out various characteristics of the object, to discover the weakness in stiffness and strength, and to improve and optimize the design as well. It is also used widely in many processes during the designing of the Space Solar Telescope (SST), such as in the main truss and the primary cell. From the beginning of the geometry modeling and the finite element creating, many aspects such as linear static, modal analysis, transient response and thermal analysis are demonstrated in SST. The error existing in the FEM, why it exists, and how to reduce it are discussed. Finally, the development trend of FEM in the astronomical instruments especially the space astronomical instruments is presented.

  11. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  12. Solution of the neutronics code dynamic benchmark by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvakumov, A. V.; Vabishchevich, P. N.; Vasilev, A. O.; Strizhov, V. F.

    2016-10-01

    The objective is to analyze the dynamic benchmark developed by Atomic Energy Research for the verification of best-estimate neutronics codes. The benchmark scenario includes asymmetrical ejection of a control rod in a water-type hexagonal reactor at hot zero power. A simple Doppler feedback mechanism assuming adiabatic fuel temperature heating is proposed. The finite element method on triangular calculation grids is used to solve the three-dimensional neutron kinetics problem. The software has been developed using the engineering and scientific calculation library FEniCS. The matrix spectral problem is solved using the scalable and flexible toolkit SLEPc. The solution accuracy of the dynamic benchmark is analyzed by condensing calculation grid and varying degree of finite elements.

  13. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, M.; Knabner, P.

    2004-06-01

    We present adaptive mixed hybrid finite element discretizations of the Richards equation, a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation modeling the flow of water into a variably saturated porous medium. The approach simultaneously constructs approximations of the flux and the pressure head in Raviart-Thomas spaces. The resulting nonlinear systems of equations are solved by a Newton method. For the linear problems of the Newton iteration a multigrid algorithm is used. We consider two different kinds of error indicators for space adaptive grid refinement: superconvergence and residual based indicators. They can be calculated easily by means of the available finite element approximations. This seems attractive for computations since no additional (sub-)problems have to be solved. Computational experiments conducted for realistic water table recharge problems illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the approach.

  14. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  15. Gradient plasticity crack tip characterization by means of the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pañeda, E.; Natarajan, S.; Bordas, S.

    2017-01-01

    Strain gradient plasticity theories are being widely used for fracture assessment, as they provide a richer description of crack tip fields by incorporating the influence of geometrically necessary dislocations. Characterizing the behavior at the small scales involved in crack tip deformation requires, however, the use of a very refined mesh within microns to the crack. In this work a novel and efficient gradient-enhanced numerical framework is developed by means of the extended finite element method (X-FEM). A mechanism-based gradient plasticity model is employed and the approximation of the displacement field is enriched with the stress singularity of the gradient-dominated solution. Results reveal that the proposed numerical methodology largely outperforms the standard finite element approach. The present work could have important implications on the use of microstructurally-motivated models in large scale applications. The non-linear X-FEM code developed in MATLAB can be downloaded from http://www.empaneda.com/codes.

  16. Simulation of cylindrical cup drawing of AZ31 sheet metal with crystal plasticity finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Weiqin; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Shaorui; Peng, Yinghong

    2013-12-01

    As a light-weight structural material, magnesium alloys show good potential in improving the fuel efficiency of vehicles and reducing CO2 emissions. However, it is well known that polycrystalline Mg alloys develop pronounced crystallographic texture and plastic anisotropy during rolling, which leads to earing phenomenon during deep drawing of the rolled sheets. It is vital to predict this phenomenon accurately for application of magnesium sheet metals. In the present study, a crystal plasticity model for AZ31 magnesium alloy that incorporates both slip and twinning is established. Then the crystal plasticity model is implemented in the commercial finite element software ABAQUS/Explicit through secondary development interface (VUMAT). Finally, the stamping process of a cylindrical cup is simulated using the developed crystal plasticity finite element model, and the predicting method is verified by comparing with experimental results from both earing profile and deformation texture.

  17. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  18. Failure analysis of laminated composites by using iterative three-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Sun, C. T.

    1989-05-01

    A failure analysis of laminated composites is accomplished by using an iterative three-dimensional finite element method. Based on Tsai-Wu failure theory, three different modes of failure are proposed: fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination. The first ply failure load is then evaluated. As the applied load exceeds the first ply failure load, localized structural failure occurs and the global structural stiffness should change. The global stiffness matrix is modified by taking nonlinearity due to partial failures within a laminate into consideration. The first ply failure load is analyzed by using a iterative mixed field method in solving the linear part of the finite element equations. The progressive failure problem is solved numerically by using Newton-Raphson iterative schemes for the solution of nonlinear finite element equations. Numerical examples include angle-ply symmetric Thornel 300 graphite/934 resin epoxy laminates under uniaxial tension. First ply failure loads as well as the final failure loads are evaluated. Good correlation between analytical results and experimental data are observed. Numerical results also include the investigation of composite specimens with a centered hole, under uniaxial tension. Excellent correlation with the experimental data is observed.

  19. The p-version of the finite element method in incremental elasto-plastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Stefan M.; Yosibash, Zohar

    1993-01-01

    Whereas the higher-order versions of the finite elements method (the p- and hp-version) are fairly well established as highly efficient methods for monitoring and controlling the discretization error in linear problems, little has been done to exploit their benefits in elasto-plastic structural analysis. Aspects of incremental elasto-plastic finite element analysis which are particularly amenable to improvements by the p-version is discussed. These theoretical considerations are supported by several numerical experiments. First, an example for which an analytical solution is available is studied. It is demonstrated that the p-version performs very well even in cycles of elasto-plastic loading and unloading, not only as compared to the traditional h-version but also in respect to the exact solution. Finally, an example of considerable practical importance - the analysis of a cold-worked lug - is presented which demonstrates how the modeling tools offered by higher-order finite element techniques can contribute to an improved approximation of practical problems.

  20. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  1. Simulation and evaluation of tablet-coating burst based on finite element method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Li, Juan; Miao, Kong-Song; Shan, Wei-Guang; Tang, Lan; Yu, Hai-Ning

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to simulate and evaluate the burst behavior of coated tablets. Three-dimensional finite element models of tablet-coating were established using software ANSYS. Swelling pressure of cores was measured by a self-made device and applied at the internal surface of the models. Mechanical properties of the polymer film were determined using a texture analyzer and applied as material properties of the models. The resulted finite element models were validated by experimental data. The validated models were used to assess the factors those influenced burst behavior and predict the coating burst behavior. The simulation results of coating burst and failure location were strongly matched with the experimental data. It was found that internal swelling pressure, inside corner radius and corner thickness were three main factors controlling the stress distribution and burst behavior. Based on the linear relationship between the internal pressure and the maximum principle stress on coating, burst pressure of coatings was calculated and used to predict the burst behavior. This study demonstrated that burst behavior of coated tablets could be simulated and evaluated by finite element method.

  2. Shape and Stress Sensing of Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Structures Using an Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerracchio, Priscilla; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The marked increase in the use of composite and sandwich material systems in aerospace, civil, and marine structures leads to the need for integrated Structural Health Management systems. A key capability to enable such systems is the real-time reconstruction of structural deformations, stresses, and failure criteria that are inferred from in-situ, discrete-location strain measurements. This technology is commonly referred to as shape- and stress-sensing. Presented herein is a computationally efficient shape- and stress-sensing methodology that is ideally suited for applications to laminated composite and sandwich structures. The new approach employs the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM) as a general framework and the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) as the underlying plate theory. A three-node inverse plate finite element is formulated. The element formulation enables robust and efficient modeling of plate structures instrumented with strain sensors that have arbitrary positions. The methodology leads to a set of linear algebraic equations that are solved efficiently for the unknown nodal displacements. These displacements are then used at the finite element level to compute full-field strains, stresses, and failure criteria that are in turn used to assess structural integrity. Numerical results for multilayered, highly heterogeneous laminates demonstrate the unique capability of this new formulation for shape- and stress-sensing.

  3. Simple finite element methods for approximating predator-prey dynamics in two dimensions using MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Marcus R; Burkardt, John; Morgan, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    We describe simple finite element schemes for approximating spatially extended predator-prey dynamics with the Holling type II functional response and logistic growth of the prey. The finite element schemes generalize 'Scheme 1' in the paper by Garvie (Bull Math Biol 69(3):931-956, 2007). We present user-friendly, open-source MATLAB code for implementing the finite element methods on arbitrary-shaped two-dimensional domains with Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, mixed Robin-Neumann, mixed Dirichlet-Neumann, and Periodic boundary conditions. Users can download, edit, and run the codes from http://www.uoguelph.ca/~mgarvie/ . In addition to discussing the well posedness of the model equations, the results of numerical experiments are presented and demonstrate the crucial role that habitat shape, initial data, and the boundary conditions play in determining the spatiotemporal dynamics of predator-prey interactions. As most previous works on this problem have focussed on square domains with standard boundary conditions, our paper makes a significant contribution to the area.

  4. Finite element method for viscoelastic medium with damage and the application to structural analysis of solid rocket motor grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Shen, ZhiBin; Duan, JingBo; Tang, GuoJin

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the damage-viscoelastic behavior of composite solid propellants of solid rocket motors (SRM). Based on viscoelastic theories and strain equivalent hypothesis in damage mechanics, a three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating with damage is developed. The resulting viscoelastic constitutive equations are numerically discretized by integration algorithm, and a stress-updating method is presented by solving nonlinear equations according to the Newton-Raphson method. A material subroutine of stress-updating is made up and embedded into commercial code of Abaqus. The material subroutine is validated through typical examples. Our results indicate that the finite element results are in good agreement with the analytical ones and have high accuracy, and the suggested method and designed subroutine are efficient and can be further applied to damage-coupling structural analysis of practical SRM grain.

  5. A least-squares finite element method for incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1989-01-01

    A least-squares finite element method, based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation, is developed for solving steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method leads to a minimization problem rather than to a saddle-point problem by the classic mixed method, and can thus accommodate equal-order interpolations. This method has no parameter to tune. The associated algebraic system is symmetric, and positive definite. Numerical results for the cavity flow at Reynolds number up to 10,000 and the backward-facing step flow at Reynolds number up to 900 are presented.

  6. A least-squares finite element method for incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1992-01-01

    A least-squares finite element method, based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation, is developed for solving steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method leads to a minimization problem rather than to a saddle-point problem by the classic mixed method and can thus accommodate equal-order interpolations. This method has no parameter to tune. The associated algebraic system is symmetric, and positive definite. Numerical results for the cavity flow at Reynolds number up to 10,000 and the backward-facing step flow at Reynolds number up to 900 are presented.

  7. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  8. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  9. Development of Finite Elements for Two-Dimensional Structural Analysis Using the Integrated Force Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method has been developed in recent years for the analysis of structural mechanics problems. This method treats all independent internal forces as unknown variables that can be calculated by simultaneously imposing equations of equilibrium and compatibility conditions. In this paper a finite element library for analyzing two-dimensional problems by the Integrated Force Method is presented. Triangular- and quadrilateral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary domain configurations are presented. The element equilibrium and flexibility matrices are derived by discretizing the expressions for potential and complementary energies, respectively. The displacement and stress fields within the finite elements are independently approximated. The displacement field is interpolated as it is in the standard displacement method, and the stress field is approximated by using complete polynomials of the correct order. A procedure that uses the definitions of stress components in terms of an Airy stress function is developed to derive the stress interpolation polynomials. Such derived stress fields identically satisfy the equations of equilibrium. Moreover, the resulting element matrices are insensitive to the orientation of local coordinate systems. A method is devised to calculate the number of rigid body modes, and the present elements are shown to be free of spurious zero-energy modes. A number of example problems are solved by using the present library, and the results are compared with corresponding analytical solutions and with results from the standard displacement finite element method. The Integrated Force Method not only gives results that agree well with analytical and displacement method results but also outperforms the displacement method in stress calculations.

  10. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  11. Finite element analysis of resistivity measurement with van der Pauw method in a diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowei; Gao, Chunxiao; Han, Yonghao; Li, Ming; He, Chunyuan; Hao, Aimin; Zhang, Dongmei; Yu, Cuiling; Zou, Guangtian; Ma, Yanzhang

    2007-06-01

    Using finite element analysis, the authors studied the steady current field distribution under the configuration of van der Pauw method [L. J. van der Pauw, Philips Tech. Rev. 20, 220 (1958)] for resistivity measurement in a diamond anvil cell. Based on the theoretical analysis, the authors obtained the theoretical accuracy curve of the van der Pauw method. This method provides accurate determination of sample resistivity when the ratio of sample thickness to its diameter is less than 0.45. They found that the contact area between electrode and sample is a key factor in the resistivity measurement accuracy and its size is dependent on the sample diameter for a given measurement accuracy.

  12. A Kernel-Free Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Young-Keun; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    An improved hybrid particle-finite element method has been developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems. Unlike alternative methods, the revised formulation computes the density without reference to any kernel or interpolation functions, for either the density or the rate of dilatation. This simplifies the state space model and leads to a significant reduction in computational cost. The improved method introduces internal energy variables as generalized coordinates in a new formulation of the thermomechanical Lagrange equations. Example problems show good agreement with exact solutions in one dimension and good agreement with experimental data in a three dimensional simulation.

  13. An hybrid finite volume finite element method for variable density incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calgaro, Caterina; Creusé, Emmanuel; Goudon, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of variable density incompressible flows, modeled by the Navier-Stokes system. We introduce an hybrid scheme which combines a finite volume approach for treating the mass conservation equation and a finite element method to deal with the momentum equation and the divergence free constraint. The breakthrough relies on the definition of a suitable footbridge between the two methods, through the design of compatibility condition. In turn, the method is very flexible and allows to deal with unstructured meshes. Several numerical tests are performed to show the scheme capabilities. In particular, the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution is carefully investigated.

  14. Parallel implementation of the finite element method using compressed data structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, F. L. B.; Ferreira, I. A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a parallel implementation of the finite element method designed for coarse-grain distributed memory architectures. The MPI standard is used for message passing and tests are run on a PC cluster and on an SGI Altix 350. Compressed data structures are employed to store the coefficient matrix and obtain iterative solutions, based on Krylov methods, in a subdomain-by-subdomain approach. Two mesh partitioning schemes are compared: non-overlapping and overlapping. The pros and cons of these partitioning methods are discussed. Numerical examples of symmetric and non-symmetric problems in two and three dimensions are presented.

  15. Permeability computation on a REV with an immersed finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Laure, P.; Puaux, G.; Silva, L.; Vincent, M.

    2011-05-04

    An efficient method to compute permeability of fibrous media is presented. An immersed domain approach is used to represent the porous material at its microscopic scale and the flow motion is computed with a stabilized mixed finite element method. Therefore the Stokes equation is solved on the whole domain (including solid part) using a penalty method. The accuracy is controlled by refining the mesh around the solid-fluid interface defined by a level set function. Using homogenisation techniques, the permeability of a representative elementary volume (REV) is computed. The computed permeabilities of regular fibre packings are compared to classical analytical relations found in the bibliography.

  16. Finite element method formulation in polar coordinates for transient heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is the formulation of the finite element method in polar coordinates to solve transient heat conduction problems. It is hard to find in the literature a formulation of the finite element method (FEM) in polar or cylindrical coordinates for the solution of heat transfer problems. This document shows how to apply the most often used boundary conditions. The global equation system is solved by the Crank-Nicolson method. The proposed algorithm is verified in three numerical tests. In the first example, the obtained transient temperature distribution is compared with the temperature obtained from the presented analytical solution. In the second numerical example, the variable boundary condition is assumed. In the last numerical example the component with the shape different than cylindrical is used. All examples show that the introduction of the polar coordinate system gives better results than in the Cartesian coordinate system. The finite element method formulation in polar coordinates is valuable since it provides a higher accuracy of the calculations without compacting the mesh in cylindrical or similar to tubular components. The proposed method can be applied for circular elements such as boiler drums, outlet headers, flux tubes. This algorithm can be useful during the solution of inverse problems, which do not allow for high density grid. This method can calculate the temperature distribution in the bodies of different properties in the circumferential and the radial direction. The presented algorithm can be developed for other coordinate systems. The examples demonstrate a good accuracy and stability of the proposed method.

  17. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via a new integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Aiello, Robert A.; Berke, Laszlo

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  18. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via an integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Aiello, R. A.; Berke, L.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  19. A general algorithm using finite element method for aerodynamic configurations at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for numerical simulation of two-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flows was developed. The Navier-Stokes equations are suitably modelled to facilitate direct solution for the essential flow parameters. A leap-frog time differencing and Galerkin minimization of these model equations yields the finite element algorithm. The finite elements are triangular with bicubic shape functions approximating the solution space. The finite element matrices are unsymmetrically banded to facilitate savings in storage. An unsymmetric L-U decomposition is performed on the finite element matrices to obtain the solution for the boundary value problem.

  20. An Embedded Statistical Method for Coupling Molecular Dynamics and Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.H.; Yamakov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with finite element methods (FEM) yields computationally efficient models that link fundamental material processes at the atomistic level with continuum field responses at higher length scales. The theoretical challenge involves developing a seamless connection along an interface between two inherently different simulation frameworks. Various specialized methods have been developed to solve particular classes of problems. Many of these methods link the kinematics of individual MD atoms with FEM nodes at their common interface, necessarily requiring that the finite element mesh be refined to atomic resolution. Some of these coupling approaches also require simulations to be carried out at 0 K and restrict modeling to two-dimensional material domains due to difficulties in simulating full three-dimensional material processes. In the present work, a new approach to MD-FEM coupling is developed based on a restatement of the standard boundary value problem used to define a coupled domain. The method replaces a direct linkage of individual MD atoms and finite element (FE) nodes with a statistical averaging of atomistic displacements in local atomic volumes associated with each FE node in an interface region. The FEM and MD computational systems are effectively independent and communicate only through an iterative update of their boundary conditions. With the use of statistical averages of the atomistic quantities to couple the two computational schemes, the developed approach is referred to as an embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM). ESCM provides an enhanced coupling methodology that is inherently applicable to three-dimensional domains, avoids discretization of the continuum model to atomic scale resolution, and permits finite temperature states to be applied.

  1. Development and Application of the p-Version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-30

    element method has been the subject of intensive study since the early 1950’s and perhaps even earlier. Study of the p-version of the finite element...method, on the other hand, began at *Washington University in St. Louis in the early 1970’s and led to a more recent study of the h-p version. Research...infinite strip to a bounded domain. 3.3 A Numerical Argument Principle In order to assure that all roots have indeed been obtained, we have studied the

  2. A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices.

    PubMed

    Vanbrabant, Pieter J M; Beeckman, Jeroen; Neyts, Kristiaan; James, Richard; Fernandez, F Anibal

    2009-06-22

    An efficient full-vectorial finite element beam propagation method is presented that uses higher order vector elements to calculate the wide angle propagation of an optical field through inhomogeneous, anisotropic optical materials such as liquid crystals. The full dielectric permittivity tensor is considered in solving Maxwell's equations. The wide applicability of the method is illustrated with different examples: the propagation of a laser beam in a uniaxial medium, the tunability of a directional coupler based on liquid crystals and the near-field diffraction of a plane wave in a structure containing micrometer scale variations in the transverse refractive index, similar to the pixels of a spatial light modulator.

  3. A locking-free immersed finite element method for planar elasticity interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tao; Sheen, Dongwoo; Zhang, Xu

    2013-08-01

    This article proposes a nonconforming immersed finite element (IFE) method for solving planar elasticity interface problems with structured (or Cartesian) meshes even if the material interface has a nontrivial geometry. IFE functions developed in this article are applicable to arbitrary configurations of elasticity materials and interface locations. Optimal approximation capability is observed for this new IFE space. The displacement Galerkin method based on this IFE space is robust (locking-free). Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate that the IFE solution converges optimally for both compressible and nearly incompressible materials.

  4. Finite element method for nonlinear Riesz space fractional diffusion equations on irregular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Yuan, Z.; Nie, Y.; Wang, J.; Zhu, X.; Liu, F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider two-dimensional Riesz space fractional diffusion equations with nonlinear source term on convex domains. Applying Galerkin finite element method in space and backward difference method in time, we present a fully discrete scheme to solve Riesz space fractional diffusion equations. Our breakthrough is developing an algorithm to form stiffness matrix on unstructured triangular meshes, which can help us to deal with space fractional terms on any convex domain. The stability and convergence of the scheme are also discussed. Numerical examples are given to verify accuracy and stability of our scheme.

  5. Application of the Finite Element Method in Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine

    2007-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a numerical algorithm for solving second order differential equations. It has been successfully used to solve many problems in atomic and molecular physics, including bound state and scattering calculations. To illustrate the diversity of the method, we present here details of two applications. First, we calculate the non-adiabatic dipole polarizability of Hi by directly solving the first and second order equations of perturbation theory with FEM. In the second application, we calculate the scattering amplitude for e-H scattering (without partial wave analysis) by reducing the Schrodinger equation to set of integro-differential equations, which are then solved with FEM.

  6. An efficient discontinuous Galerkin finite element method with nested domain decomposition for simulations of microresistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiefu

    2015-03-01

    A discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is employed to study the responses of microresistivity imaging tools used in the oil and gas exploration industry. The multiscale structure of an imaging problem is decomposed into several nested subdomains based on its geometric characteristics. Each subdomain is discretized independently, and numerical flux is used to couple all subdomains together. The nested domain decomposition scheme will lead to a block tridiagonal linear system, and the block Thomas algorithm is utilized here to eliminate the subdomain based iteration in the step of solving the linear system. Numerical results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of this method.

  7. [Valid constructing method of three-dimensional finite element human foot model and experimental analysis on its rationality].

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenxin; Yang, Yunfeng; Yu, Guangrong; Ding, Zuquan

    2009-02-01

    To provide a digital simulation platform for foot-ankle biomechanics research, a 3-D finite element model was established through helical CT images under the principle of RE (reverse engineering) and meshed in FEM software. In the process of modeling cartilage, ligaments, tendons and plantar soft tissue, many anatomic data and results of cadaver specimen experiment were referenced; LINE elements and SHELL elements were used skillfully to simplify the model and resemble the physiological state. The model was then validated by specimen experimentation, which was done on seven fresh cadaver foot specimens, and digital speckle correlation method (DSCM) was used to measure their displacements. Upon the comparison with experimentation and others models, this study also testified that the model, of which the plantar fascia is linked to the heads of metatarsus, is more reasonable to clinical application.

  8. Finite-size scaling for quantum criticality using the finite-element method.

    PubMed

    Antillon, Edwin; Wehefritz-Kaufmann, Birgit; Kais, Sabre

    2012-03-01

    Finite size scaling for the Schrödinger equation is a systematic approach to calculate the quantum critical parameters for a given Hamiltonian. This approach has been shown to give very accurate results for critical parameters by using a systematic expansion with global basis-type functions. Recently, the finite-element method was shown to be a powerful numerical method for ab initio electronic-structure calculations with a variable real-space resolution. In this work, we demonstrate how to obtain quantum critical parameters by combining the finite-element method (FEM) with finite size scaling (FSS) using different ab initio approximations and exact formulations. The critical parameters could be atomic nuclear charges, internuclear distances, electron density, disorder, lattice structure, and external fields for stability of atomic, molecular systems and quantum phase transitions of extended systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of this approach we provide detailed calculations of applying FEM to approximate solutions for the two-electron atom with varying nuclear charge; these include Hartree-Fock, local density approximation, and an "exact" formulation using FEM. We then use the FSS approach to determine its critical nuclear charge for stability; here, the size of the system is related to the number of elements used in the calculations. Results prove to be in good agreement with previous Slater-basis set calculations and demonstrate that it is possible to combine finite size scaling with the finite-element method by using ab initio calculations to obtain quantum critical parameters. The combined approach provides a promising first-principles approach to describe quantum phase transitions for materials and extended systems.

  9. Evaluation of Strip Footing Bearing Capacity Built on the Anthropogenic Embankment by Random Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczynska-Kozlowska, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    One of a geotechnical problem in the area of Wroclaw is an anthropogenic embankment layer delaying to the depth of 4-5m, arising as a result of historical incidents. In such a case an assumption of bearing capacity of strip footing might be difficult. The standard solution is to use a deep foundation or foundation soil replacement. However both methods generate significant costs. In the present paper the authors focused their attention on the influence of anthropogenic embankment variability on bearing capacity. Soil parameters were defined on the basis of CPT test and modeled as 2D anisotropic random fields and the assumption of bearing capacity were made according deterministic finite element methods. Many repeated of the different realizations of random fields lead to stable expected value of bearing capacity. The algorithm used to estimate the bearing capacity of strip footing was the random finite element method (e.g. [1]). In traditional approach of bearing capacity the formula proposed by [2] is taken into account. qf = c'Nc + qNq + 0.5γBN- γ (1) where: qf is the ultimate bearing stress, cis the cohesion, qis the overburden load due to foundation embedment, γ is the soil unit weight, Bis the footing width, and Nc, Nq and Nγ are the bearing capacity factors. The method of evaluation the bearing capacity of strip footing based on finite element method incorporate five parameters: Young's modulus (E), Poisson's ratio (ν), dilation angle (ψ), cohesion (c), and friction angle (φ). In the present study E, ν and ψ are held constant while c and φ are randomized. Although the Young's modulus does not affect the bearing capacity it governs the initial elastic response of the soil. Plastic stress redistribution is accomplished using a viscoplastic algorithm merge with an elastic perfectly plastic (Mohr - Coulomb) failure criterion. In this paper a typical finite element mesh was assumed with 8-node elements consist in 50 columns and 20 rows. Footings width B

  10. An Analysis of a Finite Element Method for Convection-Diffusion Problems. Part II. A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CONVECTION- DIFFUSION PROBLEMS PART II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES AND ADAPTIVITY by W. G. Szymczak Y 6a...PERIOD COVERED AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR final life of the contract CONVECTION- DIFFUSION PROBLEM S. Part II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ...Element Method for Convection- Diffusion Problems. Part II: A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity W. G. Szvmczak and I. Babu~ka# Laboratory for

  11. Simulation of nanoparticle transport in airways using Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Prathish; Heys, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    The transport and deposition properties of nanoparticles with a range of aerodynamic diameters ( 1 nm ≤ d ≤ 150 nm) were studied for the human airways. A finite element code was developed that solved both the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations monolithically. When modeling nanoparticle transport in the airways, the finite element method becomes unstable, and, in order resolve this issue, various stabilization methods were considered in terms of accuracy and computational cost. The stabilization methods considered here include the streamline upwind, streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin, and Galerkin least squares approaches. In order to compare the various stabilization approaches, the approximate solution from each stabilization approach was compared to the analytical Graetz solution, which is a model for monodispersed, dilute particle transport in a straight cylinder. The optimal stabilization method, especially with regard to accuracy, was found to be the Galerkin least squares approach for the Graetz problem when the Péclet number was larger than 10(4). In the human airways geometry, the Galerkin least squares stabilization approach once more provided the most accurate approximate solution for particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 nm or larger, but mesh size had a much greater effect on accuracy than the choice of stabilization method. The choice of stabilization method had a greater impact than mesh size for particles with an aerodynamic diameter 10 nm or smaller, but the most accurate stabilization method was streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin in these cases.

  12. On the accuracy of creep-damage predictions in thinwalled structures using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, H.; Kolarow, G.; Morachkovsky, O. K.; Naumenko, K.

    The constitutive model with a single damage parameter describing creep-damage behaviour of metals with respect to the different sensitivity of the damage process due to tension and compression is incorporated into the ANSYS finite element code by modifying the user defined creep material subroutine. The procedure is verified by comparison with solutions for beams and rectangular plates in bending based on the Ritz method. Various numerical tests show the sensitivity of long-term predictions to the mesh sizes and element types available for the creep analysis of thinwalled structures.

  13. The p and h-p Versions of the Finite Element Method; State of the Art.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    INSTITUTE FOp [m]Yci C Z... S’- -_ AND TECH-INOLOGY (11111:1;) ,. Technical Note BN-1156 (0 I . % I. ,,8’ .- *.° . ’ .4’ .- o%_ THE p AND h-p VERSIONS...OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. THE STATE OF THE ART -.. ; U.S.A. %%.Z - 4’ ° DTIC .21 R U-noW _STkl;,.CT.2,1986 I. Babu~ka €’ ",’- Institute ror... Institute for Physical Science and Technology AREAS WOrK UNT NUMBERS University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 ii. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND

  14. Computational Aspects of the h, p and h-p Versions of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    and T. Scapolla BN-1 061 March 1987 %" iqAppr,- - " . ..utr""o":" S Appr..: ’ ...... tor pilbhc j0 ,oe "IDI .. ,%~~~~1 %-... z u n Unliz~ited INSTITUTE ...PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMIERS Institute for Physical Science and Technology University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 it...the h, p and h-p versions of the finite element method Ivo Babulka 1" Institute for Physical Science and Technology University of Maryland, College

  15. The Theory and Practice of the h-p Version of Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    85-K-0169 I. Babuska and B. Guo NSF DMS-85-16191 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRES 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Institute for Physical...uitered) THE THEORY AND PRACTICE O THE h-p vERSION OF FINITE ElEMENT METHOD Ben Qi Guo* Ivo Babuska** Institute of Physical Science & Technology and...1Wr-194 ’The problem with none-hmogeneous Dirichlet problem is to find the finite element solution u. £ data was studied by Babuika, Guo.im- 4401 The h

  16. Survey of the status of finite element methods for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temam, Roger

    1986-01-01

    The finite element methods (FEM) have proved to be a powerful technique for the solution of boundary value problems associated with partial differential equations of either elliptic, parabolic, or hyperbolic type. They also have a good potential for utilization on parallel computers particularly in relation to the concept of domain decomposition. This report is intended as an introduction to the FEM for the nonspecialist. It contains a survey which is totally nonexhaustive, and it also contains as an illustration, a report on some new results concerning two specific applications, namely a free boundary fluid-structure interaction problem and the Euler equations for inviscid flows.

  17. Domain decomposition for a mixed finite element method in three dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, Z.; Parashkevov, R.R.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.; Ye, X.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the solution of the discrete linear system resulting from a mixed finite element discretization applied to a second-order elliptic boundary value problem in three dimensions. Based on a decomposition of the velocity space, these equations can be reduced to a discrete elliptic problem by eliminating the pressure through the use of substructures of the domain. The practicality of the reduction relies on a local basis, presented here, for the divergence-free subspace of the velocity space. We consider additive and multiplicative domain decomposition methods for solving the reduced elliptic problem, and their uniform convergence is established.

  18. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  19. Study on interaction between induced and natural fractures by extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, DanDan; Liu, ZhanLi; Zhuang, Zhuo; Zeng, QingLei; Wang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Fracking is one of the kernel technologies in the remarkable shale gas revolution. The extended finite element method is used in this paper to numerically investigate the interaction between hydraulic and natural fractures, which is an important issue of the enigmatic fracture network formation in fracking. The criteria which control the opening of natural fracture and crossing of hydraulic fracture are tentatively presented. Influence factors on the interaction process are systematically analyzed, which include the approach angle, anisotropy of in-situ stress and fluid pressure profile.

  20. Computing ferrite core losses at high frequency by finite elements method including temperature influence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Ahmad, J.; Guy, G.

    1994-09-01

    A finite elements method coupled with the Preisach model of hysteresis is used to compute-the ferrite losses in medium power transformers (10--60 kVA) working at relatively high frequencies (20--60 kHz) and with an excitation level of about 0.3 Tesla. The dynamic evolution of the permeability is taken into account. The simple and doubly cubic spline functions are used to account for temperature effects respectively on electric and on magnetic parameters of the ferrite cores. The results are compared with test data obtained with 3C8 and B50 ferrites at different frequencies.

  1. Solving the Fokker-Planck equation with the finite-element method

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Roberto F.; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2008-01-01

    We apply an efficient approach from computational engineering, the finite-element method, to numerically solve the Fokker-Planck equation in two dimensions. This approach permits us to find the solution to stochastic problems that cannot be solved analytically. We illustrate our strategy with an example from neuroscience that recently has attracted considerable attention - synchronization of neural oscillators. In particular, we show that resonators (type II neural oscillators) respond and synchronize more reliably when provided correlated stochastic inputs than do integrators (type I neural oscillators). This result is consistent with recent experimental and computational work. We briefly discuss its relevance for neuroscience. PMID:18233721

  2. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-01

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  3. [Computer simulation of the isolated lesion of tibiofibular an syndesmosis using the finite element method].

    PubMed

    Kozień, Marek S; Lorkowski, Jacek; Szczurek, Sławomir; Hładki, Waldemar; Trybus, Marek

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a computed simulation of an isolated lesion of tibiofibular syndesmosis on typical clinical range of value. The analysis was made using the method of finite elements with a simplified plain model of a bone and assuming material of bone and ankle joint as isotropic and homogeneous. The distraction processes were modelled by external generalized forces. The computed programme ANSYS was used. For evaluation obtained was the computed image of changes of anatomy in relation to forces.

  4. Finite element method calculations of ZnO nanowires for nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M. A.; Senz, S.; Alexe, M.; Hesse, D.; Gösele, U.

    2008-03-01

    The bending of a nonconducting piezoelectric ZnO nanowire is simulated by finite element method calculations. The top part is bent by a lateral force, which could be applied by an atomic force microscope tip. The generated electrical potential is ±0.3V. This relatively high signal is, however, difficult to measure due to the low capacitance of the ZnO nanowire (˜4×10-5pF) as compared to the capacitance of most preamplifiers (˜5pF). A further problem arises from the semiconducting properties of experimentally fabricated ZnO nanowires which causes the disappearance of the voltage signal within picoseconds.

  5. Finite elements and the method of conjugate gradients on a concurrent processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, G. A.; Raefsky, A.; Hager, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm for the iterative solution of finite element problems on a concurrent processor is presented. The method of conjugate gradients is used to solve the system of matrix equations, which is distributed among the processors of a MIMD computer according to an element-based spatial decomposition. This algorithm is implemented in a two-dimensional elastostatics program on the Caltech Hypercube concurrent processor. The results of tests on up to 32 processors show nearly linear concurrent speedup, with efficiencies over 90% for sufficiently large problems.

  6. Effects of welding technology on welding stress based on the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianke; Jin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process under four different conditions of welding flat butt joints. Welding seams are simulated with birth and death elements. The size and distribution of welding residual stress is obtained in the four kinds of welding conditions by Q345 manganese steel plate butt joint of the work piece. The results shown that when using two-layers welding,the longitudinal and transverse residual stress were reduced;When welding from Middle to both sides,the residual stress distribution will change,and the residual stress in the middle of the work piece was reduced.

  7. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Hookey, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  8. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-18

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  9. Method and apparatus for connecting finite element meshes and performing simulations therewith

    DOEpatents

    Dohrmann, Clark R.; Key, Samuel W.; Heinstein, Martin W.

    2003-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of connecting dissimilar finite element meshes. A first mesh, designated the master mesh, and a second mesh, designated the slave mesh, each have interface surfaces proximal the other. Each interface surface has a corresponding interface mesh comprising a plurality of interface nodes. Each slave interface node is assigned new coordinates locating the interface node on the interface surface of the master mesh. The slave interface surface is further redefined to be the projection of the slave interface mesh onto the master interface surface.

  10. Numerical study of human vocal folds vibration using Immersed Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy; Krane, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The voice production procedure is a self-oscillating, fluid-structure interaction problem. In this study, the vocal folds vibration during phonation will be simulated by self-oscillated layered-structure vocal folds model, using Immersed Finite Element Method. With the numerical results, we will find out the vocal folds vibration pattern, and also show how the lung pressure, stiffness and geometry of vocal folds will affect the vocal folds vibration. With further analysis, we shall get better understanding of the dynamics of voice production. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

  11. A blended continuous-discontinuous finite element method for solving the multi-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, E. M.; Shumlak, U.

    2016-12-01

    The multi-fluid plasma model represents electrons, multiple ion species, and multiple neutral species as separate fluids that interact through short-range collisions and long-range electromagnetic fields. The model spans a large range of temporal and spatial scales, which renders the model stiff and presents numerical challenges. To address the large range of timescales, a blended continuous and discontinuous Galerkin method is proposed, where the massive ion and neutral species are modeled using an explicit discontinuous Galerkin method while the electrons and electromagnetic fields are modeled using an implicit continuous Galerkin method. This approach is able to capture large-gradient ion and neutral physics like shock formation, while resolving high-frequency electron dynamics in a computationally efficient manner. The details of the Blended Finite Element Method (BFEM) are presented. The numerical method is benchmarked for accuracy and tested using two-fluid one-dimensional soliton problem and electromagnetic shock problem. The results are compared to conventional finite volume and finite element methods, and demonstrate that the BFEM is particularly effective in resolving physics in stiff problems involving realistic physical parameters, including realistic electron mass and speed of light. The benefit is illustrated by computing a three-fluid plasma application that demonstrates species separation in multi-component plasmas.

  12. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Carriington, David B

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  13. Finite Element Method (FEM), Mechanobiology and Biomimetic Scaffolds in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccio, A.; Ballini, A.; Pappalettere, C.; Tullo, D.; Cantore, S.; Desiate, A.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques of bone reconstructive surgery are largely based on conventional, non-cell-based therapies that rely on the use of durable materials from outside the patient's body. In contrast to conventional materials, bone tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences towards the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve bone tissue function. Bone tissue engineering has led to great expectations for clinical surgery or various diseases that cannot be solved with traditional devices. For example, critical-sized defects in bone, whether induced by primary tumor resection, trauma, or selective surgery have in many cases presented insurmountable challenges to the current gold standard treatment for bone repair. The primary purpose of bone tissue engineering is to apply engineering principles to incite and promote the natural healing process of bone which does not occur in critical-sized defects. The total market for bone tissue regeneration and repair was valued at $1.1 billion in 2007 and is projected to increase to nearly $1.6 billion by 2014. Usually, temporary biomimetic scaffolds are utilized for accommodating cell growth and bone tissue genesis. The scaffold has to promote biological processes such as the production of extra-cellular matrix and vascularisation, furthermore the scaffold has to withstand the mechanical loads acting on it and to transfer them to the natural tissues located in the vicinity. The design of a scaffold for the guided regeneration of a bony tissue requires a multidisciplinary approach. Finite element method and mechanobiology can be used in an integrated approach to find the optimal parameters governing bone scaffold performance. In this paper, a review of the studies that through a combined use of finite element method and mechano-regulation algorithms described the possible patterns of tissue differentiation in biomimetic scaffolds for bone

  14. Coupling Finite Element and Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Methods for Two-Dimensional Potential Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) method and meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method for analyzing two-dimensional potential problems is presented in this paper. The analysis domain is subdivided into two regions, a finite element (FE) region and a meshless (MM) region. A single weighted residual form is written for the entire domain. Independent trial and test functions are assumed in the FE and MM regions. A transition region is created between the two regions. The transition region blends the trial and test functions of the FE and MM regions. The trial function blending is achieved using a technique similar to the 'Coons patch' method that is widely used in computer-aided geometric design. The test function blending is achieved by using either FE or MM test functions on the nodes in the transition element. The technique was evaluated by applying the coupled method to two potential problems governed by the Poisson equation. The coupled method passed all the patch test problems and gave accurate solutions for the problems studied.

  15. Combining existing numerical models with data assimilation using weighted least-squares finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Prathish K; Manteuffel, T A; Belohlavek, M; Heys, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for combining and enhancing the results from an existing computational fluid dynamics model with experimental data using the weighted least-squares finite element method (WLSFEM). Development of the approach was motivated by the existence of both limited experimental blood velocity in the left ventricle and inexact numerical models of the same flow. Limitations of the experimental data include measurement noise and having data only along a two-dimensional plane. Most numerical modeling approaches do not provide the flexibility to assimilate noisy experimental data. We previously developed an approach that could assimilate experimental data into the process of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations, but the approach was limited because it required the use of specific finite element methods for solving all model equations and did not support alternative numerical approximation methods. The new approach presented here allows virtually any numerical method to be used for approximately solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and then the WLSFEM is used to combine the experimental data with the numerical solution of the model equations in a final step. The approach dynamically adjusts the influence of the experimental data on the numerical solution so that more accurate data are more closely matched by the final solution and less accurate data are not closely matched. The new approach is demonstrated on different test problems and provides significantly reduced computational costs compared with many previous methods for data assimilation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Thermoelastic analysis of multiple defects with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Honggang; Nie, Yufeng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the extended finite element method (XFEM) is adopted to analyze the interaction between a single macroscopic inclusion and a single macroscopic crack as well as that between multiple macroscopic or microscopic defects under thermal/mechanical load. The effects of different shapes of multiple inclusions on the material thermomechanical response are investigated, and the level set method is coupled with XFEM to analyze the interaction of multiple defects. Further, the discretized extended finite element approximations in relation to thermoelastic problems of multiple defects under displacement or temperature field are given. Also, the interfaces of cracks or materials are represented by level set functions, which allow the mesh assignment not to conform to crack or material interfaces. Moreover, stress intensity factors of cracks are obtained by the interaction integral method or the M-integral method, and the stress/strain/stiffness fields are simulated in the case of multiple cracks or multiple inclusions. Finally, some numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the accuracy of our proposed method.

  17. A generalized finite element method with global-local enrichment functions for confined plasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-J.; Duarte, C. A.; Proenca, S. P.

    2012-11-01

    The main feature of partition of unity methods such as the generalized or extended finite element method is their ability of utilizing a priori knowledge about the solution of a problem in the form of enrichment functions. However, analytical derivation of enrichment functions with good approximation properties is mostly limited to two-dimensional linear problems. This paper presents a procedure to numerically generate proper enrichment functions for three-dimensional problems with confined plasticity where plastic evolution is gradual. This procedure involves the solution of boundary value problems around local regions exhibiting nonlinear behavior and the enrichment of the global solution space with the local solutions through the partition of unity method framework. This approach can produce accurate nonlinear solutions with a reduced computational cost compared to standard finite element methods since computationally intensive nonlinear iterations can be performed on coarse global meshes after the creation of enrichment functions properly describing localized nonlinear behavior. Several three-dimensional nonlinear problems based on the rate-independent J 2 plasticity theory with isotropic hardening are solved using the proposed procedure to demonstrate its robustness, accuracy and computational efficiency.

  18. Beyond finite elements: a comprehensive, patient-specific neurosurgical simulation utilizing a meshless method.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Horton, A; Joldes, G R; Wittek, A

    2012-10-11

    To be useful in clinical (surgical) simulations, a method must use fully nonlinear (both geometric and material) formulations to deal with large (finite) deformations of tissues. The method must produce meaningful results in a short time on consumer hardware and not require significant manual work while discretizing the problem domain. In this paper, we showcase the Meshless Total Lagrangian Explicit Dynamics Method (MTLED) which meets these requirements, and use it for computing brain deformations during surgery. The problem geometry is based on patient-specific MRI data and includes the parenchyma, tumor, ventricles and skull. Nodes are distributed automatically through the domain rendering the normally difficult problem of creating a patient-specific computational grid a trivial exercise. Integration is performed over a simple, regular background grid which does not need to conform to the geometry boundaries. Appropriate nonlinear material formulation is used. Loading is performed by displacing the parenchyma surface nodes near the craniotomy and a finite frictionless sliding contact is enforced between the skull (rigid) and parenchyma. The meshless simulation results are compared to both intraoperative MRIs and Finite Element Analysis results for multiple 2D sections. We also calculate Hausdorff distances between the computed deformed surfaces of the ventricles and those observed intraoperatively. The difference between previously validated Finite Element results and the meshless results presented here is less than 0.2mm. The results are within the limits of neurosurgical and imaging equipment accuracy (~1 mm) and demonstrate the method's ability to fulfill all of the important requirements for surgical simulation.

  19. Application of the Wave and Finite Element Method to Calculate Sound Transmission Through Cylindrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingan, Michael J.; Yang, Yi; Mace, Brian R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the prediction of sound transmission through a cylindrical structure. The problem considered is that of sound generated by a line source located exterior to a two-dimensional circular cylinder which produces sound waves which transmit through the cylinder to an internal medium. An analytical solution is presented for the case of sound transmission through a thin cylindrical shell, by modelling the shell response using the Flugge- Byrne-Lur'ye equations. This solution is then compared to calculations where the response of the cylinder is calculated using the Wave and Finite Element (WFE) method. The WFE method involves modelling a small segment of a structure using traditional finite element (FE) methods. The mass and stiffness matrices of the segment are then used to calculate the response of the structure to excitation by an acoustic field. The WFE approach for calculating sound transmission is validated by comparison with the analytic solution. Formulating analytic solutions for more complicated structures can be cumbersome whereas using a numerical technique, such as the WFE method, is relatively straightforward.

  20. Helicopter trim analysis by shooting and finite element methods with optimally damped Newton iterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, N. S.; Gaonkar, G. H.

    1993-01-01

    Helicopter trim settings of periodic initial state and control inputs are investigated for convergence of Newton iteration in computing the settings sequentially and in parallel. The trim analysis uses a shooting method and a weak version of two temporal finite element methods with displacement formulation and with mixed formulation of displacements and momenta. These three methods broadly represent two main approaches of trim analysis: adaptation of initial-value and finite element boundary-value codes to periodic boundary conditions, particularly for unstable and marginally stable systems. In each method, both the sequential and in-parallel schemes are used, and the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are solved by damped Newton iteration with an optimally selected damping parameter. The impact of damped Newton iteration, including earlier-observed divergence problems in trim analysis, is demonstrated by the maximum condition number of the Jacobian matrices of the iterative scheme and by virtual elimination of divergence. The advantages of the in-parallel scheme over the conventional sequential scheme are also demonstrated.

  1. A nodal discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for nonlinear elastic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Bou Matar, Olivier; Guerder, Pierre-Yves; Li, YiFeng; Vandewoestyne, Bart; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2012-05-01

    A nodal discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DG-FEM) to solve the linear and nonlinear elastic wave equation in heterogeneous media with arbitrary high order accuracy in space on unstructured triangular or quadrilateral meshes is presented. This DG-FEM method combines the geometrical flexibility of the finite element method, and the high parallelization potentiality and strongly nonlinear wave phenomena simulation capability of the finite volume method, required for nonlinear elastodynamics simulations. In order to facilitate the implementation based on a numerical scheme developed for electromagnetic applications, the equations of nonlinear elastodynamics have been written in a conservative form. The adopted formalism allows the introduction of different kinds of elastic nonlinearities, such as the classical quadratic and cubic nonlinearities, or the quadratic hysteretic nonlinearities. Absorbing layers perfectly matched to the calculation domain of the nearly perfectly matched layers type have been introduced to simulate, when needed, semi-infinite or infinite media. The developed DG-FEM scheme has been verified by means of a comparison with analytical solutions and numerical results already published in the literature for simple geometrical configurations: Lamb's problem and plane wave nonlinear propagation.

  2. Use of the finite-element method for a dielectric-constant gas-thermometry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandt, T.; Gaiser, C.; Fellmuth, B.; Haft, N.; Thiele-Krivoi, B.; Kuhn, A.

    2013-09-01

    The finite-element method is a well-established computational methodology for the numerical treatment of partial differential equations. It is primarily used for solving problems in applied engineering and science. In previous publications, we have shown that the method is suitable to solve problems in temperature metrology, for instance to predict temperature profiles and thermal equilibration processes in complex measurement setups. In this paper, the method is used for a primary thermometry experiment, namely dielectric-constant gas thermometry. Within the framework of an international project directed to the new definition of the base unit kelvin, measurements were performed at the triple point of water in order to determine the Boltzmann constant k. The finite-element method was used for the data evaluation in different ways: calculation of the effective compressibility of the measuring capacitor by describing the deformation of its electrodes under the influence of the pressure of the gas, the dielectric constant of which has to be determined; calculation of resonance frequencies for the determination of the elastic constants of the electrode material by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy; electrostatic simulations for calculating capacitance values; estimation of uncertainty components, which allowed to draw conclusions concerning the future reduction of uncertainty components.

  3. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  4. Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Decha-Umphai, Kamolphan

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibration of a beam is analyzed by the finite element method. The geometric nonlinearity is investigated. Inplane displacement and inertia (IDI) are also considered in the formulation. Harmonic force matrix is derived and explained. Nonlinear free vibration can be simply treated as a special case of the general forced vibration by setting the harmonic force matrix equal to zero. The effect of the higher modes is more pronouced for the clamped supported beam than the simply supported one. Beams without IDI yield more effect of the higher modes than the one with IDI. The effects of IDI are to reduce nonlinearity. For beams with end supports restrained from axial movement (immovable cases), only the hardening type nonlinearity is observed. However, beams of small slenderness ratio (L/R = 20) with movable end supports, the softening type nonlinearity is found. The concentrated force case yields a more severe response than the uniformly distributed force case. Finite element results are in good agreement with the solution of simple elliptic response, harmonic balance method, and Runge-Kutte method and experiment.

  5. Finite element modeling of the non collinear mixing method for detection and characterization of closed cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanloeuil, P.; Meziane, A.

    2015-10-01

    The non-collinear mixing technique is applied for detection and characterization of closed cracks. The method is based on the nonlinear interaction of two shear waves generated with an oblique incidence. This interaction leads to the scattering of a longitudinal wave. A Finite Element model is used to demonstrate its application to a closed crack. Contact acoustic nonlinearity is the nonlinear effect considered here and is modeled using unilateral contact law with Coulomb's friction. Directivity patterns are computed using a two-step procedure. The Finite Element (FE) model provides the near-field solution on a circular boundary surrounding the closed crack. The solution in the far-field is then determined assuming that the material has a linear behavior. Directivity patterns will be used to analyze the direction of propagation of longitudinal wave(s) scattered from the closed crack. Numerical results show that the method is effective and promising when applied to a closed crack. Scattering of the longitudinal wave also enables us to image the crack, giving position and size indications. Finally, the method offers the possibility to distinguish classical nonlinearity from contact acoustic nonlinearity.

  6. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  7. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  8. Description of plastic anisotropy in AA6063-T6 using the crystal plasticity finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, S.; Engler, O.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Lademo, O. G.

    2012-07-01

    The crystal plasticity finite element method has been used in combination with crystallographic texture data to predict the plastic anisotropy of the extruded aluminium alloy AA6063 in temper T6. The results are compared with experimental data from tensile tests at different angles between the tensile and extrusion directions. Inverse modelling based on the tensile test in a reference direction is used to identify the parameters of the work-hardening model at slip system level. To investigate the influence of grain interactions, various discretizations of the grains are applied in the representative volume element modelled with finite elements. In addition, alternative homogenization schemes, such as the full-constraint Taylor and viscoplastic self-consistent methods, are used to model the behaviour of the polycrystal. It is found that the grain discretization and the homogenization scheme have only minor influence on the predicted plastic anisotropy. While the crystal plasticity-based methods all give reasonable predictions of the directional variations of flow stresses and plastic strain ratios measured experimentally, there are still significant deviations, indicating there are other sources to the plastic anisotropy than crystallographic texture.

  9. Modeling the mechanics of axonal fiber tracts using the embedded finite element method.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Harsha T; Kraft, Reuben H

    2016-08-08

    A subject-specific human head finite element model with embedded axonal fiber tractography obtained from diffusion tensor imaging was developed. The axonal fiber tractography finite element model was coupled with the volumetric elements in the head model using the embedded element method. This technique enables the calculation of axonal strains and real-time tracking of the mechanical response of the axonal fiber tracts. The coupled model was then verified using pressure and relative displacement-based (between skull and brain) experimental studies and was employed to analyze a head impact, demonstrating the applicability of this method in studying axonal injury. Following this, a comparison study of different injury criteria was performed. This model was used to determine the influence of impact direction on the extent of the axonal injury. The results suggested that the lateral impact loading is more dangerous compared to loading in the sagittal plane, a finding in agreement with previous studies. Through this analysis, we demonstrated the viability of the embedded element method as an alternative numerical approach for studying axonal injury in patient-specific human head models.

  10. Wave motion analysis in arch structures via wavelet finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Yongying; Miao, Huihui; He, Zhengjia

    2014-01-01

    The application of B-spline wavelet on interval (BSWI) finite element method for wave motion analysis in arch structures is presented in this paper. Instead of traditional polynomial interpolation, scaling functions at certain scales have been adopted to form the shape functions and construct wavelet-based elements. Different from other wavelet numerical methods adding wavelets directly, the element displacement field represented by the coefficients of wavelets expansions is transformed from wavelet space to physical space via the corresponding transformation matrix. The energy functional of the arch is obtained by the generalized shell theory, and the finite element model for wave motion analysis is constructed according to Hamilton's principle and the central difference method in time domain. Taking the practical application into account, damaged arch waveguides are also investigated. Proper analysis of the responses from structure damages allows one to indicate the location very precisely. This paper mainly focuses on the crack in structures. Based on Castigliano's theorem and the Pairs equation, the local flexibility of crack is formulated for BSWI element. Numerical experiments are performed to study the effect of wave propagations in arch waveguides, that is, frequency dispersion and mode spilt in the arch. The responses of the arch with cracks are simulated under the broad-band, narrow-band and chirp excitations. In order to estimate the spatial, time and frequency concentrations of responses, the reciprocal length, time-frequency transform and correlation coefficient are introduced in this investigation.

  11. Towards Realistic Global Geomagnetic Induction Modeling Using Scripted Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, J. T.; Constable, C. G.

    2008-12-01

    We present recent progress in forward modeling the global induction problem with realistic external field structure, 3D Earth conductivity, and rotation. The modeling is performed in the time and frequency domains via a commercially-available, general-purpose, finite element modeling package called FlexPDE, and has been validated against known solutions to 3D steady state and time-dependent problems. The induction problem is formulated in terms of the magnetic vector potential and electric scalar potential, and mesh density is managed both explicitly and through adaptive mesh refinement. The modeling routine allows for arbitrary conductivity and external field structure. The strength of the external magnetic field generated by the magnetospheric ring current is known to vary as a function of local time, giving it an asymmetric spatial structure. Electromagnetic c-responses estimated from satellite data are known to be biased with respect to local time. We investigate the influence that Earth's rotation through the non-uniform external field should have on these c-responses.

  12. Simulation of hip fracture in sideways fall using a 3D finite element model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified representation of whole body.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2007-12-01

    Hip fractures due to sideways falls are a worldwide health problem, especially among the elderly population. The objective of this study was to simulate a real life sideways fall leading to hip fracture. To achieve this a computed tomography (CT) scan based three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the pelvis-femur complex was developed using a wide range of mechanical properties in the bone of the complex. For impact absorption through large deformation, surrounding soft tissue was also included in the FE model from CT scan data. To incorporate the inertia effect, the whole body was represented by a spring-mass-dashpot system. For trochanteric soft tissue thickness of 14 mm, body weight of 77.47 kg and average hip impact velocity of 3.17 m/s, this detailed FE model could approximately simulate a sideways fall configuration and examine femoral fracture situation. At the contact surface, the peak impact load was 8331 N. In spite of the presence of 14 mm thick trochanteric soft tissue, within the trochanteric zone the most compressive peak principal strain was 3.5% which exceeds ultimate compressive strain. The modeled trochanteric fracture was consistent with clinical findings and with the findings of previous studies. Further, this detailed FE model may be used to find the effect of trochanteric soft tissue thickness variations on peak impact force, peak strain in sideways fall, and to simulate automobile side impact and backward fall situations.

  13. Effects of body configuration on pelvic injury in backward fall simulation using 3D finite element models of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2009-07-22

    Injuries due to backward fall apart from sideways fall are a major health problem, particularly among the aged populations. The objectives of this study was to evaluate the responses to changing body configurations (angle between the trunk and impacting floor as 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 45 degrees and 80 degrees) during backward fall, based on a previously developed CT-scan-derived 3D non-linear and non-homogeneous finite element (FE) model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified biomechanical representation of the whole body. Under constant impact energy, these FE models evaluated the pelvic injury situations on the basis of peak impact force (7.64-16.74 kN) and peak principal compressive strain (more than 1.5%), consistent with the clinically observed injuries (sacral insufficiency, coccydynia). Also the change in location of peak strain and increase in peak impact force for changing configurations from 0 degrees to 80 degrees indicated the effect of whole body inertia during backward fall. It was also concluded that the inclusion of sacro-iliac and acetabular cartilages in the above FE models will further reduce above findings marginally (9.2% for 15 degrees fall). These quantifications would also be helpful for a better design and development of safety structures such as safety floor for the nursing home or home for the aged persons.

  14. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Tooth Restored with High Performance Polymer PEKK Post-Core System: A 3D Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joo-Hee; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Won-Chang; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior and long-term safety of high performance polymer PEKK as an intraradicular dental post-core material through comparative finite element analysis (FEA) with other conventional post-core materials. A 3D FEA model of a maxillary central incisor was constructed. A cyclic loading force of 50 N was applied at an angle of 45° to the longitudinal axis of the tooth at the palatal surface of the crown. For comparison with traditionally used post-core materials, three materials (gold, fiberglass, and PEKK) were simulated to determine their post-core properties. PEKK, with a lower elastic modulus than root dentin, showed comparably high failure resistance and a more favorable stress distribution than conventional post-core material. However, the PEKK post-core system showed a higher probability of debonding and crown failure under long-term cyclic loading than the metal or fiberglass post-core systems. PMID:28386547

  15. Simulation of thin slot spirals and dual circular patch antennas using the finite element method with mixed elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.; Nurnberger, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    This semi-annual report describes progress up to mid-January 1995. The report contains five sections all dealing with the modeling of spiral and patch antennas recessed in metallic platforms. Of significance is the development of decomposition schemes which separate the different regions of the antenna volume. Substantial effort was devoted to improving the feed model in the context of the finite element method (FEM). Finally, an innovative scheme for truncating finite element meshes is presented.

  16. Large-scale All-electron Density Functional Theory Calculations using Enriched Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Bikash; Gavini, Vikram

    We present a computationally efficient method to perform large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations by enriching the Lagrange polynomial basis in classical finite element (FE) discretization with atom-centered numerical basis functions, which are obtained from the solutions of the Kohn-Sham (KS) problem for single atoms. We term these atom-centered numerical basis functions as enrichment functions. The integrals involved in the construction of the discrete KS Hamiltonian and overlap matrix are computed using an adaptive quadrature grid based on gradients in the enrichment functions. Further, we propose an efficient scheme to invert the overlap matrix by exploiting its LDL factorization and employing spectral finite elements along with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature rules. Finally, we use a Chebyshev polynomial based acceleration technique to compute the occupied eigenspace in each self-consistent iteration. We demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and scalability of the proposed method on various metallic and insulating benchmark systems, with systems ranging in the order of 10,000 electrons. We observe a 50-100 fold reduction in the overall computational time when compared to classical FE calculations while being commensurate with the desired chemical accuracy. We acknowledge the support of NSF (Grant No. 1053145) and ARO (Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0158) in conducting this work.

  17. Stability analysis of flexible wind turbine blades using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamoulakos, A.

    1982-01-01

    Static vibration and flutter analysis of a straight elastic axis blade was performed based on a finite element method solution. The total potential energy functional was formulated according to linear beam theory. The inertia and aerodynamic loads were formulated according to the blade absolute acceleration and absolute velocity vectors. In vibration analysis, the direction of motion of the blade during the first out-of-lane and first in-plane modes was examined; numerical results involve NASA/DOE Mod-0, McCauley propeller, north wind turbine and flat plate behavior. In flutter analysis, comparison cases were examined involving several references. Vibration analysis of a nonstraight elastic axis blade based on a finite element method solution was performed in a similar manner with the straight elastic axis blade, since it was recognized that a curved blade can be approximated by an assembly of a sufficient number of straight blade elements at different inclinations with respect to common system of axes. Numerical results involve comparison between the behavior of a straight and a curved cantilever beam during the lowest two in-plane and out-of-plane modes.

  18. Integrated force method - Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's, (2) the cluster or field CC's, and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown. The utilization of CC's has resulted in the novel integrated force method (IFM). The solution that is obtained by the IFM converges with a significantly fewer number of elements, compared to the stiffness and the hybrid methods.

  19. Biomechanical Evaluation of Different Fixation Methods for Mandibular Anterior Segmental Osteotomy Using Finite Element Analysis, Part One: Superior Repositioning Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kilinç, Yeliz; Erkmen, Erkan; Kurt, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to comparatively evaluate the mechanical behavior of 3 different fixation methods following various amounts of superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segment. In this study, 3 different rigid fixation configurations comprising double right L, double left L, or double I miniplates with monocortical screws were compared under vertical, horizontal, and oblique load conditions by means of finite element analysis. A three-dimensional finite element model of a fully dentate mandible was generated. A 3 and 5 mm superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segmental osteotomy were simulated. Three different finite element models corresponding to different fixation configurations were created for each superior repositioning. The von Mises stress values on fixation appliances and principal maximum stresses (Pmax) on bony structures were predicted by finite element analysis. The results have demonstrated that double right L configuration provides better stability with less stress fields in comparison with other fixation configurations used in this study.

  20. 3-D finite element analysis of the influence of synovial condition in sacroiliac joint on the load transmission in human pelvic system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dufang; Wang, Fang; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Xiaoqin; Wang, Qiugen

    2014-06-01

    The anterior part of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a synovial joint, with little gliding and rotary movement between the contact surfaces of SIJ during locomotion. Due to its complex structure, especially when considering the surrounding ligaments, it is difficult to construct an accurate three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model for the human pelvis. Most of the pelvic models in the previous studies were simplified with either SIJ fusing together or without the sacral bone. However, the influence of those simplifications on the load transmission in human pelvis has not been studied, so the reliability of those studies remains unclear. In this study, two 3-D pelvic models were constructed: an SIJ fusing model and an SIJ contacting model. In the SIJ fusing model, the SIJ interfaces were fused together. In the SIJ contacting model, the SIJ interfaces were just in contact with each other without fusion. Compared with the SIJ contacting model, the SIJ fusing model have smaller movements in the SIJ. The stress distribution area in the SIJ fusing model on sacroiliac cartilages was also different. Those differences contributed to the decline of tensile force in the SIJ surrounding ligaments and the re-distribution of stress in the pelvic bones. In addition, the SIJ fusing model was far less sensitive to the increase in modulus of the sacroiliac cartilages, and decrease in stiffness of the ligaments surrounding the SIJ. The presence of synovia in the SIJ had greater influence on the load transmission in the human pelvic system. Therefore, the effect of the presence of synovia should not be neglected when the biomechanical behavior of human pelvis is being studied, especially for those studies related to clinical applications.

  1. Numerical simulation of a flow-like landslide using the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Krabbenhoft, Kristian; Sheng, Daichao; Li, Weichao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an actual landslide process that occurred in Southern China is simulated by a continuum approach, the particle finite element method (PFEM). The PFEM attempts to solve the boundary-value problems in the framework of solid mechanics, satisfying the governing equations including momentum conservation, displacement-strain relation, constitutive relation as well as the frictional contact between the sliding mass and the slip surface. To warrant the convergence behaviour of solutions, the problem is formulated as a mathematical programming problem, while the particle finite element procedure is employed to tackle the issues of mesh distortion and free-surface evolution. The whole procedure of the landslide, from initiation, sliding to deposition, is successfully reproduced by the continuum approach. It is shown that the density of the mass has little influence on the sliding process in the current landslide, whereas both the geometry and the roughness of the slip surface play important roles. Comparative studies are also conducted where a satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  2. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  3. An inverse finite element method for determining the anisotropic properties of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T D; Boyce, B L

    2011-06-01

    An inverse finite element method was developed to determine the anisotropic properties of bovine cornea from an in vitro inflation experiment. The experiment used digital image correlation (DIC) to measure the three-dimensional surface geometry and displacement field of the cornea at multiple pressures. A finite element model of a bovine cornea was developed using the DIC measured surface geometry of the undeformed specimen. The model was applied to determine five parameters of an anisotropic hyperelastic model that minimized the error between the measured and computed surface displacement field and to investigate the sensitivity of the measured bovine inflation response to variations in the anisotropic properties of the cornea. The results of the parameter optimization revealed that the collagen structure of bovine cornea exhibited a high degree of anisotropy in the limbus region, which agreed with recent histological findings, and a transversely isotropic central region. The parameter study showed that the bovine corneal response to the inflation experiment was sensitive to the shear modulus of the matrix at pressures below the intraocular pressure, the properties of the collagen lamella at higher pressures, and the degree of anisotropy in the limbus region. It was not sensitive to a weak collagen anisotropy in the central region.

  4. Mixed-RKDG Finite Element Methods for the 2-D Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zhangxin; Cockburn, Bernardo; Jerome, Joseph W.; ...

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for numerically solving the equations of the hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices in two space dimensions. The method combines a standard mixed finite element method, used to obtain directly an approximation to the electric field, with the so-called Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, originally devised for numerically solving multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, which is applied here to the convective part of the equations. Numerical simulations showing the performance of the new method are displayed, and the results compared with those obtained by using Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes. Frommore » the perspective of device modeling, these methods are robust, since they are capable of encompassing broad parameter ranges, including those for which shock formation is possible. The simulations presented here are for Gallium Arsenide at room temperature, but we have tested them much more generally with considerable success.« less

  5. Advanced modeling strategy for the analysis of heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics using high-order finite element method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Bahramian, Fereshteh; Wan, Wankei

    2009-11-01

    Modeling soft tissue using the finite element method is one of the most challenging areas in the field of biomechanical engineering. To date, many models have been developed to describe heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics, which are accurate to some extent. Nevertheless, there is no comprehensive method to modeling soft tissue mechanics, This is because (1) the degree of anisotropy in the heart valve leaflet changes layer by layer due to a variety of collagen fiber densities and orientations that cannot be taken into account in the model and also (2) a constitutive material model fully describing the mechanical properties of the leaflet structure is not available in the literature. In this framework, we develop a new high-order element using p-type finite element formulation to create anisotropic material properties similar to those of the heart valve leaflet tissue in only one single element. This element also takes the nonlinearity of the leaflet tissue into consideration using a bilinear material model. This new element is composed a two-dimensional finite element in the principal directions of leaflet tissue and a p-type finite element in the direction of thickness. The proposed element is easy to implement, much more efficient than standard elements available in commercial finite element packages. This study is one step towards the modeling of soft tissue mechanics using a meshless finite element approach to be applied in real-time haptic feedback of soft-tissue models in virtual reality simulation.

  6. Static Aeroelastic Analysis of Transonic Wind Tunnel Models Using Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John R.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Valla, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A computational method for accurately predicting the static aeroelastic deformations of typical transonic transport wind tunnel models is described. The method utilizes a finite element method (FEM) for predicting the deformations. Extensive calibration/validation of this method was carried out using a novel wind-off wind tunnel model static loading experiment and wind-on optical wing twist measurements obtained during a recent wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA LaRC. Further validations were carried out using a Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver to calculate wing pressure distributions about several aeroelastically deformed wings and comparing these predictions with NTF experimental data. Results from this aeroelastic deformation method are in good overall agreement with experimentally measured values. Including the predicted deformations significantly improves the correlation between CFD predicted and experimentally measured wing & pressures.

  7. Weak Galerkin finite element methods for Darcy flow: Anisotropy and heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Liu, Jiangguo; Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a family of weak Galerkin finite element methods (WGFEMs) for Darcy flow computation. The WGFEMs are new numerical methods that rely on the novel concept of discrete weak gradients. The WGFEMs solve for pressure unknowns both in element interiors and on the mesh skeleton. The numerical velocity is then obtained from the discrete weak gradient of the numerical pressure. The new methods are quite different than many existing numerical methods in that they are locally conservative by design, the resulting discrete linear systems are symmetric and positive-definite, and there is no need for tuning problem-dependent penalty factors. We test the WGFEMs on benchmark problems to demonstrate the strong potential of these new methods in handling strong anisotropy and heterogeneity in Darcy flow.

  8. A Finite Element Method for Computation of Structural Intensity by the Normal Mode Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrić, L.; Pavić, G.

    1993-06-01

    A method for numerical computation of structural intensity in thin-walled structures is presented. The method is based on structural finite elements (beam, plate and shell type) enabling computation of real eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the undamped structure which then serve in evaluation of complex response. The distributed structural damping is taken into account by using the modal damping concept, while any localized damping is treated as an external loading, determined by use of impedance matching conditions and eigenproperties of the structure. Emphasis is given to aspects of accuracy of the results and efficiency of the numerical procedures used. High requirements on accuracy of the structural response (displacements and stresses) needed in intensity applications are satisfied by employing the "swept static solution", which effectively takes into account the influence of higher modes otherwise inaccessible to numerical computation. A comparison is made between the results obtained by using analytical methods and the proposed numerical procedure to demonstrate the validity of the method presented.

  9. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  10. Comparison of finite element and transfer matrix methods for numerical investigation of surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddouche, Issam; Cherbi, Lynda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) in the visible regime at a metal/dielectric interface within two different waveguide structures, the first is a Photonic Crystal Fiber where the Full Vector Finite Element Method (FVFEM) is used and the second is a slab waveguide where the transfer matrix method (TMM) is used. Knowing the diversities between the two methods in terms of speed, simplicity, and scope of application, computation is implemented with respect to wavelength and metal layer thickness in order to analyze and compare the performances of the two methods. Simulation results show that the TMM can be a good approximation for the FVFEM and that SPPs behave more like modes propagating in a semi infinite metal/dielectric structure as metal thickness increases from about 150 nm.

  11. A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Kim S.; Oden, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method is developed for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws in two space variables. The discontinuous Galerkin spatial approximation to the conservation laws results in a system of ordinary differential equations which are marched in time using Runge-Kutta methods. Numerical results for the two-dimensional Burger's equation show that the method is (p+1)-order accurate in time and space, where p is the degree of the polynomial approximation of the solution within an element and is capable of capturing shocks over a single element without oscillations. Results for this problem also show that the accuracy of the solution in smooth regions is unaffected by the local projection and that the accuracy in smooth regions increases as p increases. Numerical results for the Euler equations show that the method captures shocks without oscillations and with higher resolution than a first-order scheme.

  12. Solving the ECG forward problem by means of a meshless finite element method.

    PubMed

    Li, Z S; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2007-07-07

    The conventional numerical computational techniques such as the finite element method (FEM) and the boundary element method (BEM) require laborious and time-consuming model meshing. The new meshless FEM only uses the boundary description and the node distribution and no meshing of the model is required. This paper presents the fundamentals and implementation of meshless FEM and the meshless FEM method is adapted to solve the electrocardiography (ECG) forward problem. The method is evaluated on a single-layer torso model, in which the analytical solution exists, and tested in a realistic geometry homogeneous torso model, with satisfactory results being obtained. The present results suggest that the meshless FEM may provide an alternative for ECG forward solutions.

  13. Cutting force predication based on integration of symmetric fuzzy number and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanli; Hu, Yanjuan; Wang, Yao; Dong, Chao; Pang, Zaixiang

    2014-01-01

    In the process of turning, pointing at the uncertain phenomenon of cutting which is caused by the disturbance of random factors, for determining the uncertain scope of cutting force, the integrated symmetric fuzzy number and the finite element method (FEM) are used in the prediction of cutting force. The method used symmetric fuzzy number to establish fuzzy function between cutting force and three factors and obtained the uncertain interval of cutting force by linear programming. At the same time, the change curve of cutting force with time was directly simulated by using thermal-mechanical coupling FEM; also the nonuniform stress field and temperature distribution of workpiece, tool, and chip under the action of thermal-mechanical coupling were simulated. The experimental result shows that the method is effective for the uncertain prediction of cutting force.

  14. Cutting Force Predication Based on Integration of Symmetric Fuzzy Number and Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Hu, Yanjuan; Wang, Yao; Dong, Chao; Pang, Zaixiang

    2014-01-01

    In the process of turning, pointing at the uncertain phenomenon of cutting which is caused by the disturbance of random factors, for determining the uncertain scope of cutting force, the integrated symmetric fuzzy number and the finite element method (FEM) are used in the prediction of cutting force. The method used symmetric fuzzy number to establish fuzzy function between cutting force and three factors and obtained the uncertain interval of cutting force by linear programming. At the same time, the change curve of cutting force with time was directly simulated by using thermal-mechanical coupling FEM; also the nonuniform stress field and temperature distribution of workpiece, tool, and chip under the action of thermal-mechanical coupling were simulated. The experimental result shows that the method is effective for the uncertain prediction of cutting force. PMID:24790556

  15. A parametric finite element method for solid-state dewetting problems with anisotropic surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhu; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Quan

    2017-02-01

    We propose an efficient and accurate parametric finite element method (PFEM) for solving sharp-interface continuum models for solid-state dewetting of thin films with anisotropic surface energies. The governing equations of the sharp-interface models belong to a new type of high-order (4th- or 6th-order) geometric evolution partial differential equations about open curve/surface interface tracking problems which include anisotropic surface diffusion flow and contact line migration. Compared to the traditional methods (e.g., marker-particle methods), the proposed PFEM not only has very good accuracy, but also poses very mild restrictions on the numerical stability, and thus it has significant advantages for solving this type of open curve evolution problems with applications in the simulation of solid-state dewetting. Extensive numerical results are reported to demonstrate the accuracy and high efficiency of the proposed PFEM.

  16. An iterative finite-element collocation method for parabolic problems using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Advection-dominated flows occur widely in the transport of groundwater contaminants, the movements of fluids in enhanced oil recovery projects, and many other contexts. In numerical models of such flows, adaptive local grid refinement is a conceptually attractive approach for resolving the sharp fronts or layers that tend to characterize the solutions. However, this approach can be difficult to implement in practice. A domain decomposition method developed by Bramble, Ewing, Pasciak, and Schatz, known as the BEPS method, overcomes many of the difficulties. We demonstrate the applicability of the iterative BEPS ideas to finite-element collocation on trial spaces of piecewise Hermite bicubics. The resulting scheme allows one to refine selected parts of a spatial grid without destroying algebraic efficiencies associated with the original coarse grid. We apply the method to two dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion problems.

  17. An iterative finite-element collocation method for parabolic problems using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, M.C.

    1992-11-01

    Advection-dominated flows occur widely in the transport of groundwater contaminants, the movements of fluids in enhanced oil recovery projects, and many other contexts. In numerical models of such flows, adaptive local grid refinement is a conceptually attractive approach for resolving the sharp fronts or layers that tend to characterize the solutions. However, this approach can be difficult to implement in practice. A domain decomposition method developed by Bramble, Ewing, Pasciak, and Schatz, known as the BEPS method, overcomes many of the difficulties. We demonstrate the applicability of the iterative BEPS ideas to finite-element collocation on trial spaces of piecewise Hermite bicubics. The resulting scheme allows one to refine selected parts of a spatial grid without destroying algebraic efficiencies associated with the original coarse grid. We apply the method to two dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion problems.

  18. Divergence Stability in Connection with the P-Version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    RAIRO 8 (1974), pp. 129-151. [8] C. Canuto, Y. Maday and A. Quarteroni, Combined Finite Element and Spectral approximation of the Navier-Stokes...R. Verfuhrt, Error estimates for a mixed finite element approximation of the Stokes equations. RAIRO , Numer. Anal., 18 (1984), pp. 175-182. (15] M

  19. Spatial and angular finite element method for radiative transfer in participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Rafael O.; Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2015-05-01

    A computational approach for the modeling of multi-dimensional radiative transfer in participating media, including scattering, is presented. The approach is based on the sequential use of angular and spatial Finite Element Methods for the discretization of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The angular discretization is developed with an Angular Finite Element Method (AFEM) based on the Galerkin approach. The AFEM leads to a counterpart of the RTE consisting of a coupled set of transient-advective-reactive equations that are continuously dependent on space and time. The AFEM is ideally suited for so-called h- and/or p-refinement for the discretization of the angular domain: h-refinement is obtained by increasing the number of angular elements and p-refinement by increasing the order of the angular interpolating functions. The spatial discretization of the system of equations obtained after the angular discretization is based on a Variational Multi-Scale Finite Element Method (VMS-FEM) suitable for the solution of generic transport problems. The angularly and spatially discretized system is solved with a second-order accurate implicit predictor multi-corrector time stepper together with a globalized inexact Newton-Krylov nonlinear solver. The overall approach is designed and implemented to allow the seamless inclusion of other governing equations necessary to solve coupled fluid-radiative systems, such as those in combustion, high-temperature chemically reactive, and plasma flow models. The combined AFEM and VMS-FEM for the solution of the RTE is validated with two- and three-dimensional benchmark problems, each solved for 3 levels of angular partitioning (h-refinement) and for 2 orders of angular basis functions (p-refinement), i.e. piecewise constant (P0) and piecewise linear (P1) basis over spherical triangles. The overall approach is also applied to the simulation of radiative transfer in a parabolic concentrator with participating media, as encountered in

  20. Stress Induced in the Periodontal Ligament under Orthodontic Loading (Part I): A Finite Element Method Study Using Linear Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hemanth, M; deoli, Shilpi; Raghuveer, H P; Rani, M S; Hegde, Chatura; Vedavathi, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Orthodontic tooth movement is a complex procedure that occurs due to various biomechanical changes in the periodontium. Optimal orthodontic forces yield maximum tooth movement whereas if the forces fall beyond the optimal threshold it can cause deleterious effects. Among various types of tooth movements intrusion and lingual root torque are associated with causing root resoprtion, especially with the incisors. Therefore in this study, the stress patterns in the periodontal ligament (PDL) were evaluated with intrusion and lingual root torque using finite element method (FEM). Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional (3D) FEM model of the maxillary incisors was generated using SOLIDWORKS modeling software. Stresses in the PDL were evaluated with intrusive and lingual root torque movements by a 3D FEM using ANSYS software using linear stress analysis. Results: It was observed that with the application of intrusive load compressive stresses were distributed at the apex whereas tensile stress was seen at the cervical margin. With the application of lingual root torque maximum compressive stress was distributed at the apex and tensile stress was distributed throughout the PDL. Conclusion: For intrusive and lingual root torque movements stress values over the PDL was within the range of optimal stress value as proposed by Lee, with a given force system by Proffit as optimum forces for orthodontic tooth movement using linear properties. PMID:26464555