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Sample records for 3-d fracture network

  1. FROMS3D: New Software for 3-D Visualization of Fracture Network System in Fractured Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Y. H.; Um, J. G.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A new software (FROMS3D) is presented to visualize fracture network system in 3-D. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole and field fracture data, fracture network modelling, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D and calculation and visualization of intersections and equivalent pipes between fractures. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the engineering geological problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  2. Influence of fracture scale heterogeneity on the flow properties of 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; De Dreuzy, J.; Pichot, G.

    2011-12-01

    Flow channeling and permeability scaling in fractured media have been classically addressed either at the fracture- or at the network- scales. In the latter case they are linked to the topological structure of the network, while at the fracture scale they are controlled by the variability of the local aperture distribution inside individual fractures. In this study we analyze these two combined effects, investigating how flow localization below the scale of individual fractures influences that at the network scale and the resulting medium permeability. This is done by use of a new highly-resolved 3D discrete fracture network model (DFN). The local apertures of individual fractures are distributed according to a truncated Gaussian law, and exhibit self-affine spatial correlations that are bounded by an upper cutoff scale Lc; Lc and the fracture closure, defined as the ratio of the aperture fluctuations at scale Lc to the mean aperture, are considered homogeneous over the DFN. The network topology is controlled by a homogeneous scalar fracture density and a power law fracture length distribution. We have varied these features to investigate a large variety of DFN topologies, from sparse networks with varying degrees of fracture interconnections, flow bottlenecks and dead-ends (Fig. 1a), to dense well-connected networks (Fig. 1b). We have also investigated a large range of fracture closures, performing extensive simulations of about 105 different DFN realizations. At the fracture scale, accounting for local aperture fluctuations leads to a monotical deviation (which can exceed 50%) of the equivalent fracture transmissivity from the parallel plate behavior. At the network scale we observe a complex interaction between flow channeling within fracture planes and flow localization in the network. This interaction is controlled by the location of fracture interactions with respect to that of low local transmissivity zones (particularly the closed zones), in the fracture

  3. Development of 3-D fracture network visualization software based on graphical user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young-Hwan, Noh; Jeong-Gi, Um; Yosoon, Choi; Myong-Ho, Park; Jaeyoung, Choi

    2013-04-01

    A sound understanding of the structural characteristics of fractured rock masses is important in designing and maintaining earth structures because their strength, deformability, and hydraulic behavior depend mainly on the characteristics of discontinuity network structures. Despite considerable progress in understanding the structural characteristics of rock masses, the complexity of discontinuity patterns has prevented satisfactory analysis based on a 3-D rock mass visualization model. This research presents the results of studies performed to develop rock mass visualization in 3-D to analysis the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of fractured rock masses. General and particular solutions of non-linear equations of disk-shaped fractures have been derived to calculated lines of intersection and equivalent pipes. Also, program modules of DISK3D, FNTWK3D, BOUNDARY and BDM(borehole data management) have been developed to perform the visualization of fracture network and corresponding equivalent pipes for DFN based fluid flow model. The developed software for the 3-D fractured rock mass visualization model based on MS visual studio can be used to characterize rock mass geometry and network systems effectively. The results obtained in this study will be refined and then combined for use as a tool for assessing geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the 2011 Energy Efficiency and Resources Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant.

  4. Development of a new software for analyzing 3-D fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Noh, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A new software is presented to analyze fracture network in 3-D. Recently, we completed the software package based on information given in EGU2013. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole data, stochastic modelling of fracture network, construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D, calculation of equivalent pipes and production of cross-section diagrams. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. A case study was performed to analyze 3-D fracture network system at the Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in Alberta, Canada. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in modelling and visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviours of the fractured rock masses. This presentation describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of the software.

  5. 3D characterization of the fracture network in a deformed chalk reservoir analogue: The Lagerdorf case

    SciTech Connect

    Koestler, A.G.; Reksten, K.

    1994-12-31

    Quantitative descriptions of the 3D fracture networks in terms of connectivity, fracture types, fracture surface roughness and flow characteristics are necessary for reservoir evaluation, management, and enhanced oil recovery programs of fractured reservoirs. For a period of 2 years, a research project focused on an analogue to fractured chalk reservoirs excellently exposed near Laegerdorf, NW Germany. Upper Cretaceous chalk has been uplifted and deformed by an underlying salt diapir, and is now exploited for the cement industry. In the production wall of a quarry, the fracture network of the deformed chalk was characterized and mapped at different scales. The wall was scraped off as chalk exploitation proceeded, continuously revealing new sections through the faulted and fractured chalk body. A 230 m long part of the 35m high production wall was investigated during its recess of 25m. The large amount of fracture data were analyzed with respect to parameters such as fracture density distribution, orientation- and length distribution, and in terms of the representativity of data sets collected from restricted rock volumes. This 3D description and analysis of a fracture network revealed quantitative generic parameters of importance for modeling chalk reservoirs with less data and lower data quality.

  6. Finite element generation of arbitrary 3-D fracture networks for flow analysis in complicated discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi-Hua

    2015-10-01

    Finite element generation of complicated fracture networks is the core issue and source of technical difficulty in three-dimensional (3-D) discrete fracture network (DFN) flow models. Due to the randomness and uncertainty in the configuration of a DFN, the intersection lines (traces) are arbitrarily distributed in each face (fracture and other surfaces). Hence, subdivision of the fractures is an issue relating to subdivision of two-dimensional (2-D) domains with arbitrarily-distributed constraints. When the DFN configuration is very complicated, the well-known approaches (e.g. Voronoi Delaunay-based methods and advancing-front techniques) cannot operate properly. This paper proposes an algorithm to implement end-to-end connection between traces to subdivide 2-D domains into closed loops. The compositions of the vertices in the common edges between adjacent loops (which may belong to a single fracture or two connected fractures) are thus ensured to be topologically identical. The paper then proposes an approach for triangulating arbitrary loops which does not add any nodes to ensure consistency of the meshes at the common edges. In addition, several techniques relating to tolerance control and improving code robustness are discussed. Finally, the equivalent permeability of the rock mass is calculated for some very complicated DFNs (the DFN may contain 1272 fractures, 633 connected fractures, and 16,270 closed loops). The results are compared with other approaches to demonstrate the veracity and efficiency of the approach proposed in this paper.

  7. Analysis of fracture networks in a reservoir dolomite by 3D micro-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, Maarten; Hoyer, Stefan; Exner, Ulrike; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    Narrow fractures in reservoir rocks can be of great importance when determining the hydrocarbon potential of such a reservoir. Such fractures can contribute significantly to - or even be dominant for - the porosity and permeability characteristics of such rocks. Investigating these narrow fractures is therefore important, but not always trivial. Standard laboratory measurements on sample plugs from a reservoir are not always suitable for fractured rocks. Thin section analysis can provide very important information, but mostly only in 2D. Also other sources of information have major drawbacks, such as FMI (Formation Micro-Imager) during coring (insufficient resolution) and hand specimen analysis (no internal information). 3D imaging of reservoir rock samples is a good alternative and extension to the methods mentioned above. The 3D information is in our case obtained by X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (µCT) imaging. Our used samples are 2 and 3 cm diameter plugs of a narrowly fractured (apertures generally <200 µm) reservoir dolomite (Hauptdolomit formation) from below the Vienna Basin, Austria. µCT has the large advantage of being non-destructive to the samples, and with the chosen sample sizes and settings, the sample rocks and fractures can be imaged with sufficient quality at sufficient resolution. After imaging, the fracture networks need to be extracted (segmented) from the background. Unfortunately, available segmentation approaches in the literature do not provide satisfactory results on such narrow fractures. We therefore developed the multiscale Hessian fracture filter, with which we are able to extract the fracture networks from the datasets in a better way. The largest advantages of this technique are that it is inherently 3D, runs on desktop computers with limited resources, and is implemented in public domain software (ImageJ / FIJI). The results from the multiscale Hessian fracture filtering approach serve as input for porosity determination. Also

  8. Fracture-network 3D characterization in a deformed chalk reservoir analogue -- the Laegerdorf case

    SciTech Connect

    Koestler, A.G.; Reksten, K.

    1995-09-01

    Quantitative descriptions of 3D fracture networks in terms of fracture characteristics and connectivity are necessary for reservoir evaluation, management, and EOR programs of fractured reservoirs. The author`s research has focused on an analogue to North Sea fractured chalk reservoirs that is excellently exposed near Laegerdorf, northwest Germany. An underlying salt diapir uplifted and deformed Upper Cretaceous chalk; the cement industry now exploits it. The fracture network in the production wall of the quarry was characterized and mapped at different scales, and 12 profiles of the 230-m wide and 35-m high production wall were investigated as the wall receded 25 m. In addition, three wells were drilled into the chalk volume. The wells were cored and the wellbores were imaged with both the resistivity formation micro scanner (FMS) and the sonic circumferential borehole image logger (CBIL). The large amount of fracture data was analyzed with respect to parameters, such as fracture density distribution, orientation, and length distribution, and in terms of the representativity and predictability of data sets collected from restricted rock volumes.

  9. Integrated approach for quantification of fractured tight reservoir rocks: Porosity, permeability analyses and 3D fracture network characterisation on fractured dolomite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, Maarten; Barnhoorn, Auke; Exner, Ulrike; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Fractured reservoir rocks make up an important part of the hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide. A detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks in reservoir rock samples is thus essential to determine the potential of these fractured reservoirs. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this study, we therefore explore the use of an additional method - non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) - to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna Basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. 3D μCT data is used to extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations - in bulk as well as locally. The 3D analyses are complemented with thin sections made to provide some 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) of the µCT results towards more realistic reservoir conditions. Our results show that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these and other

  10. Incorporating Discrete Irregular Fracture Zone Networks into 3D Paleohydrogeologic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normani, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dual continuum computational models which include both porous media and discrete fracture zones are valuable tools in assessing groundwater migration and pathways in fractured rock systems. Fracture generation models can produce stochastic realizations of fracture networks which honor geological structures and fracture propagation behaviors. Surface lineament traces can be propagated to depth based on fracture zone statistics to produce representations of geological structures in rock. The generated discrete, complex and irregular fracture zone networks, represented as a triangulated mesh, are embedded using orthogonal quadrilateral elements within a three-dimensional hexahedral finite element mesh. A detailed coupled density-dependent paleohydrogeologic groundwater analysis of a hypothetical 104 km2 portion of the Canadian Shield has been conducted using the discrete-fracture dual continuum finite element model FRAC3DVS to investigate the characterization of large-scale fracture zone networks on groundwater and tracer movement during a 120,000 year paleoclimate cycle. Permeability reduction due to permafrost was also applied. Time series data for the depth of permafrost, along with ice thickness and lake depth, were provided by the University of Toronto (UofT) Glacial Systems Model. The crystalline rock between fracture zones was assigned properties characteristic of those reported for the Canadian Shield. Total dissolved solids concentrations of 300 g/L are encountered at depth. Surface water features and a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) were used in a GIS framework to define the watershed boundaries at surface water divides and to populate the finite element mesh. This work will illustrate the long-term evolution and stability of the geosphere and groundwater systems to external perturbations caused by glaciation through the use of performance measures such as Mean Life Expectancy and the migration of a unit tracer to depth over a paleoclimate cycle.

  11. The value of inclined coreholes for characterizing the geometry of 3-D fracture networks in bedrock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jonathan; Parker, Beth

    2013-04-01

    In bedrock aquifers where matrix permeability is low, the nature and distribution of the fracture network has a strong impact on the transport and fate of contaminants. Accurate fracture characterization is therefore essential to fully understand the flow system and to predict contaminant migration. Powerful DFN models exist, yet the limitation is often on obtaining field data of sufficient quality to use as input parameters. One major contributing factor is the common practice of using only vertical coreholes to characterize bedrock aquifers. This can lead to datasets that are significantly biased toward fractures perpendicular to the corehole and are therefore not well suited for three-dimensional (3-D) fracture geometry characterization. This bias is particularly pronounced in flat-lying sedimentary strata where fracture networks are typically comprised of flat-lying bedding parallel fractures and vertical, or near vertical joints. An examination of such bias was conducted at a contaminated site in Guelph, Ontario, Canada, in a Silurian dolostone aquifer. Three inclined coreholes plunging 60 degrees with varying azimuths were drilled between 2010 and 2012 to supplement existing data from eleven vertical coreholes from previous investigations. Depth discrete datasets were collected in the coreholes including lithological and fracture logs from rock core, downhole geophysical surveys (e.g, acoustic televiewer, formation conductivity, temperature, natural gamma), and hydraulic testing including the first use of flexible liner profiling in inclined coreholes. These datasets were integrated to provide estimates of fracture frequency, orientation and aperture distributions and to estimate values of bulk effective fracture porosity. Orientation analysis revealed three dominant fracture sets on site that vary in intensity through mechanical layers. These sets consist of a horizontal, bedding-plane set with an average spacing of 0.3m, and two high-angle sets, NE-SW and

  12. Towards improved 3D cross-borehole electrical resistivity imaging of discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Slater, L. D.; Johnson, T. J.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lacombe, P.; Johnson, C. D.; Tiedeman, C. R.; Goode, D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Shapiro, A. M.; Lane, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    There is a need to better characterize discrete fractures in contaminated bedrock aquifers to determine the migration of injected remediation amendments away from boreholes. A synthetic cross-borehole electrical resistivity study was conducted assuming a discrete fracture model of an existing contaminated site with known fracture locations. Four boreholes and two discrete fracture zones, assumed to be the dominant electrical and hydraulically conductive pathways, were explicitly modeled within an unstructured tetrahedral finite-element mesh. To simulate field conditions, 5% random Gaussian noise was added to all synthetic datasets. We first evaluated different regularization constraints starting with an uninformed smoothness-constrained inversion, to which a priori information was incrementally added. We found major improvements when (1) smoothness regularization constraints were relaxed (or disconnected) along boreholes and fractures, (2) a homogeneous conductivity was assumed along boreholes, and (3) borehole conductivity constraints, which could be determined from a fluid specific-conductance log, were applied. We also evaluated the effect of including borehole packers on the fracture-zone model recovery. We found the estimated fracture-zone conductivities with the inclusion of packers were comparable to similar trials excluding the use of packers regardless of electrical potential changes. The misplacement of fracture regularization disconnects easily can be misinterpreted as actual fracture locations. Conductivities within misplaced disconnects were near the starting model value and removing smoothing between boreholes and assumed fracture locations helped in identifying incorrectly located fracture regularization disconnects. Model sensitivity structure improved when regularization disconnects were (1) applied along the boreholes and fracture zones, and (2) fracture-zone regularization disconnects were placed where actual fractures existed. A field study

  13. The Derivation of Fault Volumetric Properties from 3D Trace Maps Using Outcrop Constrained Discrete Fracture Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgetts, David; Seers, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    -deterministic, outcrop constrained discrete fracture network modeling code to derive volumetric fault intensity measures (fault area per unit volume / fault volume per unit volume). Producing per-vertex measures of volumetric intensity; our method captures the spatial variability in 3D fault density across a surveyed outcrop, enabling first order controls to be probed. We demonstrate our approach on pervasively faulted exposures of a Permian aged reservoir analogue from the Vale of Eden Basin, UK.

  14. A quasi steady state method for solving transient Darcy flow in complex 3D fractured networks accounting for matrix to fracture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nœtinger, B.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling natural Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) receives more and more attention in applied geosciences, from oil and gas industry, to geothermal recovery and aquifer management. The fractures may be either natural, or artificial in case of well stimulation. Accounting for the flow inside the fracture network, and accounting for the transfers between the matrix and the fractures, with the same level of accuracy is an important issue for calibrating the well architecture and for setting up optimal resources recovery strategies. Recently, we proposed an original method allowing to model transient pressure diffusion in the fracture network only [1]. The matrix was assumed to be impervious. A systematic approximation scheme was built, allowing to model the initial DFN by a set of N unknowns located at each identified intersection between fractures. The higher N, the higher the accuracy of the model. The main assumption was using a quasi steady state hypothesis, that states that the characteristic diffusion time over one single fracture is negligible compared with the characteristic time of the macroscopic problem, e.g. change of boundary conditions. In that context, the lowest order approximation N = 1 has the form of solving a transient problem in a resistor/capacitor network, a so-called pipe network. Its topology is the same as the network of geometrical intersections between fractures. In this paper, we generalize this approach in order to account for fluxes from matrix to fractures. The quasi steady state hypothesis at the fracture level is still kept. Then, we show that in the case of well separated time scales between matrix and fractures, the preceding model needs only to be slightly modified in order to incorporate these fluxes. The additional knowledge of the so-called matrix to fracture transfer function allows to modify the mass matrix that becomes a time convolution operator. This is reminiscent of existing space averaged transient dual porosity models.

  15. MOSSFRAC: An anisotropic 3D fracture model

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W C; Levatin, J L

    2006-08-14

    Despite the intense effort for nearly half a century to construct detailed numerical models of plastic flow and plastic damage accumulation, models for describing fracture, an equally important damage mechanism still cannot describe basic fracture phenomena. Typical fracture models set the stress tensor to zero for tensile fracture and set the deviatoric stress tensor to zero for compressive fracture. One consequence is that the simple case of the tensile fracture of a cylinder under combined compressive radial and tensile axial loads is not modeled correctly. The experimental result is a cylinder that can support compressive radial loads, but no axial load, whereas, the typical numerical result is a cylinder with all stresses equal to zero. This incorrect modeling of fracture locally also has a global effect, because material that is fracturing produces stress release waves, which propagate from the fracture and influence the surrounding material. Consequently, it would be useful to have a model that can describe the stress relief and the resulting anisotropy due to fracture. MOSSFRAC is a material model that simulates three-dimensional tensile and shear fracture in initially isotropic elastic-plastic materials, although its framework is also amenable to initially anisotropic materials. It differs from other models by accounting for the effects of cracks on the constitutive response of the material, so that the previously described experiment, as well as complicated fracture scenarios are simulated more accurately. The model is implemented currently in the LLNL hydrocodes DYNA3D, PARADYN, and ALE3D. The purpose of this technical note is to present a complete qualitative description of the model and quantitative descriptions of salient features.

  16. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  17. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  18. 3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

    2002-11-18

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was

  19. Modeling Electric Current Flow in 3D Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, S.; Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a variety of research fields and applications such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon extraction and long-term storage of toxic waste. As fractures are highly conductive structures in comparison to the surrounding rock, their presence can be either an advantage or a drawback. For hydrocarbon extraction, fractures allow for quick and easy access to the resource whereas for toxic waste storage their presence increases the risk of leakage and migration of pollutants. In both cases, the identification of fracture network characteristics is an essential step. Recently, we have developed an approach for modeling electric current flow in 2D fractured media. This approach is based on a discrete-dual-porosity model where fractures are represented explicitly, the matrix is coarsely discretized into blocks, and current flow exchange between the fractures and matrix is analytically evaluated at the fracture-scale and integrated at the block-scale [1]. Although this approach has shown much promise and has proven its efficiency for 2D simulations, its extension to 3D remains to be addressed. To this end, we assume that fractures can be represented as two-dimensional finite planes embedded in the surrounding matrix, and we express analytically the distribution of electric potential at the fracture scale. This fracture-scale expression takes into account the electric-current-flow exchange with the surrounding matrix and flow conservation is enforced at the fracture intersections. The fracture-matrix exchange is then integrated at the matrix-block scale where the electric current flow conservation at the block boundaries is formulated with a modified finite volume method. With the objective of providing a low-computational-cost modeling approach adapted to 3D simulations in fractured media, our model is (i) validated and compared to existing modeling approaches and, (ii) used to evaluate the impact of the presence of fractures on

  20. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  1. 3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, and River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, Paul R.; Hermanson, Jan

    2002-09-09

    The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models.

  2. 3-D Mixed Mode Delamination Fracture Criteria - An Experimentalist's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Many delamination failure criteria based on fracture toughness have been suggested over the past few decades, but most only covered the region containing mode I and mode II components of loading because that is where toughness data existed. With new analysis tools, more 3D analyses are being conducted that capture a mode III component of loading. This has increased the need for a fracture criterion that incorporates mode III loading. The introduction of a pure mode III fracture toughness test has also produced data on which to base a full 3D fracture criterion. In this paper, a new framework for visualizing 3D fracture criteria is introduced. The common 2D power law fracture criterion was evaluated to produce unexpected predictions with the introduction of mode III and did not perform well in the critical high mode I region. Another 2D criterion that has been shown to model a wide range of materials well was used as the basis for a new 3D criterion. The new criterion is based on assumptions that the relationship between mode I and mode III toughness is similar to the relation between mode I and mode II and that a linear interpolation can be used between mode II and mode III. Until mixed-mode data exists with a mode III component of loading, 3D fracture criteria cannot be properly evaluated, but these assumptions seem reasonable.

  3. Imaging 3D strain field monitoring during hydraulic fracturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongzhang; Zaghloul, Mohamed A. S.; Yan, Aidong; Li, Shuo; Lu, Guanyi; Ames, Brandon C.; Zolfaghari, Navid; Bunger, Andrew P.; Li, Ming-Jun; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a distributed fiber optic sensing scheme to study 3D strain fields inside concrete cubes during hydraulic fracturing process. Optical fibers embedded in concrete were used to monitor 3D strain field build-up with external hydraulic pressures. High spatial resolution strain fields were interrogated by the in-fiber Rayleigh backscattering with 1-cm spatial resolution using optical frequency domain reflectometry. The fiber optics sensor scheme presented in this paper provides scientists and engineers a unique laboratory tool to understand the hydraulic fracturing processes in various rock formations and its impacts to environments.

  4. Using outcrop observations, 3D discrete feature network (DFN) fluid-flow simulations, and subsurface data to constrain the impact of normal faults and opening mode fractures on fluid flow in an active asphalt mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. E.; Aydin, A.; Durlofsky, L.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Brownlow, D. T.

    2008-12-01

    An active quarry near Uvalde, TX which mines asphaltic limestone from the Anacacho Formation offers an ideal setting to study fluid-flow in fractured and faulted carbonate rocks. Semi-3D exposures of normal faults and fractures in addition to visual evidence of asphalt concentrations in the quarry help constrain relationships between geologic structures and the flow and transport of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a subsurface dataset which includes thin sections and measured asphalt concentration from the surrounding region provides a basis to estimate asphalt concentrations and constrain the depositional architecture of both the previously mined portions of the quarry and the un-mined surrounding rock volume. We characterized a series of normal faults and opening mode fractures at the quarry and documented a correlation between the intensity and distribution of these structures with increased concentrations of asphalt. The three-dimensional depositional architecture of the Anacacho Formation was characterized using the subsurface thin sections. Then outcrop exposures of faults, fractured beds, and stratigraphic contacts were mapped and their three-dimensional positions were recorded with differential gps devices. These two datasets were assimilated and a quarry-scale, geologically realistic, three-dimensional Discrete Feature Network (DFN) which represents the geometries and material properties of the matrix, normal faults, and fractures within the quarry was constructed. We then performed two-point flux, control-volume finite- difference fluid-flow simulations with the DFN to investigate the 3D flow and transport of fluids. The results were compared and contrasted with available asphalt concentration estimates from the mine and the aforementioned data from the surrounding drill cores.

  5. 3-D Experimental Fracture Analysis at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Jackson; Albert S. Kobayashi

    2001-09-14

    T*e, which is an elastic-plastic fracture parameter based on incremental theory of plasticity, was determined numerically and experimentally. The T*e integral of a tunneling crack in 2024-T3 aluminum, three point bend specimen was obtained through a hybrid analysis of moire interferometry and 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The results were verified by the good agreement between the experimentally and numerically determined T*e on the specimen surface.

  6. 3-D examination of dental fractures with minimum user intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Andre; Falcão, Alexandre; Ray, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    We developed a novel, powerful segmentation algorithm and an intuitive 3-D visualization tool for the examination of root fractures with minimum user intervention. The application computes and displays a suitable oblique orientation on a selected tooth by placing at least two splines (inside and outside of the tooth) in just one slice of the volume. Next, it allows the user to scroll through the volume, slice-by-slice in parallel to the plane, or to examine the tooth by changing the orientation of a 3-D object plane (called a virtual bitewing), which is placed, at the same time, in a volume rendition. Both the root canal and the root fracture are highlighted during the examination phase. Doctors (end users) are in control to quickly and confidently examine root fractures in 3-D, for any given oblique orientation, without worrying about missing a selected tooth. We have designed and implemented these algorithms using the image foresting transform (IFT) technique for interactive tooth segmentation and used a multi-scale parameter search for automatic oblique orientation estimation.

  7. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  8. Visualizing 3D fracture morphology in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media plays a fundamental role in many natural and engineered subsurface processes. The interplay between fluid flow, medium deformation and fracture is essential in geoscience problems as disparate as fracking for unconventional hydrocarbon production, conduit formation and methane venting from lake and ocean sediments, and desiccation cracks in soil. Recent work has pointed to the importance of capillary forces in some relevant regimes of fracturing of granular materials (Sandnes et al., Nat. Comm. 2011), leading to the term hydro-capillary fracturing (Holtzman et al., PRL 2012). Most of these experimental and computational investigations have focused, however, on 2D or quasi-2D systems. Here, we develop an experimental set-up that allows us to observe two-phase flow in a 3D granular bed, and control the level of confining stress. We use an index matching technique to directly visualize the injection of a liquid in a granular media saturated with another, immiscible liquid. We determine the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system, and elucidate different regimes of the invasion pattern. We present result for the 3D morphology of the invasion, with particular emphasis on the fracturing regime.

  9. Visualizing 3D Fracture Morphology in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbe, M. J.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media plays a fundamental role in many natural and engineered subsurface processes. The interplay between fluid flow, medium deformation and fracture is essential in geoscience problems as disparate as fracking for unconventional hydrocarbon production, conduit formation and methane venting from lake and ocean sediments, and desiccation cracks in soil. Recent work has pointed to the importance of capillary forces in some relevant regimes of fracturing of granular materials (Sandnes et al., Nat. Comm. 2011), leading to the term hydro-capillary fracturing (Holtzman et al., PRL 2012). Most of these experimental and computational investigations have focused, however, on 2D or quasi-2D systems. Here, we develop an experimental set-up that allows us to observe two-phase flow in a 3D granular bed, and control the level of confining stress. We use an index matching technique to directly visualize the injection of a liquid in a granular media saturated with another, immiscible liquid. We determine the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system, and elucidate different regimes of the invasion pattern. We present result for the 3D morphology of the invasion, with particular emphasis on the fracturing regime.

  10. Modeling of Interaction of Hydraulic Fractures in Complex Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, O. 2; Wu, R.; Weng, X.; Gu, H.; Cohen, C.

    2011-12-01

    A recently developed unconventional fracture model (UFM) is able to simulate complex fracture network propagation in a formation with pre-existing natural fractures. Multiple fracture branches can propagate at the same time and intersect/cross each other. Each open fracture exerts additional stresses on the surrounding rock and adjacent fractures, which is often referred to as "stress shadow" effect. The stress shadow can cause significant restriction of fracture width, leading to greater risk of proppant screenout. It can also alter the fracture propagation path and drastically affect fracture network patterns. It is hence critical to properly model the fracture interaction in a complex fracture model. A method for computing the stress shadow in a complex hydraulic fracture network is presented. The method is based on an enhanced 2D Displacement Discontinuity Method (DDM) with correction for finite fracture height. The computed stress field is compared to 3D numerical simulation in a few simple examples and shows the method provides a good approximation for the 3D fracture problem. This stress shadow calculation is incorporated in the UFM. The results for simple cases of two fractures are presented that show the fractures can either attract or expel each other depending on their initial relative positions, and compares favorably with an independent 2D non-planar hydraulic fracture model. Additional examples of both planar and complex fractures propagating from multiple perforation clusters are presented, showing that fracture interaction controls the fracture dimension and propagation pattern. In a formation with no or small stress anisotropy, fracture interaction can lead to dramatic divergence of the fractures as they tend to repel each other. However, when stress anisotropy is large, the fracture propagation direction is dominated by the stress field and fracture turning due to fracture interaction is limited. However, stress shadowing still has a strong effect

  11. Evaluation of the 3-D channeling flow in a fractured type of oil/gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Tsuchiya, N.; Tamagawa, T.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the flow and transport characteristics through rock fracture networks is of critical importance in many engineering and scientific applications. These include effective recovery of targeted fluid such as oil/gas, geothermal, or potable waters, and isolation of hazardous materials. Here, the formation of preferential flow path (i.e. channeling flow) is one of the most significant characteristics in considering fluid flow through rock fracture networks; however, the impact of channeling flow remains poorly understood. In order to deepen our understanding of channeling flow, the authors have developed a novel discrete fracture network (DFN) model simulator, GeoFlow. Different from the conventional DFN model simulators, we can characterize each fracture not by a single aperture value but by a heterogeneous aperture distribution in GeoFlow [Ishibashi et al., 2012]. As a result, the formation of 3-D preferential flow paths within fracture network can be considered by using this simulator. Therefore, we would challenge to construct the precise fracture networks whose fractures have heterogeneous aperture distributions in field scale, and to analyze fluid flows through the fracture networks by GeoFlow. In the present study, the Yufutsu oil/gas field in Hokkaido, Japan is selected as the subject area for study. This field is known as the fractured type of reservoir, and reliable DFN models can be constructed for this field based on the 3-D seismic data, well logging, in-situ stress measurement, and acoustic emission data [Tamagawa et al., 2012]. Based on these DFN models, new DFN models for 1,080 (East-West) × 1,080 (North-South) × 1,080 (Depth) m^3, where fractures are represented by squares of 44-346 m on a side, are re-constructed. In these new models, scale-dependent aperture distributions are considered for all fractures constructing the fracture networks. Note that the multi-scale modeling of fracture flow has been developed by the authors

  12. Triangulation Based 3D Laser Imaging for Fracture Orientation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, J.; Claire, S.; Steve, M.

    2009-05-01

    Laser imaging has recently been identified as a potential tool for rock mass characterization. This contribution focuses on the application of triangulation based, short-range laser imaging to determine fracture orientation and surface texture. This technology measures the distance to the target by triangulating the projected and reflected laser beams, and also records the reflection intensity. In this study, we acquired 3D laser images of rock faces using the Laser Camera System (LCS), a portable instrument developed by Neptec Design Group (Ottawa, Canada). The LCS uses an infrared laser beam and is immune to the lighting conditions. The maximum image resolution is 1024 x 1024 volumetric image elements. Depth resolution is 0.5 mm at 5 m. An above ground field trial was conducted at a blocky road cut with well defined joint sets (Kingston, Ontario). An underground field trial was conducted at the Inco 175 Ore body (Sudbury, Ontario) where images were acquired in the dark and the joint set features were more subtle. At each site, from a distance of 3 m away from the rock face, a grid of six images (approximately 1.6 m by 1.6 m) was acquired at maximum resolution with 20% overlap between adjacent images. This corresponds to a density of 40 image elements per square centimeter. Polyworks, a high density 3D visualization software tool, was used to align and merge the images into a single digital triangular mesh. The conventional method of determining fracture orientations is by manual measurement using a compass. In order to be accepted as a substitute for this method, the LCS should be capable of performing at least to the capabilities of manual measurements. To compare fracture orientation estimates derived from the 3D laser images to manual measurements, 160 inclinometer readings were taken at the above ground site. Three prominent joint sets (strike/dip: 236/09, 321/89, 325/01) were identified by plotting the joint poles on a stereonet. Underground, two main joint

  13. Femoroacetabular impingement with chronic acetabular rim fracture - 3D computed tomography, 3D magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Nordeck, Shaun; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Madhavapeddi, Sai; Robertson, William J

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is uncommonly associated with a large rim fragment of bone along the superolateral acetabulum. We report an unusual case of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with chronic acetabular rim fracture. Radiographic, 3D computed tomography, 3D magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy correlation is presented with discussion of relative advantages and disadvantages of various modalities in the context of FAI. PMID:26191497

  14. 3D Dynamic Earthquake Fracture Simulation (Test Case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    A 3D dynamic earthquake fracture simulation is being developed for the fault structures which are non-planar to understand heterogeneous stress states in the Marmara Sea. Locating in a seismic gap, a large earthquake is expected in the center of the Sea of Marmara. Concerning the fact that more than 14 million inhabitants of İstanbul, located very closely to the Marmara Sea, the importance of the analysis of the Central Marmara Sea is extremely high. A few 3D dynamic earthquake fracture studies have been already done in the Sea of Marmara for pure right lateral strike-slip stress regimes (Oglesby and Mai, 2012; Aochi and Ulrich, 2015). In this study, a 3D dynamic earthquake fracture model with heterogeneous stress patches from the TPV5, a SCEC code validation case, is adapted. In this test model, the fault and the ground surfaces are gridded by a scalene triangulation technique using GMSH program. For a grid size changing between 0.616 km and 1.050 km the number of elements for the fault surface is 1984 and for the ground surface is 1216. When these results are compared with Kaneko's results for TPV5 from SPECFEM3D, reliable findings could be observed for the first 6.5 seconds (stations on the fault) although a stability problem is encountered after this time threshold. To solve this problem grid sizes are made smaller, so the number of elements increase 7986 for the fault surface and 4867 for the ground surface. On the other hand, computational problems arise in that case, since the computation time is directly proportional to the number of total elements and the required memory also increases with the square of that. Therefore, it is expected that this method can be adapted for less coarse grid cases, regarding the main difficulty coming from the necessity of an effective supercomputer and run time limitations. The main objective of this research is to obtain 3D dynamic earthquake rupture scenarios, concerning not only planar and non-planar faults but also

  15. Effective Permeability of Fractured Rocks by Analytical Methods: A 3D Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sævik, P. N.; Berre, I.; Jakobsen, M.; Lien, M.

    2013-12-01

    Analytical upscaling methods have been proposed in the literature to predict the effective hydraulic permeability of a fractured rock from its micro-scale parameters (fracture aperture, fracture orientation, fracture content, etc.). In this presentation, we put special emphasis on three effective medium methods (the symmetric and asymmetric self-consistent methods, and the differential method), and evaluate their accuracy for a wide range of parameter values. The analytical predictions are computed using our recently developed effective medium formulations, which are specifically adapted for fractured media. Compared to previous formulations, the new expressions have improved numerical stability properties, and require fewer input parameters. To assess their accuracy, the analytical predictions have been compared with 3D finite element simulations. Specifically, we generated realizations of several different fracture geometries, each consisting of 102 fractures within a unit cube. We applied unit potential difference on two opposing sides, and no-flux conditions on the remaining sides. A commercial finite-element solver was used to calculate the mean flux, from which the effective conductivity was found. This process was repeated for fracture densities up to ɛ = 1.0. Also, a wide range of fracture permeabilities was considered, from completely blocking to infinitely permeable fractures. The results were used to determine the range of applicability for each analytical method, which excels in different regions of the parameter space. For blocking fractures, the differential method is very accurate throughout the investigated parameter range. The symmetric self-consistent method also agrees well with the numerical results on sealed fractures, while the asymmetric self-consistent method is more unreliable. For permeable fractures, the performance of the methods depends on the dimensionless quantity λ = (Kfrac a)/(r Kmat ), describing the contrast between fracture and

  16. 3D fast wavelet network model-assisted 3D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Salwa; Jemai, Olfa; Zaied, Mourad; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-12-01

    In last years, the emergence of 3D shape in face recognition is due to its robustness to pose and illumination changes. These attractive benefits are not all the challenges to achieve satisfactory recognition rate. Other challenges such as facial expressions and computing time of matching algorithms remain to be explored. In this context, we propose our 3D face recognition approach using 3D wavelet networks. Our approach contains two stages: learning stage and recognition stage. For the training we propose a novel algorithm based on 3D fast wavelet transform. From 3D coordinates of the face (x,y,z), we proceed to voxelization to get a 3D volume which will be decomposed by 3D fast wavelet transform and modeled after that with a wavelet network, then their associated weights are considered as vector features to represent each training face . For the recognition stage, an unknown identity face is projected on all the training WN to obtain a new vector features after every projection. A similarity score is computed between the old and the obtained vector features. To show the efficiency of our approach, experimental results were performed on all the FRGC v.2 benchmark.

  17. SOAX: A software for quantification of 3D biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Nie, Wei; Yusuf, Eddy; I-Ju Lee; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Huang, Xiaolei

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous biopolymer networks in cells and tissues are routinely imaged by confocal microscopy. Image analysis methods enable quantitative study of the properties of these curvilinear networks. However, software tools to quantify the geometry and topology of these often dense 3D networks and to localize network junctions are scarce. To fill this gap, we developed a new software tool called “SOAX”, which can accurately extract the centerlines of 3D biopolymer networks and identify network junctions using Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs). It provides an open-source, user-friendly platform for network centerline extraction, 2D/3D visualization, manual editing and quantitative analysis. We propose a method to quantify the performance of SOAX, which helps determine the optimal extraction parameter values. We quantify several different types of biopolymer networks to demonstrate SOAX's potential to help answer key questions in cell biology and biophysics from a quantitative viewpoint. PMID:25765313

  18. 3-D target-based distributed smart camera network localization.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, John; Bulusu, Nirupama; Feng, Wu-Chi

    2010-10-01

    For distributed smart camera networks to perform vision-based tasks such as subject recognition and tracking, every camera's position and orientation relative to a single 3-D coordinate frame must be accurately determined. In this paper, we present a new camera network localization solution that requires successively showing a 3-D feature point-rich target to all cameras, then using the known geometry of a 3-D target, cameras estimate and decompose projection matrices to compute their position and orientation relative to the coordinatization of the 3-D target's feature points. As each 3-D target position establishes a distinct coordinate frame, cameras that view more than one 3-D target position compute translations and rotations relating different positions' coordinate frames and share the transform data with neighbors to facilitate realignment of all cameras to a single coordinate frame. Compared to other localization solutions that use opportunistically found visual data, our solution is more suitable to battery-powered, processing-constrained camera networks because it requires communication only to determine simultaneous target viewings and for passing transform data. Additionally, our solution requires only pairwise view overlaps of sufficient size to see the 3-D target and detect its feature points, while also giving camera positions in meaningful units. We evaluate our algorithm in both real and simulated smart camera networks. In the real network, position error is less than 1 ('') when the 3-D target's feature points fill only 2.9% of the frame area. PMID:20679031

  19. Fabrication of 3D carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laera, Anna Maria; Mirenghi, Luciana; Schioppa, Monica; Nobile, Concetta; Capodieci, Laura; Grazia Scalone, Anna; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Tapfer, Leander

    2016-08-01

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of a hyperbranched polymer englobing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). This new material was obtained by using SWCNTs functionalized with carboxylic groups as starting reagent. The acid groups were firstly converted in acyl chloride moieties and afterwards were bound to hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) via formation of amide functionality. The acquired spectra of attenuated total reflectance and the analysis performed through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the amide bond formation. The hyperbranched polymer characterization was completed by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The electron microscopy analyses showed the formation of an amorphous polymeric material englobing a dense network of SWCNTs without phase segregation, demonstrating that the reaction with HMDA allows a reorganization of SWCNTs in a complex three-dimensional network.

  20. An Automated 3d Indoor Topological Navigation Network Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Boguslawski, P.; Gold, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    Indoor navigation is important for various applications such as disaster management and safety analysis. In the last decade, indoor environment has been a focus of wide research; that includes developing techniques for acquiring indoor data (e.g. Terrestrial laser scanning), 3D indoor modelling and 3D indoor navigation models. In this paper, an automated 3D topological indoor network generated from inaccurate 3D building models is proposed. In a normal scenario, 3D indoor navigation network derivation needs accurate 3D models with no errors (e.g. gap, intersect) and two cells (e.g. rooms, corridors) should touch each other to build their connections. The presented 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. For reducing time and cost of indoor building data acquisition process, Trimble LaserAce 1000 as surveying instrument is used. The modelling results were validated against an accurate geometry of indoor building environment which was acquired using Trimble M3 total station.

  1. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis using 3D printing for shaft fractures of clavicles: technical note.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ho-Seung; Park, Kyoung-Jin; Kil, Kyung-Min; Chong, Suri; Eun, Hyeon-Jun; Lee, Tae-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Pyo

    2014-11-01

    This article describes a minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis technique for midshaft fractures of clavicles using intramedullary indirect reduction and prebent plates with 3D printing models. This technique allows for easy reduction of fractures with accurate prebent plates and minimal soft tissue injury around the fracture site. PMID:25164764

  2. A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kazumasa; Yongkoo, Seol

    2003-04-09

    Water fluxes in unsaturated, fractured rock involve the physical processes occurring at fracture-matrix interfaces within fracture networks. Modeling these water fluxes using a discrete fracture network model is a complicated effort. Existing preprocessors for TOUGH2 are not suitable to generate grids for fracture networks with various orientations and inclinations. There are several 3-D discrete-fracture-network simulators for flow and transport, but most of them do not capture fracture-matrix interaction. We have developed a new 3-D discrete-fracture-network mesh generator, FRACMESH, to provide TOUGH2 with information about the fracture network configuration and fracture-matrix interactions. FRACMESH transforms a discrete fracture network into a 3 dimensional uniform mesh, in which fractures are considered as elements with unique rock material properties and connected to surrounding matrix elements. Using FRACMESH, individual fractures may have uniform or random aperture distributions to consider heterogeneity. Fracture element volumes and interfacial areas are calculated from fracture geometry within individual elements. By using FRACMESH and TOUGH2, fractures with various inclinations and orientations, and fracture-matrix interaction, can be incorporated. In this paper, results of flow and transport simulations in a fractured rock block utilizing FRACMESH are presented.

  3. Construction of programmable interconnected 3D microfluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Patrick R.; Wolf, Marc P.; Wang, Xueya; Zhang, Bei; Marsch, Stephan; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B.

    2015-02-01

    Microfluidic systems represent a key-enabling platform for novel diagnostic tools for use at the point-of-care in clinical contexts as well as for evolving single cell diagnostics. The design of 3D microfluidic systems is an active field of development, but construction of true interconnected 3D microfluidic networks is still a challenge, in particular when the goal is rapid prototyping, accurate design and flexibility. We report a novel approach for the construction of programmable 3D microfluidic systems consisting of modular 3D template casting of interconnected threads to allow user-programmable flow paths and examine its structural characteristics and its modular function. To overcome problems with thread template casting reported in the literature, low-surface-energy polymer threads were used, that allow solvent-free production. Connected circular channels with excellent roundness and low diameter variability were created. Variable channel termination allowed programming a flow path on-the-fly, thus rendering the resulting 3D microfluidic systems highly customizable even after production. Thus, construction of programmable/reprogrammable fully 3D microfluidic systems by template casting of a network of interconnecting threads is feasible, leads to high-quality and highly reproducible, complex 3D geometries.

  4. Determining the 3-D fracture structure in the Geysers geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Sammis, Charles G.; Linji An; Iraj Ershaghi

    1992-01-01

    The bulk of the steam at the Geysers geothermal field is produced from fractures in a relatively impermeable graywacke massif which has been heated by an underlying felsite intrusion. The largest of these fractures are steeply dipping right lateral strike-slip faults which are subparallel to the NW striking Collayomi and Mercuryville faults which form the NE and SW boundaries of the known reservoir. Where the graywacke source rock outcrops at the surface it is highly sheared and fractured over a wide range of scale lengths. Boreholes drilled into the reservoir rock encounter distinct ''steam entries'' at which the well head pressure jumps from a few to more than one hundred psi. This observation that steam is produced from a relatively small number of major fractures has persuaded some analysts to use the Warren and Root (1963) dual porosity model for reservoir simulation purposes. The largest fractures in this model are arranged in a regular 3-D array which partitions the reservoir into cubic ''matrix'' blocks. The net storage and transport contribution of all the smaller fractures in the reservoir are lumped into average values for the porosity and permeability of these matrix blocks which then feed the large fractures. Recent improvements of this model largely focus on a more accurate representation of the transport from matrix to fractures (e.g. Pruess et al., 1983; Ziminerman et al., 1992), but the basic geometry is rarely questioned. However, it has long been recognized that steam entries often occur in clusters separated by large intervals of unproductive rock (Thomas et al., 1981). Such clustering of fixtures at all scale lengths is one characteristic of self-similar distributions in which the fracture distribution is scale-independent. Recent studies of the geometry of fracture networks both in the laboratory and in the field are finding that such patterns are self-similar and can be best described using fractal geometry. Theoretical simulations of

  5. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  6. Acetabular fractures: what radiologists should know and how 3D CT can aid classification.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Dym, Akiva A; Spektor, Michael; Avery, Laura L; Dym, R Joshua; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2015-01-01

    Correct recognition, description, and classification of acetabular fractures is essential for efficient patient triage and treatment. Acetabular fractures may result from high-energy trauma or low-energy trauma in the elderly. The most widely used acetabular fracture classification system among radiologists and orthopedic surgeons is the system of Judet and Letournel, which includes five elementary (or elemental) and five associated fractures. The elementary fractures are anterior wall, posterior wall, anterior column, posterior column, and transverse. The associated fractures are all combinations or partial combinations of the elementary fractures and include transverse with posterior wall, T-shaped, associated both column, anterior column or wall with posterior hemitransverse, and posterior column with posterior wall. The most unique fracture is the associated both column fracture, which completely dissociates the acetabular articular surface from the sciatic buttress. Accurate categorization of acetabular fractures is challenging because of the complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the pelvis, the rarity of certain acetabular fracture variants, and confusing nomenclature. Comparing a 3D image of the fractured acetabulum with a standard diagram containing the 10 Judet and Letournel categories of acetabular fracture and using a flowchart algorithm are effective ways of arriving at the correct fracture classification. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25763739

  7. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorptionmore » capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.« less

  8. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorption capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.

  9. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  10. Finite Element Code For 3D-Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Equations (3-layer).

    1992-03-24

    HYFRACP3D is a finite element program for simulation of a pseudo three-dimensional fracture geometries with a two-dimensional planar solution. The model predicts the height, width and winglength over time for a hydraulic fracture propagating in a three-layered system of rocks with variable rock mechanics properties.

  11. Reconstructing the 3D fracture distribution model from core (10 cm) to outcrop (10 m) and lineament (10 km) scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcel, C.; Davy, P.; Bour, O.; de Dreuzy, J.

    2006-12-01

    Considering the role of fractures in hydraulic flow, the knowledge of the 3D spatial distribution of fractures is a basic concern for any hydrogeology-related study (potential leakages in waste repository, aquifer management, ?). Unfortunately geophysical imagery is quite blind with regard to fractures, and only the largest ones are generally detected, if they are. Actually most of the information has to be derived from statistical models whose parameters are defined from a few sparse sampling areas, such as wells, outcrops, or lineament maps. How these observations obtained at different scales can be linked to each other is a critical point, which directly addresses the issue of fracture scaling. In this study, we use one of the most important datasets that have ever been collected for characterizing fracture networks. It was collected by the Swedish company SKB for their research program on deep repository for radioactive waste, and consists of large-scale lineament maps covering about 100 km2, several outcrops of several hundreds of m2 mapped with a fracture trace length resolution down to 0.50 m, and a series of 1000m-deep cored boreholes where both fracture orientations and fracture intensities were carefully recorded. Boreholes are an essential complement to surface outcrops as they allow the sampling of horizontal fracture planes that, generally, are severely undersampled in subhorizontal outcrops. Outcrops, on the other hand, provide information on fracture sizes which is not possible to address from core information alone. However linking outcrops and boreholes is not straightforward: the sampling scale is obviously different and some scaling rules have to be applied to relate both fracture distributions; outcrops are 2D planes while boreholes are mostly 1D records; outcrops can be affected by superficial fracturing processes that are not representative of the fracturing at depth. We present here the stereology methods for calculating the 3D distribution

  12. Constructing 3D microtubule networks using holographic optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, J.; Osunbayo, O.; Vershinin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Developing abilities to assemble nanoscale structures is a major scientific and engineering challenge. We report a technique which allows precise positioning and manipulation of individual rigid filaments, enabling construction of custom-designed 3D filament networks. This approach uses holographic optical trapping (HOT) for nano-positioning and microtubules (MTs) as network building blocks. MTs are desirable engineering components due to their high aspect ratio, rigidity, and their ability to serve as substrate for directed nano-transport, reflecting their roles in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The 3D architecture of MT cytoskeleton is a significant component of its function, however experimental tools to study the roles of this geometric complexity in a controlled environment have been lacking. We demonstrate the broad capabilities of our system by building a self-supporting 3D MT-based nanostructure and by conducting a MT-based transport experiment on a dynamically adjustable 3D MT intersection. Our methodology not only will advance studies of cytoskeletal networks (and associated processes such as MT-based transport) but will also likely find use in engineering nanostructures and devices. PMID:26657337

  13. An algorithm for studying rigidity in disordered 3D networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubynsky, M. V.; Thorpe, M. F.

    2004-03-01

    Some physical systems, such as covalent glasses and proteins, can be modeled as elastic networks, by dividing the interactions between particles into strong and weak, representing the former as constraints and neglecting the latter. For low enough connectivities, motions maintaining the constraints and thus having zero energy cost are possible. The goal of rigidity analysis is finding the number of such zero energy modes, the rigid clusters and flexible joints between them, as well as stressed bonds. For a certain class of networks there is a very fast graph-theoretical algorithm (the Pebble Game) for doing this analysis, but for more general networks, there are known counterexamples. While generalizing the Pebble Game is the ultimate goal, we propose a slower algorithm capable of doing all the same analyses as the Pebble Game but applicable to any networks. We discuss the applications of this algorithm to specific examples of 3D networks, such as diluted central force lattices, colloidal glasses and proteins.

  14. Wetting Hierarchy in Oleophobic 3D Electrospun Nanofiber Networks.

    PubMed

    Stachewicz, Urszula; Bailey, Russell J; Zhang, Hao; Stone, Corinne A; Willis, Colin R; Barber, Asa H

    2015-08-01

    Wetting behavior between electrospun nanofibrous networks and liquids is of critical importance in many applications including filtration and liquid-repellent textiles. The relationship between intrinsic nanofiber properties, including surface characteristics, and extrinsic nanofibrous network organization on resultant wetting characteristics of the nanofiber network is shown in this work. Novel 3D imaging exploiting focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) highlights a wetting hierarchy that defines liquid interactions with the network. Specifically, small length scale partial wetting between individual electrospun nanofibers and low surface tension liquids, measured both using direct SEM visualization and a nano Wilhelmy balance approach, provides oleophobic surfaces due to the high porosity of electrospun nanofiber networks. These observations conform to a metastable Cassie-Baxter regime and are important in defining general rules for understanding the wetting behavior between fibrous solids and low surface tension liquids for omniphobic functionality. PMID:26176304

  15. Colloid-guided assembly of oriented 3D neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Pautot, Sophie; Wyart, Claire; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2009-01-01

    A central challenge in neuroscience is to understand the formation and function of three-dimensional (3D) neuronal networks. In vitro studies have been mainly limited to measurements of small numbers of neurons connected in two dimensions. Here we demonstrate the use of colloids as moveable supports for neuronal growth, maturation, transfection and manipulation, where the colloids serve as guides for the assembly of controlled 3D, millimeter-sized neuronal networks. Process growth can be guided into layered connectivity with a density similar to what is found in vivo. The colloidal superstructures are optically transparent, enabling remote stimulation and recording of neuronal activity using layer-specific expression of light-activated channels and indicator dyes. The modular approach toward in vitro circuit construction provides a stepping stone for applications ranging from basic neuroscience to neuron-based screening of targeted drugs. PMID:18641658

  16. Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Pavan; Xie, Sheng Quan; Delmas, Patrice; Xu, Wei Liang

    2010-02-01

    Femur shaft fractures are caused by high impact injuries and can affect gait functionality if not treated correctly. Until recently, the pre-operative planning for femur fractures has relied on two-dimensional (2D) radiographs, light boxes, tracing paper, and transparent bone templates. The recent availability of digital radiographic equipment has to some extent improved the workflow for preoperative planning. Nevertheless, imaging is still in 2D X-rays and planning/simulation tools to support fragment manipulation and implant selection are still not available. Direct three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) are also still restricted to a minority of complex orthopedic procedures. This paper proposes a software tool which allows orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose, plan and simulate femur shaft fracture reduction procedures in 3D. The tool utilizes frontal and lateral 2D radiographs to model the fracture surface, separate a generic bone into the two fractured fragments, identify the pose of each fragment, and automatically customize the shape of the bone. The use of 3D imaging allows full spatial inspection of the fracture providing different views through the manipulation of the interactively reconstructed 3D model, and ultimately better pre-operative planning.

  17. 3-D flame temperature field reconstruction with multiobjective neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiong; Gao, Yiqing; Wang, Yuanmei

    2003-02-01

    A novel 3-D temperature field reconstruction method is proposed in this paper, which is based on multiwavelength thermometry and Hopfield neural network computed tomography. A mathematical model of multi-wavelength thermometry is founded, and a neural network algorithm based on multiobjective optimization is developed. Through computer simulation and comparison with the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and the filter back-projection algorithm (FBP), the reconstruction result of the new method is discussed in detail. The study shows that the new method always gives the best reconstruction results. At last, temperature distribution of a section of four peaks candle flame is reconstructed with this novel method.

  18. 3D Actin Network Centerline Extraction with Multiple Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and actin cables. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we propose a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy. Quantitative evaluation of the method using synthetic images shows that for images with SNR above 5.0, the average vertex error measured by the distance between our result and ground truth is 1 voxel, and the average Hausdorff distance is below 10 voxels. PMID:24316442

  19. 3D Filament Network Segmentation with Multiple Active Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and microtubules. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we developed a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D TIRF Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

  20. Challenges and opportunities for fractured rock imaging using 3D cross-borehole electrical resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Judith; Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-02-02

    There is an increasing need to characterize discrete fractures away from boreholes to better define fracture distributions and monitor solute transport. We performed a 3D evaluation of static and time-lapse cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data sets from a limestone quarry in which flow and transport are controlled by a bedding-plane feature. Ten boreholes were discretized using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, and 2D panel measurements were inverted for a 3D distribution of conductivity. We evaluated the benefits of 3D versus 2.5D inversion of ERT data in fractured rock while including the use of borehole regularization disconnects (BRDs) and borehole conductivity constraints. High-conductivity halos (inversion artifacts) surrounding boreholes were removed in static images when BRDs and borehole conductivity constraints were implemented. Furthermore, applying these constraints focused transient changes in conductivity resulting from solute transport on the bedding plane, providing a more physically reasonable model for conductivity changes associated with solute transport at this fractured rock site. Assuming bedding-plane continuity between fractures identified in borehole televiewer data, we discretized a planar region between six boreholes and applied a fracture regularization disconnect (FRD). Although the FRD appropriately focused conductivity changes on the bedding plane, the conductivity distribution within the discretized fracture was nonunique and dependent on the starting homogeneous model conductivity. Synthetic studies performed to better explain field observations showed that inaccurate electrode locations in boreholes resulted in low-conductivity halos surrounding borehole locations. These synthetic studies also showed that the recovery of the true conductivity within an FRD depended on the conductivity contrast between the host rock and fractures. Our findings revealed that the potential exists to improve imaging of fractured

  1. Large optical 3D MEMS switches in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Kaman, Volkan; Yuan, Shifu; Jerphagnon, Olivier; Helkey, Roger; Bowers, John E.

    2007-09-01

    Interest is high among residential customers and businesses for advanced, broadband services such as fast Internet access, electronic commerce, video-on-demand, digital broadcasting, teleconferencing and telemedicine. In order to satisfy such growing demand of end-customers, access technologies such as fiber-to-the-home/building (FTTH/B) are increasingly being deployed. Carriers can reduce maintenance costs, minimize technology obsolescence and introduce new services easily by reducing active elements in the fiber access network. However, having a passive optical network (PON) also introduces operational and maintenance challenges. Increased diagnostic monitoring capability of the network becomes a necessity as more and more fibers are provisioned to deliver services to the end-customers. This paper demonstrates the clear advantages that large 3D optical MEMS switches offer in solving these access network problems. The advantages in preventative maintenance, remote monitoring, test and diagnostic capability are highlighted. The low optical insertion loss for all switch optical connections of the switch enables the monitoring, grooming and serving of a large number of PON lines and customers. Furthermore, the 3D MEMS switch is transparent to optical wavelengths and data formats, thus making it easy to incorporate future upgrades, such higher bit rates or DWDM overlay to a PON.

  2. 3D Photofixation Lithography in Diels–Alder Networks

    PubMed Central

    Adzima, Brian J.; Kloxin, Christopher J.; DeForest, Cole A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2013-01-01

    3D structures were written and developed in a crosslinked polymer initially formed by a Diels–Alder reaction. Unlike conventional liquid resists, small features cannot sediment, as the reversible crosslinks function as a support, and the modulus of the material is in the MPa range at room temperature. The support structure, however, can be easily removed by heating the material which depolymerizes the polymer into a mixture of low-viscosity monomers. Complex shapes were written into the polymer network using two-photon techniques to spatially control the photoinitiation and subsequent thiol–ene reaction to selectively convert the Diels–Alder adducts into irreversible crosslinks. PMID:23080017

  3. Treatment of Intercondylar Humeral Fractures With 3D-Printed Osteosynthesis Plates.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Hu, Wei; Shao, Yinchu; Li, Hao; Zou, Hongxing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy custom 3D-printed osteosynthesis plates in the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures.Thirteen patients with distal intercondylar humeral fractures were randomized to undergo surgery using either conventional plates (n = 7) or 3D-printed plates (n = 6) at our institution from March to October 2014. Both groups were compared in terms of operative time and elbow function at 6 month follow-up.All patients were followed-up for a mean of 10.6 months (range: 6-13 months). The 3D-printing group had a significantly shorter mean operative time (70.6 ± 12.1 min) than the conventional plates group (92.3 ± 17.4 min). At the last follow-up period, there was no significant difference between groups in the rate of patients with good or excellent elbow function, although the 3D-printing group saw a slightly higher rate of good or excellent evaluations (83.1%) compared to the conventional group (71.4%).Custom 3D printed osteosynthesis plates are safe and effective for the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures and significantly reduce operative time. PMID:26817880

  4. Treatment of Intercondylar Humeral Fractures With 3D-Printed Osteosynthesis Plates

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Feng; Hu, Wei; Shao, Yinchu; Li, Hao; Zou, Hongxing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy custom 3D-printed osteosynthesis plates in the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures. Thirteen patients with distal intercondylar humeral fractures were randomized to undergo surgery using either conventional plates (n = 7) or 3D-printed plates (n = 6) at our institution from March to October 2014. Both groups were compared in terms of operative time and elbow function at 6 month follow-up. All patients were followed-up for a mean of 10.6 months (range: 6–13 months). The 3D-printing group had a significantly shorter mean operative time (70.6 ± 12.1 min) than the conventional plates group (92.3 ± 17.4 min). At the last follow-up period, there was no significant difference between groups in the rate of patients with good or excellent elbow function, although the 3D-printing group saw a slightly higher rate of good or excellent evaluations (83.1%) compared to the conventional group (71.4%). Custom 3D printed osteosynthesis plates are safe and effective for the treatment of intercondylar humeral fractures and significantly reduce operative time. PMID:26817880

  5. Microseismic network design assessment based on 3D ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näsholm, Sven Peter; Wuestefeld, Andreas; Lubrano-Lavadera, Paul; Lang, Dominik; Kaschwich, Tina; Oye, Volker

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing demand on the versatility of microseismic monitoring networks. In early projects, being able to locate any triggers was considered a success. These early successes led to a better understanding of how to extract value from microseismic results. Today operators, regulators, and service providers work closely together in order to find the optimum network design to meet various requirements. In the current study we demonstrate an integrated and streamlined network capability assessment approach. It is intended for use during the microseismic network design process prior to installation. The assessments are derived from 3D ray tracing between a grid of event points and the sensors. Three aspects are discussed: 1) Magnitude of completeness or detection limit; 2) Event location accuracy; and 3) Ground-motion hazard. The network capability parameters 1) and 2) are estimated at all hypothetic event locations and are presented in the form of maps given a seismic sensor coordinate scenario. In addition, the ray tracing traveltimes permit to estimate the point-spread-functions (PSFs) at the event grid points. PSFs are useful in assessing the resolution and focusing capability of the network for stacking-based event location and imaging methods. We estimate the performance for a hypothetical network case with 11 sensors. We consider the well-documented region around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) located north of Parkfield, California. The ray tracing is done through a detailed velocity model which covers a 26.2 by 21.2 km wide area around the SAFOD drill site with a resolution of 200 m both for the P-and S-wave velocities. Systematic network capability assessment for different sensor site scenarios prior to installation facilitates finding a final design which meets the survey objectives.

  6. Reactive transport in 3D models of irregularly fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesner, T.; Mindel, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive transport through irregularly fractured rock masses is a key phenomenon in ore-forming hydrothermal systems, geothermal systems, and many other geological processes and will affect the mechanical properties and hydraulic apertures of fractures. Realistic representations of such systems have so far been hampered by technical limitations of most hydrothermal reactive transport codes, namely the ability to represent discrete fracture networks in a porous rock matrix. We present the first three-dimensional simulation results obtained from coupling a combined finite element - finite volume scheme of the revised CSMP++ flow simulation platform (1) with the GEMIPM3K (2) chemical equilibration code. In these, we represented fracture zones as thin, porous zones of higher permeability. The simulations demonstrate the effects of fracture zone orientation relative to the pressure field and fracture zone intersections on the differential advance of reaction fronts. We outline our numerical approaches for testing and comparing the effect of various ways of representing fractures and fracture zones in irregular meshes, namely the possibility of using layers of prism elements to represent fractures of finite thickness with internally varying properties and the possibility to represent thin fractures as lower dimensional (=2D) elements. We intend to make use of the "split node" capabilities of CSMP++ (3) to maintain sharp interfaces at material boundaries in order to be able to study the transient influence of reactive flow on fracture and matrix permeability in irregularly fractured rock masses.

  7. GPR data processing for 3D fracture mapping in a marble quarry (Thassos, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, G.; Gourry, J. C.

    1996-11-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been successfully applied to detect and map fractures in marble quarries. The aim was to distinguish quickly intact marketable marble areas from fractured ones in order to improve quarry management. The GPR profiling method was chosen because it is non destructive and quickly provides a detailed image of the subsurface. It was performed in domains corresponding to future working areas in real quarry-exploitation conditions. Field surveying and data processing were adapted to the local characteristics of the fractures: E-W orientation, sub-vertical dip, and karst features. After the GPR profiles had been processed, using methods adapted from seismics (amplitude compensation, filtering and Fourier migration), the interpreted fractures from a 12 × 24 × 15 m zone were incorporated into a 3D model. Due to the low electrical conductivity of the marble, GPR provides penetration depths of about 8 and 15 m, and resolutions of about 1 and 5 cm for frequencies of 900 and 300 MHz respectively. The detection power thus seems to be sufficient to recommend use of this method. As requested by the quarriers, the 3D representation can be used directly by themselves to locate high- or low-quality marble areas. Comparison between the observed surface fractures and the fractures detected using GPR showed reasonable correlation.

  8. Use of 3-d plate in displaced angle fracture of mandible.

    PubMed

    Pal, Uma Shanker; Singh, R K; Dhasmana, Satish; Das, Somdipto; Das, Sanjib K

    2013-03-01

    Introduction Mandibular angle fractures can be treated by various methods, but even the most popular methods may not be able to give satisfactory results, as the pterygomasseteric sling and masticatory forces can result in displaced angle fracture. These displaced fragments cannot be satisfactorily retained by single miniplate fixation. The aim of this study is to assess treatment of displaced angle fracture with 3-D miniplate fixation. This study can also be considered as a therapeutic study with level V evidence. Materials and Methods This study was designed to assess the feasibility of 3-D matrix miniplate fixation in displaced angle fractures. Eighteen patients with displaced angle fractures were included in this study. Matrix miniplate fixation was done transorally under general anesthesia. Results All these cases were treated successfully, and common complications like infection (5.5% of patients), wound dehiscence (11%), paresthesia (16.7%), and malocclusion (11%) were observed in our study. Conclusions Three-dimensional miniplate fixation in displaced angle fractures provides better stability and function. PMID:24436732

  9. Bone segmentation and fracture detection in ultrasound using 3D local phase features.

    PubMed

    Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Hodgson, Antony; Rohling, Robert

    2008-01-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is increasingly considered as a viable alternative imaging modality in computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) applications. Automatic bone segmentation from US images, however, remains a challenge due to speckle noise and various other artifacts inherent to US. In this paper, we present intensity invariant three dimensional (3D) local image phase features, obtained using 3D Log-Gabor filter banks, for extracting ridge-like features similar to those that occur at soft tissue/bone interfaces. Our contributions include the novel extension of 2D phase symmetry features to 3D and their use in automatic extraction of bone surfaces and fractured fragments in 3D US. We validate our technique using phantom, in vitro, and in vivo experiments. Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate remarkably clear segmentations results of bone surfaces with a localization accuracy of better than 0.62 mm and mean errors in estimating fracture displacements below 0.65 mm, which will likely be of strong clinical utility. PMID:18979759

  10. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  11. Improved accuracy of 3D-printed navigational template during complicated tibial plateau fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Zhang, Guodong; Ouyang, Hanbin; Zeng, Canjun; Yan, Bin; Xu, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wu, Zhanglin; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-03-01

    This study was aimed to improve the surgical accuracy of plating and screwing for complicated tibial plateau fracture assisted by 3D implants library and 3D-printed navigational template. Clinical cases were performed whereby complicated tibial plateau fractures were imaged using computed tomography and reconstructed into 3D fracture prototypes. The preoperative planning of anatomic matching plate with appropriate screw trajectories was performed with the help of the library of 3D models of implants. According to the optimal planning, patient-specific navigational templates produced by 3D printer were used to accurately guide the real surgical implantation. The fixation outcomes in term of the deviations of screw placement between preoperative and postoperative screw trajectories were measured and compared, including the screw lengths, entry point locations and screw directions. With virtual preoperative planning, we have achieved optimal and accurate fixation outcomes in the real clinical surgeries. The deviations of screw length was 1.57 ± 5.77 mm, P > 0.05. The displacements of the entry points in the x-, y-, and z-axis were 0.23 ± 0.62, 0.83 ± 1.91, and 0.46 ± 0.67 mm, respectively, P > 0.05. The deviations of projection angle in the coronal (x-y) and transverse (x-z) planes were 6.34 ± 3.42° and 4.68 ± 3.94°, respectively, P > 0.05. There was no significant difference in the deviations of screw length, entry point and projection angle between the ideal and real screw trajectories. The ideal and accurate preoperative planning of plating and screwing can be achieved in the real surgery assisted by the 3D models library of implants and the patient-specific navigational template. This technology improves the accuracy and efficiency of personalized internal fixation surgery and we have proved this in our clinical applications. PMID:25663390

  12. Fracture Resistance of Non-Metallic Molar Crowns Manufactured with CEREC 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Dalia A.

    Objectives. To compare fracture strength and fatigue resistance of ceramic (ProCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) (C) and resin composite (Paradigm MZ100, 3M/ ESPE) (R) crowns made with CEREC-3D. Methods. A prepared ivorine molar tooth was duplicated to produce 40 identical prepared specimens made of epoxy resin (Viade). Twenty (C) crowns and 20 (R) were cemented to their dies using resin cement. Ten of each group were subjected to compressive loading to fracture. The remaining 10 of each group were subjected to mechanical cyclic loading for 500,000 cycles. The survivors were subjected to compressive loading to fracture. Results. No significant difference in mean fracture load was found between the two materials. However, only 30% of the (C) crowns vs. 100% of the (R) crowns survived the cyclic loading test. Conclusions. (R) crowns demonstrated higher fatigue Resistance than (C) crowns in-vitro and might better resist cracking in-vivo.

  13. A Spatial Clustering Approach for Stochastic Fracture Network Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifollahi, S.; Dowd, P. A.; Xu, C.; Fadakar, A. Y.

    2014-07-01

    Fracture network modelling plays an important role in many application areas in which the behaviour of a rock mass is of interest. These areas include mining, civil, petroleum, water and environmental engineering and geothermal systems modelling. The aim is to model the fractured rock to assess fluid flow or the stability of rock blocks. One important step in fracture network modelling is to estimate the number of fractures and the properties of individual fractures such as their size and orientation. Due to the lack of data and the complexity of the problem, there are significant uncertainties associated with fracture network modelling in practice. Our primary interest is the modelling of fracture networks in geothermal systems and, in this paper, we propose a general stochastic approach to fracture network modelling for this application. We focus on using the seismic point cloud detected during the fracture stimulation of a hot dry rock reservoir to create an enhanced geothermal system; these seismic points are the conditioning data in the modelling process. The seismic points can be used to estimate the geographical extent of the reservoir, the amount of fracturing and the detailed geometries of fractures within the reservoir. The objective is to determine a fracture model from the conditioning data by minimizing the sum of the distances of the points from the fitted fracture model. Fractures are represented as line segments connecting two points in two-dimensional applications or as ellipses in three-dimensional (3D) cases. The novelty of our model is twofold: (1) it comprises a comprehensive fracture modification scheme based on simulated annealing and (2) it introduces new spatial approaches, a goodness-of-fit measure for the fitted fracture model, a measure for fracture similarity and a clustering technique for proposing a locally optimal solution for fracture parameters. We use a simulated dataset to demonstrate the application of the proposed approach

  14. Fracture Networks in Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vevatne, Jonas; Rimstad, Eivind; Hansen, Alex; Korsnes, Reinert; Hope, Sigmund

    2014-04-01

    Fracturing and refreezing of sea ice in the Kara sea are investigated using complex networkanalysis. By going to the dual network, where the fractures are nodes and their intersectionslinks, we gain access to topological features which are easy to measure and hence comparewith modeled networks. Resulting network reveal statistical properties of the fracturing process.The dual networks have a broad degree distribution, with a scale-free tail, high clusteringand efficiency. The degree-degree correlation profile shows disassortative behavior, indicatingpreferential growth. This implies that long, dominating fractures appear earlier than shorterfractures, and that the short fractures which are created later tend to connect to the longfractures.The knowledge of the fracturing process is used to construct growing fracture network (GFN)model which provides insight into the generation of fracture networks. The GFN model isprimarily based on the observation that fractures in sea ice are likely to end when hitting existingfractures. Based on an investigation of which fractures survive over time, a simple model forrefreezing is also added to the GFN model, and the model is analyzed and compared to the realnetworks.

  15. The Evolution of Fracture Systems in Rocks with Veins: Insights from 3D Discrete Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, S.; Urai, J. L.; Abe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from natural vein systems suggest that preexisting veins can strongly influence orientation, continuity and connectivity of fractures in a rock even in cases where the orientation of the veins is incompatible with the orientation of the stress field. We present a numerical method to model cycles of fracturing and sealing in a rotating stress field to simulate such systems, for different strength ratios of host rock and vein. We study a layered model under vertical stress and uniaxial horizontal extension. This represents common conditions in sedimentary basins with layers of varying composition. The model with fractures that form during the first deformation phase is sealed and deformed again in a different direction to model the effect of a changing horizontal stress field. We find different types of fracture interaction with veins, depending on the strength contrast between veins and host rock and amount of rotation. The crack-seal and crack-jump mechanisms ensue naturally from the models as a result of the strength of the vein material relative to the host rock. Weak veins localize fracturing and reactivate, even in high misorientation to the extension direction. Connecting fractures between reactivated veins form at a higher angle to the veins than expected. In these systems, the connectivity of the fracture network is dramatically increased. Veins stronger than the host rock have less influence on the new fractures. Most fractures crosscut the veins by the step-over mechanism. Deflection occurs for favorable vein orientations but the deflection length is very short. The results are in good agreement with natural crack seal vein networks found in carbonate rocks of the Oman Mountains. We find that preexisting veins can change the fracture behavior of a rock in a way that new fractures do not necessarily align with the principle extension direction and form a highly connected network with reactivated veins that dramatically enhances lateral

  16. The role of 3D plating system in mandibular fractures: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rajendra; Thangavelu, Kavin; John, Reena

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of 3D plating system in the treatment of mandibular fractures. Patients and Methods: 20 mandibular fractures in 18 patients at various anatomic locations and were treated by open reduction and internal fixation using 3D plates. All patients were followed at regular intervals of 4th, 8th and 12th weeks respectively. Patients were assessed post-operatively for lingual splay and occlusal stability. The incidence of neurosensory deficit, infection, masticatory difficulty, non-union, malunion was also assessed. Results: A significant reduction in lingual splay (72.2%) and occlusal stability (72.2%) was seen. The overall complication rate was (16.6%) which included two patients who developed post-operative paresthesia of lip, three patients had infection and two cases of masticatory difficulty which later subsided by higher antibiotics and 4 weeks of MMF. No evidence of non-union, malunion was noted. Conclusion: A single 3D 2 mm miniplate with 2 mm × 8 mm screws is a reliable and an effective treatment modality for mandibular fracture. PMID:23946559

  17. Building virtual 3D bone fragment models to control diaphyseal fracture reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Thierry; Schuind, Frederic; Lasudry, Nadine; Van Ham, Philippe

    1999-05-01

    Most fractures of the long bones are displaced and need to be surgically reduced. External fixation is often used but the crucial point of this technique is the control of reduction, which is effected with a brilliance amplifier. This system, giving instantly a x-ray image, has many disadvantages. It implies frequent irradiation to the patient and the surgical team, the visual field is limited, the supplied images are distorted and it only gives 2D information. Consequently, the reduction is occasionally imperfect although intraoperatively it appears acceptable. Using the pains inserted in each fragment as markers and an optical tracker, it is possible to build a virtual 3D model for each principal fragment and to follow its movement during the reduction. This system will supply a 3D image of the fracture in real time and without irradiation. The brilliance amplifier could then be replaced by such a virtual reality system to provide the surgeon with an accurate tool facilitating the reduction of the fracture. The purpose of this work is to show how to build the 3D model for each principal bone fragment.

  18. Particle Swarm Transport in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Mackin, T.; Boomsma, E.

    2012-12-01

    Colloidal particles of many types occur in fractures in the subsurface as a result of both natural and industrial processes (e.g., environmental influences, synthetic nano- & micro-particles from consumer products, chemical and mechanical erosion of geologic material, proppants used in gas and oil extraction, etc.). The degree of localization and speed of transport of such particles depends on the transport mechanisms, the chemical and physical properties of the particles and the surrounding rock, and the flow path geometry through the fracture. In this study, we investigated the transport of particle swarms through artificial fracture networks. A synthetic fracture network was created using an Objet Eden 350V 3D printer to build a network of fractures. Each fracture in the network had a rectangular cross-sectional area with a constant depth of 7 mm but with widths that ranged from 2 mm to 11 mm. The overall dimensions of the network were 132 mm by 166 mm. The fracture network had 7 ports that were used either as the inlet or outlet for fluid flow through the sample or for introducing a particle swarm. Water flow rates through the fracture were controlled with a syringe pump, and ranged from zero flow to 6 ml/min. Swarms were composed of a dilute suspension (2% by mass) of 3 μm fluorescent polystyrene beads in water. Swarms with volumes of 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 μl were used and delivered into the network using a second syringe pump. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system illuminated by green (525 nm) LED arrays and captured by a CCD camera. For fracture networks with quiescent fluids, particle swarms fell under gravity and remained localized within the network. Large swarms (30-60 μl) were observed to bifurcate at shallower depths resulting in a broader dispersal of the particles than for smaller swarm volumes. For all swarm volumes studied, particle swarms tended to bifurcate at the intersection between fractures. These

  19. FRACTURED RESERVOIR E&P IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN BASINS: A 3-D RTM MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    P. Ortoleva; J. Comer; A. Park; D. Payne; W. Sibo; K. Tuncay

    2001-11-26

    Key natural gas reserves in Rocky Mountain and other U.S. basins are in reservoirs with economic producibility due to natural fractures. In this project, we evaluate a unique technology for predicting fractured reservoir location and characteristics ahead of drilling based on a 3-D basin/field simulator, Basin RTM. Recommendations are made for making Basin RTM a key element of a practical E&P strategy. A myriad of reaction, transport, and mechanical (RTM) processes underlie the creation, cementation and preservation of fractured reservoirs. These processes are often so strongly coupled that they cannot be understood individually. Furthermore, sedimentary nonuniformity, overall tectonics and basement heat flux histories make a basin a fundamentally 3-D object. Basin RTM is the only 3-D, comprehensive, fully coupled RTM basin simulator available for the exploration of fractured reservoirs. Results of Basin RTM simulations are presented, that demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Furthermore, it is shown how Basin RTM is a basis for a revolutionary automated methodology for simultaneously using a range of remote and other basin datasets to locate reservoirs and to assess risk. Characteristics predicted by our model include reserves and composition, matrix and fracture permeability, reservoir rock strength, porosity, in situ stress and the statistics of fracture aperture, length and orientation. Our model integrates its input data (overall sedimentation, tectonic and basement heat flux histories) via the laws of physics and chemistry that describe the RTM processes to predict reservoir location and characteristics. Basin RTM uses 3-D, finite element solutions of the equations of rock mechanics, organic and inorganic diagenesis and multi-phase hydrology to make its predictions. As our model predicts reservoir characteristics, it can be used to optimize production approaches (e.g., assess the stability of horizontal wells or vulnerability of fractures to

  20. Laboratory Visualization of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation and Interaction with a Network of Preexisting Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Borglin, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present optical visualization experiments of hydraulic fracture propagation within transparent rock-analogue samples containing a network of preexisting fractures. Natural fractures and heterogeneities in rock have a great impact on hydraulic fracture propagation and resulting improvements in reservoir permeability. In recent years, many sophisticated numerical simulations on hydraulic fracturing have been conducted. Laboratory experiments on hydraulic fracturing are often performed with acoustic emission (Micro Earthquake) monitoring, which allows detection and location of fracturing and fracture propagation. However, the detected fractures are not necessarily hydraulically produced fractures which provide permeable pathways connected to the injection (and production) well. The primary objectives of our visualization experiments are (1) to obtain quantitative visual information of hydraulic fracture propagation affected by pre-existing fractures and (2) to distinguish fractures activated by the perturbed stress field away from the injected fluid and hydraulically produced fractures. The obtained data are also used to develop and validate a new numerical modeling technique (TOUGH-RBSN [Rigid-Body-Spring-Network] model) for hydraulic fracturing simulations, which is presented in a companion paper. The experiments are conducted using transparent soda-lime glass cubes (10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm) containing either (1) 3D laser-engraved artificial fractures and fracture networks or (2) a random network of fractures produced by rapid thermal quenching. The strength (and also the permeability for the latter) of the fractures can be altered to examine their impact on hydraulic fracturing. The cubes are subjected to true-triaxial stress within a polyaxial loading frame, and hydraulic fractures are produced by injecting fluids with a range of viscosity into an analogue borehole drilled in the sample. The visual images of developing fractures are obtained both through a port

  1. 3-D constraint effects on models for transferability of cleavage fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Ruggieri, C.; Koppenhoefer, K.

    1997-12-31

    Since the late 1980s there has been renewed interest and progress in understanding the effects of constraint on transgranular cleavage in ferritic steels. Research efforts to characterize the complex interaction of crack tip separation processes with geometry, loading mode and material flow properties proceed along essentially two major lines of investigation: (1) multi-parameter descriptions of stationary crack-tip fields under large-scale yielding conditions, and (2) rational micromechanics models for the description of cleavage fracture which also reflect the observed scatter in the ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) region. This article reviews the essential features of a specific example representing each approach: the J-Q extension to correlative fracture mechanics and a local approach based on the Weibull stress. Discussions focus on the growing body of 3-D numerical solutions for common fracture specimens which, in certain cases, prove significantly different from long-established plane-strain results.

  2. A Retrospective 3D Radiologic Analysis of 52 Patients with Mandible Fractures.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Heval Selman; Irkoren, Saime; Durum, Yasemin; Karaca, Can

    2016-02-01

    When fractured, mandible angulates. For better preoperative evaluation, movements of fractured mandibular segments should be documented in x-, y-, and z-axes. This article quantitatively evaluates the pattern and degree of the angulation. Fifty-two patients with mandible fractures were involved in this study. After defining a three-dimensional (3D) coordination system consisting of the x-axis (the axis directed from the medial to lateral side of the skull), y-axis (directed from the inferior to superior side), and z-axis (directed from the posterior to anterior side), the degree with which the fractured mandible angulated around each of these axes was measured using 3D graphic software. The tendency of the angulation was compared between the three axes. Frequency of complications, operation times, maxilla mandibular fixation (MMF) need, and epidemiologic data were compared with the angulation results. Angulation around the x-axis was the most frequent with a 55.8% incidence, followed by a substantial margin of angulation around the y-axis with a 21.2% incidence; angulation around the z-axis was rare, with an incidence of 15.4%. Furthermore, the degree of z-axis angulation was minor compared with x- and y-axes angulations. There were statistically increased rate of complications, operation time, and MMF need in patients with more than 10 degrees of angulation in any case. Operation time and complication rates are also increased in patients with internal rotation of the proximal segment. Preoperative evaluation of mandible fracture angulation degree is useful for determining postoperative complication rates, MMF need, and operative challenge. This finding is helpful for effective performance to reposition the fractured mandible. PMID:26862971

  3. Fracture mechanics of propagating 3-D fatigue cracks with parametric dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akiyuki; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2013-07-01

    Propagation of 3-D fatigue cracks is analyzed using a discrete dislocation representation of the crack opening displacement. Three dimensional cracks are represented with Volterra dislocation loops in equilibrium with the applied external load. The stress intensity factor (SIF) is calculated using the Peach-Koehler (PK) force acting on the crack tip dislocation loop. Loading mode decomposition of the SIF is achieved by selection of Burgers vector components to correspond to each fracture mode in the PK force calculations. The interaction between 3-D cracks and free surfaces is taken into account through application of the superposition principle. A boundary integral solution of an elasticity problem in a finite domain is superposed onto the elastic field solution of the discrete dislocation method in an infinite medium. The numerical accuracy of the SIF is ascertained by comparison with known analytical solution of a 3-D crack problem in pure mode I, and for mixed-mode loading. Finally, fatigue crack growth simulations are performed with the Paris law, showing that 3-D cracks do not propagate in a self-similar shape, but they re-configure as a result of their interaction with external boundaries. A specific numerical example of fatigue crack growth is presented to demonstrate the utility of the developed method for studies of 3-D crack growth during fatigue.

  4. Conventional 2.0 mm miniplates versus 3-D plates in mandibular fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sadhwani, Bipin S.; Anchlia, Sonal

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare and evaluate the treatment outcome and postoperative complications in mandibular fractures using 2- and 3-dimensional miniplates. Materials and Methods: This study consisted of a sample of 28 patients (40 fracture sites) divided randomly but equally (single-blind control trial study) into two groups. Each group contains 14 patients (20 similar fracture sites in each group). Group 1 was treated with open reduction and internal fixation using 3-dimensional (3-D) miniplates. Group II was treated using 2-dimensional (2-D) 2-mm miniplates. Results: Out of 14 patients treated by conventional 2-mm miniplates, 2 patients developed occlusal discrepancy, another 2 had postoperative mobility at fracture site, and 1 developed plate failure and subsequent infection, which was treated by removal of the plate under antibiotic coverage. One patient treated by 3-dimensional plates had tooth damage. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that the treatment of mandibular fractures (symphysis, parasymphysis, and angle) with 3-dimensional plates provided 3-dimensional stability and carried low morbidity and infection rates. The only probable limitations of 3-dimensional plates were excessive implant material due to the extra vertical bars incorporated for countering the torque forces. PMID:24205475

  5. A new algorithm for evaluating 3D curvature and curvature gradient for improved fracture detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haibin; Gao, Dengliang

    2014-09-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, both curvature and curvature gradient are useful seismic attributes for structure characterization and fault detection in the subsurface. However, the existing algorithms are computationally intensive and limited by the lateral resolution for steeply-dipping formations. This study presents new and robust volume-based algorithms that evaluate both curvature and curvature gradient attributes more accurately and effectively. The algorithms first instantaneously fit a local surface to seismic data and then compute attributes using the spatial derivatives of the built surface. Specifically, the curvature algorithm constructs a quadratic surface by using a rectangle 9-node grid cell, whereas the curvature gradient algorithm builds a cubic surface by using a diamond 13-node grid cell. A dip-steering approach based on 3D complex seismic trace analysis is implemented to enhance the accuracy of surface construction and to reduce computational time. Applications to two 3D seismic surveys demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the new curvature and curvature gradient algorithms for characterizing faults and fractures in fractured reservoirs.

  6. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  7. Generation of Multi-Scale Vascular Network System within 3D Hydrogel using 3D Bio-Printing Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian K; Lanzi, Alison M; Haygan, Ngo; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A; Dai, Guohao

    2014-09-01

    Although 3D bio-printing technology has great potential in creating complex tissues with multiple cell types and matrices, maintaining the viability of thick tissue construct for tissue growth and maturation after the printing is challenging due to lack of vascular perfusion. Perfused capillary network can be a solution for this issue; however, construction of a complete capillary network at single cell level using the existing technology is nearly impossible due to limitations in time and spatial resolution of the dispensing technology. To address the vascularization issue, we developed a 3D printing method to construct larger (lumen size of ~1mm) fluidic vascular channels and to create adjacent capillary network through a natural maturation process, thus providing a feasible solution to connect the capillary network to the large perfused vascular channels. In our model, microvascular bed was formed in between two large fluidic vessels, and then connected to the vessels by angiogenic sprouting from the large channel edge. Our bio-printing technology has a great potential in engineering vascularized thick tissues and vascular niches, as the vascular channels are simultaneously created while cells and matrices are printed around the channels in desired 3D patterns. PMID:25484989

  8. Generation of Multi-Scale Vascular Network System within 3D Hydrogel using 3D Bio-Printing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vivian K.; Lanzi, Alison M.; Haygan, Ngo; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A.; Dai, Guohao

    2014-01-01

    Although 3D bio-printing technology has great potential in creating complex tissues with multiple cell types and matrices, maintaining the viability of thick tissue construct for tissue growth and maturation after the printing is challenging due to lack of vascular perfusion. Perfused capillary network can be a solution for this issue; however, construction of a complete capillary network at single cell level using the existing technology is nearly impossible due to limitations in time and spatial resolution of the dispensing technology. To address the vascularization issue, we developed a 3D printing method to construct larger (lumen size of ~1mm) fluidic vascular channels and to create adjacent capillary network through a natural maturation process, thus providing a feasible solution to connect the capillary network to the large perfused vascular channels. In our model, microvascular bed was formed in between two large fluidic vessels, and then connected to the vessels by angiogenic sprouting from the large channel edge. Our bio-printing technology has a great potential in engineering vascularized thick tissues and vascular niches, as the vascular channels are simultaneously created while cells and matrices are printed around the channels in desired 3D patterns. PMID:25484989

  9. Application of 3D Printing in the Surgical Planning of Trimalleolar Fracture and Doctor-Patient Communication

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Long; Shang, Xian-Wen; Fan, Jian-Nan; He, Zhi-Xu; Wang, Jian-Ji; Liu, Miao; Zhuang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3D printing in treating trimalleolar fractures and its roles in physician-patient communication, thirty patients with trimalleolar fractures were randomly divided into the 3D printing assisted-design operation group (Group A) and the no-3D printing assisted-design group (Group B). In Group A, 3D printing was used by the surgeons to produce a prototype of the actual fracture to guide the surgical treatment. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation. A questionnaire was designed for doctors and patients to verify the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototype. Meanwhile, the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss were compared between the two groups. The fracture prototypes were accurately printed, and the average overall score of the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototypes was relatively high. Both the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss in Group A were less than those in Group B (P < 0.05). Patient satisfaction using the 3D-printed prototype and the communication score were 9.3 ± 0.6 points. A 3D-printed prototype can faithfully reflect the anatomy of the fracture site; it can effectively help the doctors plan the operation and represent an effective tool for physician-patient communication. PMID:27446944

  10. Application of 3D Printing in the Surgical Planning of Trimalleolar Fracture and Doctor-Patient Communication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long; Shang, Xian-Wen; Fan, Jian-Nan; He, Zhi-Xu; Wang, Jian-Ji; Liu, Miao; Zhuang, Yong; Ye, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3D printing in treating trimalleolar fractures and its roles in physician-patient communication, thirty patients with trimalleolar fractures were randomly divided into the 3D printing assisted-design operation group (Group A) and the no-3D printing assisted-design group (Group B). In Group A, 3D printing was used by the surgeons to produce a prototype of the actual fracture to guide the surgical treatment. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation. A questionnaire was designed for doctors and patients to verify the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototype. Meanwhile, the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss were compared between the two groups. The fracture prototypes were accurately printed, and the average overall score of the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototypes was relatively high. Both the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss in Group A were less than those in Group B (P < 0.05). Patient satisfaction using the 3D-printed prototype and the communication score were 9.3 ± 0.6 points. A 3D-printed prototype can faithfully reflect the anatomy of the fracture site; it can effectively help the doctors plan the operation and represent an effective tool for physician-patient communication. PMID:27446944

  11. 3D Discrete Element Model with 1 Million Particles: an Example of Hydro-fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Pollard, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) permits large relative motion and breakage of elements, and does not require re-meshing, for example as would the Finite Element Method. DEM has a wide range of applications in the fields of solid-earth geophysics, geomechanics, mining engineering, and structural geology. However, due to the computational cost, particle numbers of discrete element models are generally less than a few tens of thousands, which limits the applications. A new 3D DEM system 'MatDEM' can complete dynamic simulations of one million particles. The conversion formulas between particle parameters and model mechanical properties were derived, and the conversion of energy in DEM can be simulated. In a recent paper (Liu et al., 2013, JGR), the analytical solutions of elastic properties and failure modes of a 2D close-packed discrete element model were proposed. Based on these theoretical results, it is easy to create materials using DEM, which have similar mechanical properties to rock. Given the mechanical properties and state of stress, geologists and engineers can investigate the characteristics of rock deformation and failure under different conditions. MatDEM provides an alternative way to study the micro-macro relationships of rock and soil, and the evolution of geologic structures. As an example, MatDEM was used to investigate the generation and development of fluid driven fractures around a micro pore. The simulation result of fractures of an anisotropic 3D model, which includes 1 million particles, is demonstrated. Via parallel computing technology, MatDEM may handle tens of millions of particles in near future. Left: Fluid pressure is applied in the pore to generate fractures. Right: Simulation results (black segments represent fractures).

  12. External fixator configurations in tibia fractures: 1D optimization and 3D analysis comparison.

    PubMed

    Roseiro, Luis M; Neto, M Augusta; Amaro, Ana; Leal, Rogerio P; Samarra, Miguel C

    2014-01-01

    The use of external fixation devices in orthopedic surgery is very common in open tibial fractures. A properly applied fixator may improve the healing process while one improperly applied might delay the healing process. The several external fixator systems used in clinical today, can be categorized into uniplanar-unilateral, uniplanar-bilateral, biplanar and multiplanar. The stability on the fracture focus and, therefore, the fracture healing process, is related with the type of external fixator configuration that is selected. The aim of this study is to discuss the principles for the successful application of unilateral-uniplanar external fixation, the assembly of its components, for the case of a transverse fractures using computational models. In this context, the fixation stiffness characteristics are evaluated using a simplified 1D finite element model for the tibia and external fixator. The beams are modeled with realistic cross-sectional geometry and material properties instead of a simplified model. The VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis) methodology is used to compute the cross-sectional model for the generalized Timoshenko model, which was embedded in the finite element solver FEAP. The use of Timoshenko beam theory allows accounting for several kinds of loads, including torsion moments. Optimal design is performed with respect to the assembly of fixator components using a genetic algorithm. The optimization procedure is based on the evaluation of an objective function, which is dependent on the displacement at the fracture focus. The initial and optimal results are compared by performing a 3D analysis, for which different three-dimensional finite element models are created. The geometrical model of a tibia is created on the basis of data acquired by CAT scan, made for a healthy tibia of a 22 year old male. The 3D comparison of the 1D optimal results show a clear improvement on the objective function for the several load cases and

  13. Measuring Fracture Properties of Meteorites: 3D Scans and Disruption Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The Arizona State University (ASU) Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) houses over 30,000 specimens that represent almost every known meteorite type. A number of these are available for fragmentation experiments in small samples, but in most cases non-destructive experiments are desired in order to determine the fundamental mechanical properties of meteorites, and by extension, the Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and other planetary bodies they derive from. We present results from an ongoing suite of measurements and experiments, featuring automated 3D topographic scans of a comprehensive suite of meteorites in the CMS collection, basic mechanical studies, and culminating in catastrophic fragmentation of four representative meteorites: Tamdakht (H5), Allende (CV3), Northwest Africa 869 (L3-6) and Chelyabinsk (LL5). Results will include high-resolution 3D color-shape models of meteorites, including specimens such as the 349g oriented and fusion crusted Martian (shergottite) Tissint, and the delicately fusion crusted and oriented 131g Whetstone Mountains (H5) ordinary chondrite. The 3D color-shape models will allow us to obtain basic physical properties (such as volume to derive density) and to derive fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces. Fractal dimension is closely related to the internal structural heterogeneity and fragmentation of the material, to macroscopic optical properties, and to rubble friction and cohesion. Freshly fractured surfaces of fragments that will result from catastrophic hypervelocity impact experiments will be subsequently scanned and analyzed in order to determine whether fractal dimension is preserved or if it changes with surface maturation.

  14. Skill Assessment in the Interpretation of 3D Fracture Patterns from Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Murillo, Salvador; Hanley, Jessica M; Kreiter, Clarence D; Karam, Matthew D; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Interpreting two-dimensional radiographs to ascertain the three-dimensional (3D) position and orientation of fracture planes and bone fragments is an important component of orthopedic diagnosis and clinical management. This skill, however, has not been thoroughly explored and measured. Our primary research question is to determine if 3D radiographic image interpretation can be reliably assessed, and whether this assessment varies by level of training. A test designed to measure this skill among orthopedic surgeons would provide a quantitative benchmark for skill assessment and training research. Methods Two tests consisting of a series of online exercises were developed to measure this skill. Each exercise displayed a pair of musculoskeletal radiographs. Participants selected one of three CT slices of the same or similar fracture patterns that best matched the radiographs. In experiment 1, 10 orthopedic residents and staff responded to nine questions. In experiment 2, 52 residents from both orthopedics and radiology responded to 12 questions. Results Experiment 1 yielded a Cronbach alpha of 0.47. Performance correlated with experience; r(8) = 0.87, p<0.01, suggesting that the test could be both valid and reliable with a slight increase in test length. In experiment 2, after removing three non-discriminating items, the Cronbach coefficient alpha was 0.28 and performance correlated with experience; r(50) = 0.25, p<0.10. Conclusions Although evidence for reliability and validity was more compelling with the first experiment, the analyses suggest motivation and test duration are important determinants of test efficacy. The interpretation of radiographs to discern 3D information is a promising and a relatively unexplored area for surgical skill education and assessment. The online test was useful and reliable. Further test development is likely to increase test effectiveness. Clinical Relevance Accurately interpreting radiographic images is an

  15. Estimation of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Earth Fill Dam by 3-D Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin-Ichi

    It is necessary to calculate strength and strain for estimation of hydraulic fracturing in the earth fill dam, and to which the FEM is effective. 2-D analysis can produce good results to some extent if an embankment is linear and the plain strain condition can be set to the cross section. However, there may be some conditions not possible to express in the 2-D plain because the actual embankment of agricultural reservoirs is formed by straight and curved lines. Moreover, it may not be possible to precisely calculate strain in the direction of dam axis because the 2-D analysis in the cross section cannot take the shape in the vertical section into consideration. Therefore, we performed 3-D built up analysis targeting the actually-leaked agricultural reservoir to examine hazards of hydraulic fracturing based on the shape of an embankment and by rapid impoundment of water. It resulted in the occurrence of hydraulic fracturing to develop by water pressure due to the vertical cracks caused by tensile strain in the valley and refractive section of the foundation.

  16. Use of 2D and 3D Imaging Techniques to Understand Fracture Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockner, D. A.

    2004-05-01

    The monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) is a valuable tool for studying the brittle fracture process in rock. With the improved characterization of transducer response, researchers are able to apply a broad spectrum of seismological techniques to AE catalogues collected in the laboratory; i.e., moment tensor analysis, Vp/Vs ratios, attenuation, event clustering statistics, Gutenberg-Richter b-value and aftershock analysis. Since AE occurs spontaneously as a result of unstable microcrack growth during rock deformation experiments, it provides a non-destructive method to observe damage accumulation. I will give examples of visualization techniques that have proven helpful in the analysis of fracture nucleation and growth based on 3D event locations in granite and sandstone samples. These techniques are useful in interpreting the development of complex fracture systems in lab samples. Complementary measurements of wave speed anisotropy and heterogeneity are used to infer both the development of damage zones and the rate of infiltration of water during fluid injection experiments. Finally, spatial clustering of AE events is evaluated in terms of the surface roughness of reactivated faults during triaxial deformation experiments.

  17. Hydrostructural Characterization of Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T. W.; Hermanson, J.

    2007-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, research in underground laboratories for radioactive waste has led to the development of integrated site investigation and modeling methods for fracture networks. These activities began with the Stripa Project in central Sweden from 1977 to 1992 and have continued worldwide. Experiments on the scale of 100- 200 meter blocks have demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating testing during drilling, pressure monitoring, geologic description, flow logging, pressure transient testing, and groundwater chemistry to define fracture network geometries, particularly with respect to the identification of major features, background fractures, and compartmentalization. Major features are those large fractures or fracture zones that control the flow at the scale of interest, and must be simulated as deterministic features. Background fractures are defined stochastically, and provide connectivity between deterministic features. Based on the experience of block-scale investigations, it is possible to develop a clear picture of hydraulic networks using an integrated structural geologic, hydraulic, and hydrochemical approach. Although fracture network characterization requires a good geologic description of fractures and fracture zones from core and image logging, not all geologic features are water-conducting. Identifying water-conducting fractures begins with measurements of flow during drilling and flow logging immediately afterwards to identify significant conducting features. Major flow features must be hydraulically isolated using multiple point piezometer systems, if subsequent investigation methods are to be successful. Once installed, the pressure responses in the piezometers to subsequent drilling provide key information on connectivity and compartmentalization. Generally with three holes are sufficient to develop initial conceptual models of the major, controlling features. Subsequent boreholes test these geometric hypotheses and provide bases

  18. 3D pore-network analysis and permeability estimation of deformation bands hosted in carbonate grainstones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Miller; Tondi, Emanuele; Mancini, Lucia; Trias, F. Xavier; Arzilli, Fabio; Lanzafame, Gabriele; Aibibula, Nijiati

    2016-04-01

    In porous rocks strain is commonly localized in narrow Deformation Bands (DBs), where the petrophysical properties are significantly modified with respect the pristine rock. As a consequence, DBs could have an important effect on production and development of porous reservoirs representing baffles zones or, in some cases, contribute to reservoir compartmentalization. Taking in consideration that the decrease of permeability within DBs is related to changes in the porous network properties (porosity, connectivity) and the pores morphology (size distribution, specific surface area), an accurate porous network characterization is useful for understanding both the effect of deformation banding on the porous network and their influence upon fluid flow through the deformed rocks. In this work, a 3D characterization of the microstructure and texture of DBs hosted in porous carbonate grainstones was obtained at the Elettra laboratory (Trieste, Italy) by using two different techniques: phase-contrast synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) and microfocus X-ray micro-CT. These techniques are suitable for addressing quantitative analysis of the porous network and implementing Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD)experiments in porous rocks. Evaluated samples correspond to grainstones highly affected by DBs exposed in San Vito Lo Capo peninsula (Sicily, Italy), Favignana Island (Sicily, Italy) and Majella Mountain (Abruzzo, Italy). For the analysis, the data were segmented in two main components porous and solid phases. The properties of interest are porosity, connectivity, a grain and/or porous textural properties, in order to differentiate host rock and DBs in different zones. Permeability of DB and surrounding host rock were estimated by the implementation of CFD experiments, permeability results are validated by comparing with in situ measurements. In agreement with previous studies, the 3D image analysis and flow simulation indicate that DBs could be constitute

  19. Fractal and geostatistical methods for modeling of a fracture network

    SciTech Connect

    Chiles, J.P.

    1988-08-01

    The modeling of fracture networks is useful for fluid flow and rock mechanics studies. About 6600 fracture traces were recorded on drifts of a uranium mine in a granite massif. The traces have an extension of 0.20-20 m. The network was studied by fractal and by geostatistical methods but can be considered neither as a fractal with a constant dimension nor a set of purely randomly located fractures. Two kinds of generalization of conventional models can still provide more flexibility for the characterization of the network: (a) a nonscaling fractal model with variable similarity dimension (for a 2-D network of traces, the dimension varying from 2 for the 10-m scale to 1 for the centimeter scale, (b) a parent-daughter model with a regionalized density; the geostatistical study allows a 3-D model to be established where: fractures are assumed to be discs; fractures are grouped in clusters or swarms; and fracturation density is regionalized (with two ranges at about 30 and 300 m). The fractal model is easy to fit and to simulate along a line, but 2-D and 3-D simulations are more difficult. The geostatistical model is more complex, but easy to simulate, even in 3-D.

  20. Real-time and post-frac' 3-D analysis of hydraulic fracture treatments in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.A.; Tanigawa, J.J.; Hyodo, Masami; Takasugi, Shinji

    1994-01-20

    Economic power production from Hot Dry Rock (HDR) requires the establishment of an efficient circulation system between wellbores in reservoir rock with extremely low matrix permeability. Hydraulic fracturing is employed to establish the necessary circulation system. Hydraulic fracturing has also been performed to increase production from hydrothermal reservoirs by enhancing the communication with the reservoir's natural fracture system. Optimal implementation of these hydraulic fracturing applications, as with any engineering application, requires the use of credible physical models and the reconciliation of the physical models with treatment data gathered in the field. Analysis of the collected data has shown that 2-D models and 'conventional' 3-D models of the hydraulic fracturing process apply very poorly to hydraulic fracturing in geothermal reservoirs. Engineering decisions based on these more 'conventional' fracture modeling techniques lead to serious errors in predicting the performance of hydraulic fracture treatments. These errors can lead to inappropriate fracture treatment design as well as grave errors in well placement for hydrothermal reservoirs or HDR reservoirs. This paper outlines the reasons why conventional modeling approaches fall short, and what types of physical models are needed to credibly estimate created hydraulic fracture geometry. The methodology of analyzing actual measured fracture treatment data and matching the observed net fracturing pressure (in realtime as well as after the treatment) is demonstrated at two separate field sites. Results from an extensive Acoustic Emission (AE) fracture diagnostic survey are also presented for the first case study aS an independent measure of the actual created hydraulic fracture geometry.

  1. Mixed-Mode Fracture and Fatigue Analysis of Cracked 3D Complex Structures using a 3D SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavanam, Sharada

    The aim of this thesis is to numerically evaluate the mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs) of complex 3D structural geometries with arbitrary 3D cracks using the Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method-Finite Element Method (SGBEM-FEM) Alternating Method. Various structural geometries with different loading scenarios and crack configurations were examined in this thesis to understand the behavior and trends of the mixed-mode SIFs as well as the fatigue life for these complex structural geometries. Although some 3D structures have empirical and numerical solutions that are readily available in the open literature, some do not; therefore this thesis presents the results of fracture and fatigue analyses of these 3D complex structures using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method to serve as reference for future studies. Furthermore, there are advantages of using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method compared to traditional FEM methods. For example, the fatigue-crack-growth and fatigue life can be better estimated for a structure because different fatigue models (i.e. Walker, Paris, and NASGRO) can be used within the same framework of the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method. The FEM (un-cracked structure)/BEM(crack model) meshes are modeled independently, which speeds up the computation process and reduces the cost of human labor. A simple coarse mesh can be used for all fracture and fatigue analyses of complex structures. In this thesis, simple coarse meshes were used for 3D complex structures, which were below 5000 elements as compared to traditional FEM, which require meshes where the elements range on the order of ˜250,000 to ˜106 and sometimes even more than that.

  2. Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution. Annual report, March 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Collier, H.A.; Owen, T.E.

    1997-06-01

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. They also may connect the borehole to remote zones of better reservoir characteristics. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based on the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. The project is a study directed toward the evaluation of acoustic logging and 3D-seismic measurement techniques as well as fluid flow and transport methods for mapping permeability anisotropy and other petrophysical parameters for the understanding of the reservoir fracture systems and associated fluid dynamics. The principal application of these measurement techniques and methods is to identify and investigate the propagation characteristics of acoustic and seismic waves in the Twin Creek hydrocarbon reservoir owned by Union Pacific Resources (UPR) and to characterize the fracture permeability distribution using production data. This site is located in the overthrust area of Utah and Wyoming. UPR drilled six horizontal wells, and presently UPR has two rigs running with many established drill hole locations. In addition, there are numerous vertical wells that exist in the area as well as 3D seismic surveys. Each horizontal well contains full FMS logs and MWD logs, gamma logs, etc.

  3. From 2D to 3D: novel nanostructured scaffolds to investigate signalling in reconstructed neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Susanna; Rauti, Rossana; Laishram, Jummi; Turco, Antonio; Lonardoni, Davide; Nieus, Thierry; Prato, Maurizio; Scaini, Denis; Ballerini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    To recreate in vitro 3D neuronal circuits will ultimately increase the relevance of results from cultured to whole-brain networks and will promote enabling technologies for neuro-engineering applications. Here we fabricate novel elastomeric scaffolds able to instruct 3D growth of living primary neurons. Such systems allow investigating the emerging activity, in terms of calcium signals, of small clusters of neurons as a function of the interplay between the 2D or 3D architectures and network dynamics. We report the ability of 3D geometry to improve functional organization and synchronization in small neuronal assemblies. We propose a mathematical modelling of network dynamics that supports such a result. Entrapping carbon nanotubes in the scaffolds remarkably boosted synaptic activity, thus allowing for the first time to exploit nanomaterial/cell interfacing in 3D growth support. Our 3D system represents a simple and reliable construct, able to improve the complexity of current tissue culture models. PMID:25910072

  4. 3D imaging of soil pore network: two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrecano, M.; Di Matteo, B.; Mele, G.; Terribile, F.

    2009-04-01

    Pore geometry imaging and its quantitative description is a key factor for advances in the knowledge of physical, chemical and biological soil processes. For many years photos from flattened surfaces of undisturbed soil samples impregnated with fluorescent resin and from soil thin sections under microscope have been the only way available for exploring pore architecture at different scales. Earlier 3D representations of the internal structure of the soil based on not destructive methods have been obtained using medical tomographic systems (NMR and X-ray CT). However, images provided using such equipments, show strong limitations in terms of spatial resolution. In the last decade very good results have then been obtained using imaging from very expensive systems based on synchrotron radiation. More recently, X-ray Micro-Tomography has resulted the most widely applied being the technique showing the best compromise between costs, resolution and size of the images. Conversely, the conceptually simpler but destructive method of "serial sectioning" has been progressively neglected for technical problems in sample preparation and time consumption needed to obtain an adequate number of serial sections for correct 3D reconstruction of soil pore geometry. In this work a comparison between the two methods above has been carried out in order to define advantages, shortcomings and to point out their different potential. A cylindrical undisturbed soil sample 6.5cm in diameter and 6.5cm height of an Ap horizon of an alluvial soil showing vertic characteristics, has been reconstructed using both a desktop X-ray micro-tomograph Skyscan 1172 and the new automatic serial sectioning system SSAT (Sequential Section Automatic Tomography) set up at CNR ISAFOM in Ercolano (Italy) with the aim to overcome most of the typical limitations of such a technique. Image best resolution of 7.5 µm per voxel resulted using X-ray Micro CT while 20 µm was the best value using the serial sectioning

  5. Extracting Hidden Hierarchies in 3D Distribution Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modes, Carl; Magnasco, Marcelo; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-03-01

    Natural and man-made transport webs are frequently dominated by dense sets of nested cycles. The architecture of these networks - the topology and edge weights - determines how efficiently the networks perform their function. Yet, the set of tools that can characterize such a weighted cycle-rich architecture in a physically relevant, mathematically compact way is sparse. In order to fill this void, we have developed a new algorithm that rests on an abstraction of the physical `tiling' in the case of a two dimensional network to an effective tiling of an abstract surface in space that the network may be thought to sit in. Generically these abstract surfaces are richer than the plane and upon sequential removal of the weakest links by edge weight, neighboring tiles merge and a tree characterizing this merging process results. The properties of this characteristic tree can provide the physical and topological data required to describe the architecture of the network and to build physical models. This new algorithm can be used for automated phenotypic characterization of any weighted network whose structure is dominated by cycles, such as mammalian vasculature in the organs, the root networks of clonal colonies like quaking aspen, or the force networks in jammed granular matter.

  6. Extracting Hidden Hierarchies in 3D Distribution Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modes, Carl D.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Katifori, Eleni

    2016-07-01

    Natural and man-made transport webs are frequently dominated by dense sets of nested cycles. The architecture of these networks, as defined by the topology and edge weights, determines how efficiently the networks perform their function. Yet, the set of tools that can characterize such a weighted cycle-rich architecture in a physically relevant, mathematically compact way is sparse. In order to fill this void, we have developed a new algorithm that rests on an abstraction of the physical "tiling" in the case of a two-dimensional network to an effective tiling of an abstract surface in 3-space that the network may be thought to sit in. Generically, these abstract surfaces are richer than the flat plane because there are now two families of fundamental units that may aggregate upon cutting weakest links—the plaquettes of the tiling and the longer "topological" cycles associated with the abstract surface itself. Upon sequential removal of the weakest links, as determined by a physically relevant edge weight, such as flow volume or capacity, neighboring plaquettes merge and a new tree graph characterizing this merging process results. The properties of this characteristic tree can provide the physical and topological data required to describe the architecture of the network and to build physical models. The new algorithm can be used for automated phenotypic characterization of any weighted network whose structure is dominated by cycles, such as mammalian vasculature in the organs or the force networks in jammed granular matter.

  7. Evaluation of trapezoidal-shaped 3-D plates for internal fixation of mandibular subcondylar fractures in adults

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Manoj; Pant, Harshvardhan; Singh, Manpreet; Vashistha, Arpit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical results and to assess the efficacy, stability, and rigidity of trapezoidal 3-D plates for osteosynthesis in adult mandibular subcondylar fracture patients. Methods This study included 15 cases of trauma having mandibular subcondylar fractures, in which open reduction and internal fixation are indicated. After selecting patient according to the inclusion criteria, all patients underwent open reduction and rigid fixation. Fracture was then stabilized using 4 hole, 2.0 mm trapezoidal-shaped 3-D titanium plates using retromandibular incision. Postoperative clinical examination was carried out on 3rd day; 1st, 2nd, and 4th weeks; and 3rd and 6th months. Results The results of this study suggest that the fixation of mandibular subcondylar fracture with trapezoidal-shaped 3-D plates provides three-dimensional stability and carries low morbidity. Conclusion Patients with gross displacement of condylar fragment, major reduction in posterior facial height, and deranged occlusion can be successfully managed by open reduction of condylar fracture and its fixation using 3-D plates. PMID:26587378

  8. 3D microtumors in vitro supported by perfused vascular networks

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino, Agua; Phan, Duc T. T.; Datta, Rupsa; Wang, Xiaolin; Hachey, Stephanie J.; Romero-López, Mónica; Gratton, Enrico; Lee, Abraham P.; George, Steven C.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing microphysiological systems that can be used to model both normal and pathological human organs in vitro. This “organs-on-chips” approach aims to capture key structural and physiological characteristics of the target tissue. Here we describe in vitro vascularized microtumors (VMTs). This “tumor-on-a-chip” platform incorporates human tumor and stromal cells that grow in a 3D extracellular matrix and that depend for survival on nutrient delivery through living, perfused microvessels. Both colorectal and breast cancer cells grow vigorously in the platform and respond to standard-of-care therapies, showing reduced growth and/or regression. Vascular-targeting agents with different mechanisms of action can also be distinguished, and we find that drugs targeting only VEGFRs (Apatinib and Vandetanib) are not effective, whereas drugs that target VEGFRs, PDGFR and Tie2 (Linifanib and Cabozantinib) do regress the vasculature. Tumors in the VMT show strong metabolic heterogeneity when imaged using NADH Fluorescent Lifetime Imaging Microscopy and, compared to their surrounding stroma, many show a higher free/bound NADH ratio consistent with their known preference for aerobic glycolysis. The VMT platform provides a unique model for studying vascularized solid tumors in vitro. PMID:27549930

  9. 3D microtumors in vitro supported by perfused vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Sobrino, Agua; Phan, Duc T T; Datta, Rupsa; Wang, Xiaolin; Hachey, Stephanie J; Romero-López, Mónica; Gratton, Enrico; Lee, Abraham P; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing microphysiological systems that can be used to model both normal and pathological human organs in vitro. This "organs-on-chips" approach aims to capture key structural and physiological characteristics of the target tissue. Here we describe in vitro vascularized microtumors (VMTs). This "tumor-on-a-chip" platform incorporates human tumor and stromal cells that grow in a 3D extracellular matrix and that depend for survival on nutrient delivery through living, perfused microvessels. Both colorectal and breast cancer cells grow vigorously in the platform and respond to standard-of-care therapies, showing reduced growth and/or regression. Vascular-targeting agents with different mechanisms of action can also be distinguished, and we find that drugs targeting only VEGFRs (Apatinib and Vandetanib) are not effective, whereas drugs that target VEGFRs, PDGFR and Tie2 (Linifanib and Cabozantinib) do regress the vasculature. Tumors in the VMT show strong metabolic heterogeneity when imaged using NADH Fluorescent Lifetime Imaging Microscopy and, compared to their surrounding stroma, many show a higher free/bound NADH ratio consistent with their known preference for aerobic glycolysis. The VMT platform provides a unique model for studying vascularized solid tumors in vitro. PMID:27549930

  10. Stress evolution during 3D single-layer visco-elastic buckle folding: Implications for the initiation of fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Eckert, Andreas; Connolly, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Buckle folds of sedimentary strata commonly feature a variety of different fracture sets. Some fracture sets including outer arc tensile fractures and inner arc shear fractures at the fold hinge zones are well understood by the extensional and compressional strain/stress pattern. However, other commonly observed fracture sets, including tensile fractures parallel to the fold axis, tensile fractures cutting through the limb, extensional faults at the fold hinge, and other shear fractures of various orientations in the fold limb, fail to be intuitively explained by the strain/stress regimes during the buckling process. To obtain a better understanding of the conditions for the initiation of the various fractures sets associated with single-layer cylindrical buckle folds, a 3D finite element modeling approach using a Maxwell visco-elastic rheology is utilized. The influences of three model parameters with significant influence on fracture initiation are considered: burial depth, viscosity, and permeability. It is concluded that these parameters are critical for the initiation of major fracture sets at the hinge zone with varying degrees. The numerical simulation results further show that the buckling process fails to explain most of the fracture sets occurring in the limb unless the process of erosional unloading as a post-fold phenomenon is considered. For fracture sets that only develop under unrealistic boundary conditions, the results demonstrate that their development is realistic for a perclinal fold geometry. In summary, a more thorough understanding of fractures sets associated with buckle folds is obtained based on the simulation of in-situ stress conditions during the structural development of buckle folds.

  11. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    logging, porosity varies by a factor of 2.5 whilst hydraulic conductivity varies by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. In addition, a 3D numerical reconstruction of the internal structure of the fault zone inferred from borehole imagery has been built to estimate the permeability tensor variations. First results indicate that hydraulic conductivity values calculated for this structure are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude above those measured in situ. Such high values are due to the imaging method that only takes in to account open fractures of simple geometry (sine waves). Even though improvements are needed to handle more complex geometry, outcomes are promising as the fault damaged zone clearly appears as the highest permeability zone, where stress analysis show that the actual stress state may favor tensile reopening of fractures. Using shale samples cored from the different internal structures of the fault zone, we aim now to characterize the advection and diffusion using laboratory petrophysical tests combined with radial and through-diffusion experiments.

  12. Numerical investigation of hydraulic fracture network propagation in naturally fractured shale formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yushi; Zhang, Shicheng; Ma, Xinfang; Zhou, Tong; Zeng, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracture network (HFN) propagation in naturally fractured shale formations is investigated numerically using a 3D complex fracturing model based on the discrete element method. To account for the plastic deformation behavior of shales, the Drucker-Prager plasticity model is incorporated into the fracturing model. Parametric studies are then conducted for different Young's moduli, horizontal differential stresses, natural fracture (NF) properties, injection rates, and number and spacing of perforation clusters. Numerical results show that horizontal differential stress primarily determines the generation of a complex HFN. The plastic deformation of shale can reduce the stimulated reservoir volume; this is more obvious with Young's modulus of less than 20 GPa. In addition, a higher injection rate could largely increase the fracture complexity index (FCI). Moreover, increasing perforation cluster numbers per fracturing stage is beneficial for increasing the FCI, but it also increases the potential merging of neighboring fractures, which may lead to non-uniform development of HFN in far-wellbore regions. To achieve uniform development of HFN within a fracturing stage, the distribution of NFs should be fully considered. The results presented here may provide improved understanding of HFN generation and are favorable for optimizing fracturing treatment designs for shale formations.

  13. Analyzing 3D xylem networks in Vitis vinifera using High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) have made it possible to visualize three dimensional (3D) xylem networks without time consuming, labor intensive physical sectioning. Here we describe a new method to visualize complex vessel networks in plants and produce a quantitat...

  14. 3D-printed fluidic networks as vasculature for engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Kinstlinger, Ian S; Miller, Jordan S

    2016-05-24

    Fabrication of vascular networks within engineered tissue remains one of the greatest challenges facing the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering. Historically, the structural complexity of vascular networks has limited their fabrication in tissues engineered in vitro. Recently, however, key advances have been made in constructing fluidic networks within biomaterials, suggesting a strategy for fabricating the architecture of the vasculature. These techniques build on emerging technologies within the microfluidics community as well as on 3D printing. The freeform fabrication capabilities of 3D printing are allowing investigators to fabricate fluidic networks with complex architecture inside biomaterial matrices. In this review, we examine the most exciting 3D printing-based techniques in this area. We also discuss opportunities for using these techniques to address open questions in vascular biology and biophysics, as well as for engineering therapeutic tissue substitutes in vitro. PMID:27173478

  15. A 3D numerical simulation of stress distribution and fracture process in a zirconia-based FPD framework.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wen; Li, Decong; Qiao, Jiyan; Chen, Li; Ding, Yansheng; Sjögren, Göran

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a numerical approach to the fracture behavior in a three-unit zirconia-based fixed partial denture (FPD) framework was made under mechanical loading using a newly developed three-dimensional (3D) numerical modeling code. All the materials studied were treated heterogeneously and Weibull distribution law was applied to describe the heterogeneity. The Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion with tensile strength cut-off was utilized to judge whether the material was in an elastic or failed state. For validation, the fracture pattern obtained from the numerical modeling was compared with a laboratory test; they largely correlated with each other. Similar fracture initiation sites were detected both in the numerical simulation and in an earlier fractographic analysis. The numerical simulation applied in this study clearly described the stress distribution and fracture process of zirconia-based FPD frameworks, information that could not be gained from the laboratory tests alone. Thus, the newly developed 3D numerical modeling code seems to be an efficient tool for prediction of the fracture process in ceramic FPD frameworks. PMID:21210519

  16. Inclusion-based effective medium models for the field-scale permeability of 3D fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebigbo, Anozie; Lang, Philipp S.; Paluszny, Adriana; Zimmerman, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    Fractures that are more permeable than their host rock can act as preferential, or at least additional, pathways for fluid to flow through the rock. The additional transmissivity contributed by these fractures will be of great relevance in several areas of earth science and engineering, such as radioactive waste disposal in crystalline rock, exploitation of fractured hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs, or hydraulic fracturing. In describing or predicting flow through fractured rock, the effective permeability of the rock mass, comprising both the rock matrix and a network of fractures, is a crucial parameter, and will depend on several geometric properties of the fractures/networks, such as lateral extent, aperture, orientation, and fracture density. This study investigates the ability of classical inclusion-based effective medium models (following the work of Sævik et al., Transp. Porous Media, 2013) to predict this permeability. In these models, the fractures are represented as thin, spheroidal inclusions, the interiors of which are treated as porous media having a high (but finite) permeability. The predictions of various effective medium models, such as the symmetric and asymmetric self-consistent schemes, the differential scheme, and Maxwell's method, are tested against the results of explicit numerical simulations of mono- and polydisperse isotropic fracture networks embedded in a permeable rock matrix. Comparisons are also made with the Hashin-Shrikman bounds, Snow's model, and Mourzenko's heuristic model (Mourzenko et al., Phys. Rev. E, 2011). This problem is characterised mathematically by two small parameters, the aspect ratio of the spheroidal fractures, α, and the ratio between matrix and fracture permeability, κ. Two different regimes can be identified, corresponding to α/κ < 1 and α/κ > 1. The lower the value of α/κ, the more significant is flow through the matrix. Due to differing flow patterns, the dependence of effective permeability on

  17. The Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method applied to the Study of Rock Fracturing Behavior in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, Esteban; Bradley, Christopher R.; Broom, Scott T.; Knight, Earl E.; Munjiza, Ante; Sussman, Aviva J.; Swift, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction the combined finite-discrete element method (FEM/DEM), has become an excellent tool to address a wide range of problems involving fracturing and fragmentation of solids. Within the context of rock mechanics, the FEM/DEM method has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques, rock blasting, seismic waves, packing problems, rock crushing problems, etc. In the real world most of the problems involving fracture and fragmentation of solids are three dimensional problems. With the aim of addressing these problems an improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM capability has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These capabilities include state of the art 3D contact detection, contact interaction, constitutive material models, and fracture models. In this paper, Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) Brazilian experiments are simulated using this improved 2D/3D FEM/DEM approach which is implemented in LANL's MUNROU (Munjiza-Rougier) code. The results presented in this work show excellent agreement with both the SHPB experiments and previous 2D numerical simulations performed by other FEM/DEM research groups.

  18. Modeling the influence of particle morphology on the fracture behavior of silica sand using a 3D discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cil, Mehmet B.; Alshibli, Khalid A.

    2015-02-01

    The constitutive behavior and deformation characteristics of uncemented granular materials are to a large extent derived from the fabric or geometry of the particle structure and the interparticle friction resulting from normal forces acting on particles or groups of particles. Granular materials consist of discrete particles with a fabric (microstructure) that changes under loading. Synchrotron micro-computed tomography (SMT) has emerged as a powerful non-destructive 3D scanning technique to study geomaterials. In this paper, SMT was used to acquire in situ scans of the oedometry test of a column of three silica sand particles. The sand is known as ASTM 20-30 Ottawa sand, and has a grain size between US sieves #20 (0.841 mm) and #30 (0.595 mm). The characteristics and evolution of particle fracture in sand were examined using SMT images, and a 3D discrete element method (DEM) was used to model the fracture behavior of sand particles. It adopts the bonded particle model to generate a crushable agglomerate that consists of a large number of small spherical sub-particles. The agglomerate shape matches the 3D physical shape of the tested sand particles by mapping the particle morphology from the SMT images. The paper investigates and discusses the influence of agglomerate packing (i.e., the number and size distribution of spherical sub-particles that constitute the agglomerate) and agglomerate shape on the fracture behavior of crushable particles.

  19. Ex vivo 3D osteocyte network construction with primary murine bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiaoling; Gu, Yexin; Zhang, Wenting; Dziopa, Leah; Zilberberg, Jenny; Lee, Woo

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as three-dimensionally (3D) networked cells in the lacunocanalicular structure of bones and regulate bone and mineral homeostasis. Despite of their important regulatory roles, in vitro studies of osteocytes have been challenging because: (1) current cell lines do not sufficiently represent the phenotypic features of mature osteocytes and (2) primary cells rapidly differentiate to osteoblasts upon isolation. In this study, we used a 3D perfusion culture approach to: (1) construct the 3D cellular network of primary murine osteocytes by biomimetic assembly with microbeads and (2) reproduce ex vivo the phenotype of primary murine osteocytes, for the first time to our best knowledge. In order to enable 3D construction with a sufficient number of viable cells, we used a proliferated osteoblastic population of healthy cells outgrown from digested bone chips. The diameter of microbeads was controlled to: (1) distribute and entrap cells within the interstitial spaces between the microbeads and (2) maintain average cell-to-cell distance to be about 19 µm. The entrapped cells formed a 3D cellular network by extending and connecting their processes through openings between the microbeads. Also, with increasing culture time, the entrapped cells exhibited the characteristic gene expressions (SOST and FGF23) and nonproliferative behavior of mature osteocytes. In contrast, 2D-cultured cells continued their osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation. This 3D biomimetic approach is expected to provide a new means of: (1) studying flow-induced shear stress on the mechanotransduction function of primary osteocytes, (2) studying physiological functions of 3D-networked osteocytes with in vitro convenience, and (3) developing clinically relevant human bone disease models. PMID:26421212

  20. Evolution of stress and strain during 3D folding: application to orthogonal fracture systems in folded turbidites, SW Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, J. E.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Lechmann, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    We present field data and numerical modeling results which show the evolution of stress and strain patterns during 3D folding resulting in an orthogonal fracture system. The field area is located near Almograve, SW Portugal. The area is part of the Mira Formation which itself is part of the South Portuguese Zone (SPZ). The structural development of the SPZ is characterized by southwest vergent folding and thrust displacement. The metamorphism in the SPZ increases from diagenetic conditions in the southwest to greenschist-facies conditions to the northeast. The Mira Formation is composed of turbiditic layers of Carboniferous age with low sandstone to shale ratio. The data was gathered at three outcrops which show structures similar to chocolate tablet structures in the folded sandstone layers. Chocolate tablet structures are generated under simultaneous extension in two directions and show two fracture systems of the same age which are perpendicular to each other. However, the Mira Formation is located in a convergent area. Also, the outcrops near Almograve show two fracture systems of different age. The fractures orthogonal to the fold axis and the bedding are crosscut by fractures parallel to the fold axis and orthogonal to the bedding. Our hypothesis for the evolution of the observed fracture systems is as follows; the older fractures which are now orthogonal to the fold axis and to the bedding plane were generated during compression while the layers were still approximately horizontal. They are parallel to σ1(i.e. mode 1 fractures). The second and younger fracture family was generated in a phase where there is local extension in the fold limbs. These fractures are orthogonal to the far-field σ1, parallel to the fold axis and perpendicular to the bedding. The shortening direction is constant during the entire folding process. We test our hypothesis with numerical modeling. We use 2D and 3D finite element codes with a mixed formulation for incompressible flow

  1. 3D Slicer as an Image Computing Platform for the Quantitative Imaging Network

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Andriy; Beichel, Reinhard; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Finet, Julien; Fillion-Robin, Jean-Christophe; Pujol, Sonia; Bauer, Christian; Jennings, Dominique; Fennessy, Fiona; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John; Aylward, Stephen; Miller, James V.; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis has tremendous but mostly unrealized potential in healthcare to support objective and accurate interpretation of the clinical imaging. In 2008, the National Cancer Institute began building the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) initiative with the goal of advancing quantitative imaging in the context of personalized therapy and evaluation of treatment response. Computerized analysis is an important component contributing to reproducibility and efficiency of the quantitative imaging techniques. The success of quantitative imaging is contingent on robust analysis methods and software tools to bring these methods from bench to bedside. 3D Slicer is a free open source software application for medical image computing. As a clinical research tool, 3D Slicer is similar to a radiology workstation that supports versatile visualizations but also provides advanced functionality such as automated segmentation and registration for a variety of application domains. Unlike a typical radiology workstation, 3D Slicer is free and is not tied to specific hardware. As a programming platform, 3D Slicer facilitates translation and evaluation of the new quantitative methods by allowing the biomedical researcher to focus on the implementation of the algorithm, and providing abstractions for the common tasks of data communication, visualization and user interface development. Compared to other tools that provide aspects of this functionality, 3D Slicer is fully open source and can be readily extended and redistributed. In addition, 3D Slicer is designed to facilitate the development of new functionality in the form of 3D Slicer extensions. In this paper, we present an overview of 3D Slicer as a platform for prototyping, development and evaluation of image analysis tools for clinical research applications. To illustrate the utility of the platform in the scope of QIN, we discuss several use cases of 3D Slicer by the existing QIN teams, and we elaborate on the future

  2. 3D Slicer as an image computing platform for the Quantitative Imaging Network.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Andriy; Beichel, Reinhard; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Finet, Julien; Fillion-Robin, Jean-Christophe; Pujol, Sonia; Bauer, Christian; Jennings, Dominique; Fennessy, Fiona; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John; Aylward, Stephen; Miller, James V; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative analysis has tremendous but mostly unrealized potential in healthcare to support objective and accurate interpretation of the clinical imaging. In 2008, the National Cancer Institute began building the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) initiative with the goal of advancing quantitative imaging in the context of personalized therapy and evaluation of treatment response. Computerized analysis is an important component contributing to reproducibility and efficiency of the quantitative imaging techniques. The success of quantitative imaging is contingent on robust analysis methods and software tools to bring these methods from bench to bedside. 3D Slicer is a free open-source software application for medical image computing. As a clinical research tool, 3D Slicer is similar to a radiology workstation that supports versatile visualizations but also provides advanced functionality such as automated segmentation and registration for a variety of application domains. Unlike a typical radiology workstation, 3D Slicer is free and is not tied to specific hardware. As a programming platform, 3D Slicer facilitates translation and evaluation of the new quantitative methods by allowing the biomedical researcher to focus on the implementation of the algorithm and providing abstractions for the common tasks of data communication, visualization and user interface development. Compared to other tools that provide aspects of this functionality, 3D Slicer is fully open source and can be readily extended and redistributed. In addition, 3D Slicer is designed to facilitate the development of new functionality in the form of 3D Slicer extensions. In this paper, we present an overview of 3D Slicer as a platform for prototyping, development and evaluation of image analysis tools for clinical research applications. To illustrate the utility of the platform in the scope of QIN, we discuss several use cases of 3D Slicer by the existing QIN teams, and we elaborate on the future

  3. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Roschger, Paul; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N.; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  4. Modeling and simulating the adaptive electrical properties of stochastic polymeric 3D networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigala, R.; Smerieri, A.; Schüz, A.; Camorani, P.; Erokhin, V.

    2013-10-01

    Memristors are passive two-terminal circuit elements that combine resistance and memory. Although in theory memristors are a very promising approach to fabricate hardware with adaptive properties, there are only very few implementations able to show their basic properties. We recently developed stochastic polymeric matrices with a functionality that evidences the formation of self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) networks of memristors. We demonstrated that those networks show the typical hysteretic behavior observed in the ‘one input-one output’ memristive configuration. Interestingly, using different protocols to electrically stimulate the networks, we also observed that their adaptive properties are similar to those present in the nervous system. Here, we model and simulate the electrical properties of these self-assembled polymeric networks of memristors, the topology of which is defined stochastically. First, we show that the model recreates the hysteretic behavior observed in the real experiments. Second, we demonstrate that the networks modeled indeed have a 3D instead of a planar functionality. Finally, we show that the adaptive properties of the networks depend on their connectivity pattern. Our model was able to replicate fundamental qualitative behavior of the real organic 3D memristor networks; yet, through the simulations, we also explored other interesting properties, such as the relation between connectivity patterns and adaptive properties. Our model and simulations represent an interesting tool to understand the very complex behavior of self-assembled memristor networks, which can finally help to predict and formulate hypotheses for future experiments.

  5. Highly Resolved Long-term 3D Hydrological Simulation of a Forested Catchment with Litter Layer and Fractured Bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Bogena, H. R.; Kollet, S. J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water content plays a key role in the water and energy balance in soil, vegetation and atmosphere systems. According to Wood et al. (2011) there is a grand need to increase global-scale hyper-resolution water-energy-biogeochemistry land surface modelling capabilities. However, such a model scheme should also recognize the epistemic uncertainties, as well as the nonlinearity and hysteresis in its dynamics. Unfortunately, it is not clear how to parameterize hydrological processes as a function of scale and how to test deterministic models with regard to epistemic uncertainties. In this study, high resolution long-term simulations were conducted in the highly instrumented TERENO hydrological observatory, the Wüstebach catchment. Soil hydraulic parameters were derived using inverse modeling with the Hydrus-1D model using the global optimization scheme SCE-UA and soil moisture data from a wireless soil moisture sensor network. The estimated parameters were then used for 3D simulations using the integrated parallel simulation platform ParFlow-CLM. The simulated soil water content, as well as evapotranspiration and runoff, were compared with long-term field observations to illustrate how well the model was able to reproduce the water budget dynamics. With variable model setup scenarios in boundary conditions and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivity, we investigated how lateral flow processes above the underlying fractured bedrock affects the simulation results. Furthermore, we explored the importance of the litter layer and the heterogeneity of the forest soil in the simulation of flow processes and model performance. For the analysis of spatial patterns of simulated and observed soil water content we applied the method of empirical orthogonal function (EOF). The results suggest that strong anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity may be the reason for the fast lateral flow observed in Wüstebach. Introduction of heterogeneity in the hydraulic properties in the

  6. New method for detection of complex 3D fracture motion - Verification of an optical motion analysis system for biomechanical studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fracture-healing depends on interfragmentary motion. For improved osteosynthesis and fracture-healing, the micromotion between fracture fragments is undergoing intensive research. The detection of 3D micromotions at the fracture gap still presents a challenge for conventional tactile measurement systems. Optical measurement systems may be easier to use than conventional systems, but, as yet, cannot guarantee accuracy. The purpose of this study was to validate the optical measurement system PONTOS 5M for use in biomechanical research, including measurement of micromotion. Methods A standardized transverse fracture model was created to detect interfragmentary motions under axial loadings of up to 200 N. Measurements were performed using the optical measurement system and compared with a conventional high-accuracy tactile system consisting of 3 standard digital dial indicators (1 μm resolution; 5 μm error limit). Results We found that the deviation in the mean average motion detection between the systems was at most 5.3 μm, indicating that detection of micromotion was possible with the optical measurement system. Furthermore, we could show two considerable advantages while using the optical measurement system. Only with the optical system interfragmentary motion could be analyzed directly at the fracture gap. Furthermore, the calibration of the optical system could be performed faster, safer and easier than that of the tactile system. Conclusion The PONTOS 5 M optical measurement system appears to be a favorable alternative to previously used tactile measurement systems for biomechanical applications. Easy handling, combined with a high accuracy for 3D detection of micromotions (≤ 5 μm), suggests the likelihood of high user acceptance. This study was performed in the context of the deployment of a new implant (dynamic locking screw; Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland). PMID:22405047

  7. Modeling blood flow circulation in intracranial arterial networks: a comparative 3D/1D simulation study.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, L; Cheever, E; Anor, T; Madsen, J R; Karniadakis, G E

    2011-01-01

    We compare results from numerical simulations of pulsatile blood flow in two patient-specific intracranial arterial networks using one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) models. Specifically, we focus on the pressure and flowrate distribution at different segments of the network computed by the two models. Results obtained with 1D and 3D models with rigid walls show good agreement in massflow distribution at tens of arterial junctions and also in pressure drop along the arteries. The 3D simulations with the rigid walls predict higher amplitude of the flowrate and pressure temporal oscillations than the 1D simulations with compliant walls at various segments even for small time-variations in the arterial cross-sectional areas. Sensitivity of the flow and pressure with respect to variation in the elasticity parameters is investigated with the 1D model. PMID:20661645

  8. 3D hybrid tectono-stochastic modeling of naturally fractured reservoir: Application of finite element method and stochastic simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizadeh Doonechaly, N.; Rahman, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs offers significant challenges due to the lack of a methodology that can utilize field data. To date several methods have been proposed by authors to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Among them is the unfolding/folding method which offers some degree of accuracy in estimating the probability of the existence of fractures in a reservoir. Also there are statistical approaches which integrate all levels of field data to simulate the fracture network. This approach, however, is dependent on the availability of data sources, such as seismic attributes, core descriptions, well logs, etc. which often make it difficult to obtain field wide. In this study a hybrid tectono-stochastic simulation is proposed to characterize a naturally fractured reservoir. A finite element based model is used to simulate the tectonic event of folding and unfolding of a geological structure. A nested neuro-stochastic technique is used to develop the inter-relationship between the data and at the same time it utilizes the sequential Gaussian approach to analyze field data along with fracture probability data. This approach has the ability to overcome commonly experienced discontinuity of the data in both horizontal and vertical directions. This hybrid technique is used to generate a discrete fracture network of a specific Australian gas reservoir, Palm Valley in the Northern Territory. Results of this study have significant benefit in accurately describing fluid flow simulation and well placement for maximal hydrocarbon recovery.

  9. Efficient routing in network-on-chip for 3D topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Junior, Luneque; Nedjah, Nadia; De Macedo Mourelle, Luiza

    2015-10-01

    With the increasing of the integration capability intra-chip, nowadays numerous integrated systems explore a set of processing elements, such as in multicore processors. An efficient interconnection of those elements can be obtained via the use of Network on chip (NoC). This approach is similar to the traditional computer networks where, not restricted to multiprocessors, it is possible to interconnect several dedicated devices. Like other networks, NoCs can be arranged in different topologies, such as ring, mesh and torus. It has shared links that can be used in the transmission of packets of different nodes. Thus, the network congestion is an issue and must be treated to reduce delays. Algorithms based on ant colony optimisation have proven to be effective in static routing in systems designed to perform a fixed set of tasks, or where the communication pattern is known. This article introduces 3D ant colony routing (3D-ACR) and applies it as routing policy of NoCs having three different 3D topologies: mesh, torus and hypercube. Experimental results show that 3D ant colony routing performs consistently better compared with the previously proposed routing strategies.

  10. Next generation 3-D OFDM based optical access networks using FEC under various system impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pravindra; Srivastava, Anand

    2013-12-01

    Passive optical network based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM-PON) exhibits excellent performance in optical access networks due to its greater resistance to fiber dispersion, high spectral efficiency and exibility on both multiple services and dynamic bandwidth allocation. The major elements of conventional OFDM communication system are two-dimensional (2-D) signal mapper and one-dimensional (1-D) inverse fast fourier transform (IFFT). Three dimensional (3-D) OFDM use the concept of 3-D signal mapper and 2-D IFFT. With 3-D OFDM, minimum Euclidean distance (MED) is increased which results in BER performance improvement. As bit error rate (BER) depends on minimum Euclidean distance (MED) which is 15.46 % more in case of 3-D OFDM as compared to 2-D OFDM. Forward error correction (FEC) coding is a technique where redundancy is added to original bit sequence to increase the reliability of communication system. In this paper, we propose and analytically analyze a new PON architecture based on 3-D OFDM with convolutional coding and Viterbi decoding and is compared with conventional 2-D OFDM under various system impairments for coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) without using any optical dispersion compensation. Analytical result show that at BER of 10-9, there is 2.7 dB, 3.8 dB and 9.3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain with 3-D OFDM, 3-D OFDM combined with convolutional coding and Viterbi hard decision decoding (CC-HDD) and 3-D OFDM combined with convolutional coding and Viterbi soft decision decoding (CC-SDD) respectively as compared to 2-D OFDM-PON. At BER of 10-9, 3-D OFDM-PON with CC-HDD gives 2.8 dB improvement in optical budget for both upstream and downstream path and gives 5.7 dB improvement in optical budget using 3-D OFDM-PON combined with CC-SDD as compared to conventional OFDM-PON system.

  11. 3D Chemical Similarity Networks for Structure-Based Target Prediction and Scaffold Hopping.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chen; Senese, Silvia; Damoiseaux, Robert; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-19

    Target identification remains a major challenge for modern drug discovery programs aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of drugs. Computational target prediction approaches like 2D chemical similarity searches have been widely used but are limited to structures sharing high chemical similarity. Here, we present a new computational approach called chemical similarity network analysis pull-down 3D (CSNAP3D) that combines 3D chemical similarity metrics and network algorithms for structure-based drug target profiling, ligand deorphanization, and automated identification of scaffold hopping compounds. In conjunction with 2D chemical similarity fingerprints, CSNAP3D achieved a >95% success rate in correctly predicting the drug targets of 206 known drugs. Significant improvement in target prediction was observed for HIV reverse transcriptase (HIVRT) compounds, which consist of diverse scaffold hopping compounds targeting the nucleotidyltransferase binding site. CSNAP3D was further applied to a set of antimitotic compounds identified in a cell-based chemical screen and identified novel small molecules that share a pharmacophore with Taxol and display a Taxol-like mechanism of action, which were validated experimentally using in vitro microtubule polymerization assays and cell-based assays. PMID:27285961

  12. Minimal camera networks for 3D image based modeling of cultural heritage objects.

    PubMed

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-01-01

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue "Lamassu". Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm. PMID:24670718

  13. Minimal Camera Networks for 3D Image Based Modeling of Cultural Heritage Objects

    PubMed Central

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-01-01

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue “Lamassu”. Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883–859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm. PMID:24670718

  14. Numerical investigation of 3-D constraint effects on brittle fracture in SE(B) and C(T) specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Nevalainen, M.; Dodds, R.H. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    This investigation employs 3-D nonlinear finite element analyses to conduct an extensive parametric evaluation of crack front stress triaxiality for deep notch SE(B) and C(T) specimens and shallow notch SE(B) specimens, with and without side grooves. Crack front conditions are characterized in terms of J-Q trajectories and the constraint scaling model for cleavage fracture toughness proposed previously by Dodds and Anderson. The 3-D computational results imply that a significantly less strict size/deformation limit, relative to the limits indicated by previous plane-strain computations, is needed to maintain small-scale yielding conditions at fracture by a stress- controlled, cleavage mechanism in deep notch SE(B) and C(T) specimens. Additional new results made available from the 3-D analyses also include revised {eta}-plastic factors for use in experimental studies to convert measured work quantities to thickness average and maximum (local) J-values over the crack front.

  15. GIS Data Based Automatic High-Fidelity 3D Road Network Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    3D road models are widely used in many computer applications such as racing games and driving simulations_ However, almost all high-fidelity 3D road models were generated manually by professional artists at the expense of intensive labor. There are very few existing methods for automatically generating 3D high-fidelity road networks, especially those existing in the real world. This paper presents a novel approach thai can automatically produce 3D high-fidelity road network models from real 2D road GIS data that mainly contain road. centerline in formation. The proposed method first builds parametric representations of the road centerlines through segmentation and fitting . A basic set of civil engineering rules (e.g., cross slope, superelevation, grade) for road design are then selected in order to generate realistic road surfaces in compliance with these rules. While the proposed method applies to any types of roads, this paper mainly addresses automatic generation of complex traffic interchanges and intersections which are the most sophisticated elements in the road networks

  16. Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

  17. Interplay between the magnetic and magneto-transport properties of 3D interconnected nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Câmara Santa Clara Gomes, Tristan; De La Torre Medina, Joaquín; Velázquez-Galván, Yenni G.; Martínez-Huerta, Juan Manuel; Encinas, Armando; Piraux, Luc

    2016-07-01

    We have explored the interplay between the magnetic and magneto-transport properties of 3D interconnected nanowire networks made of various magnetic metals by electrodeposition into nanoporous membranes with crossed channels and controlled topology. The close relationship between their magnetic and structural properties has a direct impact on their magneto-transport behavior. In order to accurately and reliably describe the effective magnetic anisotropy and anisotropic magnetoresistance, an analytical model inherent to the topology of 3D nanowire networks is proposed and validated. The feasibility to obtain magneto-transport responses in nanowire network films based on interconnected nanowires makes them very attractive for the development of mechanically stable superstructures that are suitable for potential technological applications.

  18. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-07-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  19. Reliable and Fault-Tolerant Software-Defined Network Operations Scheme for Remote 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyun; Gil, Joon-Min

    2015-03-01

    The recent wide expansion of applicable three-dimensional (3D) printing and software-defined networking (SDN) technologies has led to a great deal of attention being focused on efficient remote control of manufacturing processes. SDN is a renowned paradigm for network softwarization, which has helped facilitate remote manufacturing in association with high network performance, since SDN is designed to control network paths and traffic flows, guaranteeing improved quality of services by obtaining network requests from end-applications on demand through the separated SDN controller or control plane. However, current SDN approaches are generally focused on the controls and automation of the networks, which indicates that there is a lack of management plane development designed for a reliable and fault-tolerant SDN environment. Therefore, in addition to the inherent advantage of SDN, this paper proposes a new software-defined network operations center (SD-NOC) architecture to strengthen the reliability and fault-tolerance of SDN in terms of network operations and management in particular. The cooperation and orchestration between SDN and SD-NOC are also introduced for the SDN failover processes based on four principal SDN breakdown scenarios derived from the failures of the controller, SDN nodes, and connected links. The abovementioned SDN troubles significantly reduce the network reachability to remote devices (e.g., 3D printers, super high-definition cameras, etc.) and the reliability of relevant control processes. Our performance consideration and analysis results show that the proposed scheme can shrink operations and management overheads of SDN, which leads to the enhancement of responsiveness and reliability of SDN for remote 3D printing and control processes.

  20. Neuronal-glial populations form functional networks in a biocompatible 3D scaffold.

    PubMed

    Smith, Imogen; Haag, Marcus; Ugbode, Christopher; Tams, Daniel; Rattray, Marcus; Przyborski, Stefan; Bithell, Angela; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-11-16

    Monolayers of neurons and glia have been employed for decades as tools for the study of cellular physiology and as the basis for a variety of standard toxicological assays. A variety of three dimensional (3D) culture techniques have been developed with the aim to produce cultures that recapitulate desirable features of intact. In this study, we investigated the effect of preparing primary mouse mixed neuron and glial cultures in the inert 3D scaffold, Alvetex. Using planar multielectrode arrays, we compared the spontaneous bioelectrical activity exhibited by neuroglial networks grown in the scaffold with that seen in the same cells prepared as conventional monolayer cultures. Two dimensional (monolayer; 2D) cultures exhibited a significantly higher spike firing rate than that seen in 3D cultures although no difference was seen in total signal power (<50Hz) while pharmacological responsiveness of each culture type to antagonism of GABAAR, NMDAR and AMPAR was highly comparable. Interestingly, correlation of burst events, spike firing and total signal power (<50Hz) revealed that local field potential events were associated with action potential driven bursts as was the case for 2D cultures. Moreover, glial morphology was more physiologically normal in 3D cultures. These results show that 3D culture in inert scaffolds represents a more physiologically normal preparation which has advantages for physiological, pharmacological, toxicological and drug development studies, particularly given the extensive use of such preparations in high throughput and high content systems. PMID:26493605

  1. Review: Mathematical expressions for estimating equivalent permeability of rock fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Richeng; Li, Bo; Jiang, Yujing; Huang, Na

    2016-06-01

    Fracture networks play a more significant role in conducting fluid flow and solute transport in fractured rock masses, comparing with that of the rock matrix. Accurate estimation of the permeability of fracture networks would help researchers and engineers better assess the performance of projects associated with fluid flow in fractured rock masses. This study provides a review of previous works that have focused on the estimation of equivalent permeability of two-dimensional (2-D) discrete fracture networks (DFNs) considering the influences of geometric properties of fractured rock masses. Mathematical expressions for the effects of nine important parameters that significantly impact on the equivalent permeability of DFNs are summarized, including (1) fracture-length distribution, (2) aperture distribution, (3) fracture surface roughness, (4) fracture dead-end, (5) number of intersections, (6) hydraulic gradient, (7) boundary stress, (8) anisotropy, and (9) scale. Recent developments of 3-D fracture networks are briefly reviewed to underline the importance of utilizing 3-D models in future research.

  2. 3D self-consistent percolative model for networks of randomly aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colasanti, S.; Deep Bhatt, V.; Abdellah, A.; Lugli, P.

    2015-10-01

    A numerical percolative model for simulations of random networks of carbon nanotubes is presented. This algorithm takes into account the real 3D nature of these networks, allowing for a better understanding of their electrical properties. The nanotubes are modeled as non-rigid bendable cylinders with geometrical properties derived according to some statistical distributions inferred from the experiments. For the transport mechanisms we refer to the theory of one-dimensional ballistic channels which is based on the computation of the density of states. The behavior of the entire network is then simulated by coupling a SPICE program with an iterative algorithm that calculates self-consistently the electrostatic potential and the current flow in each node of the network. We performed several simulations on the resistivity of networks with different thicknesses and over different simulation domains. Our results confirm the percolative nature of the electrical transport, which are more pronounced in films close to their percolation threshold.

  3. Discovery of a tetracontinuous, aqueous lyotropic network phase with unusual 3D-hexagonal symmetry.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Gregory P; Schmitt, Adam K; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K

    2014-11-01

    Network phase aqueous lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) are technologically useful materials with myriad applications in chemistry, biology, and materials science, which stem from their structurally periodic aqueous and hydrophobic nanodomains (∼0.7-5.0 nm in diameter) that are lined with well-defined chemical functionalities. The exclusive observation of bicontinuous cubic network phase LLCs (e.g., double gyroid, double diamond, and primitive phases) has fueled speculations that all stable LLC network phases must exhibit cubic symmetry. Herein, we describe the self-assembly behavior of a simple aliphatic gemini surfactant that forms the first example of a triply periodic network phase LLC with the 3D-hexagonal symmetry P63/mcm (space group #193). This normal, tetracontinuous 3D-hexagonal network LLC phase HI(193) partitions space into four continuous and interpenetrating, yet non-intersecting volumes. This discovery directly demonstrates that the gemini amphiphile platform furnishes a rational strategy for discovering and stabilizing new, three-dimensionally periodic multiply continuous network phase LLCs with variable symmetries and potentially new applications. PMID:25182008

  4. Nodes Localization in 3D Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Multidimensional Scaling Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the recent years, there has been a huge advancement in wireless sensor computing technology. Today, wireless sensor network (WSN) has become a key technology for different types of smart environment. Nodes localization in WSN has arisen as a very challenging problem in the research community. Most of the applications for WSN are not useful without a priory known nodes positions. Adding GPS receivers to each node is an expensive solution and inapplicable for indoor environments. In this paper, we implemented and evaluated an algorithm based on multidimensional scaling (MDS) technique for three-dimensional (3D) nodes localization in WSN using improved heuristic method for distance calculation. Using extensive simulations we investigated our approach regarding various network parameters. We compared the results from the simulations with other approaches for 3D-WSN localization and showed that our approach outperforms other techniques in terms of accuracy.

  5. Formation of Neural Networks in 3D Scaffolds Fabricated by Means of Laser Microstereolithography.

    PubMed

    Vedunova, M V; Timashev, P S; Mishchenko, T A; Mitroshina, E V; Koroleva, A V; Chichkov, B N; Panchenko, V Ya; Bagratashvili, V N; Mukhina, I V

    2016-08-01

    We developed and tested new 3D scaffolds for neurotransplantation. Scaffolds of predetermined architectonic were prepared using microstereolithography technique. Scaffolds were highly biocompatible with the nervous tissue cells. In vitro studies showed that the material of fabricated scaffolds is not toxic for dissociated brain cells and promotes the formation of functional neural networks in the matrix. These results demonstrate the possibility of fabrication of tissue-engineering constructs for neurotransplantation based on created scaffolds. PMID:27595153

  6. Pt-Free Counter Electrodes with Carbon Black and 3D Network Epoxy Polymer Composites

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Gyeongho; Choi, Jongmin; Park, Taiho

    2016-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite, representing dual functions for conductive corrosion protective layer (CCPL) and catalytic layer (CL) by the control of CB weight ratio against polymer is developed. Our strategy provides a proper approach which applies high catalytic ability and chemical stability of CB in corrosive triiodide/iodide (I3−/I−) redox electrolyte system. The CB and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite coated on the stainless steel (SS) electrode to alternate counter electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A two-step spray pyrolysis process is used to apply a solution containing epoxy monomers and a polyfunctional amine hardener with 6 wt% CB to a SS substrate, which forms a CCPL. Subsequently, an 86 wt% CB is applied to form a CL. The excellent catalytic properties and corrosion protective properties of the CB and 3D network epoxy polymer composites produce efficient counter electrodes that can replace fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with CCPL/SS and Pt/FTO with CL/CCPL/SS in DSSCs. This approach provides a promising approach to the development of efficient, stable, and cheap solar cells, paving the way for large-scale commercialization. PMID:26961256

  7. Pt-Free Counter Electrodes with Carbon Black and 3D Network Epoxy Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Gyeongho; Choi, Jongmin; Park, Taiho

    2016-03-01

    Carbon black (CB) and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite, representing dual functions for conductive corrosion protective layer (CCPL) and catalytic layer (CL) by the control of CB weight ratio against polymer is developed. Our strategy provides a proper approach which applies high catalytic ability and chemical stability of CB in corrosive triiodide/iodide (I3‑/I‑) redox electrolyte system. The CB and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite coated on the stainless steel (SS) electrode to alternate counter electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A two-step spray pyrolysis process is used to apply a solution containing epoxy monomers and a polyfunctional amine hardener with 6 wt% CB to a SS substrate, which forms a CCPL. Subsequently, an 86 wt% CB is applied to form a CL. The excellent catalytic properties and corrosion protective properties of the CB and 3D network epoxy polymer composites produce efficient counter electrodes that can replace fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with CCPL/SS and Pt/FTO with CL/CCPL/SS in DSSCs. This approach provides a promising approach to the development of efficient, stable, and cheap solar cells, paving the way for large-scale commercialization.

  8. Pt-Free Counter Electrodes with Carbon Black and 3D Network Epoxy Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gyeongho; Choi, Jongmin; Park, Taiho

    2016-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite, representing dual functions for conductive corrosion protective layer (CCPL) and catalytic layer (CL) by the control of CB weight ratio against polymer is developed. Our strategy provides a proper approach which applies high catalytic ability and chemical stability of CB in corrosive triiodide/iodide (I3(-)/I(-)) redox electrolyte system. The CB and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite coated on the stainless steel (SS) electrode to alternate counter electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A two-step spray pyrolysis process is used to apply a solution containing epoxy monomers and a polyfunctional amine hardener with 6 wt% CB to a SS substrate, which forms a CCPL. Subsequently, an 86 wt% CB is applied to form a CL. The excellent catalytic properties and corrosion protective properties of the CB and 3D network epoxy polymer composites produce efficient counter electrodes that can replace fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with CCPL/SS and Pt/FTO with CL/CCPL/SS in DSSCs. This approach provides a promising approach to the development of efficient, stable, and cheap solar cells, paving the way for large-scale commercialization. PMID:26961256

  9. An approach to architecture 3D scaffold with interconnective microchannel networks inducing angiogenesis for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaoxia; Wang, Yuanliang; Qian, Zhiyong; Hu, Chenbo

    2011-11-01

    The angiogenesis of 3D scaffold is one of the major current limitations in clinical practice tissue engineering. The new strategy of construction 3D scaffold with microchannel circulation network may improve angiogenesis. In this study, 3D poly(D: ,L: -lactic acid) scaffolds with controllable microchannel structures were fabricated using sacrificial sugar structures. Melt drawing sugar-fiber network produced by a modified filament spiral winding method was used to form the microchannel with adjustable diameters and porosity. This fabrication process was rapid, inexpensive, and highly scalable. The porosity, microchannel diameter, interconnectivity and surface topographies of the scaffold were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by compression tests. The mean porosity values of the scaffolds were in the 65-78% and the scaffold exhibited microchannel structure with diameter in the 100-200 μm range. The results showed that the scaffolds exhibited an adequate porosity, interconnective microchannel network, and mechanical properties. The cell culture studies with endothelial cells (ECs) demonstrated that the scaffold allowed cells to proliferate and penetrate into the volume of the entire scaffold. Overall, these findings suggest that the fabrication process offers significant advantages and flexibility in generating a variety of non-cytotoxic tissue engineering scaffolds with controllable distributions of porosity and physical properties that could provide the necessary physical cues for ECs and further improve angiogenesis for tissue engineering. PMID:21861076

  10. 3D MPEG-2 video transmission over broadband network and broadcast channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Gilles; Subramaniam, Suganthan; Vincent, Andre

    2001-06-01

    This paper explores the transmission of MPEG-2 compressed stereoscopic (3-D) video over broadband networks and digital television (DTV) broadcast channels. A system has been developed to perform 3-D (stereoscopic) MPEG-2 video encoding, transmission and decoding over broadband networks in real- time. Such a system can benefit applications where a depiction of the relative positions of objects in 3-dimensional space is critical, by providing visual cues along the sight axis. Applications such as tele-medicine, remote surveillance, tele- education, entertainment and others could benefit from such a system since it conveys an added viewing experience. For simplicity and cost efficiency the system is kept as simple as possible while offering a certain degree of control over the encoding and decoding platforms. Data exchange is done with TCP/IP for control between the server and client and with UDP/IP for the MPEG-2 transport streams delivered to the client. Parameters such as encoding rate can be set independently for the left and right viewing channels to satisfy network bandwidth restrictions, while maintaining satisfactory quality. Using this system, transmission of stereoscopic MPEG-2 transport streams (video and audio) has been performed over a 155 Mbps ATM network shared with other video transactions between server and clients. Preliminary results have shown that the system is reasonably robust to network impairments making it useable in relatively loaded networks. An innovative technique for broadcasting Standard Definition Television 3-D video using an ATSC compatible encoding and broadcasting system is also presented. This technique requires a simple video multiplexer before the ATSC encoding process, and a slight modification at the receiver after the ATSC decoding.

  11. Morphogenesis of 3D vascular networks is regulated by tensile forces.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Dekel; Landau, Shira; Shandalov, Yulia; Raindel, Noa; Freiman, Alina; Shor, Erez; Blinder, Yaron; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Mooney, David J; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2016-03-22

    Understanding the forces controlling vascular network properties and morphology can enhance in vitro tissue vascularization and graft integration prospects. This work assessed the effect of uniaxial cell-induced and externally applied tensile forces on the morphology of vascular networks formed within fibroblast and endothelial cell-embedded 3D polymeric constructs. Force intensity correlated with network quality, as verified by inhibition of force and of angiogenesis-related regulators. Tensile forces during vessel formation resulted in parallel vessel orientation under static stretching and diagonal orientation under cyclic stretching, supported by angiogenic factors secreted in response to each stretch protocol. Implantation of scaffolds bearing network orientations matching those of host abdominal muscle tissue improved graft integration and the mechanical properties of the implantation site, a critical factor in repair of defects in this area. This study demonstrates the regulatory role of forces in angiogenesis and their capacities in vessel structure manipulation, which can be exploited to improve scaffolds for tissue repair. PMID:26951667

  12. 3D position estimation using an artificial neural network for a continuous scintillator PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhu, W.; Cheng, X.; Li, D.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous crystal based PET detectors have features of simple design, low cost, good energy resolution and high detection efficiency. Through single-end readout of scintillation light, direct three-dimensional (3D) position estimation could be another advantage that the continuous crystal detector would have. In this paper, we propose to use artificial neural networks to simultaneously estimate the plane coordinate and DOI coordinate of incident γ photons with detected scintillation light. Using our experimental setup with an ‘8 + 8’ simplified signal readout scheme, the training data of perpendicular irradiation on the front surface and one side surface are obtained, and the plane (x, y) networks and DOI networks are trained and evaluated. The test results show that the artificial neural network for DOI estimation is as effective as for plane estimation. The performance of both estimators is presented by resolution and bias. Without bias correction, the resolution of the plane estimator is on average better than 2 mm and that of the DOI estimator is about 2 mm over the whole area of the detector. With bias correction, the resolution at the edge area for plane estimation or at the end of the block away from the readout PMT for DOI estimation becomes worse, as we expect. The comprehensive performance of the 3D positioning by a neural network is accessed by the experimental test data of oblique irradiations. To show the combined effect of the 3D positioning over the whole area of the detector, the 2D flood images of oblique irradiation are presented with and without bias correction.

  13. Generalized finite element method enrichment functions for curved singularities in 3D fracture mechanics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J. P.; Duarte, C. A.; Jiao, X.; Guoy, D.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a study of generalized enrichment functions for 3D curved crack fronts. Two coordinate systems used in the definition of singular curved crack front enrichment functions are analyzed. In the first one, a set of Cartesian coordinate systems defined along the crack front is used. In the second case, the geometry of the crack front is approximated by a set of curvilinear coordinate systems. A description of the computation of derivatives of enrichment functions and curvilinear base vectors is presented. The coordinate systems are automatically defined using geometrical information provided by an explicit representation of the crack surface. A detailed procedure to accurately evaluate the surface normal, conormal and tangent vectors along curvilinear crack fronts in explicit crack surface representations is also presented. An accurate and robust definition of orthonormal vectors along crack fronts is crucial for the proper definition of enrichment functions. Numerical experiments illustrate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed approaches.

  14. Understanding Plasticity and Fracture in Aluminum Alloys and their Composites by 3D X-ray Synchrotron Tomography and Microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, Peter

    Aluminum alloys and their composites are attractive materials for applications requiring high strength-to-weight ratios and reasonable cost. Many of these applications, such as those in the aerospace industry, undergo fatigue loading. An understanding of the microstructural damage that occurs in these materials is critical in assessing their fatigue resistance. Two distinct experimental studies were performed to further the understanding of fatigue damage mechanisms in aluminum alloys and their composites, specifically fracture and plasticity. Fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs) depends on many aspects of composite microstructure. Fatigue crack growth behavior is particularly dependent on the reinforcement characteristics and matrix microstructure. The goal of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of fatigue crack growth behavior in SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composites. In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was performed on two samples at low (R=0.1) and at high (R=0.6) R-ratios. The resulting reconstructed images were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) rendering of the particles and fatigue crack. Behaviors of the particles and crack, as well as their interaction, were analyzed and quantified. Four-dimensional (4D) visual representations were constructed to aid in the overall understanding of damage evolution. During fatigue crack growth in ductile materials, a plastic zone is created in the region surrounding the crack tip. Knowledge of the plastic zone is important for the understanding of fatigue crack formation as well as subsequent growth behavior. The goal of this work was to quantify the 3D size and shape of the plastic zone in 7075 Al alloys. X-ray synchrotron tomography and Laue microdiffraction were used to non-destructively characterize the volume surrounding a fatigue crack tip. The precise 3D crack profile was segmented from the reconstructed tomography data. Depth-resolved Laue patterns were obtained using

  15. Percolation properties of 3-D multiscale pore networks: how connectivity controls soil filtration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, E. M. A.; Bird, N. R. A.; Rieutord, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    Quantifying the connectivity of pore networks is a key issue not only for modelling fluid flow and solute transport in porous media but also for assessing the ability of soil ecosystems to filter bacteria, viruses and any type of living microorganisms as well inert particles which pose a contamination risk. Straining is the main mechanical component of filtration processes: it is due to size effects, when a given soil retains a conveyed entity larger than the pores through which it is attempting to pass. We postulate that the range of sizes of entities which can be trapped inside soils has to be associated with the large range of scales involved in natural soil structures and that information on the pore size distribution has to be complemented by information on a Critical Filtration Size (CFS) delimiting the transition between percolating and non percolating regimes in multiscale pore networks. We show that the mass fractal dimensions which are classically used in soil science to quantify scaling laws in observed pore size distributions can also be used to build 3-D multiscale models of pore networks exhibiting such a critical transition. We extend to the 3-D case a new theoretical approach recently developed to address the connectivity of 2-D fractal networks (Bird and Perrier, 2009). Theoretical arguments based on renormalisation functions provide insight into multi-scale connectivity and a first estimation of CFS. Numerical experiments on 3-D prefractal media confirm the qualitative theory. These results open the way towards a new methodology to estimate soil filtration efficiency from the construction of soil structural models to be calibrated on available multiscale data.

  16. Percolation properties of 3-D multiscale pore networks: how connectivity controls soil filtration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, E. M. A.; Bird, N. R. A.; Rieutord, T. B.

    2010-10-01

    Quantifying the connectivity of pore networks is a key issue not only for modelling fluid flow and solute transport in porous media but also for assessing the ability of soil ecosystems to filter bacteria, viruses and any type of living microorganisms as well inert particles which pose a contamination risk. Straining is the main mechanical component of filtration processes: it is due to size effects, when a given soil retains a conveyed entity larger than the pores through which it is attempting to pass. We postulate that the range of sizes of entities which can be trapped inside soils has to be associated with the large range of scales involved in natural soil structures and that information on the pore size distribution has to be complemented by information on a critical filtration size (CFS) delimiting the transition between percolating and non percolating regimes in multiscale pore networks. We show that the mass fractal dimensions which are classically used in soil science to quantify scaling laws in observed pore size distributions can also be used to build 3-D multiscale models of pore networks exhibiting such a critical transition. We extend to the 3-D case a new theoretical approach recently developed to address the connectivity of 2-D fractal networks (Bird and Perrier, 2009). Theoretical arguments based on renormalisation functions provide insight into multi-scale connectivity and a first estimation of CFS. Numerical experiments on 3-D prefractal media confirm the qualitative theory. These results open the way towards a new methodology to estimate soil filtration efficiency from the construction of soil structural models to be calibrated on available multiscale data.

  17. Structural and property studies on metal–organic compounds with 3-D supramolecular network

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi-Ying; Ma, Ke-Fang; Xiao, Hong-Ping; Li, Xin-Hua; Shi, Qian

    2014-07-01

    Two carboxylato-bridged allomeric compounds, ([Cu{sub 2}(dbsa){sub 2}(hmt) (H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sub 1/2}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Ni(dbsa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 1/2}[Ni(dbsa)(hmt)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 1/2}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2) (H{sub 2}dbsa=meso-2,3-dibromosuccinic acid, hmt=hexamethylenetetramine) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray structral analyses. The metal ions have two kinds of coordination fashion in one unit, and bridged by carboxylate and hmt ligands along with weak interactions existing in the solid structure, forming a 3-D supramolecular network. Variable-temperature magnetic property studies reveal the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions in 1 and 2 with g=2.2, J{sub 1}=−3.5 cm{sup −1}, J{sub 2}=−2.8 cm{sup −1} for 1, and g=2.1, J=−3.5 cm{sup −1} for 2. - Graphical abstract: Variable-temperature magnetic property studies of two 3-D supramolecular compounds reveal the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal ions, through the effective super-exchange media. - Highlights: • Two 3-D allomeric Cu(II) and Ni(II) metal–organic compounds have been prepared. • The 3-D networks were constructed by coordination bonds, weak interactions and hydrogen bond interactions. • There are antiferromagnetic super-exchange interactions between the metal ions.

  18. Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

    2009-03-31

    Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications

  19. 2D and 3D Histioid Disclination Networks in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Miao; Guo, Yubing; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Wei, Qi-Huo

    Topological defects and disclination lines are of both fundamental interest and practical importance. In this paper, we will show that periodic/non-periodic 2D/3D networks of disclination lines can be created in nematic liquid crystal cells by setting well-designed alignment patterns at the top and bottom substrate surfaces. The desired complex patterns of liquid crystal molecular alignments at the substrates are obtained using a projection photoalignment technique based on plasmonic metamasks. The designs of alignment patterns and their resulting disclination line networks will be presented. These designable topological networks represent a new kind of artificial materials which could be of useful for directing colloidal and molecular assembly. National Science Foundation CMMI-1436565.

  20. Accuracy of typical photogrammetric networks in cultural heritage 3D modeling projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocerino, E.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.

    2014-06-01

    The easy generation of 3D geometries (point clouds or polygonal models) with fully automated image-based methods poses nontrivial problems on how to check a posteriori the quality of the achieved results. Clear statements and procedures on how to plan the camera network, execute the survey and use automatic tools to achieve the prefixed requirements are still an open issue. Although such issues had been discussed and solved some years ago, the importance of camera network geometry is today often underestimated or neglected in the cultural heritage field. In this paper different camera network geometries, with normal and convergent images, are analyzed and the accuracy of the produced results are compared to ground truth measurements.

  1. Direct synthesis of graphene 3D-coated Cu nanosilks network for antioxidant transparent conducting electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Huachun; Wu, Chenping; Lin, Na; Soomro, Abdul Majid; Guo, Huizhang; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaping; Cai, Duanjun; Kang, Junyong

    2015-06-01

    Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 μm length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by the imprint method. A magnetic manipulator equipped with a copper capsule was used to produce high Cu vapor pressure on Cu nanosilks and realize the graphene 3D-coating. The coated Cu@graphene nanosilks network achieved high transparency, low sheet resistance (41 Ohm sq-1 at 95% transmittance) and robust antioxidant ability. With this technique, the transfer process of graphene is no longer needed, and a flexible, uniform and high-performance transparent conducting film could be fabricated in unlimited size.Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 μm length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by

  2. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  3. Random fracture networks: percolation, geometry and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic properties of fracture networks. Most of the data can only be derived numerically, and to be useful they need to be rationalized, i.e., a large set of numbers should be replaced by a simple formula which is easy to apply for estimating orders of magnitude. Three major tools are found useful in this rationalization effort. First, analytical results can usually be derived for infinite fractures, a limit which corresponds to large densities. Second, the excluded volume and the dimensionless density prove crucial to gather data obtained at intermediate densities. Finally, shape factors can be used to further reduce the influence of fracture shapes. Percolation of fracture networks is of primary importance since this characteristic controls transport properties such as permeability. Recent numerical studies for various types of fracture networks (isotropic, anisotropic, heterogeneous in space, polydisperse, mixture of shapes) are summarized; the percolation threshold rho is made dimensionless by means of the excluded volume. A general correlation for rho is proposed as a function of the gyration radius. The statistical characteristics of the blocks which are cut in the solid matrix by the network are presented, since they control transfers between the porous matrix and the fractures. Results on quantities such as the volume, surface and number of faces are given and semi empirical relations are proposed. The possible intersection of a percolating network and of a cubic cavity is also summarized. This might be of importance for the underground storage of wastes. An approximate reasoning based on the excluded volume of the percolating cluster and of the cubic cavity is proposed. Finally, consequences on the permeability of fracture networks are briefly addressed. An empirical formula which verifies some theoretical properties is proposed.

  4. Producing 3D neuronal networks in hydrogels for living bionic device interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aregueta-Robles, Ulises A; Lim, Khoon S; Martens, Penny J; Lovell, Nigel H; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Green, Rylie

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogels hold significant promise for supporting cell based therapies in the field of bioelectrodes. It has been proposed that tissue engineering principles can be used to improve the integration of neural interfacing electrodes. Degradable hydrogels based on poly (vinyl alcohol) functionalised with tyramine (PVA-Tyr) have been shown to support covalent incorporation of non-modified tyrosine rich proteins within synthetic hydrogels. PVA-Tyr crosslinked with such proteins, were explored as a scaffold for supporting development of neural tissue in a three dimensional (3D) environment. In this study a model neural cell line (PC12) and glial accessory cell line, Schwann cell (SC) were encapsulated in PVA-Tyr crosslinked with gelatin and sericin. Specifically, this study aimed to examine the growth and function of SC and PC12 co-cultures when translated from a two dimensional (2D) environment to a 3D environment. PC12 differentiation was successfully promoted in both 2D and 3D at 25 days post-culture. SC encapsulated as a single cell line and in co-culture were able to produce both laminin and collagen-IV which are required to support neuronal development. Neurite outgrowth in the 3D environment was confirmed by immunocytochemical staining. PVA-Tyr/sericin/gelatin hydrogel showed mechanical properties similar to nerve tissue elastic modulus. It is suggested that the mechanical properties of the PVA-Tyr hydrogels with native protein components are providing with a compliant substrate that can be used to support the survival and differentiation of neural networks. PMID:26736824

  5. Distributed Network, Wireless and Cloud Computing Enabled 3-D Ultrasound; a New Medical Technology Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people. PMID:19936236

  6. Distributed network, wireless and cloud computing enabled 3-D ultrasound; a new medical technology paradigm.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people. PMID:19936236

  7. Neural network techniques for invariant recognition and motion tracking of 3-D objects

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.N.; Tseng, Y.H.

    1995-12-31

    Invariant recognition and motion tracking of 3-D objects under partial object viewing are difficult tasks. In this paper, we introduce a new neural network solution that is robust to noise corruption and partial viewing of objects. This method directly utilizes the acquired range data and requires no feature extraction. In the proposed approach, the object is first parametrically represented by a continuous distance transformation neural network (CDTNN) which is trained by the surface points of the exemplar object. When later presented with the surface points of an unknown object, this parametric representation allows the mismatch information to back-propagate through the CDTNN to gradually determine the best similarity transformation (translation and rotation) of the unknown object. The mismatch can be directly measured in the reconstructed representation domain between the model and the unknown object.

  8. Nonthreshold-based event detection for 3d environment monitoring in sensor networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Liu, Y.H.; Chen, L.

    2008-12-15

    Event detection is a crucial task for wireless sensor network applications, especially environment monitoring. Existing approaches for event detection are mainly based on some predefined threshold values and, thus, are often inaccurate and incapable of capturing complex events. For example, in coal mine monitoring scenarios, gas leakage or water osmosis can hardly be described by the overrun of specified attribute thresholds but some complex pattern in the full-scale view of the environmental data. To address this issue, we propose a nonthreshold-based approach for the real 3D sensor monitoring environment. We employ energy-efficient methods to collect a time series of data maps from the sensor network and detect complex events through matching the gathered data to spatiotemporal data patterns. Finally, we conduct trace-driven simulations to prove the efficacy and efficiency of this approach on detecting events of complex phenomena from real-life records.

  9. Analysis of transport connectivity in karstic aquifers spanned by 3D conduit networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronayne, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Karst aquifers are characterized by interconnected conduits that behave as structural pathways for groundwater and solutes. This modeling study assesses the influence of conduit network geometry on solute transport behavior within karst systems. Synthetic karst aquifers containing 3D conduit networks were considered. Networks of varying complexity were generated using a directed percolation model. Flow and transport simulations were conducted for each synthetic aquifer by modeling the conduits as discretized high-permeability features within a uniform matrix material. Transport connectivity and dispersive properties were evaluated using statistical moments of the solute arrival time distribution at the downgradient conduit outlet (karst spring). In addition, a new connectivity metric that quantifies solute residence time within conduits was considered. Results show that a more complex network leads to enhanced mixing between the conduit and matrix domains, which has the effect of reducing transport connectivity. This modeling study illustrates how typically available transport data (e.g., solute breakthrough curves at the conduit outlet) may reveal information about the internal network structure, thus providing guidance for future inverse modeling.

  10. Calibration of an Outdoor Distributed Camera Network with a 3D Point Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Agustín; Silva, Manuel; Teniente, Ernesto H.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Bernardino, Alexandre; Gaspar, José; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor camera networks are becoming ubiquitous in critical urban areas of the largest cities around the world. Although current applications of camera networks are mostly tailored to video surveillance, recent research projects are exploiting their use to aid robotic systems in people-assisting tasks. Such systems require precise calibration of the internal and external parameters of the distributed camera network. Despite the fact that camera calibration has been an extensively studied topic, the development of practical methods for user-assisted calibration that minimize user intervention time and maximize precision still pose significant challenges. These camera systems have non-overlapping fields of view, are subject to environmental stress, and are likely to suffer frequent recalibration. In this paper, we propose the use of a 3D map covering the area to support the calibration process and develop an automated method that allows quick and precise calibration of a large camera network. We present two cases of study of the proposed calibration method: one is the calibration of the Barcelona Robot Lab camera network, which also includes direct mappings (homographies) between image coordinates and world points in the ground plane (walking areas) to support person and robot detection and localization algorithms. The second case consist of improving the GPS positioning of geo-tagged images taken with a mobile device in the Facultat de Matemàtiques i Estadística (FME) patio at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). PMID:25076221

  11. Calibration of an outdoor distributed camera network with a 3D point cloud.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Agustín; Silva, Manuel; Teniente, Ernesto H; Ferreira, Ricardo; Bernardino, Alexandre; Gaspar, José; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor camera networks are becoming ubiquitous in critical urban areas of the largest cities around the world. Although current applications of camera networks are mostly tailored to video surveillance, recent research projects are exploiting their use to aid robotic systems in people-assisting tasks. Such systems require precise calibration of the internal and external parameters of the distributed camera network. Despite the fact that camera calibration has been an extensively studied topic, the development of practical methods for user-assisted calibration that minimize user intervention time and maximize precision still pose significant challenges. These camera systems have non-overlapping fields of view, are subject to environmental stress, and are likely to suffer frequent recalibration. In this paper, we propose the use of a 3D map covering the area to support the calibration process and develop an automated method that allows quick and precise calibration of a large camera network. We present two cases of study of the proposed calibration method: one is the calibration of the Barcelona Robot Lab camera network, which also includes direct mappings (homographies) between image coordinates and world points in the ground plane (walking areas) to support person and robot detection and localization algorithms. The second case consist of improving the GPS positioning of geo-tagged images taken with a mobile device in the Facultat de Matemàtiques i Estadística (FME) patio at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). PMID:25076221

  12. Visualisation of BioPAX Networks using BioLayout Express 3D

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Derek W.; Angus, Tim; Enright, Anton J.; Freeman, Tom C.

    2014-01-01

    BioLayout Express 3D is a network analysis tool designed for the visualisation and analysis of graphs derived from biological data. It has proved to be powerful in the analysis of gene expression data, biological pathways and in a range of other applications. In version 3.2 of the tool we have introduced the ability to import, merge and display pathways and protein interaction networks available in the BioPAX Level 3 standard exchange format. A graphical interface allows users to search for pathways or interaction data stored in the Pathway Commons database. Queries using either gene/protein or pathway names are made via the cPath2 client and users can also define the source and/or species of information that they wish to examine. Data matching a query are listed and individual records may be viewed in isolation or merged using an ‘Advanced’ query tab. A visualisation scheme has been defined by mapping BioPAX entity types to a range of glyphs. Graphs of these data can be viewed and explored within BioLayout as 2D or 3D graph layouts, where they can be edited and/or exported for visualisation and editing within other tools. PMID:25949802

  13. Visualisation of BioPAX Networks using BioLayout Express (3D).

    PubMed

    Wright, Derek W; Angus, Tim; Enright, Anton J; Freeman, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    BioLayout Express (3D) is a network analysis tool designed for the visualisation and analysis of graphs derived from biological data. It has proved to be powerful in the analysis of gene expression data, biological pathways and in a range of other applications. In version 3.2 of the tool we have introduced the ability to import, merge and display pathways and protein interaction networks available in the BioPAX Level 3 standard exchange format. A graphical interface allows users to search for pathways or interaction data stored in the Pathway Commons database. Queries using either gene/protein or pathway names are made via the cPath2 client and users can also define the source and/or species of information that they wish to examine. Data matching a query are listed and individual records may be viewed in isolation or merged using an 'Advanced' query tab. A visualisation scheme has been defined by mapping BioPAX entity types to a range of glyphs. Graphs of these data can be viewed and explored within BioLayout as 2D or 3D graph layouts, where they can be edited and/or exported for visualisation and editing within other tools. PMID:25949802

  14. Direct synthesis of graphene 3D-coated Cu nanosilks network for antioxidant transparent conducting electrode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Huachun; Wu, Chenping; Lin, Na; Soomro, Abdul Majid; Guo, Huizhang; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaping; Cai, Duanjun; Kang, JunYong

    2015-06-28

    Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 μm length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by the imprint method. A magnetic manipulator equipped with a copper capsule was used to produce high Cu vapor pressure on Cu nanosilks and realize the graphene 3D-coating. The coated Cu@graphene nanosilks network achieved high transparency, low sheet resistance (41 Ohm sq(-1) at 95% transmittance) and robust antioxidant ability. With this technique, the transfer process of graphene is no longer needed, and a flexible, uniform and high-performance transparent conducting film could be fabricated in unlimited size. PMID:26018299

  15. 3D geological model developed to analyse the aquifer - sewer network interaction in Bucharest city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpescu, I.; Radu, E.; Gogu, R. G.; Priceputu, A.; Boukhemacha, M. A.; Bica, I.; Gaitanaru, D.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the fact that several important Bucharest city sewer segments drain the groundwater and provide high input flow-rates for the existing waste-water treatment plant, their rehabilitation is necessary. A hydrogeological model, currently under development, will permit to compute the groundwater-sewer network interaction allowing the simulation of distinct design solutions to prevent city disturbances. For groundwater modelling the geological model represents the fundament of understanding the aquifers system behaviour. In this respect a 3D accurate and detailed geological model, covering a region of about 75 km2 has been developed to identify its contact with the major collecting sewer conduit. The shallow aquifer stratum of quaternary formations called Colentina is made of gravels and sands. This unconfined aquifer can be found mainly in the Bucharest city region at depths up to 20 m. A clayey-marl layer is located between Colentina and a lower confined aquifer called Mostistea. This second one is located at depths between 25 m and 70 m and is made of fine and medium sands with gravel intercalations. It overlays on a very thick sequence (40 m to 150 m) of marl and clay layers with slim sandy intercalations. The geological model has been developed on the basis of a large number of geological and geotechnical boreholes. A set of 400 boreholes with depths between 5m to 200 m showing a detailed geological and lithological description stored in a geospatial database have been used. The geological analysis has been performed using a software platform that integrates the spatial database and a set of tools and methodologies developed in a GIS environment with the aim of facilitating the development of 3D geological models for sedimentary media. Taking into account the first 50 m in depth, 25 geological profiles have been interpreted on the basis of chronostratigraphycal, lithological, and sedimentological criteria to delineate the geological formations and assess

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of 3D cerebral microvascular network dynamics in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yingtian; You, Jiang; Volkow, Nora D.; Park, Ki; Du, Congwu

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread applications of multiphoton microscopy in microcirculation, its small field of view and inability to instantaneously quantify cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) in vascular networks limit its utility in investigating the heterogeneous responses to brain stimulations. Optical Doppler tomography (ODT) provides 3D images of CBFv networks, but it suffers poor sensitivity for measuring capillary flows. Here we report a new method, contrast-enhanced ODT with intralipid that significantly improves quantitative CBFv imaging of capillary networks by obviating the errors from long latency between flowing red blood cells (low hematocrit ~20% in capillaries). This enhanced sensitivity allowed us to measure the ultraslow microcirculation surrounding a brain tumor and the abnormal ingrowth of capillary flows in the tumor as well as in ischemia triggered by chronic cocaine in the mouse brain that could not be detected by regular ODT. It also enabled significantly enhanced sensitivity for quantifying the heterogeneous CBFv responses of vascular networks to acute cocaine. Inasmuch as intralipids are widely used for parenteral nutrition the intralipid contrast method has translational potential for clinical applications. PMID:25192654

  17. Texture analysis of the 3D collagen network and automatic classification of the physiology of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojuan; Wu, Jianping; Swift, Benjamin; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2015-07-01

    A close relationship has been found between the 3D collagen structure and physiological condition of articular cartilage (AC). Studying the 3D collagen network in AC offers a way to determine the condition of the cartilage. However, traditional qualitative studies are time consuming and subjective. This study aims to develop a computer vision-based classifier to automatically determine the condition of AC tissue based on the structural characteristics of the collagen network. Texture analysis was applied to quantitatively characterise the 3D collagen structure in normal (International Cartilage Repair Society, ICRS, grade 0), aged (ICRS grade 1) and osteoarthritic cartilages (ICRS grade 2). Principle component techniques and linear discriminant analysis were then used to classify the microstructural characteristics of the 3D collagen meshwork and the condition of the AC. The 3D collagen meshwork in the three physiological condition groups displayed distinctive characteristics. Texture analysis indicated a significant difference in the mean texture parameters of the 3D collagen network between groups. The principle component and linear discriminant analysis of the texture data allowed for the development of a classifier for identifying the physiological status of the AC with an expected prediction error of 4.23%. An automatic image analysis classifier has been developed to predict the physiological condition of AC (from ICRS grade 0 to 2) based on texture data from the 3D collagen network in the tissue. PMID:24428581

  18. Creating 3D chemical gradients with self-folding microfluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamal, Mustapha; Kalinin, Yevgeniy; Zarafshar, Aasiyeh; Gracias, David

    2012-02-01

    We describe the reversible self-folding of polymeric films into intricate three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic networks and investigate their utility as bio-inspired synthetic vasculature for in vitro tissue culture models. Our fabrication methodology relies on patterning of channels inside the films at the planar microfabrication stage followed by programmable self-folding of the two-dimensional patterned structures. Here self-folding action is enabled by stress gradients which develop in the films due to differential ultraviolet cross-linking and subsequent solvent conditioning. We achieved wafer-scale assembly of micropatterned geometries including helices, polyhedra and corrugated sheets. To demonstrate utility of such self-folded microfluidic devices we present localized chemical delivery of biochemicals in 3D to discrete regions of cells cultured on the curved self-assembled surfaces and in a thick, surrounding hydrogel. We believe that the devices can be used to mimic such natural self-assembled systems as leaves and tissues. Reference: M. Jamal et al., Nature Communications (2011; in press).

  19. Novel enzymatically cross-linked hyaluronan hydrogels support the formation of 3D neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Broguiere, Nicolas; Isenmann, Luca; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2016-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an essential component of the central nervous system's extracellular matrix and its high molecular weight (MW) form has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties relevant for regenerative medicine. Here, we introduce a new hydrogel based on high MW HA which is cross-linked using the transglutaminase (TG) activity of the activated blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIIIa). These HA-TG gels have significant advantages for neural tissue engineering compared to previous HA gels. Due to their chemical inertness in the absence of FXIIIa, the material can be stored long-term, is stable in solution, and shows no cytotoxicity. The gelation is completely cell-friendly due to the specificity of the enzyme and the gelation rate can be tuned from seconds to hours at physiological pH and independently of stiffness. The gels are injectable, and attach covalently to fibrinogen and fibrin, two common bioactive components in in vitro tissue engineering, as well as proteins present in vivo, allowing the gels to covalently bind to brain or spinal cord defects. These optimal chemical and bioactive properties of HA-TG gels enabled the formation of 3D neuronal cultures of unprecedented performance, showing fast neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic speciation, strong synaptic connectivity in 3D networks, and rapidly-occurring and long-lasting coordinated electrical activity. PMID:27209262

  20. 3D reconstruction of carbon nanotube networks from neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mostafa; Baniassadi, Majid; Baghani, Mostafa; Dadmun, Mark; Tehrani, Mehran

    2015-09-01

    Structure reconstruction from statistical descriptors, such as scattering data obtained using x-rays or neutrons, is essential in understanding various properties of nanocomposites. Scattering based reconstruction can provide a realistic model, over various length scales, that can be used for numerical simulations. In this study, 3D reconstruction of a highly loaded carbon nanotube (CNT)-conducting polymer system based on small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS, respectively) data was performed. These light-weight and flexible materials have recently shown great promise for high-performance thermoelectric energy conversion, and their further improvement requires a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationships. The first step in achieving such understanding is to generate models that contain the hierarchy of CNT networks over nano and micron scales. The studied system is a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). SANS and USANS patterns of the different samples containing 10, 30, and 50 wt% SWCNTs were measured. These curves were then utilized to calculate statistical two-point correlation functions of the nanostructure. These functions along with the geometrical information extracted from SANS data and scanning electron microscopy images were used to reconstruct a representative volume element (RVE) nanostructure. Generated RVEs can be used for simulations of various mechanical and physical properties. This work, therefore, introduces a framework for the reconstruction of 3D RVEs of high volume faction nanocomposites containing high aspect ratio fillers from scattering experiments.

  1. Control of vascular network location in millimeter-sized 3D-tissues by micrometer-sized collagen coated cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yen; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-25

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) vascularized constructs remains a central challenge because capillary network structures are important for sufficient oxygen and nutrient exchange to sustain the viability of engineered constructs. However, construction of 3D-tissues at single cell level has yet to be reported. Previously, we established a collagen coating method for fabricating a micrometer-sized collagen matrix on cell surfaces to control cell distance or cell densities inside tissues. In this study, a simple fabrication method is presented for constructing vascular networks in 3D-tissues over micrometer-sized or even millimeter-sized with controlled cell densities. From the results, well vascularized 3D network structures can be observed with a fluorescence label method mixing collagen coated cells and endothelia cells, indicating that constructed ECM rich tissues have the potential for vascularization, which opens up the possibility for various applications in pharmaceutical or tissue engineering fields. PMID:26920051

  2. Models and simulation of 3D neuronal dendritic trees using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Pedro L; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Neuron morphology is crucial for neuronal connectivity and brain information processing. Computational models are important tools for studying dendritic morphology and its role in brain function. We applied a class of probabilistic graphical models called Bayesian networks to generate virtual dendrites from layer III pyramidal neurons from three different regions of the neocortex of the mouse. A set of 41 morphological variables were measured from the 3D reconstructions of real dendrites and their probability distributions used in a machine learning algorithm to induce the model from the data. A simulation algorithm is also proposed to obtain new dendrites by sampling values from Bayesian networks. The main advantage of this approach is that it takes into account and automatically locates the relationships between variables in the data instead of using predefined dependencies. Therefore, the methodology can be applied to any neuronal class while at the same time exploiting class-specific properties. Also, a Bayesian network was defined for each part of the dendrite, allowing the relationships to change in the different sections and to model heterogeneous developmental factors or spatial influences. Several univariate statistical tests and a novel multivariate test based on Kullback-Leibler divergence estimation confirmed that virtual dendrites were similar to real ones. The analyses of the models showed relationships that conform to current neuroanatomical knowledge and support model correctness. At the same time, studying the relationships in the models can help to identify new interactions between variables related to dendritic morphology. PMID:21305364

  3. Regional application of multi-layer artificial neural networks in 3-D ionosphere tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Razin, Mir Reza; Voosoghi, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Tomography is a very cost-effective method to study physical properties of the ionosphere. In this paper, residual minimization training neural network (RMTNN) is used in voxel-based tomography to reconstruct of 3-D ionosphere electron density with high spatial resolution. For numerical experiments, observations collected at 37 GPS stations from Iranian permanent GPS network (IPGN) are used. A smoothed TEC approach was used for absolute STEC recovery. To improve the vertical resolution, empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) obtained from international reference ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012) used as object function in training neural network. Ionosonde observations is used for validate reliability of the proposed method. Minimum relative error for RMTNN is 1.64% and maximum relative error is 15.61%. Also root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.17 × 1011 (electrons/m3) is computed for RMTNN which is less than RMSE of IRI2012. The results show that RMTNN has higher accuracy and compiles speed than other ionosphere reconstruction methods.

  4. Multi-static networked 3D ladar for surveillance and access control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ogirala, S. S. R.; Hu, B.; Le, Han Q.

    2007-04-01

    A theoretical design and simulation of a 3D ladar system concept for surveillance, intrusion detection, and access control is described. It is a non-conventional system architecture that consists of: i) multi-static configuration with an arbitrarily scalable number of transmitters (Tx's) and receivers (Rx's) that form an optical wireless code-division-multiple-access (CDMA) network, and ii) flexible system architecture with modular plug-and-play components that can be deployed for any facility with arbitrary topology. Affordability is a driving consideration; and a key feature for low cost is an asymmetric use of many inexpensive Rx's in conjunction with fewer Tx's, which are generally more expensive. The Rx's are spatially distributed close to the surveyed area for large coverage, and capable of receiving signals from multiple Tx's with moderate laser power. The system produces sensing information that scales as NxM, where N, M are the number of Tx's and Rx's, as opposed to linear scaling ~N in non-network system. Also, for target positioning, besides laser pointing direction and time-of-flight, the algorithm includes multiple point-of-view image fusion and triangulation for enhanced accuracy, which is not applicable to non-networked monostatic ladars. Simulation and scaled model experiments on some aspects of this concept are discussed.

  5. In situ generation of silver nanoparticles within crosslinked 3D guar gum networks for catalytic reduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yian; Zhu, Yongfeng; Tian, Guangyan; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-02-01

    The direct use of guar gum (GG) as a green reducing agent for the facile production of highly stable silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) within this biopolymer and subsequent crosslinking with borax to form crosslinked Ag@GG beads with a 3D-structured network are presented here. These crosslinked Ag@GG beads were characterized using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and then tested as a solid-phase heterogenerous catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of excess borohydride. The results indicate that these crosslinked Ag@GG beads show excellent catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-NP within 20 min and can be readily used for 10 successive cycles. PMID:25445685

  6. Distributed network of integrated 3D sensors for transportation security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejmadi, Vic; Garcia, Fred

    2009-05-01

    The US Port Security Agency has strongly emphasized the needs for tighter control at transportation hubs. Distributed arrays of miniature CMOS cameras are providing some solutions today. However, due to the high bandwidth required and the low valued content of such cameras (simple video feed), large computing power and analysis algorithms as well as control software are needed, which makes such an architecture cumbersome, heavy, slow and expensive. We present a novel technique by integrating cheap and mass replicable stealth 3D sensing micro-devices in a distributed network. These micro-sensors are based on conventional structures illumination via successive fringe patterns on the object to be sensed. The communication bandwidth between each sensor remains very small, but is of very high valued content. Key technologies to integrate such a sensor are digital optics and structured laser illumination.

  7. Mapping the 3D Connectivity of the Rat Inner Retinal Vascular Network Using OCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, Conor; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Weiner, Geoffrey; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) graphing based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography for characterization of the inner retinal vascular architecture and determination of its topologic principles. Methods Rat eyes (N = 3) were imaged with a 1300-nm spectral/Fourier domain OCT microscope. A topologic model of the inner retinal vascular network was obtained from OCT angiography data using a combination of automated and manually-guided image processing techniques. Using a resistive network model, with experimentally-quantified flow in major retinal vessels near the optic nerve head as boundary conditions, theoretical changes in the distribution of flow induced by vessel dilations were inferred. Results A topologically-representative 3D vectorized graph of the inner retinal vasculature, derived from OCT angiography data, is presented. The laminar and compartmental connectivity of the vasculature are characterized. In contrast to sparse connectivity between the superficial vitreal vasculature and capillary plexuses of the inner retina, connectivity between the two capillary plexus layers is dense. Simulated dilation of single arterioles is shown to produce both localized and lamina-specific changes in blood flow, while dilation of capillaries in a given retinal vascular layer is shown to lead to increased total flow in that layer. Conclusions Our graphing and modeling data suggest that vascular architecture enables both local and lamina-specific control of blood flow in the inner retina. The imaging, graph analysis, and modeling approach presented here will help provide a detailed characterization of vascular changes in a variety of retinal diseases, both in experimental preclinical models and human subjects. PMID:26325417

  8. Semi-automatic characterization of fractured rock masses using 3D point clouds: discontinuity orientation, spacing and SMR geomechanical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Adrian; Tomas, Roberto; Abellan, Antonio; Cano, Miguel; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of fractured rock masses for different geological applications (e.g. fractured reservoir exploitation, rock slope instability, rock engineering, etc.) requires a deep geometric understanding of the discontinuity sets affecting rock exposures. Recent advances in 3D data acquisition using photogrammetric and/or LiDAR techniques currently allow a quick and an accurate characterization of rock mass discontinuities. This contribution presents a methodology for: (a) use of 3D point clouds for the identification and analysis of planar surfaces outcropping in a rocky slope; (b) calculation of the spacing between different discontinuity sets; (c) semi-automatic calculation of the parameters that play a capital role in the Slope Mass Rating geomechanical classification. As for the part a) (discontinuity orientation), our proposal identifies and defines the algebraic equations of the different discontinuity sets of the rock slope surface by applying an analysis based on a neighbouring points coplanarity test. Additionally, the procedure finds principal orientations by Kernel Density Estimation and identifies clusters (Riquelme et al., 2014). As a result of this analysis, each point is classified with a discontinuity set and with an outcrop plane (cluster). Regarding the part b) (discontinuity spacing) our proposal utilises the previously classified point cloud to investigate how different outcropping planes are linked in space. Discontinuity spacing is calculated for each pair of linked clusters within the same discontinuity set, and then spacing values are analysed calculating their statistic values. Finally, as for the part c) the previous results are used to calculate parameters F_1, F2 and F3 of the Slope Mass Rating geomechanical classification. This analysis is carried out for each discontinuity set using their respective orientation extracted in part a). The open access tool SMRTool (Riquelme et al., 2014) is then used to calculate F1 to F3 correction

  9. COMBINING A NEW 3-D SEISMIC S-WAVE PROPAGATION ANALYSIS FOR REMOTE FRACTURE DETECTION WITH A ROBUST SUBSURFACE MICROFRACTURE-BASED VERIFICATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Hardage; M.M. Backus; M.V. DeAngelo; R.J. Graebner; S.E. Laubach; Paul Murray

    2004-02-01

    Fractures within the producing reservoirs at McElroy Field could not be studied with the industry-provided 3C3D seismic data used as a cost-sharing contribution in this study. The signal-to-noise character of the converted-SV data across the targeted reservoirs in these contributed data was not adequate for interpreting azimuth-dependent data effects. After illustrating the low signal quality of the converted-SV data at McElroy Field, the seismic portion of this report abandons the McElroy study site and defers to 3C3D seismic data acquired across a different fractured carbonate reservoir system to illustrate how 3C3D seismic data can provide useful information about fracture systems. Using these latter data, we illustrate how fast-S and slow-S data effects can be analyzed in the prestack domain to recognize fracture azimuth, and then demonstrate how fast-S and slow-S data volumes can be analyzed in the poststack domain to estimate fracture intensity. In the geologic portion of the report, we analyze published regional stress data near McElroy Field and numerous formation multi-imager (FMI) logs acquired across McElroy to develop possible fracture models for the McElroy system. Regional stress data imply a fracture orientation different from the orientations observed in most of the FMI logs. This report culminates Phase 2 of the study, ''Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis for Remote Fracture Detection with a Robust Subsurface Microfracture-Based Verification Technique''. Phase 3 will not be initiated because wells were to be drilled in Phase 3 of the project to verify the validity of fracture-orientation maps and fracture-intensity maps produced in Phase 2. Such maps cannot be made across McElroy Field because of the limitations of the available 3C3D seismic data at the depth level of the reservoir target.

  10. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  12. Estimation of 3-D pore network coordination number of rocks from watershed segmentation of a single 2-D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, Arash; Ayatollahi, Shahab; Kharrat, Riyaz; Dashti, Nader

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we have utilized 3-D micro-tomography images of real and synthetic rocks to introduce two mathematical correlations which estimate the distribution parameters of 3-D coordination number using a single 2-D cross-sectional image. By applying a watershed segmentation algorithm, it is found that the distribution of 3-D coordination number is acceptably predictable by statistical analysis of the network extracted from 2-D images. In this study, we have utilized 25 volumetric images of rocks in order to propose two mathematical formulas. These formulas aim to approximate the average and standard deviation of coordination number in 3-D pore networks. Then, the formulas are applied for five independent test samples to evaluate the reliability. Finally, pore network flow modeling is used to find the error of absolute permeability prediction using estimated and measured coordination numbers. Results show that the 2-D images are considerably informative about the 3-D network of the rocks and can be utilized to approximate the 3-D connectivity of the porous spaces with determination coefficient of about 0.85 that seems to be acceptable considering the variety of the studied samples.

  13. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W.; Wadleigh, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  14. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W.; Wadleigh, E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  15. SIZE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS IN FRACTURE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas H. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    The research conducted under DOE grant DE-FG26-98FT40385 provides a detailed assessment of size scaling issues in natural fracture and active fault networks that extend over scales from several tens of kilometers to less than a tenth of a meter. This study incorporates analysis of data obtained from several sources, including: natural fracture patterns photographed in the Appalachian field area, natural fracture patterns presented by other workers in the published literature, patterns of active faulting in Japan mapping at a scale of 1:100,000, and lineament patterns interpreted from satellite-based radar imagery obtained over the Appalachian field area. The complexity of these patterns is always found to vary with scale. In general,but not always, patterns become less complex with scale. This tendency may reverse as can be inferred from the complexity of high-resolution radar images (8 meter pixel size) which are characterized by patterns that are less complex than those observed over smaller areas on the ground surface. Model studies reveal that changes in the complexity of a fracture pattern can be associated with dominant spacings between the fractures comprising the pattern or roughly to the rock areas bounded by fractures of a certain scale. While the results do not offer a magic number (the fractal dimension) to characterize fracture networks at all scales, the modeling and analysis provide results that can be interpreted directly in terms of the physical properties of the natural fracture or active fault complex. These breaks roughly define the size of fracture bounded regions at different scales. The larger more extensive sets of fractures will intersect and enclose regions of a certain size, whereas smaller less extensive sets will do the same--i.e. subdivide the rock into even smaller regions. The interpretation varies depending on the number of sets that are present, but the scale breaks in the logN/logr plots serve as a guide to interpreting the

  16. FEM analysis of deformation localization mechanisms in a 3-D fractured medium under rotating compressive stress orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strijker, Geertje; Beekman, Fred; Bertotti, Giovanni; Luthi, Stefan M.

    2013-05-01

    Stress distributions and deformation patterns in a medium with a pre-existing fracture set are analyzed as a function of the remote compressive stress orientation (σH) using finite element models with increasingly complex fracture configurations. Slip along the fractures causes deformation localization at the tips as wing cracks or shear zones. The deformation intensity is proportional to the amount of slip, attaining a peak value for α = 45° (α: angle between the fracture strike and σH) and slip is linearly proportional with fracture length. Wing cracks develop for high deformation intensities for 30° < α < 60°, whereas primary plastic shear zones develop for low deformation intensities. Additionally, two types of secondary shear zones develop for α < 30° and α > 60°, with constant angles of 135° and - 60° with σH, respectively. Mechanical interaction between fractures in a fracture zone, quantified as change in slip compared to an isolated fracture, decreases with increasing fracture separation. Fracture underlap elongates the fracture length and therefore increases the amount of slip, while fracture overlap exhibits the opposite effect. Fracture slip decreases with an increasing amount of directly adjacent fractures. Mechanical interaction becomes negligible for fracture configurations with spacing-to-length and spacing-to-overlap ratios exceeding 0.5 and that in this case fractures are decoupled. Independent of the pre-existing fracture configuration, the development of a secondary systematic fracture set driven by a remote stress rotation is dominated by σH; development of wing cracks or shear zones is restricted to the fracture tips. Blocks with tapered geometries are present in models with a variable fracture strike, where the maximum principal stress (σ1, applying the geological convention that compressive stresses are positive) trajectories consistently deviate from σH; the presence of two systematic σ1 trajectory orientations suggests

  17. Sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro; Manepally, Chandrika; Fedors, Randall; Wyrick, Danielle Y.

    2009-09-01

    Active fractures refer to the portions of unsaturated, connected fractures that actively conduct water. The active fracture model parameter accounts for the reduction in the number of fractures carrying water and in the fracture-matrix interface area in field-scale simulations of flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rocks. One example includes the numerical analyses of the fault test results at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada (USA). In such applications, the active fracture model parameter is commonly used as a calibration parameter without relating it to fracture network orientations and infiltration rates. A two-dimensional, multiphase lattice-Boltzmann model was used in this study to investigate the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios for an unsaturated, variable dipping, and geometrically simple fracture network. The active fracture model parameter differed by as much as 0.11-0.44 when the effects of fracture network orientation, injection rate, and injection mode were included in the simulations. Hence, the numerical results suggest that the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation, injection rates, and injection modes should be explored at the field-scale to strengthen the technical basis and range of applicability of the active fracture model.

  18. XFEM-Based CZM for the Simulation of 3D Multiple-Stage Hydraulic Fracturing in Quasi-brittle Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, M.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Cohesive Zone Model (CZM) engages the plastic zone and softening effects at the fracture tip in a quasi-brittle rock, e.g. shale, which concludes a more precise fracture geometry and pumping pressure compared to those from Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Nevertheless, this model, namely planar CZM, assumes a predefined surface on which the fractures propagate and therefore, restricts the fracture propagation direction. Notably, this direction depends on the stress interactions between closely spaced fractures and can be acquired integrating CZM as the segmental contact interaction model with a fully coupled pore pressure-displacement, extended finite element model (XFEM). This later model simulates the fracture initiation and propagation along an arbitrary, solution-dependent path. In this work, we modeled double- and triple-cluster 3D hydraulic fracturing in a single-layer, quasi-brittle shale formation using planar CZM and XFEM-based CZM including slit flow and poro-elasticity for fracture and matrix spaces, respectively, in Abaqus. Our fully-coupled pore pressure-stress Geomechanics model includes leak-off as a continuum-based fluid flow component coupled with the other unknowns in the problem. Having compared the triple-cluster fracturing results from planar CZM with those from XFEM-based CZM, we found that the stress shadowing effect of multiple hydraulic fractures on each other can cause these fractures to rationally propagate out of plane; this also demonstrates the advantages of the second method compared to the first one. We investigated the effect of this arbitrary propagation direction on not only the fractures' length, aperture, and the required injection pressure, but also fractures' connection to the wellbore. Depending on the spacing and the number of clusters per stage, this connection can be gradually disrupted with time due to the near-wellbore fracture closure which may embed proppant particles on the fracture wall, or screen out the

  19. APEnet+: a 3D Torus network optimized for GPU-based HPC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Frezza, O.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Paolucci, P. S.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the supercomputing arena, the strong rise of GPU-accelerated clusters is a matter of fact. Within INFN, we proposed an initiative — the QUonG project — whose aim is to deploy a high performance computing system dedicated to scientific computations leveraging on commodity multi-core processors coupled with latest generation GPUs. The inter-node interconnection system is based on a point-to-point, high performance, low latency 3D torus network which is built in the framework of the APEnet+ project. It takes the form of an FPGA-based PCIe network card exposing six full bidirectional links running at 34 Gbps each that implements the RDMA protocol. In order to enable significant access latency reduction for inter-node data transfer, a direct network-to-GPU interface was built. The specialized hardware blocks, integrated in the APEnet+ board, provide support for GPU-initiated communications using the so called PCIe peer-to-peer (P2P) transactions. This development is made in close collaboration with the GPU vendor NVIDIA. The final shape of a complete QUonG deployment is an assembly of standard 42U racks, each one capable of 80 TFLOPS/rack of peak performance, at a cost of 5 k€/T F LOPS and for an estimated power consumption of 25 kW/rack. In this paper we report on the status of final rack deployment and on the R&D activities for 2012 that will focus on performance enhancement of the APEnet+ hardware through the adoption of new generation 28 nm FPGAs allowing the implementation of PCIe Gen3 host interface and the addition of new fault tolerance-oriented capabilities.

  20. Knowledge Based 3d Building Model Recognition Using Convolutional Neural Networks from LIDAR and Aerial Imageries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoost, F.; Arefi, H.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, with the development of the high resolution data acquisition technologies, many different approaches and algorithms have been presented to extract the accurate and timely updated 3D models of buildings as a key element of city structures for numerous applications in urban mapping. In this paper, a novel and model-based approach is proposed for automatic recognition of buildings' roof models such as flat, gable, hip, and pyramid hip roof models based on deep structures for hierarchical learning of features that are extracted from both LiDAR and aerial ortho-photos. The main steps of this approach include building segmentation, feature extraction and learning, and finally building roof labeling in a supervised pre-trained Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) framework to have an automatic recognition system for various types of buildings over an urban area. In this framework, the height information provides invariant geometric features for convolutional neural network to localize the boundary of each individual roofs. CNN is a kind of feed-forward neural network with the multilayer perceptron concept which consists of a number of convolutional and subsampling layers in an adaptable structure and it is widely used in pattern recognition and object detection application. Since the training dataset is a small library of labeled models for different shapes of roofs, the computation time of learning can be decreased significantly using the pre-trained models. The experimental results highlight the effectiveness of the deep learning approach to detect and extract the pattern of buildings' roofs automatically considering the complementary nature of height and RGB information.

  1. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  2. Extraction and visualization of a fracture network using Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, A.; Voorn, M.; Exner, U.

    2012-04-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (µCT) measurements were conducted on 3 cm dolomite drill core plugs to gain knowledge about the distribution and orientation of a fracture network inside such plugs. µCT produces a 3D-image stack of 2D-images and these are used to reconstruct a 3D-Model of the fracture network representing the main pore space. The measurements are performed on a Rayscan 250 E at the University of Applied Sciences of Upper Austria (Fachhochschule Oberösterreich, FHÖO) using optimal recording parameters, to ensure the best spatial resolution and image quality. The resolution of the performed scans is around 20 µm. Each scan is acquired five times and then averaged to increase contrast and decrease noise artifacts. Due to the fact that the fracture apertures can be far below 20 µm, noise can be a main drawback to be able to segment the fractures. To decrease a further impact of noise we filter the images after image acquisition, by means of image histogram equalization and edge enhanced diffusion. Segmenting the fractures and the fracture network is not trivial. Many different segmentation routines the one option giving by far the best results was the Frangi Filter 2D. This filter was written in the medical research field to trace blood vessels. From a data perspective blood vessels are rather similar structures to fractures. However, the results are intensity images so that we still have to use a global threshold. This step is done by the automatic Otsu threshold, which is not biased by any human input. From a segmented image it is possible to quantify the apertures, orientation and distribution of the fractures. Using this technique can provide deep insight into the deformation history and a geometrical dataset to calculate permeability of a fracture network, which is additionally calibrated with conventional thin section analysis.

  3. Superior Sodium Storage in 3D Interconnected Nitrogen and Oxygen Dual-Doped Carbon Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yang, Zhenzhong; Li, Weihan; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Carbonaceous materials have attracted immense interest as anode materials for Na-ion batteries (NIBs) because of their good chemical, thermal stabilities, as well as high Na-storage capacity. However, the carbonaceous materials as anodes for NIBs still suffer from the lower rate capability and poor cycle life. An N,O-dual doped carbon (denoted as NOC) network is designed and synthesized, which is greatly favorable for sodium storage. It exhibits high specific capacity and ultralong cycling stability, delivering a capacity of 545 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) after 100 cycles and retaining a capacity of 240 mAh g(-1) at 2 A g(-1) after 2000 cycles. The NOC composite with 3D well-defined porosity and N,O-dual doped induces active sites, contributing to the enhanced sodium storage. In addition, the NOC is synthesized through a facile solution process, which can be easily extended to the preparation of many other N,O-dual doped carbonaceous materials for wide applications in catalysis, energy storage, and solar cells. PMID:27028729

  4. Spatio-temporal interpolation of soil moisture in 3D+T using automated sensor network data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, C.; Hengl, T.; Magney, T. S.; Brown, D. J.; Gräler, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil sensor networks provide frequent in situ measurements of dynamic soil properties at fixed locations, producing data in 2- or 3-dimensions and through time (2D+T and 3D+T). Spatio-temporal interpolation of 3D+T point data produces continuous estimates that can then be used for prediction at unsampled times and locations, as input for process models, and can simply aid in visualization of properties through space and time. Regression-kriging with 3D and 2D+T data has successfully been implemented, but currently the field of geostatistics lacks an analytical framework for modeling 3D+T data. Our objective is to develop robust 3D+T models for mapping dynamic soil data that has been collected with high spatial and temporal resolution. For this analysis, we use data collected from a sensor network installed on the R.J. Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF), a 37-ha Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research (LTAR) site in Pullman, WA. For five years, the sensors have collected hourly measurements of soil volumetric water content at 42 locations and five depths. The CAF dataset also includes a digital elevation model and derivatives, a soil unit description map, crop rotations, electromagnetic induction surveys, daily meteorological data, and seasonal satellite imagery. The soil-water sensor data, combined with the spatial and temporal covariates, provide an ideal dataset for developing 3D+T models. The presentation will include preliminary results and address main implementation strategies.

  5. Scattering and coupling effects of electromagnetic waves in 3D networks of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defos Du Rau, M.; Pessan, F.; Ruffie, G.; Vignéras-Lefebvre, V.; Parneix, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of electromagnetic scattering from a 3D system of spheres is considered and an iterative solution that accounts for multiple scattering is proposed. The Mie formalism used for a single sphere is extended to account for multiple scattered fields between several particles. The translational addition theorems for spherical wave functions are used to express the electromagnetic field scattered by a sphere S_i in terms of an incident field for a sphere S_k in a spherical coordinates system attached to the sphere S_k. In this work, the numerical convergence of the method is discussed and associated computational times are given. Numerical computations including Radar Cross Section (RCS) and radiation patterns for various 3D configurations are presented. Some of them are compared with free-space measurements made in the 8 to 100 GHz frequency band using vectorial network analyzers. 11.55.-m S-matrix theory; analytic structure of amplitudes Cet article étudie la diffusion des ondes électromagnétiques par des réseaux tridimensionnels de sphères et propose une méthode itérative pour prendre en compte les effets de multidiffusion. Le formalisme de Mie utilisé dans le cas d'une sphère est étendu pour calculer les champs "multidiffusés" entre plusieurs particules. Les théorèmes d'addition et de translation des fonctions d'onde sphériques sont utilisés pour exprimer le champ diffusé par une sphère S_i comme étant incident sur une sphère S_k, dans un système de coordonnées sphériques lié au centre de S_k. La convergence numérique de la méthode est discutée et des temps de calcul sont donnés. Des résultats numériques tels que des Surfaces Équivalentes Radar (SER) et des diagrammes de rayonnement pour différentes configurations tridimensionnelles sont montrés. Certains d'entre eux sont comparés à des mesures en espace libre faites à l'aide d'analyseurs de réseaux vectoriels dans la bande de fréquence 8{-}100 GHz.

  6. Numerical Simulation of 3D Hydraulic Fracturing Based on an Improved Flow-Stress-Damage Model and a Parallel FEM Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. C.; Tang, C. A.; Li, G.; Wang, S. Y.; Liang, Z. Z.; Zhang, Y. B.

    2012-09-01

    The failure mechanism of hydraulic fractures in heterogeneous geological materials is an important topic in mining and petroleum engineering. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model that considers the coupled effects of seepage, damage, and the stress field is introduced. This model is based on a previously developed two-dimensional (2D) version of the model (RFPA2D-Rock Failure Process Analysis). The RFPA3D-Parallel model is developed using a parallel finite element method with a message-passing interface library. The constitutive law of this model considers strength and stiffness degradation, stress-dependent permeability for the pre-peak stage, and deformation-dependent permeability for the post-peak stage. Using this model, 3D modelling of progressive failure and associated fluid flow in rock are conducted and used to investigate the hydro-mechanical response of rock samples at laboratory scale. The responses investigated are the axial stress-axial strain together with permeability evolution and fracture patterns at various stages of loading. Then, the hydraulic fracturing process inside a rock specimen is numerically simulated. Three coupled processes are considered: (1) mechanical deformation of the solid medium induced by the fluid pressure acting on the fracture surfaces and the rock skeleton, (2) fluid flow within the fracture, and (3) propagation of the fracture. The numerically simulated results show that the fractures from a vertical wellbore propagate in the maximum principal stress direction without branching, turning, and twisting in the case of a large difference in the magnitude of the far-field stresses. Otherwise, the fracture initiates in a non-preferred direction and plane then turns and twists during propagation to become aligned with the preferred direction and plane. This pattern of fracturing is common when the rock formation contains multiple layers with different material properties. In addition, local heterogeneity of the rock

  7. Application of artificial neural network in 3D imaging with lanthanum bromide calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostojic, A.; Tatischeff, V.; Kiener, J.; Hamadache, C.; Karkour, N.; Linget, D.; Grave, X.; Gibelin, L.; Travers, B.; Blin, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range from 0.1 up to 100 MeV holds many understudied questions connected with e.g. stellar nucleosynthesis, the active Sun, neutron stars and black holes. To access the physics behind, a significant improvement in detection sensitivity is needed compared to previous missions, e.g. CGRO and INTEGRAL. One of the promising concepts for a future gamma-ray mission is an Advanced Compton Telescope. Under the project of creating a prototype of such instrument, we study the perspectives of using a novel inorganic scintillator as a calorimeter part. Modern inorganic crystal or ceramics scintillators are constantly improving on qualities such as energy resolution and radiation hardness, and this makes them a smart choice for a new space-borne telescope. At CSNSM Orsay, we have assembled a detection module from a 5 × 5cm2 area and 1 cm thick, cerium-doped lanthanum (III) bromide (LaBr3:Ce) inorganic scintillator coupled to a 64 channel multi-anode photomultiplier. The readout of the PMT signals is carried out with the ASIC MAROC, used previously for the luminometer of the ATLAS detector (CERN). Characterization, thorough measurements with various radioactive sources, as well as, single photoelectron detection have been done. Furthermore, we made a comparison of measurements with a detailed GEANT4-based simulation which includes tracking of the optical photons. Finally, we have studied the 3D reconstruction of the first interaction point of incident gamma rays, utilizing a neural network algorithm. This spatial position resolution plays a crucial part in the future implementations and, together with the other measured properties, it makes our detector module very interesting for the next generation of space telescopes operating in the MeV range.

  8. Deep MRI brain extraction: A 3D convolutional neural network for skull stripping.

    PubMed

    Kleesiek, Jens; Urban, Gregor; Hubert, Alexander; Schwarz, Daniel; Maier-Hein, Klaus; Bendszus, Martin; Biller, Armin

    2016-04-01

    Brain extraction from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for many neuroimaging workflows. Current methods demonstrate good results on non-enhanced T1-weighted images, but struggle when confronted with other modalities and pathologically altered tissue. In this paper we present a 3D convolutional deep learning architecture to address these shortcomings. In contrast to existing methods, we are not limited to non-enhanced T1w images. When trained appropriately, our approach handles an arbitrary number of modalities including contrast-enhanced scans. Its applicability to MRI data, comprising four channels: non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1w, T2w and FLAIR contrasts, is demonstrated on a challenging clinical data set containing brain tumors (N=53), where our approach significantly outperforms six commonly used tools with a mean Dice score of 95.19. Further, the proposed method at least matches state-of-the-art performance as demonstrated on three publicly available data sets: IBSR, LPBA40 and OASIS, totaling N=135 volumes. For the IBSR (96.32) and LPBA40 (96.96) data set the convolutional neuronal network (CNN) obtains the highest average Dice scores, albeit not being significantly different from the second best performing method. For the OASIS data the second best Dice (95.02) results are achieved, with no statistical difference in comparison to the best performing tool. For all data sets the highest average specificity measures are evaluated, whereas the sensitivity displays about average results. Adjusting the cut-off threshold for generating the binary masks from the CNN's probability output can be used to increase the sensitivity of the method. Of course, this comes at the cost of a decreased specificity and has to be decided application specific. Using an optimized GPU implementation predictions can be achieved in less than one minute. The proposed method may prove useful for large-scale studies and clinical trials. PMID:26808333

  9. Analysis of the Influence of a Natural Fracture Network on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation in Carbonate Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Mian; Zhang, Guangqing

    2014-03-01

    A new experimental model has been designed to simulate the influence of a natural fracture network on the propagation geometry of hydraulic fractures in naturally fractured formations using a tri-axial fracturing system. In this model, a parallel and symmetrical pre-fracture network was created by placing cement plates in a cubic mold and filling the mold with additional cement to create the final testing block. The surface of the plates will thus be weakly cemented and form pre-fractures. The dimension and direction of the pre-fractures can be controlled using the plates. The experiments showed that the horizontal differential stress and the angle between the maximum horizontal principal in situ stress and the pre-fracture are the dominating factors for the initiation and propagation of hydraulic fractures. For and or and , the direction of the initiation and propagation of the hydraulic fractures are consistent with or deviate from the normal direction of the pre-fracture. When the hydraulic fractures approach the pre-fractures, the direction of the hydraulic fracture propagation will be consistent with the normal direction of the pre-fracture. Otherwise, the hydraulic fracture will deflect and perpendicularly cross the parallel and symmetric pre-fracture network. For and , and or and , before the hydraulic fracture and the pre-fractures intersect, the direction of the hydraulic fracture propagation remains unchanged, and the pre-fractures open or dilate when the hydraulic fracture propagates to the intersection point, forming a complicated hydraulic fracture network with the propagation region of the overall hydraulic fracture network taking the shape of an ellipse. In this condition, the complexity level of the hydraulic fracture is controlled by the net pressure, the compressive normal stress acting on the pre-fractures, the shearing strength and the cohesion strength of the planes of weakness. The conclusions of this research are inconsistent with the

  10. Percolation and permeability of heterogeneous fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Mourzenko, Valeri; Thovert, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    Natural fracture fields are almost necessarily heterogeneous with a fracture density varying with space. Two classes of variations are quite frequent. In the first one, the fracture density is decreasing from a given surface; the fracture density is usually (but not always see [1]) an exponential function of depth as it has been shown by many measurements. Another important example of such an exponential decrease consists of the Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ) which is created by the excavation process of a gallery [2,3]. In the second one, the fracture density undergoes some local random variations around an average value. This presentation is mostly focused on the first class and numerical samples are generated with an exponentially decreasing density from a given plane surface. Their percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity can be calculated by the numerical codes which are detailed in [4]. Percolation is determined by a pseudo diffusion algorithm. Flow determination necessitates the meshing of the fracture networks and the discretisation of the Darcy equation by a finite volume technique; the resulting linear system is solved by a conjugate gradient algorithm. Only the flow properties of the EDZ along the directions which are parallel to the wall are of interest when a pressure gradient parallel to the wall is applied. The transmissivity T which relates the total flow rate per unit width Q along the wall through the whole fractured medium to the pressure gradient grad p, is defined by Q = - T grad p/mu where mu is the fluid viscosity. The percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity are systematically determined for a wide range of decay lengths and anisotropy parameters. They can be modeled by comparison with anisotropic fracture networks with a constant density. A heuristic power-law model is proposed which accurately describes the results for the percolation threshold over the whole investigated range of heterogeneity and anisotropy. Then, the data

  11. FRACGEN™ Stochastically Generates Fracture Networks Consistent with Data

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; McKoy, M.L.; Boyle, E.J.

    2006-10-01

    FRACGEN(tm) generates fracture networks for highly fractured reservoirs (< 60,000 fractures) consistent with field data (e.g., outcrop data, fmi and other logs) and a geologist’s intuition. It uses four Boolean models of increasing complexity through a Monte Carlo process that samples statistical distributions for various network attributes of each fracture set as found from the data. Three models account for hierarchical relations among fracture sets, and two generate fracture swarming. Termination/intersection frequencies may be controlled implicitly or explicitly. The code also is being upgraded to allow specification of fractal properties for the fracture network. FRACGEN provides an output file that specifies length, orientation, and effective aperture for each fracture. This output file can be used by a unique reservoir engineering code, NFFLOW, to perform reservoir engineering studies for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. This presentation describes use of FRACGEN to describe a reservoir in the Oriskany Sandstone in West Virginia.

  12. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, C. T.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through stochastically generated two-dimensional fracture networks. The centres and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow either a lognormal distribution or a power law distribution. We have considered the case where the fractures in the network each have the same aperture, as well as the case where the aperture of each fracture is directly proportional to the fracture length. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this conductivity using a simple estimation method that does not require extensive computation. For our calculations, fracture networks are represented as networks composed of conducting segments (bonds) between nodes. Each bond represents the region of a single fracture between two adjacent intersections with other fractures. We assume that the bonds are arranged on a kagome lattice, with some fraction of the bonds randomly missing. The conductance of each bond is then replaced with some effective conductance, Ceff, which we take to be the arithmetic mean of the individual conductances, averaged over each bond, rather than over each fracture. This is in contrast to the usual approximation used in effective medium theories, wherein the geometric mean is used. Our

  13. Polydopamine Inter-Fiber Networks: New Strategy for Producing Rigid, Sticky, 3D Fluffy Electrospun Fibrous Polycaprolactone Sponges.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wuyong; Lee, Slgirim; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Designing versatile 3D interfaces that can precisely represent a biological environment is a prerequisite for the creation of artificial tissue structures. To this end, electrospun fibrous sponges, precisely mimicking an extracellular matrix and providing highly porous interfaces, have capabilities that can function as versatile physical cues to regenerate various tissues. However, their intrinsic features, such as sheet-like, thin, and weak structures, limit the design of a number of uses in tissue engineering applications. Herein, a highly facile methodology capable of fabricating rigid, sticky, spatially expanded fluffy electrospun fibrous sponges is proposed. A bio-inspired adhesive material, poly(dopamine) (pDA), is employed as a key mediator to provide rigidity and stickiness to the 3D poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibrous sponges, which are fabricated using a coaxial electrospinning with polystyrene followed by a selective leaching process. The iron ion induced oxidation of dopamine into pDA networks interwoven with PCL fibers results in significant increases in the rigidity of 3D fibrous sponges. Furthermore, the exposure of catecholamine groups on the fiber surfaces promotes the stable attachment of the sponges on wet organ surfaces and triggers the robust immobilization of biomolecules (e.g., proteins and gene vectors), demonstrating their potential for 3D scaffolds as well as drug delivery vehicles. Because fibrous structures are ubiquitous in the human body, these rigid, sticky, 3D fibrous sponges are good candidates for powerful biomaterial systems that functionally mimic a variety of tissue structures. PMID:26855375

  14. Effects of fracture reactivation and diagenesis on fracture network evolution: Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, J. N.; Eichhubl, P.; Xu, G.; Ahn, H.; Fall, A.; Hargrove, P.; Laubach, S.; Ukar, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambrian Eriboll Formation quartzarenites contain abundant fractures with varying degrees of quartz cement infill. Fractures exist that are entirely sealed; are locally sealed by bridging cements but preserve pore space among bridges; are mostly open but lined with veneers of cement; or are devoid of cement. Fracture propagation in the Eriboll Formation is highly sensitive to the presence of pre-existing fractures. Fracture reactivation occurs in opening mode as individual fractures repeatedly open and are filled or bridged by syn-kinematic cements. As well, reactivation occurs in shear as opening of one fracture orientation coincides with shear displacement along pre-existing fractures of different orientations. The tendency for pre-existing fractures to slip varies in part by the extent of cement infill, yet we observe shear and opening-mode reactivation even among sealed fractures. Paleotemperature analysis of fluid inclusions within fracture cements suggests some fractures now in outcrop formed deep in the subsurface. Fractures within the Eriboll Formation may therefore affect later fracture propagation throughout geologic time. With progressive strain, fault zones develop within fracture networks by a sequence of opening-mode fracture formation, fracture reactivation and linkage, fragmentation, cataclasis, and the formation of slip surfaces. Cataclasite within fault zones is commonly more thoroughly cemented than fractures in the damage zone or outside the fault zone. This variance of cement abundance is likely the result of (1) continued exposure of freshly broken quartz surfaces within cataclasite, promoting quartz precipitation, and (2) possibly more interconnected pathways for mass transfer within the fault zone. Enhanced cementation of cataclasite results in strengthening or diagenetic strain hardening of the evolving fault zone. Further slip is accommodated by shear localization along discrete slip surfaces. With further linkage of fault segments

  15. Analysis for Clinical Effect of Virtual Windowing and Poking Reduction Treatment for Schatzker III Tibial Plateau Fracture Based on 3D CT Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huafeng; Li, Zhijun; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Ke; Ma, Xinlong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the applications of preoperative planning and virtual surgery including surgical windowing and elevating reduction and to determine the clinical effects of this technology on the treatment of Schatzker type III tibial plateau fractures. Methods. 32 patients with Schatzker type III tibial plateau fractures were randomised upon their admission to the hospital using a sealed envelope method. Fourteen were treated with preoperative virtual design and assisted operation (virtual group) and 18 with direct open reduction and internal fixation (control group). Results. All patients achieved primary incision healing. Compared with control group, virtual groups showed significant advantages in operative time, incision length, and blood loss (P < 0.001). The virtual surgery was consistent with the actual surgery. Conclusion. The virtual group was better than control group in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures of Schatzker type III, due to shorter operative time, smaller incision length, and lower blood loss. The reconstructed 3D fracture model could be used to preoperatively determine the surgical windowing and elevating reduction method and simulate the operation for Schatzker type III tibial plateau fractures. PMID:25767804

  16. Effect of Joint Scale and Processing on the Fracture of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joints: Application to Micro-bumps in 3D Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebanpour, B.; Huang, Z.; Chen, Z.; Dutta, I.

    2016-01-01

    In 3-dimensional (3D) packages, a stack of dies is vertically connected to each other using through-silicon vias and very thin solder micro-bumps. The thinness of the micro-bumps results in joints with a very high volumetric proportion of intermetallic compounds (IMCs), rendering them much more brittle compared to conventional joints. Because of this, the reliability of micro-bumps, and the dependence thereof on the proportion of IMC in the joint, is of substantial concern. In this paper, the growth kinetics of IMCs in thin Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu joints attached to Cu substrates were analyzed, and empirical kinetic laws for the growth of Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn in thin joints were obtained. Modified compact mixed mode fracture mechanics samples, with adhesive solder joints between massive Cu substrates, having similar thickness and IMC content as actual micro-bumps, were produced. The effects of IMC proportion and strain rate on fracture toughness and mechanisms were investigated. It was found that the fracture toughness G C decreased with decreasing joint thickness ( h Joint). In addition, the fracture toughness decreased with increasing strain rate. Aging also promoted alternation of the crack path between the two joint-substrate interfaces, possibly proffering a mechanism to enhance fracture toughness.

  17. Fabrication of 3D high aspect ratio PDMS microfluidic networks with a hybrid stamp.

    PubMed

    Kung, Yu-Chun; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Fan, Yu-Jui; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2015-04-21

    We report a novel methodology for fabricating large-area, multilayer, thin-film, high aspect ratio, 3D microfluidic structures with through-layer vias and open channels that can be bonded between hard substrates. It is realized by utilizing a hybrid stamp with a thin plastic sheet embedded underneath a PDMS surface. This hybrid stamp solves an important edge protrusion issue during PDMS molding while maintaining necessary stamp elasticity to ensure the removal of PDMS residues at through-layer regions. Removing edge protrusion is a significant progress toward fabricating 3D structures since high aspect ratio PDMS structures with flat interfaces can be realized to facilitate multilayer stacking and bonding to hard substrates. Our method also allows for the fabrication of 3D deformable channels, which can lead to profound applications in electrokinetics, optofluidics, inertial microfluidics, and other fields where the shape of the channel cross section plays a key role in device physics. To demonstrate, as an example, we have fabricated a microfluidic channel by sandwiching two 20 μm wide, 80 μm tall PDMS membranes between two featureless ITO glass substrates. By applying electrical bias to the two ITO substrates and pressure to deform the thin membrane sidewalls, strong electric field enhancement can be generated in the center of a channel to enable 3D sheathless dielectrophoretic focusing of biological objects including mammalian cells and bacteria at a flow speed up to 14 cm s(-1). PMID:25710255

  18. Recovering 3D Shape with Absolute Size from Endoscope Images Using RBF Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Seiya; Iwahori, Yuji; Bhuyan, M. K.; Woodham, Robert J.; Kasugai, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnosis judges the status of polyp from the size and the 3D shape of the polyp from its medical endoscope image. However the medical doctor judges the status empirically from the endoscope image and more accurate 3D shape recovery from its 2D image has been demanded to support this judgment. As a method to recover 3D shape with high speed, VBW (Vogel-Breuß-Weickert) model is proposed to recover 3D shape under the condition of point light source illumination and perspective projection. However, VBW model recovers the relative shape but there is a problem that the shape cannot be recovered with the exact size. Here, shape modification is introduced to recover the exact shape with modification from that with VBW model. RBF-NN is introduced for the mapping between input and output. Input is given as the output of gradient parameters of VBW model for the generated sphere. Output is given as the true gradient parameters of true values of the generated sphere. Learning mapping with NN can modify the gradient and the depth can be recovered according to the modified gradient parameters. Performance of the proposed approach is confirmed via computer simulation and real experiment. PMID:25949235

  19. Functional metabolic interactions of human neuron-astrocyte 3D in vitro networks.

    PubMed

    Simão, Daniel; Terrasso, Ana P; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    The generation of human neural tissue-like 3D structures holds great promise for disease modeling, drug discovery and regenerative medicine strategies. Promoting the establishment of complex cell-cell interactions, 3D culture systems enable the development of human cell-based models with increased physiological relevance, over monolayer cultures. Here, we demonstrate the establishment of neuronal and astrocytic metabolic signatures and shuttles in a human 3D neural cell model, namely the glutamine-glutamate-GABA shuttle. This was indicated by labeling of neuronal GABA following incubation with the glia-specific substrate [2-(13)C]acetate, which decreased by methionine sulfoximine-induced inhibition of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase. Cell metabolic specialization was further demonstrated by higher pyruvate carboxylase-derived labeling in glutamine than in glutamate, indicating its activity in astrocytes and not in neurons. Exposure to the neurotoxin acrylamide resulted in intracellular accumulation of glutamate and decreased GABA synthesis. These results suggest an acrylamide-induced impairment of neuronal synaptic vesicle trafficking and imbalanced glutamine-glutamate-GABA cycle, due to loss of cell-cell contacts at synaptic sites. This work demonstrates, for the first time to our knowledge, that neural differentiation of human cells in a 3D setting recapitulates neuronal-astrocytic metabolic interactions, highlighting the relevance of these models for toxicology and better understanding the crosstalk between human neural cells. PMID:27619889

  20. From 1D chain to 3D network: A theoretical study on TiO2 low dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ling-ju; Zeng, Zhi; He, Tao

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a systematic study on a series of low dimensional TiO2 nanostructures under density functional theory methods. The geometries, stabilities, growth mechanism, and electronic structures of 1D chain, 2D ring, 2D ring array, and 3D network of TiO2 nanostructures are analyzed. Based on the Ti2O4 building unit, a series of 1D TiO2 nano chains and rings can be built. Furthermore, 2D ring array and 3D network nanostructures can be constructed from 1D chains and rings. Among non-periodic TiO2 chain and ring structures, one series of ring structures is found to be more stable. The geometry model of the 2D ring arrays and 3D network structures in this work has provided a theoretical understanding on the structure information in experiments. Based on these semiconductive low dimensional structures, moreover, it can help to understand and design new hierarchical TiO2 nanostructure in the future.

  1. From 1D chain to 3D network: A theoretical study on TiO{sub 2} low dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ling-ju; He, Tao; Zeng, Zhi

    2015-06-14

    We have performed a systematic study on a series of low dimensional TiO{sub 2} nanostructures under density functional theory methods. The geometries, stabilities, growth mechanism, and electronic structures of 1D chain, 2D ring, 2D ring array, and 3D network of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures are analyzed. Based on the Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4} building unit, a series of 1D TiO{sub 2} nano chains and rings can be built. Furthermore, 2D ring array and 3D network nanostructures can be constructed from 1D chains and rings. Among non-periodic TiO{sub 2} chain and ring structures, one series of ring structures is found to be more stable. The geometry model of the 2D ring arrays and 3D network structures in this work has provided a theoretical understanding on the structure information in experiments. Based on these semiconductive low dimensional structures, moreover, it can help to understand and design new hierarchical TiO{sub 2} nanostructure in the future.

  2. Role of 3D force networks in linking grain scale to macroscale processes in sheared granular debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, K.; Jettestuen, E.; Abe, S.

    2013-12-01

    Active faults, landslides and subglacial tills contain accumulations of granular debris that evolve during sliding. The macroscopic motion in these environments is at least to some extent determined by processes operating in this sheared granular material. A valid question is how the local behavior at the individual granular contacts actually sums up to influence macroscopic sliding. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling can potentially help elucidate this. Observations of jamming (stick) and unjamming (flow) as well as concentrated shear bands on the scale of 5-10 grains suggest that a simple continuum description may be insufficient to capture important elements of the behavior. We therefore seek a measure of the organization of the granular fabric and the 3D structure of the load bearing skeleton that effectively demonstrates how the individual grain interactions are manifested in the macroscopic sliding behavior we observe. Contact force networks are an expression of this. Here we investigate the structure and variability of the most connected system spanning force networks produced in 3D discrete element models of granular layers under shear. We use percolation measures to identify, characterize, compare and track the evolution of these strongly connected contact force networks. We show that specific topological measures used in describing the networks, such as number of contacts and coordination number, are sensitive to grain size distribution (and likely the grain shape) of the material as well as loading conditions. Hence, faults of different maturity would be expected to accommodate shear in different ways. Distinct changes in the topological characteristics i.e. the geometry of strong force networks with accumulated strain are directly correlated to fluctuations in macroscopic shearing resistance. This suggests that 3D force networks play an important bridging role between individual grain scale processes and macroscopic sliding behavior.

  3. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We used indirect stereolithography (SL) to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture. PMID:27228079

  4. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We used indirect stereolithography (SL) to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture. PMID:27228079

  5. Aligning 3D nanofibrous networks from self-assembled phenylalanine nanofibers†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianfeng; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled synthetic materials are typically disordered, and controlling the alignment of such materials at the nanometer scale may be important for a variety of biological applications. In this study, we have applied directional freeze-drying, for the first time, to develop well aligned three dimensional (3D) nanofibrous materials using amino acid like L-phenylalanine (Phe). 3D free-standing Phe nanofibrous monoliths have been successfully prepared using directional freeze-drying, and have presented a unique hierarchical structure with well-aligned nanofibers at the nanometer scale and an ordered compartmental architecture at the micrometer scale. We have found that the physical properties (e.g. nanofiber density and alignment) of the nanofibrous materials could be tuned by controlling the concentration and pH of the Phe solution and the freezing temperature. Moreover, the same strategy (i.e. directional freeze-drying) has been successfully applied to assemble peptide nanofibrous materials using a dipeptide (i.e. diphenylalanine), and to assemble Phe-based nanofibrous composites using polyethylenimine and poly(vinyl alcohol). The tunability of the nanofibrous structures together with the biocompatibility of Phe may make these 3D nanofibrous materials suitable for a variety of applications, including biosensor templates, tissue scaffolds, filtration membranes, and absorbents. The strategy reported here is likely applicable to create aligned nanofibrous structures using other amino acids, peptides, and polymers. PMID:25621167

  6. a Fractal Network Model for Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Cuihong; Qiu, Shuxia; Sasmito, Agus Pulung

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties and mechanisms of fractured porous media are very important for oil and gas reservoir engineering, hydraulics, environmental science, chemical engineering, etc. In this paper, a fractal dual-porosity model is developed to estimate the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media, where a fractal tree-like network model is used to characterize the fracture system according to its fractal scaling laws and topological structures. The analytical expressions for the effective permeability of fracture system and fractured porous media, tortuosity, fracture density and fraction are derived. The proposed fractal model has been validated by comparisons with available experimental data and numerical simulation. It has been shown that fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture have significant effect on the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media. The effective permeability of fracture system can be increased with the increase of fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture, while it can be remarkably lowered by introducing tortuosity at large branching angle. Also, a scaling law between the fracture density and fractal dimension for fracture length has been found, where the scaling exponent depends on the fracture number. The present fractal dual-porosity model may shed light on the transport physics of fractured porous media and provide theoretical basis for oil and gas exploitation, underground water, nuclear waste disposal and geothermal energy extraction as well as chemical engineering, etc.

  7. Flow focusing in unsaturated fracture networks: A numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2003-04-17

    A numerical modeling study is presented to investigate flow-focusing phenomena in a large-scale fracture network, constructed using field data collected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed repository site for high-level nuclear waste. The two-dimensional fracture network for an area of 100 m x 150 m contains more than 20,000 fractures. Steady-state unsaturated flow in the fracture network is investigated for different boundary conditions and rock properties. Simulation results indicate that flow paths are generally vertical, and that horizontal fractures mainly provide pathways between neighboring vertical paths. In addition to fracture properties, flow-focusing phenomena are also affected by rock-matrix permeability, with lower matrix permeability leading to a high degree of flow focusing. The simulation results further indicate that the average spacing between flow paths in a layered system tends to increase and flow tends to becomes more focused, with depth.

  8. Bi-Mn mixed metal organic oxide: A novel 3d-6p mixed metal coordination network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fa-Nian; Rosa Silva, Ana; Bian, Liang

    2015-05-01

    A new terminology of metal organic oxide (MOO) was given a definition as a type of coordination polymers which possess the feature of inorganic connectivity between metals and the direct bonded atoms and show 1D, 2D or 3D inorganic sub-networks. One such compound was shown as an example. A 3d-6p (Mn-Bi. Named MOOMnBi) mixed metals coordination network has been synthesized via hydrothermal method. The new compound with the molecular formula of [MnBi2O(1,3,5-BTC)2]n (1,3,5-BTC stands for benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) was characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction technique that revealed a very interesting 3-dimensional (3D) framework with Bi4O2(COO)12 clusters which are further connected to Mn(COO)6 fragments into a 2D MOO. The topology study indicates an unprecedented topological type with the net point group of {413.62}{413.68}{416.65}{418.610}{422.614}{43} corresponding to 3,6,7,7,8,9-c hexa-nodal net. MOOMnBi shows catalytic activity in the synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones.

  9. Effects of simplifying fracture network representation on inert chemical migration in fracture-controlled aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wellman, T.P.; Shapiro, A.M.; Hill, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely recognized that highly permeable 'large-scale' fractures dominate chemical migration in many fractured aquifers, recent studies suggest that the pervasive 'small-scale' fracturing once considered of less significance can be equally important for characterizing the spatial extent and residence time associated with transport processes. A detailed examination of chemical migration through fracture-controlled aquifers is used to advance this conceptual understanding. The influence of fracture structure is evaluated by quantifying the effects to transport caused by a systematic removal of fractures from three-dimensional discrete fracture models whose attributes are derived from geologic and hydrologic conditions at multiple field sites. Results indicate that the effects to transport caused by network simplification are sensitive to the fracture network characteristics, degree of network simplification, and plume travel distance, but primarily in an indirect sense since correlation to individual attributes is limited. Transport processes can be 'enhanced' or 'restricted' from network simplification meaning that the elimination of fractures may increase or decrease mass migration, mean travel time, dispersion, and tailing of the concentration plume. The results demonstrate why, for instance, chemical migration may not follow the classic advection-dispersion equation where dispersion approximates the effect of the ignored geologic structure as a strictly additive process to the mean flow. The analyses further reveal that the prediction error caused by fracture network simplification is reduced by at least 50% using the median estimate from an ensemble of simplified fracture network models, and that the error from network simplification is at least 70% less than the stochastic variability from multiple realizations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Effects of simplifying fracture network representation on inert chemical migration in fracture-controlled aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, Tristan P.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Hill, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely recognized that highly permeable `large-scale' fractures dominate chemical migration in many fractured aquifers, recent studies suggest that the pervasive `small-scale' fracturing once considered of less significance can be equally important for characterizing the spatial extent and residence time associated with transport processes. A detailed examination of chemical migration through fracture-controlled aquifers is used to advance this conceptual understanding. The influence of fracture structure is evaluated by quantifying the effects to transport caused by a systematic removal of fractures from three-dimensional discrete fracture models whose attributes are derived from geologic and hydrologic conditions at multiple field sites. Results indicate that the effects to transport caused by network simplification are sensitive to the fracture network characteristics, degree of network simplification, and plume travel distance, but primarily in an indirect sense since correlation to individual attributes is limited. Transport processes can be `enhanced' or `restricted' from network simplification meaning that the elimination of fractures may increase or decrease mass migration, mean travel time, dispersion, and tailing of the concentration plume. The results demonstrate why, for instance, chemical migration may not follow the classic advection-dispersion equation where dispersion approximates the effect of the ignored geologic structure as a strictly additive process to the mean flow. The analyses further reveal that the prediction error caused by fracture network simplification is reduced by at least 50% using the median estimate from an ensemble of simplified fracture network models, and that the error from network simplification is at least 70% less than the stochastic variability from multiple realizations.

  11. Quantitative, 3D Visualization of the Initiation and Progression of Vertebral Fractures Under Compression and Anterior Flexion.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Timothy M; Hussein, Amira I; Curtiss, Cameron; Fein, Paul M; Camp, Anderson; De Barros, Lidia; Morgan, Elise F

    2016-04-01

    The biomechanical mechanisms leading to vertebral fractures are not well understood. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that the vertebral endplate plays a key role in failure of the vertebra as a whole, but how this role differs for different types of vertebral loading is not known. Mechanical testing of human thoracic spine segments, in conjunction with time-lapsed micro-computed tomography, enabled quantitative assessment of deformations occurring throughout the entire vertebral body under axial compression combined with anterior flexion ("combined loading") and under axial compression only ("compression loading"). The resulting deformation maps indicated that endplate deflection was a principal feature of vertebral failure for both loading modes. Specifically, the onset of endplate deflection was temporally coincident with a pronounced drop in the vertebra's ability to support loads. The location of endplate deflection, and also vertebral strength, were associated with the porosity of the endplate and the microstructure of the underlying trabecular bone. However, the location of endplate deflection and the involvement of the cortex differed between the two types of loading. Under the combined loading, deflection initiated, and remained the largest, at the anterior central endplate or the anterior ring apophysis, depending in part on health of the adjacent intervertebral disc. This deflection was accompanied by outward bulging of the anterior cortex. In contrast, the location of endplate deflection was more varied in compression loading. For both loading types, the earliest progression to a mild fracture according to a quantitative morphometric criterion occurred only after much of the failure process had occurred. The outcomes of this work indicate that for two physiological loading modes, the vertebral endplate and underlying trabecular bone are critically involved in vertebral fracture. These outcomes provide a strong biomechanical rationale for

  12. 3D/4D analyses of damage and fracture behaviours in structural materials via synchrotron X-ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    X-ray microtomography has been utilized for the in-situ observation of various structural metals under external loading. Recent advances in X-ray microtomography provide remarkable tools to image the interior of materials. In-situ X-ray microtomography provides a unique possibility to access the 3D character of internal microstructure and its time evolution behaviours non-destructively, thereby enabling advanced techniques for measuring local strain distribution. Local strain mapping is readily enabled by processing such high-resolution tomographic images either by the particle tracking technique or the digital image correlation technique [1]. Procedures for tracking microstructural features which have been developed by the authors [2], have been applied to analyse localised deformation and damage evolution in a material [3]. Typically several tens of thousands of microstructural features, such as particles and pores, are tracked in a tomographic specimen (0.2 - 0.3 mm(3) in volume). When a sufficient number of microstructural features is dispersed in 3D space, the Delaunay tessellation algorithm is used to obtain local strain distribution. With these techniques, 3D strain fields can be measured with reasonable accuracy. Even local crack driving forces, such as local variations in the stress intensity factor, crack tip opening displacement and J integral along a crack front line, can be measured from discrete crack tip displacement fields [4]. In the present presentation, complicated crack initiation and growth behaviour and the extensive formation of micro cracks ahead of a crack tip are introduced as examples.A novel experimental method has recently been developed by amalgamating a pencil beam X-Ray diffraction (XRD) technique with the microstructural tracking technique [5]. The technique provides information about individual grain orientations and 1-micron-level grain morphologies in 3D together with high-density local strain mapping. The application of this

  13. SERS spectroscopy, electrical recording and intracellular injection in neuronal networks with 3D plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprettini, Valeria; Messina, Gabriele C.; Dipalo, Michele; La Rocca, Rosanna; Cerea, Andrea; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    We developed a platform based on 3D plasmonic nanoantennas able to perform different functions with applications in the biological research area. In particular it will be shown how the peculiar geometry of the system plays a fundamental role, leading to a tight interaction with the cellular membrane. Such configuration allows on one side the investigation of extracellular features through enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and electrical recording, and on the other the possibility of intracellular injection by optoporation. In this regard it will be demonstrated how the characteristics of the laser pulse used for exciting the antenna establish the kind of involved phenomena. A dependence of these properties on the metal coating the antenna will be also shown.

  14. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer in a Heterogeneous Fracture Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisladottir, V. R.; Roubinet, D.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy harvesting requires extraction and injection of geothermal fluid. Doing so in an optimal way requires a quantitative understanding of site-specific heat transfer between geothermal fluid and the ambient rock. We develop a heat transfer particle-tracking approach to model that interaction. Fracture-network models of heat transfer in fractured rock explicitly account for the presence of individual fractures, ambient rock matrix, and fracture-matrix interfaces. Computational domains of such models span the meter scale, whereas fracture apertures are on the millimeter scale. The computations needed to model these multi-scale phenomenon can be prohibitively expensive, even for methods using nonuniform meshes. Our approach appreciably decreases the computational costs. Current particle-tracking methods usually assume both infinite matrix and one-dimensional (1D) heat transfer in the matrix blocks. They rely on 1D analytical solutions for heat transfer in a single fracture, which can lead to large predictive errors. Our two-dimensional (2D) heat transfer simulation algorithm is mesh-free and takes into account both longitudinal and transversal heat conduction in the matrix. It uses a probabilistic model to transfer particle to the appropriate neighboring fracture unless it returns to the fracture of origin or remains in the matrix. We use this approach to look at the impact of a fracture-network topology (e.g. the importance of smaller scale fractures), as well as the matrix block distribution on the heat transport in heterogeneous fractured rocks.

  15. A study of two phase flow in fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.; Pruess, K.; Vomvoris, S.; Segan, S.

    1994-12-31

    Accurate characterization of the two-phase flow behavior of the fractured rock mass is vital to the safety of a potential high level nuclear waste repository in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff at Yucca Mountain, NV. A tool for studying the two-phase flow properties of a fracture networks was developed. It is based on a simple mechanistic model in which the capillary pressure of a fracture is a unique function of the aperture. Whether a particular fracture element is occupied by wetting fluid or non-wetting fluid is determined by allowability and accessibility criteria. Relative permeability characteristics of a simulated fracture network were investigated using the model. Different assumptions are examined regarding the interactions between phases. In all cases, strong phase interference was observed. Hysteresis effects and irreducible saturation were also explained based on the model.

  16. Efficient Data Gathering in 3D Linear Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Using Sink Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mariam; Javaid, Nadeem; Khan, Ayesha Hussain; Imran, Muhammad; Shoaib, Muhammad; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Due to the unpleasant and unpredictable underwater environment, designing an energy-efficient routing protocol for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) demands more accuracy and extra computations. In the proposed scheme, we introduce a mobile sink (MS), i.e., an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and also courier nodes (CNs), to minimize the energy consumption of nodes. MS and CNs stop at specific stops for data gathering; later on, CNs forward the received data to the MS for further transmission. By the mobility of CNs and MS, the overall energy consumption of nodes is minimized. We perform simulations to investigate the performance of the proposed scheme and compare it to preexisting techniques. Simulation results are compared in terms of network lifetime, throughput, path loss, transmission loss and packet drop ratio. The results show that the proposed technique performs better in terms of network lifetime, throughput, path loss and scalability. PMID:27007373

  17. Efficient Data Gathering in 3D Linear Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Using Sink Mobility.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mariam; Javaid, Nadeem; Khan, Ayesha Hussain; Imran, Muhammad; Shoaib, Muhammad; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Due to the unpleasant and unpredictable underwater environment, designing an energy-efficient routing protocol for underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs) demands more accuracy and extra computations. In the proposed scheme, we introduce a mobile sink (MS), i.e., an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and also courier nodes (CNs), to minimize the energy consumption of nodes. MS and CNs stop at specific stops for data gathering; later on, CNs forward the received data to the MS for further transmission. By the mobility of CNs and MS, the overall energy consumption of nodes is minimized. We perform simulations to investigate the performance of the proposed scheme and compare it to preexisting techniques. Simulation results are compared in terms of network lifetime, throughput, path loss, transmission loss and packet drop ratio. The results show that the proposed technique performs better in terms of network lifetime, throughput, path loss and scalability. PMID:27007373

  18. Characterization of EGS Fracture Network Lifecycles

    SciTech Connect

    Gillian R. Foulger

    2008-03-31

    Geothermal energy is relatively clean, and is an important non-hydrocarbon source of energy. It can potentially reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and contribute to reduction in carbon emissions. High-temperature geothermal areas can be used for electricity generation if they contain permeable reservoirs of hot water or steam that can be extracted. The biggest challenge to achieving the full potential of the nation’s resources of this kind is maintaining and creating the fracture networks required for the circulation, heating, and extraction of hot fluids. The fundamental objective of the present research was to understand how fracture networks are created in hydraulic borehole injection experiments, and how they subsequently evolve. When high-pressure fluids are injected into boreholes in geothermal areas, they flow into hot rock at depth inducing thermal cracking and activating critically stressed pre-existing faults. This causes earthquake activity which, if monitored, can provide information on the locations of the cracks formed, their time-development and the type of cracking underway, e.g., whether shear movement on faults occurred or whether cracks opened up. Ultimately it may be possible to monitor the critical earthquake parameters in near-real-time so the information can be used to guide the hydraulic injection while it is in progress, e.g., how to adjust factors such as injectate pressure, volume and temperature. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to mature analysis techniques and software that were, at the start of this project, in an embryonic developmental state. Task 1 of the present project was to develop state-of-the-art techniques and software for calculating highly accurate earthquake locations, earthquake source mechanisms (moment tensors) and temporal changes in reservoir structure. Task 2 was to apply the new techniques to hydrofracturing (Enhanced Geothermal Systems, or “EGS”) experiments performed at the Coso geothermal field

  19. SnS2 nanoplates embedded in 3D interconnected graphene network as anode material with superior lithium storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hongli; Qi, Xiang; Han, Weijia; Ren, Long; Liu, Yundan; Wang, Xingyan; Zhong, Jianxin

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interconnected graphene network embedded with uniformly distributed tin disulfide (SnS2) nanoplates was prepared by a facile two-step method. The microstructures and morphologies of the SnS2/graphene nanocomposite (SSG) are experimentally confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using the as-prepared SSG as an anode material for lithium batteries, its electrochemical performances were investigated by cyclic voltammograms (CV), charge/discharge tests, galvanostatic cycling performance and AC impedance spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the as-prepared SSG exhibits excellent cycling performance with a capacity of 1060 mAh g-1 retained after 200 charge/discharge cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1, also a superior rate capability of 670 mAh g-1 even at such a high current density of 2000 mA g-1. This favorable performance can be attributed to the unique 3D interconnected architecture with great electro-conductivity and its intimate contact with SnS2. Our results indicate a potential application of this novel 3D SnS2/graphene nanocomposite in lithium-ion battery.

  20. AxeCorp's "Team Challenge": Teaching Teamwork via 3D Social Networking Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    To prepare business communication undergraduates for a changing work world and to engage today's tech-savvy students, many instructors have embraced social media by incorporating its use in the classroom. This article describes AxeCorp, a fictional company headquartered on the immersive social networking platform, Second Life, and one particular…

  1. Volume learning algorithm artificial neural networks for 3D QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Tetko, I V; Kovalishyn, V V; Livingstone, D J

    2001-07-19

    The current study introduces a new method, the volume learning algorithm (VLA), for the investigation of three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of chemical compounds. This method incorporates the advantages of comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and artificial neural network approaches. VLA is a combination of supervised and unsupervised neural networks applied to solve the same problem. The supervised algorithm is a feed-forward neural network trained with a back-propagation algorithm while the unsupervised network is a self-organizing map of Kohonen. The use of both of these algorithms makes it possible to cluster the input CoMFA field variables and to use only a small number of the most relevant parameters to correlate spatial properties of the molecules with their activity. The statistical coefficients calculated by the proposed algorithm for cannabimimetic aminoalkyl indoles were comparable to, or improved, in comparison to the original study using the partial least squares algorithm. The results of the algorithm can be visualized and easily interpreted. Thus, VLA is a new convenient tool for three-dimensional QSAR studies. PMID:11448223

  2. Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Fu, Pengcheng; Carrigan, Charles R.; Lu, Zhiming; Tong, Charles H.; Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2013-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been used widely to stimulate production of oil, natural gas, and geothermal energy in formations with low natural permeability. Numerical optimization of fracture stimulation often requires a large number of evaluations of objective functions and constraints from forward hydraulic fracturing models, which are computationally expensive and even prohibitive in some situations. Moreover, there are a variety of uncertainties associated with the pre-existing fracture distributions and rock mechanical properties, which affect the optimized decisions for hydraulic fracturing. In this study, a surrogate-based approach is developed for efficient optimization of hydraulic fracturing well design in the presence of natural-system uncertainties. The fractal dimension is derived from the simulated fracturing network as the objective for maximizing energy recovery sweep efficiency. The surrogate model, which is constructed using training data from high-fidelity fracturing models for mapping the relationship between uncertain input parameters and the fractal dimension, provides fast approximation of the objective functions and constraints. A suite of surrogate models constructed using different fitting methods is evaluated and validated for fast predictions. Global sensitivity analysis is conducted to gain insights into the impact of the input variables on the output of interest, and further used for parameter screening. The high efficiency of the surrogate-based approach is demonstrated for three optimization scenarios with different and uncertain ambient conditions. Our results suggest the critical importance of considering uncertain pre-existing fracture networks in optimization studies of hydraulic fracturing.

  3. A hydrogen bonded molecular capsule versus a 3D network of tripodal organopolysilanols.

    PubMed

    Fukawa, Marina; Sato, Takayuki; Kabe, Yoshio

    2015-10-11

    1,3,5-Triethylbenzene based tripodal trisilanols were synthesized. The X-ray crystal structures of trisilanols showed capsule formation as well as non-capsular network formation using silanol hydrogen bonds. The (1)H NMR and ESI-mass spectroscopy experiments for solution state binding supported encapsulation of the halide ions in the cavity of the molecular capsule with a C3 symmetry. PMID:26295069

  4. Automatic delineation and 3D visualization of the human ventricular system using probabilistic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, Fraser N.; Dehmeshki, Jamshid

    1998-09-01

    Neurosurgery is an extremely specialized area of medical practice, requiring many years of training. It has been suggested that virtual reality models of the complex structures within the brain may aid in the training of neurosurgeons as well as playing an important role in the preparation for surgery. This paper focuses on the application of a probabilistic neural network to the automatic segmentation of the ventricles from magnetic resonance images of the brain, and their three dimensional visualization.

  5. Drainage fracture networks in elastic solids with internal fluid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobchenko, Maya; Hafver, Andreas; Jettestuen, Espen; Galland, Olivier; Renard, François; Meakin, Paul; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Dysthe, Dag K.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments in which CO2 gas was generated by the yeast fermentation of sugar in an elastic layer of gelatine gel confined between two glass plates are described and analyzed theoretically. The CO2 gas pressure causes the gel layer to fracture. The gas produced is drained on short length scales by diffusion and on long length scales by flow in a fracture network, which has topological properties that are intermediate between river networks and hierarchical-fracture networks. A simple model for the experimental system with two parameters that characterize the disorder and the intermediate (river-fracture) topology of the network was developed and the results of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  6. Organ-wide 3D-imaging and topological analysis of the continuous microvascular network in a murine lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Kelch, Inken D.; Bogle, Gib; Sands, Gregory B.; Phillips, Anthony R. J.; LeGrice, Ian J.; Rod Dunbar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the microvasculature has previously been limited by the lack of methods capable of capturing and modelling complete vascular networks. We used novel imaging and computational techniques to establish the topology of the entire blood vessel network of a murine lymph node, combining 63706 confocal images at 2 μm pixel resolution to cover a volume of 3.88 mm3. Detailed measurements including the distribution of vessel diameters, branch counts, and identification of voids were subsequently re-visualised in 3D revealing regional specialisation within the network. By focussing on critical immune microenvironments we quantified differences in their vascular topology. We further developed a morphology-based approach to identify High Endothelial Venules, key sites for lymphocyte extravasation. These data represent a comprehensive and continuous blood vessel network of an entire organ and provide benchmark measurements that will inform modelling of blood vessel networks as well as enable comparison of vascular topology in different organs. PMID:26567707

  7. Bi–Mn mixed metal organic oxide: A novel 3d-6p mixed metal coordination network

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Fa-Nian; Rosa Silva, Ana; Bian, Liang

    2015-05-15

    A new terminology of metal organic oxide (MOO) was given a definition as a type of coordination polymers which possess the feature of inorganic connectivity between metals and the direct bonded atoms and show 1D, 2D or 3D inorganic sub-networks. One such compound was shown as an example. A 3d-6p (Mn–Bi. Named MOOMnBi) mixed metals coordination network has been synthesized via hydrothermal method. The new compound with the molecular formula of [MnBi{sub 2}O(1,3,5-BTC){sub 2}]{sub n} (1,3,5-BTC stands for benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) was characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction technique that revealed a very interesting 3-dimensional (3D) framework with Bi{sub 4}O{sub 2}(COO){sub 12} clusters which are further connected to Mn(COO){sub 6} fragments into a 2D MOO. The topology study indicates an unprecedented topological type with the net point group of (4{sup 13}.6{sup 2})(4{sup 13}.6{sup 8})(4{sup 16}.6{sup 5})(4{sup 18}.6{sup 10})(4{sup 22}.6{sup 14})(4{sup 3}) corresponding to 3,6,7,7,8,9-c hexa-nodal net. MOOMnBi shows catalytic activity in the synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones. - Graphical abstract: This metal organic framework (MOF) is the essence of a 2D metal organic oxide (MOO). - Highlights: • New concept of metal organic oxide (MOO) was defined and made difference from metal organic framework. • New MOO of MOOMnBi was synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Crystal structure of MOOMnBi was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. • The catalytic activity of MOOMnBi was studied showing reusable after 2 cycles.

  8. Mixed-scale channel networks including Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnels for efficient single particle entrapment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunjeong; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2016-06-01

    Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic carbon mold is fabricated by pyrolyzing a polymer mold patterned by photolithography. During pyrolysis, the polymer mold shrinks by ∼90%, which enables nanosized carbon molds to be produced without a complex nanofabrication process. Because of the good adhesion between the polymer mold and the Si substrate, non-uniform volume reduction occurs during pyrolysis resulting in the formation of curved carbon mold side walls. These curved side walls and the relatively low surface energy of the mold provide efficient demolding of the PDMS channel networks. In addition, the trigonal prismatic shape of the polymer is converted into to a Kingfisher-beak-shaped carbon structure due to the non-uniform volume reduction. The transformation of this mold architecture produces a PDMS Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnel that connects the microchannel and the nanochannel smoothly. The smooth reduction in the cross-sectional area of the 3D microfunnels enables efficient single microparticle trapping at the nanochannel entrance; this is beneficial for studies of cell transfection. PMID:27279423

  9. Engineering interconnected 3D vascular networks in hydrogels using molded sodium alginate lattice as the sacrificial template.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Ying; Jin, Zi-He; Gan, Bo-Wen; Lv, Song-Wei; Xie, Min; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2014-08-01

    Engineering 3D perfusable vascular networks in vitro and reproducing the physiological environment of blood vessels is very challenging for tissue engineering and investigation of blood vessel function. Here, we engineer interconnected 3D microfluidic vascular networks in hydrogels using molded sodium alginate lattice as sacrificial templates. The sacrificial templates are rapidly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chips via Ca⁺²-crosslinking and then fully encapsulated in hydrogels. Interconnected channels with well controlled size and morphology are obtained by dissolving the monolayer or multilayer templates with EDTA solution. The human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured on the channel linings and proliferated to form vascular lumens. The strong cell adhesion capability and adaptive response to shear stress demonstrate the excellent cytocompatibility of both the template and template-sacrificing process. Furthermore, the barrier function of the endothelial layer is characterized and the results show that a confluent endothelial monolayer is fully developed. Taken together, we develop a facile and rapid approach to engineer a vascular model that could be potentially used in physiological studies of vascular functions and vascular tissue engineering. PMID:24887141

  10. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Michela; Bukreeva, Inna; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spanò, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-02-01

    Faults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal system represents a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of ex-vivo mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with nor contrast agent nor sectioning and neither destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is very suitable for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries, in particular to resolve the entangled relationship between VN and neuronal system.

  11. PEG-diacrylate/hyaluronic acid semi-interpenetrating network compositions for 3D cell spreading and migration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Joon; Sen, Atanu; Bae, Sooneon; Lee, Jeoung Soo; Webb, Ken

    2015-01-01

    To serve as artificial matrices for therapeutic cell transplantation, synthetic hydrogels must incorporate mechanisms enabling localized, cell-mediated degradation that allows cell spreading and migration. Previously, we have shown that hybrid semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) composed of hydrolytically degradable PEG-diacrylates (PEGdA), acrylate-PEG-GRGDS, and native hyaluronic acid (HA) support increased cell spreading relative to fully synthetic networks that is dependent on cellular hyaluronidase activity. This study systematically investigated the effects of PEGdA/HA semi-IPN network composition on 3D spreading of encapsulated fibroblasts, the underlying changes in gel structure responsible for this activity, and the ability of optimized gel formulations to support long-term cell survival and migration. Fibroblast spreading exhibited a biphasic response to HA concentration, required a minimum HA molecular weight, decreased with increasing PEGdA concentration, and was independent of hydrolytic degradation at early time points. Increased gel turbidity was observed in semi-IPNs, but not in copolymerized hydrogels containing methacrylated HA that did not support cell spreading; suggesting an underlying mechanism of polymerization-induced phase separation resulting in HA-enriched defects within the network structure. PEGdA/HA semi-IPNs were also able to support cell spreading at relatively high levels of mechanical properties (~10 kPa elastic modulus) compared to alternative hybrid hydrogels. In order to support long-term cellular remodeling, the degradation rate of the PEGdA component was optimized by preparing blends of three different PEGdA macromers with varying susceptibility to hydrolytic degradation. Optimized semi-IPN formulations supported long-term survival of encapsulated fibroblasts and sustained migration in a gel-within-gel encapsulation model. These results demonstrate that PEGdA/HA semi-IPNs provide dynamic microenvironments that

  12. Minimum cross-sectional stream power as the criteria of shaping 3-D network-scale landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, K.

    2008-12-01

    It has been widely accepted that the minimum total energy expenditure (MTEE) [Rodríguez-Iturbe et al., 1992] is the important tendency in the formation of self-similar tree river networks. However, this formulation has simplified the 3-D nature of landscape adaptation as a 2-D network connectivity problem. As a result, MTEE cannot capture other signatures of landform such as meandering. This leads to an idea that there could be another optimality condition which can better represent landscape evolution than MTEE. In this study, I focused on the theory of minimum cross-sectional stream power (MCSP) [Chang and Hill, 1977] which has been successfully used in channel-scale problems. I investigated the applicability of this rule of MCSP to the network-scale landscape formation. To test this idea, I devised a dynamic 2-D genetic algorithm which can handle the adaptation of 3-D landscape over time. The result shows that the landscape formed under the criteria of both MCSP and MTEE exhibit self-similar tree structure of natural river networks. However, the landscape formed by MCSP criteria also exhibits the meandering pattern of natural streams, which cannot be captured by MTEE. Chang, H. H., and J. C. Hill (1977), Minimum stream power for rivers and deltas, Journal of the Hydraulics Division (ASCE), 103, 1375--1389. Rodríguez-Iturbe, I., A. Rinaldo, R. Rigon, R. L. Bras, A. Marani, and E. J. Ijjasz-Váquez (1992), Energy dissipation, runoff production, and the three-dimensional structure of river basins, Water Resour. Res., 28, 1095--1103.

  13. A combined fuzzy-neural network model for non-linear prediction of 3-D rendering workload in grid computing.

    PubMed

    Doulamis, Nikolaos D; Doulamis, Anastasios D; Panagakis, Athanasios; Dolkas, Konstantinos; Varvarigou, Theodora A; Varvarigos, Emmanuel

    2004-04-01

    Implementation of a commercial application to a grid infrastructure introduces new challenges in managing the quality-of-service (QoS) requirements, most stem from the fact that negotiation on QoS between the user and the service provider should strictly be satisfied. An interesting commercial application with a wide impact on a variety of fields, which can benefit from the computational grid technologies, is three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In order to implement, however, 3-D rendering to a grid infrastructure, we should develop appropriate scheduling and resource allocation mechanisms so that the negotiated (QoS) requirements are met. Efficient scheduling schemes require modeling and prediction of rendering workload. In this paper workload prediction is addressed based on a combined fuzzy classification and neural network model. Initially, appropriate descriptors are extracted to represent the synthetic world. The descriptors are obtained by parsing RIB formatted files, which provides a general structure for describing computer-generated images. Fuzzy classification is used for organizing rendering descriptor so that a reliable representation is accomplished which increases the prediction accuracy. Neural network performs workload prediction by modeling the nonlinear input-output relationship between rendering descriptors and the respective computational complexity. To increase prediction accuracy, a constructive algorithm is adopted in this paper to train the neural network so that network weights and size are simultaneously estimated. Then, a grid scheduler scheme is proposed to estimate the queuing order that the tasks should be executed and the most appopriate processor assignment so that the demanded QoS are satisfied as much as possible. A fair scheduling policy is considered as the most appropriate. Experimental results on a real grid infrastructure are presented to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed workload prediction--scheduling algorithm

  14. Multi-scale fracture networks within layered shallow water tight carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panza, Elisa; Agosta, Fabrizio; Rustichelli, Andrea; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Zambrano, Miller; Prosser, Giacomo; Tondi, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    The work is aimed at deciphering the contribution of background deformation and persistent fracture zones on the fluid flow properties of tight platform carbonates. Taking advantage of 3D exposures present in the Murge area of southern Italy, the fracture networks crosscutting at different scales the layered Cretaceous limestone of the Altamura Fm. were analyzed. The rock multi-layer is characterized by 10's of cm-thick, sub-horizontal, laterally continuous carbonate beds. Each bed commonly represents a shallowing-upward peritidal cycle made up of homogeneous micritic limestones grading upward to cm-thick stromatolitic limestones and/or fenestral limestones. The bed interfaces are formed by sharp maximum flooding surfaces. Porosity measurements carried out on 40 limestone samples collected from a single carbonate bed show values ranging between 0,5% and 5,5%. Background deformation includes both stratabound and non-stratabound fractures. The former elements consist of bed-perpendicular joints and sheared joints, which are confined within a single bed and often displace small, bed-parallel stylolites. Non-stratabound fractures consist of incipient, cm offset, sub-vertical strike-slip faults, which crosscut the bed interfaces. The aforementioned elements are often confined within individual bed-packages, which are identified by presence of pronounced surfaces locally marked by veneers of reddish clayey paleosoils. Persistent fracture zones consist of 10's of m-high, 10's of cm-offset strike-slip faults that offset the bed-package interfaces and are confined within individual bed-packages association. Laterally discontinuous, cm- to a few m-thick paleokarstic breccia levels separate the different bed-packages associations. Persistent fracture zones include asymmetric fractured damage zones and mm-thick veneers of discontinuous fault rocks. The fracture networks that pervasively crosscut the study limestone multi-layer are investigated by mean of scanline and scanarea

  15. The 3-D image recognition based on fuzzy neural network technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, Kaoru; Yamauchi, Kenichi; Murakami, Jun; Tanaka, Kei

    1993-01-01

    Three dimensional stereoscopic image recognition system based on fuzzy-neural network technology was developed. The system consists of three parts; preprocessing part, feature extraction part, and matching part. Two CCD color camera image are fed to the preprocessing part, where several operations including RGB-HSV transformation are done. A multi-layer perception is used for the line detection in the feature extraction part. Then fuzzy matching technique is introduced in the matching part. The system is realized on SUN spark station and special image input hardware system. An experimental result on bottle images is also presented.

  16. 3D functional and perfusable microvascular networks for organotypic microfluidic models.

    PubMed

    Bersini, Simone; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-05-01

    The metastatic dissemination of cancer cells from primary tumors to secondary loci is a complex and multistep process including local invasion, intravasation, survival in the blood stream and extravasation towards the metastatic site. It is well known cancer metastases follow organ-specific pathways with selected primary tumors mainly metastasizing towards a specific panel of secondary organs (Steven Paget's theory 1889). However, circulatory patterns and microarchitecture of capillary networks play a key role in the metastatic spread as well (James Ewing's theory 1929). Taking into account both these factors would be critical to develop more complex and physiologically relevant in vitro cancer models. This review presents recent advances in the generation of microvascularized systems through microfluidic approaches and discusses promising results achieved by organ-on-a-chip platforms mimicking the pathophysiology of the functional units of specific organs. The combination of physiologically-like microvascular networks and organotypic microenvironments would foster a new generation of in vitro cancer models to more effectively screen new therapeutics, design personalized medicine treatments and investigate molecular pathways involved in cancer metastases. PMID:25893395

  17. A fracture network model for water flow and solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes code development work and sample calculations for FRACNET, a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. The model analyzes flow and transport by generating a fracture network based on statistical characteristics of fractures obtained from well logs and other data. After a network is generated, flow and tracer transport are computed for appropriate boundary conditions and wellbore source/sink terms. In addition, for a given realization, the code can be used to indicate whether the medium can be treated as an equivalent porous medium. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Hackett, C.L.; Brown, R.L.; Collier, H.A.; Datta-Gupta, A.

    1998-10-01

    To characterize the Buena Vista Hills field, the authors have implemented methods of modeling, processing and interpretation. The modeling methods are based on deterministic and stochastic solutions. Deterministic solutions were developed in Phase 1 and applied in Phase 2 to simulate acoustic responses of laminated reservoirs. Specifically, the simulations were aimed at implementing processing techniques to correct P-wave and S-wave velocity logs for scattering effects caused by thin layering. The authors are also including a summary of the theory and the processing steps of this new method for predicting intrinsic dispersion and attenuation in Section 2. Since the objective for correcting velocity scattering effects is to predict intrinsic dispersion from velocity data, they are presenting an application to illustrate how to relate permeability anisotropy with intrinsic dispersion. Also, the theoretical solution for calculating full waveform dipole sonic that was developed in Phase 1 was applied to simulate dipole responses at different azimuthal source orientations. The results will be used to interpret the effects of anisotropy associated with the presence of vertical fractures at Buena Vista Hills. The results of the integration of core, well logs, and geology of Buena Vista Hills is also given in Section 2. The results of this integration will be considered as the input model for the inversion technique for processing production data. Section 3 summarizes accomplishments. In Section 4 the authors present a summary of the technology transfer and promotion efforts associated with this project. In the last section, they address the work to be done in the next six months and future work by applying the processing, modeling and inversion techniques developed in Phases 1 and 2 of this project.

  19. 3-D multilateration for measurement of earth crustal deformation and network densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, K. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of how range and range-difference data types can make possible precise three-dimensional measurement of ground station positions and the position of an artificial signal source, without explicit dependence upon the signal source trajectory. An effective strategy for such measurement is to combine the multilateration approach with a VLBI system using natural radio sources. The VLBI methods would provide a coarse grid of three-dimensional benchmark locations on a regional and global scale. Multilateration stations would then occupy these coarse grid locations and provide a means for highly portable, relatively low-cost units to then densify networks on a regional and local scale. Because a multilateration approach can make use of strong artificial radio sources, it makes possible the use of relatively low-cost, highly mobile stations. Such mobile stations are virtually essential for three dimensional surveying in heavily urbanized areas or in rugged terrain.

  20. Combining high-performance computing and networking for advanced 3-D cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, M F; Positano, V; Landini, L

    2000-03-01

    This paper deals with the integration of a powerful parallel computer-based image analysis and visualization system for cardiology into a hospital information system. Further services are remote access to the hospital Web server through an internet network. The visualization system includes dynamic three-dimensional representation of two types of medical images (e.g., magnetic resonance and nuclear medicine) as well as two images in the same modality (e.g., basal versus stress images). A series of software tools for quantitative image analysis developed for supporting diagnosis of cardiac disease are also available, including automated image segmentation and quantitative time evaluation of left ventricular volumes and related indices during cardiac cycle, myocardial mass, and myocardial perfusion indices. The system has been tested both at a specialized cardiologic center and for remote consultation in diagnosis of cardiac disease by using anatomical and perfusion magnetic resonance images. PMID:10761775

  1. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  2. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Stauffer, Philip H; Knight, Earl E; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  3. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  4. Some Characteristics of Regular Fracture-lineament Global Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, Vladimir; Longinos, Biju

    2013-04-01

    Existence of regular fracture-lineament global network global network (FLGN) (or regmatic network), was known for lands of the Earth in many regions. Authors made more than 20 000 measurements of lineaments and faults azimuths of the lineaments and fractures on geographic, geologic and tectonic maps for number of regions and for all Earth. Later all data files have subjected by the factor analysis. We detect existence FLGN in the Ocean bottom. Statistic relation between fractures and lineaments directions was established. Control of large-scale lineaments by fractures within the competence of the FLGN was based. Predominating strike directions of line elements of FLGN are: 0 - 10˚, 80 - 90˚, 30 - 60˚, 120 - 150˚. FLGN have attribute of fractality. One-direction lines elements of the FLGN alternate with constant step within the competence of defined scale. FLGN was formed under a continuous stress, which exist at least throughout the entire earthcrust thickness and during the time of at least the entire Phanerozoe. This stress was generated by a complex of forces: rotational, pulsating and, possibly, some others in the earthcrust. All of these forces are symmetric to the Earth rotation axis and some of them also to the equator. Rotation and pulsating processes of the Earth are the main factors of these forces and, hence, formation of the fracture- lineament network. FLGN determines the most favorable place for fracturing, formation of fracture-controlled landforms, volcanic and seismic processes (geohazards), fluid flow and ore-formation (minerals).

  5. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gasmore » breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.« less

  6. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  7. Dynamic network morphology and tension buildup in a 3D model of cytokinetic ring assembly.

    PubMed

    Bidone, Tamara C; Tang, Haosu; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    During fission yeast cytokinesis, actin filaments nucleated by cortical formin Cdc12 are captured by myosin motors bound to a band of cortical nodes and bundled by cross-linking proteins. The myosin motors exert forces on the actin filaments, resulting in a net pulling of the nodes into a contractile ring, while cross-linking interactions help align actin filaments and nodes into a single bundle. We used these mechanisms in a three-dimensional computational model of contractile ring assembly, with semiflexible actin filaments growing from formins at cortical nodes, capturing of filaments by neighboring nodes, and cross-linking among filaments through attractive interactions. The model was used to predict profiles of actin filament density at the cell cortex, morphologies of condensing node-filament networks, and regimes of cortical tension by varying the node pulling force and strength of cross-linking among actin filaments. Results show that cross-linking interactions can lead to confinement of actin filaments at the simulated cortical boundary. We show that the ring-formation region in parameter space lies close to regions leading to clumps, meshworks or double rings, and stars/cables. Since boundaries between regions are not sharp, transient structures that resemble clumps, stars, and meshworks can appear in the process of ring assembly. These results are consistent with prior experiments with mutations in actin-filament turnover regulators, myosin motor activity, and changes in the concentration of cross-linkers that alter the morphology of the condensing network. Transient star shapes appear in some simulations, and these morphologies offer an explanation for star structures observed in prior experimental images. Finally, we quantify tension along actin filaments and forces on nodes during ring assembly and show that the mechanisms describing ring assembly can also drive ring constriction once the ring is formed. PMID:25468341

  8. Pillared Graphene: A New 3-D Innovative Network Nanostructure Augments Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgios, Dimitrakakis K.; Emmanuel, Tylianakis; George, Froudakis E.

    2009-08-01

    Nowadays, people have turned into finding an alternative power source for everyday applications. One of the most promising energy fuels is hydrogen. It can be used as an energy carrier at small portable devices (e.g. laptops and/or cell phones) up to larger, like cars. Hydrogen is considered as the perfect fuel. It can be burnt in combustion engines and the only by-product is water. For hydrogen-powered vehicles a big liming factor is the gas tank and is the reason for not using widely hydrogen in automobile applications. According to United States' Department of Energy (D.O.E.) the target for reversible hydrogen storage in mobile applications is 6% wt. and 45 gr. H2/L and these should be met by 2010. After their synthesis Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) were considered as ideal candidates for hydrogen storage especially after some initially incorrect but invitingly results. As it was proven later, pristine carbon nanotubes cannot achieve D.O.E.'s targets in ambient conditions of pressure and temperature. Therefore, a way to increase their hydrogen storage capacity should be found. An attempt was done by doping CNTs with alkali metal atoms. Although the results were promising, even that increment was not enough. Consequently, new architectures were suggested as materials that could potentially enhance hydrogen storage. In this work a novel three dimensional (3-D) nanoporous carbon structure called Pillared Graphene (Figure 1) is proposed for augmented hydrogen storage in ambient conditions. Pillared Graphene consists of parallel graphene sheets and CNTs that act like pillars and support the graphene sheets. The entire structure (Figure 1) can be resembled like a building in its early stages of construction, where the floors are represented by graphene sheets and the pillars are the CNTs. As shown in Figure 1, CNTs do not penetrate the structure from top to bottom. Instead, they alternately go up and down, so that on the same plane do not exist two neighboring CNTs with the

  9. Radionuclide migration analysis using a discrete fracture network model

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, Y.; Sawada, A.; Webb, E.K.; Watari, S.; Hatanaka, K.; Uchida, M.; Ishiguro, K.; Umeki, H.; Dershowitz, W.S.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes an approach for assessing the geosphere performance of nuclear waste disposal in fractured rock. In this approach, a three-dimensional heterogeneous channel-network model is constructed using a stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) code. Radionuclide migration in the channel-network model is solved using the Laplace transform Galerkin finite element method, taking into account advection-dispersion in a fracture network, matrix diffusion, sorption in the rock matrix as well as radioactive chain decay. Preliminary radionuclide migration analysis was performed for fifty realizations of a synthetic block-scale DFN model. The total radionuclide release from all packages in the repository was estimated from the statistics of the results of fifty realizations under the hypothesis of ergodicity. The interpretation of the result of the three-dimensional network model by a combination of simpler one-dimensional parallel plate models is also discussed.

  10. Optimization of flow modeling in fractured media with discrete fracture network via percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donado-Garzon, L. D.; Pardo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Fractured media are very heterogeneous systems where occur complex physical and chemical processes to model. One of the possible approaches to conceptualize this type of massifs is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN). Donado et al., modeled flow and transport in a granitic batholith based on this approach and found good fitting with hydraulic and tracer tests, but the computational cost was excessive due to a gigantic amount of elements to model. We present in this work a methodology based on percolation theory for reducing the number of elements and in consequence, to reduce the bandwidth of the conductance matrix and the execution time of each network. DFN poses as an excellent representation of all the set of fractures of the media, but not all the fractures of the media are part of the conductive network. Percolation theory is used to identify which nodes or fractures are not conductive, based on the occupation probability or percolation threshold. In a fractured system, connectivity determines the flow pattern in the fractured rock mass. This volume of fluid is driven through connection paths formed by the fractures, when the permeability of the rock is negligible compared to the fractures. In a population of distributed fractures, each of this that has no intersection with any connected fracture do not contribute to generate a flow field. This algorithm also permits us to erase these elements however they are water conducting and hence, refine even more the backbone of the network. We used 100 different generations of DFN that were optimized in this study using percolation theory. In each of the networks calibrate hydrodynamic parameters as hydraulic conductivity and specific storage coefficient, for each of the five families of fractures, yielding a total of 10 parameters to estimate, at each generation. Since the effects of the distribution of fault orientation changes the value of the percolation threshold, but not the universal laws of classical

  11. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  12. Experimental Study of Heat Transport in Fractured Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta M.; Redondo, Jose M.; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in transport of natural resources or contaminants transport through subsurface systems. In recent years, interest has grown in investigating heat transport by means of tracer tests, driven by the important current development of geothermal applications. In literature different methods are available for predicting thermal breakthrough in fractured reservoirs based on the information coming from tracer tests. Geothermal energy is one of the largest sources of renewable energies that are extracted from the earth. The growing interest in this new energy source has stimulated attempts to develop methods and technologies for extracting energy also from ground resource at low temperature. An example is the exploitation of low enthalpy geothermal energy that can be obtained at any place with the aid of ground-source heat pump system from the soil, rock and groundwater. In such geothermal systems the fluid movement and thermal behavior in the fractured porous media is very important and critical. Existing theory of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is of limited usefulness when applied to fractured rocks. Many field and laboratory tracer tests in fractured media show that fracture -matrix exchange is more significant for heat than mass tracers, thus thermal breakthrough curves (BTCs) are strongly controlled by matrix thermal diffusivity. In this study the behaviour of heat transport in a fractured network at bench scale has been investigated. Heat tracer tests on an artificially created fractured rock sample have been carried out. The observed thermal BTCs obtained with six thermocouple probes located at different locations in the fractured medium have been modeled with the Explicit Network Model (ENM) based an adaptation of Tang's solution for solute transport in a semi-infinite single fracture embedded in a porous matrix. The ENM model is able to represent the behavior of observed heat transport except where the

  13. Characterization of fracture networks for fluid flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.C.S.; Billaux, D.; Hestir, K.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Karasaki, K.; Nihei, K.; Gentier, S.; Cox, L.

    1989-06-01

    The analysis of fluid flow through fractured rocks is difficult because the only way to assign hydraulic parameters to fractures is to perform hydraulic tests. However, the interpretation of such tests, or ''inversion'' of the data, requires at least that we know the geometric pattern formed by the fractures. Combining a statistical approach with geophysical data may be extremely helpful in defining the fracture geometry. Cross-hole geophysics, either seismic or radar, can provide tomograms which are pixel maps of the velocity or attenuation anomalies in the rock. These anomalies are often due to fracture zones. Therefore, tomograms can be used to identify fracture zones and provide information about the structure within the fracture zones. This structural information can be used as the basis for simulating the degree of fracturing within the zones. Well tests can then be used to further refine the model. Because the fracture network is only partially connected, the resulting geometry of the flow paths may have fractal properties. We are studying the behavior of well tests under such geometry. Through understanding of this behavior, it may be possible to use inverse techniques to refine the a priori assignment of fractures and their conductances such that we obtain the best fit to a series of well test results simultaneously. The methodology described here is under development and currently being applied to several field sites. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Analysis of performance improvements for host and GPU interface of the APENet+ 3D Torus network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola A, R.; Biagioni, A.; Frezza, O.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Paolucci, P. S.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.

    2014-06-01

    APEnet+ is an INFN (Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics) project aiming to develop a custom 3-Dimensional torus interconnect network optimized for hybrid clusters CPU-GPU dedicated to High Performance scientific Computing. The APEnet+ interconnect fabric is built on a FPGA-based PCI-express board with 6 bi-directional off-board links showing 34 Gbps of raw bandwidth per direction, and leverages upon peer-to-peer capabilities of Fermi and Kepler-class NVIDIA GPUs to obtain real zero-copy, GPU-to-GPU low latency transfers. The minimization of APEnet+ transfer latency is achieved through the adoption of RDMA protocol implemented in FPGA with specialized hardware blocks tightly coupled with embedded microprocessor. This architecture provides a high performance low latency offload engine for both trasmit and receive side of data transactions: preliminary results are encouraging, showing 50% of bandwidth increase for large packet size transfers. In this paper we describe the APEnet+ architecture, detailing the hardware implementation and discuss the impact of such RDMA specialized hardware on host interface latency and bandwidth.

  15. Multisensor fusion for 3-D defect characterization using wavelet basis function neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jaein; Udpa, Satish S.; Udpa, Lalita; Afzal, Muhammad

    2001-04-01

    The primary objective of multi-sensor data fusion, which offers both quantitative and qualitative benefits, has the ability to draw inferences that may not be feasible with data from a single sensor alone. In this paper, data from two sets of sensors are fused to estimate the defect profile from magnetic flux leakage (MFL) inspection data. The two sensors measure the axial and circumferential components of the MFL. Data is fused at the signal level. If the flux is oriented axially, the samples of the axial signal are measured along a direction parallel to the flaw, while the circumferential signal is measured in a direction that is perpendicular to the flaw. The two signals are combined as the real and imaginary components of a complex valued signal. Signals from an array of sensors are arranged in contiguous rows to obtain a complex valued image. A boundary extraction algorithm is used to extract the defect areas in the image. Signals from the defect regions are then processed to minimize noise and the effects of lift-off. Finally, a wavelet basis function (WBF) neural network is employed to map the complex valued image appropriately to obtain the geometrical profile of the defect. The feasibility of the approach was evaluated using the data obtained from the MFL inspection of natural gas transmission pipelines. Results show the effectiveness of the approach.

  16. Applications of neural networks to landmark detection in 3-D surface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Craig M.

    1992-09-01

    The problem of identifying key landmarks in 3-dimensional surface data is of considerable interest in solving a number of difficult real-world tasks, including object recognition and image processing. The specific problem that we address in this research is to identify the specific landmarks (anatomical) in human surface data. This is a complex task, currently performed visually by an expert human operator. In order to replace these human operators and increase reliability of the data acquisition, we need to develop a computer algorithm which will utilize the interrelations between the 3-dimensional data to identify the landmarks of interest. The current presentation describes a method for designing, implementing, training, and testing a custom architecture neural network which will perform the landmark identification task. We discuss the performance of the net in relationship to human performance on the same task and how this net has been integrated with other AI and traditional programming methods to produce a powerful analysis tool for computer anthropometry.

  17. Characterization of New PEEK/HA Composites with 3D HA Network Fabricated by Extrusion Freeforming.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, Mohammad; Black, Cameron; Gibbs, David M R; Oreffo, Richard O C; Brady, Mark; Moshrefi-Torbati, Mohamed; Yang, Shoufeng

    2016-01-01

    Addition of bioactive materials such as calcium phosphates or Bioglass, and incorporation of porosity into polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been identified as an effective approach to improve bone-implant interfaces and osseointegration of PEEK-based devices. In this paper, a novel production technique based on the extrusion freeforming method is proposed that yields a bioactive PEEK/hydroxyapatite (PEEK/HA) composite with a unique configuration in which the bioactive phase (i.e., HA) distribution is computer-controlled within a PEEK matrix. The 100% interconnectivity of the HA network in the biocomposite confers an advantage over alternative forms of other microstructural configurations. Moreover, the technique can be employed to produce porous PEEK structures with controlled pore size and distribution, facilitating greater cellular infiltration and biological integration of PEEK composites within patient tissue. The results of unconfined, uniaxial compressive tests on these new PEEK/HA biocomposites with 40% HA under both static and cyclic mode were promising, showing the composites possess yield and compressive strength within the range of human cortical bone suitable for load bearing applications. In addition, preliminary evidence supporting initial biological safety of the new technique developed is demonstrated in this paper. Sufficient cell attachment, sustained viability in contact with the sample over a seven-day period, evidence of cell bridging and matrix deposition all confirmed excellent biocompatibility. PMID:27240326

  18. Engineering of a Biomimetic Pericyte-Covered 3D Microvascular Network

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sudong; Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hun; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes enveloping the endothelium play an important role in the physiology and pathology of microvessels, especially in vessel maturation and stabilization. However, our understanding of fundamental pericyte biology is limited by the lack of a robust in vitro model system that allows researchers to evaluate the interactions among multiple cell types in perfusable blood vessels. The present work describes a microfluidic platform that can be used to investigate interactions between pericytes and endothelial cells (ECs) during the sprouting, growth, and maturation steps of neovessel formation. A mixture of ECs and pericytes was attached to the side of a pre-patterned three dimensional fibrin matrix and allowed to sprout across the matrix. The effects of intact coverage and EC maturation by the pericytes on the perfused EC network were confirmed using a confocal microscope. Compared with EC monoculture conditions, EC-pericyte co-cultured vessels showed a significant reduction in diameter, increased numbers of junctions and branches and decreased permeability. In response to biochemical factors, ECs and pericytes in the platform showed the similar features with previous reports from in vivo experiments, thus reflect various pathophysiological conditions of in vivo microvessels. Taken together, these results support the physiological relevancy of our three-dimensional microfluidic culture system but also that the system can be used to screen drug effect on EC-pericyte biology. PMID:26204526

  19. The 3D-based scaling index algorithm to optimize structure analysis of trabecular bone in postmenopausal women with and without osteoporotic spine fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Dirk; Monetti, Roberto A.; Bohm, Holger F.; Bauer, Jan; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Rath, Christoph W.

    2004-05-01

    The scaling index method (SIM) is a recently proposed non-linear technique to extract texture measures for the quantitative characterisation of the trabecular bone structure in high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI). The three-dimensional tomographic images are interpreted as a point distribution in a state space where each point (voxel) is defined by its x, y, z coordinates and the grey value. The SIM estimates local scaling properties to describe the nonlinear morphological features in this four-dimensional point distribution. Thus, it can be used for differentiating between cluster-, rod-, sheet-like and unstructured (background) image components, which makes it suitable for quantifying the microstructure of human cancellous bone. The SIM was applied to high resolution magnetic resonance images of the distal radius in patients with and without osteoporotic spine fractures in order to quantify the deterioration of bone structure. Using the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis the diagnostic performance of this texture measure in differentiating patients with and without fractures was compared with bone mineral density (BMD). The SIM demonstrated the best area under the curve (AUC) value for discriminating the two groups. The reliability of our new texture measure and the validity of our results were assessed by applying bootstrapping resampling methods. The results of this study show that trabecular structure measures derived from HR-MRI of the radius in a clinical setting using a recently proposed algorithm based on a local 3D scaling index method can significantly improve the diagnostic performance in differentiating postmenopausal women with and without osteoporotic spine fractures.

  20. Ice-Templated Assembly Strategy to Construct 3D Boron Nitride Nanosheet Networks in Polymer Composites for Thermal Conductivity Improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Gong, Zhengyu; Wang, Fangfang; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Owing to the growing heat removal issue of modern electronic devices, polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have drawn much attention in the past few years. However, a traditional method to enhance the thermal conductivity of the polymers by addition of inorganic fillers usually creates composite with not only limited thermal conductivity but also other detrimental effects due to large amount of fillers required. Here, novel polymer composites are reported by first constructing 3D boron nitride nanosheets (3D-BNNS) network using ice-templated approach and then infiltrating them with epoxy matrix. The obtained polymer composites exhibit a high thermal conductivity (2.85 W m(-1) K(-1)), a low thermal expansion coefficient (24-32 ppm K(-1)), and an increased glass transition temperature (T(g)) at relatively low BNNSs loading (9.29 vol%). These results demonstrate that this approach opens a new avenue for design and preparation of polymer composites with high thermal conductivity. The polymer composites are potentially useful in advanced electronic packaging techniques, namely, thermal interface materials, underfill materials, molding compounds, and organic substrates. PMID:26479262

  1. Bone canalicular network segmentation in 3D nano-CT images through geodesic voting and image tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, Maria A.; Orkisz, Maciej; Dong, Pei; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Gouttenoire, Pierre-Jean; Peyrin, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies emphasized the role of the bone lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) in the understanding of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. However, suitable methods to investigate this structure are lacking. The aim of this paper is to introduce a methodology to segment the LCN from three-dimensional (3D) synchrotron radiation nano-CT images. Segmentation of such structures is challenging due to several factors such as limited contrast and signal-to-noise ratio, partial volume effects and huge number of data that needs to be processed, which restrains user interaction. We use an approach based on minimum-cost paths and geodesic voting, for which we propose a fully automatic initialization scheme based on a tessellation of the image domain. The centroids of pre-segmented lacunæ are used as Voronoi-tessellation seeds and as start-points of a fast-marching front propagation, whereas the end-points are distributed in the vicinity of each Voronoi-region boundary. This initialization scheme was devised to cope with complex biological structures involving cells interconnected by multiple thread-like, branching processes, while the seminal geodesic-voting method only copes with tree-like structures. Our method has been assessed quantitatively on phantom data and qualitatively on real datasets, demonstrating its feasibility. To the best of our knowledge, presented 3D renderings of lacunæ interconnected by their canaliculi were achieved for the first time.

  2. Bone canalicular network segmentation in 3D nano-CT images through geodesic voting and image tessellation.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Maria A; Orkisz, Maciej; Dong, Pei; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Gouttenoire, Pierre-Jean; Peyrin, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies emphasized the role of the bone lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) in the understanding of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. However, suitable methods to investigate this structure are lacking. The aim of this paper is to introduce a methodology to segment the LCN from three-dimensional (3D) synchrotron radiation nano-CT images. Segmentation of such structures is challenging due to several factors such as limited contrast and signal-to-noise ratio, partial volume effects and huge number of data that needs to be processed, which restrains user interaction. We use an approach based on minimum-cost paths and geodesic voting, for which we propose a fully automatic initialization scheme based on a tessellation of the image domain. The centroids of pre-segmented lacunæ are used as Voronoi-tessellation seeds and as start-points of a fast-marching front propagation, whereas the end-points are distributed in the vicinity of each Voronoi-region boundary. This initialization scheme was devised to cope with complex biological structures involving cells interconnected by multiple thread-like, branching processes, while the seminal geodesic-voting method only copes with tree-like structures. Our method has been assessed quantitatively on phantom data and qualitatively on real datasets, demonstrating its feasibility. To the best of our knowledge, presented 3D renderings of lacunæ interconnected by their canaliculi were achieved for the first time. PMID:24710691

  3. 3D morphometry of valley networks on Mars from HRSC/MEX DEMs: Implications for climatic evolution through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansan, V.; Mangold, N.

    2013-09-01

    valley networks have been identified mainly in the Noachian heavily cratered uplands. Eight dense branching valley networks were studied in Noachian terrains of Huygens, Newcomb and Kepler craters, south Tyrrhena Terra, and Thaumasia, in Hesperian terrains of Echus Plateau and west Eberswalde craters, and in Amazonian terrains of Alba Patera, using images and digital elevation models from the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera to determine 2D and 3D morphometric parameters. Extracted geomorphic parameters show similar geometry to terrestrial valleys: drainage densities, organization from bifurcation ratios and lengths ratios, Hack exponent consistent with terrestrial values of ~0.6, and progressive deepening of valleys with increasing Strahler order. In addition, statistics on valley depths indicate a deeper incision of Noachian valleys compared to younger post-Noachian valleys (<25 m for Amazonian ones compared to >100 m for Noachian ones), showing a strong difference in fluvial erosion. These characteristics show that dense Martian valley networks formed by overland flows in relation to a global atmospheric water cycle in Noachian epoch and confirm that the later stages of activity may be related to shorter duration of activity, distinct climatic conditions, and/or regional processes, or conditions.

  4. Nanoparticles and 3D sponge-like porous networks of manganese oxides and their microwave absorption properties.

    PubMed

    Yan, D; Cheng, S; Zhuo, R F; Chen, J T; Feng, J J; Feng, H T; Li, H J; Wu, Z G; Wang, J; Yan, P X

    2009-03-11

    Hydrohausmannite nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm) were prepared by the hydrothermal method at 100 degrees C for 72 h. Subsequent annealing was done in air at 400 degrees C and 800 degrees C for 10 h, Mn(3)O(4) nanoparticles (approximately 25 nm) and 3D Mn(2)O(3) porous networks were obtained, respectively. The products were characterized by XRD, TEM, SAED and FESEM. Time-dependent experiments were carried out to exhibit the formation process of the Mn(2)O(3) networks. Their microwave absorption properties were investigated by mixing the product and paraffin wax with 50 vol%. The Mn(3)O(4) nanoparticles possess excellent microwave absorbing properties with the minimum reflection loss of -27.1 dB at 3.1 GHz. In contrast, the Mn(2)O(3) networks show the weakest absorption of all samples. The absorption becomes weaker with the annealing time increasing at 800 degrees C. The attenuation of microwave can be attributed to dielectric loss and their absorption mechanism was discussed in detail. PMID:19417534

  5. Effective transmissivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1995-04-01

    Many of the sites that have been proposed as potential locations of underground radioactive waste repositories contain fractured rocks. For example, both the saturated and unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contains many hydrogeologic units that are extensively fractured. When modeling the hydrological behavior of these sites, for either the purpose of site characterization of performance assessment, computational grid-blocks are often used that contain large number of fractures. In order to treat these as equivalent continua, it is necessary to develop a procedure for relating the hydraulic properties of the individual fractures and he topology of the fracture network to the overall scale permeability. One aspect of this problem is that of determining the in situ hydraulic properties of the individual fractures. Another aspect is to reconstruct the three-dimensional geometry of the fracture network based on borehole or outcrop measurements. The final stage in the problem is that of taking a network of known geometry and determining it effective scale conductivity. The purpose of this paper is to describe a simple procedure for solving this latter problem,a nd to demonstrate it use in cases of both saturated and unsaturated flow. The TOUGH simulator was used.

  6. Mixed-scale channel networks including Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnels for efficient single particle entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yunjeong; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2016-06-01

    Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic carbon mold is fabricated by pyrolyzing a polymer mold patterned by photolithography. During pyrolysis, the polymer mold shrinks by ~90%, which enables nanosized carbon molds to be produced without a complex nanofabrication process. Because of the good adhesion between the polymer mold and the Si substrate, non-uniform volume reduction occurs during pyrolysis resulting in the formation of curved carbon mold side walls. These curved side walls and the relatively low surface energy of the mold provide efficient demolding of the PDMS channel networks. In addition, the trigonal prismatic shape of the polymer is converted into to a Kingfisher-beak-shaped carbon structure due to the non-uniform volume reduction. The transformation of this mold architecture produces a PDMS Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnel that connects the microchannel and the nanochannel smoothly. The smooth reduction in the cross-sectional area of the 3D microfunnels enables efficient single microparticle trapping at the nanochannel entrance; this is beneficial for studies of cell transfection.Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic

  7. Efficient 3D conducting networks built by graphene sheets and carbon nanoparticles for high-performance silicon anode.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaosi; Yin, Ya-Xia; Cao, An-Min; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2012-05-01

    The utilization of silicon particles as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries is hindered by their low intrinsic electric conductivity and large volume changes during cycling. Here we report a novel Si nanoparticle-carbon nanoparticle/graphene composite, in which the addition of carbon nanoparticles can effectively alleviate the aggregation of Si nanoparticles by separating them from each other, and help graphene sheets build efficient 3D conducting networks for Si nanoparticles. Such Si-C/G composite shows much improved electrochemical properties in terms of specific capacity and cycling performance (ca. 1521 mA h g(-1) at 0.2 C after 200 cycles), as well as a favorable high-rate capability. PMID:22563769

  8. Mesoporous Co3O4 sheets/3D graphene networks nanohybrids for high-performance sodium-ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanguo; Cheng, Zhiying; Sun, Hongyu; Arandiyan, Hamidreza; Li, Jinpeng; Ahmad, Mashkoor

    2015-01-01

    Co3O4 mesoporous nanosheets/three-dimensional graphene networks (Co3O4 MNSs/3DGNs) nanohybrids have been successfully synthesized and investigated as anode materials for sodium ion batteries (SIBs). Microstructure characterizations have been performed to confirm the 3DGNs and Co3O4 MNSs nanostructures. It has been found that the present Co3O4 MNSs/3DGNs nanohybrids exhibit better SIB performance with enhanced reversible capacity, good cycle performance and rate capability as compared to Co3O4 MNSs and Co3O4 nanoparticles. The improved electrochemical performance is considered due to the mesoporous nature of the products, the addition of 3DGNs, 3D assembled hierarchical architecture and decrease in volume expansion during cycling. Thus, SIB is considered as a low cost alternative to LIBs for large-scale electric storage applications.

  9. Electrospun carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network derived from metal-organic frameworks for capacitive deionization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Ma, Jiaqi; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network (e-CNF-PCP) was prepared through electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performance of the e-CNF-PCP were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and their electrosorption performance in NaCl solution was studied. The results show that the e-CNF-PCP exhibits a high electrosorption capacity of 16.98 mg g−1 at 1.2 V in 500 mg l−1 NaCl solution, which shows great improvement compared with those of electrospun carbon nanofibers and porous carbon polyhedra. The e-CNF-PCP should be a very promising candidate as electrode material for CDI applications. PMID:27608826

  10. Piezoresistive Sensor with High Elasticity Based on 3D Hybrid Network of Sponge@CNTs@Ag NPs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Nishuang; Shi, Yuling; Liu, Weijie; Yue, Yang; Wang, Siliang; Ma, Yanan; Wen, Li; Li, Luying; Long, Fei; Zou, Zhengguang; Gao, Yihua

    2016-08-31

    Pressure sensors with high elasticity are in great demand for the realization of intelligent sensing, but there is a need to develope a simple, inexpensive, and scalable method for the manufacture of the sensors. Here, we reported an efficient, simple, facile, and repeatable "dipping and coating" process to manufacture a piezoresistive sensor with high elasticity, based on homogeneous 3D hybrid network of carbon nanotubes@silver nanoparticles (CNTs@Ag NPs) anchored on a skeleton sponge. Highly elastic, sensitive, and wearable sensors are obtained using the porous structure of sponge and the synergy effect of CNTs/Ag NPs. Our sensor was also tested for over 2000 compression-release cycles, exhibiting excellent elasticity and cycling stability. Sensors with high performance and a simple fabrication process are promising devices for commercial production in various electronic devices, for example, sport performance monitoring and man-machine interfaces. PMID:27482721

  11. Electrospun carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network derived from metal-organic frameworks for capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Ma, Jiaqi; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network (e-CNF-PCP) was prepared through electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performance of the e-CNF-PCP were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and their electrosorption performance in NaCl solution was studied. The results show that the e-CNF-PCP exhibits a high electrosorption capacity of 16.98 mg g(-1) at 1.2 V in 500 mg l(-1) NaCl solution, which shows great improvement compared with those of electrospun carbon nanofibers and porous carbon polyhedra. The e-CNF-PCP should be a very promising candidate as electrode material for CDI applications. PMID:27608826

  12. Hybrid nickel manganese oxide nanosheet-3D metallic dendrite percolation network electrodes for high-rate electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuyen; Eugénio, Sónia; Boudard, Michel; Rapenne, Laetitia; Carmezim, M. João; Silva, Teresa M.; Montemor, M. Fátima

    2015-07-01

    This work reports the fabrication, by electrodeposition and post-thermal annealing, of hybrid electrodes for high rate electrochemical energy storage composed of nickel manganese oxide (Ni0.86Mn0.14O) nanosheets over 3D open porous dendritic NiCu foams. The hybrid electrodes are made of two different percolation networks of nanosheets and dendrites, and exhibit a specific capacitance value of 848 F g-1 at 1 A g-1. The electrochemical tests revealed that the electrodes display an excellent rate capability, characterized by capacitance retention of approximately 83% when the applied current density increases from 1 A g-1 to 20 A g-1. The electrodes also evidenced high charge-discharge cycling stability, which attained 103% after 1000 cycles.

  13. Tetrapeptide-coumarin conjugate 3D networks based on hydrogen-bonded charge transfer complexes: gel formation and dye release.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongxia; Gong, Ruiying; Jiang, Yi; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-08-14

    Oligopeptide-based derivatives are important synthons for bio-based functional materials. In this article, a Gly-(L-Val)-Gly-(L-Val)-coumarin (GVGV-Cou) conjugate was synthesized, which forms 3D networks in ethanol. The gel nanostructures were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and TEM. It is suggested that the formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes between the coumarin moieties is the main driving force for the gel formation. The capability of the gel to encapsulate and release dyes was explored. Both Congo Red (CR) and Methylene Blue (MB) can be trapped in the CT gel matrix and released over time. The present gel might be used as a functional soft material for guest encapsulation and release. PMID:26138931

  14. Periodic Hydraulic Testing for Discerning Fracture Network Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Guihéneuf, N.; Cole, M.

    2015-12-01

    Discrete fracture network (DFN) models often predict highly variable hydraulic connections between injection and pumping wells used for enhanced oil recovery, geothermal energy extraction, and groundwater remediation. Such connections can be difficult to verify in fractured rock systems because standard pumping or pulse interference tests interrogate too large a volume to pinpoint specific connections. Three field examples are presented in which periodic hydraulic tests were used to obtain information about hydraulic connectivity in fractured bedrock. The first site, a sandstone in New York State, involves only a single fracture at a scale of about 10 m. The second site, a granite in Brittany, France, involves a fracture network at about the same scale. The third site, a granite/schist in the U.S. State of New Hampshire, involves a complex network at scale of 30-60 m. In each case periodic testing provided an enhanced view of hydraulic connectivity over previous constant rate tests. Periodic testing is particularly adept at measuring hydraulic diffusivity, which is a more effective parameter than permeability for identify the complexity of flow pathways between measurement locations. Periodic tests were also conducted at multiple frequencies which provides a range in the radius of hydraulic penetration away from the oscillating well. By varying the radius of penetration, we attempt to interrogate the structure of the fracture network. Periodic tests, therefore, may be uniquely suited for verifying and/or calibrating DFN models.

  15. 3-D components of a biological neural network visualized in computer generated imagery. II - Macular neural network organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Meyer, Glenn; Lam, Tony; Cutler, Lynn; Vaziri, Parshaw

    1990-01-01

    Computer-assisted reconstructions of small parts of the macular neural network show how the nerve terminals and receptive fields are organized in 3-dimensional space. This biological neural network is anatomically organized for parallel distributed processing of information. Processing appears to be more complex than in computer-based neural network, because spatiotemporal factors figure into synaptic weighting. Serial reconstruction data show anatomical arrangements which suggest that (1) assemblies of cells analyze and distribute information with inbuilt redundancy, to improve reliability; (2) feedforward/feedback loops provide the capacity for presynaptic modulation of output during processing; (3) constrained randomness in connectivities contributes to adaptability; and (4) local variations in network complexity permit differing analyses of incoming signals to take place simultaneously. The last inference suggests that there may be segregation of information flow to central stations subserving particular functions.

  16. Fractal modeling of natural fracture networks. Final report, June 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Dean, B.H.; Mick, C.

    1996-04-01

    Recovery from naturally fractured, tight-gas reservoirs is controlled by the fracture network. Reliable characterization of the actual fracture network in the reservoir is severely limited. The location and orientation of fractures intersecting the borehole can be determined, but the length of these fractures cannot be unambiguously determined. Fracture networks can be determined for outcrops, but there is little reason to believe that the network in the reservoir should be identical because of the differences in stresses and history. Because of the lack of detailed information about the actual fracture network, modeling methods must represent the porosity and permeability associated with the fracture network, as accurately as possible with very little apriori information. Three rather different types of approaches have been used: (1) dual porosity simulations; (2) `stochastic` modeling of fracture networks, and (3) fractal modeling of fracture networks. Stochastic models which assume a variety of probability distributions of fracture characteristics have been used with some success in modeling fracture networks. The advantage of these stochastic models over the dual porosity simulations is that real fracture heterogeneities are included in the modeling process. In the sections provided in this paper the authors will present fractal analysis of the MWX site, using the box-counting procedure; (2) review evidence testing the fractal nature of fracture distributions and discuss the advantages of using their fractal analysis over a stochastic analysis; (3) present an efficient algorithm for producing a self-similar fracture networks which mimic the real MWX outcrop fracture network.

  17. Do you see what I hear: experiments in multi-channel sound and 3D visualization for network monitoring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballora, Mark; Hall, David L.

    2010-04-01

    Detection of intrusions is a continuing problem in network security. Due to the large volumes of data recorded in Web server logs, analysis is typically forensic, taking place only after a problem has occurred. This paper describes a novel method of representing Web log information through multi-channel sound, while simultaneously visualizing network activity using a 3-D immersive environment. We are exploring the detection of intrusion signatures and patterns, utilizing human aural and visual pattern recognition ability to detect intrusions as they occur. IP addresses and return codes are mapped to an informative and unobtrusive listening environment to act as a situational sound track of Web traffic. Web log data is parsed and formatted using Python, then read as a data array by the synthesis language SuperCollider [1], which renders it as a sonification. This can be done either for the study of pre-existing data sets or in monitoring Web traffic in real time. Components rendered aurally include IP address, geographical information, and server Return Codes. Users can interact with the data, speeding or slowing the speed of representation (for pre-existing data sets) or "mixing" sound components to optimize intelligibility for tracking suspicious activity.

  18. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network's of polyimides: Fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Marion Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to improve the fracture toughness of the PMR-15 thermosetting polyimide by co-disolving LaRC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide. The co-solvation of a thermoplastic into a thermoset produces an interpenetration of the thermoplastic polymer into the thermoset polyimide network. A second research program was planned around the concept that to improve the fracture toughness of a thermoset polyimide polymer, the molecular weight between crosslink points would be an important macromolecular topological parameter in producing a fracture toughened semi-IPN polyimide.

  19. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  20. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  1. Towards effective flow simulations in realistic discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrone, Stefano; Pieraccini, Sandra; Scialò, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We focus on the simulation of underground flow in fractured media, modeled by means of Discrete Fracture Networks. Focusing on a new recent numerical approach proposed by the authors for tackling the problem avoiding mesh generation problems, we further improve the new family of methods making a step further towards effective simulations of large, multi-scale, heterogeneous networks. Namely, we tackle the imposition of Dirichlet boundary conditions in weak form, in such a way that geometrical complexity of the DFN is not an issue; we effectively solve DFN problems with fracture transmissivities spanning many orders of magnitude and approaching zero; furthermore, we address several numerical issues for improving the numerical solution also in quite challenging networks.

  2. Tooth periodontal ligament: Direct 3D microCT visualization of the collagen network and how the network changes when the tooth is loaded.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2013-02-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL), a soft tissue connecting the tooth and the bone, is essential for tooth movement, bone remodeling and force dissipation. A collagenous network that connects the tooth root surface to the alveolar jaw bone is one of the major components of the PDL. The organization of the collagenous component and how it changes under load is still poorly understood. Here using a state-of-the-art custom-made loading apparatus and a humidified environment inside a microCT, we visualize the PDL collagenous network of a fresh rat molar in 3D at 1 μm voxel size without any fixation or contrasting agents. We demonstrate that the PDL collagen network is organized in sheets. The spaces between sheets vary thus creating dense and sparse networks. Upon vertical loading, the sheets in both networks are stretched into well aligned arrays. The sparse network is located mainly in areas which undergo compressive loading as the tooth moves towards the bone, whereas the dense network functions mostly in tension as the tooth moves further from the bone. This new visualization method can be used to study other non-mineralized or partially mineralized tissues, and in particular those that are subjected to mechanical loads. The method will also be valuable for characterizing diseased tissues, as well as better understanding the phenotypic expressions of genetic mutants. PMID:23110851

  3. Determination of 3D surface displacement rates in the Upper Rhine Graben based on GURN (GNSS Upper Rhine Graben Network)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Knöpfler, A.; Masson, F.; Ulrich, P.; Heck, B.

    2012-04-01

    regional network GURN actually consists of approx. 80 permanently operating GNSS sites of different data providers in Germany, France and Switzerland. The first work steps in the context of GURN were dominated by a detailed analysis of the GNSS data base (e.g., instrumental change artefacts). This analysis included a comparison of the working group related results (EOST, GIK), where different software packages and data handling strategies were used to derive 3D coordinate time series as basis for the determination of a 3D surface displacement field. Due to very small expected velocities in the URG region, the recent GURN focus is on the reliable derivation of site velocities, therefore effects of datum realisation have to be handled with care. The presentation gives an insight into the joint venture GURN focussing on recent results (e.g., 3D surface velocity field).

  4. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  5. A semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Pin; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Wu, Yonghui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks. The model dynamically couples an analytical dual-porosity model with a numerical discrete fracture model. The small-scale fractures with the matrix are idealized as a dual-porosity continuum and an analytical flow solution is derived based on source functions in Laplace domain. The large-scale fractures are represented explicitly as the major fluid conduits and the flow is numerically modeled, also in Laplace domain. This approach allows us to include finer details of the fracture network characteristics while keeping the computational work manageable. For example, the large-scale fracture network may have complex geometry and varying conductivity, and the computations can be done at predetermined, discrete times, without any grids in the dual-porosity continuum. The validation of the semi-analytical model is demonstrated in comparison to the solution of ECLIPSE reservoir simulator. The simulation is fast, gridless and enables rapid model setup. On the basis of the model, we provide detailed analysis of the flow behavior of a horizontal production well in fractured reservoir with multi-scale fracture networks. The study has shown that the system may exhibit six flow regimes: large-scale fracture network linear flow, bilinear flow, small-scale fracture network linear flow, pseudosteady-state flow, interporosity flow and pseudoradial flow. During the first four flow periods, the large-scale fracture network behaves as if it only drains in the small-scale fracture network; that is, the effect of the matrix is negligibly small. The characteristics of the bilinear flow and the small-scale fracture network linear flow are predominantly determined by the dimensionless large-scale fracture conductivity. And low dimensionless fracture conductivity will generate large pressure drops in the large-scale fractures surrounding the wellbore. With

  6. A descriptive study of fracture networks in rocks using complex network metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Elizabeth; Velasco-Hernández, Jorge X.; Romero-Salcedo, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we describe the static topological fracture structure of five rock samples from three regions in Eastern Mexico by the application of centrality and communicability measures used in the area of complex networks. The information obtained from fracture images is used to characterize the fracture networks. The analysis is divided into two groups of characteristics. The first provides a general summary of the fracture network through the description of the number of nodes, edges, diameter, radius, lengths and clustering coefficients. A second group of features centers on the description of communicability in the network by means of three indexes recently proposed. In addition, we apply centrality measures (betweenness, closeness, eigenvector and eccentricity) for quantifying the importance of nodes in the entire network. Finally, we identify a topology for fracture networks using a classification based on the degree of communicability. The most important results obtained in this work are focused in the topological characteristic patterns found in fracture networks applying the approach of complex networks that in general provide local and global parameters of connectivity and communicability.

  7. NiO nanoarrays of a few atoms thickness on 3D nickel network for enhanced pseudocapacitive electrode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Kadumudi, Firoz Babu; Ho, Nhu Thuy; Kim, Ji-Woong; Park, Sungkyun; Bae, Jong-Seong; Choi, Won Mook; Cho, Shinuk; Kim, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The present work focuses on the development of template-free mesoporous NiO nanoarrays with large surface area grown on 3D nickel foam networks by a seed mediated aqueous chemical growth technique and subsequent annealing process. The resultant binder-free, well-aligned and vertically grown NiO nanoarrays exhibits a micron-sized planar structure as well as an ultrathin thickness (˜7 nm). The unique surface and electronic structure facilitates surface-dependent electrochemical reaction processes with no dead volume. They deliver a high capacitance of 2065 F g-1 at a current density of 16 A g-1 as a three electrode system. A specific capacitance of 1247 F g-1 is maintained at a higher current rate of 70 A g-1 with 88.9% retention after 5000 cycles. Finally, in a solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor configuration using NiO//activated carbon, the device delivers an enhanced supercapacitive performance, with an energy density of 43.5 Wh kg-1 and power density of 2.1 kW kg-1. Thus, the current research paves the way for the use of NiO nanoarrays as an electrode material for practical supercapacitor devices with higher cycling retention and rate capacity.

  8. Flexible, solid-state, ion-conducting membrane with 3D garnet nanofiber networks for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun Kelvin; Gong, Yunhui; Dai, Jiaqi; Gong, Amy; Han, Xiaogang; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yibo; Chen, Yanan; Yan, Chaoyi; Li, Yiju; Wachsman, Eric D; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-28

    Beyond state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology with metallic lithium anodes to replace conventional ion intercalation anode materials is highly desirable because of lithium's highest specific capacity (3,860 mA/g) and lowest negative electrochemical potential (∼3.040 V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a 3D lithium-ion-conducting ceramic network based on garnet-type Li6.4La3Zr2Al0.2O12 (LLZO) lithium-ion conductor to provide continuous Li(+) transfer channels in a polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based composite. This composite structure further provides structural reinforcement to enhance the mechanical properties of the polymer matrix. The flexible solid-state electrolyte composite membrane exhibited an ionic conductivity of 2.5 × 10(-4) S/cm at room temperature. The membrane can effectively block dendrites in a symmetric Li | electrolyte | Li cell during repeated lithium stripping/plating at room temperature, with a current density of 0.2 mA/cm(2) for around 500 h and a current density of 0.5 mA/cm(2) for over 300 h. These results provide an all solid ion-conducting membrane that can be applied to flexible LIBs and other electrochemical energy storage systems, such as lithium-sulfur batteries. PMID:27307440

  9. A series of rare earth complexes with novel non-interpenetrating 3D networks: synthesis, structures, magnetic and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Hua; Yang, Lin-Yan; Liao, Sheng-Yun; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Jin-Lei; Du, Pei-Yao; Gu, Wen; Liu, Xin

    2014-04-21

    A series of metal-organic framework {Ln(BCPBA)(H2O)}n {Ln = Nd (1), Sm (2), Eu (3), Tb (4), Dy (5)}; {[Ln(BCPBA)(H2O)](H2O)}n {Ln = Pr (6), Gd (7)} have been synthesized through the hydrothermal synthesis method. These compounds possess non-interpenetrating 3D networks with 10.1438 Å× 17.9149 Å rhombic channels along the [001] direction. The results of temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that compounds 4 and 7 exhibit Ln(III)Ln(III) antiferromagnetic interactions, while compound 5 exhibits Ln(III)Ln(III) ferromagnetic interactions. Frequency dependent out-of-phase signals were observed in alternating current (ac) magnetic susceptibility measurements which indicate that they have slow magnetic relaxation characteristics. The luminescent properties of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 are also discussed. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, compound 4 has longer fluorescence lifetime (τ1 = 400.0000 ms, τ2 = 1143.469 ms) and higher quantum yield (Φ = 42%) compared with other compounds. PMID:24572766

  10. The 3-D strain patterns in Turkey using geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutoglu, Hakan Senol; Toker, Mustafa; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our use of GPS data to obtain and quantify the full continuous strain tensor using a 3-D velocity field in Turkey. In this study, GPS velocities improve the estimation of short-term strain tensor fields for determining the seismic hazard of Turkey. The tensorial analysis presents different aspects of deformation, such as the normal and shear strains, including their directions, the compressional and extensional strains. This analysis is appropriate for the characterizing the state of the current seismic deformation. GPS velocity data from continuous measurements (2009-2012) to estimate deformations were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK software. Using high-rate GPS data from permanent 146 GNSS stations (RTK-CORS-TR network), the strain distribution was determined and interpolated using a biharmonic spline technique. We show the strain field patterns within axial and plane form at several critical locations, and discuss these results within the context of the seismic and tectonic deformation of Turkey. We conclude that the knowledge of the crustal strain patterns provides important information on the location of the main faults and strain accumulation for the hazard assessment. The results show an agreement between the seismic and tectonic strains confirming that there are active crustal deformations in Turkey.

  11. Liver Tumor Segmentation from MR Images Using 3D Fast Marching Algorithm and Single Hidden Layer Feedforward Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Our objective is to develop a computerized scheme for liver tumor segmentation in MR images. Materials and Methods. Our proposed scheme consists of four main stages. Firstly, the region of interest (ROI) image which contains the liver tumor region in the T1-weighted MR image series was extracted by using seed points. The noise in this ROI image was reduced and the boundaries were enhanced. A 3D fast marching algorithm was applied to generate the initial labeled regions which are considered as teacher regions. A single hidden layer feedforward neural network (SLFN), which was trained by a noniterative algorithm, was employed to classify the unlabeled voxels. Finally, the postprocessing stage was applied to extract and refine the liver tumor boundaries. The liver tumors determined by our scheme were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as the “ground truth.” Results. The study was evaluated on two datasets of 25 tumors from 16 patients. The proposed scheme obtained the mean volumetric overlap error of 27.43% and the mean percentage volume error of 15.73%. The mean of the average surface distance, the root mean square surface distance, and the maximal surface distance were 0.58 mm, 1.20 mm, and 6.29 mm, respectively. PMID:27597960

  12. Liver Tumor Segmentation from MR Images Using 3D Fast Marching Algorithm and Single Hidden Layer Feedforward Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Le, Trong-Ngoc; Bao, Pham The; Huynh, Hieu Trung

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Our objective is to develop a computerized scheme for liver tumor segmentation in MR images. Materials and Methods. Our proposed scheme consists of four main stages. Firstly, the region of interest (ROI) image which contains the liver tumor region in the T1-weighted MR image series was extracted by using seed points. The noise in this ROI image was reduced and the boundaries were enhanced. A 3D fast marching algorithm was applied to generate the initial labeled regions which are considered as teacher regions. A single hidden layer feedforward neural network (SLFN), which was trained by a noniterative algorithm, was employed to classify the unlabeled voxels. Finally, the postprocessing stage was applied to extract and refine the liver tumor boundaries. The liver tumors determined by our scheme were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as the "ground truth." Results. The study was evaluated on two datasets of 25 tumors from 16 patients. The proposed scheme obtained the mean volumetric overlap error of 27.43% and the mean percentage volume error of 15.73%. The mean of the average surface distance, the root mean square surface distance, and the maximal surface distance were 0.58 mm, 1.20 mm, and 6.29 mm, respectively. PMID:27597960

  13. Cataloguing Seismic Waveform Properties Recorded With a 3D Network in a Gold Mine in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, J.; Nyblade, A. A.; Gok, R.; Walter, W. R.; Linzer, L.; Durrheim, R. J.; Dirks, P.

    2007-12-01

    The SAVUKA gold mine is located in the northwestern edge of the Witwatersrand basin, a Late Archean (3.07- 2.71~Ga) intracratonic basin in South Africa that hosts the largest known gold-uranium-pyrite ore deposits in the world. Seismic events related to the mine activity span several orders of magnitude through a variety of sources that include mine blasts, pillar collapses, and faulting events. These events are systematically recorded and catalogued through an in-mine, 3D seismic network consisting of 20, three-component, short-period stations with natural frequencies ranging between 4.5 and 28.0~Hz and deployed as deep as ~3.5 km. After 5 months of seismic monitoring of the mine, we have been able to assemble a database of over 6000 events spanning magnitudes in the -2.5 < ML < 4.4 range. The potential of this unique data set for characterizing the detailed seismic properties of the basin and studying source properties of non-double couple events is explored through simple, first-pass analysis on the recorded waveforms. Moreover, the in-mine network is complemented by a small array of 4 broadband stations interspaced ~10~km apart on the surface of the mine, and by a number of AfricaArray stations in South Africa and neighboring countries located at regional distances (50- 1000~km) from the mine. The largest mine-induced events are clearly recorded at distances as far away from the mine as 450~km and provide a unique opportunity for studying the regional propagation of seismic phases as well as the structure of the cratonic crust underlying the basin.

  14. Microfluidic Investigation of Oil Mobilization in Shale Fracture Networks at Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; Carey, J. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Investigations of pore-scale fluid flow and transport phenomena using engineered micromodels has steadily increased in recent years. In these investigations fluid flow is restricted to two-dimensions allowing for real time visualization and quantification of complex flow and reactive transport behavior, which is difficult to obtain in other experimental systems. One drawback to these studies is the use of engineered materials that do not faithfully represent the rock properties (e.g., porosity, wettability, roughness, etc.) encountered in subsurface formations. In this work, we describe a unique high pressure (up to 1500 psi) and temperature (up to 80 °C) microfluidics experimental system in which we investigate fluid flow and transport in geo-material (e.g., shale, Portland cement, etc.) micromodels. The use of geo-material micromodels allows us to better represent fluid-rock interactions including wettability, chemical reactivity, and nano-scale porosity at conditions representative of natural subsurface environments. Here, we present experimental results in fracture systems with applications to hydrocarbon mobility in hydraulically fractured shale. Complex fracture network patterns are derived from 3D x-ray tomography images of actual fractures created in shale rock cores. We use both shale and glass micromodels, allowing for a detailed comparison between flow phenomena in the different materials. We discuss results from two-phase huff-and-puff experiments involving N2 and n-Decane, as well as three-phase displacement experiments involving supercritical CO2, brine, and n-Decane.

  15. 3D hierarchical MnO2 nanorod/welded Ag-nanowire-network composites for high-performance supercapacitor electrodes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhensong; Yang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Shuhua; Zhang, Liqiang; Cao, Bingqiang

    2016-06-28

    3D MnO2 nanorod/welded Ag-nanowire-network supercapacitor electrodes were prepared. Welding treatment of the Ag nanowire-network leads to low resistance and long lifetime. Galvanostatic charge/discharge (GCD) induces an ever-lasting morphology changing from flower-like to honeycomb-like for MnO2, which manifests as increasing specific capacitance to 663.4 F g(-1) after 7000 GCD cycles. PMID:27263832

  16. Outgassing of silicic magma through bubble and fracture networks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, S.; Nakamura, M.; Uesugi, K.

    2013-12-01

    Outgassing of magma is a fundamental process that controls the style and explosivity of volcanic eruptions. Vesiculation during the ascent and decompression of magma results in the formation of bubble networks within the magma. The permeable gas escape through the bubble networks is an efficient way to induce the outgassing of silicic magma (Eichelberger et al., 1986). To understand magma ascent dynamics and predict the style and explosivity of eruptions, it is necessary to constrain the rate of magma outgassing as the magma ascends in a volcanic conduit. However, the gas permeability of natural samples should not be considered, because it reflects complicated processes involving vesiculation, deformation, outgassing, and compaction. Experimental studies have demonstrated that vesiculation and compaction processes show hysteresis behavior (Okumura et al., 2013). Thus, we have performed experiments to simulate magma decompression and the deformation of vesicular magmas (e.g., Okumura et al., 2009, 2012). A series of decompression and deformation experiments indicates that the gas permeability is less than the order of 10-15 m2 for isotropic vesiculation at vesicularity <60-80 vol%. When magma ascent is simulated with shear deformation, the gas permeability is much greater than that observed under isotropic conditions. Akin to bubble networks, permeable networks consisting of shear-induced brittle fractures are thought to be efficient outgassing pathways (Gonnermann and Manga, 2003). Our recent experiments demonstrated that fractured magma has a higher gas permeability than vesicular magma at least at vesicularities <~40 vol%. This indicates that fracture networks in magma become efficient parts for the outgassing. However, as shear fracturing results from high strain rates in highly viscous magma, outgassing via fracture networks can be enhanced in localized shear zones and shallow parts of the conduit. The permeable bubble and fracture networks are preferentially

  17. Fracture size and transmissivity correlations: Implications for transport simulations in sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks following a truncated power law distribution of fracture size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Aldrich, Garrett Allen; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2016-08-25

    We characterize how different fracture size-transmissivity relationships influence flow and transport simulations through sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. Although it is generally accepted that there is a positive correlation between a fracture's size and its transmissivity/aperture, the functional form of that relationship remains a matter of debate. Relationships that assume perfect correlation, semicorrelation, and noncorrelation between the two have been proposed. To study the impact that adopting one of these relationships has on transport properties, we generate multiple sparse fracture networks composed of circular fractures whose radii follow a truncated power law distribution. The distribution of transmissivities are selected somore » that the mean transmissivity of the fracture networks are the same and the distributions of aperture and transmissivity in models that include a stochastic term are also the same. We observe that adopting a correlation between a fracture size and its transmissivity leads to earlier breakthrough times and higher effective permeability when compared to networks where no correlation is used. While fracture network geometry plays the principal role in determining where transport occurs within the network, the relationship between size and transmissivity controls the flow speed. Lastly, these observations indicate DFN modelers should be aware that breakthrough times and effective permeabilities can be strongly influenced by such a relationship in addition to fracture and network statistics.« less

  18. 3D Printing and Digital Rock Physics for Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging techniques for the analysis of porous structures have revolutionized our ability to quantitatively characterize geomaterials. Digital representations of rock from CT images and physics modeling based on these pore structures provide the opportunity to further advance our quantitative understanding of fluid flow, geomechanics, and geochemistry, and the emergence of coupled behaviors. Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, has revolutionized production of custom parts with complex internal geometries. For the geosciences, recent advances in 3D printing technology may be co-opted to print reproducible porous structures derived from CT-imaging of actual rocks for experimental testing. The use of 3D printed microstructure allows us to surmount typical problems associated with sample-to-sample heterogeneity that plague rock physics testing and to test material response independent from pore-structure variability. Together, imaging, digital rocks and 3D printing potentially enables a new workflow for understanding coupled geophysical processes in a real, but well-defined setting circumventing typical issues associated with reproducibility, enabling full characterization and thus connection of physical phenomena to structure. In this talk we will discuss the possibilities that these technologies can bring to geosciences and present early experiences with coupled multiscale experimental and numerical analysis using 3D printed fractured rock specimens. In particular, we discuss the processes of selection and printing of transparent fractured specimens based on 3D reconstruction of micro-fractured rock to study fluid flow characterization and manipulation. Micro-particle image velocimetry is used to directly visualize 3D single and multiphase flow velocity in 3D fracture networks. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U

  19. Analysis of the Complex Fracture Flow in Multiple Fractured Horizontal Wells with the Fractal Tree-Like Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wendong; Su, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiao; Sheng, Guanglong; Ren, Long

    2015-03-01

    This paper formulates a fractal-tree network model to address the challenging problem of characterizing the hydraulic fracture network in unconventional reservoirs. It has been proved that the seepage flow in tight/shale oil reservoirs is much more complicated to the conventional formation. To further understand the flow mechanisms in such a complex system, a semi-analytical model considering "branch network fractures" was established stage by stage using point source method and superposition principle. Fractal method was employed to generate and represent induced fracture network around bi-wing fractures. In addition, based on the new established model and solution, deterministic fractal-tree-like fracture network patterns and heterogeneity were carefully investigated and compared with the simulation model. Results show that the fractal dimension for the fracture network has significant effect on the connectivity of the stimulated reservoir. The proposed fractal model may capture the characteristics of the heterogeneous complex fracture network and help in understanding the flow and transport mechanisms of multiple fractured horizontal wells.

  20. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single–crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  1. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-03-01

    The single-crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment.

  2. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single-crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  3. Importance of Stratabound Fracture Networks for Seismic Hazard Assessment of Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W.; Davidsen, J.; Pedersen, P. K.; Boroumand, N.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing, a powerful completion technique used to enhance oil or gas production from impermeable strata, may trigger unintended earthquake activity. The primary basis for assessment of triggered and natural seismic hazard is the classic Gutenberg-Richter (G-R) relation, which expresses scale-independent behavior of earthquake magnitudes. Using a stochastic approach to simulate microseismicity from three monitoring programs in North America, we show that magnitude-distance trends for microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing may deviate significantly from the G-R relation. This apparent breakdown in the power-law scaling paradigm, coupled with unusually high values for the b-parameter (slope) of the G-R relation, can be explained by a new model based on activation of stratabound fracture networks in which fracture height growth is limited by mechanical bed thickness. For the three areas considered, mechanical bed thickness is well represented by a lognormal distribution, which leads asymptotically to a Gaussian decay for induced magnitudes that fits the observations remarkably well. This new relationship has profound implications for understanding the scaling behavior of induced microearthquakes, as well as for forecasting the probability of larger earthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas development.

  4. Hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale: reviewing influence factors and their mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  5. Hydraulic Fracture Extending into Network in Shale: Reviewing Influence Factors and Their Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  6. Anomalous transport in fracture networks: field scale experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous transport is widely observed in different settings and scales of transport through porous and fractured geologic media. A common signature of anomalous transport is the late-time power law tailing in breakthrough curves (BTCs) during tracer tests. Various conceptual models of anomalous transport have been proposed, including multirate mass transfer, continuous time random walk, and stream tube models. Since different conceptual models can produce equally good fits to a single BTC, tracer test interpretation has been plagued with ambiguity. Here, we propose to resolve such ambiguity by analyzing BTCs obtained from both convergent and push-pull flow configurations at two different fracture planes. We conducted field tracer tests in a fractured granite formation close to Ploemeur, France. We observe that BTC tailing depends on the flow configuration and the injection fracture. Specifically the tailing disappears under push-pull geometry, and when we injected at a fracture with high flux (Figure 1). This indicates that for this fractured granite, BTC tailing is controlled by heterogeneous advection and not by matrix diffusion. To explain the change in tailing behavior for different flow configurations, we employ a simple lattice network model with heterogeneous conductivity distribution. The model assigns random conductivities to the fractures and solves the Darcy equation for an incompressible fluid, enforcing mass conservation at fracture intersections. The mass conservation constraint yields a correlated random flow through the fracture system. We investigate whether BTC tailing can be explained by the spatial distribution of preferential flow paths and stagnation zones, which is controlled by the conductivity variance and correlation length. By combining the results from the field tests and numerical modeling, we show that the reversibility of spreading is a key mechanism that needs to be captured. We also demonstrate the dominant role of the injection

  7. Three 3D hybrid networks based on octamolybdates and different Cu I/Cu II-bis(triazole) motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Jing; Pang, Hai-Jun; Tang, Qun; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Chen, Ya-Guang

    2010-12-01

    Three 3D compounds based on octamolybdate clusters and various Cu I/Cu II-bis(triazole) motifs, [Cu I2btb][ β-Mo 8O 26] 0.5 ( 1), [Cu I2btpe][ β-Mo 8O 26] 0.5 ( 2), and [Cu II(btpe) 2][ β-Mo 8O 26] 0.5 ( 3) [btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, btpe=1,5-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pentane], were isolated via tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. In 1, the copper(I)-btb motif is a one-dimensional (1D) chain which is further linked by hexadentate β-[Mo 8O 26] 4- clusters via coordinating to Cu I cations giving a 3D structure. In 2, the copper(I)-btpe motif exhibits a "stairs"-like [Cu I2btpe] 2+ sheet, and the tetradentate β-[Mo 8O 26] 4- clusters interact with two neighboring [Cu I2btpe] 2+ sheets constructing a 3D framework. In 3, the copper(II)-btpe motif possesses a novel (2D→3D) interdigitated structure, which is further connected by the tetradentate β-[Mo 8O 26] 4- clusters forming a 3D framework. The thermal stability and luminescent properties of 1- 3 are investigated in the solid state.

  8. Flow and Transport Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Fracture Networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Adolfo Antonio

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation presents a comprehensive study of two-dimensional fracture networks; it addresses three different aspects: geometry, fluid-flow and diffusion solute transport. The first subject consists in the description of the topological structure of the network. This is done by creating matrix representations for different topological operators which are then used to describe the geometry of the system. A series of systematic procedures were developed to determine the most important geometrical features of the fracture network including connectivity and backbone. The second point of study was subdivided in two parts: steady-state and transient phenomena. The steady -state hydraulic response of the network was investigated by generalizing the topological formulations of electrical networks. These formulations (which were originally developed by classical authors like Kirchhoff and Weyl) give a convenient mean for expressing the mass balance condition at the nodes. The analogy between electrical conduction and steady-state fluid flow is not exact thus, some additional concepts need to be introduced (like the node-rate-injection vector). Results for this part of the work include detailed vector field diagrams that represent the flow pattern across the network. In order to solve the transient fluid-flow problem, some additional considerations needed to be made. The idea is to start with the one-dimensional partial differential equation that governs the transient fluid flow across a single fracture (diffusion equation). The Laplace transform is then applied to eliminate time, the mass balance condition at each node is expressed in terms of the Laplace transform variables. Once the results are found, the inverse Laplace transforms were obtained via a numerical algorithm (Stephest algorithm). With the introduction of two new topological operators (closely related to the boundary operator), it was possible to express the linear set of mass balance equations in a form

  9. A Novel 3D Fibril Force Assay Implicates Src in Tumor Cell Force Generation in Collagen Networks

    PubMed Central

    Polackwich, Robert J.; Koch, Daniel; Arevalo, Richard; Miermont, Anne M.; Jee, Kathleen J.; Lazar, John; Urbach, Jeffrey; Mueller, Susette C.; McAllister, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    New insight into the biomechanics of cancer cell motility in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) environments would significantly enhance our understanding of aggressive cancers and help identify new targets for intervention. While several methods for measuring the forces involved in cell-matrix interactions have been developed, previous to this study none have been able to measure forces in a fibrillar environment. We have developed a novel assay for simultaneously measuring cell mechanotransduction and motility in 3D fibrillar environments. The assay consists of a controlled-density fibrillar collagen gel atop a controlled-stiffness polyacrylamide (PAA) surface. Forces generated by living cells and their migration in the 3D collagen gel were measured with the 3D motion of tracer beads within the PAA layer. Here, this 3D fibril force assay is used to study the role of the invasion-associated protein kinase Src in mechanotransduction and motility. Src expression and activation are linked with proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, and have been shown to be required in 2D for invadopodia membranes to direct and mediate invasion. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MD-231 was stably transfected with GFP-tagged constitutively active Src or wild-type Src. In 3D fibrillar collagen matrices we found that, relative to wild-type Src, constitutively active Src: 1) increased the strength of cell-induced forces on the ECM, 2) did not significantly change migration speed, and 3) increased both the duration and the length, but not the number, of long membrane protrusions. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Src controls invasion by controlling the ability of the cell to form long lasting cellular protrusions to enable penetration through tissue barriers, in addition to its role in promoting invadopodia matrix-degrading activity. PMID:23536784

  10. Clean Synthesis of an Economical 3D Nanochain Network of PdCu Alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Performance towards Ethanol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiawei; Huang, Zhao; Cai, Kai; Zhang, Huan; Lu, Zhicheng; Li, Tingting; Zuo, Yunpeng; Han, Heyou

    2015-12-01

    A one-pot method for the fast synthesis of a 3D nanochain network (NNC) of PdCu alloy without any surfactants is described. The composition of the as-prepared PdCu alloy catalysts can be precisely controlled by changing the precursor ratio of Pd to Cu. First, the Cu content changes the electronic structure of Pd in the 3D NNC of PdCu alloy. Second, the 3D network structure offers large open pores, high surface areas, and self-supported properties. Third, the surfactant-free strategy results in a relatively clean surface. These factors all contribute to better electrocatalytic activity and durability towards ethanol oxidation. Moreover, the use of copper in the alloy lowers the price of the catalyst by replacing the noble metal palladium with non-noble metal copper. The composition-optimized Pd80 Cu20 alloy in the 3D NNC catalyst shows an increased electrochemically active surface area (80.95 m(2)  g(-1) ) and a 3.62-fold enhancement of mass activity (6.16 A mg(-1) ) over a commercial Pd/C catalyst. PMID:26472208

  11. A Distributed Fiber Optic Sensor Network for Online 3-D Temperature and Neutron Fluence Mapping in a VHTR Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, Pavel; Dickerson, Bryan; French, Joseph; McEachern, Donald; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-04-30

    Robust sensing technologies allowing for 3D in-core performance monitoring in real time are of paramount importance for already established LWRs to enhance their reliability and availability per year, and therefore, to further facilitate their economic competitiveness via predictive assessment of the in-core conditions.

  12. Modeling in-situ transport of uranine and colloids in the fracture network in KURT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Baik, Min-Hoon; Jeong, Jongtae

    2015-02-01

    An in-situ dipole migration experiment was conducted using the conservative tracer uranine and latex colloids in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The location and dimensions of the fractures between the two boreholes were estimated using the results of a borehole image processing system (BIPS) investigation, and the connectivity of the fractures was evaluated by a packer test. To investigate the flow and transport of uranine and colloids through an in-situ fracture network, a fracture network transport model was newly developed. The model consists of a series of one-dimensional advection-dispersion-matrix diffusion equations for each channel of the fracture network. Using the fracture network transport model, the most probable representation and the hydrologic parameters of the fracture network can be estimated by fitting the breakthrough of uranine. While the fracture network might not be unique, the representation chosen was adequate to describe the breakthrough of uranine and it represents a reasonable approach to modeling transport in the fracture network. An additional evaluation showed that the colloid transport in this study was influenced by filtration on the fracture surface rather than the enhancement of the colloid velocity. Overall, the model can explain successfully the in-situ experimental results of uranine and colloid transports through the fracture network. PMID:25543462

  13. Two 3D network complexes of Y(III) and Ce(III) with 2-fold interpenetration and reversible desorption-adsorption behavior of lattice water

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Wenjuan; He Yong; Zhao Qinghuan; Fan Yaoting; Hou Hongwei

    2010-10-15

    Two novel inorganic-organic 3D network, namely{l_brace}[Ln(L){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O{r_brace}n [Ln=Y (1), Ce (2); Ln(L){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O [Ln=Y (1), Ce (2)], have been prepared through the assembly of the ligand 1,2-bis[3-(1,2,4-triazolyl)-4-amino-5-carboxylmethylthio]ethane (H{sub 2}L) and lanthanide (III) salts under hydrothermal condition and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. In complexes 1 and 2, the L{sup 2-} anions adopt three different coordination fashions (bidentate chelate, bidentate bridging and bidentate chelate bridging) connecting Ln(III) ions via the oxygen atoms from carboxylate moieties. Both 1 and 2 exhibit 3D network structures with 2-fold interpenetration. Interestingly, the reversible desorption-adsorption behavior of lattice water is significantly observed in the two compounds. The result shows their potential application as late-model water absorbent in the field of adsorption material. - Graphical abstract: Two inorganic-organic 3D network, namely {l_brace}[Ln(L){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O{r_brace}n [Ln=Y (1), Ce (2)], have been prepared under hydrothermal condition and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. Both 1 and 2 exhibit 3D network structures with 2-fold interpenetration. Interestingly, the reversible desorption-adsorption behavior of lattice water is significantly observed in the two compounds. The result shows their potential application as late-model water absorbent in the field of adsorption material.

  14. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

  15. Construction of a 3D porous network of copper film via a template-free deposition method with superior mechanical and electrical properties for micro-energy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuncheng; Wang, Yao; Deng, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    With the ever increasing level of performance of energy conversion micro-devices, such as thin-film solar cells and thermoelectric micro-generators or coolers, their reliability and stability still remain a challenge. The high electrical and mechanical stability of an electrode is two of the critical factors that affect the long-term life of devices. Here we show that these factors can be achieved by constructing a 3D porous network of nanostructures in copper film using facile magnetron sputtering technology without any templates. The constructed 3D porous network of nanostructures in Cu film provides not only the advantages of light weight, prominently high conductivity, and large elastic deformation, but also the ability to absorb stress, preventing crack propagation, which is crucial for electrodes to maintain stable electrical and mechanical properties under working conditions. The nanopores inside the 3D network are capable of unrestrained deformation under applied stress resulting in strong elastic recovery. This work puts forward a feasible solution for manufacturing electrodes with excellent electrical and mechanical properties for micro-energy devices.

  16. Creating permeable fracture networks for EGS: Engineered systems versus nature

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L Karner

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy has set long-term national goals for the development of geothermal energy that are significantly accelerated compared to historical development of the resource. To achieve these goals, it is crucial to evaluate the performance of previous and existing efforts to create enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Two recently developed EGS sites are evaluated from the standpoint of geomechanics. These sites have been established in significantly different tectonic regimes: 1. compressional Cooper Basin (Australia), and 2. extensional Soultz-sous-Fôrets (France). Mohr-Coulomb analyses of the stimulation procedures employed at these sites, coupled with borehole observations, indicate that pre-existing fractures play a significant role in the generation of permeability networks. While pre-existing fabric can be exploited to produce successful results for geothermal energy development, such fracture networks may not be omnipresent. For mostly undeformed reservoirs, it may be necessary to create new fractures using processes that merge existing technologies or use concepts borrowed from natural hydrofracture examples (e.g. dyke swarms).

  17. Effect of Internal Aperture Variability on Tracer Transport in Large Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Aperture variability within individual fractures is usually neglected in modeling flow and transport through fractured media. Typically, individual fractures are assumed to be homogeneous. However, in reality, individual fractures are heterogeneous, which may affect flow and transport in fractured media. The relative importance of including in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling has been under debate for a long time. Previous studies have shown flow channeling on an individual fracture with internal variability, where the fracture is considered isolated from the rest of the fracture network. Although these studies yield some clear insights into the process, the boundary conditions are impractical for field-scale networks, where the realistic boundary conditions are determined by fracture connections in the network. Therefore, flow in a single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. In order to address the question of the importance of in-fracture variability, the internal heterogeneity of every individual fracture is incorporated into a three-dimensional fracture network, represented by a composition of intersecting fractures. The new DFN simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate a kilometer scale DFNs similar to the Forsmark, Sweden site. In our DFN model, the in-fracture aperture variability is scattered over each cell of the computational mesh along the fracture, representing by a stationary Gaussian random field with various correlation lengths. The Lagrangian particle tracking is conducted in multiple DFN realizations and the flow-dependent Lagrangian parameters, non-reacting travel time, τ, and cumulative reactivity parameter, β, are obtained along particles streamlines. It is shown that early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture aperture variability than tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the aperture variations and spatial

  18. Multiscale fracture network characterization and impact on flow: A case study on the Latemar carbonate platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebol, N. J.; Maier, C.; Nick, H.; Geiger, S.; Bertotti, G.; Boro, H.

    2015-12-01

    A fracture network arrangement is quantified across an isolated carbonate platform from outcrop and aerial imagery to address its impact on fluid flow. The network is described in terms of fracture density, orientation, and length distribution parameters. Of particular interest is the role of fracture cross connections and abutments on the effective permeability. Hence, the flow simulations explicitly account for network topology by adopting Discrete-Fracture-and-Matrix description. The interior of the Latemar carbonate platform (Dolomites, Italy) is taken as outcrop analogue for subsurface reservoirs of isolated carbonate build-ups that exhibit a fracture-dominated permeability. New is our dual strategy to describe the fracture network both as deterministic- and stochastic-based inputs for flow simulations. The fracture geometries are captured explicitly and form a multiscale data set by integration of interpretations from outcrops, airborne imagery, and lidar. The deterministic network descriptions form the basis for descriptive rules that are diagnostic of the complex natural fracture arrangement. The fracture networks exhibit a variable degree of multitier hierarchies with smaller-sized fractures abutting against larger fractures under both right and oblique angles. The influence of network topology on connectivity is quantified using Discrete-Fracture-Single phase fluid flow simulations. The simulation results show that the effective permeability for the fracture and matrix ensemble can be 50 to 400 times higher than the matrix permeability of 1.0 · 10-14 m2. The permeability enhancement is strongly controlled by the connectivity of the fracture network. Therefore, the degree of intersecting and abutting fractures should be captured from outcrops with accuracy to be of value as analogue.

  19. Fabrication of Highly Stretchable Conductors Based on 3D Printed Porous Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Conductive Carbon Nanotubes/Graphene Network.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shasha; Yang, Ke; Wang, Zhihui; Chen, Mengting; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Chunzhong

    2016-01-27

    The combination of carbon nanomaterial with three-dimensional (3D) porous polymer substrates has been demonstrated to be an effective approach to manufacture high-performance stretchable conductive materials (SCMs). However, it remains a challenge to fabricate 3D-structured SCMs with outstanding electrical conductivity capability under large strain in a facile way. In this work, the 3D printing technique was employed to prepare 3D porous poly(dimethylsiloxane) (O-PDMS) which was then integrated with carbon nanotubes and graphene conductive network and resulted in highly stretchable conductors (OPCG). Two types of OPCG were prepared, and it has been demonstrated that the OPCG with split-level structure exhibited both higher electrical conductivity and superior retention capability under deformations, which was illustrated by using a finite element method. The specially designed split-level OPCG is capable of sustaining both large strain and repeated deformations showing huge potential in the application of next-generation stretchable electronics. PMID:26713456

  20. Uncertainties in Parameterizing Faults for Discrete Fracture Network Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models represent conducting faults and fractures as two dimensional features with transmissivity that defines the flow capacity, storativity that represents the open volume and compressibility, and aperture that determines the flow velocity. While these properties work well for capturing the pressure and flow behaviors they are not complete for understanding solute transport in groundwater or production in fault-dominated oil and gas reservoirs. For oil and gas production, water breakthrough will be controlled by the small portion of the fault that accounts for most of the fault's transmissivity, while the major portion in the fault's storage will be released more slowly. Similarly, in contaminant hydrology, the multiple porosities of the faults may enhance matrix diffusion effects. This presentation focuses on faults in granitic basement rock with low matrix permeability and porosity. Although these rocks contain joints and simple fractures, the major portion of the flow and storage may appear in faults and shear fractures that span a large range of scales. Unlike simple fractures or joints, faults and shear fractures have complex internal geometries including a range of materials including altered rock, breccia, mylonite, cataclasite, and gouge. These materials may have significant porosities ranging from a few percent to over thirty percent in heavily weathered or altered rocks. The core materials may act as either barriers or conduits. Altered granitic rock may also have porosities in the range of several percent. As faults may have thicknesses from a few centimeters to several tens of meters, the pore volumes in fault rock can be very significant. A key to understanding fault zone behaviors lies in having a range for the relative pore volumes of the conducting portion of the fault versus that of the larger damage zone. This presentation summarizes a literature review focusing on these fault properties. The conducting portion of

  1. Analysis of microseismicity using fuzzy logic and fractals for fracture network characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Maity, D.; Boyle, K.; Sahimi, M.; Sammis, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    The area where microseismic events occur may be correlated with the fracture network at a geothermal field. For an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir, an extensive fracture network with a large aerial distribution is required. Pore-pressure increase, temperature changes, volume change due to fluid withdrawal/injection and chemical alteration of fracture surfaces are all mechanisms that may explain microseismic events at a geothermal field. If these mechanisms are operative, any fuzzy cluster of the microseismic events should represent a connected fracture network. Drilling new EGS wells (both injection and production wells) in these locations may facilitate the creation of an EGS reservoir. In this article we use the fuzzy clustering technique to find the location and characteristics of fracture networks in the Geysers geothermal field. We also show that the centers of these fuzzy clusters move in time, which may represent fracture propagation or fluid movement within the fracture network. Furthermore, analyzing the distribution of fuzzy hypocenters and quantifying their fractal structure helps us to develop an accurate fracture map for the reservoir. Combining the fuzzy clustering results with the fractal analysis allows us to better understand the mechanisms for fracture stimulation and better characterize the evolution of the fracture network. We also show how micro-earthquake date collected in different time periods can be correlated with drastic changes in the distribution of active fractures resulting from injection, production or other transient events.

  2. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Painter, Scott L.; Gable, Carl W.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-08-01

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer-scale field-scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.

  3. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Painter, Scott L.; Gable, Carl W.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-06-17

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer18 scale field–scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling withinmore » large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into 23 flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.« less

  4. Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

  5. 3D structure of macropore networks within natural and de-embarked estuary saltmarsh sediments: towards an improved understanding of network structural control over hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate; James, Tempest; Lucy, Diggens

    2015-04-01

    Saltmarshes are globally important environments which, though occupying < 4% of the Earth's surface, provide a range of ecosystem services. Yet, they are threatened by sea level rise, human population growth, urbanization and pollution resulting in degradation. To compensate for this habitat loss many coastal restoration projects have been implemented over the last few decades, largely driven by legislative requirements for improved biodiversity e.g. the EU Habitats Directive and Birds Directive. However, there is growing evidence that restored saltmarshes, recreated through the return to tidal inundation of previously drained and defended low-lying coastal land, do not have the same species composition even after 100 years and while environmental enhancement has been achieved, there may be consequences for ecosystem functioning This study presents the findings of a comparative analysis of detailed sediment structure and hydrological functioning of equivalent natural and de-embanked saltmarsh sediments at Orplands Farm, Essex, UK. 3D x-ray CT scanning of triplicate undisturbed sediment cores recovered in 2013 have been used to derive detailed volumetric reconstructions of macropore structure and networks, and to infer differences in bulk microporosity between natural and de-embanked saltmarshes. These volumes have been further visualised for qualitative analysis of the main sediment components, and extraction of key macropore space parameters for quantified analysis including total porosity and connectivity, as well as structure, organisation and efficiency (tortuosity) of macropore networks. Although total porosity was significantly greater within the de-embanked saltmarsh sediments, pore networks in these samples were less organised and more tortuous, and were also inferred to have significantly lower micro-porosity than those of the natural saltmarsh. These datasets are applied to explain significant differences in the hydraulic behaviour and functioning

  6. Higher-order compositional modeling of three-phase flow in 3D fractured porous media based on cross-flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Moortgat, Joachim Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase compositional flow in fractured porous media, when all the species can transfer between the phases, is a real challenge. Despite the broad applications in hydrocarbon reservoir engineering and hydrology, a compositional numerical simulator for three-phase flow in fractured media has not appeared in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. In this work, we present a three-phase fully compositional simulator for fractured media, based on higher-order finite element methods. To achieve computational efficiency, we invoke the cross-flow equilibrium (CFE) concept between discrete fractures and a small neighborhood in the matrix blocks. We adopt the mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to approximate convective Darcy fluxes and the pressure equation. This approach is the most natural choice for flow in fractured media. The mass balance equations are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, which is perhaps the most efficient approach to capture physical discontinuities in phase properties at the matrix-fracture interfaces and at phase boundaries. In this work, we account for gravity and Fickian diffusion. The modeling of capillary effects is discussed in a separate paper. We present the mathematical framework, using the implicit-pressure-explicit-composition (IMPEC) scheme, which facilitates rigorous thermodynamic stability analyses and the computation of phase behavior effects to account for transfer of species between the phases. A deceptively simple CFL condition is implemented to improve numerical stability and accuracy. We provide six numerical examples at both small and larger scales and in two and three dimensions, to demonstrate powerful features of the formulation.

  7. Percolation and permeability of fracture networks in Excavated Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J.; Adler, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Generally, the excavation process of a gallery generates fractures in its immediate vicinity. The corresponding zone which is called the Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ), has a larger permeability than the intact surrounding medium. The properties of the EDZ are attracting more and more attention because of their potential importance in repositories of nuclear wastes. The EDZ which is induced by the excavation process may create along the galleries of the repositories a high permeability zone which could directly connect the storage area with the ground surface. Therefore, the studies of its properties are of crucial importance for applications such as the storage of nuclear wastes. Field observations (such as the ones which have been systematically performed at Mont Terri by [1, 2]) suggest that the fracture density is an exponentially decreasing function of the distance to the wall with a characteristic length of about 0.5 m and that the fracture orientation is anisotropic (most fractures are subparallel to the tunnel walls) and well approximated by a Fisher law whose pole is orthogonal to the wall. Numerical samples are generated according to these prescriptions. Their percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity can be calculated by the numerical codes which are detailed in [3]. Percolation is determined by a pseudo diffusion algorithm. Flow determination necessitates the meshing of the fracture networks and the discretisation of the Darcy equation by a finite volume technique; the resulting linear system is solved by a conjugate gradient algorithm. Only the flow properties of the EDZ along the directions which are parallel to the wall are of interest when a pressure gradient parallel to the wall is applied. The transmissivity T which relates the total flow rate per unit width Q along the wall through the whole EDZ to the pressure gradient grad p, is defined by Q = - T grad p/mu where mu is the fluid viscosity. The percolation status and hydraulic transmissivity

  8. Arrays of 3D double-network hydrogels for the high-throughput discovery of materials with enhanced physical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cairnan; Venturato, Andrea; Callanan, Anthony; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Bradley, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic hydrogels are attractive biomaterials due to their similarity to natural tissues and their chemical tunability, which can impart abilities to respond to environmental cues, e.g. temperature, pH and light. The mechanical properties of hydrogels can be enhanced by the generation of a double-network. Here, we report the development of an array platform that allows the macroscopic synthesis of up to 80 single- and double-network hydrogels on a single microscope slide. This new platform allows for the screening of hydrogels as 3D features in a high-throughput format with the added dimension of significant control over the compressive and tensile properties of the materials, thus widening their potential application. The platform is adaptable to allow different hydrogels to be generated, with the potential ability to tune and alter the first and second network, and represents an exciting tool in material and biomaterial discovery. PMID:26712601

  9. Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.Y; Zhang, C.Y.; Liu, Q.S.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2009-05-01

    In many underground nuclear waste repository systems, such as at Yucca Mountain, water flow rate and amount of water seepage into the waste emplacement drifts are mainly determined by hydrological properties of fracture network in the surrounding rock mass. Natural fracture network system is not easy to describe, especially with respect to its connectivity which is critically important for simulating the water flow field. In this paper, we introduced a new method for fracture network description and prediction, termed multi-point-statistics (MPS). The process of the MPS method is to record multiple-point statistics concerning the connectivity patterns of a fracture network from a known fracture map, and to reproduce multiple-scale training fracture patterns in a stochastic manner, implicitly and directly. It is applied to fracture data to study flow field behavior at the Yucca Mountain waste repository system. First, the MPS method is used to create a fracture network with an original fracture training image from Yucca Mountain dataset. After we adopt a harmonic and arithmetic average method to upscale the permeability to a coarse grid, THM simulation is carried out to study near-field water flow in the surrounding waste emplacement drifts. Our study shows that connectivity or patterns of fracture networks can be grasped and reconstructed by MPS methods. In theory, it will lead to better prediction of fracture system characteristics and flow behavior. Meanwhile, we can obtain variance from flow field, which gives us a way to quantify model uncertainty even in complicated coupled THM simulations. It indicates that MPS can potentially characterize and reconstruct natural fracture networks in a fractured rock mass with advantages of quantifying connectivity of fracture system and its simulation uncertainty simultaneously.

  10. Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chengyuan; Liu, Quansheng; Birkholzer, Jens

    2009-05-01

    In many underground nuclear waste repository systems, such as Yucca Mountain project, water flow rate and amount of water seepage into the waste emplacement drifts are mainly determined by hydrological properties of fracture network in the surrounding rock mass. Natural fracture network system is not easy to describe, especially with respect to its connectivity which is critically important for simulating the water flow field. In this paper, we introduced a new method for fracture network description and prediction, termed multi-point-statistics (MPS). The process of Multi-point Statistical method is to record multiple-point statistics concerning the connectivity patterns of fracture network from a known fracture map, and to reproduce multiple-scale training fracture patterns in a stochastic manner, implicitly and directly. It is applied to fracture data to study flow field behavior at Yucca Mountain waste repository system. First, MPS method is used to create fracture network with original fracture training image from Yucca Mountain dataset. After we adopt a harmonic and arithmetic average method to upscale the permeability to a coarse grid, THM simulation is carried out to study near-field water flow in surrounding rock of waste emplacement drifts. Our study shows that connectivity or pattern of fracture network can be grasped and reconstructed by Multi-Point-Statistical method. In theory, it will lead to better prediction of fracture system characteristics and flow behavior. Meanwhile, we can obtain variance from flow field, which gives us a way to quantify uncertainty of models even in complicated coupled THM simulation. It indicates that Multi-Point Statistics is a potential method to characterize and reconstruct natural fracture network in a fractured rock mass with advantages of quantifying connectivity of fracture system and its simulation uncertainty simultaneously.

  11. Solute transport and retention in three-dimensional fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Frampton, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Resolving the hydrodynamic control of retention is an important step in predictive modeling of transport of sorbing tracers in fractured rock. The statistics of the transport resistance parameter β [T/L] and the related effective active specific surface area sf [1/L] are studied in a crystalline rock volume on a 100 m scale. Groundwater flow and advective transport are based on generic boundary conditions and realistic discrete fracture networks inferred from the Laxemar site, southeast Sweden. The overall statistics of β are consistent with statistics of the water residence time τ; the moments of β vary linearly with distance, at least up to 100 m. The correlation between log τ and log β is predominantly linear, however, there is significant dispersion; the parameter sf strongly depends on the assumed hydraulic law (theoretical cubic or empirical quadratic). Fast and slow trajectories/segments in the network determine the shape of the β distribution that cannot be reproduced by infinitely divisible model over the entire range; the low value range and median can be reproduced reasonably well with the tempered one-sided stable density using the exponent in the range 0.35-0.7. The low percentiles of the β distribution seems to converge to a Fickian type of behavior from a 50 to 100 m scale.

  12. The Locust Standard Brain: A 3D Standard of the Central Complex as a Platform for Neural Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    el Jundi, Basil; Heinze, Stanley; Lenschow, Constanze; Kurylas, Angela; Rohlfing, Torsten; Homberg, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Many insects use the pattern of polarized light in the sky for spatial orientation and navigation. We have investigated the polarization vision system in the desert locust. To create a common platform for anatomical studies on polarization vision pathways, Kurylas et al. (2008) have generated a three-dimensional (3D) standard brain from confocal microscopy image stacks of 10 male brains, using two different standardization methods, the Iterative Shape Averaging (ISA) procedure and the Virtual Insect Brain (VIB) protocol. Comparison of both standardization methods showed that the VIB standard is ideal for comparative volume analysis of neuropils, whereas the ISA standard is the method of choice to analyze the morphology and connectivity of neurons. The central complex is a key processing stage for polarization information in the locust brain. To investigate neuronal connections between diverse central-complex neurons, we generated a higher-resolution standard atlas of the central complex and surrounding areas, using the ISA method based on brain sections from 20 individual central complexes. To explore the usefulness of this atlas, two central-complex neurons, a polarization-sensitive columnar neuron (type CPU1a) and a tangential neuron that is activated during flight, the giant fan-shaped (GFS) neuron, were reconstructed 3D from brain sections. To examine whether the GFS neuron is a candidate to contribute to synaptic input to the CPU1a neuron, we registered both neurons into the standardized central complex. Visualization of both neurons revealed a potential connection of the CPU1a and GFS neurons in layer II of the upper division of the central body. PMID:20161763

  13. A Study on the Effect of Fracture Aperture Variability on Advective Transport in aFractured Shale using Discrete Fracture Network Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Gable, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas from unconventional fossil energy sources such as shale and tight gasformations has a profound impact on US energy independence. The current state ofproduction of methane and other hydrocarbons from low permeability shale involvesprocesses such as hydraulic fracturing of rock, multiphase flow, and recovery of the gasvia these fractures. Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for the past couple ofdecades, little is known about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curvesthat are seen in the field, such as, reasons for 50-60% decline after the first year in typicalproduction curves.Numerical experiments on a realistic fractured shale system are presented toidentify the effect of complex flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on theproduction curve. For characterizing flow, including the characteristics and geometriesfor the fracture networks, we use a methodology that incorporates a recently developeddiscrete fracture network meshing approach [1], which is combined with the highlyparallel PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport code [2] and a new particletracking capability [3]. The results of this reservoir-scale methodology for analyzing thedecline in gas production rates indicate dominant flow in fractures in the initial highproduction rate. Increase in matrix diffusivity improves production recovery after theinitial production of gas from fractures. Moreover, it is observed that increasing aperturevariability within a single fracture has little effect on the production compared tovariations of the mean fracture aperture from fracture to fracture in a fracture network. [1] Hyman, J.D., Gable C.W., Painter S.L., and Makedonska N., ConformingDelaunay Triangulation of Stochastically Generated Three Dimensional DiscreteFracture Networks: a Feature Rejection Algorithm f or Meshing Strategy, SIAM J.Sci. Comput, 2014 (in press). [2] Lichtner, P.C., Hammond G.E., Lu C., Karra S., Bisht G., Mills R.T., and KumarJ., PFLOTRAN User

  14. Experimental Investigation into Hydraulic Fracture Network Propagation in Gas Shales Using CT Scanning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushi, Zou; Shicheng, Zhang; Tong, Zhou; Xiang, Zhou; Tiankui, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Multistage fracturing of the horizontal well is recognized as the main stimulation technology for shale gas development. The hydraulic fracture geometry and stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) is interpreted by using the microseismic mapping technology. In this paper, we used a computerized tomography (CT) scanning technique to reveal the fracture geometry created in natural bedding-developed shale (cubic block of 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm) by laboratory fracturing. Experimental results show that partially opened bedding planes are helpful in increasing fracture complexity in shale. However, they tend to dominate fracture patterns for vertical stress difference Δ σ v ≤ 6 MPa, which decreases the vertical fracture number, resulting in the minimum SRV. A uniformly distributed complex fracture network requires the induced hydraulic fractures that can connect the pre-existing fractures as well as pulverize the continuum rock mass. In typical shale with a narrow (<0.05 mm) and closed natural fracture system, it is likely to create complex fracture for horizontal stress difference Δ σ h ≤ 6 MPa and simple transverse fracture for Δ σ h ≥ 9 MPa. However, high naturally fractured shale with a wide open natural fracture system (>0.1 mm) does not agree with the rule that low Δ σ h is favorable for uniformly creating a complex fracture network in zone. In such case, a moderate Δ σ h from 3 to 6 MPa is favorable for both the growth of new hydraulic fractures and the activation of a natural fracture system. Shale bedding, natural fracture, and geostress are objective formation conditions that we cannot change; we can only maximize the fracture complexity by controlling the engineering design for fluid viscosity, flow rate, and well completion type. Variable flow rate fracturing with low-viscosity slickwater fluid of 2.5 mPa s was proved to be an effective treatment to improve the connectivity of induced hydraulic fracture with pre-existing fractures. Moreover, the

  15. Individual 3D region-of-interest atlas of the human brain: neural-network-based tissue classification with automatic training point extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Obladen, Thorsten; Sabri, Osama; Buell, Udalrich

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of individual 3D region-of-interest atlas extraction is to automatically define anatomically meaningful regions in 3D MRI images for quantification of functional parameters (PET, SPECT: rMRGlu, rCBF). The first step of atlas extraction is to automatically classify brain tissue types into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), scalp/bone (SB) and background (BG). A feed-forward neural network with back-propagation training algorithm is used and compared to other numerical classifiers. It can be trained by a sample from the individual patient data set in question. Classification is done by a 'winner takes all' decision. Automatic extraction of a user-specified number of training points is done in a cross-sectional slice. Background separation is done by simple region growing. The most homogeneous voxels define the region for WM training point extraction (TPE). Non-white-matter and nonbackground regions are analyzed for GM and CSF training points. For SB TPE, the distance from the BG region is one feature. For each class, spatially uniformly distributed training points are extracted by a random generator from these regions. Simulated and real 3D MRI images are analyzed and error rates for TPE and classification calculated. The resulting class images can be analyzed for extraction of anatomical ROIs.

  16. Design of AN Intelligent Individual Evacuation Model for High Rise Building Fires Based on Neural Network Within the Scope of 3d GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atila, U.; Karas, I. R.; Turan, M. K.; Rahman, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most dangerous disaster threatening the high rise and complex buildings of today's world including thousands of occupants inside is fire with no doubt. When we consider high population and the complexity of such buildings it is clear to see that performing a rapid and safe evacuation seems hard and human being does not have good memories in case of such disasters like world trade center 9/11. Therefore, it is very important to design knowledge based realtime interactive evacuation methods instead of classical strategies which lack of flexibility. This paper presents a 3D-GIS implementation which simulates the behaviour of an intelligent indoor pedestrian navigation model proposed for a self -evacuation of a person in case of fire. The model is based on Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) which is one of the most preferred artificial neural network architecture in classification and prediction problems. A sample fire scenario following through predefined instructions has been performed on 3D model of the Corporation Complex in Putrajaya (Malaysia) and the intelligent evacuation process has been realized within a proposed 3D-GIS based simulation.

  17. 3-D ADI-FDTD modeling of GPR backscatter from complex targets for the training of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, D. S.; Everett, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    Artificial neural networks can provide approximate solutions to ground-penetrating radar (GPR) problems in cases where real time performance is needed. Examples include discrimination of landmines or UXO's, and in circumstances that require a high number of successive forward problems, for example inversion or imaging. The training of neural networks to work within even a limited range of targets and electromagnetic properties requires a large set of successive examples generated from numerical methods such as finite difference time domain (FDTD). The traditional FDTD technique suffers from numerical dispersion unless time steps are kept below the Courant stability limit. The accurate modeling of electromagnetic scattering by complex targets require a refined grid, subgrids, or conformal grids that can significantly increase computation time, making neural network training inefficient. A relatively recent FDTD technique, ADI-FDTD, uses implicit equations that help to cancel numerical dispersion and allow for unconditionally stable modeling of EM propagation and therefore is not bound by the Courant stability limit. The technique is especially efficient for the accurate modeling of complex targets. Our ADI-FDTD code includes the ability to refine the model grid and to implement a conformal gridding to improve model accuracy without effecting the overall computation time. We will explore the tradeoff in computation time and accuracy in modeling the GPR backscatter of various targets using both the ADI-FDTD technique and the traditional FDTD technique for the purpose of neural network training.

  18. A Facile Route to Bimetal and Nitrogen-Codoped 3D Porous Graphitic Carbon Networks for Efficient Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengping; Dou, Meiling; Liu, Haijing; Dai, Liming; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Bimetal nitrogen-doped carbon with both Fe and Co, derived from the pyrolysis carbon of iron and cobalt phthalocyanine-based conjugated polymer networks, possesses a few-layer graphene-like texture with hierarchical porosity in meso/micro multimodal pore size distribution. The novel electrocatalyst exhibits Pt-like catalytic activity and much higher catalytic durability for oxygen reduction. PMID:27389707

  19. Principal curves for lumen center extraction and flow channel width estimation in 3-D arterial networks: theory, algorithm, and validation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wilbur C K; So, Ronald W K; Chung, Albert C S

    2012-04-01

    We present an energy-minimization-based framework for locating the centerline and estimating the width of tubelike objects from their structural network with a nonparametric model. The nonparametric representation promotes simple modeling of nested branches and n -way furcations, i.e., structures that abound in an arterial network, e.g., a cerebrovascular circulation. Our method is capable of extracting the entire vascular tree from an angiogram in a single execution with a proper initialization. A succinct initial model from the user with arterial network inlets, outlets, and branching points is sufficient for complex vasculature. The novel method is based upon the theory of principal curves. In this paper, theoretical extension to grayscale angiography is discussed, and an algorithm to find an arterial network as principal curves is also described. Quantitative validation on a number of simulated data sets, synthetic volumes of 19 BrainWeb vascular models, and 32 Rotterdam Coronary Artery volumes was conducted. We compared the algorithm to a state-of-the-art method and further tested it on two clinical data sets. Our algorithmic outputs-lumen centers and flow channel widths-are important to various medical and clinical applications, e.g., vasculature segmentation, registration and visualization, virtual angioscopy, and vascular atlas formation and population study. PMID:22167625

  20. Assessment of Image Processing and Resolution on Permeability and Drainage Simulations Through 3D Pore-networks Obtained Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G.; Willson, C. S.; Thompson, K. E.; Rivers, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Typically, continuum-scale flow parameters are obtained through laboratory experiments. Over the past several years, image-based modeling, which is a direct simulation of flow through the structural arrangements of the voids and solids obtained using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in a sample porous medium, has become a reliable technique for predicting certain flow parameters. Even though XCT is capable of resolving micron-level details, the voxel resolution of the reconstructed image is still dependent upon a number of factors, including the sample size, X-ray energy and XCT beamline setup. Thus, each imaging experiment requires a tradeoff between the sample size that can be imaged, the voxel resolution, and the length scale of the pore space that can be extracted. In addition, the geometric and topological properties of the void space and 3D pore network structure are dictated by the image processing and the choice of pore network generation method. In this research, image-based pore network models are used to quantitatively assess the impact of image resolution, image processing and the choice of pore network generation methods on simulated parameters. A 5 mm diameter and ~15 mm in length Berea sandstone core was scanned two times. First, a ~12 mm long section of the entire cross-section was scanned at 4.1 micron voxel resolution; next, a ~1.4 mm diameter and ~4.12 mm length section within the 1st domain was scanned at 1 micron voxel resolution. The resulting 3D datasets were filtered and segmented into solid and void space. The low resolution image was filtered and segmented using two different approaches in order to evaluate the potential of each approach in identifying the different solid phases in the original 16 bit dataset. A set of networks were created by varying the pore density on both the high and low resolution datasets in order to assess the impact of these factors on flow simulations. Single-phase permeability and a two-phase drainage pore

  1. Sparse short-distance connections enhance calcium wave propagation in a 3D model of astrocyte networks

    PubMed Central

    Lallouette, Jules; De Pittà, Maurizio; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Berry, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, astrocytes have been considered to couple via gap-junctions into a syncytium with only rudimentary spatial organization. However, this view is challenged by growing experimental evidence that astrocytes organize as a proper gap-junction mediated network with more complex region-dependent properties. On the other hand, the propagation range of intercellular calcium waves (ICW) within astrocyte populations is as well highly variable, depending on the brain region considered. This suggests that the variability of the topology of gap-junction couplings could play a role in the variability of the ICW propagation range. Since this hypothesis is very difficult to investigate with current experimental approaches, we explore it here using a biophysically realistic model of three-dimensional astrocyte networks in which we varied the topology of the astrocyte network, while keeping intracellular properties and spatial cell distribution and density constant. Computer simulations of the model suggest that changing the topology of the network is indeed sufficient to reproduce the distinct ranges of ICW propagation reported experimentally. Unexpectedly, our simulations also predict that sparse connectivity and restriction of gap-junction couplings to short distances should favor propagation while long–distance or dense connectivity should impair it. Altogether, our results provide support to recent experimental findings that point toward a significant functional role of the organization of gap-junction couplings into proper astroglial networks. Dynamic control of this topology by neurons and signaling molecules could thus constitute a new type of regulation of neuron-glia and glia-glia interactions. PMID:24795613

  2. Capturing 3D resistivity of semi-arid karstic subsurface in varying moisture conditions using a wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, K.; Oden, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    The dissolution of soluble bedrock results in surface and subterranean karst channels, which comprise 7-10% of the dry earth's surface. Karst serves as a preferential conduit to focus surface and subsurface water but it is difficult to exploit as a water resource or protect from pollution because of irregular structure and nonlinear hydrodynamic behavior. Geophysical characterization of karst commonly employs resistivity and seismic methods, but difficulties arise due to low resistivity contrast in arid environments and insufficient resolution of complex heterogeneous structures. To help reduce these difficulties, we employ a state-of-the-art wireless geophysical sensor array, which combines low-power radio telemetry and solar energy harvesting to enable long-term in-situ monitoring. The wireless aspect removes topological constraints common with standard wired resistivity equipment, which facilitates better coverage and/or sensor density to help improve aspect ratio and resolution. Continuous in-situ deployment allows data to be recorded according to nature's time scale; measurements are made during infrequent precipitation events which can increase resistivity contrast. The array is coordinated by a smart wireless bridge that continuously monitors local soil moisture content to detect when precipitation occurs, schedules resistivity surveys, and periodically relays data to the cloud via 3G cellular service. Traditional 2/3D gravity and seismic reflection surveys have also been conducted to clarify and corroborate results.

  3. Evaluating Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Dissolution and Chemical Oxidation in a three-dimensional, bench-scale fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, K.; McCray, J. E.; Schaefer, C.

    2011-12-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) present in fractured bedrock settings at residual saturation introduces remediation challenges that are dramatically different from porous media settings. Evaluating DNAPL distribution in a field-scale setting is generally impractical, yet DNAPL distribution plays a critical role in the DNAPL dissolution kinetics. This research uses a three-dimensional (3-D), bench-scale network comprised of low-porosity, fractured sandstone to evaluate the dissolution kinetics of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) DNAPL at residual saturation. DNAPL dissolution kinetics were evaluated during ambient groundwater conditions as well as during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) in the 3-D fractured sandstone experiment. DNAPL dissolution in the fracture network was evaluated and described using an effective parameter, the bulk mass transfer coefficient (KL). Results from dissolution experiments revealed a positive, statistically significant correlation between KL with DNAPL-water interfacial area and KL with DNAPL saturation. Results of ISCO experiments with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) determined that the formation of reaction products (manganese dioxides and carbon dioxide) likely altered the primary flow paths and decreased effectiveness of the ISCO application in the fracture network. The formation of reaction products was believed to cause flow bypassing and reduce the DNAPL-oxidant contact, which reduced mass transfer rates. The effectiveness of ISCO was improved (over dissolution alone) if the ISCO application was discontinued after an initial period of effective mass removal. The findings of this research indicate that DNAPL dissolution and oxidation effectiveness in a fracture network setting are not directly correlated to aperture size, which was unexpected, but appear to be primarily impacted by flow path variability and heterogeneous DNAPL distribution.

  4. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  5. The Benefits of Maximum Likelihood Estimators in Predicting Bulk Permeability and Upscaling Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuele Rizzo, Roberto; Healy, David; De Siena, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The success of any predictive model is largely dependent on the accuracy with which its parameters are known. When characterising fracture networks in fractured rock, one of the main issues is accurately scaling the parameters governing the distribution of fracture attributes. Optimal characterisation and analysis of fracture attributes (lengths, apertures, orientations and densities) is fundamental to the estimation of permeability and fluid flow, which are of primary importance in a number of contexts including: hydrocarbon production from fractured reservoirs; geothermal energy extraction; and deeper Earth systems, such as earthquakes and ocean floor hydrothermal venting. Our work links outcrop fracture data to modelled fracture networks in order to numerically predict bulk permeability. We collected outcrop data from a highly fractured upper Miocene biosiliceous mudstone formation, cropping out along the coastline north of Santa Cruz (California, USA). Using outcrop fracture networks as analogues for subsurface fracture systems has several advantages, because key fracture attributes such as spatial arrangements and lengths can be effectively measured only on outcrops [1]. However, a limitation when dealing with outcrop data is the relative sparseness of natural data due to the intrinsic finite size of the outcrops. We make use of a statistical approach for the overall workflow, starting from data collection with the Circular Windows Method [2]. Then we analyse the data statistically using Maximum Likelihood Estimators, which provide greater accuracy compared to the more commonly used Least Squares linear regression when investigating distribution of fracture attributes. Finally, we estimate the bulk permeability of the fractured rock mass using Oda's tensorial approach [3]. The higher quality of this statistical analysis is fundamental: better statistics of the fracture attributes means more accurate permeability estimation, since the fracture attributes feed

  6. 3-D inversion of borehole-to-surface electrical data using a back-propagation neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Trong Long

    2009-08-01

    The "fluid-flow tomography", an advanced technique for geoelectrical survey based on the conventional mise-à-la-masse measurement, has been developed by Exploration Geophysics Laboratory at the Kyushu University. This technique is proposed to monitor fluid-flow behavior during water injection and production in a geothermal field. However data processing of this technique is very costly. In this light, this paper will discuss the solution to cost reduction by applying a neural network in the data processing. A case study in the Takigami geothermal field in Japan will be used to illustrate this. The achieved neural network in this case study is three-layered and feed-forward. The most successful learning algorithm in this network is the Resilient Propagation (RPROP). Consequently, the study advances the pragmatism of the "fluid-flow tomography" technique which can be widely used for geothermal fields. Accuracy of the solution is then verified by using root mean square (RMS) misfit error as an indicator.

  7. Efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks in the frequency domain for application to high-resolution 2D and 3D images.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tom; Tam, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Deep learning has traditionally been computationally expensive, and advances in training methods have been the prerequisite for improving its efficiency in order to expand its application to a variety of image classification problems. In this letter, we address the problem of efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks by learning the weights in the frequency domain, which eliminates the time-consuming calculation of convolutions. An essential consideration in the design of the algorithm is to minimize the number of transformations to and from frequency space. We have evaluated the running time improvements using two standard benchmark data sets, showing a speed-up of up to 8 times on 2D images and up to 200 times on 3D volumes. Our training algorithm makes training of convolutional deep belief networks on 3D medical images with a resolution of up to 128×128×128 voxels practical, which opens new directions for using deep learning for medical image analysis. PMID:25380341

  8. Fracture-fault network characterization of pavement imagery of the Whitby Mudstone, Yorkshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, Quinten; Hardebol, Nico; Houben, Maartje; Barnhoorn, Auke; Drury, Martyn

    2015-04-01

    Natural fractures play an important role in the hydrocarbon production from tight reservoirs. The need for fracture network pathways by fraccing matters particularly for shale gas prospects, due to their micro- to nano-darcies matrix permeabilities. The study of natural fractures from outcrops helps to better understand network connectivity and possibility of reactivating pre-existing planes of weakness, induced by hydraulic stimulation. Microseismicity also show that natural fractures are reactivated during fraccing in tight gas reservoirs and influence the success of the stimulation. An accurate understanding of natural fracture networks can help in predicting the development of fracture networks. In this research we analyze an outcrop analogue, the Whitby Mustone Formation (WMF), in terms of its horizontal fracture network. The WMF is the time equivalent of the Posidonia Shale Formation (PSF), which on itself is the main shale gas prospect in the Dutch subsurface. The fracture network of the WMF is characterized by a system of steep dipping joints with two dominant directions with N-S and E-W strike. The network was digitized from bird-view imagery of the pavement with a spatial extent of ~100 m at sub-cm resolution. The imagery is interpreted in terms of orientation and length distributions, intensity and fractal dimensions. Samples from the field were analyzed for rock strength and sample mineralogy. The results indicate that the fracture networks greatly differ per bed. Observed differences are for example; the geometry of the fracture network, its cumulative length distribution law, the fracture intensity, the fracture length vs its orientation and the fractal dimension. All these parameters greatly influence fracture network connectivity, the probability that longer fractures exist within the pavement and whether the network is more prone to clustering or scattering. Apart from the differences, the networks display a fairly similar orthogonal arrangement

  9. 3-D components of a biological neural network visualized in computer generated imagery. I - Macular receptive field organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Cutler, Lynn; Meyer, Glenn; Lam, Tony; Vaziri, Parshaw

    1990-01-01

    Computer-assisted, 3-dimensional reconstructions of macular receptive fields and of their linkages into a neural network have revealed new information about macular functional organization. Both type I and type II hair cells are included in the receptive fields. The fields are rounded, oblong, or elongated, but gradations between categories are common. Cell polarizations are divergent. Morphologically, each calyx of oblong and elongated fields appears to be an information processing site. Intrinsic modulation of information processing is extensive and varies with the kind of field. Each reconstructed field differs in detail from every other, suggesting that an element of randomness is introduced developmentally and contributes to endorgan adaptability.

  10. A novel method for identifying a graph-based representation of 3-D microvascular networks from fluorescence microscopy image stacks.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Sepideh; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Gu, Chenghua; Miller, Eric L

    2015-02-01

    A novel approach to determine the global topological structure of a microvasculature network from noisy and low-resolution fluorescence microscopy data that does not require the detailed segmentation of the vessel structure is proposed here. The method is most appropriate for problems where the tortuosity of the network is relatively low and proceeds by directly computing a piecewise linear approximation to the vasculature skeleton through the construction of a graph in three dimensions whose edges represent the skeletal approximation and vertices are located at Critical Points (CPs) on the microvasculature. The CPs are defined as vessel junctions or locations of relatively large curvature along the centerline of a vessel. Our method consists of two phases. First, we provide a CP detection technique that, for junctions in particular, does not require any a priori geometric information such as direction or degree. Second, connectivity between detected nodes is determined via the solution of a Binary Integer Program (BIP) whose variables determine whether a potential edge between nodes is or is not included in the final graph. The utility function in this problem reflects both intensity-based and structural information along the path connecting the two nodes. Qualitative and quantitative results confirm the usefulness and accuracy of this method. This approach provides a mean of correctly capturing the connectivity patterns in vessels that are missed by more traditional segmentation and binarization schemes because of imperfections in the images which manifest as dim or broken vessels. PMID:25515433

  11. Architectural improvements and 28 nm FPGA implementation of the APEnet+ 3D Torus network for hybrid HPC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Frezza, Ottorino; Lo Cicero, Francesca; Stanislao Paolucci, Pier; Lonardo, Alessandro; Rossetti, Davide; Simula, Francesco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero

    2014-06-01

    Modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are now considered accelerators for general purpose computation. A tight interaction between the GPU and the interconnection network is the strategy to express the full potential on capability computing of a multi-GPU system on large HPC clusters; that is the reason why an efficient and scalable interconnect is a key technology to finally deliver GPUs for scientific HPC. In this paper we show the latest architectural and performance improvement of the APEnet+ network fabric, a FPGA-based PCIe board with 6 fully bidirectional off-board links with 34 Gbps of raw bandwidth per direction, and X8 Gen2 bandwidth towards the host PC. The board implements a Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) protocol that leverages upon peer-to-peer (P2P) capabilities of Fermi- and Kepler-class NVIDIA GPUs to obtain real zero-copy, low-latency GPU-to-GPU transfers. Finally, we report on the development activities for 2013 focusing on the adoption of the latest generation 28 nm FPGAs and the preliminary tests performed on this new platform.

  12. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  13. The 3D structure of the collagen fibril network in human trabecular bone: relation to trabecular organization.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Natalie; Chase, Hila; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2015-02-01

    Trabecular bone is morphologically and functionally different from compact bone at the tissue level, but both are composed of lamellae at the micrometer-scale level. We present a three-dimensional study of the collagenous network of human trabecular lamellar bone from the proximal femur using the FIB-SEM serial surface view method. The results are compared to human compact lamellar bone of the femoral shaft, studied by the same method. Both demineralized trabecular and compact lamellar bone display the same overall structural organization, namely the presence of ordered and disordered materials and the confinement of the canalicular network to the disordered material. However, in trabecular bone lamellae a significant proportion of the ordered collagen fibril arrays is aligned with the long axis of the trabecula and, unlike in compact bone, is not related to the anatomical axis of the whole femur. The remaining ordered collagen fibrils are offset from the axis of a trabecula either by about 30° or 70°. Interestingly, at the tissue scale of millimeters, the most abundant angles between any two connected trabeculae - the inter-trabecular angles - center around 30° and 70°. This implies that within a framework of interconnected trabeculae the same lamellar structure will always have a significant component of the fibrils aligned with the long axes of connected trabeculae. This structural complementarity at different hierarchical levels presumably reflects an adaptation of trabecular bone to function. PMID:25445457

  14. A novel method for identifying a graph-based representation of 3-D microvascular networks from fluorescence microscopy image stacks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyin; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Gu, Chenghua; Miller, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach to determine the global topological structure of a microvasculature network from noisy and low-resolution fluorescence microscopy data that does not require the detailed segmentation of the vessel structure is proposed here. The method is most appropriate for problems where the tortuosity of the network is relatively low and proceeds by directly computing a piecewise linear approximation to the vasculature skeleton through the construction of a graph in three dimensions whose edges represent the skeletal approximation and vertices are located at Critical Points (CPs) on the microvasculature. The CPs are defined as vessel junctions or locations of relatively large curvature along the centerline of a vessel. Our method consists of two phases. First, we provide a CP detection technique that, for junctions in particular, does not require any a priori geometric information such as direction or degree. Second, connectivity between detected nodes is determined via the solution of a Binary Integer Program (BIP) whose variables determine whether a potential edge between nodes is or is not included in the final graph. The utility function in this problem reflects both intensity-based and structural information along the path connecting the two nodes. Qualitative and quantitative results confirm the usefulness and accuracy of this method. This approach provides a mean of correctly capturing the connectivity patterns in vessels that are missed by more traditional segmentation and binarization schemes because of imperfections in the images which manifest as dim or broken vessels. PMID:25515433

  15. Implementation of Linear Pipe Channel Network to Estimate Hydraulic Parameters of Fractured Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Um, J. G.; Wang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Modeling of fluid flow is important in geological, petroleum, environmental, civil and mining engineering. Fluid flow through fractured hard rock is very much dependent on the fracture network pattern in the rock mass and on the flow behavior through these fractures. This research deals with fluid flow behavior through fractures at an abandoned copper mine in southeast Korea. An injection well and three observation wells were installed at the mine site to monitor the hydraulic heads induced by injection of fresh water. A series of packer tests were performed to estimate the rock mass permeability and corresponding effective hydraulic aperture of the fractures. The three dimensional stochastic fracture network model was built and validated for the mine site. The two dimensional linear pipe network systems were constructed in directions of the observation wells using the fracture network model. A procedure of the fluid flow analysis on two dimensional discrete domain was applied to estimate the conductance, flow quantity and nodal head in the 2-D linear pipe channel network. The present results indicate that fracture geometry parameters (orientation, density and size) play an important role in the hydraulic characteristics of fractured rock masses.

  16. Using genetic algorithms to optimize an active sensor network on a stiffened aerospace panel with 3D scanning laser vibrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, R.; Clarke, A.; Featherston, C.; Kawashita, L.; Paget, C.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of aircraft structures and materials there is an essential need to continually monitor the structure for damage. This also drives the requirement for optimizing the location of sensors for damage detection to ensure full damage detection coverage of the structure whilst minimizing the number of sensors required, hence reducing costs, weight and data processing. An experiment was carried out to investigate the optimal sensor locations of an active sensor network for detecting adhesive disbonds of a stiffened panel. A piezoelectric transducer was coupled to two different stiffened aluminium panels; one healthy and one with a 25.4mm long disbond. The transducer was positioned at five individual locations to assess the effectiveness of damage detection at different transmission locations. One excitation frequency of 100kHz was used for this study. The panels were scanned with a 3D scanning laser vibrometer which represented a network of ‘ideal’ receiving transducers. The responses measured on the disbonded panel were cross- correlated with those measured on the healthy panel at a large number of potential sensor locations. This generated a cost surface which a genetic algorithm could interrogate in order to find the optimal sensor locations for a given size of sensor network. Probabilistic techniques were used to consider multiple disbond location scenarios, in order to optimise the sensor network for maximum probability of detection across a range of disbond locations.

  17. Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced in granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, Nicholas W. A.; Elphick, Stephen C.; Meredith, Philip; Main, Ian; Ngwenya, Bryne T.

    2007-08-01

    We report the first measurements of hydrodynamic dispersion in a microfractured granite using a combination of novel techniques. A fracture network was induced in a cylindrical plug of Ailsa Craig micro-granite by thermal stressing, to produce an isotropic network of fractures with an average aperture of ˜ 0.3 μm, a density of approximately 4 × 10 4 fractures/mm 3 and a permeability of 5.5 × 10 - 17 m 2. After saturating the cores with 0.01 M NaCl solution a step in the concentration profile to 1 M was advected into the plug at flow rates of 0.07 to 2.13 cm 3 h - 1 . The longitudinal electrical impedance of the plug was measured continuously as the solute front advected through its length until the plug was saturated with the concentrated electrolyte. Analysis of the impedance versus time relationships allows the derivation of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, DL, and hydrodynamic retardation, RH. The Peclet number-dispersion relationship for the micro-fracture network is very similar to that predicted for other, radically different, fracture networks. Thus dispersion may be more dependent on fracture connectivity and length than fracture density and display a relationship similar to that shown by particle beds and clastic sandstones. The high retardation values observed (2.2-4.9) reflect flow behaviour within a fracture network with a proportion of 'blind' sections, and demonstrates how such networks can slow the advance of conservative solute components.

  18. 3D modelling of the active normal fault network in the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea): Integration of seismic and bathymetric data with implicit surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Pellegrini, Caludio; Savini, Alessandra; Marchese, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian Sea, Mediterranean), interposed between the facing Apennines and Hellenides subduction zones (to the west and east respectively), is characterized by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a penetrative network of NNW-SSE normal faults. These are exposed onshore in Puglia, and are well represented offshore in a dataset composed of 2D seismics and wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, recent very high resolution seismics (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multibeam echosounder bathymetry, and sedimentological and geo-chronological analyses of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Faults are evident in 2D seismics at all scales, and their along-strike geometry and continuity can be characterized with multibeam bathymetric data, which show continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides). Fault scarps also reveal the finite displacement accumulated in the Holocene-Pleistocene. We reconstructed a 3D model of the fault network and suitable geological boundaries (mainly unconformities due to the discontinuous distribution of quaternary and tertiary sediments) with implicit surface methods implemented in SKUA/GOCAD. This approach can be considered very effective and allowed reconstructing in details complex structures, like the frequent relay zones that are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and submarine mass-wasting deposits (Holocene-Pleistocene), indicating that, at least in places, these features are coeval, hence the fault network should be considered active. At the regional scale, the 3D model allowed measuring the horizontal WSW-ENE stretching, which can be associated to the bending moment applied to the Apulian Plate by the combined effect

  19. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  20. Development of a fracture network: a block and springs model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Jozwick, A.; Smith, D.H.

    2008-03-01

    Since flow in fractured reservoirs is significantly enhanced by clusters of inter-connecting fractures, it's important to understand their inter-connectedness. In these fractured reservoirs, one often finds two sets of fractures due to two separate geologic events. We have developed a blocks and springs model to study how the second generation fractures intersect the first generation of. We find a percolation-like transition where the cluster size grows with increasing strain leading to system-spanning fractal clusters. Increasing the thickness of the layer being fractured leads to sparser system-spanning fracture clusters with smaller fractal dimension. We have studied how the thickness of the layer affects the fractal character of the fracture clusters as well as their number distribution, and the correlations within the large fracture cluster.

  1. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  2. Templated assembly of BiFeO3 nanocrystals into 3D mesoporous networks for catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadas, I. T.; Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Armatas, G. S.

    2015-03-01

    The self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals into large porous architectures is currently of immense interest for nanochemistry and nanotechnology. These materials combine the respective advantages of discrete nanoparticles and mesoporous structures. In this article, we demonstrate a facile nanoparticle templating process to synthesize a three-dimensional mesoporous BiFeO3 material. This approach involves the polymer-assisted aggregating assembly of 3-aminopropanoic acid-stabilized bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) nanocrystals followed by thermal decomposition of the surfactant. The resulting material consists of a network of tightly connected BiFeO3 nanoparticles (~6-7 nm in diameter) and has a moderately high surface area (62 m2 g-1) and uniform pores (ca. 6.3 nm). As a result of the unique mesostructure, the porous assemblies of BiFeO3 nanoparticles show an excellent catalytic activity and chemical stability for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol with NaBH4.The self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals into large porous architectures is currently of immense interest for nanochemistry and nanotechnology. These materials combine the respective advantages of discrete nanoparticles and mesoporous structures. In this article, we demonstrate a facile nanoparticle templating process to synthesize a three-dimensional mesoporous BiFeO3 material. This approach involves the polymer-assisted aggregating assembly of 3-aminopropanoic acid-stabilized bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) nanocrystals followed by thermal decomposition of the surfactant. The resulting material consists of a network of tightly connected BiFeO3 nanoparticles (~6-7 nm in diameter) and has a moderately high surface area (62 m2 g-1) and uniform pores (ca. 6.3 nm). As a result of the unique mesostructure, the porous assemblies of BiFeO3 nanoparticles show an excellent catalytic activity and chemical stability for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol with NaBH4. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  3. Simulation of hydraulic fracture networks in three dimensions utilizing massively parallel computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settgast, R. R.; Johnson, S.; Fu, P.; Walsh, S. D.; Ryerson, F. J.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been an enabling technology for commercially stimulating fracture networks for over half of a century. It has become one of the most widespread technologies for engineering subsurface fracture systems. Despite the ubiquity of this technique in the field, understanding and prediction of the hydraulic induced propagation of the fracture network in realistic, heterogeneous reservoirs has been limited. A number of developments in multiscale modeling in recent years have allowed researchers in related fields to tackle the modeling of complex fracture propagation as well as the mechanics of heterogeneous materials. These developments, combined with advances in quantifying solution uncertainties, provide possibilities for the geologic modeling community to capture both the fracturing behavior and longer-term permeability evolution of rock masses under hydraulic loading across both dynamic and viscosity-dominated regimes. Here we will demonstrate the first phase of this effort through illustrations of fully three-dimensional, tightly coupled hydromechanical simulations of hydraulically induced fracture network propagation run on massively parallel computing scales, and discuss preliminary results regarding the mechanisms by which fracture interactions and the accompanying changes to the stress field can lead to deleterious or beneficial changes to the fracture network.

  4. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: The SOLFRAC program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-01

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL http://labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm. It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments

  5. Modeling the Effect of Fluid Flow on a Growing Network of Fractures in a Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhashim, Mohammed; Koch, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The injection of a viscous fluid at high pressure in a geological formation induces the fracturing of pre-existing joints. Assuming a constant solid-matrix stress field, a weak joint saturated with fluid is fractured when the fluid pressure exceeds a critical value that depends on the joint's orientation. In this work, the formation of a network of fractures in a porous medium is modeled. When the average length of the fractures is much smaller than the radius of a cluster of fractured joints, the fluid flow within the network can be described as Darcy flow in a permeable medium consisting of the fracture network. The permeability and porosity of the medium are functions of the number density of activated joints and consequently depend on the fluid pressure. We demonstrate conditions under which these relationships can be derived from percolation theory. Fluid may also be lost from the fracture network by flowing into the permeable rock matrix. The solution of the model shows that the cluster radius grows as a power law with time in two regimes: (1) an intermediate time regime when the network contains many fractures but fluid loss is negligible; and (2) a long time regime when fluid loss dominates. In both regimes, the power law exponent depends on the Euclidean dimension and the injection rate dependence on time.

  6. Late rectal bleeding after 3D-CRT for prostate cancer: development of a neural-network-based predictive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatis, S.; Rancati, T.; Fiorino, C.; Vavassori, V.; Fellin, G.; Cagna, E.; Mauro, F. A.; Girelli, G.; Monti, A.; Baccolini, M.; Naldi, G.; Bianchi, C.; Menegotti, L.; Pasquino, M.; Stasi, M.; Valdagni, R.

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model exploiting artificial neural networks (ANNs) to correlate dosimetric and clinical variables with late rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy and to compare the ANN results with those of a standard logistic regression (LR) analysis. 718 men included in the AIROPROS 0102 trial were analyzed. This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. Radiotherapy doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Information was recorded for comorbidity, previous abdominal surgery, use of drugs and hormonal therapy. For each patient, a rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the whole treatment was recorded and the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) evaluated as an effective descriptor of the whole DVH. Late rectal bleeding of grade ≥ 2 was considered to define positive events in this study (52 of 718 patients). The overall population was split into training and verification sets, both of which were involved in model instruction, and a test set, used to evaluate the predictive power of the model with independent data. Fourfold cross-validation was also used to provide realistic results for the full dataset. The LR was performed on the same data. Five variables were selected to predict late rectal bleeding: EUD, abdominal surgery, presence of hemorrhoids, use of anticoagulants and androgen deprivation. Following a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the independent test set, the areas under the curves (AUCs) were 0.704 and 0.655 for ANN and LR, respectively. When evaluated with cross-validation, the AUC was 0.714 for ANN and 0.636 for LR, which differed at a significance level of p = 0.03. When a practical discrimination threshold was selected, ANN could classify data with sensitivity and specificity both equal to 68.0%, whereas these values were 61.5% for LR. These data provide reasonable evidence that results obtained with

  7. 2D and 3D soil moisture imaging using a sensor-based platform moving inside a subsurface network of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravalos, I.; Moshou, D.; Loutridis, S.; Gialamas, Th.; Kateris, D.; Bompolas, E.; Tsiropoulos, Z.; Xyradakis, P.; Fountas, S.

    2013-08-01

    In this study a prototype sensor-based platform moving inside a subsurface network of pipes with the task of monitoring the soil moisture content is presented. It comprises of a mobile platform, a modified commercial soil moisture sensor (Diviner 2000), a network of subsurface polyvinylchloride (PVC) access pipes, driving hardware and image processing software. The software allows the composition of two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) images with high accuracy and at a large scale. The 3D soil moisture images are created by using 2D slices for better illustration of the soil moisture variability. Three case studies of varying soil moisture content using an experimental soil tank were examined. In the first case study, the irrigation water was applied uniformly on the entire tank surface. In second and third case studies, the irrigation water was applied uniformly only on the surface of the intermediate and last part of the soil tank respectively. The processed images give a detailed description of the soil moisture distribution of a layer at 15 cm depth under the soil surface in the tank. In all case studies that have been investigated, the distribution of soil moisture was characterized by a significant variability (difference between poorly and well-drained regions) of the soil tank. A very poorly-drained region was located in the middle of the soil tank, while well-drained soil areas were located southwest and northeast. The knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture is a valuable tool for proper management of crop irrigation.

  8. Structural Variations in the Uranyl/4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylate System. Rare Examples of 2D → 3D Polycatenated Uranyl-Organic Networks.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-08-17

    4,4'-Biphenyldicarboxylic acid (H2L) was reacted with uranyl ions under solvo-hydrothermal conditions with variations in the experimental procedure (organic cosolvent, presence of additional 3d-block metal cations, and N-donor species), thus giving six complexes of the fully deprotonated acid that were characterized by their crystal structure and, in most cases, their emission spectrum. The three complexes [UO2(L)(DMA)] (1), [UO2(L)(NMP)] (2), and [UO2(L)(NMP)] (3) include the cosolvent as a coligand, and they crystallize as two-dimensional (2D) assemblies, with different combinations of the chelating and bridging-bidentate carboxylate coordination modes, resulting in two different topologies. Complex 4, [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)2(C2O4)]·H2O, includes oxalate coligands generated in situ and contains an anionic planar two-dimensional (2D) assembly with a {6(3)} honeycomb topology. The same hexagonal geometry is found in the homoleptic complexes [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·6H2O (5) and [Ni(phen)3][(UO2)2(L)3]·4H2O (6), but the large size of the hexagonal rings in these cases (∼27 Å in the longest dimension) allows 2D → three-dimensional (3D) inclined polycatenation to occur, with the two families of networks either orthogonal in tetragonal complex 5 or at an angle of 73.4° in orthorhombic complex 6. The parallel networks are arranged in closely spaced groups of two, with possible π···π stacking interactions, and as many as four rods from four parallel nets pass through each ring of the inclined family of nets, an unusually high degree of catenation. These are the second cases only of 2D → 3D inclined polycatenation in uranyl-organic species. Emission spectra measured in the solid state show the usual vibronic fine structure, with variations in intensity and positions of maxima that are not simply connected with the number of equatorial donors and the presence of additional metal cations. PMID:26241368

  9. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  10. Integrated workflow for characterizing and modeling fracture network in unconventional reservoirs using microseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, Tayeb

    We develop a new method for integrating information and data from different sources. We also construct a comprehensive workflow for characterizing and modeling a fracture network in unconventional reservoirs, using microseismic data. The methodology is based on combination of several mathematical and artificial intelligent techniques, including geostatistics, fractal analysis, fuzzy logic, and neural networks. The study contributes to scholarly knowledge base on the characterization and modeling fractured reservoirs in several ways; including a versatile workflow with a novel objective functions. Some the characteristics of the methods are listed below: 1. The new method is an effective fracture characterization procedure estimates different fracture properties. Unlike the existing methods, the new approach is not dependent on the location of events. It is able to integrate all multi-scaled and diverse fracture information from different methodologies. 2. It offers an improved procedure to create compressional and shear velocity models as a preamble for delineating anomalies and map structures of interest and to correlate velocity anomalies with fracture swarms and other reservoir properties of interest. 3. It offers an effective way to obtain the fractal dimension of microseismic events and identify the pattern complexity, connectivity, and mechanism of the created fracture network. 4. It offers an innovative method for monitoring the fracture movement in different stages of stimulation that can be used to optimize the process. 5. Our newly developed MDFN approach allows to create a discrete fracture network model using only microseismic data with potential cost reduction. It also imposes fractal dimension as a constraint on other fracture modeling approaches, which increases the visual similarity between the modeled networks and the real network over the simulated volume.

  11. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  12. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  13. Strong and fast-recovery organic/inorganic hybrid AuNPs-supramolecular gels based on loofah-like 3D networks.

    PubMed

    He, Huiwen; Chen, Si; Tong, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yining; Wu, Bozhen; Ma, Meng; Wang, Xiaosong; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-21

    Super strong and fast-recovery organic/inorganic hybrid gold nanoparticle (AuNPs)-supramolecular gels based on a three-dimensional loofah-like nanoscale network self-assembled by polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) core supramolecular gelators are reported for the first time. Two series of POSS core organic/inorganic hybrid gelators, POSS-BOC-l-Homophenylalanine (POSS-Hpy) and POSS-Boc-Cys(Bzl)-OH (POSS-Cys), with two types of peripherals having different abilities for driving the self-assembly of AuNPs in gels were designed and synthesized, both of which self-assembled into three-dimensional loofah-like nanoscale gel networks producing hybrid physical gels with fast-recovery behaviors. The mechanical properties of the resultant hybrid gels were dramatically increased by as much as 100 times in the system of sulfur containing POSS-Cys gelators without destroying the fast-recovery behaviors, with the addition of AuNPs, which had direct interaction with AuNPs to give S-Au non-covalent driving force to lead AuNPs self-assemble onto the 3D loofah-like network nanofibres in the supramolecular hybrid gel system. However, in the POSS-Hpy gelator system without sulfur, no strong interaction with AuNPs existed and the POSS-Hpy nanocomposites showed no clear changes in morphology, thermal stability or rheological properties, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tube-inversion and rotational rheometer measurements. This indicated that the organic/inorganic hybrid gelator POSS-Cys could be applied to the formation of soft materials in which AuNPs were self-assembled and closely arranged into three-dimensional nanoscale networks. This hybrid material has great potential for applications in self-recovery, nano- and micron-scale electronic devices, because it has both a large mechanical strength and a fast-recovery capability. PMID:26568047

  14. Particle method for upscaling transport with retention and in-growth in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Frampton, A.; Painter, S.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    An important challenge in subsurface hydrology is predictive modeling of tracer transport in sparsely fractured rock. A particular issue relevant for applications is how to accurately account for retention processes that are due to exchange (diffusion-sorption) of tracers between mobile fluid in fractures and immobile fluid in the rock matrix. Typically, tracers are subject to decay processes which may involve chains and in-growth (e.g., for radionuclides and some classes of hydrocarbons). Recently, a comprehensive particle-based methodology for upscaling transport with emphasis on tracer retention has been presented and applied to stochastic 2D discrete fracture networks (Frampton and Cvetkovic 2007, WRR, 43, W10429). Furthermore, a time domain random walk method has also recently been presented that effectively accounts for different exchange mechanisms and in-growth (Painter et al. 2008, WRR, 44, W01406). Now we present further advances in coupling these novel methodologies for solving radionuclide transport, and apply them to realistic 3D fracture networks, based on comprehensive data sets obtained from site characterization of the Laxemar area in south-east Sweden. Site measurements have revealed at least five fracture sets based on statistically significant orientation data, exhibiting power-law behaviour for fracture size and inferred transmissivity distributions. A few equally probable DFN realizations are generated based on these interpretations of the field data, in which advective fluid flow is solved using boundary conditions that mimic natural conditions. Thereafter, many particles are injected and tracked through the system, providing first- passage distributions of particle residence time and of the transport resistance parameter (quantifying the hydrodynamic control of retention). These distributions are then used as a basis for implementing the particle time-domain random walk model for radionuclide transport with retention and in-growth. Also, an

  15. Macroscopic properties of isotropic and anisotropic fracture networks from the percolation threshold to very large densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J.; Mourzenko, V.

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this review paper is to summarize some recent studies of fracture networks. Progress has been made possible thanks to a very versatile numerical technique based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture networks. Any network geometry, any boundary condition, and any distribution of the fractures can be addressed. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. The second step consists in the discretization of the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Two important properties were systematically studied, namely the percolation threshold rho_c and the macroscopic permeability K_n of the fracture network. Dimensionless quantities are denoted by a prime. The numerical results are interpreted in a systematic way with the concept of excluded volume which enables us to define a dimensionless fracture density rho' equal in the average to the average number of intersections per fracture. 1. Isotropic networks of identical fractures The dimensionless percolation threshold rho'_c of such networks was systematically studied for fractures of various shapes. rho'_c was shown to be almost independent of the shape except when one has very elongated rectangles. A formula is proposed for rho'_c. The permeability of these networks was calculated for a wide range of fracture densities and shapes. K'_n(rho') is almost independent of the fracture shape; an empirical formula is proposed for any value of rho' between rho'_c and infinity. For large rho', K_n is well approximated by the Snow formula initially derived for infinite fractures. 2. Anisotropic networks of identical fractures The fracture orientations are supposed to follow a Fisher distribution characterized by the parameter kappa; when kappa=0, the fractures are isotropic; when kappa=infinity, the fractures are perpendicular to a given direction. rho'_c does not depend significantly on kappa and the general formula proposed in 1

  16. Quantifying fluid distribution and phase connectivity with a simple 3D cubic pore network model constrained by NMR and MICP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chicheng; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2013-12-01

    A computer algorithm is implemented to construct 3D cubic pore networks that simultaneously honor nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) measurements on core samples. The algorithm uses discretized pore-body size distributions from NMR and pore-throat size versus incremental pore-volume fraction information from MICP as initial inputs. Both pore-throat radius distribution and body-throat correlation are iteratively refined to match percolation-simulated primary drainage capillary pressure with MICP data. It outputs a pore-throat radius distribution which is not directly measurable with either NMR or MICP. In addition, quasi-static fluid distribution and single-phase connectivity are quantified at each capillary pressure stage. NMR measurements on desaturating core samples are simulated from the quantitative fluid distribution in a gas-displacing-water drainage process and are verified with laboratory measurements. We invoke effective medium theory to quantify the single-phase connectivity in two-phase flow by simulating percolation in equivalent sub-pore-networks that consider the remaining fluid phase as solid cementation. Primary drainage relative permeability curves quantified from fluid distribution and phase connectivity show petrophysical consistency after applying a hydrated-water saturation correction. Core measurements of tight-gas sandstone samples from the Cotton Valley formation, East Texas, are used to verify the new algorithm.

  17. Single-Crystal to Single-Crystal Phase Transition and Segmented Thermochromic Luminescence in a Dynamic 3D Interpenetrated Ag(I) Coordination Network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Hao; Li, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Li-Wei; Yu, Si-Qi; Wang, Xing-Po; Sun, Di

    2016-02-01

    A new 3D Ag(I)-based coordination network, [Ag2(pz)(bdc)·H2O]n (1; pz = pyrazine and H2bdc = benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid), was constructed by one-pot assembly and structurally established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at different temperatures. Upon cooling from 298 to 93 K, 1 undergo an interesting single-crystal to single-crystal phase transition from orthorhombic Ibca (Z = 16) to Pccn (Z = 32) at around 148 K. Both phases show a rare 2-fold-interpenetrated 4-connected lvt network but incorporate different [Ag2(COO)2] dimeric secondary building units. It is worth mentioning that complex 1 shows red- and blue-shifted luminescences in the 290-170 and 140-80 K temperature ranges, respectively. The variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray crystallographic studies suggest that the argentophilic interactions and rigidity of the structure dominated the luminescence chromism trends at the respective temperature ranges. Upon being mechanically ground, 1 exhibits a slight mechanoluminescence red shift from 589 to 604 nm at 298 K. PMID:26828950

  18. Numerical Modelling of the Triggering of Microseismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Using a Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruel, D.; Baujard, C.

    2005-05-01

    Heat extraction from deep engineered fractured formations is currently under investigation at the Soultz sous Forêts site with the support of the European Commission. The challenge is to develop a reservoir at great depth and to circulate a fluid in order to recover heat and produce electricity. The pilot project evolved toward a three well system at 5 km in depth with temperatures close to 200 C. Massive hydraulic tests performed to develop the reservoir have shown from the recorded micro-seismic signature, that fractures can easily be re-activated. The discussion now focusses on the hydraulic significance of the shear failure mechanism, considered as the source of the accoustic emissions. To improve our understanding of these coupled hydrau-mechanical processes, a numerical model was presented [1], based on a 3D random description of fracture networks. Local flow rules along equivalent 1D channels connecting the fractures can account for (i) a normal closure versus effective stress law together with (ii) a dilatant behaviour during shearing motion when a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is met. The purpose of the present work is to simulate injection tests in some synthetic fracture network using power law distributions for the fracture size, and to analyse the spatio-temporal growth of the sheared zones. Assuming that this process is analogue to the triggering of the microseismicity, we then perform an evaluation of the so called SBRC reservoir characterisation method [2] stating that the spatial position of the triggering front in an homogeneous isotropic poroelastic medium with a hydraulic diffusivity Dh is at time t given by √4 π Dh t. We conclude to its validity, although it is found sensitive to the hypothesis of critically stressed pre-existing fractures. The connectivity of the sub-set of subcritically oriented fractures plays a major role in the succes of a stimulation treatment and controls an equivalent macro-cohesion behaviour at the reservoir scale

  19. Transport of conservative solutes in simulated fracture networks: 1. Synthetic data generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Donald M.; Benson, David A.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper investigates whether particle ensembles in a fractured rock domain may be adequately modeled as an operator-stable plume. If this statistical model applies to transport in fractured media, then an ensemble plume in a fractured rock domain may be modeled using the novel Fokker-Planck evolution equation of the operator-stable plume. These plumes (which include the classical multi-Gaussian as a subset) are typically characterized by power law leading-edge concentration profiles and super-Fickian growth rates. To investigate the possible correspondence of ensemble plumes to operator-stable densities, we use numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport through large-scale (2.5 km by 2.5 km), randomly generated fracture networks. These two-dimensional networks are generated according to fracture statistics obtained from field studies that describe fracture length, transmissivity, density, and orientation. A fracture continuum approach using MODFLOW is developed for the solution of fluid flow within the fracture network and low-permeability rock matrix, while a particle-tracking code, random walk particle method for simulating transport in heterogeneous permeable media (RWHet), is used to simulate the advective motion of conservative solutes through the model domain. By deterministically mapping individual fractures onto a highly discretized finite difference grid (1 m × 1 m × 1 m here), the MODFLOW "continuum" simulations can faithfully preserve details of the generated network and can approximate fluid flow in a discrete fracture network model. An advantage of the MODFLOW approach is that matrix permeability can be made nonzero to account for any degree of matrix flow and/or transport.

  20. Searching for fractures in a fracture network - a game theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Liana; Braester, Carol

    1991-12-01

    Positioning of a fracture within a given permeability range, under the assumption that a prospective borehole is intersected by one fracture, was modeled by Braester and Barak as a two-person zero-sum game. This paper presents two extensions of the mentioned model, one referring to the situation when more than one fracture intersects each borehole, and the other one for the case when more than one borehole are drilled simultaneously. The one-fracture game model is proved to represent a strong basis in the formalization of these complex situations.

  1. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  2. A new computer code for discrete fracture network modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoshui; Dowd, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The authors describe a comprehensive software package for two- and three-dimensional stochastic rock fracture simulation using marked point processes. Fracture locations can be modelled by a Poisson, a non-homogeneous, a cluster or a Cox point process; fracture geometries and properties are modelled by their respective probability distributions. Virtual sampling tools such as plane, window and scanline sampling are included in the software together with a comprehensive set of statistical tools including histogram analysis, probability plots, rose diagrams and hemispherical projections. The paper describes in detail the theoretical basis of the implementation and provides a case study in rock fracture modelling to demonstrate the application of the software.

  3. Macroscopic properties of fracture networks from the percolation threshold to very large densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P.; Thovert, J.-F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2012-04-01

    Progress has been made possible thanks to a very versatile numerical technique based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture networks. Any network geometry, any boundary condition, and any distribution of the fractures can be addressed. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. The second step consists in the discretization of the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Two important properties were systematically studied, namely the percolation threshold rhoc and the macroscopic permeability Kn of the fracture network. Dimensionless quantities are denoted by a prime. The numerical results are interpreted in a systematic way with the concept of excluded volume which enables us to define a dimensionless fracture density rho' equal in the average to the average number of intersections per fracture. 1. Isotropic networks of identical fractures The dimensionless percolation threshold rho'c of such networks was systematically studied for fractures of various shapes. rho'c was shown to be almost independent of the shape except when one has very elongated rectangles. A formula is proposed for rho'_c. The permeability of these networks was calculated for a wide range of fracture densities and shapes. K'_n(rho') is almost independent of the fracture shape; an empirical formula is proposed for any value of rho' between rho'c and infinity. For large rho', Kn is well approximated by the Snow formula initially derived for infinite fractures. 2. Anisotropic networks of identical fractures The fracture orientations are supposed to follow a Fisher distribution characterized by the parameter kappa; when kappa=0, the fractures are isotropic; when kappa=infinity, the fractures are perpendicular to a given direction. rho'c does not depend significantly on kappa and the general formula proposed in 1 can be used as a first approximation. A considerable simplification occurs for permeability. The

  4. A numerical procedure for transient free surface seepage through fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qinghui; Ye, Zuyang; Zhou, Chuangbing

    2014-11-01

    A parabolic variational inequality (PVI) formulation is presented for the transient free surface seepage problem defined for a whole fracture network. Because the seepage faces are specified as Signorini-type conditions, the PVI formulation can effectively eliminate the singularity of spillpoints that evolve with time. By introducing a continuous penalty function to replace the original Heaviside function, a finite element procedure based on the PVI formulation is developed to predict the transient free surface response in the fracture network. The effects of the penalty parameter on the solution precision are analyzed. A relative error formula for evaluating the flow losses at steady state caused by the penalty parameter is obtained. To validate the proposed method, three typical examples are solved. The solutions for the first example are compared with the experimental results. The results from the last two examples further demonstrate that the orientation, extent and density of fractures significantly affect the free surface seepage behavior in the fracture network.

  5. Fracture-frequency prediction from borehole wireline logs using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, E.M.; Bean, C.J.; Reilly, R.

    1999-11-01

    Borehole-wall imaging is currently the most reliable means of mapping discontinuities within boreholes. As these imaging techniques are expensive and thus not always included in a logging run, a method of predicting fracture frequency directly from traditional logging tool responses would be very useful and cost effective. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) show great potential in this area. ANNs are computational systems that attempt to mimic natural biological neural networks. They have the ability to recognize patterns and develop their own generalizations about a given data set. Neural networks are trained on data sets for which the solution is known and tested on data not previously seen in order to validate the network result. The authors show that artificial neural networks, due to their pattern recognition capabilities, are able to assess the signal strength of fracture-related heterogeneity in a borehole log and thus fracture frequency within a borehole. A combination of wireline logs (neutron porosity, bulk density, P-sonic, S-sonic, deep resistivity and shallow resistivity) were used as input parameters to the ANN. Fracture frequency calculated from borehole televiewer data was used as the single output parameter. The ANN was trained using a back-propagation algorithm with a momentum learning function. In addition to fracture frequency within a single borehole, an ANN trained on a subset of boreholes in an area could be used for prediction over the entire set of boreholes, thus allowing the lateral correlation of fracture zones.

  6. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

  7. Fracture network characterisation of a landslide by electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, S.; Szokoli, K.; Novák, A.; Tóth, Á.; Metwaly, M.; Prácser, E.

    2014-06-01

    In contrary to most of the landslide studies which concentrate to the sliding surface in this paper the fracture system of a loess landslide is investigated. The continuity and geometry, orientation and dip of the major fractures are crucial parameters for assessing rock stability and landslide evolution. Rain infiltrating moreover easily into the rock mass through fractures providing lubrication for the material to slide, and increases the self-mass of the material increasing the slumping rate. Fracture maps enable beside of the characterisation of the fractured area the delineation of the endangered area of slow-moving landslides in due time and getting information about its inner structure. For constructing such maps Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements have been carried out using different geoelectric configurations. In spite of the high density of the fractures and their changing physical parameters in function of their water content - which make the interpretation rather difficult - a number of fractures have been detected and more or less well localised. On the basis of the present research the application of the Schlumberger and the Pole-Dipole arrays is recommended to fulfil the aim of the study. The optimised Stummer array is at the same time the only array which presents conductive anomalies (supposedly water filled fractures), as well, and indicates that fractures elongate deep downwards. Because these features seem to be realistic based on field observations or theoretical considerations the Stummer array may be a very good tool for completing e.g. P-Dp measurements. The study area could have been divided by all arrays into differently fractured zones, which assists a lot in understanding the landslide structure and evolution. It was shown, moreover, that in the still passive area there are thick fractures, too, verifying its dangerousness, as well. The ERT results enabled localising the rupture surfaces of future slumps which proved to

  8. A high-resolution 3D seismic velocity model of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake rupture zone using land & OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. P.; Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I. M.; Miller, M.; Lee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of seismic properties along a subduction megathrust can shed light on the composition and structure of rocks along the fault. By comparing seismic velocity structure with models of interseismic locking, co-seismic slip and afterslip, we can begin to understand how physical properties may affect fault dynamics throughout the subduction seismic cycle. The Maule earthquake, which hit the coast of central Chile in 2010, is the 6th largest earthquake ever recorded, rupturing a 500 x 80 km area of the Chilean megathrust. Published models demonstrate a complex bilateral rupture, with most co-seismic slip occurring to the north of the mainshock epicentre, although significant slip likely stopped short of the trench and the continental Moho. Here, we show a new high-resolution 3D velocity model (vp and vp/vs ratio) of the central Chilean margin Our velocity model is based on manually picked P- and S-wave arrival times from 670 aftershocks recorded by the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) network. Seismic properties of the marine forearc are poorly understood in subduction zones, but by incorporating picks from two ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) networks, we can resolve the velocity structure of the megathrust as far as the trench. In total, the catalogue used for the tomographic inversion yields a total of ~50,000 high quality P- and S-wave picks. We analyse the quality of our model by analysis of the resolution matrix and by testing characteristic models. The 3D velocity model shows the main structures associated within a subduction forearc: the marine forearc basin (vp < 6.0 km/s), continental mantle (vp > 7.5 km/s), and subducting oceanic crust (vp ~ 7.7 km/s). The plate interface is well defined by relocated aftershock seismicity. P-wave velocities along the megathrust range from 6.5 km/s beneath the marine forearc to 7.7 km/s at the intersection of the megathrust with the continental Moho. We infer several high vp anomalies within the South

  9. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  10. Individual 3D region-of-interest atlas of the human brain: automatic training point extraction for neural-network-based classification of brain tissue types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Obladen, Thorsten; Sabri, Osama; Buell, Udalrich

    2000-04-01

    Individual region-of-interest atlas extraction consists of two main parts: T1-weighted MRI grayscale images are classified into brain tissues types (gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), scalp/bone (SB), background (BG)), followed by class image analysis to define automatically meaningful ROIs (e.g., cerebellum, cerebral lobes, etc.). The purpose of this algorithm is the automatic detection of training points for neural network-based classification of brain tissue types. One transaxial slice of the patient data set is analyzed. Background separation is done by simple region growing. A random generator extracts spatially uniformly distributed training points of class BG from that region. For WM training point extraction (TPE), the homogeneity operator is the most important. The most homogeneous voxels define the region for WM TPE. They are extracted by analyzing the cumulative histogram of the homogeneity operator response. Assuming a Gaussian gray value distribution in WM, a random number is used as a probabilistic threshold for TPE. Similarly, non-white matter and non-background regions are analyzed for GM and CSF training points. For SB TPE, the distance from the BG region is an additional feature. Simulated and real 3D MRI images are analyzed and error rates for TPE and classification calculated.

  11. Effects of using a continuum representation of discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, L.C.; Clemo, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    The substitution of matrix or continuum permeability for discrete fracture permeability in the simulation of complex fracture systems requires a radically different treatment of transport in the matrix. The spatial distribution of pressure is reasonably well described by inclusion of only the major fractures. Transport of tracer and heat, however, depends on a detailed knowledge of fluid velocities. Two factors are involved. First, the velocities are dependent on the active porosity of the system. Because fractures channel flow, the active porosity may be much smaller than the total porosity of the system. Secondly, the distribution of velocities is generally not normally distributed precluding the use of a Gaussian dispersion model. Characterization of the active porosity and velocity distribution are necessary to quantify tracer and heat movement.

  12. Three Dimensional Flow, Transport and Geomechanical Simulations in Discrete Fracture Network Under Condition of Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Glascoe, L. G.; Antoun, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Data collected are often reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable probabilistic assessment of flow, transport and geomechanical phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, we investigate the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport and geomechanics. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory. (Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344)

  13. 3D-calibration of three- and four-sensor hot-film probes based on collocated sonic using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Eliezer; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-09-01

    High resolution measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are critical to the understanding of physical processes and parameterization of important quantities, such as the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation. Low spatio-temporal resolution of standard atmospheric instruments, sonic anemometers and LIDARs, limits their suitability for fine-scale measurements of ABL. The use of miniature hot-films is an alternative technique, although such probes require frequent calibration, which is logistically untenable in field setups. Accurate and truthful calibration is crucial for the multi-hot-films applications in atmospheric studies, because the ability to conduct calibration in situ ultimately determines the turbulence measurements quality. Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23–41) described a novel methodology for calibration of hot-film probes using a collocated sonic anemometer combined with a neural network (NN) approach. An important step in the algorithm is the generation of a calibration set for NN training by an appropriate low-pass filtering of the high resolution voltages, measured by the hot-film-sensors and low resolution velocities acquired by the sonic. In Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23–41), Kit and Grits (2011 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 28 104–10) and Vitkin et al (2014 Meas. Sci. Technol. 25 75801), the authors reported on successful use of this approach for in situ calibration, but also on the method’s limitations and restricted range of applicability. In their earlier work, a jet facility and a probe, comprised of two orthogonal x-hot-films, were used for calibration and for full dataset generation. In the current work, a comprehensive laboratory study of 3D-calibration of two multi-hot-film probes (triple- and four-sensor) using a grid flow was conducted. The probes were embedded in a collocated sonic, and their relative pitch and yaw orientation to the mean flow was changed by means of

  14. 3-D P-wave velocity structure and seismicity in Central Costa Rica from Local Earthquake Tomography using an amphibic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, I.; Husen, S.; Flueh, E.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Central Pacific sector of the erosional margin in Costa Rica shows a high seismicity rate, coincident with the subduction of rough-relief ocean floor, and generates earthquakes up to Mw 7. Precise earthquake locations and detailed knowledge of the 3-D velocity structure provide key insights into the dynamics of subduction zones. To this end, we performed a 3-D Local Earthquake Tomography using P-wave traveltimes from 595 selected events recorded by a seismological network of off- and onshore stations, deployed for 6 months in the area. The results reflect the complexity associated to subduction of bathymetric highs and the transition from normal to thickened oceanic crust (Cocos Ridge). The slab is imaged as a high-velocity anomaly with a band of low velocities (LVB) on top enclosing the intraslab events deeper than ~30 km. Below the margin slope, the LVB is locally thickened by at least two seamounts. We observe an abrupt, eastward widening of the LVB, preceded by a low-velocity anomaly under the continental shelf, which we interpret as a big seamount. The thickening coincides with an inverted basin at the inner forearc and a low-velocity anomaly under it. The latter appears in a sector where blocks of inner forearc are uplifted, possibly by underplating of eroded material against the base of the crust. The anomaly promotes seismicity by high-friction with the upper plate, and could be linked to a Mw 6.4 earthquake in 2004. In the west part of the area, the interplate seismicity forms a cluster beneath the continental shelf. Its updip limit coincides with the 150° C isotherm and an increase in Vp along the plate boundary. This further supports a proposed model in which the seismicity onset along the plate interface is mainly due to a decrease in the abundance of the fluids released by subducted sediments. Higher seismicity rates locally concur with seamounts present at the seismogenic zone, while seamounts under the margin slope may shallow the onset of

  15. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, W; Hong, S-M

    2016-03-01

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN(+) , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN(+) prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN(+) implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN(+) . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating

  16. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhari, W.; Hong, S.-M.

    2016-03-01

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient’s breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN+ , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN+ prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN+ implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN+ . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN+ algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN+ algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating function, albeit

  17. Mechanical transport in two-dimensional networks of fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, H.K.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this research are to evaluate directional mechanical transport parameters for anisotropic fracture systems, and to determine if fracture systems behave like equivalent porous media. The tracer experiments used to measure directional tortuosity, longitudinal geometric dispersivity, and hydraulic effective porosity are conducted with a uniform flow field and measurements are made from the fluid flowing within a test section where linear length of travel is constant. Since fluid flow and mechanical transport are coupled processes, the directional variations of specific discharge and hydraulic effective porosity are measured in regions with constant hydraulic gradients to evaluate porous medium equivalence for the two processes, respectively. If the fracture region behaves like an equivalent porous medium, the system has the following stable properties: (1) specific discharge is uniform in any direction and can be predicted from a permeability tensor; and (2) hydraulic effective porosity is directionally stable. Fracture systems with two parallel sets of continuous fractures satisfy criterion 1. However, in these systems hydraulic effective porosity is directionally dependent, and thus, criterion 2 is violated. Thus, for some fracture systems, fluid flow can be predicted using porous media assumptions, but it may not be possible to predict transport using porous media assumptions. Two discontinuous fracture systems were studied which satisfied both criteria. Hydraulic effective porosity for both systems has a value between rock effective porosity and total porosity. A length-density analysis (LDS) of Canadian fracture data shows that porous media equivalence for fluid flow and transport is likely when systems have narrow aperture distributions. 54 references, 90 figures, 7 tables.

  18. Numerical Simulation of non-Newtonian Fluid Flows through Fracture Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmawan, I. A.; Ulhag, R. Z.; Endyana, C.; Aufaristama, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation of non-Newtonian fluid flow in a twodimensional fracture network. The fracture is having constant mean aperture and bounded with Hurst exponent surfaces. The non-Newtonian rheology behaviour of the fluid is described using the Power-Law model. The lattice Boltzmann method is employed to calculate the solutions for non-Newtonian flow in finite Reynolds number. We use a constant force to drive the fluid within the fracture, while the bounceback rules and periodic boundary conditions are applied for the fluid-solid interaction and inflow outlflow boundary conditions, respectively. The validation study of the simulation is done via parallel plate flow simulation and the results demonstrated good agreement with the analytical solution. In addition, the fluid flow properties within the fracture network follow the relationships of power law fluid while the errors are becoming larger if the fluid more shear thinning.

  19. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  20. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  1. Encapsulated discrete octameric water cluster, 1D water tape, and 3D water aggregate network in diverse MOFs based on bisimidazolium ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ruo-Bing; Pi, Min; Jiang, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Jin, Chuan-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Four new metal-organic frameworks, [Zn(2-mBIM)2(SO3CF3)2·(H2O)4] (1), [Zn(BMIE)(1,4-BDC)]·(H2O)3 (2), [Cd(BIM)2(OH)(H2O)2(PF6)]·(H2O)4 (3), and [Cd(PA-BIM)2 (ClO4)2]·11.33H2O (4) (2-mBIM = bis(2-methylimidazol-1-yl)methane, BMIE = 1,2-bis[1-(2-methylimidazole)-diethoxy]ethane, BIM = bis(imidazol-1-yl)methane, and PA-BIM = 1,1-bis [(2-phenylazo)imidazol-1-yl]methane) have been prepared and structurally characterized. Complex 1 exhibits an infinite 1D cationic beaded-chain structure, which encapsulated discrete octameric water clusters that are comprised of a chair-like hexameric water cluster with two extra water molecules dangling on two diagonal vertices of the chair. Complex 2 forms a 1D infinite zigzag metal-organic chain structure with a 1D T4(0)A(4) water tape. Complexes 3 show a 2D grid-like sheet structure with the 1D water tape T4(0)A(0)2(0) motif. Complex 4 is a porous 3D MOF with tetrahedron-coordinated Cd(II) centers and trans-conformation PA-BIM ligands. These holes are occupied by a fascinating three-dimensional water clathrate network, which consists of cage-shaped structural tetradecameric water cluster (H2O)14 units and six independent bridged water molecules. The results suggest that the bisimidazolium ligands and anions play crucial roles in the formation of the different host structures and different guest water aggregations. Additionally, the thermal stabilities and photoluminescence spectra of the complexes have been discussed.

  2. Relating permeability and electrical resistivity in fractures using random resistor network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Alison; Heinson, Graham; Krieger, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We use random resistor network models to explore the relationship between electrical resistivity and permeability in a fracture filled with an electrically conductive fluid. Fluid flow and current are controlled by both the distribution and the volume of pore space. Therefore, the aperture distribution of fractures must be accurately modeled in order to realistically represent their hydraulic and electrical properties. We have constructed fracture surface pairs based on characteristics measured on rock samples. We use these to construct resistor networks with variable hydraulic and electrical resistance in order to investigate the changes in both properties as a fault is opened. At small apertures, electrical conductivity and permeability increase moderately with aperture until the fault reaches its percolation threshold. Above this point, the permeability increases by 4 orders of magnitude over a change in mean aperture of less than 0.1 mm, while the resistivity decreases by up to a factor of 10 over this aperture change. Because permeability increases at a greater rate than matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, the percolation threshold can also be defined in terms of the matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, M. The value of M at the percolation threshold, MPT, varies with the ratio of rock to fluid resistivity, the fault spacing, and the fault offset. However, MPT is almost always less than 10. Greater M values are associated with fractures above their percolation threshold. Therefore, if such M values are observed over fluid-filled fractures, it is likely that they are open for fluid flow.

  3. Permeability, porosity, and percolation properties of two-dimensional disordered fracture networks.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Hamzehpour, Hossein; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    Using extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we study the effective permeability, porosity, and percolation properties of two-dimensional fracture networks in which the fractures are represented by rectangles of finite widths. The parameters of the study are the width of the fractures and their number density. For low and intermediate densities, the average porosity of the network follows a power-law relation with the density. The exponent of the power law itself depends on the fractures' width through a power law. For an intermediate range of the densities, the effective permeability scales with the fractures' width as a power law, with an exponent that depends on the density. For high densities the effective permeability also depends on the porosity through a power law, with an exponent that depends on the fractures' width. In agreement with the results, experimental data also indicate the existence of a power-law relationship between the effective permeability and porosity in consolidated sandstones and sedimentary rocks with a nonuniversal exponent. The percolation threshold or critical number density of the fractures depends on their width and is maximum if they are represented by squares, rather than rectangles. PMID:22181271

  4. Conceptual Models for the Fracture Network in Contaminated Shale Based on Different Lines of Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, B. L.; Chapman, S.; Cherry, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    In investigations of groundwater flow in fractured sedimentary rock, there is typically a large discrepancy between the number of fractures identified by different methods in boreholes. The methods directed at fracture geometry such as inspection of continuous core and borehole imaging (acoustic, optical, electrical televiewing, borehole camera, etc.) commonly identify numerous fractures. In contrast, the methods that infer fractures from measurements in the open borehole water column (borehole flow meters, temperature, electrical conductance, full borehole dilution) show far fewer fractures. These two different categories of data support two very different conceptual models for the fracture networks in which groundwater flow occurs. A study was conducted at a contaminated industrial site in an area of approximately 150m by 100m located on a fractured Ordovician shale in New York State where a fracture network conceptual model was initially developed based primarily on borehole flow metering and related cross-borehole hydraulic tests. In this conceptual model based on eight boreholes having a maximum depth of 50 m, the total number of flow zones identified was 14 over 140 m of open hole and ranged from none to five per hole. PCE DNAPL released decades ago has caused substantial VOC contamination (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE, and VC) and this contamination was delineated by means of a large number of contaminant analyses on samples from continuous rock core at an average spacing of 0.3 m. Although groundwater flow occurs almost entirely in the fractures, almost all the contaminant mass resides in the rock matrix (porosity 2-5%) because of long term diffusion-driven mass transfer from fractures to the matrix. The rock core contaminant profiles indicate that advective transport has occurred over decades through numerous fractures in each borehole. Therefore, many of the fractures identified from corelogs and televiewing must have active groundwater flow. This supports a

  5. Influence of structural position on fracture networks in the Torridon Group, Achnashellach fold and thrust belt, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Hannah; Butler, Robert W. H.; Bond, Clare E.; Healy, Dave

    2015-05-01

    In fold-and-thrust belts rocks undergo deformation as fold geometries evolve. Deformation may be accommodated by brittle fracturing, which can vary depending on structural position. We use 2D forward modelling and 3D restorations to determine strain distributions throughout folds of the Achnashellach Culmination, Moine Thrust Belt, NW Scotland. Fracture data is taken from the Torridon Group; a thick, coarse grained fluviatile sandstone deposited during the Proterozoic. Modelling infers a correlation between strain and simple curvature; we use simple curvature to infer how structural position and strain control fracture attribute variations in a fold and thrust belt. In high curvature regions, such as forelimbs, fracture intensities are high and fractures are short and oriented parallel to fold hinges. In low curvature regions fractures have variable intensities and are longer. Fracture orientations in these regions are scattered and vary over short distances. These variations do not relate to strain; data suggests lithology may influence fracturing. The strain history of fold structures also influences fracturing; structures with longer deformation histories exhibit consistent fracture attributes due to moderate-high strain during folding, despite present day low curvature. This is in contrast to younger folds with similar curvatures but shorter deformation histories. We suggest in high strain regions fracturing is influenced by structural controls, whereas in low strain regions lithology becomes more important in influencing fracturing.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Non-Darcy CH4 Flow in Fracture Network of Coal Using Lattice Boltzmann Method