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Sample records for 3-d mantle convection

  1. Influence of Chemical Piles on Convective Structure and the Geoid from 3D Spherical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2013-12-01

    Classic mantle dynamic models for the Earth's geoid are mostly based on whole mantle convection and constrain that the upper mantle is significantly weaker than the lower mantle. Whole mantle convection models with such mantle viscosity structure have successfully explained the long-wavelength structure in the mantle. However, with increasing consensus on the existence of chemically distinct piles above the core mantle boundary (CMB) (also known as large low shear velocity provinces or LLSVPs), questions arise as to what extent the chemical piles influence the Earth's geoid and long-wavelength mantle convection. Some recent studies suggested that the chemical piles have a controlling effect on the Earth's degree two mantle structure, geoid, and true polar wander, although the chemical piles are estimated to be of small volume (~2% of the whole mantle) by seismic studies. We have formulated dynamically consistent 3D mantle convection models using CitcomS and studied how the chemical piles above CMB influence the long-wavelength convective structure and geoid. The models have free slip boundary conditions and temperature dependent viscosity. By comparing with purely thermal convection models, we found that the long wavelength convective structure is not sensitive to the presence of the chemical piles. By determining the geoid from the buoyance of a certain layer of the mantle, we found that for both purely thermal and thermochemical convection, the geoid is mostly contributed by the upper part of the mantle, with ~80% geoid explained by the buoyancy in the upper half of the mantle. In purely thermal convection, the contribution to the geoid from the bottom layer of the mantle always has the same sign with the total geoid (a bottom ~ 600 km thick layer gives ~3.5% of the total geoid). However, in the thermochemical convection, the bottom layer with overall negatively buoyant chemical piles gives rise to the geoid that has opposite sign with the total geoid and has a

  2. 3D spherical models of Martian mantle convection constrained by melting history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, Pavithra; King, Scott D.

    2014-02-01

    While most of Tharsis rise was in place by end of the Noachian period, at least one volcano on Tharsis swell (Arsia Mons) has been active within the last 2 Ma. This places an important constraint on mantle convection and on the thermal evolution of Mars. The existence of recent volcanism on Mars implies that adiabatic decompression melting and, hence, upwelling convective flow in the mantle remains important on Mars at present. The thermal history on Mars can be constrained by the history of melt production, specifically generating sufficient melt in the first billion years of the planets history to produce Tharsis rise as well as present day melt to explain recent volcanism. In this work, mantle convection simulations were performed using finite element code CitcomS in a 3D sphere starting from a uniformly hot mantle and integrating forward in time for the age of the solar system. We implement constant and decaying radioactive heat sources; and vary the partitioning of heat sources between the crust and mantle, and consider decreasing core-mantle boundary temperature and latent heat of melting. The constant heat source calculations produce sufficient melt to create Tharsis early in Martian history and continue to produce significant melt to the present. Calculations with decaying radioactive heat sources generate excessive melt in the past, except when all the radiogenic elements are in the crust, and none produce melt after 2 Gyr. Producing a degree-1 or degree-2 structure may not be pivotal to explain the Tharsis rise: we present multi-plume models where not every plume produces melt. The Rayleigh number controls the timing of the first peak of volcanism while late-stage volcanism is controlled more by internal mantle heating. Decreasing the Rayleigh number increases the lithosphere thickness (i.e., depth), and increasing lithosphere thickness increases the mean mantle temperature. Increasing pressure reduces melt production while increasing temperature

  3. Interactive Visualization of 3-D Mantle Convection Extended Through AJAX Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, J. C.; Czech, W.; Yuen, D.; Greensky, J.; Knox, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a new software system for real-time interactive visualization of results taken directly from large-scale simulations of 3-D mantle convection and other large-scale simulations. This approach allows for intense visualization sessions for a couple of hours as opposed to storing massive amounts of data in a storage system. Our data sets consist of 3-D data for volume rendering with over 10 million unknowns at each timestep. Large scale visualization on a display wall holding around 13 million pixels has already been accomplished with extension to hand-held devices, such as the OQO and Nokia N800 and recently the iPHONE. We are developing web-based software in Java to extend the use of this system across long distances. The software is aimed at creating an interactive and functional application capable of running on multiple browsers by taking advantage of two AJAX-enabled web frameworks: Echo2 and Google Web Toolkit. The software runs in two modes allowing for a user to control an interactive session or observe a session controlled by another user. Modular build of the system allows for components to be swapped out for new components so that other forms of visualization could be accommodated such as Molecular Dynamics in mineral physics or 2-D data sets from lithospheric regional models.

  4. Mechanism for generating stagnant slabs in 3-D spherical mantle convection models at Earth-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Yamagishi, Yasuko; Hamano, Yozo; Stegman, Dave R.; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas; Jellinek, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Seismic tomography reveals the natural mode of convection in the Earth is whole mantle with subducted slabs clearly seen as continuous features into the lower mantle. However, simultaneously existing alongside these deep slabs are stagnant slabs which are, if only temporarily, trapped in the upper mantle. Previous numerical models of mantle convection have observed a range of behavior for slabs in the transition zone depending on viscosity stratification and mineral phase transitions, but typically only exhibit flat-lying slabs when mantle convection is layered or trench migration is imposed. We use 3-D spherical models of mantle convection which range up to Earth-like conditions in Rayleigh number to systematically investigate three effects on mantle dynamics: (1) the mineral phase transitions, (2) a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity with plastic yielding at shallow depth, and (3) a viscosity increase in the lower mantle. First a regime diagram is constructed for isoviscous models over a wide range of Rayleigh number and Clapeyron slope for which the convective mode is determined. It agrees very well with previous results from 2-D simulations by Christensen and Yuen (1985), suggesting present-day Earth is in the intermittent convection mode rather than layered or strictly whole mantle. Two calculations at Earth-like conditions (Ra and RaH = 2 í 107 and 5 í 108, respectively) which include effects (2) and (3) are produced with and without the effect of the mineral phase transitions. The first calculation (without the phase transition) successfully produces plate-like behavior with a long wavelength structure and surface heat flow similar to Earth's value. While the observed convective flow pattern in the lower mantle is broader compared to isoviscous models, it basically shows the behavior of whole mantle convection, and does not exhibit any slab flattening at the viscosity increase at 660 km depth. The second calculation which includes the phase

  5. An efficient compact fourth order FD method for simulating 3-D mantle convection at high Rayleigh number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    , 533, 1984. Isosurfaces of the temperature field from a 3-D mantle convection simulation at Rayleigh number 10**7 during the transition from a purely conductive state to a double-layer convection state. Simulation was performed using the compact fourth order finite difference scheme at a resolution of 200-by-200-by-100 (length-by-width-by-height).

  6. A new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling: Implications for the Cenozoic evolution of 3-D structure and dynamics of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2016-06-01

    The 3-D distribution of buoyancy in the convecting mantle drives a suite of convection-related manifestations. Although seismic tomography is providing increasingly resolved images of the present-day mantle heterogeneity, the distribution of mantle density variations in the geological past is unknown, and, by implication, this is true for the convection-related observables. The one major exception is tectonic plate motions, since geologic data are available to estimate their history and they currently provide the only available constraints on the evolution of 3-D mantle buoyancy in the past. We developed a new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling with a procedure for matching plate velocity data at different instants in the past. The crucial aspect of this reconstruction methodology is to ensure that at all times plates are driven by buoyancy forces in the mantle and not vice versa. Employing tomography-based retrodictions over the Cenozoic, we estimate the global amplitude of the following observables: dynamic surface topography, the core-mantle boundary ellipticity, the free-air gravity anomalies, and the global divergence rates of tectonic plates. One of the major benefits of the new data assimilation method is the stable recovery of much shorter wavelength changes in heterogeneity than was possible in our previous work. We now resolve what appears to be two-stage subduction of the Farallon plate under the western U.S. and a deeply rooted East African Plume that is active under the Ethiopian volcanic fields during the Early Eocene.

  7. Spontaneous development of arcuate single-sided subduction in global 3-D mantle convection models with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Fabio; Tackley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The work presented aims at a better understanding of plate tectonics, a crucial dynamical feature within the global framework of mantle convection. Special focus is given to the interaction of subduction-related mantle flow and surface topography. Thereby, the application of a numerical model with two key functional requirements is essential: an evolution over a long time period to naturally model mantle flow and a physically correct topography calculation. The global mantle convection model presented in Crameri et al. (2012a) satisfies both of these requirements. First, it is efficiently calculated by the finite-volume code Stag-YY (e.g., Tackley 2008) using a multi-grid method on a fully staggered grid. Second, it applies the sticky-air method (Matsumoto and Tomoda 1983; Schmeling et al, 2008) and thus approximates a free surface when the sticky-air parameters are chosen carefully (Crameri et al., 2012b). This leads to dynamically self-consistent mantle convection with realistic, single-sided subduction. New insights are thus gained into the interplay of obliquely sinking plates, toroidal mantle flow and the arcuate shape of slabs and trenches. Numerous two-dimensional experiments provide optimal parameter setups that are applied to three-dimensional models in Cartesian and fully spherical geometries. Features observed and characterised in the latter experiments give important insight into the strongly variable behaviour of subduction zones along their strike. This includes (i) the spontaneous development of arcuate trench geometry, (ii) regional subduction polarity reversals and slab tearing, and the newly discovered features (iii) 'slab tunnelling' and (iv) 'back-slab spiral flow'. Overall, this study demonstrates the strong interaction between surface topography and mantle currents and highlights the variability of subduction zones and their individual segments. REFERENCES Crameri, F., P. J. Tackley, I. Meilick, T. V. Gerya, and B. J. P. Kaus (2012a), A free

  8. Zoned mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  9. Zoned mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  10. Mantle convection, topography and geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golle, Olivia; Dumoulin, Caroline; Choblet, Gaël.; Cadek, Ondrej

    2010-05-01

    The internal evolution of planetary bodies often include solid-state convection. This phenomenon may have a large impact on the various interfaces of these bodies (dynamic topography occurs). It also affects their gravity field (and the geoid). Since both geoid and topography can be measured by a spacecraft, and are therefore available for several planetary bodies (while seismological measurements are still lacking for all of them but the Moon and the Earth), these are of the first interest for the study of internal structures and processes. While a classical approach now is to combine gravity and altimetry measurements to infer the internal structure of a planet [1], we propose to complement it by the reverse problem, i.e., producing synthetic geoid and dynamic topography from numerical models of convection as proposed by recent studies (e.g. for the CMB topography of the Earth,[2]). This procedure first include a simple evaluation of the surface topography and geoid from the viscous flow obtained by the 3D numerical tool OEDIPUS [3] modeling convection in a spherical shell. An elastic layer will then be considered and coupled to the viscous model - one question being whether the elastic shell shall be included 'on top' of the convective domain or within it, in the cold 'lithospheric' outer region. What we will present here corresponds to the first steps of this work: the comparison between the response functions of the topography and the geoid obtained from the 3D convection program to the results evaluated by a spectral method handling radial variations of viscosity [4]. We consider the effect of the elastic layer whether included in the convective domain or not. The scale setting in the context of a full thermal convection model overlaid by an elastic shell will be discussed (thickness of the shell, temperature at its base...). References [1] A.M. Wieczorek, (2007), The gravity and topography of the terrestrial planets, Treatise on Geophysics, 10, 165-206. [2

  11. Venusian Applications of 3D Convection Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonaccorso, Timary Annie

    2011-01-01

    This study models mantle convection on Venus using the 'cubed sphere' code OEDIPUS, which models one-sixth of the planet in spherical geometry. We are attempting to balance internal heating, bottom mantle viscosity, and temperature difference across Venus' mantle, in order to create a realistic model that matches with current planetary observations. We also have begun to run both lower and upper mantle simulations to determine whether layered (as opposed to whole-mantle) convection might produce more efficient heat transfer, as well as to model coronae formation in the upper mantle. Upper mantle simulations are completed using OEDIPUS' Cartesian counterpart, JOCASTA. This summer's central question has been how to define a mantle plume. Traditionally, we have defined a hot plume the region with temperature at or above 40% of the difference between the maximum and horizontally averaged temperature, and a cold plume as the region with 40% of the difference between the minimum and average temperature. For less viscous cases (1020 Pa?s), the plumes generated by that definition lacked vigor, displaying buoyancies 1/100th of those found in previous, higher viscosity simulations (1021 Pa?s). As the mantle plumes with large buoyancy flux are most likely to produce topographic uplift and volcanism, the low viscosity cases' plumes may not produce observable deformation. In an effort to eliminate the smallest plumes, we experimented with different lower bound parameters and temperature percentages.

  12. Mantle convection on modern supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Jens; Gmeiner, Björn; Mohr, Marcus; Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures demand an interdisciplinary co-design. Here we report about recent advances of the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups in computer sciences, mathematics and geophysical application under the leadership of FAU Erlangen. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection assessing the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  13. Mantle Convection on Modern Supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, J.; Gmeiner, B.; Huber, M.; John, L.; Mohr, M.; Rüde, U.; Wohlmuth, B.; Bunge, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures is handled successfully only in an interdisciplinary context. A new priority program - named SPPEXA - by the German Research Foundation (DFG) addresses this issue, and brings together computer scientists, mathematicians and application scientists around grand challenges in HPC. Here we report from the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection and assess the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  14. Osmium isotopes and mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Erik H

    2002-11-15

    The decay of (187)Re to (187)Os (with a half-life of 42 billion years) provides a unique isotopic fingerprint for tracing the evolution of crustal materials and mantle residues in the convecting mantle. Ancient subcontinental mantle lithosphere has uniquely low Re/Os and (187)Os/(188)Os ratios due to large-degree melt extraction, recording ancient melt-depletion events as old as 3.2 billion years. Partial melts have Re/Os ratios that are orders of magnitude higher than their sources, and the subduction of oceanic or continental crust introduces into the mantle materials that rapidly accumulate radiogenic (187)Os. Eclogites from the subcontinental lithosphere have extremely high (187)Os/(188)Os ratios, and record ages as old as the oldest peridotites. The data show a near-perfect partitioning of Re/Os and (187)Os/(188)Os ratios between peridotites (low) and eclogites (high). The convecting mantle retains a degree of Os-isotopic heterogeneity similar to the lithospheric mantle, although its amplitude is modulated by convective mixing. Abyssal peridotites from the ocean ridges have low Os isotope ratios, indicating that the upper mantle had undergone episodes of melt depletion prior to the most recent melting events to produce mid-ocean-ridge basalt. The amount of rhenium estimated to be depleted from the upper mantle is 10 times greater than the rhenium budget of the continental crust, requiring a separate reservoir to close the mass balance. A reservoir consisting of 5-10% of the mantle with a rhenium concentration similar to mid-ocean-ridge basalt would balance the rhenium depletion of the upper mantle. This reservoir most likely consists of mafic oceanic crust recycled into the mantle over Earth's history and provides the material that melts at oceanic hotspots to produce ocean-island basalts (OIBs). The ubiquity of high Os isotope ratios in OIB, coupled with other geochemical tracers, indicates that the mantle sources of hotspots contain significant quantities

  15. Temporally Transitional Mantle Convection: Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loddoch, A.; Hansen, U.

    2007-12-01

    The thermal evolution of terrestrial planets such as Earth, Mars and Venus is strongly dominated by the convective processes in the planet's silicate mantle. The actual planform of convection controls the efficiency of heat transport and thus, the cooling behavior and thermal evolution of the whole planet. In the present study we investigate the heat transport properties of variable viscosity convection. Here, the focus is on the temporally transitional behavior discovered recently (Loddoch et. al, 2006). While the difference of the newly found convective regime to the already known stagnant lid and episodic behavior has been elaborated in our previous study, the present work investigates the implications of the observed intermittent behavior on the thermal evolution of terrestrial planets. A 3D numerical mantle convection code is applied and calculations are carried out in the parameter range for which the temporally transitional behavior has been found. Using the described approach it is possible to investigate the transition from a (temporarily) mobilized towards a stagnant surface in a fluid dynamically consistent manner. While such a scenario has repeatedly been suggested for Mars' early history, it has so far been investigated only by means of parameterized convection models. We show, that the sporadic surface mobilization events occur on time scales relevant for Mars. In order to assess their influence on the subsequent thermal evolution of planetary bodies, an internal heating of the mantle and a secular cooling of the core are additionally taken into account. The obtained results are compared to the findings of thermal evolution studies employing parameterized convection models.

  16. Physics of Multi-scale Convection In The Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, J.; Jordan, T. H.

    We investigate the physics of multi-scale convection in the Earth's mantle, character- ized by the coexistence of large-scale mantle circulation associated plate tectonics and small-scale sublithospheric convection. Several basic scaling laws are derived, using a series of 2-D numerical modeling and 3-D linear stability analyses, for the following three distinct phases of sublithospheric convection: (1) onset of convection, (2) lay- ered convection in the upper mantle, and (3) breakdown of layered convection. First, the onset of convection with temperature-dependent viscosity is studied with 2-D con- vection models. A robust scaling law for onset time is derived by a nonlinear scaling analysis based on the concept of the differential Rayleigh number. Next, the planform of sublithospheric convection is studied by a 3-D linear stability analysis of longitu- dinal rolls in the presence of vertical shear. Finally, the temporal and spatial evolu- tion of sublithospheric convection is studied by 2-D whole-mantle convection models with temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity and an endothermic phase transition. Scaling laws for the breakdown of layered convection as well as the strength of con- vection are derived as a function of viscosity layering, the phase buoyancy parameter, and the thermal Rayleigh number. All of these scaling laws are combined to delineate possible dynamic regimes beneath evolving lithosphere.

  17. How stratified is mantle convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1997-04-01

    We quantify the flow stratification in the Earth's mid-mantle (600-1500 km) in terms of a stratification index for the vertical mass flux, Sƒ (z) = 1 - ƒ(z) / ƒref (z), in which the reference value ƒref(z) approximates the local flux at depth z expected for unstratified convection (Sƒ=0). Although this flux stratification index cannot be directly constrained by observations, we show from a series of two-dimensional convection simulations that its value can be related to a thermal stratification index ST(Z) defined in terms of the radial correlation length of the temperature-perturbation field δT(z, Ω). ST is a good proxy for Sƒ at low stratifications (Sƒ<0.2), where it rises with stratification strength much more rapidly than Sƒ. Assuming that the shear-speed variations δβ(z, Ω) imaged by seismic tomography are primarily due to convective temperature fluctuations, we can approximate ST by Sβ, the analogous index for the radial correlation length of δβ, and thereby construct bounds on Sƒ. We discuss several key issues regarding the implementation of this strategy, including finite resolution of the seismic data, biases due to the parameterization of the tomographic models, and the bias and variance due to noise. From the comparison of the numerical simulations with recent tomographic structures, we conclude that it is unlikely that convection in the Earth's mantle has Sƒ≳0.15. We consider the possibility that this estimate is biased because mantle convection is intermittent and therefore that the present-day tomographic snapshot may differ from its time average. Although this possibility cannot be dismissed completely, we argue that values of Sƒ≳0.2 can be discounted under a weak version of the Uniformitarian Principle. The bound obtained here from global tomography is consistent with local seismological evidence for slab flux into the lower mantle; however, the total material flux has to be significantly greater (by a factor of 2-3) than that

  18. Global tectonics from mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of the surface of the Earth are described using the theory of Plate Tectonics. Despite the fact that this theory has shaped modern geosciences it has some limitations, and among them the impossibility to evaluate the forces at the origin of the surface displacements and deformations. Hence important questions remain difficult to solve like the origin of the sizes of plates, forces driving mountain building or supercontinent dispersal... Tremendous progresses have been made in the past 15 years in mantle convection modelling. Especially, modern convection codes can solve for motion equations with complex material properties. Since the early 2000's, the development of pseudo-plastic rheologies contributed to produce convection models with plate-like behaviour: plates naturally emerge and interact with the flow in a self-organized manner. Using such models in 3D spherical geometry (computed with StagYY - Tackley, 2008), I will show that important questions on the global tectonics of the planet can be addressed now: the distribution of seafloor ages, the distribution of plate area, the lifetime of small and large plates or modes of plate reorganizations. Tackley, P.J., Modellng compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter, 171, 7-18 (2008).

  19. 3D Convection-pulsation Simulations with the HERACLES Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, S.; Audit, E.; Dintrans, B.

    2015-10-01

    We present 3D simulations of the coupling between surface convection and pulsations due to the κ-mechanism in classical Cepheids of the red edge of Hertzsprung-Russell diagram's instability strip. We show that 3D convection is less powerful than 2D convection and does not quench the radiative pulsations, leading to an efficient 3D κ-mechanism. Thus, the 3D instability strip is closer to the observed one than the 1D or 2D were.

  20. Convective Differentiation of the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Schmalzl, J.; Stemmer, K.

    2007-05-01

    The differentiation of the Earth is likely to be influenced by convective motions within the early mantle. Double- diffusive convection (d.d.c), driven by thermally and compositionally induced density differences is considered as a vital mechanism behind the dynamic differentiation of the early mantle.. We demonstrate that d.d.c can lead to layer formation on a planetary scale in the diffusive regime where composition stabilizes the system whil heat provides the destabilizing force. Choosing initial conditions in which a stable compositional gradient overlies a hot reservoir we mimic the situation of a planet in a phase after core formation. Differently from earlier studies we fixed the temperature rather than the heat flux at the lower boundary, resembling a more realistic condition for the core-mantle boundary. We have carried out extended series of numerical experiments, ranging from 2D calculations in constant viscosity fluids to fully 3D experiments in spherical geometry with strongly temperature dependent viscosity. The buoyancy ratio R and the Lewis number Le are the important dynamical parameters. In all scenarios we could identify a parameter regime where the non-layered initial structure developed into a state consisting of several, mostly two layers. Initially plumes from the bottom boundary homogenize a first layer which subsequently thickens. The bottom layer heats up and then convection is initiated in the top layer. This creates dynamically (i.e. without jump in the material behavior) a stack of separately convecting layers. The bottom layer is significantly thicker than the top layer. Strongly temperature dependent viscosity leads to a more complex evolution The formation of the bottom layer is followed by the generation of several layers on top. Finally the uppermost layer starts to convect. In general, the multilayer structure collapses into a two layer system. We employed a numerical technique, allowing for a diffusion free treatment of the

  1. 3D Spherical Convection Modeling of Venusian Resurfacing Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prunty, A. C.; King, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    The surface of Venus is thought to have undergone a global resurfacing event approximately 750 Ma. While several variations and modifications within the proposed resurfacing models exist, two end-member mechanisms can be broadly identified: (1) catastrophic overturns of the lithosphere, and (2) global volcanic resurfacing. We perform high-resolution, 3D spherical convection calculations using CitcomS to determine the conditions in Venus' deep interior necessary for each mechanism to occur. To date, we have focused on modeling episodic overturns of the lithosphere in the stagnant lid regime following the method of van Heck and Tackley (2008), and implementing a temperature-dependent rheology and yield stress. We find in general that lithospheric yielding can occur with a Rayleigh number of the order of 105 and a yield stress of the order of 20 ­- 400 MPa, consistent with the results of van Heck and Tackley. Additionally, we find that the behavior of lithospheric overturn depends strongly on the yield stress. To see this, we systematically increase the Rayleigh number and the yield stress via a priori scaling relationships. We find that models with Rayleigh number between 105 and 108 exhibit some variation of stagnant-lid convection; however, we observe that by varying the yield stress we are able to control the degree to which the overturns consist of the subduction of large, coherent segments of lithosphere as opposed to the formation of a large number of smaller, regional delaminations. We analyze these two modes of overturn by looking at the resultant geoid and topography fields to see if they yield distinguishable signatures. Furthermore, we analyze the spherical harmonic power spectrum of the geoid and topography to determine the extent to which their signatures are contributed from lower mantle anomalies and surface features. We also test the effects of mineral phase transformations and depth­-increasing viscosity on lithospheric overturn behavior by varying

  2. Temporal Variations in the Convective Style of Planetary Mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, H.; Loddoch, A.; Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    2005-12-01

    Investigations of mantle convection with temperature and stress dependent viscosity have shown the existence of fundamentally different convective styles: By varying e.g. the Rayleigh number, the viscosity contrast or the stress-dependency of viscosity, the planform of convection in the asymptotic stationary state changes from the so-called stagnant lid regime to an episodic behavior and further to a state characterized by a permanently mobilized surface. Our studies suggest that this transition may not only be induced by a change of parameters but also occurs temporally for fixed parameters. We have in fact observed convective systems in the stagnant lid regime that show isolated events of surface mobilization occurring out of a thermally equilibrated state. We use a 3D numerical mantle convection model to investigate mantle convection and surface dynamics as a coupled fluid dynamical system. Our studies focus on the occurrence of temporal variations in the style of convection especially between the stagnant lid and the episodic regime. We were able to deduce a mobilization criterion that describes the stability of the stagnant surface, thus allowing for a quantitative analysis of the transition to a (temporarily) mobilized surface. This criterion is also suitable to predict the occurrence of surface mobilization events.

  3. Driving forces: Slab subduction and mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    Mantle convection is the mechanism ultimately responsible for most geological activity at Earth's surface. To zeroth order, the lithosphere is the cold outer thermal boundary layer of the convecting mantle. Subduction of cold dense lithosphere provides tha major source of negative buoyancy driving mantle convection and, hence, surface tectonics. There are, however, importnat differences between plate tectonics and the more familiar convecting systems observed in the laboratory. Most important, the temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of mantle rocks makes the thermal boundary layer mechanically strong, leading to nearly rigid plates. This strength stabilizes the cold boundary layer against small amplitude perturbations and allows it to store substantial gravitational potential energy. Paradoxically, through going faults at subduction zones make the lithosphere there locally weak, allowing rapid convergence, unlike what is observed in laboratory experiments using fluids with temperature dependent viscosities. This bimodal strength distribution of the lithosphere distinguishes plate tectonics from simple convection experiments. In addition, Earth has a buoyant, relatively weak layer (the crust) occupying the upper part of the thermal boundary layer. Phase changes lead to extra sources of heat and bouyancy. These phenomena lead to observed richness of behavior of the plate tectonic style of mantle convection.

  4. Adiabaticity and viscosity in deep mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quareni, F.; Yuen, D. A.; Saari, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been conducted of steady convection with adiabatic and viscous heating for variable viscosity in the Boussinesq limit using the mean-field theory. A strong nonlinear coupling is found between the thermodynamic constants governing adiabatic heating and the rheological parameters. The range of rheological values for which adiabaticity would occur throughout the mantle has been established. Too large an activation volume, greater than 6 cu cm/mol for the cases examined, would produce unreasonably high temperature at the bottom of the mantle (greater than 6000 K) and superadiabatic gradients, especially in the lower mantle. Radiogenic heating plays a profound role in controlling dynamically mantle temperatures. Present values for the averaged mantle heat production would yield objectionably high temperatures in the lower mantle.

  5. Can mantle convection be self-regulated?

    PubMed

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The notion of self-regulating mantle convection, in which heat loss from the surface is constantly adjusted to follow internal radiogenic heat production, has been popular for the past six decades since Urey first advocated the idea. Thanks to its intuitive appeal, this notion has pervaded the solid earth sciences in various forms, but approach to a self-regulating state critically depends on the relation between the thermal adjustment rate and mantle temperature. I show that, if the effect of mantle melting on viscosity is taken into account, the adjustment rate cannot be sufficiently high to achieve self-regulation, regardless of the style of mantle convection. The evolution of terrestrial planets is thus likely to be far from thermal equilibrium and be sensitive to the peculiarities of their formation histories. Chance factors in planetary formation are suggested to become more important for the evolution of planets that are more massive than Earth.

  6. Can mantle convection be self-regulated?

    PubMed Central

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The notion of self-regulating mantle convection, in which heat loss from the surface is constantly adjusted to follow internal radiogenic heat production, has been popular for the past six decades since Urey first advocated the idea. Thanks to its intuitive appeal, this notion has pervaded the solid earth sciences in various forms, but approach to a self-regulating state critically depends on the relation between the thermal adjustment rate and mantle temperature. I show that, if the effect of mantle melting on viscosity is taken into account, the adjustment rate cannot be sufficiently high to achieve self-regulation, regardless of the style of mantle convection. The evolution of terrestrial planets is thus likely to be far from thermal equilibrium and be sensitive to the peculiarities of their formation histories. Chance factors in planetary formation are suggested to become more important for the evolution of planets that are more massive than Earth. PMID:27551689

  7. Can mantle convection be self-regulated?

    PubMed

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The notion of self-regulating mantle convection, in which heat loss from the surface is constantly adjusted to follow internal radiogenic heat production, has been popular for the past six decades since Urey first advocated the idea. Thanks to its intuitive appeal, this notion has pervaded the solid earth sciences in various forms, but approach to a self-regulating state critically depends on the relation between the thermal adjustment rate and mantle temperature. I show that, if the effect of mantle melting on viscosity is taken into account, the adjustment rate cannot be sufficiently high to achieve self-regulation, regardless of the style of mantle convection. The evolution of terrestrial planets is thus likely to be far from thermal equilibrium and be sensitive to the peculiarities of their formation histories. Chance factors in planetary formation are suggested to become more important for the evolution of planets that are more massive than Earth. PMID:27551689

  8. Preserving noble gases in a convecting mantle.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Helge M; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2009-05-28

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios sampled at many ocean islands are usually attributed to an essentially undegassed lower-mantle reservoir with high (3)He concentrations. A large and mostly undegassed mantle reservoir is also required to balance the Earth's (40)Ar budget, because only half of the (40)Ar produced from the radioactive decay of (40)K is accounted for by the atmosphere and upper mantle. However, geophysical and geochemical observations suggest slab subduction into the lower mantle, implying that most or all of Earth's mantle should have been processed by partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges and hotspot volcanoes. This should have left noble gases in both the upper and the lower mantle extensively outgassed, contrary to expectations from (3)He/(4)He ratios and the Earth's (40)Ar budget. Here we suggest a simple solution: recycling and mixing of noble-gas-depleted slabs dilutes the concentrations of noble gases in the mantle, thereby decreasing the rate of mantle degassing and leaving significant amounts of noble gases in the processed mantle. As a result, even when the mass flux across the 660-km seismic discontinuity is equivalent to approximately one lower-mantle mass over the Earth's history, high (3)He contents, high (3)He/(4)He ratios and (40)Ar concentrations high enough to satisfy the (40)Ar mass balance of the Earth can be preserved in the lower mantle. The differences in (3)He/(4)He ratios between mid-ocean-ridge basalts and ocean island basalts, as well as high concentrations of (3)He and (40)Ar in the mantle source of ocean island basalts, can be explained within the framework of different processing rates for the upper and the lower mantle. Hence, to preserve primitive noble gas signatures, we find no need for hidden reservoirs or convective isolation of the lower mantle for any length of time.

  9. Viscosity distribution in the mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubitsyn, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental property of the mantle which determines the global geodynamical processes. According to the microscopic theory of defects and laboratory experiments, viscosity exponentially depends on temperature and pressure, with activation energy and activation volume being the parameters. The existing laboratory measurements are conducted with much higher strain rates than in the mantle and have significant uncertainty. The data on postglacial rebound only allow the depth distributions of viscosity to be reconstructed. Therefore, spatial distributions (along the depth and lateral) are as of now determined from the models of mantle convection which are calculated by the numerical solution of the convection equations, together with the viscosity dependences on pressure and temperature ( PT-dependences). The PT-dependences of viscosity which are presently used in the numerical modeling of convection give a large scatter in the estimates for the lower mantle, which reaches several orders of magnitude. In this paper, it is shown that it is possible to achieve agreement between the calculated depth distributions of viscosity throughout the entire mantle and the postglacial rebound data. For this purpose, the values of the volume and energy of activation for the upper mantle can be taken from the laboratory experiments, and for the lower mantle, the activation volume should be reduced twice at the 660-km phase transition boundary. Next, the reduction in viscosity by an order of magnitude revealed at the depths below 2000 km by the postglacial rebound data can be accounted for by the presence of heavy hot material at the mantle bottom in the LLSVP zones. The models of viscosity spatial distribution throughout the entire mantle with the lithospheric plates are presented.

  10. Finding the patterns in mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Suzanne; Rozel, Antoine; Valentine, Andrew; Tackley, Paul; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-04-01

    Inverting mantle flow for past configurations is one of the great outstanding problems in geodynamics. We demonstrate a new method for probabilistic inversion of present-day Earth observations for mantle properties and history. Convection is a non-linear and chaotic, thwarting most standard inversion methods. Because of its chaotic and unpredictable nature, small errors in initial conditions, parameter selection, and computational precision can all significantly change the results produced by mantle convection simulations. However, some patterns and statistics of convection contain the signature of the parameters used in the simulations over long time-scales. Geodynamical studies often vary these parameters to investigate their effects on the patterns produced. We show that with a large enough set of simulations, we can investigate the relationship between input parameters and convection patterns in a more rigorous way. Probabilistic inversion is the only way to approach highly non-linear problems. We use neural networks to represent the probability density function linking convection simulation input parameters and the patterns they produce. This allows us to find input parameters, whilst taking into account all of the uncertainties that are inherent in the inversion of any Earth system: how well do we understand the physics of the process; what do we already know about the input parameters; and how certain are our observations? We show that the mantle structures produced by 4.5 Gyr of convection simulations contain enough information on yield stress, viscosity coefficients, mantle heating rate, and the initial state of primordial material that we can infer them directly without requiring any other information, such as plate velocity.

  11. Influence of the Geometry on Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Tosi, N.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling of geodynamic processes like mantle or core convection has strongly improved over the last two decades thanks to the steady development of numerical codes that tend to incorporate a more and more realistic physics. High-performance parallel computations allow the simulation of complex problems, such as the self-consistent generation of tectonic plates or the formation of planetary magnetic fields. However, the need to perform broad explorations of the parameter space and the large computational demands imposed by the non-linear, multi-scale nature of convection require several simplifications, in the domain geometry as well as in the physical complexity of the problem. A straightforward approach to limit the computational complexity of the simulations is to decrease the total number of degrees of freedom of the problem by reducing either the number of dimensions or the size of the model domain. On the one hand, for a given resolution, a 3D spherical shell clearly needs a much larger number of grid points than a 2D cylindrical shell or a 2D Cartesian box. At the resolutions typically employed to solve mantle convection problems, this difference amounts to at least a factor of a few hundreds. On the other hand, for certain problems, only a relatively small part of the mantle may be of interest, as in the case of the modelling of subduction [1], mid-ocean ridges or transform faults [2]. We adapted the code GAIA [3] to solve the Stokes problem in several different geometries (Cartesian box, cylindrical, spherical and regional-spherical) and dimensions (2D and 3D) and started a benchmark along the lines of [4] to assess the loss of accuracy when using reduced domains instead of a 3D spherical shell [5]. In general, upwellings in Cartesian geometry are rather flat, whereas the spherical geometry changes their shape to more mushroom-like structures. Furthermore, the number of plumes, which is representative of the characteristic wavelength of convection, varies

  12. Thermal and chemical convection in planetary mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupeyrat, L.; Sotin, C.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the upper mantle and extraction of melt result in the formation of a less dense depleted mantle. This paper describes series of two-dimensional models that investigate the effects of chemical buoyancy induced by these density variations. A tracer particles method has been set up to follow as closely as possible the chemical state of the mantle and to model the chemical buoyant force at each grid point. Each series of models provides the evolution with time of magma production, crustal thickness, surface heat flux, and thermal and chemical state of the mantle. First, models that do not take into account the displacement of plates at the surface of Earth demonstrate that chemical buoyancy has an important effect on the geometry of convection. Then models include horizontal motion of plates 5000 km wide. Recycling of crust is taken into account. For a sufficiently high plate velocity which depends on the thermal Rayleigh number, the cell's size is strongly coupled with the plate's size. Plate motion forces chemically buoyant material to sink into the mantle. Then the positive chemical buoyancy yields upwelling as depleted mantle reaches the interface between the upper and the lower mantle. This process is very efficient in mixing the depleted and undepleted mantle at the scale of the grid spacing since these zones of upwelling disrupt the large convective flow. At low spreading rates, zones of upwelling develop quickly, melting occurs, and the model predicts intraplate volcanism by melting of subducted crust. At fast spreading rates, depleted mantle also favors the formation of these zones of upwelling, but they are not strong enough to yield partial melting. Their rapid displacement toward the ridge contributes to faster large-scale homogenization.

  13. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  14. The origin of large scale structure in mantle convection: effects of plate motions and viscosity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, H.; Richards, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Convection in Earth{close_quote}s mantle is dominated by long-wavelength structure, as evidenced by the very {open_quote}{open_quote}red{close_quote}{close_quote} spectra of both seismic velocity heterogeneity in the deep mantle and the non-hydrostatic gravity field, or geoid. Here we show that this large-scale structure may be a consequence of two factors that influence the scale of mantle convection. First, the existence of surface plates, which tend to organize the flow. Second, a substantial increase in lower mantle viscosity for which there is considerable independent geophysical evidence. Combining these two factors in 3-D spherical mantle convection models explains rather well the observed seismic spectrum of mantle heterogeneity. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1996

  15. Zig-Zag Thermal-Chemical 3-D Instabilities in the Mantle Wedge: Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Gerya, T. V.; Arcay, D.; Yuen, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    To understand the plume initiation and propagation it is important to understand whether small-scale convection is occurring under the back-arc in the Low Viscosity Wedge(LVW) and its implication on the island-arc volcanism. Honda et al. [Honda and Saito, 2003; Honda, et al., 2007]) already deployed small- scale convection in the Low Viscosity Wedge (LVW) above a subducting slab with kinematically imposed velocity boundary condition. They have suggested that a roll (finger)-like pattern of hot and cold anomalies emerges in the mantle wedge above the subducting slab. Here, we perform three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of intraoceanic one-sided subduction with spontaneously bending retreating slab characterized by weak hydrated upper interface by using multigrid approach combined with characteristics-based marker-in-cell method with conservative finite difference schemes[Gerya and Yuen, 2003a], to investigate the 3D instabilities above the slab and lateral variation along the arc. Our results show that water released from subducting slab through dehydration reactions may lower the viscosity of the mantle. It allows the existence of wave-like small-scale convection in the LVW, which is shown as roll-like structure in 2D petrological-thermomechanical numerical experiments [Gorczyk et al., 2006] using in-situ rock properties computed on the basis of Gibbs free energy minimization. However, in our 3D cases, the rolls aligning with the arc mainly occur earlier , while zig-zag small-scale thermal-chemical instabilities may episodically form above the slab at later stages, which is different from the aligning finger-like pattern in purely thermal models (Honda et al,2003;2007). Also in contrast to thermal convection chemically buoyant hydrated plumes rising from the slab in our models are actually colder then the mantle wedge [Gerya and Yuen 2003b] which also strongly modify both the convection pattern and the seismic structure in

  16. Compressible Magma/Mantle Dynamics: 3d, Adaptive Simulations in ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Heister, Timo

    2016-09-01

    Melt generation and migration are an important link between surface processes and the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's interior. However, their vastly different time scales make it difficult to study mantle convection and melt migration in a unified framework, especially for three-dimensional, global models. And although experiments suggest an increase in melt volume of up to 20% from the depth of melt generation to the surface, previous computations have neglected the individual compressibilities of the solid and the fluid phase. Here, we describe our extension of the finite element mantle convection code ASPECT that adds melt generation and migration. We use the original compressible formulation of the McKenzie equations, augmented by an equation for the conservation of energy. Applying adaptive mesh refinement to this type of problems is particularly advantageous, as the resolution can be increased in areas where melt is present and viscosity gradients are high, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. Together with a high-performance, massively parallel implementation, this allows for high resolution, 3d, compressible, global mantle convection simulations coupled with melt migration. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of benchmarks and model setups, compare results of the compressible and incompressible formulation, and show the effectiveness of adaptive mesh refinement when applied to melt migration. Our model of magma dynamics provides a framework for modelling processes on different scales and investigating links between processes occurring in the deep mantle and melt generation and migration. This approach could prove particularly useful applied to modelling the generation of komatiites or other melts originating in greater depths. The implementation is available in the Open Source ASPECT repository.

  17. 3-D Spherical modelling of the thermo-chemical evolution of Venus' mantle and crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armann, M.; Tackley, P. J.

    2008-09-01

    Background Several first-order aspects of the dynamics of Venus' mantle remain poorly understood. These include (i) how Venus' mantle loses its radiogenic heat, which is expected to be about the same as Earth's, despite the presence of stagnant lid convection. Hypotheses that have been advanced (summarised in [1]) are conduction through a thin lithosphere, episodic overturn of the lithosphere, magmatic heat transport, and concentration of almost all heat-producing elements into the crust, but there are problems with all of these taken individually. A thick lithosphere may not be consistent with admittance ratios, magmatic heat transport would require a too-large resurfacing rate, and a large concentration of heat-producing elements in the crust would cause weakness and possibly melting in the deep crust. (ii) The relatively long-wavelength distribution of surface features, which is surprising because numerical models and analogue laboratory experiments of stagnant-lid convection produce relatively short-wavelength convective cells. (iii) The inferred (from crater distributions [2]) relatively uniform surface age of 500-700 Ma. (iv) Whether the highlands are above mantle downwellings as on Earth or above mantle upwellings [3]. (v) How the mantle can have outgassing only 25% of 40Ar [4] but supposedly most of its water [5]. (vi) The cause of coronae and relationship to mantle processes [6]. Model To study some of these questions, we take advantage of advances in computational capabilities to perform integrated thermo-chemical convection models of Venus' evolution over 4.5 billion years, in 3-D spherical geometry as well as 2-D spherical annulus geometry [7]. These models include realistic ("laboratory") rheological parameters for diffusion creep and dislocation creep based on [8][9], which are also composition-dependent, and plastic yielding based on Byerlee's law, which might cause changes in tectonic regime (e.g., episodic plate tectonics). Crustal formation and

  18. Eclogites, pyroxene geotherm, and layered mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Ongley, J S; Macgregor, I D

    1986-09-19

    Temperatures of equilibration for the majority (81 percent) of the eclogite xenoliths of the Roberts Victor kimberlite pipe in South Africa range between 1000 degrees and 1250 degrees C, falling essentially on the gap of the lower limb of the subcontinental inflected geotherm derived from garnet peridotite xenoliths. In view of the Archean age (>2.6 x 10(9) years) of these eclogites and their stratigraphic position on the geotherm, it is proposed that the inflected part of the geotherm represents the convective boundary layer beneath the conductive lid of the lithospheric plate. The gradient of 8 Celsius degrees per kilometer for the inflection is characteristic of a double thermal boundary layer and suggests layered convection rather than whole mantle convection for the earth. PMID:17843357

  19. Eclogites, pyroxene geotherm, and layered mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Ongley, J S; Macgregor, I D

    1986-09-19

    Temperatures of equilibration for the majority (81 percent) of the eclogite xenoliths of the Roberts Victor kimberlite pipe in South Africa range between 1000 degrees and 1250 degrees C, falling essentially on the gap of the lower limb of the subcontinental inflected geotherm derived from garnet peridotite xenoliths. In view of the Archean age (>2.6 x 10(9) years) of these eclogites and their stratigraphic position on the geotherm, it is proposed that the inflected part of the geotherm represents the convective boundary layer beneath the conductive lid of the lithospheric plate. The gradient of 8 Celsius degrees per kilometer for the inflection is characteristic of a double thermal boundary layer and suggests layered convection rather than whole mantle convection for the earth.

  20. Temporal Variations in the Convective Style of Planetary Mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loddoch, A.; Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    2004-12-01

    Investigations of mantle convection with temperature- and stress-dependent viscosity have revealed the existence of fundamentally different convective styles: By varying e.g. the Rayleigh number, the viscosity contrast or the stress dependency of viscosity, the planform of convection in the asymptotic stationary state changes from the so-called stagnant lid regime to an episodic behaviour and further to a state characterized by a mobile surface. Our studies suggest that this transition may not only be induced by a change of parameters but also occurs temporally, i.e. a system that initially shows an episodic behaviour falls into the stagnant lid mode of convection as time proceeds. Such a temporal variation can probably describe the evolution of terrestrial planets like Mars, which is assumed to have undergone a change of convective style in its early history. In this contribution we present a 3D fluiddynamical model that exhibits a change of the convective style for temporally constant parameters. We also describe the methods developed to characterize different regimes and to identify the transitions observed.

  1. Mantle convection and crustal tectonics in the Tethyan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, L.; Sternai, P.; Menant, A.; Faccenna, C.; Becker, T. W.; Burov, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Mantle convection drives plate tectonics and the size, number and thermotectonic age of plates codetermines the convection pattern. However, the degree of coupling of surface deformation and mantle flow is unclear. The use of SKS waves seismic anisotropy shows a coherence of mantle and surface deformation, but significant examples depart from this scenario. We review geological observations and present kinematic reconstructions of the Aegean and Middle East and 3D numerical models to discuss the role of asthenospheric flow in crustal deformation. At the scale of the Mediterranean backarcs, lithosphere-mantle coupling is effective below the most extended regions as shown by the alignment of SKS fast orientations and stretching directions in MCCs. In the Aegean, the directions of mantle flow, crustal stretching and GPS velocities are almost parallel, while, below the main part of the Anatolian plate, SKS fast orientations are oblique to GPS velocities. When considering the long-term geological history of the Tethyan convergent, one can conclude that asthenospheric flow has been an important player. The case of Himalaya and Tibet strongly supports a major contribution of a northward asthenospheric push, with no persistent slab that could drive India after collision, large thrust planes being then decoupling zones between deep convection and surface tectonics. The African plate repeatedly fragmented during its migration, with rifting of large pieces of continents that had then been moving northward faster than Africa (Apulia, Arabia). This also suggests a dominant role of an underlying flow at large scale, dragging and mechanically eroding plates and breaking them into fragments, then passively carried. Mantle flow thus seems to be able to carry plates toward subduction zones, break-away pieces of plates, and deform backarc upper crust where the lithosphere is the thinnest. Most numerical models of lithospheric deformation are designed such that strain is a consequence

  2. Mantle Convection Models Constrained by Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, C. J.; Shahnas, M.; Peltier, W. R.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Although available three dimensional models of the lateral heterogeneity of the mantle, based upon the latest advances in seismic tomographic imaging (e.g. Ritsema et al., 2004, JGR) have provided profound insights into aspects of the mantle general circulation that drives continental drift, the compatibility of the tomography with explicit models of mantle mixing has remained illusive. For example, it remains a significant issue as to whether hydrodynamic models of the mixing process alone are able to reconcile the observed detailed pattern of surface plate velocities or whether explicit account must be taken of elastic fracture processes to account for the observed equipartition of kinetic energy between the poloidal and toroidal components of the surface velocity pattern (e.g. Forte and Peltier, 1987, JGR). It is also an issue as to the significance of the role of mantle chemical heterogeneity in determining the buoyancy distribution that drives mantle flow, especially given the expected importance of the spin transition of iron that onsets in the mid-lower mantle, at least in the ferropericlase component of the mineralogy. In this paper we focus upon the application of data assimilation techniques to the development of a model of mantle mixing that is consistent with a modern three dimensional tomography based model of seismic body wave heterogeneity. Beginning with the simplest possible scenario, that chemical heterogeneity is irrelevant to first order, we employ a three dimensional version of the recently published control volume based convection model of Shahnas and Peltier (2010, JGR) as the basis for the assimilation of a three dimensional density field inferred from our preferred tomography model (Ritsema et al., 2004, JGR). The convection model fully incorporates the dynamical influence of the Olivine-Spinel and Spinel-Perovskite+Magnesiowustite solid-solid phase transformations that bracket the mantle transition zone as well as the recently discovered

  3. Free surface calculations in mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, I.; Buffett, B. A.; Heister, T.

    2015-12-01

    Geodynamic simulations increasingly rely on simulations with a true free surface to investigate questions of dynamic topography, tectonic deformation, gravity perturbations, and global mantle convection. However, implementations of free surface boundary conditions have proven challenging from a standpoint of accuracy, robustness, and stability. In particular, free surfaces tend to suffer from sloshing instabilities, also known as the "drunken sailor" instability, which severely limit time step sizes. Several schemes have been proposed in the literature to deal with these instabilities. Here we analyze the problem of creeping viscous flow with a free surface and discuss the origin of these instabilities. We demonstrate their cause and how existing stabilization schemes work to damp them out. Our analysis is based on formulating a generalized eigenvalue problem for the relaxation spectra of the linearized free surface problem. We also propose a new scheme for removing instabilites from free surface calculations. It does not require modifications to the system matrix, nor additional variables, but is instead an explicit scheme based on nonstandard finite differences. It relies on a single stabilization parameter which may be identified with the smallest relaxation timescale of the free surface. We analyze the stability and accuracy of the nonstandard finite difference scheme, and describe its implementation in the open source mantle convection software Aspect. We also provide comparisons between the nonstandard finite difference scheme and the quasi-implicit scheme proposed by Kaus, Muhlhaus, and May (2010).

  4. Probing Seismically Melting Induced Mantle Heterogeneities in Thermal-chemical Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, H. V.; Davies, H.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two regions at the base of the Earth's mantle (the Large Low-Shear Velocity Provinces) pose a fundamental problem in understanding large-scale mantle dynamics and history. Are they dense piles of (possibly primordial) material separated from mantle circulation, or large-scale thermal features which are part of global mantle convection? Or some combination of the two? We use our numerical 3D spherical mantle convection code to perform simulations of the Earths mantle dynamical evolution. We drive the surface velocity of the model according to 200 Ma plate motion reconstructions, to arrive at Earth-like structures in the mantle at present day. Variations in bulk chemistry will be tracked in two ways: 1) by starting the calculations with a (primordial) dense layer at the base of the mantle, and 2) by tracking basalt fraction which is fractionated upon melting close to the surface. The resulting distribution of chemical heterogeneity and temperature will be converted to seismic velocities. This will be done with a thermodynamical database (Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni, GJI, 2005, 2011), allowing us to compare the model with previous observations of triplications and waveform complexity near the margins of the LLSVPs. These observations have been taken as proof that strong chemical variations are present; our simulations can be used to show whether this is true, or if purely thermal convection can also cause these features. We simulate finite-frequency, 3D seismograms at ~5 s period and compare these with previous studies.

  5. Volatiles, rheology, and mantle convection: Comparing Earth, Venus, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicate rheology is controlled in part by volatile content. The variation of viscosity with position in the mantle will influence the nature of mantle convection; hence, modeling mantle convection and its effect on surface observables such as the geoid places constraints on the viscosity structure of a planet's mantle and may indirectly constrain the volatile distribution. Models of viscous mantle flow and the Earth's geoid indicate that there is roughly a two order of magnitude variation in viscosity between the upper and lower mantles, although there is some disagreement over the depth of the viscosity minimum in the upper mantle. Some studies of post-glacial rebound also support such a viscosity contrast between the upper and lower mantles. On Venus, several highland regions appear to be supported by mantle plumes. Modeling of the geoid and topography of these regions indicates that if these features are plume-related, then the mantle of Venus can not have an Earth-like low viscosity zone in its upper mantle. On Mars, the Tharsis volcanic province has alternatively been explained as supported either by mantle convection or by flexure of a thick lithosphere. If the convective model is correct, then the large geoid anomaly requires that Mars can not have a low viscosity zone in its upper mantle.

  6. Temporal Variations in the Convective Style of Planetary Mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loddoch, A.; Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    2006-12-01

    Investigations of mantle convection with temperature- and strain-rate-dependent viscosity have shown the existence of three fundamentally different convective styles. By varying e.g. the Rayleigh number, the viscosity contrast or the strain-rate dependency of viscosity either the so-called stagnant lid regime, the episodic behavior or a state characterized by a constantly mobilized surface is obtained. Our studies suggest that this transition may not only be induced by a change of parameters but also occurs temporally. For example, a system initially showing an episodic behavior falls into the stagnant lid mode of convection as time proceeds. In this contribution we present a 3D fluid dynamical model that shows a change in the convective style for temporally constant parameters. We developed a mobilization criterion that describes the stability of the stagnant surface layer. This allows for a quantitative analysis of the transition to a temporarily mobilized surface. The criterion is used to predict the occurrence of further surface mobilization events. It furthermore provides insights into the temporal characteristics of the newly found transitional regime.

  7. Mantle convection and the state of the Earth's interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1987-01-01

    During 1983 to 1986 emphasis in the study of mantle convection shifted away from fluid mechanical analysis of simple systems with uniform material properties and simple geometries, toward analysis of the effects of more complicated, presumably more realistic models. The important processes related to mantle convection are considered. The developments in seismology are discussed.

  8. Mantle convection and the state of the earth's interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Gurnis, Michael

    1987-01-01

    During 1983 to 1986 emphasis in the study of mantle convection shifted away from fluid mechanical analysis of simple systems with uniform material properties and simple geometries, toward analysis of the effects of more complicated, presumably more realistic models. The important processes related to mantle convection are considered. The developments in seismology are discussed.

  9. Convective instability in sedimentation: 3-D numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Hsu, Tian-Jian; Balachandar, S.

    2014-11-01

    To provide a probable explanation on the field observed rapid sedimentation process near river mouths, we investigate the convective sedimentation in stably stratified saltwater using 3-D numerical simulations. Guided by the linear stability analysis, this study focuses on the nonlinear interactions of several mechanisms, which lead to various sediment finger patterns, and the effective settling velocity for sediment ranging from clay (single-particle settling velocity V0 = 0.0036 and 0.0144 mm/s, or particle diameter d = 2 and 4 μm) to silt (V0 = 0.36 mm/s, or d = 20 μm). For very fine sediment with V0 = 0.0036 mm/s, the convective instability is dominated by double diffusion, characterized by millimeter-scale fingers. Gravitational settling slightly increases the growth rate; however, it has notable effect on the downward development of vertical mixing shortly after the sediment interface migrates below the salt interface. For sediment with V0 = 0.0144 mm/s, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities become dominant before double-diffusive modes grow sufficiently large. Centimeter-scale and highly asymmetric sediment fingers are obtained due to nonlinear interactions between different modes. For sediment with V0 = 0.36 mm/s, Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism dominates and the resulting centimeter-scale sediment fingers show a plume-like structure. The flow pattern is similar to that without ambient salt stratification. Rapid sedimentation with effective settling velocity on the order of 1 cm/s is likely driven by convective sedimentation for sediment with V0 greater than 0.1 mm/s at concentration greater than 10-20 g/L.

  10. Hard turbulent thermal convection and thermal evolution of the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, D. A.; Hansen, U.; Zhao, W.; Vincent, A. P.; Malevsky, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    Hard turbulent convection is investigated using laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. In Newtonian mantle convection, the appearance of disconnected plumes marks the transition from soft to hard turbulence. For non-Newtonian rheology, the transition to hard turbulence takes place at much lower Nusselt numbers than it does for Newtonian rheology. This has important ramifications for the mantle. Large curvatures are developed in the trajectories of non-Newtonian plumes in the hard turbulent regime, in contrast to the trajectories of Newtonian plumes. When phase transitions are considered, mantle convection tends to become more layered with increasing Rayleigh numbers. The manner of mantle convection might have changed with time from a layered to a more whole mantle type of flow. Superplume events could have been caused by catastrophic overturns associated with strong gravitational instabilities in the transition zone.

  11. 3D Simulations of methane convective storms on Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    The arrival of the Cassini/Huygens mission to Titan has opened an unprecedented opportunity to study the atmosphere of this satellite. Under the pressure-temperature conditions on Titan, methane, a large atmospheric component amounting perhaps to a 3-5% of the atmosphere, is close to its triple point, potentially playing a similar role as water on Earth. The Huygens probe has shown a terrain shaped by erosion of probably liquid origin, suggestive of past rain. On the other hand, Voyager IRIS spectroscopic observations of Titan imply a saturated atmosphere of methane (amounting perhaps to 150 covered by methane clouds, if we think on Earth meteorology. However, observations from Earth and Cassini have shown that clouds are localized, transient and fast evolving, in particular in the South Pole (currently in its summer season). This might imply a lack of widespread presence on Titan of nuclei where methane could initiate condensation and particle growth with subsequent precipitation. We investigate different scenarios of moist convective storms on Titan using a complete 3D atmospheric model that incorporates a full microphysics treatment required to study cloud formation processes under a saturated atmosphere with low concentration of condensation nuclei. We study local convective development under a variety of atmospheric conditions: sub-saturation, super-saturation, abundances of condensation nuclei fall, condensation nuclei lifted from the ground or gently falling from the stratosphere. We show that under the appropriate circumstances, precipitation rates comparable to typical tropical storms on Earth can be found. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  12. The mantle wedge's transient 3-D flow regime and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Le Voci, G.; Goes, S.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Arc volcanism, volatile cycling, mineralization, and continental crust formation are likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure. Wedge flow is often assumed to follow a regular corner-flow pattern. However, studies that incorporate a hydrated rheology and thermal buoyancy predict internal small-scale-convection (SSC). Here, we systematically explore mantle-wedge dynamics in 3-D simulations. We find that longitudinal "Richter-rolls" of SSC (with trench-perpendicular axes) commonly occur if wedge hydration reduces viscosities to Pa s, although transient transverse rolls (with trench-parallel axes) can dominate at viscosities of Pa s. Rolls below the arc and back arc differ. Subarc rolls have similar trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular dimensions of 100-150 km and evolve on a 1-5 Myr time-scale. Subback-arc instabilities, on the other hand, coalesce into elongated sheets, usually with a preferential trench-perpendicular alignment, display a wavelength of 150-400 km and vary on a 5-10 Myr time scale. The modulating influence of subback-arc ridges on the subarc system increases with stronger wedge hydration, higher subduction velocity, and thicker upper plates. We find that trench-parallel averages of wedge velocities and temperature are consistent with those predicted in 2-D models. However, lithospheric thinning through SSC is somewhat enhanced in 3-D, thus expanding hydrous melting regions and shifting dehydration boundaries. Subarc Richter-rolls generate time-dependent trench-parallel temperature variations of up to K, which exceed the transient 50-100 K variations predicted in 2-D and may contribute to arc-volcano spacing and the variable seismic velocity structures imaged beneath some arcs.

  13. 3-d numerical modeling for the interaction of mantle plumes with cratonic keel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Kuo, B.

    2003-04-01

    The magmatism of the Ethiopian and east African plateaus is one of the largest active continental igneous provinces on Earth. Great volumes of volcanic deposits have been thought to be originated from the upwelling mantle or plumes under the African continent [e.g., Ebinger et al., 1989]. Major, trace element and radiogenic isotope ratios (Sr, Nd and Pb) and the dating data [George et al., 1998] suggest that there are at least two mantle plumes, i.e., the latter Afar plume and earlier Kenya plume, beneath the East African rift system. It was proposed [e.g., Rogers et al., 2000] that the northeastward plate motion over the Kenya plume produced the magmatism from southern Ethiopia to northern Tanzania since about 45 Ma, and that the Afar plume later generated the magma in the Ethiopia Plateau. Meanwhile, it has been found that the Tanzania Craton in central Africa has survived the thermal erosion of the mantle plumes and the extensional tectonics in this region [e.g., Ritsema and van Heijst, 2000]. Here we investigate how the plume material changes its directions when it meets the tectonically stable cratonic keel using 3-D numerical experiments. The stronger temperature dependence of viscosity as well as the hotter plumes can at times provide higher buoyancy flux and determine how far the plume material can reach. In the meantime, the cratonic keel can divert the plume material and induce the edge-driven convection. Numerical models have been designed to address the double-plume hypothesis, in which the plumes were initiated at different periods of time and interacted with the cratonic keel on a moving plate. The numerical models and a comparison between the models and geological constraints will be presented.

  14. What Does the Mantle Remember of Its Convection History?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, S.; Tackley, P. J.; Valentine, A. P.; Trampert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle convection is a non-linear system. Convection patterns are therefore not directly proportional to initialization parameters. We investigate which parameters affect convection evolution, and the timescales over which these effects are observable. To do this, we run thousands of mantle convection simulations, each model having different, randomly selected, thermal, rheological, and compositional starting parameters. Our convection program is StagYY, run in 2D spherical-annulus geometry with self-consistent mineral physics properties calculated in Perple_X. StagYY allows melting and basaltic crust production and includes decaying radiogenic heat production in both core and mantle. At various timesteps after initiation, the temperature, density, and composition fields can be extracted. We train neural networks to find the most likely initial parameters responsible for any convection pattern. The networks produce probability density functions, so that the relative likelihood of any value of the inputs parameters can be calculated, allowing inversion of the non-linear convection systems. This means that the uncertainty of the result is also provided. After two billion years, we can find initial mantle potential temperature, initial CMB temperature, approximated initial mantle composition, reference viscosity, depth dependent viscosity, yield stress and the existence and thickness of any initial layer of primordial material. Our results suggest that the signal from these initialisation parameters is retained in the pattern of convection for much longer than 2 Gy. Our ultimate goal is to use tomographic models of the real mantle to investigate the 'initialisation' parameters of the Earth. We can also apply the same methodology to back-step convection, allowing us to build up a history of Earth's mantle convection.

  15. Thermochemical differentiation and intermittent convection of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelkin, Vycheslav; Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2010-05-01

    The numerical experiments are based on the thermochemical model of mantle convection. The model includes the description of the endothermic phase transition at the upper/lower mantle boundary. The aim of this work is the influence of thermochemical processes on mantle convection. As regards the thermochemical differentiation takes place near the mantle boundaries. The differentiation in the D" layer is due to melting with the rise in temperature and the descent of molten iron-bearing components of mantle material into the core. This process generates the lighter fraction, particularly produces the lower mantle plums. It takes place only if the current temperature exceeds the melting temperature. The differentiation near the outer mantle boundary is due to extracting the lighter mantle components into the crust. These thermochemical processes take place when the hot substance is lifting and the pressure falls. The growth of the continental crust on the outer surface is modeling. The oceanic crust returns into mantle throw the subducting zones. The modeling includes the "gabbro-eclogite" transition of oceanic crust. As regards the generation of heavy eclogitic material is located at the depths 80-100 km. Seismic tomography of deep mantle layers showed that the mantle really contains large inclusions of heavy, supposedly eclogitic material. The numerical experiments give a strong nonlinear interaction (either accelerating or slowing down) between the thermochemical processes and mantle convection. It leads to an impulsive character of geodynamics and promotes the formation of different cycles in the evolutionary process. Periods of gradual evolution are interrupted by the geodynamic activity outbursts. These peaks of geodynamic activity play a key role in the geological history of the Earth. Analogous oscillations of geodynamic process produce interaction heavy and light density inhomogeneities with the endothermic phase transition. When convection is layered then the

  16. The effect of water to mantle rheology and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brändli, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Water has a significant influence to mantle rheology and therefore also to the convection of the mantle and the plate tectonics. The viscosity of the mantle can be decreased by up to two orders of magnitude when water is present. Another effect of the water is the change in the solidus of the mantle and therefore the melting regime. These two effects of water in the mantle have a significant influence on mantle convection and plate tectonics. The influx of water to the mantle is driven by plate tectonics as wet oceanic lithosphere is subducted into the mantle, then water is brought back to the lithosphere and the surface by MOR-, arc- and hotspot volcanism. Studies show that the amount of water in the mantle is about three times bigger than the water in the oceans. To model this water cycle multiple additions to our simulation code StagYY are necessary. A water diffusion to complement the water transport due to advection, and water dependent viscosity law are implemented. This additions to StagYY will be followed by implementations of a pressure-temperature law for maximum water content, additional transport mechanisms for water, water dependent solidus functions and the implementation of recent values for plate velocities and water capacities in subducting slabs. This will allow us to research the influence of water to the mantle convection and rheology over the past 200Ma.

  17. Role of viscoelasticity in mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patocka, Vojtech; Cadek, Ondrej; Tackley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    constitutive equations in a way more suitable for global studies, which is different from the method refered to earlier. The computational domain is expected to be composed of two parts: One in which elastic effects are important and where material does not move significantly within one elastic time step and one where elastic effects are not important, where material is allowed to move across many cells within one elastic time step. Local accumulation of stress in viscoelastic simulations is observed, suggesting elasticity could e.g. trigger plasticity in realistic cases. References Moresi L., Dufour F., Mühlhaus H.-B., 2003: A Lagrangian integration point finite element method for large deformation modeling of viscoelastic geomaterials, Journal of Computational Physics, 184 (2003), 476 - 497 Tackley P., 2008: Modelling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 171 (2008), 7-18

  18. ON THE VIGOR OF MANTLE CONVECTION IN SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Tachinami, Chihiro; Kameyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Masaki E-mail: ctchnm.geo@gmail.com E-mail: cmaogawa@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    Numerical models are presented to clarify how adiabatic compression affects thermal convection in the mantle of super-Earths ten times the Earth's mass. The viscosity strongly depends on temperature, and the Rayleigh number is much higher than that of the Earth's mantle. The strong effect of adiabatic compression reduces the activity of mantle convection; hot plumes ascending from the bottom of the mantle lose their thermal buoyancy in the middle of the mantle owing to adiabatic decompression, and do not reach the surface. A thick lithosphere, as thick as 0.1 times the depth of the mantle, develops along the surface boundary, and the efficiency of convective heat transport measured by the Nusselt number is reduced by a factor of about four compared with the Nusselt number for thermal convection of incompressible fluid. The strong effect of adiabatic decompression is likely to inhibit hot spot volcanism on the surface and is also likely to affect the thermal history of the mantle, and hence, the generation of magnetic field in super-Earths.

  19. Mantle convection with plates and mobile, faulted plate margins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, S; Gurnis, M

    1995-02-10

    A finite-element formulation of faults has been incorporated into time-dependent models of mantle convection with realistic rheology, continents, and phase changes. Realistic tectonic plates naturally form with self-consistent coupling between plate and mantle dynamics. After the initiation of subduction, trenches rapidly roll back with subducted slabs temporarily laid out along the base of the transition zone. After the slabs have penetrated into the lower mantle, the velocity of trench migration decreases markedly. The inhibition of slab penetration into the lower mantle by the 670-kilometer phase change is greatly reduced in these models as compared to models without tectonic plates. PMID:17813909

  20. Constraints on upper mantle rheology from modeling of plate motions with fully 3D visco-elasto-plastic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, S. V.; Popov, A.; Steinberger, B.

    2009-04-01

    The convection in deep Earth is linked to the surface through the heterogeneous and rheologically complex lithosphere and asthenosphere, which are usually strongly simplified in global geodynamic models. We use a newly developed 3D thermomechanical finite element numerical technique (Popov and Sobolev, PEPI 2008) to model a 300 km thick upper layer of the Earth in full 3D, coupled with the convecting mantle. The present day temperature distribution and crustal structure within the layer are taken from existing models. We also assume that the upper layer is composed from non-linear temperature- and stress-dependent visco-elastic rheology, corresponding to the dry or wet olivine (mantle) or naturally wet plagioclase (crust), combined with Mohr-Coulomb frictional plasticity. Plate boundaries are represented by the narrow zones of elasto-visco-plastic rheology with much lower frictional strength than within the plates. The mantle below the 300 km depth is modeled using Hager and O'Connell's mantle flow spectral modeling technique with present day density and viscosity distribution based on either interpretation of global seismic tomography or history of subduction. The upper layer and mantle modeling domains are coupled by iteratively achieved precise continuity of tractions and velocities at 300 km depth. Here we will show modeling results for the present day Earth structure focusing on the effect on the plate velocities of the frictional strength at plate boundaries, of mantle potential temperature and of rheology of the asthenosphere (dry versus wet). Modeling shows that deep convection generates plate tectonic-like velocity pattern only when effective friction at subduction plate boundaries becomes less than 0.1. Both magnitudes and directions of plate velocities are reproduced very well at friction in subduction zones around 0.005-0.05 and friction at other plate boundaries of 0.05-0.1. The best fit of the observed velocities is obtained assuming that

  1. New observational and experimental evidence for a plume-fed asthenosphere boundary layer in mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.; Shi, C.

    2013-03-01

    The textbook view is that the asthenosphere is the place beneath the tectonic plates where competing temperature and pressure effects on mantle rheology result in the lowest viscosity region of Earth's mantle. We think the sub-oceanic asthenosphere exists for a different reason, that instead it is where rising plumes of hot mantle stall and spread out beneath the strong tectonic plates. Below this plume-fed asthenosphere is a thermal and density inversion with cooler underlying average-temperature mantle. Here we show several recent seismic studies that are consistent with a plume-fed asthenosphere. These include the seismic inferences that asthenosphere appears to resist being dragged down at subduction zones, that a sub-oceanic thermal inversion ∼250-350 km deep is needed to explain the seismic velocity gradient there for an isochemical mantle, that a fast 'halo' of shear-wave travel-times surrounds the Hawaiian plume conduit, and that an apparent seismic reflector is found ∼300 km beneath Pacific seafloor near Hawaii. We also present 2D axisymmetric and 3D numerical experiments that demonstrate these effects in internally consistent models with a plume-fed asthenosphere. If confirmed, the existence of a plume-fed asthenosphere will change our understanding of the dynamics of mantle convection and melting, and the links between surface plate motions and mantle convection.

  2. Using pattern recognition to infer parameters governing mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Suzanne; Valentine, Andrew P.; Tackley, Paul J.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-08-01

    The results of mantle convection simulations are fully determined by the input parameters and boundary conditions used. These input parameters can be for initialisation, such as initial mantle temperature, or can be constant values, such as viscosity exponents. However, knowledge of Earth-like values for many input parameters are very poorly constrained, introducing large uncertainties into the simulation of mantle flow. Convection is highly non-linear, therefore linearised inversion methods cannot be used to recover past configurations over more than very short periods of time, which makes finding both initial and constant simulation input parameters very difficult. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for making inferences about simulation input parameters from observations of the mantle temperature field after billions of years of convection. The method is fully probabilistic. We use prior sampling to construct probability density functions for convection simulation input parameters, which are represented using neural networks. Assuming smoothness, we need relatively few samples to make inferences, making this approach much more computationally tractable than other probabilistic inversion methods. As a proof of concept, we show that our method can invert the amplitude spectra of temperature fields from 2D convection simulations, to constrain yield stress, surface reference viscosity and the initial thickness of primordial material at the CMB, for our synthetic test cases. The best constrained parameter is yield stress. The reference viscosity and initial thickness of primordial material can also be inferred reasonably well after several billion years of convection.

  3. New Insights into the Basin and Swell Dynamics of Africa Driven by Whole-Mantle Convection (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.; Rowley, D. B.; Mitrovica, J.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past decade, a number of geodynamic studies have attempted to relate different surface manifestations of mantle convection under the African plate, such as plate velocity, gravity and topography anomalies, to the underlying mantle flow. To date, these studies have not been successful in simultaneously reconciling the ensemble of these geodynamic data with the 3-D pattern of convection below Africa. This difficulty has hampered efforts to elucidate the detailed relationship between mantle convection and surface dynamics, in particular the unique basin and swell physiography of the African continent. We present a recent tomography-based mantle convection model derived from the joint inversion of seismic, geodynamic and mineral physical data sets that successfully reproduces the totality of the convection-related data outlined above [Forte et al., EPSL 2010]. The resolution of 3-D mantle structure provided by this new convection model also yields detailed regional maps of shallow mantle flow which clearly connect late-Cenozoic volcanic structures and adjacent basins to asthenospheric upwellings and downwellings, respectively. We find strong asthenospheric upwellings under the African swells such as the Hoggar massif, Main Ethiopian Rift, Kenya domes, Cameroon volcanic line, Canary and Cape Verde Islands. These upwellings of hot mantle material are driven by active, positive buoyancy forces that extend deep into the mantle. The convection model also reveals a distinct pattern of downwellings below the main African basins, in particular the Congo in central Africa and the offshore Somali basin. The subcontinental downwellings below these basins appear to provide a heretofore unrecognised mechanism for accommodating the opening of the East African Rift system. Such 'rift-accommodating' downwellings are similar to that predicted under the eastern margin of the Arabian plate, in the Persian Gulf, in response to the opening of the Red Sea.

  4. On global gravity anomalies and two-scale mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The two-scale model of mantle convection developed by Richter and Parsons (1975) predicts that if the depth of the convective layer is about 600 km, then for a plate moving at 10 cm/yr, longitudinal convective rolls will be produced in about 50 million years, and the strike of these rolls indicates the direction of motion of the plate relative to the upper mantle. The paper tests these predictions by examining a new global free air gravity model complete to the 30th degree and order. The free air gravity map developed shows a series of linear positive and negative anomalies (with transverse wavelengths of about 2000 km) spanning the Pacific Ocean, crossing the Pacific rise and striking parallel to the Hawaiian seamounts. It is suggested that the pattern of these anomalies may indicate the presence of longitudinal convective rolls beneath the Pacific plates, a result which tends to support the predictions of Richter and Parsons.

  5. Computational study of 3-D Benard convection with gravitational modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Peltier, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    In this numerical study the effects of a modulated gravitational field on three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection with heating from above or from below is investigated. The full, nonlinear, time-dependent, Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation are solved by a semiimplicit, pseudo-spectral procedure. This study has been motivated by the need to better understand the effects of vibration (G-Jitter) on fluids systems especially in the low gravity environment.

  6. Variability of Water in the Convecting Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauri, E. H.; Saal, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the abundance of water in mantle sources first requires careful consideration of the shallow-level effects of degassing and contamination by seawater-derived components. Use of submarine glasses erupted at >500m water depth, and critically-evaluated use of melt inclusion volatile contents, can be used to identify and eliminate degassing as an important mitigating factor; widespread evidence for seawater-derived components are evident in halogen contents, but these effects do not typically correlate with water though there may be subtle effects in long-lived magmatic systems at mid-ocean ridges. H2O/Ce ratios show large differences between mid-ocean ridges, hotspots, back-arc basins and arc-front volcanoes that testify to the large input of water at subduction zones; however, at arcs most of the Ce (like most of the water) is derived from the subducting slab, and at hotspots isotopic tracers of recycled components indicate the presence of materials that can, in sufficient quantity, dominate the Ce budget of mantle plumes. Thus H2O/Ce ratios, while useful, are problematic when the goal is to determine the absolute abundances of water in mantle sources because the abundance of Ce cannot normally be assumed with confidence, except perhaps at mid-ocean ridges. A more complete understanding of the abundance of water in mantle sources can be obtained when data for radiogenic isotopes are used as tracers of mantle composition, and when major and trace element data illuminate the process of mantle melting. In areas far from hotspots, normal mid-ocean ridges reveal a remarkably narrow range of H2O/Ce ratios yet display large-scale regional differences between ocean basins [1]. Isotopically enriched signatures at hotspots suggest low absolute H2O abundances [2], yet there is so much water delivered to the sources of arc volcanoes that even >95% dehydration of slabs results in delivery of water to the deep mantle in excess of that observed in MORB sources. The

  7. A 3D Convective Model for the Jovian Wind Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Chan, K. L.

    2004-11-01

    In an earlier paper (Mayr et al. 1984, Earth, Moon, & Planets, 30, 245), we proposed that Jupiter's alternating wind bands are a manifestation of the global interaction between rotation and convection in a shallow layer. The model, however, was obtained from linearization of the 2D equations of motions. At HKUST/Hong Kong, we are now trying to study this problem by rigorous numerical simulation. Using a three-dimensional spectral numerical code, we compute models for the outermost layer of Jupiter's convective envelope. Two cases have been studied. In one the atmospheric pressure varies from 1 to 23 bar, and in the other from 1 to 115 bar. The physical parameters (internal energy flux, rotation rate) are chosen to be close to those expected, but solar heating, chemistry, as well as dynamical influences from deeper layers are ignored. The models generate wind field patterns that contain alternating jet streams with resemblance to the Jovian bands. Instantaneous values of the mean zonal flow at the equator reach 80 m/sec. Yet the mean meridional flows are less than 1% of such value. The meridional temperature profile at the cloud top level also shows a double hump structure of a few degrees (as observed) in the subtropics. Though there is not complete quantitative agreement (caused perhaps by neglected effects like solar radiation), these models demonstrate, in principle, the feasibility of generating a Jovian type wind pattern through the interaction of fast rotation and convection in a thin shell. KLC thanks RGC/Hong Kong for support.

  8. Seismic Anisotropy in the Deep Mantle, Boundary Layers and the Geometry of Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, S.

    An attempt is made to explore the geodynamical significance of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle on the basis of mineral physics. The mineral physics observations used include the effects of deformation mechanisms on lattice and shape preferred orientation, the effects of pressure on elastic anisotropy and the nature of lattice preferred orientation in deep mantle minerals in dislocation creep regime. Many of these issues are still poorly constrained, but a review of recent results shows that it is possible to interpret deep mantle seismic anisotropy in a unified fashion, based on the solid state processes without invoking partial melting. The key notions are (i) the likely regional variation in the magnitude of anisotropy as deformation mechanisms change from dislocation to diffusion creep (or superplasticity), associated with a change in the stress level and/or grain-size in the convecting mantle with a high Rayleigh number, and (ii) the change in elastic anisotropy with pressure in major mantle minerals, particularly in (Mg, Fe)O. The results provide the following constraints on the style of mantle convection (i) the SH > SV anisotropy in the bottom transition zone and the SV > SH anisotropy in the top lower mantle can be attributed to anisotropy structures (lattice preferred orientation and/or laminated structures) caused by the horizontal flow in this depth range, suggesting the presence of a mid-mantle boundary layer due to (partially) layered convection, (ii) the observed no significant seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle near subduction zones implies that deformation associated with subducting slabs is due mostly to diffusion creep (or superplasticity) and therefore slabs are weak in the deep mantle and hence easily deformed when encountered with resistance forces, and (iii) the SH > SV anisotropy in the cold thick portions of the D" layer is likely to be due to horizontally aligned shape preferred orientation in perovskite plus magnesiow

  9. Numerical simulation of 3-D Benard convection with gravitational modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Peltier, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    In this numerical study, randomly and sinusoidally modulated gravitational fields imposed on three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection are investigated in an effort to understand the effects of vibration (G-Jitter) on fluid systems. The time-dependent, Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation with Boussinesq approximations are solved by a semi-implicit, pseudospectral procedure. An analysis of energy balances indicates that with increasing modulation amplitude, transition from synchronous to relaxation oscillation goes through the subharmonic response. Random modulations are found to be less stabilizing than sinusoidal and are shown to impose three-dimensionality on the flow for some parameter ranges both at terrestrial and zero base gravity conditions.

  10. Contamination of the Convecting Mantle in Eastern Tethyan 'Subduction Factories'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, M. F.; Nguyen, T. H.

    2003-04-01

    As subduction gives way to collision at the end of a Wilson Cycle the associated magmatic activity becomes increasingly enriched in potassium and other large-ion lithophile elements. This is usually attributed to the addition of continental crust-derived material to the convecting mantle wedge. Corresponding depletions in high-field strength elements (Ti and Nb) are more commonly explained in terms of accessory phase buffering or protracted reaction of melts with mantle wallrock. It is increasingly apparent that mantle wedge magmatic sources range from 'fertile' (lherzolitic) to 'refractory' (harzburgitic) although the extent to which this corresponds to the LILE and HFSE variation is unclear. Mantle wedge mass balances clearly hold clues to enrichment-depletion histories of the convecting asthenosphere with respect to both the overriding and subducting plates. With a view to better understanding these effects we have used the MELTS algorithm to calculate hypothetical partial melt compositions as a function of source fertility and H2O content, in the pressure range, 0-1.0 GPa as a basis comparison for natural partial melts. Primitive magmas characterizing the Mariana (western Pacific) and Sunda-Banda (Indonesia) arcs, and the northeastern syntaxis of the India-Asia collision suture (Yunnan) appear to resemble calculated equilibrium melts of refractory (basalt-depleted) peridotite, variably enriched in lithophile and light rare earth elements. These comparisons lead to three observations. 1) HFSE and Fe abundances in primitive MORB, calcalkaline, and boninite magmas, and their respective high-potassium variants are consistent with those implied by phase equilibria associated with partial melting and fractionation, suggesting accessory phases, wall-rock reaction, and slab contamination are probably not important as causes of HFSE depletions. 2) Magmatic sources at convergent and colliding margins are typically refractory (basalt-depleted) compared to those yielding

  11. Mantle convection pattern and subcrustal stress field under South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1980-01-01

    The tectonic, igneous and metallogenic features of South America are discussed in terms of the crustal deformation associated with stresses due to mantle convection as inferred from the high degree harmonics in the geopotential field. The application of Runcorn's model for the laminar viscous flows in the upper mantle to satellite and gravity data results in a convection pattern which reveals the ascending flows between the descending Nazca plate and the overlying South American plate as well as segments of the descending Nazca plate beneath South America. The arc volcanism in South America is shown apparently to be related to the upwelling of high-temperature material induced by the subduction of the Nazca plate, with the South American basin systems associated with downwelling mantle flows. The resulting tensional stress fields are shown to be regions of structural kinship characterized by major concentrations of ore deposits and related to the cordillera, shield and igneous systems and the upward Andean movements. It is suggested that the upwelling convection flows in the upper mantle, coupled with crustal tension, have provided an uplift mechanism which has forced the hydrothermal systems in the basement rocks to the surface.

  12. Time-dependent convection models of mantle thermal structure constrained by seismic tomography and geodynamics: implications for mantle plume dynamics and CMB heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, P.; Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.

    2012-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in modern geodynamics is the development of thermal convection models that are consistent with the present-day flow dynamics in the Earth's mantle, in accord with seismic tomographic images of 3-D Earth structure, and that are also capable of providing a time-dependent evolution of the mantle thermal structure that is as 'realistic' (Earth-like) as possible. A successful realization of this objective would provide a realistic model of 3-D mantle convection that has optimal consistency with a wide suite of seismic, geodynamic and mineral physical constraints on mantle structure and thermodynamic properties. To address this challenge, we have constructed a time-dependent, compressible convection model in 3-D spherical geometry that is consistent with tomography-based instantaneous flow dynamics, using an updated and revised pseudo-spectral numerical method. The novel feature of our numerical solutions is that the equations of conservation of mass and momentum are solved only once in terms of spectral Green's functions. We initially focus on the theory and numerical methods employed to solve the equation of thermal energy conservation using the Green's function solutions for the equation of motion, with special attention placed on the numerical accuracy and stability of the convection solutions. A particular concern is the verification of the global energy balance in the dissipative, compressible-mantle formulation we adopt. Such validation is essential because we then present geodynamically constrained convection solutions over billion-year timescales, starting from present-day seismically constrained thermal images of the mantle. The use of geodynamically constrained spectral Green's functions facilitates the modelling of the dynamic impact on the mantle evolution of: (1) depth-dependent thermal conductivity profiles, (2) extreme variations of viscosity over depth and (3) different surface boundary conditions, in this case mobile

  13. Assessing the performance of a parallel MATLAB-based 3D convection code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, G. J.; Hasenclever, J.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Shi, C.

    2008-12-01

    We are currently building 2D and 3D MATLAB-based parallel finite element codes for mantle convection and melting. The codes use the MATLAB implementation of core MPI commands (eg. Send, Receive, Broadcast) for message passing between computational subdomains. We have found that code development and algorithm testing are much faster in MATLAB than in our previous work coding in C or FORTRAN, this code was built from scratch with only 12 man-months of effort. The one extra cost w.r.t. C coding on a Beowulf cluster is the cost of the parallel MATLAB license for a >4core cluster. Here we present some preliminary results on the efficiency of MPI messaging in MATLAB on a small 4 machine, 16core, 32Gb RAM Intel Q6600 processor-based cluster. Our code implements fully parallelized preconditioned conjugate gradients with a multigrid preconditioner. Our parallel viscous flow solver is currently 20% slower for a 1,000,000 DOF problem on a single core in 2D as the direct solve MILAMIN MATLAB viscous flow solver. We have tested both continuous and discontinuous pressure formulations. We test with various configurations of network hardware, CPU speeds, and memory using our own and MATLAB's built in cluster profiler. So far we have only explored relatively small (up to 1.6GB RAM) test problems. We find that with our current code and Intel memory controller bandwidth limitations we can only get ~2.3 times performance out of 4 cores than 1 core per machine. Even for these small problems the code runs faster with message passing between 4 machines with one core each than 1 machine with 4 cores and internal messaging (1.29x slower), or 1 core (2.15x slower). It surprised us that for 2D ~1GB-sized problems with only 3 multigrid levels, the direct- solve on the coarsest mesh consumes comparable time to the iterative solve on the finest mesh - a penalty that is greatly reduced either by using a 4th multigrid level or by using an iterative solve at the coarsest grid level. We plan to

  14. The Mantle-Atmosphere Connection: Oxidation of the Atmosphere through Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. K. M.; Gu, T.; Li, M.; McCammon, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's mantle connects the surface with the deep interior through convection, and the evolution of its redox state will affect the distribution of siderophile elements1, recycling of refractory isotopes2 and the oxidation state of the atmosphere through volcanic outgassing3. The rise of oxygen in atmosphere, i.e., the Great Oxidation Event (G.O.E.) occurred ~2.4 billion years ago (Ga)4. However, multiple lines of evidence point to biological oxygen production well before 2.4 Ga5; while chromium isotopes in iron formations indicates a decline of atmospheric oxygen about 1.88 Ga6. In contrast to the fluctuation of atmospheric oxygen, vanadium in Archean mantle lithosphere suggests that the mantle redox state has been constant for ~3.5 Ga7. Indeed, the redox state of the deep Earth's interior is not well constrained8 and its effect on mantle dynamics is unknown. Here we show a redox-induced density difference affects mantle convection and may potentially cause the oxidation of the upper mantle. From two synthetic enstatite chondritic samples with identical bulk compositions but formed under different oxygen fugacities (fO2) compressed to lower mantle pressures and temperatures, we find Al2O3 forms its own phase separate from the dominant Mg-silicate perovskite phase (i.e., bridgmanite9) in the more reduced composition, in contrast to a more Al-rich, bridgmanite-dominated assemblage for a more oxidized starting composition. As a result, the reduced material is ~1-1.5% denser than the oxidized material. Geodynamical numerical simulations show that the redox-induced density difference could lead to an increased oxidation of Earth's upper mantle but is buffered by slow mixing with more reduced material through hot upwellings, which will potentially affect mantle redox and rise of oxygen in atmosphere.

  15. Assessing the role of slab rheology in coupled plate-mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Léa; Coltice, Nicolas; Tackley, Paul J.; Dietmar Müller, R.; Cannon, John

    2015-11-01

    Reconstructing the 3D structure of the Earth's mantle has been a challenge for geodynamicists for about 40 yr. Although numerical models and computational capabilities have substantially progressed, parameterizations used for modeling convection forced by plate motions are far from being Earth-like. Among the set of parameters, rheology is fundamental because it defines in a non-linear way the dynamics of slabs and plumes, and the organization of lithosphere deformation. In this study, we evaluate the role of the temperature dependence of viscosity (variations up to 6 orders of magnitude) and the importance of pseudo-plasticity on reconstructing slab evolution in 3D spherical models of convection driven by plate history models. Pseudo-plasticity, which produces plate-like behavior in convection models, allows a consistent coupling between imposed plate motions and global convection, which is not possible with temperature-dependent viscosity alone. Using test case models, we show that increasing temperature dependence of viscosity enhances vertical and lateral coherence of slabs, but leads to unrealistic slab morphologies for large viscosity contrasts. Introducing pseudo-plasticity partially solves this issue, producing thin laterally and vertically more continuous slabs, and flat subduction where trench retreat is fast. We evaluate the differences between convection reconstructions employing different viscosity laws to be very large, and similar to the differences between two models with the same rheology but using two different plate histories or initial conditions.

  16. The effects of Venusian mantle convection with multiple phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbach, V.; Yuen, D. A.; Christensen, U. R.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there was a flurry of activities in studying the effects of phase transitions in the Earth's mantle. From petrological and geophysical considerations, phase-transitions would also play an important role in venusian dynamics. The basic differences between the two planets are the surface boundary conditions, both thermally and mechanically. In this vein we have studied time-dependent mantle convection with multiple phase transitions and depth-dependent thermal expansivity (alpha is approximately rho(exp -6)), based on high-pressure and temperature measurements. Both the olivine-spinel and spinel-perovskite transitions were simulated by introducing an effective thermal expansivity, as described. Used together with the extended Boussinesq Approximation this method serves as a powerful tool to examine the effects of phase transitions on convection at relatively low computational costs.

  17. Microwave-based laboratory experiments for internally-heated mantle convection

    SciTech Connect

    Limare, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E.; Jaupart, C.; Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Neamtu, C.

    2013-11-13

    The thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is mainly controlled by the amount of radioactive heat sources in their mantle, and by the geometry and efficiency of solid state thermo-chemical convection within. So far, these systems have been studied using numerical methods only and cross validation by laboratory analogous experiments has not been conducted yet. To fill this gap we perform the first laboratory experiments of mantle convection driven by microwave-generated internal heating. We use a 30×30×5 cm{sup 3} experimental tank filled with 0.5 % Natrosol in water mixture (viscosity 0.6 Pa.s at 20°C). The fluid is heated from within by a microwave device that delivers a uniform volumetric heating from 10 to 70 kW/m{sup 3}; the upper boundary of the fluid is kept at constant temperature, whereas the lower boundary is adiabatic. The velocity field is determined with particle image velocimetry and the temperature field is measured using thermochromic liquid crystals which enable us to charaterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution. Numerical simulations, conducted using Stag-3D in 3D cartesian geometry, reproduce the experimental setup (i.e., boundary conditions, box aspect ratio, temperature dependence of physical parameters, internal heating rate). The successful comparison between the experimental and numerical results validates our approach of modelling internal heating using microwaves.

  18. Towards the Next Generation Upper-Mantle 3D Anelastic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoglu, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In order to distinguish the thermal and compositional heterogeneities in the mantle, it is crucial to resolve the lateral variations not only in seismic velocities but also in intrinsic attenuation. Indeed, the high sensitivity of intrinsic attenuation to temperature and water content, governed by a form of Arrhenius equation, contrasts with the quasi-linear dependence of velocities on both temperature and major element composition. The major challenge in imaging attenuation lies in separating its effects on seismic waves from the elastic ones. The latter originate from the wave propagation in media with strong lateral elastic gradients causing (de)focusing and scattering. We have previously developed a 3D upper-mantle shear attenuation model based on time domain waveform inversion of long period (T > 60s) fundamental and overtone surface wave data (Gung & Romanowicz, 2004). However, at that time, resolution was limited to very long wavelength structure, because elastic models were still rather smooth, and the effects of focusing could only be estimated approximately, using asymptotic normal mode perturbation theory.With recent progress in constraining global mantle shear velocity from waveform tomography based on the Spectral Element Method (e.g. SEMUCB_WM1, French & Romanowicz, 2014), we are now in a position to develop an improved global 3D model of shear attenuation in the upper mantle. In doing so, we use a similar time domain waveform inversion approach, but (1) start with a higher resolution elastic model with better constraints on lateral elastic gradients and (2) jointly invert, in an iterative fashion, for shear attenuation and elastic parameters. Here, we present the results of synthetic tests that confirm our inversion strategy, as well as preliminary results towards the construction of the next generation upper-mantle anelastic model.

  19. Dynamiical layering in mantle convection - impact on the viscoisity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Ulrich; Stein, Claudia; Dude, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Thermal boundary layers play a key role for the dynamics of the Earth's mantle. They mark the transition between the core and the mantle and , at least locally and transient, the transition between the upper- and the lower mantle at a depth of 670 km. There is much evidence that these boundary layers do not resemble the picture of a simple thermal boundary layer, as known from thermal convection at high Rayleigh number. Especially the lower boundary seems to be of complex structure, possible induced by compositionally dense material. Present models of mantle convection, aiming at simulating the complex structure and dynamics of the lower boundary layer require several ad hoc assumptions. Especially the density excess and the mass of compositionally distinct need to be assumed. Both conditions are critical for the dynamics but hardly constrained. The internal boundary at 670 is usually implemented by specifying a density jump through a phase boundary, We have developed models where the internal boundary as well as a thermochemical CMB , displaying topography which result from compositionally distinct piles , develop self consistently without the named ad hoc assumptions. As a starting condition we assume that a chemically stratified mantle, as resulting from fractional crystallization in an early magma ocean , is heated by the hot core. Double diffusive convection in material with strongly temperature dependent viscosity leads then to layering and, in a later state to the formation of a rough lower thermochemical boundary layer. Especially the viscosity profiles, as emerging from this configuration are investigated and compared with recent results from inversion studies.

  20. Global distribution of MORB isotopic variability and mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.; Meyzen, C.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2006-12-01

    In order to assess the potential of mantle isochrons as parameters relevant to mantle convection, we compiled the isotopic variations of Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb in MORB along most of the mid-ocean ridge system from the North Atlantic to the North Pacific. The data were extracted from the PetDB database. We calculated the variance of isotope distributions as a function of the distance along the ridge axis over a moving window of 5 degrees. Most of the variance is carried by a small number of regularly spaced peaks (~45°) which correspond to the locations of triple junctions at the time of continental breakup and to well-identified hot spots (Iceland, Azores, Ascension, Bouvet, St Paul, and Sala y Gomez). Overall, large hotspots, such as Iceland, contribute to less peak variance than smaller ones such as Bouvet and St Paul. These peaks also show some decoupling of the different isotopic systems, notably between Hf and the other isotopes, and between the source Th/U and 87Sr/86Sr. On a global scale, the variance is mainly localized along the Atlantic and Indian ridge segments (the Pangea domain), where near-ridge hotspots are much more abundant and spreading velocities much slower than in the Pacific domain. This large-scale pattern reflects different modes of lower mantle injection into the upper mantle. The upper mantle in the Pangea domain is only slowly filled by multiple narrow upwellings and the drag exerted by the deep roots of the Archean cratons strongly perturbs its velocity field. This mode is particularly well expressed along the Southwest Indian Ridge, which is very slowly pulling apart Africa from Antarctica, two continents with Archean cratons underlain by thick lithospheric roots. In contrast, upper mantle material from the Pacific domain is quickly replaced by broad lower mantle upwellings with no significant continental hindrance. The geochemical contrast between the Pangea and Pacific domains demonstrates therefore the long-term influence of

  1. The convective mantle and the not so passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moucha, Robert; Forte, Alessandro; Glisovic, Petar; Rowley, David; Mitrovica, Jerry; Simmons, Nathan; Grand, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown that dynamic topography driven by convective mantle flow has profound implications for the inference and interpretation of long term sea level variations obtained from either backstripping analysis of bore-hole data and/or seismic sequence analysis at sites within so-called passive continental margins (e.g. Moucha et al., 2008; Spasojević et al., 2008; Conrad et al., 2009). In this presentation, we will explore the geodynamic implications of convective flow on the stability of passive margins throughout the late Cenozoic by carrying out backward mantle flow simulations starting with present-day heterogeneity derived from a high resolution joint seismic-geodynamic tomography model (Simmons et al., 2009) that yields excellent fits to present day surface observables (e.g. dynamic topography and the geoid). Uncertainties in our reconstruction of margin topography that originate from the numerical method of backward convection to the staring models of mantle heterogeneity and rheology are fully investigated and compared with the geological record from the northeastern US margin and the Angolan margin of Africa.

  2. Deformation of "stable" continental interiors by mantle convection: Implications for intraplate stress in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2011-12-01

    The enigmatic origin of large-magnitude earthquakes far from active plate boundaries, especially those occurring in so-called "stable" continental interiors, is a source of continuing controversy that has eluded a satisfactory explanation using past geophysical models of intraplate deformation and faulting. One outstanding case of such major intraplate earthquakes is the 1811-1812 series of events in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). We contend that the origin of some of these enigmatic intraplate events is due to regional variations in the pattern of tectonic stress generated by mantle convective flow acting on the overlying lithosphere and crust. Mantle convection affects the entire surface of the planet, irrespective of the current configuration of surface plate boundaries. In addition, it must be appreciated that plate tectonics is not a 2-D process, because the convective flow that drives the observed horizontal motions of the tectonic plates also drives vertical displacements of the crust across distances as great as 2 to 3 km. This dynamic topography is directly correlated with convection-driven stress field variations in the crust and lithosphere and these stresses can be locally focussed if the mantle rheology below the lithosphere is characterised by sufficiently low viscosities. We have developed global models of convection-driven mantle flow [Forte et al. 2009,2010] that are based on recent high-resolution 3-D tomography models derived from joint inversions of seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data [Simmons et al. 2007,2008,2010]. These tomography-based mantle convection models also include a full suite of surface geodynamic (postglacial rebound and convection) constraints on the depth-dependent average viscosity of the mantle [Mitrovica & Forte 2004]. Our latest tomography-based and geodynamically-constrained convection calculations reveal that mantle flow under the central US are driven by density anomalies within the lower mantle associated

  3. Thermal-chemical Mantle Convection Models With Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Zhong, S.

    2008-12-01

    In numerical modeling of mantle convection, resolution is often crucial for resolving small-scale features. New techniques, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), allow local mesh refinement wherever high resolution is needed, while leaving other regions with relatively low resolution. Both computational efficiency for large- scale simulation and accuracy for small-scale features can thus be achieved with AMR. Based on the octree data structure [Tu et al. 2005], we implement the AMR techniques into the 2-D mantle convection models. For pure thermal convection models, benchmark tests show that our code can achieve high accuracy with relatively small number of elements both for isoviscous cases (i.e. 7492 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements) and for temperature-dependent viscosity cases (i.e. 14620 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements). We further implement tracer-method into the models for simulating thermal-chemical convection. By appropriately adding and removing tracers according to the refinement of the meshes, our code successfully reproduces the benchmark results in van Keken et al. [1997] with much fewer elements and tracers compared with uniform-mesh models (i.e. 7552 AMR elements v.s. 16384 uniform elements, and ~83000 tracers v.s. ~410000 tracers). The boundaries of the chemical piles in our AMR code can be easily refined to the scales of a few kilometers for the Earth's mantle and the tracers are concentrated near the chemical boundaries to precisely trace the evolvement of the boundaries. It is thus very suitable for our AMR code to study the thermal-chemical convection problems which need high resolution to resolve the evolvement of chemical boundaries, such as the entrainment problems [Sleep, 1988].

  4. Effects of compressibility in the mantle convection Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubitsyn, V. P.; Trubitsyna, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    The Boussinesq approximation of thermal convection equations results from neglecting the number of the terms which are actually not small in the conditions of the Earth's mantle. However, the error of calculating the structure of the convective flows is lower than the discarded terms. In this work we analyze the causes of this fact by successively passing from the general equations for a heated viscous compressible fluid to the simpler thermal convection equations by rejecting small quantities with the parameters of the presentday Earth. We consider the anelastic liquid approximation (ALA), truncated anelastic liquid approximation (TALA), extended Boussinesq approximation (EBA), and the simplest classical Boussinesq approximation (BA) which fully disregards the compressibility of a fluid. With the parameters of the mantle, BA is only accurate when describing the flow velocities, while the temperature is predicted with an error of up to a few dozen percent. Therefore, it appears reasonable to consider an intermediate approximation between EBA and BA, in which the effects of compressibility are only taken into account for temperature. This approximation can be referred to as the superadiabatic Boussinesq approximation (SBA) for temperature T sa. The corresponding equations are structurally similar to the standard Boussinesq approximation but with a superadiabatic temperature T sa instead of total temperature T. In this simple approximation, the calculated structure of the convective flows and the distribution of total temperature (obtained by adding the known adiabatic T a to the calculated T sa) are more accurate than in the classical Boussinesq approximation.

  5. High-resolution 3D seismic model of the crustal and uppermost mantle structure in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin; Ostaficzuk, Stanisław R.

    2016-01-01

    In the area of Poland a contact between the Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe and the Carpathians has a complicated structure and a complex P-wave velocity of the sedimentary cover, crystalline crust, Moho depth and the uppermost mantle. The geometry of the uppermost several kilometers of sediments is relatively well recognized from over 100,000 boreholes. The vertical seismic profiling (VSP) from 1188 boreholes provided detailed velocity data for regional tectonic units and for stratigraphic successions from Permian to the Tertiary and Quaternary deposits. These data, however, do not provide information about the velocity and basement depth in the central part of the Trans-European suture zone (TESZ) and in the Carpathians. So, the data set is supplemented by 2D velocity models from 32 deep seismic sounding refraction profiles which also provide information about the crust and uppermost mantle. Together with the results of other methods: vertical seismic profiling, magnetotelluric, allow for the creation of a detailed, high-resolution 3D model for the entire Earth's crust and the uppermost mantle down to a depth of 60 km. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclise is only 0.3 to 1 km thick, which increases to 7 to 8 km along the East European Craton (EEC) margin, and 9 to 12 km in the TESZ. The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1-4 km thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sedimentary layers, up to about 20 km. The crystalline crust is differentiated and has a layered structure. The crust beneath the West European Platform (WEP; Variscan domain) is characterized by P-wave velocities of 5.8-6.6 km/s. The upper and middle crusts beneath the EEC are characterized by velocities of 6.1-6.6 km/s, and are underlain by a high velocity lower crust with a velocity of about 7 km/s. A general decrease in velocity is observed from the older to the younger tectonic domains. The TESZ is associated with a steep dip

  6. Influence of heating mode on three-dimensional mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models of three-dimensional thermal convection in highly viscous spherical shells with different combinations of internal and basal heating consistently have upwelling concentrations in the form of cylindrical plumes and downwelling in planar sheets. As the proportion of internal heating increases, the number of upwelling plumes increases, and downwelling sheets become more vigorous and time-dependent. With any amount of basal heating, the entire convective pattern, during its evolution, is anchored to the upwelling plumes. As the proportion of internal heating increases, the heat flow carried by the upwelling plumes remains a large fraction of the basal heat flow. Downwelling sheets carry only a minor fraction (approximately 30 percent) of the basal heat flow (even when the shell is entirely heated from below), but they advect almost all of the internally generated heat. The relatively large number of plumes in the earth's mantle (inferred from hotspots), the possibility that downwelling slabs are vigorous enough to penetrate the lower mantle, and the small fraction of terrestrial surface heat flow carried by plumes all suggest that the mantle is predominantly heated from within.

  7. A comparison of mantle convection models featuring plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Lowman, J. P.; Hansen, U.

    2014-06-01

    plates are an integral part of the Earth's mantle and thus play an important role in its dynamics and evolution. To allow plate behavior to arise naturally in numerical mantle convection models, self-consistent plate generation methods apply a fully rheological approach (featuring a temperature-, pressure- and stress-dependent viscosity). However, due to the extreme local viscosity changes that the self-generation of model plates entails, their computational requirements are demanding. Alternative plate modeling methods specify the existence of plates explicitly but can also obtain dynamically determined velocities (e.g., by employing a force-balance method). Here we present modifications to a force-balance model by utilizing a rheology-dependent viscosity profile. Accordingly, plate viscosity and plate thickness are no longer prescribed by the modeler but now follow as a dynamic consequence of the temperature and stress dependence of the viscosity and the model's evolution. We describe the new method and present benchmark results for a rheologically self-consistent mantle convection model and the modified force-balance plate model. Our results show that both plate modeling methods lead to the same system behavior for a wide range of system parameters making the new method a powerful tool to also achieve plate-like surface motion naturally.

  8. A comparison of mantle convection models featuring plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Lowman, J. P.; Hansen, U.

    2012-04-01

    Oceanic plates are an integral part of the Earth's mantle and thus play an important role in its dynamics and evolution. To allow plate behaviour to arise naturally in numerical mantle convection models, self-consistent plate generation methods apply a fully rheological approach (featuring a temperature-, pressure- and stress-dependent viscosity) to achieve plate-like surface motion. However, due to the extreme local viscosity changes that the self-generation of model plates entails, their computational requirements are demanding. Alternative plate modeling methods specify the existence of plates explicitly but can also obtain dynamically determined velocities (e.g., by employing a force-balance method). Here, we present modifications to a force-balance model by utilizing a geotherm- and pressure-dependent viscosity. Accordingly, plate viscosity and plate thickness are no longer prescribed by the modeler but now follow as a dynamic consequence of the temperature dependence of the viscosity and the model's evolution. We describe the new method and present benchmark results for a rheologically self-consistent mantle convection model capable of yielding plate-like surface velocities, and the modified force-balance plate model.

  9. Mantle convection-driven variable uplift of the eastern US: A mechanism for late-Cenozoic rejuvenation of topography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Rowley, D. B.; Moucha, R.; Glisovic, P.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2011-12-01

    Topographic uplift driven by hot, buoyant upwelling flow in the mantle is a natural consequence of convection with sufficiently strong bottom heating across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). An adequate CMB heat flux is needed to maintain an active, unstable lower thermal boundary layer that gives rise to hot upwellings that can generate surface topography in a mantle-wide convective flow. This dynamic topography provides a global mechanism for uplifting and rejuvenating landscapes, in particular ancient decaying orogens, in intraplate environments far from plate boundaries. We have recently carried out a new series of time-dependent mantle convection simulations that feature substantial CMB heat flux and numerous buoyant, hot mantle upwellings under several continents, in particular Africa and North America. These convection calculations incorporate a wide suite of data from seismology, geodynamics and mineral physics and they are capable of successfully reconciling all the data constraints we have employed. This work has yielded models of the 3-D thermo-chemical structure of the mantle [Simmons et al. 2007,2009,2010] that have been employed to successfully predict the present-day mantle convective flow and surface dynamics [Forte et al. 2009,2010] as well as providing detailed reconstructions of time-dependent mantle convection in the geologic past [Moucha et al. 2008, Moucha & Forte 2011]. Here we employ these high-resolution global convection models to elucidate the role of hot buoyant mantle, entering under the eastern US from the mid-Atlantic, in generating topographic uplift. While previous tomography-based convection models have predicted monotonic subsidence of the eastern half of the US [e.g. Spasojevic et al. 2008] due to the sole effect of the descending Farallon slab, we instead predict a time-dependent topography that includes variable uplift of the eastern margin of the US. This pattern of uplift extends inland, away from the coast, and suggests a new

  10. Mantle convection and plate tectonics: toward an integrated physical and chemical theory

    PubMed

    Tackley

    2000-06-16

    Plate tectonics and convection of the solid, rocky mantle are responsible for transporting heat out of Earth. However, the physics of plate tectonics is poorly understood; other planets do not exhibit it. Recent seismic evidence for convection and mixing throughout the mantle seems at odds with the chemical composition of erupted magmas requiring the presence of several chemically distinct reservoirs within the mantle. There has been rapid progress on these two problems, with the emergence of the first self-consistent models of plate tectonics and mantle convection, along with new geochemical models that may be consistent with seismic and dynamical constraints on mantle structure.

  11. Can we approximate non-Newtonian rheology to model mantle convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüttig, Christian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important parameters in mantle convection studies is the rheology since it is directly responsible for the convective vigor, heat transport and shape of up- and downwellings. Deformation in terrestrial mantles is accommodated by two main deformation mechanisms: diffusion and dislocation creep. While the former probably plays a dominant role at high pressures, the latter is thought to be important at relatively low pressures, as inferred by seismic anisotropy of the Earth's upper mantle [1]. Dislocation creep is more challenging to handle than diffusion creep as the viscosity becomes strain-rate dependent [2], introducing a strong non-linearity that requires much longer computational times. In order to avoid this additional complexity, a Newtonian rheology (i.e. diffusion creep) with reduced activation parameters is often used to mimic non-Newtonian behaviour as described in [3], although this approximation has never been carefully tested for a stagnant-lid regime. Mobile-lid steady-state simulations presented in [3] show that the reduction of the activation parameters should be applied with care and in dependence of the problem considered (e.g., amount of internal heating, pressure- or temperature-dominated viscosity). Nevertheless, this simplification is widely employed in convection studies assuming its presumed general validity (e.g. [4,5]). We perform numerical simulations in 2D Cartesian, cylindrical and 3D spherical geometry using the mantle convection codes YACC [6] and Gaia [7] to investigate the consequences of this simplification for various scenarios. To verify our methods, we rerun some of the cases from [3] finding a good agreement. Using rheological parameters from [2] and the approximation from [3], our results show that some global properties such as mean temperature, root mean square velocity and nusselt number are indeed similar (within ~10%) to those obtained when employing a fully non-linear rheology. However, the mantle

  12. The Effects of Chemically Distinct LLSVPs on the Geoid: the Results from Both 3-D Thermochemical Convection and Seismically Constrained Instantaneous Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Zhong, Shijie

    2015-04-01

    The long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and mantle viscosity structure. Hager and Ricard and their colleagues successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically imaged mantle structure as buoyancy force in an isochemical, whole mantle convection model. However, it has been generally agreed that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath the Pacific and the Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and likely more dense than the ambient mantle. In this study, we investigate how chemically distinct LLSVPs or chemical piles affect the geoid using both time-dependent thermochemical convection model and instantaneous flow model driven by buoyancy derived from seismic models. First, by conducting a series of 3D spherical thermochemical convection calculations, we found that the chemically dense piles above the CMB have a compensation effect on the geoid, and as a result, the total geoid is only controlled by the upper ~1600 km of the mantle. Second, we use buoyancy structure derived from seismic models (e.g., Smean and other models) to study whether the observed geoid can be reproduced by considering the compensation effects of the LLSVPs. The geoid modeling requires a viscosity profile and a seismic velocity to density scaling f. We define a four-layer viscosity model with viscosities for lithosphere, the upper mantle, the transition zone, and the lower mantle . With a fixed non-dimensional lithospheric viscosity at 20, we compute the geoid and search for other three viscosity parameters and scaling parameter f that lead to the maximum variance reduction for the geoid. For the whole mantle, isochemical model, the best model with variance reduction of ~71% for degrees 2-9 has viscosities of 0.5, 0.5, and 35, for the upper mantle, transition zone, and lower mantle, respectively, and the scaling f is 0.24. For the thermochemical model with the bottom 1000 km of structure

  13. Mantle convection: concensus and queries (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal convection driven by surface cooling and internal heat production is the cause of endogenic activity of all planets, expressed as tectonic activity and volcanism for solid planets. The sluggish convection of the silicated mantle also controls the activity of the metallic core and the possibility of an active dynamo. A glimpse of the internal structure of Earth's mantle is provided by seismic tomography. However, both the limited resolution of seismic methods and the complexity of the relations between seismic velocities and the thermo-mechanical parameters (mostly temperature and density), leave to the geodynamicist a large degree of interpretation. At first order, a very simple model of mantle heterogeneities, only built from the paleogeographic positions of Cenozoic and Mesozoic slabs, explains the pattern and amplitude of Earth's plate motions and gravity field, while being in agreement with long wavelength tomography. This indicates that the mantle dynamics is mostly controlled by thermal anomalies and by the dynamics of the top boundary layer, the lithosphere. However, the presence of various complexities due to variations in elemental composition and to phase transitions is required by seismology, mineralogy and geochemistry. I will review how these complexities affect the dynamics of the transition zone and of the deep mantle and discuss the hypothesis on their origins, either primordial or as a consequence of plate tectonics. The rheologies that are used in global geodynamic models for the mantle and the lithosphere remain very simplistic. Some aspects of plate tectonics (e.g., the very existence of plates, their evolution, the dynamics of one-sided subductions...) are now reproduced by numerical simulations. However the rheologies implemented and their complexities remain only remotely related to that of solid minerals as observed in laboratories. The connections between the quantities measured at microscopic scale (e.g., mineralogy, grainsize

  14. 3D numerical modeling of subduction dynamics: plate stagnation and segmentation, and crustal advection in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Tajima, F.

    2012-04-01

    Water content in the mantle transition zone (MTZ) has been broadly debated in the Earth science community as a key issue for plate dynamics [e.g., Bercovici and Karato, 2003]. In this study, a systematic series of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation are performed in an attempt to verify two hypotheses for plate subduction with effects of deep water transport: (1) the small-scale behavior of subducted oceanic plate in the MTZ; and (2) the role of subducted crust in the MTZ. These hypotheses are postulated based on the seismic observations characterized by large-scale flattened high velocity anomalies (i.e., stagnant slabs) in the MTZ and discontinuity depth variations. The proposed model states that under wet conditions the subducted plate main body of peridotite (olivine rich) is abutted by subducted crustal materials (majorite rich) at the base of the MTZ. The computational domain of mantle convection is confined to 3D regional spherical-shell geometry with a thickness of 1000 km and a lateral extent of 10° × 30° in the latitudinal and longitudinal directions. A semi-dynamic model of subduction zone [Morishige et al., 2010] is applied to let the highly viscous, cold oceanic plate subduct. Weak (low-viscosity) fault zones (WFZs), which presumably correspond to the fault boundaries of large subduction earthquakes, are imposed on the top part of subducting plates. The phase transitions of olivine to wadsleyite and ringwoodite to perovskite+magnesiowüstite with Clapeyron slopes under both "dry" and "wet" conditions are considered based on recent high pressure experiments [e.g., Ohtani and Litasov, 2006]. Another recent experiment provides new evidence for lower-viscosity (weaker strength) of garnet-rich zones than the olivine dominant mantle under wet conditions [Katayama and Karato, 2008]. According to this, the effect of viscosity reduction of oceanic crust is considered under wet condition in the MTZ. Results show that there is a substantial difference

  15. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Flow: Thermochemical Convection and Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Steinberger, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin; Sobolev, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    One of the most robust results from tomographic studies is the existence of two antipodally located Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle, which appear to be chemically denser than the ambient mantle. Results from reconstruction studies (Torsvik et al., 2006) infer that the LLSVPs are stable, long-lived, and are sampled by deep mantle plumes that rise predominantly from their margins. The origin of the dense material is debated, but generally falls within three categories: (i) a primitive layer that formed during magma ocean crystallization, (ii) accumulation of a dense eclogitic component from the recycled oceanic crust, and (iii) outer core material leaking into the lower mantle. A dense layer underlying a less dense ambient mantle is gravitationally stable. However, the flow due to thermal density variations, i.e. hot rising plumes and cold downwelling slabs, may deform the layer into piles with higher topography. Further deformation may lead to entrainment of the dense layer, its mixing with the ambient material, and even complete homogenisation with the rest of the mantle. The amount of the anomalous LLSVP-material that gets entrained into the rising plumes poses a constraint on the survival time of the LLSVPs, as well as on the plume buoyancy, on the lithospheric uplift associated with plume interaction and geochemical signature of the erupted lavas observed at the Earth's surface. Recent estimates for the plume responsible for the formation of the Siberian Flood Basalts give about 15% of entrained dense recycled oceanic crust, which made the hot mantle plume almost neutrally buoyant (Sobolev et al., 2011). In this numerical study we investigate the mechanics of entrainment of a dense basal layer by convective mantle flow. We observe that the types of flow that promote entrainment of the dense layer are (i) upwelling of the dense layer when it gets heated enough to overcome its stabilizing chemical density anomaly, (ii

  16. Development of seismic anisotropy during subduction-induced 3D mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.; capitanio, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    Subduction zones are convergent margins where the rigid lithosphere sinks into the Earth's mantle inducing complex 3D flow patterns. Seismic anisotropy generated by strain-induced lattice/crystal preferred orientation (LPO/CPO) of intrinsically anisotropic minerals is commonly used to study flow in the mantle and its relations with plate motions. As the development of seismic anisotropy due to upper and lower plate motions occurs at depths and timescales such that it is not directly observable, numerical modelling provides a useful tool to investigate these processes. We computed the seismic anisotropy of dry olivine-enstatite aggregates due to strain-induced LPO in 3D mechanical models of dynamic subduction by using, respectively, D-Rex and Underworld. Subsequently, FSTRACK was used to compute seismogram synthetics and SKS splitting patterns. We found that for relatively narrow subducting plates, retreat motions are maximized producing strong subslab trench-parallel anisotropy. Here, synthetic data reproduce quite well the observations in analogous subduction systems like Calabria and South Sandwich, where the fast azimuths orients parallel to the trench in the forearc and follow the toroidal flow patterns on the slab edges. Furthermore, we found that the amount of anisotropy is proportional to the amount of subduction, while it does not depend on the rate at which the plate subducts. On the other hand, larger subducting plates subducts mainly by plate advance, favoring poloidal motions and trench-perpendicular anisotropy. Additional Earth-like plate geometries involving along-trench variation of the subducting plate age that induces differential slab retreat motions are considered. We also tested different olivine fabrics (A, B, C, E type), yielding distinct SKS splitting patterns that may help to constrain the composition of the upper mantle. Although more sophisticated numerical modelling taking into account temperature-dependent mantle rock rheologies and P

  17. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems: the Transition from 2D to 3D Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Eric; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies have reproduced the patterns of zonal flow and thermal emission on the Giant Planets using deep convection models. For example, it has been shown that the fundamental differences between the winds of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, and the Gas Giants, Jupiter and Saturn, may be explained by the breakdown of the influence of rotation on convection. Here, we present results from a coupled suite of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of rotating convection which span a broad range of parameter space. We observe distinct transitions from rotationally controlled, quasi-2D dynamics to strongly 3D, non-rotating style convection. We quantify the boundary between these two regimes as a function of the Rayleigh and Ekman numbers. The transition is not determined, as long assumed, by the convective Rossby number, but instead is controlled by boundary layer dynamics. It may then be easier than previously thought for convection systems to break free from the constraints of rotation. We are presently investigating how this transition correlates with zonal flows and magnetic field generation on the Giant Planets. Funding provided by NSF Geophysics Program (EAR/IF) and NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  18. Combine Effects of Plate Motions and Small-Scale Convection on Mantle Stirring Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S.; Samuel, H.

    2012-04-01

    Convection in Earth's mantle generates large scale, vigorous motions often thought to be the primary mechanism of mantle stirring. However additional thermal instabilities may progressively develop below lithospheric plates, leading to smaller scale convective motions. While there is growing evidence supporting the presence of small-scale convection in Earth's mantle, little is known of its contribution to the mixing of mantle heterogeneities. We have thus investigated the influence of small-scale convection on mantle stirring efficiency using 2D numerical modeling of infinite Prandtl number convection with imposed surface plate motion and temperature and pressure dependent rheology. We measure stirring efficiency using Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) and we vary systematically the Peclet number, Pe, defined as the ratio of the advection time scale based on surface plate velocity to a characteristic diffusion time. Our computational domain has an aspect ratio of 1:3. For moderate Pe, small-scale convection is well developed, leading to efficient stirring. However large Pe numbers do not allow the development of small-scale convection and result in significantly lower stirring efficiency, although plate motions are faster. This indicates that (i) small-scale convection contributes significantly to mantle stirring efficiency, (ii) mantle stirring efficiency many spatially vary significantly due to the local magnitude of plate velocity and (iii) the relationship between mantle stirring efficiency and large-scale convective motions may be more complex than previously thought.

  19. Choosing an adequate FEM grid for global mantle convection modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Global numerical models of mantle convection are typically run on a grid which represents a hollow sphere. In the context of using the Finite Element method, there are many ways to discretise a hollow sphere by means of cuboids in a regular fashion (adaptive mesh refinement is here not considered). I will here focus on the following two: the cubed sphere [1], which is a quasi-uniform mapping of a cube to a sphere (considering both equidistant and equiangular projections), and the 12-block grid used for instance in CITCOM [2]. By means of simple experiments, I will show that at comparable resolutions (and all other things being equal), the 12-block grid is surprisingly vastly superior to the cubed-sphere grid, when used in combination with trilinear velocity - constant pressure elements, while being more difficult to build/implement. [1] C. Ronchi, R. Iacono, and P. S. Paolucci, The "Cubed Sphere": A New Method for the Solution of Partial Differential Equations in Spherical Geometry, Journal of Computational Physics, 124, p93-114 (1996). [2] S. Zhong and M.T. Zuber and L.N. Moresi and M. Gurnis, Role of temperature-dependent viscosity and surface plates in spherical shell models of mantle convection, Journal of Geophysical Research, 105 (B5), p 11,063-11,082 (2000).

  20. Thermal convection in a 3D spherical shell with strongly temperature and pressure dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, K.; Harder, H.; Hansen, U.

    2004-12-01

    The style of convection in planetary mantles is presumably dominated by the strong dependence of the viscosity of the mantle material on temperature and pressure. While several efforts have been undertaken in cartesian geometry to investigate convection in media with strong temperature dependent viscosity, spherical models are still in their infancy and still limited to modest parameters. Spectral approaches are usually employed for spherical convection models which do not allow to take into account lateral variations, like temperature dependent viscosity. We have developed a scheme, based on a finite volume discretization, to treat convection in a spherical shell with strong temperature dependent viscosity. Our approach has been particularly tailored to run efficiently on parallel computers. The spherical shell is topologically divided into six cubes. The equations are formulated in primitive variables, and are treated in the cartesian cubes. In order to ensure mass conservation a SIMPLER pressure correction procedure is applied and to handle strong viscosity variations up to Δ η =106 and high Rayleigh-numbers up to Ra=108 the pressure correction algorithm is combined with a pressure weighted interpolation method to satisfy the incompressibility condition and to avoid oscillations. We study thermal convection in a basal and mixed-mode heated shell with stress free and isothermal boundary conditions, as a function of the Rayleigh-number and viscosity contrast. Besides the temperature dependence we have further explored the effects of pressure on the viscosity. As a general result we observe the existence of three regimes (mobile, sluggish and stagnant lid), characterized by the type of surface motion. Laterally averaged depth-profiles of velocity, temperature and viscosity exhibit significant deviations from the isoviscous case. As compared to cartesian geometries, convection in a spherical shell possesses strong memory for the initial state. At strong

  1. Effect of Earth's rotation on thermal convection in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozoki, Tamas; Herein, Mátyás; Galsa, Attila

    2016-04-01

    Numerical model calculations have been carried out to study the effect of the centrifugal force on the thermal convection in the mantle. With the help of a simple dimensional analysis it can be shown that among the inertial forces generated by Earth's rotation, only the centrifugal force might have a detectable effect on the thermal convection in the mantle. A new non-dimensional parameter, RaCF was introduced to characterize the thermal buoyancy caused by the centrifugal force compared to the viscous force. Two-dimensional cylindrical shell geometry was applied with stationary value of angular velocity. The models started from the same non-rotated, quasi-stationary convection and 10 Gyr temporal evolution was observed. In the different models the magnitude of angular velocity varied from the recent value of Ω0 = 7.29E-5 1/s to the extreme value of 100 Ω0. The temporal and spatial variation of the surface heat flux (qs) and the root-mean-square velocity (vRMS) depending on the rotation velocity were investigated systematically in the model. Velocity was decomposed to tangential (vφ) and radial (vr) velocity to analyze the effect of the rotation on the flow system. The rotation arranges the convection to polar up- and equatorial downwellings, which structure is more peculiar at higher angular velocities and by the progress of time. Three main regimes can be identified based on the monitoring parameters (qs, vRMS). At low angular velocities (Ω = 0 - 4 Ω0) the convection pattern and the surface heat flux are slightly influenced by the centrifugal force. The most specific effect appears in the middle transitional regime (Ω = 4 - 15 Ω0) where the monotonic decrease of the heat flux separates from the unvarying average velocity. In this regime the constant vRMS is maintained by the enhanced tangential and reduced radial velocity component which is in accordance with the decrease in the number of plumes. vφ and vr shows an intensive decrease from the angular

  2. 3-D X-ray tomography of diamondiferous mantle eclogite xenoliths, Siberia: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Sobolev, Nikolay V.; Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Maisano, Jessica A.; Pokhilenko, Lyudmila N.; Taylor, Dawn; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2015-04-01

    -systems'. Diamonds observed completely enclosed in garnets suggest an early diamond-forming event prior to major re-crystallization and eclogite formation during subduction. The occurrence of diamond in association with embayed garnets suggests that diamond grew at the expense of the hosting silicate protolith. In addition, the spatial relationships of diamonds with metasomatic pathways, which are generally interpreted to result from late-stage proto-kimberlitic fluid percolation, indicate a period of diamond growth occurring close to, but prior to, the time of kimberlite emplacement. Furthermore, the paragenesis of sulfides within eclogite xenoliths are described using 3-D models for entire xenoliths volumes, providing important constraints of the timing of sulfide mobilization within the mantle. Three-D animations created using X-ray tomography data for ten of the xenoliths can be viewed at the following link: http://eps.utk.edu/faculty/taylor/tomography.php

  3. The Large-scale Component of Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cserepes, L.

    Circulation in the Earth's mantle occurs on multiple spatial scales: this review dis- cusses the character of its large-scale or global components. Direct and strong evi- dence concerning the global flow comes, first of all, from the pattern of plate motion. Further indirect observational data which can be transformed into flow velocities by the equation of motion are the internal density heterogeneities revealed by seismic to- mography, and the geoid can also be used as an observational constraint. Due to their limited spatial resolution, global tomographic data automatically filter out the small- scale features and are therefore relevant to the global flow pattern. Flow solutions obtained from tomographic models, using the plate motion as boundary condition, re- veal that subduction is the downwelling of the global mantle circulation and that the deep-rooted upwellings are concentrated in 2-3 superplumes. Spectral analysis of the tomographic heterogeneities shows that the power of global flow appears dominantly in the lowest spherical harmonic orders 2-5. Theoretical convection calculations con- tribute substantially to the understanding of global flow. If basal heating of the mantle is significant, numerical models can reproduce the basic 2 to 5 cell pattern of con- vection even without the inclusion of surface plates. If plates are superimposed on the solution with their present arrangement and motion, the dominance of these low spherical harmonic orders is more pronounced. The cells are not necessarily closed, rather they show chaotic time-dependence, but they are normally bordered by long downwelling features, and they have usually a single superplume in the cell interior. Swarms of small plumes can develop in the large cells, especially when convection is partially layered due to an internal boundary such as the 670 km discontinuity (source of small plumes). These small plumes are usually tilted by the background large-scale flow which shows that they are

  4. New Era in 3-D Modeling of Convection and Magnetic Dynamos in Stellar Envelopes and Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomre, J.; Augustson, K. C.; Brown, B. P.; Browning, M. K.; Brun, A. S.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    The recent advances in asteroseismology and spectropolarimetry are beginning to provide estimates of differential rotation and magnetic structures for a range of F and G-type stars possessing convective envelopes, and in A-type stars with convective cores. It is essential to complement such observational work with theoretical studies based on 3-D simulations of highly turbulent convection coupled to rotation, shear and magnetic fields in full spherical geometries. We have so employed the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code, which deals with compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in spherical shells, to examine the manner in which the global-scale convection can establish differential rotation and meridional circulations under current solar rotation rates, and these make good contact with helioseismic findings. For younger G stars rotating 3 to 5 times faster than the current Sun, the convection establishes ever stronger angular velocity contrasts between their fast equators and slow poles, and these are accompanied by prominent latitudinal temperature contrasts as well. Turning to MHD simulation of magnetic dynamo action within these younger G stars, the resulting magnetism involves wreaths of strong toroidal magnetic fields (up to 50 to 100 kG strengths) in the bulk of the convection zone, typically of opposite polarity in the northern and southern hemispheres. These fields can persist for long intervals despite being pummeled by the fast convective downflows, but they can also exhibit field reversals and cycles. Turning to shallower convective envelopes in the more luminous F-type stars that range in mass from 1.2 to 1.4 solar masses and for various rotation rates, we find that the convection can again establish solar-like differential rotation profiles with a fast equator and slow poles, but the opposite is achieved at the slower rotation rates. The F stars are also capable of building strong magnetic fields, often as wreaths, through dynamo action. We also

  5. Quantifying global melt flux and degassing rate from global mantle convection models with plate motion history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Black, B. A.; Zhong, S.; Manga, M.; Rudolph, M. L.; Olson, P.

    2015-12-01

    How does the Earth's deep mantle convection affect surface climate change? Volcanism in various geological settings, including mid-ocean ridges, volcanic arcs, rift zones and sites with intraplate volcanism, releases volatiles to Earth's surface. The amount and composition of these volatiles influence the evolution Earth's ocean, crust and atmosphere, which in turn control the evolution of the biosphere. While there are constraints of Earth's degassing from the geochemistry of samples in some localized regions, a quantification of the time evolution of degassing on a global scale remains largely unknown.In this study, we run geodynamical calculations with a full 3D spherical geometry to explore the amount of partial melting in the shallow part of Earth's mantle and implied degassing at a global scale. The plate motion history for the last 200 Ma or longer is employed as time-dependent velocity boundary condition for mantle flow. Using the temperature, pressure and composition in mantle convection models, we calculate the degree of partial melting in different geological settings. We show that the melt flux at mid-ocean ridges generally increases linearly with the speed of plates, with some perturbations due to changes of length of mid-ocean ridges. Generally, this melt flux is about 2-3 times in the past 200 million years than that of the present-day Earth. The present-day melt flux is ~20 km3/year, but this value reaches ~40 km3/year at about 80Ma, and ~60 km3/year at about 120-160Ma. Given estimates of volatile content in the source regions where partial melting occurs and the melt flux we calculate, we quantify the evolution of degassing rate (of CO2) at mid-ocean ridges, hotspots, large igneous provinces, and subduction zones.

  6. The Effects of Chemically Distinct LLSVPs on the Geoid: the Results from Both 3-D Thermochemical Convection and Seismically Constrained Instantaneous Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2014-12-01

    The long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and mantle viscosity structure. Hager and Ricard and their colleagues successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically imaged mantle structure as buoyancy force in an isochemical, whole mantle convection model. However, it has been generally agreed that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath the Pacific and the Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and likely more dense than the ambient mantle. In this study, we investigate how chemically distinct LLSVPs or chemical piles affect the geoid using both time-dependent thermochemical convection model and instantaneous flow model driven by buoyancy derived from seismic models. First, by conducting a series of 3D spherical thermochemical convection calculations, we found that the chemically dense piles above the CMB have a compensation effect on the geoid, and as a result, the total geoid is only controlled by the upper ~1600 km of the mantle. Second, we use buoyancy structure derived from seismic model Smean to study whether the observed geoid can be reproduced by considering the compensation effects of the LLSVPs. The geoid modeling requires a viscosity profile η and a seismic velocity to density scaling f. We define a four-layer viscosity model with viscosities for lithosphere η_lt, the upper mantle η_um, the transition zone η_tz, and the lower mantle η_lm. With a fixed η_lt of 20, we compute the geoid and search for η_um, η_tz, η_lm, and f that lead to the maximum variance reduction for the geoid. For the whole mantle, isochemical model, the best model with variance reduction of ~71% for degrees 2-9 has viscosities of 20, 0.5, 0.5, 35, for η_lt, η_um, η_tz, and η_lm, respectively, and the scaling f is 0.24. For the thermochemical model with the bottom 1000 km of structure removed, the best model has a viscosity profile of 20, 0.5, 0.5, 30 for the four

  7. A New Global Model for 3-D variations in P Wave Speed in Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karason, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Li, C.

    2003-12-01

    In an effort to improve the resolution of mantle structure we have combined complementary data sets of short- and long period (absolute and differential) travel time residuals. Our new model is based on short period P (N\\~7.7x10**6), pP (N\\~2.3x10**5), and PKP (N\\~16x10**4) data from the catalog by Engdahl et al (BSSA, 1998), short-period PKP differential times (N\\~1600) measured by McSweeney & Creager, and long-period differential PP-P times - N\\~20,000 measured by Bolton & Masters and N\\~18,000 by Ritsema - and Pdiff-PKP (N\\~560) measured by Wysession. Inversion tests, spectral analysis, and comparison with geology indicate that the large-scale upper mantle structure is better constrained with the addition of PP-P, whereas the Pdiff and PKP data help constrain deep mantle structure (Karason & Van der Hilst, JGR, 2001). The long period data were measured by cross-correlation. We solved the system of equations using 400 iterations of the iterative algorithm LSQR For the short period (1 Hz) data we use a high frequency approximation and trace rays through a fine grid of constant slowness cells to invert for mantle structure. For low frequency Pdiff and PP data we account for sensitivity to structure away from the optical ray path with 3-D Frechet derivatives (sensitivity kernels) estimated from single forward scattering and projected onto basis functions (constant slowness blocks) used for model parameterization. With such kernels the low frequency data can constrain long wavelength heterogeneity without keeping the short period data from mapping details in densely sampled regions. In addition to finite frequency sensitivity kernels we optimized the localization by using a parameterization that adapts to spatial resolution, with small cells in regions of dense sampling and larger cells in regions where sampling is more sparse (the total number of cells was \\~ 350,000). Finally, we corrected all travel times and surface reflections for lateral variations in

  8. Mantle convection and the distribution of geochemical reservoirs in the silicate shell of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walzer, Uwe; Hendel, Roland

    2010-05-01

    We present a dynamic 3-D spherical-shell model of mantle convection and the evolution of the chemical reservoirs of the Earth`s silicate shell. Chemical differentiation, convection, stirring and thermal evolution constitute an inseparable dynamic system. Our model is based on the solution of the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy, angular momentum, and four sums of the number of atoms of the pairs 238U-206Pb, 235U-207Pb, 232Th-208Pb, and 40K-40Ar. Similar to the present model, the continental crust of the real Earth was not produced entirely at the start of the evolution but developed episodically in batches [1-7]. The details of the continental distribution of the model are largely stochastic, but the spectral properties are quite similar to the present real Earth. The calculated Figures reveal that the modeled present-day mantle has no chemical stratification but we find a marble-cake structure. If we compare the observational results of the present-day proportion of depleted MORB mantle with the model then we find a similar order of magnitude. The MORB source dominates under the lithosphere. In our model, there are nowhere pure unblended reservoirs in the mantle. It is, however, remarkable that, in spite of 4500 Ma of solid-state mantle convection, certain strong concentrations of distributed chemical reservoirs continue to persist in certain volumes, although without sharp abundance boundaries. We deal with the question of predictable and stochastic portions of the phenomena. Although the convective flow patterns and the chemical differentiation of oceanic plateaus are coupled, the evolution of time-dependent Rayleigh number, Rat , is relatively well predictable and the stochastic parts of the Rat(t)-curves are small. Regarding the juvenile growth rates of the total mass of the continents, predictions are possible only in the first epoch of the evolution. Later on, the distribution of the continental-growth episodes is increasingly stochastic

  9. Generation of Plates In Numerical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    A threedimensional numerical model is employed to investigate with an appropriate rheology how the mantle convection system organizes itself into a state, exhibiting essential features of plate tectonics. While a strongly temperature dependent viscosity leads to a stagnant lid, mobilization of the surface appears if an additional yield-stress criterion is taken into account. During short periods, parts of the surface move like plates. These periods are interrupted by phases in which a stagnant lid exists. Besides plate-like motion we observe other features like the migration of subduction-zones. Adding further a pressure dependence of the viscosity leads to change to a more con- tinuous plate-like behaviour. Once plates have formed, the surface moves essentially steady throughout the modelled time. This model evolves into a state displaying ex- tended rigidly moving plates, surrounded by localized areas with high deformation.

  10. Formation of Plates in Numerical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    2001-12-01

    In a threedimensional numerical model we demonstrate that with an appropriate rheology the mantle convection system organizes itself into a state, exhibiting essential features of plate tectonics. While a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity leads to a stagnant lid, mobilization of the surface appears if an additional yield-stress criterion is taken into account. During short periods, parts of the surface move like plates. These periods are interrupted by phases in which a stagnant lid exists. Besides plate-like motion we observe other features like the migration of subduction-zones. Adding further a pressure dependence of the viscosity leads to change from the episodic to a more continuous plate-like behavior. Once plates have formed, the surface moves essentially steady throughout the modelled time. This models evolves into a state displaying extended rigidly moving plates, surrounded by localized areas with high deformation.

  11. Three-dimensional spherical models of layered and whole mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Schubert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    We present numerical calculations of three-dimensional spherical shell thermal convection for constant viscosity and stratified viscosity models of whole-layer and two-layer mantle convection. These four examples are intended to provide theoretical guidance for determining the style of convection that is occurring in Earth's mantle. An impermeable interface between the upper and lower convecting shells in the two-layer solutions is placed at a depth of 670 km to coincide with the mantle seismic discontinuity that divides the upper and lower mantle. The interface results in an internal thermal boundary layer that raises the mean temperature in the lower shell by about 1400 K compared to the whole-layer solutions. The patterns of convection in the upper part of the whole-layer solutions are dominated by narrow arcuate sheetlike downflows in a background of weak upflow. In contrast, the upper shells of the two-layer solutions have complicated networks of convective rolls with the upflows and downflows having very similar structure. The structure of convection in the lower shells is similar to that in the lower part of the whole-layer solutions. Based on the horizontal structure of subduction zones on Earth's surface and on tomographic images of temperature variations in Earth's mantle, we conclude that the style of convection in Earth's mantle is more like that of the whole-mantle models.

  12. Anomalously low amplitude of S waves produced by the 3D structures in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Akiko; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Direct S and Sdiff phases with anomalously low amplitudes are recorded for the earthquakes in Papua New Guinea by seismographs in northern America. According to the prediction by a standard 1D model, the amplitudes are the lowest at stations in southern California, at a distance and azimuth of around 95° and 55°, respectively, from the earthquake. The amplitude anomaly is more prominent at frequencies higher than 0.03 Hz. We checked and ruled out the possibility of the anomalies appearing because of the errors in the focal mechanism used in the reference synthetic waveform calculations. The observed anomaly distribution changes drastically with a relatively small shift in the location of the earthquake. The observations indicate that the amplitude reduction is likely due to the 3D shear velocity (Vs) structure, which deflects the wave energy away from the original ray paths. Moreover, some previous studies suggested that some of the S and Sdiff phases in our dataset are followed by a prominent postcursor and show a large travel time delay, which was explained by placing a large ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) located on the core-mantle boundary southwest of Hawaii. In this study, we evaluated the extent of amplitude anomalies that can be explained by the lower mantle structures in the existing models, including the previously proposed ULVZ. In addition, we modified and tested some models and searched for the possible causes of low amplitudes. Full 3D synthetic waveforms were calculated and compared with the observations. Our results show that while the existing models explain the trends of the observed amplitude anomalies, the size of such anomalies remain under-predicted especially at large distances. Adding a low velocity zone, which is spatially larger and has less Vs reduction than ULVZ, on the southwest side of ULVZ, contributes to explain the low amplitudes observed at distances larger than 100° from the earthquake. The newly proposed low velocity zone

  13. Slab pull, mantle convection, and Pangaean assembly and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    Two global-scale mantle convection cells presently exist on Earth, centred on upwelling zones in the South Pacific Ocean and northeast Africa: one cell (Panthalassan) contains only oceanic plates, the other (Pangaean) contains all the continental plates. They have remained fixed relative to one another for >400 Ma. A transverse (Rheic-Tethyian) subduction system splits the Pangaean cell. Poloidal plate motion in the oceanic cell reflects circumferential pull of Panthalassan slabs, but toroidal flow in the Pangaean cell, reflected by vortex-type motion of continents toward the Altaids of central-east Asia throughout the Phanerozoic, has resulted from the competing slab-pull forces of both cells. The combined slab-pull effects from both cells also controlled Pangaean assembly and dispersal. Assembly occurred during Palaeozoic clockwise toroidal motion in the Pangaean cell, when Gondwana was pulled into Pangaea by the NE-trending Rheic subduction zone, forming the Appalachian-Variscide-Altaid chain. Pangaean dispersal occurred when the Rheic trench re-aligned in the Jurassic to form the NW-trending Tethyside subduction system, which pulled east Gondwanan fragments in the opposite direction to form the Cimmerian-Himalayan-Alpine chain. This re-alignment also generated a new set of (Indian) mid-ocean ridge systems which dissected east Gondwana and facilitated breakup. 100-200-Myr-long Phanerozoic Wilson cycles reflect rifting and northerly migration of Gondwanan fragments across the Pangaean cell into the Rheic-Tethyian trench. Pangaean dispersal was amplified by retreat of the Panthalassan slab away from Europe and Africa, which generated mantle counterflow currents capable of pulling the Americas westward to create the Atlantic Ocean. Thermal blanketing beneath Pangaea and related hotspot activity were part of a complex feedback mechanism that established the breakup pattern, but slab retreat is considered to have been the main driving force. The size and longevity of

  14. 3D coexisting modes of thermal convection in the faulted Lower Yarmouk Gorge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Fabien; Inbar, Nimrod; Möller, Peter; Raggad, Marwan; Rödiger, Tino; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Siebert, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Numerical investigations of 3D modes of large-scale convection in faulted aquifers are presented with the aim to infer possible transport mechanisms supporting the formation of thermal springs in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG), at the border between Israel and Jordan. The transient finite elements models are based on a geological model of the LYG that introduces more realistic structural features of the basin, compared to previous existing models of the area (Magri et al., submitted). The sensitivity analysis of the fault permeability showed that faults cross-cutting the main regional flow direction allow groundwater to be driven laterally by convective forces within the fault planes. Therein thermal waters can either discharge along the fault traces or exit the fault through adjacent permeable aquifers. The location of springs can migrate with time, is not strictly constrained to the damage zones and reflects the interplay between the wavelength of the multicellular regime in the fault zone and the regional flow toward discharge areas in the lowlands. The results presented here suggest that in the LYG case, crossing flow paths result from the coexistence of fault convection, that can develop for example along NE-SW oriented faults within the Gorge, and additional flow fields that can be induced either by topography N-S gradients, e.g. perpendicular to the major axe of the Gorge, or by local thermal convection in permeable aquifers below Eocene aquiclude. The sensitivity analysis is consistent with the analytical solutions based on viscous-dependent Rayleigh theory. It indicates that in the LYG coexisting transport processes likely occur at fault hydraulic conductivity ranging between 2.3e-7 m/s and 9.3e- 7 m/s (i.e. 7 m/yr and 30 m/yr). The LYG numerical example and the associated Rayleigh analysis can be applied to study the onset of thermal convection and resulting flow patterns of any fractured hydrothermal basin. References Magri F, Möller S, Inbar N, M

  15. Implementation and application of adaptive mesh refinement for thermochemical mantle convection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Wei; Zhong, Shijie

    2011-04-01

    Numerical modeling of mantle convection is challenging. Owing to the multiscale nature of mantle dynamics, high resolution is often required in localized regions, with coarser resolution being sufficient elsewhere. When investigating thermochemical mantle convection, high resolution is required to resolve sharp and often discontinuous boundaries between distinct chemical components. In this paper, we present a 2-D finite element code with adaptive mesh refinement techniques for simulating compressible thermochemical mantle convection. By comparing model predictions with a range of analytical and previously published benchmark solutions, we demonstrate the accuracy of our code. By refining and coarsening the mesh according to certain criteria and dynamically adjusting the number of particles in each element, our code can simulate such problems efficiently, dramatically reducing the computational requirements (in terms of memory and CPU time) when compared to a fixed, uniform mesh simulation. The resolving capabilities of the technique are further highlighted by examining plume-induced entrainment in a thermochemical mantle convection simulation.

  16. Three-dimensional spherical models of convection in the earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G. ); Glatzmaier, G.A. )

    1989-05-26

    Three-dimensional, spherical models of mantle convection in the earth reveal that upwelling cylindrical plumes and downwelling planar sheets are the primary features of mantle circulation. Thus, subduction zones and descending sheetlike slabs in the mantle are fundamental characteristics of thermal convection in a spherical shell and are not merely the consequences of the rigidity of the slabs, which are cooler than the surrounding mantle. Cylindrical mantle plumes that cause hotspots such as Hawaii are probably the only form of active upwelling and are therefore not just secondary convective currents separate from the large-scale mantle circulation. Active sheetlike upwellings that could be associated with mid-ocean ridges did not develop in the model simulations, a result that is in agreement with evidence suggesting that ridges are passive phenomena resulting from the tearing of surface plates by the pull of descending slabs. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Mixing and entrainment in mantle plumes: A 3D experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, William; Cotel, Aline; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina; Hart, Stanley; Whitehead, John

    2011-11-01

    Significant differences exist between isotopic signatures of typical mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and those associated with many ocean islands, with ocean island basalts (OIB) generally exhibiting more variability in trace element concentrations and also a bias towards enrichment in radiogenic isotopes such as Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb. Such observations coupled with other geophysical evidence have been used to suggest that OIB's are surface manifestations of thermal plumes originating in the deep interior near the core-mantle boundary that interact with distinct, heterogeneous reservoirs as material is transported from the Earth's interior to the surface. We experimentally investigate the structure and transport characteristics of isolated thermal plumes in corn syrup. The 3D velocity field is measured using a scanning stereoscopic particle image velocimetry system. Two types of tracer particles are simultaneously utilized, with thermochromic liquid crystals providing an estimate of the temperature field. Lagrangian coherent structures computed from the velocity field identify key material lines and surfaces that provide a taxonomic picture of plumes operating in different regimes. These govern how the plume interacts with the ambient during its ascent.

  18. Is the 3-D magnetic null point with a convective electric field an efficient particle accelerator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.-N.; Büchner, J.; Otto, A.; Santos, J.; Marsch, E.; Gan, W.-Q.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: We study the particle acceleration at a magnetic null point in the solar corona, considering self-consistent magnetic fields, plasma flows and the corresponding convective electric fields. Methods: We calculate the electromagnetic fields by 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and expose charged particles to these fields within a full-orbit relativistic test-particle approach. In the 3-D MHD simulation part, the initial magnetic field configuration is set to be a potential field obtained by extrapolation from an analytic quadrupolar photospheric magnetic field with a typically observed magnitude. The configuration is chosen so that the resulting coronal magnetic field contains a null. Driven by photospheric plasma motion, the MHD simulation reveals the coronal plasma motion and the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. In a subsequent test particle experiment the particle energies and orbits (determined by the forces exerted by the convective electric field and the magnetic field around the null) are calculated in time. Results: Test particle calculations show that protons can be accelerated up to 30 keV near the null if the local plasma flow velocity is of the order of 1000 km s-1 (in solar active regions). The final parallel velocity is much higher than the perpendicular velocity so that accelerated particles escape from the null along the magnetic field lines. Stronger convection electric field during big flare explosions can accelerate protons up to 2 MeV and electrons to 3 keV. Higher initial velocities can help most protons to be strongly accelerated, but a few protons also run the risk to be decelerated. Conclusions: Through its convective electric field and due to magnetic nonuniform drifts and de-magnetization process, the 3-D null can act as an effective accelerator for protons but not for electrons. Protons are more easily de-magnetized and accelerated than electrons because of their larger Larmor radii. Notice that macroscopic MHD

  19. Evidence for deep mantle convection and primordial heterogeneity from nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palot, M.; Cartigny, P.; Harris, J. W.; Kaminsky, F. V.; Stachel, T.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond, as the deepest sample available for study, provides a unique opportunity to sample and examine parts of the Earth's mantle not directly accessible. In order to provide further constraints on mantle convection and deep volatile cycles, we analysed nitrogen and carbon isotopes and nitrogen abundances in 133 diamonds from Juina (Brazil) and Kankan (Guinea). Host syngenetic inclusions within these diamonds indicate origins from the lithosphere, the asthenosphere-transition zone and the lower mantle. Juina and Kankan diamonds both display overall carbon isotopic compositions within the current upper mantle range but the δ13C signatures of diamonds from the asthenosphere-transition zone extend toward very negative and positive values, respectively. Two Kankan diamonds with both lower mantle and asthenosphere-transition zone inclusions (KK-45 and KK-83) are zoned in δ13C, and have signatures consistent with multiple growth steps likely within both the lower mantle and the asthenosphere-transition zone illustrating the transfer of material through the 670 km seismic discontinuity. At a given locality, diamonds from the upper and the lower mantle show similar δ15N distributions with coinciding modes within the range defined by typical upper mantle samples, as one might expect for a well stirred reservoir resulting from whole mantle convection. Kankan diamonds KK-11 (lower mantle), KK-21 and KK-92 (both lithospheric) display the lowest δ15N values (-24.9%, -39.4% and -30.4%) ever measured in terrestrial samples, which we interpret as reflecting primordial heterogeneity preserved in an imperfectly mixed convective mantle. Our diamond data thus provide support for deeply rooted convection cells, together with the preservation of primordial volatiles in an imperfectly mixed convecting mantle, thereby reconciling the conflicting interpretations regarding mantle homogeneity derived from geochemical and geophysical studies.

  20. Numerical studies on convective stability and flow pattern in three-dimensional spherical mantle of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Kameyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    We explore thermal convection of a fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity in a basally heated 3-D spherical shell using linear stability analyses and numerical experiments, while considering the application of our results to terrestrial planets. The inner to outer radius ratio of the shell f assumed in the linear stability analyses is in the range of 0.11-0.88. The critical Rayleigh number Rc for the onset of thermal convection decreases by two orders of magnitude as f increases from 0.11 to 0.88, when the viscosity depends sensitively on the temperature, as is the case for real mantle materials. Numerical simulations carried out in the range of f = 0.11-0.55 show that a thermal boundary layer (TBL) develops both along the surface and bottom boundaries to induce cold and hot plumes, respectively, when f is 0.33 or larger. However, for smaller f values, a TBL develops only on the bottom boundary. Convection occurs in the stagnant-lid regime where the root mean square velocity on the surface boundary is less than 1 per cent of its maximum at depth, when the ratio of the viscosity at the surface boundary to that at the bottom boundary exceeds a threshold that depends on f. The threshold decreases from 106.5 at f = 0.11 to 104 at f = 0.55. If the viscosity at the base of the convecting mantle is 1020-1021 Pa s, the Rayleigh number exceeds Rc for Mars, Venus and the Earth, but does not for the Moon and Mercury; convection is unlikely to occur in the latter planets unless the mantle viscosity is much lower than 1020 Pa s and/or the mantle contains a strong internal heat source.

  1. Characterizing 3D Structure of Convective Momentum Transport Associated with the MJO Based on Contemporary Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Jiang, X.; Waliser, D. E.; Moncrieff, M. W.; Johnson, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    As one of the most prominent tropical atmospheric variability modes, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) exerts profound influences on global weather and climate, and serves as a critical predictability source for extend-range forecast. While credible representation of the MJO still represents a great challenge for current general circulation models (GCMs), previous studies on the vertical structure of the MJO have largely focused on collective impacts from multi-scale convective systems on thermodynamic properties of the MJO. Most recently, limited observational studies and idealized modeling work suggested that convective momentum transport (CMT) could also play an important role in interpreting the observed MJO features. In this study, the 3D CMT structure associated with the MJO is examined by analyzing model output from three recent high-quality reanalysis systems, including NOAA's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and ECMWF-the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) reanalysis. Consistent with previous cloud-resolving model study, a well-organized three-layer vertical structure in the CMT associated with the MJO is also discerned based on reanalyses. The result suggests that CMT tends to intensify the MJO circulation, particularly in the lower troposphere. Relative roles of meso-scale systems (MCS) and synoptic waves in contributing the total CMT profiles of the MJO will also be explored. Differences in CMT profiles in these several reanalysis models will be discussed.

  2. Investigating the Subduction History of the Southwest Pacific using Coupled Plate Tectonic-Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, K. J.; Flament, N. E.; Williams, S.; Müller, D.; Gurnis, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene (~85-45 Ma) evolution of the southwest Pacific has been the subject of starkly contrasting plate reconstruction models, reflecting sparse and ambiguous data. Disparate models of (1) west-dipping subduction and back-arc basin opening to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, (2) east-dipping subduction and back-arc basin closure to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, and (3) tectonic quiescence with no subduction have all been proposed for this time frame. To help resolve this long-standing problem we test a new southwest Pacific reconstruction using global mantle flow models with imposed plate motions. The kinematic model incorporates east to northeast directed rollback of a west-dipping subduction zone between 85 and 55 Ma, accommodating opening of the South Loyalty back-arc basin to the east of New Caledonia. At 55 Ma there is a plate boundary reorganization in the region. West-dipping subduction and back-arc basin spreading end, and there is initiation of northeast dipping subduction within the back-arc basin. Consumption of South Loyalty Basin seafloor continues until 45 Ma, when obduction onto New Caledonia begins. West-dipping Tonga-Kermadec subduction initiates at this time at the relict Late Cretaceous-earliest Eocene subduction boundary. We use the 3D spherical mantle convection code CitcomS coupled to the plate reconstruction software GPlates, with plate motions and evolving plate boundaries imposed since 230 Ma. The predicted present-day mantle structure is compared to S- and P-wave seismic tomography models, which can be used to infer the presence of slab material in the mantle at locations where fast velocity anomalies are imaged. This workflow enables us to assess the forward-modeled subduction history of the region.

  3. Modes of mantle convection and the removal of heat from the earth's interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spohn, T.; Schubert, G.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal histories for two-layer and whole-mantle convection models are calculated and presented, based on a parameterization of convective heat transport. The model is composed of two concentric spherical shells surrounding a spherical core. The models were constrained to yield the observed present-day surface heat flow and mantle viscosity, in order to determine parameters. These parameters were varied to determine their effects on the results. Studies show that whole-mantle convection removes three times more primordial heat from the earth interior and six times more from the core than does two-layer convection (in 4.5 billion years). Mantle volumetric heat generation rates for both models are comparable to that of a potassium-depleted chondrite, and thus surface heat-flux balance does not require potassium in the core. Whole and two-layer mantle convection differences are primarily due to lower mantle thermal insulation and the lower heat removal efficiency of the upper mantle as compared with that of the whole mantle.

  4. The longevity of Archean mantle residues in the convecting upper mantle and their role in young continent formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingao; Scott, James M.; Martin, Candace E.; Pearson, D. Graham

    2015-08-01

    The role played by ancient melt-depleted lithospheric mantle in preserving continental crust through time is critical in understanding how continents are built, disrupted and recycled. While it has become clear that much of the extant Archean crust is underpinned by Archean mantle roots, reports of Proterozoic melt depletion ages for peridotites erupted through Phanerozoic terranes raise the possibility that ancient buoyant lithospheric mantle acts as a "life-raft" for much of the Earth's continental crust. Here we report the largest crust-lithospheric mantle age decoupling (∼2.4 Ga) so far observed on Earth and examine the potential cause for such extreme age decoupling. The Phanerozoic (<300 Ma) continental crust of West Otago, New Zealand, is intruded by Cenozoic diatremes that have erupted cratonic mantle-like highly depleted harzburgites and dunites. These peridotites have rhenium depletion Os model ages that vary from 0.5 to 2.7 Ga, firmly establishing the record of an Archean depletion event. However, the vast range in depletion ages does not correlate with melt depletion or metasomatic tracer indices, providing little support for the presence of a significant volume of ancient mantle root beneath this region. Instead, the chemical and isotopic data are best explained by mixing of relict components of Archean depleted peridotitic mantle residues that have cycled through the asthenosphere over Ga timescales along with more fertile convecting mantle. Extensive melt depletion associated with the "docking" of these melt residues beneath the young continental crust of the Zealandia continent explains the decoupled age relationship that we observe today. Hence, the newly formed lithospheric root incorporates a mixture of ancient and modern mantle derived from the convecting mantle, cooled and accreted in recent times. We argue that in this case, the ancient components played no earlier role in continent stabilization, but their highly depleted nature along with

  5. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online.

  6. Three-dimensional spherical models of layered and whole mantle convection

    SciTech Connect

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Schubert, G.

    1993-12-10

    We present numerical calculations of three-dimensional spherical shell thermal convection for constant viscosity and stratified viscosity models of whole-layer and two-layer mantle convection. These four examples are intended to provide theoretical guidance for determining the style of convection that is occurring in Earth`s mantle. An impermeable interface between the upper and lower convecting shells in the two-layer solutions is placed at a depth of 670 km to coincide with the mantle seismic discontinuity that divides the upper and lower mantle. The interface results in an internal thermal boundary layer that raises the mean temperature in the lower shell by about 1400 K compared to the whole-layer solutions. The patterns of convection in the upper part of the whole-layer solutions are dominated by narrow acurate sheetlike downflows in a background of weak upflow. In contrast, the upper shells of the two-layer solutions have complicated networks of convective rolls with the upflows and downflows having very similar structure. The structure of convection in the lower shells is similar to that in the lower part of the whole-layer solutions. An increase (decrease) in the viscosity in the lower (upper) shell decreases (increase) the convective velocity in the lower (upper) shell and increases (decreases) the horizontal scale in the lower (upper) shell. The upper and lower shells are viscously coupled at the 670-km interface when viscosity is the same in the two shells. However, when viscosity in the lower shell is 30 times greater than that in the upper shell, the coupling is partially viscous and partially thermal. Based on the horizontal structure of subduction zones on Earth`s surface and on tomographic images of temperature variations in Earth`s mantle, we conclude that the style of convection in Earth`s mantle is more like that of the whole-mantle models. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  7. A global 3D P-velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle for improved event location : SALSA3D.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Christopher John; Steck, Lee K.; Phillips, William Scott; Ballard, Sanford; Chang, Marcus C.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D version 1.5, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is {approx}50%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model is assessed

  8. SALSA3D : a global 3D p-velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle for improved event location.

    SciTech Connect

    Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Young, Christopher John; Chang, Marcus C.; Ballard, Sally C.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D version 1.5, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is {approx}50%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model is assessed

  9. Convective instability rising out of the underbelly of stagnant slabs in the Mantle Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim D.; Motoki, Matthew H.

    2016-04-01

    The study of volcanism can further our understanding of Earth's mantle processes and composition. Continental intraplate volcanism commonly occurs above subducted slabs that stagnate in the Mantle Transition Zone (MTZ), such as in Europe, eastern China, and western North America. Here, we use two-dimensional numerical models to explore the evolution of stagnant slabs in the MTZ and their potential to sustain mantle upwellings that can support volcanism. We find [1] that weak slabs may go convectively unstable within tens of Myr. Upwellings rise out of the relatively warm underbelly of the slab, are entrained by ambient-mantle flow and reach the base of the lithosphere. The first and most vigorous upwellings rise adjacent to lateral heterogeneity within the slab. Ultimately, convective instability also acts to separate the compositional components of the slab, harzburgite and eclogite, from each other with harzburgite rising into the upper mantle and eclogite sinking toward the base of the MTZ, and potentially into the lower mantle. Such a physical filtering process may sustain a long-term compositional stratification across the mantle [2]. [1] Motoki, M. H. and M. D. Ballmer (2015): Convective instability of Stagnant Slabs in the Mantle Transition Zone, Geochem. Geophys. Geosys., doi:10.1002/2014GC005608. [2] Ballmer, M. D., N. C. Schmerr, T. Nakagawa, and J. Ritsema (2015): Compositional mantle layering revealed by slab stagnation at ~1,000 km depth, Science Advances, doi:10.1126/sciadv.1500815

  10. Long Mantle Mixing Times for the early Earth Inferred from Convection Models with Grain-Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, B. J.; Rizo, H.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle dynamics on the Hadean and Archean Earth, particularly whether plate tectonics was in operation or not, is hotly debated. One important constraint comes from evidence for long mantle mixing timescales in the early Earth based on observations of early-formed geochemical heterogeneities. Specifically, 142Nd anomalies recorded in 3.8 to 3.4 Ga rocks from southwest Greenland [e.g. 1] and 2.7 Ga rocks from the Superior Province (Canada) [2] indicate that chemically heterogeneous reservoirs, formed during the first ~ 10-100 million years of Earths' history, survived their remixing into the mantle for over 1 Gyr. Such a long mantle mixing time is difficult to explain with a traditional model of plate tectonics, where plate speeds increase significantly in the past due to a hotter mantle, thus prompting appeals to stagnant lid convection on the early Earth [e.g. 2]. However, a new model for generating plate tectonics from mantle convection based on grainsize reduction (called grain-damage) proposes that plate speeds may have decreased with increasing mantle temperature. Higher mantle temperatures lead to higher grain-growth rates that inhibit the formation of weak lithospheric shear zones. As a result, plate boundaries are more viscous and provide a stronger resistance to plate motions, and thus mantle-mixing times in the mobile lid regime may still be long even at Hadean or Archean mantle temperatures. We use new numerical models of convection with grain-damage to constrain mantle-mixing times for the early Earth with the effects of grainsize variation included. We find that mantle mixing times for mobile lid convection remain long as mantle temperature increases because of faster grain-growth rates in the mantle and lithosphere. Therefore the preservation of chemical heterogeneities for over 1 Gyr in the Hadean-Archean mantle is not inconsistent with the operation of mobile lid convection and subduction at this time. Early Earth subduction may still have differed

  11. 3-D Seismic Imaging of Sedimentary Underplating at the Corner of the Cascadia Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. J.; Preston, L. A.; Farahbod, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    In several subduction zones, teleseismic surveys have identified landward dipping zones with anomalously low seismic velocities at depths >20 km, which are interpreted to be the subducting oceanic crust. In the Cascadia subduction zone, two teleseismic profiles (CAFE and POLARIS) lie in an area of dense seismicity and mostly within a group of active source, crustal-scale seismic surveys that were acquired between 1995 and 1999. A 3-D P wave velocity model, which extends to depths as great as 65 km, has been derived by an integrated tomographic inversion of the areally distributed earthquakes and active source data. To identify the low velocity zone in the velocity model, we compare coincident linear sections extracted from the model with the P and S wave velocity perturbations derived from the teleseismic data. Given the uncertainties in the analysis of the different datasets, it is probable that the analyses of the teleseismic data and the tomographic inversion of local seismic travel time data have identified the same landward dipping low velocity zone. In the 3-D tomographic velocity model, the low velocity zone, which can be traced along strike between the two 2-D teleseismic surveys, outcrops in the Olympic Mountains where rocks of the accretionary wedge have been exhumed. The oceanic crust, which is located by PmP reflections, underlies the more shallowly dipping low velocity zone. At depths of 35-40 km, the low velocity zone separates from the descending plate and decreases in amplitude. The plate interface may be located at the top of the basaltic oceanic crust, i.e. near the base of the low velocity zone, but the boundary between the two plates could also be a vertically distributed shear zone corresponding to the deeper part of the low velocity region. At depth, the low velocity zone corresponds to previously identified seismic reflections, which we suggest represent rocks sheared at, or immediately above, the inter-plate boundary. The seismic reflectors

  12. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr(-1)) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. PMID:25673102

  13. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-02-12

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr(-1)) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean.

  14. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-02-01

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr-1) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean.

  15. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr−1) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. PMID:25673102

  16. Deformation of the core-mantle boundary induced by spherical-shell, compressible convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shuxia; Yuen, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Single-mode, mean-field equations, for spherical-shell convection are derived, with variable viscosity and compressibility included. Core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography produced by whole mantle convection is computed for various rheologies and different thermal boundary conditions at CMB. Results for long-wavelength undulations show the extreme sensitivity of these signatures to rheological and equation of state parameters. In order to obtain excess ellipticity of about 1 km, the activation energy and volume in the lower mantle should be low, and the temperatures at CMB should be around 4500 K, in accord with recent experimental findings.

  17. Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: How continents affect mantle convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trubitsyn, V.P.; Mooney, W.D.; Abbott, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional convection models with moving continents show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. If the continents are wider than the wavelength of the convection cells (???3000 km, the thickness of the mantle), they cause neighboring deep mantle thermal upwellings to coalesce into a single focused upwelling. This focused upwelling zone will have a potential temperature anomaly of about 200??C, much higher than the 100??C temperature anomaly of upwelling zones generated beneath typical oceanic lithosphere. Extensive high-temperature melts (including flood basalts and late potassic granites) will be produced, and the excess temperature anomaly will induce continental uplift (as revealed in sea level changes) and the eventual breakup of the supercontinent. The mantle thermal anomaly will persist for several hundred million years after such a breakup. In contrast, small continental blocks (<1000 km diameter) do not induce focused mantle upwelling zones. Instead, small continental blocks are dragged to mantle downwelling zones, where they spend most of their time, and will migrate laterally with the downwelling. As a result of sitting over relatively cold mantle (downwellings), small continental blocks are favored to keep their cratonic roots. This may explain the long-term survival of small cratonic blocks (e.g., the Yilgarn and Pilbara cratons of western Australia, and the West African craton). The optimum size for long-term stability of a continental block is <3000 km. These results show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. These effects are illustrated in terms of the timing and history of supercontinent breakup, the production of high-temperature melts, and sea level changes. Such two-dimensional calculations can be further refined and tested by three-dimensional numerical simulations of mantle convection with moving continental and oceanic plates.

  18. Effect of GIA models with 3D composite mantle viscosity on GRACE mass balance estimates for Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Whitehouse, Pippa L.; Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    2015-03-01

    Seismic data indicate that there are large viscosity variations in the mantle beneath Antarctica. Consideration of such variations would affect predictions of models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), which are used to correct satellite measurements of ice mass change. However, most GIA models used for that purpose have assumed the mantle to be uniformly stratified in terms of viscosity. The goal of this study is to estimate the effect of lateral variations in viscosity on Antarctic mass balance estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. To this end, recently-developed global GIA models based on lateral variations in mantle temperature are tuned to fit constraints in the northern hemisphere and then compared to GPS-derived uplift rates in Antarctica. We find that these models can provide a better fit to GPS uplift rates in Antarctica than existing GIA models with a radially-varying (1D) rheology. When 3D viscosity models in combination with specific ice loading histories are used to correct GRACE measurements, mass loss in Antarctica is smaller than previously found for the same ice loading histories and their preferred 1D viscosity profiles. The variation in mass balance estimates arising from using different plausible realizations of 3D viscosity amounts to 20 Gt/yr for the ICE-5G ice model and 16 Gt/yr for the W12a ice model; these values are larger than the GRACE measurement error, but smaller than the variation arising from unknown ice history. While there exist 1D Earth models that can reproduce the total mass balance estimates derived using 3D Earth models, the spatial pattern of gravity rates can be significantly affected by 3D viscosity in a way that cannot be reproduced by GIA models with 1D viscosity. As an example, models with 1D viscosity always predict maximum gravity rates in the Ross Sea for the ICE-5G ice model, however, for one of the three preferred 3D models the maximum (for the same ice model) is found

  19. Three-dimensional instabilities of mantle convection with multiple phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, S.; Yuen, D. A.; Balachandar, S.; Reuteler, D.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of multiple phase transitions on mantle convection are investigated by numerical simulations that are based on three-dimensional models. These simulations show that cold sheets of mantle material collide at junctions, merge, and form a strong downflow that is stopped temporarily by the transition zone. The accumulated cold material gives rise to a strong gravitational instability that causes the cold mass to sink rapidly into the lower mantle. This process promotes a massive exchange between the lower and upper mantles and triggers a global instability in the adjacent plume system. This mechanism may be cyclic in nature and may be linked to the generation of superplumes.

  20. Accessing the Full Potential of Asteroseismology with Kepler using Realistic 3D Simulations of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampedach, Regner

    Asteroseismic analysis of stars is frequently hampered by the unknown surface effect: a systematic frequency shift of acoustic modes between observed and theoretical frequencies from 1D stellar structure models. If ignored, the surface effect will lead to the wrong set of physical parameters for the target star. This bias will also depend on the available modeset, as the surface effect increases with frequency. Well constrained low- frequency modes are needed for an unaffected reference, but are often not available. For F stars the surface effect seems to be of similar magnitude as the large frequency separation (the difference between modes of consecutive radial order and same spherical degree), severely limiting the possibility of unambiguous mode identification. Two rather different F-star models can be found to match the frequencies similarly well, and conflicting schemes have been proposed for discriminating between them. This situation worsens for evolved stars displaying avoided crossings between p-modes, and g-modes from the interior radiative zone. In such cases mode identification is even more challenging ― correct identification is however, also rewarded with frequencies that are highly sensitive to the structure of the core (and hence the age), which can therefore be exceedingly well constrained. The central objective of the proposed project is to evaluate the surface effect and implement appropriate corrections in an asteroseismic data-reduction pipeline. The surface effect is composed of a number of inherently 3D convective effects, which will be evaluated from a grid of realistic 3D hydrodynamical simulations of deep convective atmospheres. New formalisms need to be developed for this, and the results will be made available to the community. The theoretical findings will be validated against, in particular, Kepler observations. This project is of fundamental importance to all asteroseismic research and will advance the science goals of NASA

  1. Convection, composition, and the thermal state of the lower mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Richter, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    A thermal model for the lower mantle is presented, which is constructed from the petrologically derived estimates of the temperature in the transition zone and from an adiabat based on the thermal properties of MgO and SiO2 measured at high pressures. Superadiabatic contributions to the geotherm through the lower mantle are negligibly small. A thermal boundary layer is required at the base of the mantle in order to satisfy an estimate of the lowest possible temperature in the core. It is suggested that a thermal boundary layer is associated with a chemical discontinuity either at the top of the lower mantle or near its base.

  2. Convection and chemistry effects in CVD: A 3-D analysis for silicon deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.; Tsui, P.; Chait, A.

    1989-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT has been adopted to simulate the entire rectangular-channel-like (3-D) geometry of an experimental CVD reactor designed for Si deposition. The code incorporated the effects of both homogeneous (gas phase) and heterogeneous (surface) chemistry with finite reaction rates of important species existing in silane dissociation. The experiments were designed to elucidate the effects of gravitationally-induced buoyancy-driven convection flows on the quality of the grown Si films. This goal is accomplished by contrasting the results obtained from a carrier gas mixture of H2/Ar with the ones obtained from the same molar mixture ratio of H2/He, without any accompanying change in the chemistry. Computationally, these cases are simulated in the terrestrial gravitational field and in the absence of gravity. The numerical results compare favorably with experiments. Powerful computational tools provide invaluable insights into the complex physicochemical phenomena taking place in CVD reactors. Such information is essential for the improved design and optimization of future CVD reactors.

  3. Study on 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in Sichuan-yunnan region, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, C.; Mooney, W.D.; Wang, X.; Wu, J.; Lou, H.; Wang, F.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the first arrival P and S data of 4 625 regional earthquakes recorded at 174 stations dispersed in the Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces, the 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in the region is determined, incorporating with previous deep geophysical data. In the upper crust, a positive anomaly velocity zone exists in the Sichuan basin, whereas a negative anomaly velocity zone exists in the western Sichuan plateau. The boundary between the positive and negative anomaly zones is the Longmenshan fault zone. The images of lower crust and upper mantle in the Longmenshan fault, Xianshuihe fault, Honghe fault and others appear the characteristic of tectonic boundary, indicating that the faults litely penetrate the Moho discontinuity. The negative velocity anomalies at the depth of 50 km in the Tengchong volcanic area and the Panxi tectonic zone appear to be associated with the temperature and composition variations in the upper mantle. The overall features of the crustal and the upper mantle structures in the Sichuan-Yunnan region are the lower average velocity in both crust and uppermost mantle, the large crustal thickness variations, and the existence of high conductivity layer in the crust or/and upper mantle, and higher geothermal value. All these features are closely related to the collision between the Indian and the Asian plates. The crustal velocity in the Sichuan-Yunnan rhombic block generally shows normal.value or positive anomaly, while the negative anomaly exists in the area along the large strike-slip faults as the block boundary. It is conducive to the crustal block side-pressing out along the faults. In the major seismic zones, the seismicity is relative to the negative anomaly velocity. Most strong earthquakes occurred in the upper-mid crust with positive anomaly or normal velocity, where the negative anomaly zone generally exists below.

  4. SALSA3D - A Global 3D P-Velocity Model of the Earth's Crust and Mantle for Improved Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, S.; Begnaud, M. L.; Young, C. J.; Hipp, J. R.; Chang, M.; Encarnacao, A. V.; Rowe, C. A.; Phillips, W. S.; Steck, L.

    2010-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth’s crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D version 1.5, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is ~50%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions.. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with ~400 processors. Resolution of our model is assessed using a

  5. Dynamics of Mantle Circulation Associated with Slab Window Formation: Insights from 3D Laboratory Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, B.; Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Faccenna, C.; Martinod, J.

    2009-12-01

    Slab window can form either by the intersection of a spreading ridge with a subduction zone or because of internal deformation of the slab that leads to its disruption. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. We performed laboratory models of a two-layer linear viscous slab (silicone putty)-upper mantle (glucose syrup) system to quantitatively investigate the pattern of mantle circulation within the slab window (using Feature Tracking image analysis technique) and its influence on the kinematics of the system. Two different geometries have been tested considering a window located (a) at slab edges or (b) within the slab. Kinematic consequences of slab window have been explored to understand the dynamics of the mantle-slab interaction. Configuration (a) implies a reduction of the slab width (W) during subduction and is characterized by toroidal fluxes around the slab edges. The abrupt opening of lateral slab windows produces an acceleration of the trench retreat and subduction velocity, such as 40% for a three-fold width reduction. We interpret this behavior as mostly due to the decrease in the toroidal flow inside subduction windows, scaling with W2. Configuration (b) has been designed to explore the pattern of mantle flow within the window in the case of a laterally constrained subduction system. Slab window, which had a width (Ww) fixed to 15 % of the slab width, opened in the trench-perpendicular direction. It produced the formation of two toroidal mantle cells, centered on the slab midpoint and laterally growing as the slab window enlarged. Particles extruded through the slab window did not mix with particles located in the mantle wedge, the boundary between both reaching distances from the trench up to 3×Ww in the trench-perpendicular direction, and up to 1.5×Ww from the window edge in

  6. Regional 3D Numerical Modeling of the Lithosphere-Mantle System: Implications for Continental Rift-Parallel Surface Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, S.; Bangerth, W.; Hager, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) is an active divergent plate boundary with slow, approximately E-W extension rates ranging from <1-6 mm/yr. Previous work using thin-sheet modeling indicates lithospheric buoyancy dominates the force balance driving large-scale Nubia-Somalia divergence, however GPS observations within the Western Branch of the EARS show along-rift motions that contradict this simple model. Here, we test the role of mantle flow at the rift-scale using our new, regional 3D numerical model based on the open-source code ASPECT. We define a thermal lithosphere with thicknesses that are systematically changed for generic models or based on geophysical constraints in the Western branch (e.g. melting depths, xenoliths, seismic tomography). Preliminary results suggest existing variations in lithospheric thicknesses along-rift in the Western Branch can drive upper mantle flow that is consistent with geodetic observations.

  7. Crust Uppermost Mantle Structure beneath Eastern Asia: Progress towards a Uniform, Tightly Constrained, High Resolution 3-D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Zheng, Y.; Lin, F. C.; Kim, Y.; Ning, J.; Kang, D.; Feng, L.; Wiens, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, large and dense seismic arrays have been deployed across much of eastern Asia (e.g., the "CEArray" and the "China Array" deployed by the China Earthquake Administration (CEA), the NECESS Array deployed collaboratively by China, Japan and the US, Korean Seismic Network, KNET and other networks in Japan, and historical PASSCAL installations), which have been used to produce increasingly well resolved models of the crust and uppermost mantle at different length scales. These models, however, do not cover eastern Asia uniformly. In this presentation, we report on an effort to generate a uniform high resolution 3-D model of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath eastern Asia using state-of-art surface wave and body wave inversion techniques. Highlights of this effort include: 1) We collect ambient noise cross-correlations using more than 1,800 seismic stations from multiple seismic arrays in this area and perform uniform surface wave tomography for the study area. 2) We collect P-wave receiver functions for over 1,000 stations and Rayleigh wave H/V ratio measurements for over 200 stations in this area. 3) We adopt a Bayesian Monte Carlo inversion to the Rayleigh wave dispersion maps and produce a uniform 3-D model with uncertainties of the crust and uppermost mantle. 4) In the areas where receiver functions and/or Rayleigh wave H/V ratios are collected, we replace the surface wave inversion by a joint inversion of surface waves and these seismic observables. The resulting model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle which we summarize and discuss with focus on the relationship between the observed crustal variations and tectonic/geological boundaries and lithospheric modifications associated with volcanism in Northeast China.

  8. Small-scale convective instability and upper mantle viscosity under California

    SciTech Connect

    Zandt, G.; Carrigan, C.R. )

    1993-07-23

    Thermal calculations and convection analysis, constrained by seismic tomography results, suggest that a small-scale convective instability developed in the upper 200 kilometers of the mantle under California after the upwelling and cooling of asthenosphere into the slab window associated with the formation of the San Andreas transform boundary. The upper bound for the upper mantle viscosity in the slab window, 5 [times] 10[sup 19] pascal seconds, is similar to independent estimates for the asthenosphere beneath young oceanic and tectonically active continental regions. These model calculations suggest that many tectonically active continental regions characterized by low upper mantle seismic velocities may be affected by time-dependent small-scale convection that can generate localized areas of uplift and subsidence.

  9. African hot spot volcanism: small-scale convection in the upper mantle beneath cratons.

    PubMed

    King, S D; Ritsema, J

    2000-11-10

    Numerical models demonstrate that small-scale convection develops in the upper mantle beneath the transition of thick cratonic lithosphere and thin oceanic lithosphere. These models explain the location and geochemical characteristics of intraplate volcanos on the African and South American plates. They also explain the presence of relatively high seismic shear wave velocities (cold downwellings) in the mantle transition zone beneath the western margin of African cratons and the eastern margin of South American cratons. Small-scale, edge-driven convection is an alternative to plumes for explaining intraplate African and South American hot spot volcanism, and small-scale convection is consistent with mantle downwellings beneath the African and South American lithosphere. PMID:11073447

  10. Small-scale convective instability and upper mantle viscosity under california.

    PubMed

    Zandt, G; Carrigan, C R

    1993-07-23

    Thermal calculations and convection analysis, constrained by seismic tomography results, suggest that a small-scale convective instability developed in the upper 200 kilometers of the mantle under California after the upwelling and cooling of asthenosphere into the slab window associated with the formation of the San Andreas transform boundary. The upper bound for the upper mantle viscosity in the slab window, 5 x 10(19) pascal seconds, is similar to independent estimates for the asthenosphere beneath young oceanic and tectonically active continental regions. These model calculations suggest that many tectonically active continental regions characterized by low upper mantle seismic velocities may be affected by time-dependent small-scale convection that can generate localized areas of uplift and subsidence. PMID:17770025

  11. Small-scale convective instability and upper mantle viscosity Under California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandt, George; Carrigan, Charles R.

    1993-07-01

    Thermal calculations and convection analysis, constrained by seismic tomography results, suggest that a small-scale convective instability developed in the upper 200 kilometers of the mantle under California after the upwelling and cooling of asthenosphere into the slab window associated with the formation of the San Andreas transform boundary. The upper bound for the upper mantle viscosity in the slab window, 5 x 1019 pascal seconds, is similar to independent estimates for the asthenosphere beneath young oceanic and tectonically active continental regions. These model calculations suggest that many tectonically active continental regions characterized by low upper mantle seismic velocities may be affected by time-dependent small-scale convection that can generate localized areas of uplift and subsidence.

  12. MANTLE: A finite element program for the thermal-mechanical analysis of mantle convection. A user's manual with examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element computer code for the analysis of mantle convection is described. The coupled equations for creeping viscous flow and heat transfer can be solved for either a transient analysis or steady-state analysis. For transient analyses, either a control volume or a control mass approach can be used. Non-Newtonian fluids with viscosities which have thermal and spacial dependencies can be easily incorporated. All material parameters may be written as function statements by the user or simply specified as constants. A wide range of boundary conditions, both for the thermal analysis and the viscous flow analysis can be specified. For steady-state analyses, elastic strain rates can be included. Although this manual was specifically written for users interested in mantle convection, the code is equally well suited for analysis in a number of other areas including metal forming, glacial flows, and creep of rock and soil.

  13. Osmium isotope variations in the Pacific mantle: implications for the distribution of heterogeneity in the convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, A.; Senda, R.; Suzuki, K.; Tani, K.; Ishii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Recent accumulation of Os isotope data obtained either from abyssal peridotites or from ocean island peridotite xenoliths has clearly demonstrated that the modern convecting mantle is substantially heterogeneous in Os-isotope composition. Unlike other radiogenic isotope heterogeneities observed in oceanic basalts, largely controlled by incorporation of recycled crustal materials, it seems likely that the observed range of Os-isotope compositions in oceanic peridotites directly reflect varying degrees of ancient melt extraction from peridotitic mantle. Hence, global variations of Os-isotope compositions in oceanic peridotites may provide an important piece of information in unraveling the geochemical and geodynamic evolution of the convecting mantle. Here we present the Os-isotope variations in peridotite-serpentinite recovered from the Pacific area because the number of data available is yet scarce when compared with data from other oceans (Atlantic, Arctic and Indian Ocean). Our primary purpose is to test whether mantle domains underlying four major oceans are distinct in terms of Os isotope variations, reflecting the pattern of mantle convection or mixing efficiency. We examined 187Os/188Os ratios and highly siderophile element concentrations in serpentinized harzburgite recovered from Hess Deep in the East Pacific Rise, a mantle section in the Taitao ophiolite, Chile (Schulte et al., 2009), serpentinized harzburgite bodies in the Izu-Ogasawara and Tonga forearc (Parkinson et al., 1998), peridotite xenoliths from the Pali-Kaau vent in O'ahu island, Hawaii (Bizimis et al., 2007), and low-temperature type peridotite xenoliths from Malaita, Solomon Islands (Ishikawa et al., 2011). The results demonstrate that samples from each area display very similar Os-isotope variations with a pronounced peak in 187Os/188Os = 0.125-0.128. Moreover, the relatively larger datasets obtained from Hess Deep, Taitao and Malaita clearly exhibit the presence of secondary peak in 187Os

  14. 3-D numerical investigation of the mantle dynamics associated with the breakup of Pangea

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element calculations in spherical geometry are performed to study the response of the mantle with platelike blocks at its surface to an initial condition corresponding to subduction along the margins of Pangea. The mantle is treated as an infinite Prandtl number Boussinesq fluid inside a spherical shell with isothermal, undeformable, free-slip boundaries. Nonsubducting rigid blocks to model continental lithosphere are included in the topmost layer of the computational mesh. At the beginning of the numerical experiments these blocks represent the present continents mapped to their approximate Pangean positions. Asymmetrical downwelling at the margins of these nonsubducting blocks results in a pattern of stresses that acts to pull the supercontinent apart. The calculations suggest that the breakup of Pangea and the subsequent global pattern of seafloor spreading was driven largely by the subduction at the Pangean margins.

  15. 3-D numerical investigation of the mantle dynamics associated with the breakup of Pangea

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    Three-dimensional finite element calculations in spherical geometry are performed to study the response of the mantle with platelike blocks at its surface to an initial condition corresponding to subduction along the margins of Pangea. The mantle is treated as an infinite Prandtl number Boussinesq fluid inside a spherical shell with isothermal, undeformable, free-slip boundaries. Nonsubducting rigid blocks to model continental lithosphere are included in the topmost layer of the computational mesh. At the beginning of the numerical experiments these blocks represent the present continents mapped to their approximate Pangean positions. Asymmetrical downwelling at the margins of these nonsubducting blocks results in a pattern of stresses that acts to pull the supercontinent apart. The calculations suggest that the breakup of Pangea and the subsequent global pattern of seafloor spreading was driven largely by the subduction at the Pangean margins.

  16. A sequential data assimilation approach for the joint reconstruction of mantle convection and surface tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocher, M.; Coltice, N.; Fournier, A.; Tackley, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the progress of mantle convection modelling over the last decade, it now becomes possible to solve for the dynamics of the interior flow and the surface tectonics to first order. We show here that tectonic data (like surface kinematics and seafloor age distribution) and mantle convection models with plate-like behaviour can in principle be combined to reconstruct mantle convection. We present a sequential data assimilation method, based on suboptimal schemes derived from the Kalman filter, where surface velocities and seafloor age maps are not used as boundary conditions for the flow, but as data to assimilate. Two stages (a forecast followed by an analysis) are repeated sequentially to take into account data observed at different times. Whenever observations are available, an analysis infers the most probable state of the mantle at this time, considering a prior guess (supplied by the forecast) and the new observations at hand, using the classical best linear unbiased estimate. Between two observation times, the evolution of the mantle is governed by the forward model of mantle convection. This method is applied to synthetic 2-D spherical annulus mantle cases to evaluate its efficiency. We compare the reference evolutions to the estimations obtained by data assimilation. Two parameters control the behaviour of the scheme: the time between two analyses, and the amplitude of noise in the synthetic observations. Our technique proves to be efficient in retrieving temperature field evolutions provided the time between two analyses is ≲10 Myr. If the amplitude of the a priori error on the observations is large (30 per cent), our method provides a better estimate of surface tectonics than the observations, taking advantage of the information within the physics of convection.

  17. Mantle dynamics in Mars and Venus: Influence of an immobile lithosphere on three-dimensional mantle convection

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, G.; Bercovici ); Glatzmaier, G.A. )

    1990-08-30

    Numerical calculations of fully three-dimensional convection in constant viscosity, compressible spherical shells are interpreted in terms of possible convective motions in the mantles of Venus and Mars. The shells are heated both internally and from below to account for radiogenic heating, secular cooling, and heat flow from the core. The lower boundary of each of the shells is isothermal and shear stress free, as appropriate to the interface between a mantle and a liquid outer core. The upper boundary of each of the shells is rigid and isothermal, as appropriate to the base of a thick immobile lithosphere. Calculations with shear stress-free upper boundaries are also carried out to assess the role of the rigid surface condition. The ratio of the inner radius of each shell to its outer radius is in accordance with possible core sizes in both Venus and Mars. A calculation is also carried out for a Mars model with a small core to simulate mantle convection during early core formation. Different relative proportions of internal and bottom heating are investigated, ranging from nearly complete heating from within to almost all heating from below. The Rayleigh numbers of all the cases are approximately 100 times the critical Rayleigh numbers for the onset of convection. Cylindrical plumes are the prominent form of upwelling in the models independent of the surface boundary condition so long as sufficient heat derives from the core. Thus major volcanic centers on Mars, such as Tharsis and Elysium, and the coronae and some equatorial highlands on Venus may be the surface expressions of cylindrical mantle plumes.

  18. A Non-Linear Inversion for the Global 3-D Electrical Conductivity Distribution in the Upper to Mid-Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbert, A.; Schultz, A.

    2004-12-01

    The case for substantial heterogeneity in mantle conductivity has stimulated the development of methods for solving Maxwell's equations in a heterogeneous conducting sphere. A global 3-D frequency domain forward solver has been devised (Uyeshima & Schultz, 2000), accurate and efficient enough to be an attractive kernel of a practical inverse method. The solver employs a staggered-grid finite difference formulation in spherical coordinates. The induced fields are found as a solution to the integral form of Maxwell's equations, while the system is solved using stabilised biconjugate gradient methods. A single, accurate forward solution takes approx. 4 minutes on 5 GFLOP (peak) processor. The aim of our present research is to produce an inverse solver, to be applied to the Fujii & Schultz (2002) data set of globally-distributed EM response functions, which would reconstruct the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution in the upper to mid-mantle. Geophysical inversion is an ill-posed problem, therefore the aim is to apply suitable parameter constraints and a nonlinear search algorithm to identify candidate minima, then to apply local gradient methods around those minima. Our specific target involves designing a fast enough global optimisation routine that would allow us to produce at least one fully 3-D starting model, optimal with respect to the RMS misfit between the data and the forward solutions. A new and very flexible inverse solver has been developed utilizing parallel optimisation routines to obtain a starting model that satisfies the data. 3-D simulations have been run, the parametrization based on a spherical harmonic representation of a chess board model of varying degree and order. The inversion has demonstrated accurate fidelity in reproducing resolvable features of the test model. A study has been made of the reduction in fidelity as the number and distribution of observatory sites on the Earth's surface is degraded. An inversion of the Fujii & Schultz

  19. Pattern of lobate scarps on Mercury's surface reproduced by a model of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Scott D.

    2008-04-01

    Mercury is the smallest and least tectonically active of the terrestrial planets. Although Mercury's ancient, cratered surface resembles the Moon, it has the largest ratio of metallic core to silicate mantle among the terrestrial planets as well as an internal magnetic field. Images from the Mariner 10 spacecraft reveal lobate scarps, so called because of their curved or scalloped edges, which have been interpreted to be high-angle thrust faults resulting from a period of global contraction. A range of mechanisms has been invoked to explain the stresses leading to global contraction, including cooling and core formation, tidal effects due to gravitational interactions with the Sun, mantle convection and the impact that formed the Caloris basin. Here I present numerical simulations of the three-dimensional nature of convection within Mercury's silicate mantle. The model yields a regularly spaced pattern of convection, in which upwelling regions of the mantle assume linear, sheet-like shapes at low latitudes and a nearly hexagonal pattern near the poles. The distribution of resultant surface stresses is consistent with the observed pattern of lobate scarps, suggesting that the compressive features record an ancient pattern of mantle convection, in addition to global contraction. The gravity and topographic data returned from the MESSENGER 11 mission will help test this hypothesis.

  20. Numerical Mantle Convection Modeling: The Effect of Plates on the Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Fahl, A.; Hansen, U.

    2008-12-01

    Until today it is unclear in which way mantle processes find their expressions in surface signatures such as heat flow, gravity and topography. On Earth, plates may shield the surface from far below processes. Further, the situation is complicated by the interaction of internal dynamics and the motion of surface plates. In order to better understand this relationship and the possible imprints of internal dynamics on the surface, we have employed a numerical model of mantle convection with a complex rheology. The equations of mantle convection have been solved using the multigrid method in a finite volume formulation. In particular, we applied a viscosity structure which strongly depends on temperature, pressure and stress, thus allowing for surface plates to form naturally and as an integral part of the convective system. The experiments were carried out in a Cartesian box with stress-free, impermeable boundaries, reflecting sidewalls and isothermal temperatures at the top (T = 0) and at the bottom (T = 1). In this configuration we have performed several numerical experiments to understand the surface expression of rising mantle plumes. While it is common understanding that plumes elevate the surface topography, our results show that the existence of a mantle plume can also correlate with a depression in the topography rather than always leading to an elevation. One reason for this phenomenon is that the overriding plate sinks deeper into the mantle at the plume location and overcompensates the effect of the buoyancy-driven plume.

  1. Deep mantle heat flow and thermal evolution of the Earth's core based on thermo-chemical mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P.; Buffett, B.

    2004-12-01

    A coupled core-mantle evolution model that combines the global heat balance in the core with a fully-dynamical thermo-chemical mantle convection [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004 published in EPSL] is used to investigate the deep mantle heat flow that is required to sustain the magnetic field generated by the geodynamo process. Effects of a radioactive heat source due to potassium in the core are also included in the global heat balance in the Earth??s core. Two important parameters are checked in this study; (1) density variation between depleted hartzbergite and basaltic material (0 to 3 percent) and (2) concentration of radioactive potassium in the core alloy (0ppm to 400ppm). The parameter set that most closely satisfies the criteria of size of the inner core (1220km at present time) is around 2 percent of density difference in a convecting mantle and 200ppm of radioactive heat source in the core. The concentration of potassium in the core is consistent with the geochemical approach [Murthy et al., 2003] but smaller than other successful thermal evolution models [Labrosse, 2003; Nimmo et al., 2004]. Heat flow through the core-mantle boundary and the contribution of radioactive heat sources in the core are consistent with theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002] and geochemical constraints [Gessmann and Wood, 2002]. The power available to the geodynamo, based on the predicted heat flow through the core-mantle boundary, is approximately four times greater than the value predicted by numerical models of the geodynamo [Christensen and Kutzner, 2004] but closer to theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002].

  2. Surface plates and thermal plumes - Separate scales of the mantle convective circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    In reviewing the problem of mantle convection, emphasis is placed on several recent developments from the theory of convection itself, from studies of mantle viscosity using postglacial rebound data, and from geochemistry. This recent work is seen as demonstrating that most of the observations that can be employed to constrain models of the convective circulation lend themselves to a satisfactory explanation by the simple whole mantle model. It is noted that this conceptual model has been strongly reinforced by the recent geochemical consensus that the earth contains far too little radioactivity to explain the currently observed surface heat flow. The difference between the rate of radioactive heat supply and the surface heat loss should be made up principally by the secular cooling of the planet. This scenario is seen as having the additional attractive feature that it immediately provides the energy to the core that is necessary to power the geodynamo. As the planet cools, the inner core grows and thereby drives a chemical convective circulation that Loper and Roberts (1981) have most recently argued to be an extremely efficient means of generating a magnetic field. The hypothesis of whole mantle convection is seen as reconciling most of the existing observations.

  3. Formation and Preservation of the Depleted and Enriched Shergottite Isotopic Reservoirs in a Convecting Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Jones, John H.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling isotopic and crater density evidence for geologically recent volcanism on Mars, in the last 100-200 million years and possibly in the last 50 million years. This volcanism is due to adiabatic decompression melting and thus requires some type of present-day convective upwelling in the martian mantle. On the other hand, martian meteorites preserve evidence for at least 3 distinct radiogenic isotopic reservoirs. Anomalies in short-lived isotopic systems (Sm-146, Nd-142, Hf-182, W-182) require that these reservoirs must have developed in the first 50 to 100 million years of Solar System history. The long-term preservation of chemically distinct reservoirs has sometimes been interpreted as evidence for the absence of mantle convection and convective mixing on Mars for most of martian history, a conclusion which is at odds with the evidence for young volcanism. This apparent paradox can be resolved by recognizing that a variety of processes, including both inefficient mantle mixing and geographic separation of isotopic reservoirs, may preserve isotopic heterogeneity on Mars in an actively convecting mantle. Here, we focus on the formation and preservation of the depleted and enriched isotopic and trace element reservoirs in the shergottites. In particular, we explore the possible roles of processes such as chemical diffusion and metasomatism in dikes and magma chambers for creating the isotopically enriched shergottites. We also consider processes that may preserve the enriched reservoir against convective mixing for most of martian history.

  4. The onset of time-dependent convection in spherical shells as a clue to chaotic convection in the earth's mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machetel, Philippe; Yuen, David

    1986-01-01

    This work presents a detailed numerical study of the dynamical behavior of convection in a spherical shell, as applied to mantle convection. From both two-dimensional (120 radial and 360 tangential points) and three-dimensional (60 radial levels and spherical harmonics up to order and degree L = 33, m = 33), it is shown that for a spherical shell (with inner-to-outer radii ratio eta = 0.62) convection becomes time-dependent, with l = 2 dominating, at a Rayleigh number of about 31 times supercritical for a constant-viscosity, base-heated configuration. This secondary instability is characterized by oscillatory time dependence, with higher frequencies involved, at slightly higher Rayleigh numbers. In illustrating the onset of time dependence, the analysis is extended to show that the onset of weak turbulence in spherical-shell convection takes place at about 60 times the critical Rayleigh number via a quasi-periodic mode.

  5. Effect of the temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity on mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuslits, L. B.; Farkas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Finite element numerical modeling has been carried out in order to investigate the effect of the depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity on the thermal convection occurring in the Earth's mantle. Calculations were made in a 2D spherical shell domain applying Boussinesq approximation. It was established by systematic model calculations that the stronger depth-dependence of the viscosity (higher γ) hinders the convection rather in the deeper zone of the mantle that retards the heat from the core and cools the mantle. The less vigorous convection results in slower flow and increases the mobility of the surface (the ratio of the average surface and mantle velocity). Stronger temperature-dependence of the viscosity (higher δ) has qualitatively the opposite effect. Above the core mantle boundary, which is the hottest part of the mantle, the viscosity decreases that facilitates the heat transport from the core. Whereas the cold, more viscous surface retards the heat. It warms up the mantle, decreases its average viscosity and accelerates the creep flow. Due to the cold and more viscous surface layer the mobility reduces. The observed velocity, temperate, heat flux and viscosity parameters show a power law function of δ. Two additional numerical model calculations were made with more realistic γ and δ parameters scaling the depth and temperature-dependence of the mantle convection. In model 1 the viscosity increased exponentially 100 times (γ=100) and decreased 7 orders of magnitude (δ=10^7 ) as the depth and temperature grew from the surface to the core, respectively. Owing to the strong temperature-dependence of the viscosity a rigid lid formed around the mantle that reduced the heat outcome effectively and resulted in a hot mantle. Model 2 had the viscosity scaling factors of γ=10 and δ=10^6 , and a 30 times viscosity jump was built in model at the depth of 660 km to reflect the effect of the olivine ! perovskite + magnesiowustite mineralogical phase

  6. Effect of the temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity on mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek Kuslits, Lukács; Pál Farkas, Márton; Galsa, Attila

    2013-04-01

    Finite element numerical modeling has been carried out in order to investigate the effect of the depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity on the thermal convection occurring in the Earth's mantle. Calculations were made in a 2D spherical shell domain applying Boussinesq approximation. It was established by systematic model calculations that the stronger depth-dependence of the viscosity (higher ?) hinders the convection rather in the deeper zone of the mantle that retards the heat from the core and cools the mantle. The less vigorous convection results in slower flow and increases the mobility of the surface (the ratio of the average surface and mantle velocity). Stronger temperature-dependence of the viscosity (higher δ) has qualitatively the opposite effect. Above the core mantle boundary, which is the hottest part of the mantle, the viscosity decreases that facilitates the heat transport from the core. Whereas the cold, more viscous surface retards the heat. It warms up the mantle, decreases its average viscosity and accelerates the creep flow. Due to the cold and more viscous surface layer the mobility reduces. The observed velocity, temperate, heat flux and viscosity parameters show a power law function of δ. Two additional numerical model calculations were made with more realistic ? and δ parameters scaling the depth- and temperature-dependence of the mantle convection. In model 1 the viscosity increased exponentially 100 times (?=100) and decreased 7 orders of magnitude (δ=107) as the depth and temperature grew from the surface to the core, respectively. Owing to the strong temperature-dependence of the viscosity a rigid lid formed around the mantle that reduced the heat outcome effectively and resulted in a hot mantle. Model 2 had the viscosity scaling factors of ?=10 and δ=106, and a 30 times viscosity jump was built in model at the depth of 660 km to reflect the effect of the olivine ? perovskite + magnesiowustite mineralogical phase transition

  7. Chaotic, subduction-like downflows in a spherical model of convection in the earth's mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Schubert, Gerald; Bercovici, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Model calculations are described for a compressible fluid in a three-dimensional spherical shell with 80 percent of the surface heat flow generated within the model mantle. The numerical solutions are strongly chaotic, with surface planforms dominated by long curvilinear downflows reminiscent of the descending slabs in the earth's mantle. The results suggest that descending slabs play an important part in driving mantle convection, and that their chaotic evolution may influence the spatial and temporal behavior of plates and thus the dispersal and aggregation of continents.

  8. Convective upwelling in the mantle beneath the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Savage, Brian

    2009-11-26

    In the past six million years, Baja California has rifted obliquely apart from North America, opening up the Gulf of California. Between transform faults, seafloor spreading and rifting is well established in several basins. Other than hotspot-dominated Iceland, the Gulf of California is the only part of the world's seafloor-spreading system that has been surrounded by enough seismometers to provide horizontal resolution of upper-mantle structure at a scale of 100 kilometres over a distance great enough to include several spreading segments. Such resolution is needed to address the long-standing debate about the relative importance of dynamic and passive upwelling in the shallow mantle beneath spreading centres. Here we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to image the shear velocity in the upper 200 kilometres or so of the mantle. Low shear velocities similar to those beneath the East Pacific Rise oceanic spreading centre underlie the entire length of the Gulf, but there are three concentrated locations of anomalously low velocities spaced about 250 kilometres apart. These anomalies are 40 to 90 kilometres beneath the surface, at which depths petrological studies indicate that extensive melting of passively upwelling mantle should begin. We interpret these seismic velocity anomalies as indicating that partial melting triggers dynamic upwelling driven by either the buoyancy of retained melt or by the reduced density of depleted mantle.

  9. Convective upwelling in the mantle beneath the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Savage, Brian

    2009-11-26

    In the past six million years, Baja California has rifted obliquely apart from North America, opening up the Gulf of California. Between transform faults, seafloor spreading and rifting is well established in several basins. Other than hotspot-dominated Iceland, the Gulf of California is the only part of the world's seafloor-spreading system that has been surrounded by enough seismometers to provide horizontal resolution of upper-mantle structure at a scale of 100 kilometres over a distance great enough to include several spreading segments. Such resolution is needed to address the long-standing debate about the relative importance of dynamic and passive upwelling in the shallow mantle beneath spreading centres. Here we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to image the shear velocity in the upper 200 kilometres or so of the mantle. Low shear velocities similar to those beneath the East Pacific Rise oceanic spreading centre underlie the entire length of the Gulf, but there are three concentrated locations of anomalously low velocities spaced about 250 kilometres apart. These anomalies are 40 to 90 kilometres beneath the surface, at which depths petrological studies indicate that extensive melting of passively upwelling mantle should begin. We interpret these seismic velocity anomalies as indicating that partial melting triggers dynamic upwelling driven by either the buoyancy of retained melt or by the reduced density of depleted mantle. PMID:19940924

  10. 3-D seismic velocity structure of the crust and the uppermost mantle in the northeastern Japan Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Horiuchi, Shigeki; Hasegawa, Akira

    1990-09-01

    3-D seismic velocity structure of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath the northeastern Japan Arc is investigated by using arrival time data from local earthquakes. We use a velocity model composed of three layers corresponding to the upper crust, the lower crust and the uppermost mantle, respectively. Taking into account the observed regional variation of P n-velocity, the uppermost mantle is further divided into three parts by two P n-velocity boundaries near the coasts of the Japan Sea and the Pacific Ocean. The velocities within the upper crust, the lower crust and the three parts of the uppermost mantle are assumed to be constant. Locations of two P n-velocity boundaries and depth distributions of the Conrad and the Moho discontinuities are expressed by continuous functions of unknown parameters. Station corrections and hypocenters are also introduced to be unknowns. These unknown parameters are determined by inverting arrival time data of P- and S-wave first arrivals and clear later arrivals of P g- and P ∗-waves. The P n-velocity boundary between the land and the Pacific Ocean is located approximately along the Pacific coastline and that between the land and the Japan Sea is nearly along the Japan Sea coastline. The Conrad and the Moho discontinuities are at depths ranging from 14 to 20 km and from 27 to 36 km, respectively. The Conrad and the Moho depths have similar spatial distributions. They are deep beneath the land and become shallower toward the western and the eastern coastlines. Beneath the land, they are shallow in the central part of the Tohoku District and become deeper toward both the north and the south directions. In the north, they become shallow again.

  11. Modeling study of the small-scale mantle convection in the subduction zone mantle wedge including the melting mechanism of mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Tamura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    It is observed that subduction zone mantle wedge is not uniform even in the direction along the overlying island-arc that is perpendicular to the subducting direction. The hot fingers model is a hypothetical model specifying the three dimensional structural variation within the mangle wedge; it assumes that there is a fingers-like stripe pattern of mechanical and thermodynamical properties within the wedge. Those non-uniformity appears over the arc crust as nonuniform distribution of volcanic eruptions. Indeed, quaternary volcanoes in the NE Japan arc could be grouped into ten volcano clusters striking transverse to the arc. These have an average width of ∼50 km, and are separated by parallel gaps 30-75 km wide. Moreover, the structure of the mantle wedge and arc crust beneath the NE Japan arc and the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, respectively, suggest that the third dimension, lying along the strike of the arc, is necessary to understand the actual production of magmas in subduction zones. To explore the physical and mathematical mechanism of formation of the hot-fingers pattern, we develop a model of mantle convection in the mantle wedge. Our model incorporates the melting mechanism of the mantle rocks, which affect temperature and velocity of mantle. Our model produces a spatiotemporal pattern in those variables. The obtained results are compared with the spatiotemporal patterns observed in the NE Japan arc.

  12. Development of a Mantle Convection Physical Model to Assist with Teaching about Earth's Interior Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, G. B.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory (MEDL) at UCLA is developing a mantle convection physical model to assist educators with the pedagogy of Earth’s interior processes. Our design goal consists of two components to help the learner gain conceptual understanding by means of visual interactions without the burden of distracters, which may promote alternative conceptions. Distracters may be any feature of the conceptual model that causes the learner to use inadequate mental artifact to help him or her understand what the conceptual model is intended to convey. The first component, and most important, is a psychological component that links properties of “everyday things” (Norman, 1988) to the natural phenomenon, mantle convection. Some examples of everyday things may be heat rising out from a freshly popped bag of popcorn, or cold humid air falling from an open freezer. The second component is the scientific accuracy of the conceptual model. We would like to simplify the concepts for the learner without sacrificing key information that is linked to other natural phenomena the learner will come across in future science lessons. By taking into account the learner’s mental artifacts in combination with a simplified, but accurate, representation of what scientists know of the Earth’s interior, we expect the learner to have the ability to create an adequate qualitative mental simulation of mantle convection. We will be presenting some of our prototypes of this mantle convection physical model at this year’s poster session and invite constructive input from our colleagues.

  13. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  14. Mantle convection, tectonics and the evolution of the Tethyan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Sternai, Pietro; Menant, Armel; Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten; Burov, Evguenii

    2014-05-01

    Mantle convection drives plate tectonics and the size, number and thermotectonic age of plates codetermines the convection pattern. However, the degree of coupling of surface deformation and mantle flow is unclear. Most numerical models of lithospheric deformation are designed such that strain is a consequence of kinematic boundary conditions, and rarely account for basal stresses due to mantle flow. On the other hand, convection models often treat the lithosphere as a single-layer stagnant lid with vertically undeformable surface. There is thus a gap between convection models and lithospheric-scale geodynamic models. The transmission of stresses from the flowing mantle to the crust is a complex process. The presence of a ductile lower crust inhibits the upward transmission of stresses but a highly extended crust in a hot environment such as a backarc domain, with no lithospheric mantle and a ductile lower crust in direct contact with asthenosphere, will be more prone to follow the mantle flow than a thick and stratified lithosphere. We review geological observations and present reconstructions of the Aegean and Middle East and discuss the possible role played by basal drag in governing lithospheric deformation. In Mediterranean backarc regions, lithosphere-mantle coupling is effective on geological time scale as shown by the consistency of SKS fast orientations in the mantle with stretching directions in the crust. The long-term geological history of the Tethyan convergent zone suggests that asthenospheric flow has been an important player. The case of Himalaya and Tibet strongly supports a major contribution of a northward asthenospheric push, with no persistent slab that could drive India after collision, large thrust planes being then decoupling zones between deep convection and surface tectonics. The African plate repeatedly fragmented during its northward migration with the separation of Apulia and Arabia. Indeed, extension has been active on the northern

  15. Simulation of active tectonic processes for a convecting mantle with moving continents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trubitsyn, V.; Kaban, M.; Mooney, W.; Reigber, C.; Schwintzer, P.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical models are presented that simulate several active tectonic processes. These models include a continent that is thermally and mechanically coupled with viscous mantle flow. The assumption of rigid continents allows use of solid body equations to describe the continents' motion and to calculate their velocities. The starting point is a quasi-steady state model of mantle convection with temperature/ pressure-dependent viscosity. After placing a continent on top of the mantle, the convection pattern changes. The mantle flow subsequently passes through several stages, eventually resembling the mantle structure under present-day continents: (a) Extension tectonics and marginal basins form on boundary of a continent approaching to subduction zone, roll back of subduction takes place in front of moving continent; (b) The continent reaches the subduction zone, the extension regime at the continental edge is replaced by strong compression. The roll back of the subduction zone still continues after closure of the marginal basin and the continent moves towards the upwelling. As a result the ocean becomes non-symmetric and (c) The continent overrides the upwelling and subduction in its classical form stops. The third stage appears only in the upper mantle model with localized upwellings. ?? 2006 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2006 RAS.

  16. Mantle convection in the Middle East: Reconciling Afar upwelling, Arabia indentation and Aegean trench rollback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.; Jolivet, Laurent; Keskin, Mehmet

    2013-08-01

    The Middle East region represents a key site within the Tethyan domain where continental break-up, collision, backarc extension and escape tectonics are kinematically linked together. We perform global mantle circulation computations to test the role of slab pull and mantle upwellings as driving forces for the kinematics of the Arabia-Anatolia-Aegean (AAA) system, evaluating different boundary conditions and mantle density distributions as inferred from seismic tomography or slab models. Model results are compared with geodetically inferred crustal motions, residual topography, and shear wave splitting measurements. The AAA velocity field with respect to Eurasia shows an anti-clockwise toroidal pattern, with increasing velocities toward the Aegean trench. The best match to these crustal motions can be obtained by combining the effect of slab pull exerted in the Aegean with a mantle upwelling underneath Afar and, more generally, with the large-scale flow associated with a whole mantle, Tethyan convection cell. Neogene volcanism for AAA is widespread, not only in the extensional or subduction settings, but also within plates, such as in Syria-Jordan-Israel and in Turkey, with geochemical fingerprints similar of those of the Afar lava. In addition, morphological features show large uplifting domains far from plate boundaries. We speculate that the tectonic evolution of AAA is related to the progressive northward entrainment of upwelling mantle material, which is itself associated with the establishment of the downwelling part of a convection cell through the segmented Tethyan slab below the northern Zagros and Bitlis collision zone. The recently established westward flow dragged Anatolia and pushed the Aegean slab south-westward, thus accelerating backarc extension. Our model reconciles Afar plume volcanism, the collision in the Bitlis mountains and northern Zagros, and the rapid increase of Aegean trench rollback in a single coherent frame of large scale mantle

  17. Locally modified QUICK scheme for highly convective 2-D and 3-D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    The positive and negative aspects of the QUICK scheme are discussed. QUICK is used in the bulk of the flow domain; however, when the local curvature of the convected variable exceeds a preset value, the algorithm switches to exponential upwinding or other compatible interpolation. Results are presented for the purely convective oblique-step test. A comparison is made between the sharp monotonic EULER-QUICK results and first-, second-, and third-order upwinding.

  18. Enhanced convection and fast plumes in the lower mantle induced by the spin transition in ferropericlase.

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, D. J.; Gurnis, M.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; X-Ray Science Division; California Inst. of Tech.

    2009-05-28

    Using a numerical model we explore the consequences of the intrinsic density change ({Delta}{rho}/{rho} {approx} 2-4%) caused by the Fe{sup 2+} spin transition in ferropericlase on the style and vigor of mantle convection. The effective Clapeyron slope of the transition from high to low spin is strongly positive in pressure-temperature space and broadens with high temperature. This introduces a net spin-state driving density difference for both upwellings and downwellings. In 2-D cylindrical geometry spin-buoyancy dominantly enhances the positive thermal buoyancy of plumes. Although the additional buoyancy does not fundamentally alter large-scale dynamics, the Nusselt number increases by 5-10%, and vertical velocities by 10-40% in the lower mantle. Advective heat transport is more effective and temperatures in the core-mantle boundary region are reduced by up to 12%. Our findings are relevant to the stability of lowermost mantle structures.

  19. Influence of cratonic lithosphere on slab geometry and mantle flow: insights from 3D time-dependent modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramón, Jorge M.; Rodríguez-González, Juan; Negredo, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show a clear correlation between the occurrence of flat subduction and the proximity of areas of high elastic/thermal thickness in the overriding plate. A plausible explanation is that cold overriding plates lead to colder mantle wedge, increasing the hydrodynamic suction and decreasing the slab dip. In particular, recent numerical modeling has shown that the presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate has a significant effect on subducting slabs. In this study we quantify the influence of cratonic areas in the overriding plate on subduction dynamics. We present 3D thermo-mechanical and time-dependent numerical models of buoyancy-driven subduction processes. A non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic rheology is assumed. Different simulations have been performed to quantify the effect of different factors, such as the craton width, thermal thickness and distante to the trench. Modelling results indicate that presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate produces strong along-trench variations of the slab geometry. These variations are maintained and propagated at great depths as the slab sinks deeper into the mantle. Significant trench-parallel flow in the mantle wedge is generated by time-dependent changes in slab dip. For cases of reduced slab pull, the slab and the base of the craton become coupled, which causes a dramatic reduction of subduction velocity and the formation of a slab gap. The presence of cratons may have an important role on subduction episodicity and provide a new mechanism to explain slab gaps in areas where cratons have been located close to trenches, as is the case of South America and the Cenozoic subduction of North America. We further emphasize that the lithospheric structure of the overriding plate should be taken into account in analysis and modelling studies of subduction zones.

  20. Can We Approximate Non-Newtonian Rheology to Model Mantle Convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, A. C.; Breuer, D.; Hüttig, C.; Tosi, N.

    2014-12-01

    The rheology is a key influencing factor in mantle convection as it is directly responsible for the convective vigor, therefore altering heat transport and the distribution of stresses. Deformation in terrestrial mantles is mainly accommodated by two mechanisms: diffusion and dislocation creep. While the former probably plays a dominant role at high pressures, the latter is thought to be important at relatively low pressures, as inferred by seismic anisotropy in the Earth's upper mantle [1].Dislocation creep is more challenging to handle than diffusion creep as the viscosity becomes strain-rate dependent, introducing a non-linearity that requires more computational resources. Thus, to avoid this additional complexity, a Newtonian rheology (i.e. diffusion creep) with reduced activation parameters is often used to mimic non-Newtonian behavior [2], causing misleading results if applied to certain scenarios.We run thermal evolution models in 2D cylindrical geometry using the mantle convection code Gaia [3] for Mercury, the Moon and Mars. It has been argued that their mantles deform by pure dislocation creep but our simulations show that, when using a mixed rheology that accounts for both diffusion and dislocation creep, deformation in the mantles of Mercury, Moon and Mars is dominated by diffusion creep, while dislocation creep only occurs in small confined regions. Further, our results show a transition from a diffusion creep to a dislocation creep dominated mantle as the Rayleigh number increases and indicate that systems even with relatively high effective Rayleigh numbers (up to 5 x 107) are dominated by diffusion creep. Terrestrial bodies like Mercury, the Moon or Mars can thus be correctly modeled using a Newtonian rheology. This may change for bodies like the Earth or Venus since the effective Rayleigh numbers are higher and thus either a mixture of both diffusion and dislocation or purely dislocation creep would define the deformation mechanism. Moreover

  1. Linking the geological record for large igneous provinces and hotspots with tomography-based numerical models of thermal convection in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisovic, P.; Forte, A. M.; Rowley, D. B.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Current tomographic imaging of the 3-D structure in Earth's interior reveals several large-scale anomalies of strongly reduced seismic velocity in the deep lower mantle, in particular beneath the Perm region in Western Siberia, the East Pacific Rise, the West Pacific (Caroline Islands), the Southwest Indian Ocean, as well as under Western and Southern Africa. We have carried out mantle dynamic simulations (Glisovic et al., GJI 2012) of the evolution of these large-scale structures that directly incorporate robust constraints provided by joint seismic-geodynamic inversions of mantle density structure with further constraints provided by mineral physics data (Simmons et al., GJI 2009, JGR 2010). These tomography-based convection simulations also incorporate constraints on mantle viscosity inferred by inversion of a suite of convection-related and glacial isostatic adjustment data sets (Mitrovica & Forte, EPSL 2004) and are characterized by Earth-like Rayleigh numbers. The convection simulations provide a detailed insight into the very-long-time evolution of the buoyancy of these lower-mantle anomalies. We find, in particular, that the buoyancy associated with the 'Perm Anomaly' generates a very long-lived hot upwelling or 'superplume' that is connected to the paleomagnetic location of the Siberian Traps (Smirnov & Tarduno, EPSL 2010) and also to location of North Atlantic Igneous Provinces (i.e., the opening of North Atlantic Ocean). These convection simulations (both backwards and forwards in time) also reveal stable and long-lived plume-like upwellings under the East Pacific Rise, as previously identified by Rowley et al. (AGU 2011, Nature - in review), in particular beneath the Easter & Pitcairn hotspots. Finally we also provide detailed reconstructions of the 65 Myr evolution of the 'Reunion plume' that gave rise to the Deccan Traps.

  2. Possible links between long-term geomagnetic variations and whole-mantle convection processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggin, A. J.; Steinberger, B.; Aubert, J.; Suttie, N.; Holme, R.; Torsvik, T. H.; van der Meer, D. G.; van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.

    2012-08-01

    The Earth's internal magnetic field varies on timescales of months to billions of years. The field is generated by convection in the liquid outer core, which in turn is influenced by the heat flowing from the core into the base of the overlying mantle. Much of the magnetic field's variation is thought to be stochastic, but over very long timescales, this variability may be related to changes in heat flow associated with mantle convection processes. Over the past 500 Myr, correlations between palaeomagnetic behaviour and surface processes were particularly striking during the middle to late Mesozoic era, beginning about 180 Myr ago. Simulations of the geodynamo suggest that transitions from periods of rapid polarity reversals to periods of prolonged stability -- such as occurred between the Middle Jurassic and Middle Cretaceous periods -- may have been triggered by a decrease in core-mantle boundary heat flow either globally or in equatorial regions. This decrease in heat flow could have been linked to reduced mantle-plume-head production at the core-mantle boundary, an episode of true polar wander, or a combination of the two.

  3. 3D Numerical Models of Slab-Mantle Interactions: Implications for Eurasia Philippine Sea Arc-Continent Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, R. V.; Suppe, J.; Ellis, S. M.; Buiter, S.

    2012-12-01

    Oblique convergence between the Luzon arc on the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) and the Eurasian continental margin is associated with a progressive termination of northwestward collision in northern Taiwan along with the eastward subduction of the Eurasian plate underneath the island. It has long been recognized that one model for this flipping of subduction polarity beneath Taiwan is the progressive tearing of the Eurasian plate along the continental margin. Modern global tomography, combined with local tomography near Taiwan images this predicted torn northern edge of the Eurasian slab within the continental mantle lithosphere, which is subducting underneath the collisional mountain belt as a single slab that is continuous with the subducting oceanic lithosphere of the South China Sea. Seismic observations also indicate that the subducting Philippine Sea plate experiences east-west compression - as well as horizontal flexure - at depths shallower than 100 km near its orthogonal contact with the Eurasian lithosphere. Here, we make a first attempt to understand the complex 3D plate interactions associated with the PSP-Eurasia convergence, and to evaluate the role of slab versus mantle driving forces in its evolution. Specifically, we aim to understand the relatively recent change in PSP motion that initiated the deformation of the Eurasian margin and the formation of Taiwan. Unfolding of tomographically inferred present-day subducted slab geometries surrounding the PSP provides kinematic constrains on its interactions with adjacent plates over the past 10s of Ma. The resulting relative plate motions provide the driving boundary conditions for our forward numerical models of lithospheric dynamics, thus allowing us to test new regional plate-tectonic hypotheses. We are exploring a hierarchical set of models with increasing complexity to investigate the sensitivity of model predictions to boundary conditions as well as upper-mantle and slab rheology. Our simulations can

  4. Full Three-Dimensional Approach: Seismic Structure of the Mantle Beneath Western Pacific Using 3-D Fréchet Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Zhao, L.; Jordan, T. H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a full three-dimensional (3-D) model of the shear-speed structure for the mantle beneath western Pacific Ocean. Over 800 three-component recordings of earthquakes (Mw > 5.5) from the seismic zones around the western Pacific rim to station HON/KIP in Hawaii, MIDW in Midway, MAT/MAJO and ERM in Japan, and GUMO in Mariana Island were processed to obtain ~20,000 frequency-dependent phase delays for various of seismic waves, including S, SS, upper-mantle guided and surface waves, and ScS reverberations. The 3-D Fréchet kernels for these delay times are computed by the coupled normal mode theory described by Zhao, Jordan, and Chapman (2000), and the measurements were inverted for a 3-D radially anisotropic shear-speed model using a linear Gaussian-Bayesian scheme. The model parameters include shear-speed variations throughout the mantle and perturbations to radial shear-wave anisotropy in the uppermost mantle. The resolving power of the inversion has been investigated through a series of checkerboard and other tests, which indicate that the horizontal and vertical resolving lengths of about 700 and 200 km or less in the upper mantle. Our results for the large-scale variations in the isotropic shear speeds are generally consistent with published global tomographic models. For example, the uppermost mantle (< 200 km depth) shows fast anomalies in the interior of the Pacific plate and slow anomalies in the marginal basins along the Pacific rim, while this pattern is reversed in the transition zone (400-700 km). Our model reveals greater lateral heterogeneity than the global models, especially in the 200-400 km depth range, suggesting a complex 3-D mantle flow in the western Pacific upper mantle.

  5. Quaternary Hot-spot Activity within the Australian Continent Fueled by Edge-driven Convection: Combined Evidence from Seismic Tomography and 3D Geodynamic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, N.; Davies, R.

    2013-12-01

    Although the Australian continent is often regarded as tectonically quiescent owing to its intra-plate setting, it is not entirely free from large-scale processes, which result in lithospheric-scale changes in composition and structure. A clear example of this is the Newer Volcanics Province (NVP), located in the state of Victoria, southeast Australia, which exhibits the youngest evidence (~5ka) of basaltic intra-plate volcanism within Australia. Over the last few decades there has been much conjecture as to whether the source of volcanism originates deep in the mantle - for example, a rising plume - or is somehow localized in the uppermost mantle. In order to directly address this question, we use teleseismic arrival time residuals recorded by the WOMBAT transportable array in eastern Australia - the largest of its type in the southern hemisphere - to image 3-D variations in P-wavespeed in the upper mantle beneath the NVP. Our results unequivocally show the presence of a low velocity anomaly beneath the NVP which terminates at around 250 km depth. Assuming that this distinct anomaly is associated with increased temperatures and melting, then it appears likely that the NVP is a shallow, rather than deeply rooted feature. It is not possible to completely rule out the presence of a plume, because a narrow plume that spreads out on contact with the base of the lithosphere may yield a similar signature; however, our seismic results, combined with complementary evidence, including: (i) the lack of a hotspot chain; (ii) modest topographic response; and (iii) elongation of the eruption centers in a direction perpendicular to contemporary plate motion, all support the same conclusion. An idea that has been invoked to explain the NVP is so-called edge driven convection, where a change in lithospheric thickness drives a localized convection cell, which can transport deeper and hotter material to the surface. It has been inferred, from regional surface wave models, that the

  6. Mantle Convection, Stagnant Lids and Plate Tectonics on Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; van Heck, H. J.

    2008-12-01

    The discovery of extra-solar super-Earths has prompted interest in their possible mantle dynamics and evolution, and in whether their lithospheres are most likely to be undergoing plate tectonics like on Earth, or be stagnant lids like on Mars and Venus. The origin of plate tectonics is poorly understood for the Earth, likely involving a complex interplay of rheological, compositional, melting and thermal effects, which makes it impossible to make reliable predictions for other planets. Nevertheless, as a starting point it is common to parameterize the complex processes involved as a simple yield stress that is either constant or has a linear "Byerlee's law" dependence on pressure (e.g., [Tackley, GCubed 2000ab] in 3D cartesian geometry; [van Heck and Tackley, GRL 2008] in 3D spherical geometry). For such a simple description, scaling with planet size is expected to depend on heating mode (internal versus basal) and lithospheric strength profile. Simple "back of the envelope" scaling laws (e.g., following Moresi and Solomatov, GJI 1998) ignoring the pressure- dependence of physical properties such as density and thermal expansivity, suggest that the threshold for plate tectonics (i.e., yield stress or friction coefficient) does not depend strongly on planet size, and plate tectonics is equally likely or more likely for larger planets. Scalings that take into account pressure-related changes in physical properties [Valencia et al., Astrophys. J., 2007] make a similar prediction for predominantly internally-heated convection. Because the simplifying assumptions made in developing analytical scalings may not be valid over all parameter ranges, numerical simulations are needed; the one numerical study on super-Earths to date (O'Neill and Lenardic, GRL 2007) finds that plate tectonics is less likely on a larger planet, in apparent contradiction of analytical results. To try and understand this we here present new calculations of yielding- induced plate tectonics as a

  7. Progress in developing the ASPECT Mantle Convection Code - New Features, Benchmark Comparisons and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Bangerth, Wolfgang; Sobolev, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Since there is no direct access to the deep Earth, numerical simulations are an indispensible tool for exploring processes in the Earth's mantle. Results of these models can be compared to surface observations and, combined with constraints from seismology and geochemistry, have provided insight into a broad range of geoscientific problems. In this contribution we present results obtained from a next-generation finite-element code called ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion), which is especially suited for modeling thermo-chemical convection due to its use of many modern numerical techniques: fully adaptive meshes, accurate discretizations, a nonlinear artificial diffusion method to stabilize the advection equation, an efficient solution strategy based on a block triangular preconditioner utilizing an algebraic multigrid, parallelization of all of the steps above and finally its modular and easily extensible implementation. In particular the latter features make it a very versatile tool applicable also to lithosphere models. The equations are implemented in the form of the Anelastic Liquid Approximation with temperature, pressure, composition and strain rate dependent material properties including associated non-linear solvers. We will compare computations with ASPECT to common benchmarks in the geodynamics community such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (van Keken et al., 1997) and demonstrate recently implemented features such as a melting model with temperature, pressure and composition dependent melt fraction and latent heat. Moreover, we elaborate on a number of features currently under development by the community such as free surfaces, porous flow and elasticity. In addition, we show examples of how ASPECT is applied to develop sophisticated simulations of typical geodynamic problems. These include 3D models of thermo-chemical plumes incorporating phase transitions (including melting) with the accompanying density changes, Clapeyron

  8. Controls on geomagnetic reversals and core evolution by mantle convection in the Phanerozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter; Deguen, Renaud; Hinnov, Linda A.; Zhong, Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Numerical dynamos driven by non-uniform heat flux at the core-mantle boundary are used to investigate the connections between geomagnetic field structure, geomagnetic reversal frequency, core evolution, and mantle convection through Phanerozoic time. Polarity reversal sequences and time average magnetic field structures are calculated using dynamos driven by two representations of lower mantle history: a reconstruction of mantle convection with plate motions by Zhang and Zhong (2011) that produces time variable core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux and an irregular evolution of the core, and a second model based on hotspot locations with a time independent pattern of CMB heat flux derived from the present-day seismic shear wave heterogeneity of the lower mantle that produces a monotonic evolution of the core. For both mantle histories, present-day values of the dynamo control parameters are tuned to match Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale reversal statistics for 0-5 Ma, and the time dependences of the dynamo control parameters are determined from the thermal evolution of the core, including time variability of CMB heat flow, inner core size, inner core chemical buoyancy flux, and rotation rate. The dynamo with time independent CMB heat flux shows minor fluctuations in reversal frequency with age, whereas the dynamo with time variable CMB heat flux shows reversal rate fluctuations including stable polarity at 275 and 475 Ma and frequent reversals at other times. This dynamo also produces departures from geocentric axial dipole symmetry during the time of supercontinent Pangaea and a heterogeneous growth history of the inner core.

  9. A global 3D P-velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle for improved event location.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sanford; Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Young, Christopher John; Chang, Marcus C.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D (SAndia LoS Alamos) version 1.4, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is > 55%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model

  10. Multiphotonic Confocal Microscopy 3D imaging: Application to mantle sulfides in sub-arc environment (Avacha Volcano, Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Bénard; Luc-Serge, Doucet; Sabine, Palle; Dmitri A., Ionov

    2010-05-01

    . 0.4 along Z axis) 2PEF enables analysis of 3D textural relations of tiny individual MSS globules (˜10 μm) in their various habitus. Statistical microgeometric descriptions can be derived from volumetric image data. These results may permit refinement of models concerning (re-) crystallisation kinetics and miscibility conditions of sulphur species in various media likely to act in different mantle environments: silicate melt, fluid-rich silicate melt, silicate-rich fluid. Furthermore, this study provides 3D images with improved resolution of several components (silicate phases, sulfides, silicate glass) over the full thickness (>100 μm) of rock slices which cannot be done with classical methods. Besides 3D imaging of ‘hidden' phases in mantle rocks, it opens up new possibilities for other domains in geosciences like crystallography or petrophysics. [1] Bénard & Ionov (2010) GRA, this volume [2] Abramoff, M.D., Magelhaes, P.J. & Ram, S.J. (2004) Image processing with ImageJ. Biophoton. Int., 11, 36-42

  11. The route to chaos in thermal convection at infinite Prandtl number. I - Some trajectories and bifurcations. [in earth mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Cheryl A.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The question of whether or not thermal convection in the earth's mantle is chaotic is addressed. It is suggested that the high Prandtl number/high Raleigh number thermal convection associated with mantle convection is chaotic. To test this hypothesis, the route to chaos in a fluid with infinite Prandtl number is examined, using the Saltzman (1962) equations and the Lorenz (1963) equations. It is concluded that thermal convection at infinite Prandtl number becomes chaotic by means of symmetry-breaking pitchfork bifurcations and the appearance of Hopf bifurcations which produce unstable periodic orbits.

  12. Automatic differentiation as a tool for sensitivity analysis of a convective storm in a 3-D cloud model

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.K.; Droegemeier, K.K.; Bischof, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    The ADIFOR automatic differentiation tool is applied to a 3-D storm-scale meteorological model to generate a sensitivity-enhanced code capable of providing derivatives of all model output variables and related diagnostic (derived) parameters as a function of specified control parameters. The tangent linear approximation, applied to a deep convective storm by the first of its kind using a full-physics compressible model, is valid up to 50 min for a 1% water vapor perturbations. The result is very encouraging considering the highly nonlinear and discontinuous properties of solutions. The ADIFOR-generated code has provided valuable sensitivity information on storm dynamics. Especially, it is very efficient and useful for investigating how a perturbation inserted at earlier time propagates through the model variables at later times. However, it is computationally very expensive to be applied to the variational data assimilation, especially for 3-D meteorological models, which potentially have a large number of input variables.

  13. Stellar models with mixing length and T(τ) relations calibrated on 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaris, Maurizio; Cassisi, Santi

    2015-05-01

    The calculation of the thermal stratification in the superadiabatic layers of stellar models with convective envelopes is a long-standing problem of stellar astrophysics, and has a major impact on predicted observational properties such as radius and effective temperature. The mixing length theory, almost universally used to model the superadiabatic convective layers, contains one free parameter to be calibrated (αml) whose value controls the resulting effective temperature. Here we present the first self-consistent stellar evolution models calculated by employing the atmospheric temperature stratification, Rosseland opacities, and calibrated variable αml (dependent on effective temperature and surface gravity) from a recently published large suite of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of stellar convective envelopes and atmospheres for solar stellar composition. From our calculations (with the same composition of the radiation hydrodynamics simulations), we find that the effective temperatures of models with the hydro-calibrated variable αml (that ranges between ~1.6 and ~2.0 in the parameter space covered by the simulations) present only minor differences, by at most ~30-50 K, compared to models calculated at constant solar αml (equal to 1.76, as obtained from the same simulations). The depth of the convective regions is essentially the same in both cases. We also analyzed the role played by the hydro-calibrated T(τ) relationships in determining the evolution of the model effective temperatures, when compared to alternative T(τ) relationships often used in stellar model computations. The choice of the T(τ) can have a larger impact than the use of a variable αml compared to a constant solar value. We found that the solar semi-empirical T(τ) by Vernazza et al. (1981, ApJS, 45, 635) provides stellar model effective temperatures that agree quite well with the results with the hydro-calibrated relationships.

  14. 3D analytical investigation of melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Dorfman, S. M.; Gaal, R.; Piet, H.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    The diamond anvil cell is a unique tool to study materials under static pressures up to several hundreds of GPa. It is possible to generate temperatures as high as several thousand degrees in the diamond anvil cell by laser heating. This allows us to achieve deep mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC). The small heated volume is surrounded by thermally conductive diamond anvils results in high temperature gradients which affect phase transformation and chemical distribution in the LH-DAC. Analytical characterization of samples in three dimensions is essential to fully understand phase assemblages and equilibrium in LHDAC. In this study we used San Carlos olivine as a starting material as a simple proxy to deep mantle composition. Three samples were melted at ~3000 K and at ~45 GPa for three different durations ranging from 1 to 6 minutes; two other samples were melted at 30 GPa and 70 GPa. All samples were then sliced by focused ion beam (FIB). From each slice, an electron image and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) map were acquired by scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the dual beam FIB instrument. These slices were collected on one half of the heated area in each sample, from which we obtained 3D elemental and phase distribution. The other half of the heated area was used to extract a 100 nm thick section for subsequent analysis by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain diffraction patterns and high resolution EDX maps. 3D reconstruction of SEM EDX results shows at least four differentiated regions in the heated area for all samples. The exact Fe and Mg compositions mentioned below are an example of the sample melted at 45 GPa for 6 minutes. The bulk of the heated are is surrounded by ferropericlase (Mg0.92, Fe0.08)O shell (Fp). Inside this shell we find a thick region of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (Brg) coexisting with Fp. In the center lies a Fe-rich core which is surrounded by magnesiow

  15. The complex 3-D transition from continental crust to backarc magmatism and exhumed mantle in the Central Tyrrhenian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, M.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.; Vendrell, M. G.; Grevemeyer, I.; Zitellini, N.; de Franco, R.

    2015-10-01

    Geophysical data from the MEDOC experiment across the Northern Tyrrhenian backarc basin has mapped a failed rift during backarc extension of cratonic Variscan lithosphere. In contrast, data across the Central Tyrrhenian have revealed the presence of magmatic accretion followed by mantle exhumation after continental breakup. Here we analyse the MEDOC transect E-F, which extends from Sardinia to the Campania margin at 40.5°N, to define the distribution of geological domains in the transition from the complex Central Tyrrhenian to the extended continental crust of the Northern Tyrrhenian. The crust and uppermost mantle structure along this ˜400-km-long transect have been investigated based on wide-angle seismic data, gravity modelling and multichannel seismic reflection imaging. The P-wave tomographic model together with a P-wave-velocity-derived density model and the multichannel seismic images reveal seven different domains along this transect, in contrast to the simpler structure to the south and north. The stretched continental crust under Sardinia margin abuts the magmatic crust of Cornaglia Terrace, where accretion likely occurred during backarc extension. Eastwards, around Secchi seamount, a second segment of thinned continental crust (7-8 km) is observed. Two short segments of magmatically modified continental crust are separated by the ˜5-km-wide segment of the Vavilov basin possibly made of exhumed mantle rocks. The eastern segment of the 40.5°N transect E-F is characterized by continental crust extending from mainland Italy towards the Campania margin. Ground truthing and prior geophysical information obtained north and south of transect E-F was integrated in this study to map the spatial distribution of basement domains in the Central Tyrrhenian basin. The northward transition of crustal domains depicts a complex 3-D structure represented by abrupt spatial changes of magmatic and non-magmatic crustal domains. These observations imply rapid variations

  16. The Elephants' Graveyard: Constraints from Mantle Plumes on the Fate of Subducted Slabs and Implications for the Style of Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassiter, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    The style of mantle convection (e.g., layered- vs. whole-mantle convection) is one of the most hotly contested questions in the Geological Sciences. Geochemical arguments for and against mantle layering have largely focused on mass-balance evidence for the existence of "hidden" geochemical reservoirs. However, the size and location of such reservoirs are largely unconstrained, and most geochemical arguments for mantle layering are consistent with a depleted mantle comprising most of the mantle mass and a comparatively small volume of enriched, hidden material either within D" or within seismically anomalous "piles" beneath southern Africa and the South Pacific. The mass flux associated with subduction of oceanic lithosphere is large and plate subduction is an efficient driver of convective mixing in the mantle. Therefore, the depth to which oceanic lithosphere descends into the mantle is effectively the depth of the upper mantle in any layered mantle model. Numerous geochemical studies provide convincing evidence that many mantle plumes contain material which at one point resided close to the Earth's surface (e.g., recycled oceanic crust ± sediments, possibly subduction-modified mantle wedge material). Fluid dynamic models further reveal that only the central cores of mantle plumes are involved in melt generation. The presence of recycled material in the sources of many ocean island basalts therefore cannot be explained by entrainment of this material during plume ascent, but requires that recycled material resides within or immediately above the thermo-chemical boundary layer(s) that generates mantle plumes. More recent Os- isotope studies of mantle xenoliths from OIB settings reveal the presence not only of recycled crust in mantle plumes, but also ancient melt-depleted harzburgite interpreted to represent ancient recycled oceanic lithosphere [1]. Thus, there is increasing evidence that subducted slabs accumulate in the boundary layer(s) that provide the source

  17. MANTLE CONVECTION, PLATE TECTONICS, AND VOLCANISM ON HOT EXO-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Summeren, Joost; Conrad, Clinton P.; Gaidos, Eric

    2011-07-20

    Recently discovered exoplanets on close-in orbits should have surface temperatures of hundreds to thousands of Kelvin. They are likely tidally locked and synchronously rotating around their parent stars and, if an atmosphere is absent, have surface temperature contrasts of many hundreds to thousands of Kelvin between permanent day and night sides. We investigated the effect of elevated surface temperature and strong surface temperature contrasts for Earth-mass planets on the (1) pattern of mantle convection, (2) tectonic regime, and (3) rate and distribution of partial melting, using numerical simulations of mantle convection with a composite viscous/pseudo-plastic rheology. Our simulations indicate that if a close-in rocky exoplanet lacks an atmosphere to redistribute heat, a {approx}>400 K surface temperature contrast can maintain an asymmetric degree 1 pattern of mantle convection in which the surface of the planet moves preferentially toward subduction zones on the cold night side. The planetary surface features a hemispheric dichotomy, with plate-like tectonics on the night side and a continuously evolving mobile lid on the day side with diffuse surface deformation and vigorous volcanism. If volcanic outgassing establishes an atmosphere and redistributes heat, plate tectonics is globally replaced by diffuse surface deformation and volcanism accelerates and becomes distributed more uniformly across the planetary surface.

  18. The effect of internal heating on plate dynamics in planetary mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.; Lowman, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Plate dynamics on terrestrial planets such as Mars, Venus and Earth strongly differs in temporal variability and thermal evolution. Stagnant-lid convection is characterized by a hot convecting interior and subduction events leading to a cooling of the interior. Moreover it has been shown that the heating mode of mantle convection affects the time-dependence of plate-like surface behavior. Flow reversals have been observed as a result of a heat build-up close to a subduction zone. We investigate the effect of strong internal heating on plate dynamics which is of particular importance for the Super-Earth, a recently discovered class of exosolar planets. In particular, in numerical mantle convection models we consider different modes of internal heating such as purely internal heating and mixed-mode heating. In our study we apply different model approaches in which the viscosity depends on temperature and pressure to allow for high viscosity plates. Plate mobilisation is obtained by additionally employing either a stress dependence of the viscosity or utilizing the force-balance method. The latter approach requires that the stress at the base of each high viscosity plate sums to zero so that the plates neither drive nor resist mantle flow. We find differences between the two modes of heating which has implications for the thermal history. Systems with an insulating bottom are characterized by a cooler interior than systems which are additionally heated from below. This leads to great differences in the plate dynamics, as it is more difficult to sustain stagnant-lid convection in cooler systems.

  19. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bézos, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 °C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing number of

  20. Ultraslow, slow, or fast spreading ridges: Arm wrestling between mantle convection and far-field tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Bezos, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic spreading rates are highly variable, and these variations are known to correlate to a variety of surface observables, like magmatic production, heat flow or bathymetry. This correlation lead to classify ridges into fast and slow spreading ridges, but also into the more peculiar ultraslow spreading regime. Here we explore the dynamic relationships between spreading ridges, plate tectonics and mantle flow. We first focus on the thermal signature of the mantle, that we infer from the global S-wave seismic tomography model of Debayle and Ricard (2012). We show that the thermal structure of ridges gradually departs from the half-space cooling model for slow, and above all ultraslow spreading ridges. We also infer that the sublithospheric mantle temperature decreases by more than 150 degrees C from fast to ultraslow spreading regimes. Both observations overall indicate that the mantle convection pattern is increasingly chaotic underneath slow and ultraslow spreading ridges. We suggest that this is due to far-field tectonics at the other ends of lithospheric plates: not only it modulates the spreading rates but it also alters the convection regime by obstructing the circulation of plates, which in turn modifies the surface kinematic conditions for the convecting mantle. We test this hypothesis using a thermo-mechanical model that represents a convection cell carrying a continental lithosphere atop. The continent gradually drifts away from the spreading ridge, from which the oceanic lithosphere grows and cools while the continent eventually collides at the opposite side. In turn, this event drastically modifies the upper kinematic condition for the convecting mantle that evolves from a mobile lid regime to an almost stagnant lid regime. Implications on spreading ridges are prominent: heat advection decreases with respect to thermal conduction, which causes the oceanic lithosphere to thicken faster; the oceanic plates get compressed and destabilized by a growing

  1. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. Methods: The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, were matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derived the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[vz,vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. Results: The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is α๏MLT (Sbot) = 1.98. . For different stellar parameters, αMLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, αMLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for α๏MLT (ΔS). In addition, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean-field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and find that it qualitatively shows a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with the solar value of α๏m = 1.83.. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields 1.71 for the Sun, but only displays a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increases with Teff. Conclusions: We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, αm and related quantities vary strongly. Our results will help to replace a constant αMLT. Appendices are available in electronic form at http

  2. Linking TERRA and DRex to relate mantle convection and seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Andrew; Davies, Huw; Davies, Rhodri; Wookey, James

    2015-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy caused by flow induced alignment of the olivine crystals in Earth's upper mantle provides a powerful way to test our ideas of mantle convection. We have been working to directly combine computer simulations of mantle dynamics, using fluid mechanics at the continuum scale, with models of rock deformation to capture fabric evolution at the grain scale. By combining models of deformation at these two scales we hope to be able to rigorously test hypothesis linking mantle flow to seismic anisotropy in regions as diverse as subduction zones, the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and the transition zone. We also intend to permit feedback, for example via geometrical softening, from the model of fabric development into the material properties used in the convection simulation. We are building a flexible framework for this approach which we call Theia. Our initial implementation uses the TERRA convection code (Baumgardner, J. Stat. Phys. 39:501-511, 1985; Davies et al. Geosci. Model Dev. 6:1095-1107, 2013) to drive DRex (Kaminski et al. Geophys. J. Int. 158:744-752, 2004), which is used to predict the evolution of crystallographic preferred orientation in the upper mantle. Here we describe our current implementation which makes use of the ability of TERRA to track markers, or particles, through the evolving flow field. These tracers have previously been used to track attributes such as the bulk chemical composition or trace element ratios. Our modification is to use this technology to track a description of the current state of the texture and microstructure (encompassing an orientation distribution function, grain size parameters and dislocation density) such that we can advance models of polycrystalline deformation for many simultaneous DRex instances alongside and in sync with models of mantle convection. We will also describe initial results from our first use of the Theia framework where we are investigating the effect of asthenospheric viscosity

  3. Contribution of mantle convection to shifting South American coastlines during the Tertiary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, G. E.; Müller, D.; Hale, A. J.; Spasojevic, S.; Liu, L.; Gurnis, M.

    2009-12-01

    To what degree does mantle convection drive sea-level change and subsequently coastline change around South America in the Tertiary? The westward movement of the South American plate implies the overriding of the Phoenix and Farallon slabs. Temperature and density anomalies of subducted slabs are preserved in the mantle and can be inferred from seismic tomography images. The currently subducting Nazca Plate, is expected to generate a dynamic surface topography effect, leading to variable surface tilting and vertical motions over time. We use numerical models to discern the contribution to subsidence or uplift due to mantle convection and slab subduction. Geodynamic modelling software, CitcomS combined with the GPlates software facilitates the modelling of linked plate kinematic and mantle convection processes. The quality of model output for the surface dynamic topography can be assessed by comparison with observations. These include geological data constraining surface uplift or subsidence, mantle tomography models, as well as regional versus global estimates of sea-level and palaeoshoreline analysis. Initial results show an encouraging connection between palaeogeography reconstructed from geological data and modelled dynamic topography. Modelled vertical motions suggest changes of up to ±1500m amplitude, or ~±150m/10Ma. A South American digital elevation model that is corrected for time-dependent dynamic topography effects, and inundated using a eustatic sea level model, shows a substantially improved agreement with mapped paleo-coastlines from geological data compared with an uncorrected elevation model. This supports the notion that mantle convection effects through time have played a profound role in driving shifts in coastlines and river drainage in South America. The uplift of the Andes has previously been suggested as attributing to the reversal in flow of the Amazon river. However, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for major Miocene changes in

  4. MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION DYNAMICS FROM 3D MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dário; Charbonneau, Paul; Miesch, Mark

    2015-02-10

    The form of solar meridional circulation is a very important ingredient for mean field flux transport dynamo models. However, a shroud of mystery still surrounds this large-scale flow, given that its measurement using current helioseismic techniques is challenging. In this work, we use results from three-dimensional global simulations of solar convection to infer the dynamical behavior of the established meridional circulation. We make a direct comparison between the meridional circulation that arises in these simulations and the latest observations. Based on our results, we argue that there should be an equatorward flow at the base of the convection zone at mid-latitudes, below the current maximum depth helioseismic measures can probe (0.75 R{sub ⊙}). We also provide physical arguments to justify this behavior. The simulations indicate that the meridional circulation undergoes substantial changes in morphology as the magnetic cycle unfolds. We close by discussing the importance of these dynamical changes for current methods of observation which involve long averaging periods of helioseismic data. Also noteworthy is the fact that these topological changes indicate a rich interaction between magnetic fields and plasma flows, which challenges the ubiquitous kinematic approach used in the vast majority of mean field dynamo simulations.

  5. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction

  6. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dannberg, Juliane; Dohmen, Janik; Kalousova, Klara; Maurice, Maxim; Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana; Soucek, Ondrej; Spiegelman, Marc; Thieulot, Cedric; Tosi, Nicola; Wallner, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we carry out a benchmark comparison. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, cases 1a to 1c (Blankenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and Rayleigh numbers of 104 to 10^6. Melting is modelled using a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) five cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 is identical to case 1 except that latent heat is switched on. Case 3 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm) and depletion buoyancy, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms), the maximum and the total melt volume and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 4 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases are carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. For cases 1 - 3 very good agreement

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variability in the Circulation and Thermal Evolution of the Mantle in Subduction Zones: Insights From 3-D Laboratory Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kincaid, C.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    The subduction of oceanic lithosphere plays a key role in plate tectonics, the thermal evolution of the mantle and recycling processes between Earth's interior and surface. The majority of subduction models are two-dimensional (2-D), assuming limited variability in the direction parallel to the trench. Observationally based models increasingly appeal to three-dimensional (3-D) flow associated with trench migration and the sinking of oceanic plates with a translational component of motion (rollback). We report results from laboratory experiments that reveal fundamental differences in 3-D mantle circulation and temperature structure in response to subduction with and without a rollback component. In our experiments the upper mantle is simulated with glucose syrup and the subducting plate is represented with a Phenolic sheet that is forced to sink into the glucose along prescribed trajectories. An array of 40 thermisters embedded within the plate is used to monitor slab surface temperatures (SSTs). We vary the relative magnitude of downdip and translational components of slab motion and also consider cases where the plate steepens with time. Another parameter is the initial thickness of the thermal boundary layer (TBL) beneath the overriding plate. Without rollback motion, flow in the mantle wedge is sluggish, there is no mass flux around the plate, and plate edges heat up faster than plate centers. Rollback subduction drives flow around and beneath the sinking plate, velocities increase within the mantle wedge and are focussed towards the center of the plate and the surface of the plate heats more along the centerline. In addition to lateral variability in flow and mantle temperatures, results highlight temporal variability in SSTs and 3-D mantle flow trajectories associated with the initiation of subduction and variations between periods of predominantly downdip versus rollback sinking.

  8. Constraining mantle convection models with palaeomagnetic reversals record and numerical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, G.; Amit, H.; Husson, L.

    2016-11-01

    We present numerical models of mantle dynamics forced by plate velocities history in the last 450 Ma. The lower-mantle rheology and the thickness of a dense basal layer are systematically varied and several initial procedures are considered for each case. For some cases, the dependence on the mantle convection vigour is also examined. The resulting evolution of the CMB heat flux is analysed in terms of criteria to promote or inhibit reversals inferred from numerical dynamos. Most models present a rather dynamic lower mantle with the emergence of two thermochemical piles towards present-day. Only a small minority of models present two stationary piles over the last 450 Myr. At present-day, the composition field obtained in our models is found to correlate better with tomography than the temperature field. In addition, the temperature field immediately at the CMB (and thus the heat flux pattern) slightly differs from the average temperature field over the 100-km thick mantle layer above it. The evolution of the mean CMB heat flux or of the amplitude of heterogeneity seldom presents the expected correlation with the evolution of the palaeomagnetic reversal frequency suggesting these effects cannot explain the observations. In contrast, our analysis favours `inertial control' on the geodynamo associated with polar cooling and in some cases break of Taylor columns in the outer core as sources of increased reversal frequency. Overall, the most likely candidates among our mantle dynamics models involve a viscosity increase in the mantle equal or smaller than 30: models with a discontinuous viscosity increase at the transition zone tend to agree better at present-day with observations of seismic tomography, but models with a gradual viscosity increase agree better with some of the criteria proposed to affect reversal frequency.

  9. Constraining mantle convection models with paleomagnetic reversals record and numerical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, G.; Amit, H.; Husson, L.

    2016-09-01

    We present numerical models of mantle dynamics forced by plate velocities history in the last 450 Ma. The lower mantle rheology and the thickness of a dense basal layer are systematically varied and several initial procedures are considered for each case. For some cases, the dependence on the mantle convection vigor is also examined. The resulting evolution of the CMB heat flux is analyzed in terms of criteria known to promote or inhibit reversals inferred from numerical dynamos. Most models present a rather dynamic lower mantle with the emergence of two thermochemical piles towards present-day. Only a small minority of models present two stationary piles over the last 450 Myr. At present-day, the composition field obtained in our models is found to correlate better with tomography than the temperature field. In addition, the temperature field immediately at the CMB (and thus the heat flux pattern) slightly differs from the average temperature field over the 100-km thick mantle layer above it. The evolution of the mean CMB heat flux or of the amplitude of heterogeneities seldom presents the expected correlation with the evolution of the paleomagnetic reversal frequency suggesting these effects cannot explain the observations. In contrast, our analysis favors either 'inertial control' on the geodynamo associated to polar cooling and in some cases break of Taylor columns in the outer core as sources of increased reversal frequency. Overall, the most likely candidates among our mantle dynamics models involve a viscosity increase in the mantle equal or smaller than 30: models with a discontinuous viscosity increase at the transition zone tend to agree better at present-day with observations of seismic tomography, but models with a gradual viscosity increase agree better with some of the criteria proposed to affect reversal frequency.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Mantle Convection with Heat-pipe Melt Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Sebastian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2015-04-01

    During the early evolution of terrestrial bodies, a large amount of mantle melting is expected to affect significantly the energy budget of the interior through heat transport by volcanism. Partial melt, generated when the mantle temperature exceeds the solidus, can propagate to the surface through dikes, thereby advecting upwards a large amount of heat. This so-called heat-pipe mechanism is an effective way to transport thermal energy from the meltregion to the planetary surface. Indeed, recent studies suggest that this mechanism may have shaped the Earth's earliest evolution by controlling interior heat loss until the onset of plate tectonics [1]. Furthermore, heat-piping is likely the primary mechanism through which Jupiter's moon Io loses its tidally generated heat, leading to massive volcanism able to cause a present-day heat-flux about 40 times higher than the Earth's average heat-flux [2]. However, despite its obvious importance, heat-piping is often neglected in mantle convection models of terrestrial planets because of its additional complexity and vaguely defined parameterization. In this study, adopting the approach of [1] we model mantle convection in a generic stagnant lid planet and study heat-piping effects in a systematic way. Assuming that melt is instantaneously extracted to the surface and melting regions are refilled by downward advection of cold mantle material in order to ensure mass conservation, we investigate the influence of heat-pipes on the mantle temperature and stagnant lid thickness using the numerical code Gaia [3]. To this end, we run a large set of simulations in 2D Cartesian geometry spanning a wide parameter space. Our results are consistent with [1] and show that in systems with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity the heat-pipe mechanism sets in at a Rayleigh number Ra ~ 2 × 107. Upon increasing Ra up to ~ 6 × 107mantle temperature accompanied by an increase of the

  11. Os Isotope Heterogeneity of the Convecting Upper Mantle: The Mayari-Baracoa Ophiolitic Belt (Eastern Cuba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, R.; Gervilla, F.; Meibom, A.; Proenza, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Chromite separates from a set of historically important chromite deposits from the 90 Ma old Mayarí-Baracoa Ophiolitic Belt in eastern Cuba were inspected for Re-Os isotopic systematics in an attempt to quantify the extent of Os isotopic heterogeneities within a restricted upper mantle portion represented by a single ophiolite. Compositional variations of chromites indicate their crystallization from hydrous melts varying in composition from back-arc basin basalts (Al-rich chromites; Cr# = 0.43-0.55; low Pd/Ir) to boninites (Cr-rich chromites; Cr# = 0.60-0.83; high Pd/Ir) in a supra-subduction zone setting. Initial Os isotopic compositions of the studied chromites can be grouped according to their distribution in 3 regional districts. Results indicate systematically negative calculated initial γOs values varying from -1.06 ± 0.79 (Moa-Baracoa district), -1.77 ± 0.80 (Sagua de Tanamo district) and -2.79 ± 0.31 (Mayari district). These suprachondritic values are distinctly (3.5-5.2%) less radiogenic than the estimated minimum 187Os/188Os composition of the primitive upper mantle of 0.1296 ± 8 and can be explained by Re depletion during ancient partial melting and melt percolation events. Old Os isotope model ages (<2100 Ma)of some of the chromites (or platinum-group minerals included in them) show and confirm previous findings that ancient Os isotopic signatures can survive in the Earth's upper mantle. Our systematically negative initial γOs values do not improve the definition of an already statistically poorly defined present-day Os isotopic composition of the convecting upper mantle, but instead indicate a complex history for the convecting upper mantle which precludes the calculation of a uniform regional Os isotopic signature for this reservoir.

  12. Evolution of the interior of Mercury influenced by coupled magmatism-mantle convection system and heat flux from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    To discuss mantle evolution in Mercury, I present two-dimensional numerical models of magmatism in a convecting mantle. Thermal, compositional, and magmatic buoyancy drives convection of temperature-dependent viscosity fluid in a rectangular box placed on the top of the core that is modeled as a heat bath of uniform temperature. Magmatism occurs as a permeable flow of basaltic magma generated by decompression melting through a matrix. Widespread magmatism caused by high initial temperature of the mantle and the core makes the mantle compositionally stratified within the first several hundred million years of the 4.5 Gyr calculated history. The stratified structure persists for 4.5 Gyr, when the reference mantle viscosity at 1573 K is higher than around 1020 Pa s. The planet thermally contracts by an amount comparable to the one suggested for Mercury over the past 4 Gyr. Mantle upwelling, however, generates magma only for the first 0.1-0.3 Gyr. At lower mantle viscosity, in contrast, a positive feedback between magmatism and mantle upwelling operates to cause episodic magmatism that continues for the first 0.3-0.8 Gyr. Convective current stirs the mantle and eventually dissolves its stratified structure to enhance heat flow from the core and temporarily resurrect magmatism depending on the core size. These models, however, predict larger contraction of the planet. Coupling between magmatism and mantle convection plays key roles in mantle evolution, and the difficulty in numerically reproducing the history of magmatism of Mercury without causing too large radial contraction of the planet warrants further exploration of this coupling.

  13. Turbulent Convection: Is 2D a good proxy of 3D?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    Several authors have recently carried out 2D simulations of turbulent convection for both solar and massive stars. Fitting the 2D results with the MLT, they obtain that alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 specifically, 1.4 less than alpha(sub MLT) less than 1.8. The authors further suggest that this methodology could be used to calibrate the MLT used in stellar evolutionary codes. We suggest the opposite viewpoint: the 2D results show that MLT is internally inconsistent because the resulting alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 violates the MLT basic assumption that alpha(sub MLT) less than 1. When the 2D results are fitted with the CM model, alpha(sub CMT) less than 1, in accord with the basic tenet of the model. On the other hand, since both MLT and CM are local models, they should be replaced by the next generation of non-local, time dependent turbulence models which we discuss in some detail.

  14. 3D numerical modeling of mantle flow, crustal dynamics and magma genesis associated with slab roll-back and tearing: The eastern Mediterranean case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, Armel; Sternai, Pietro; Jolivet, Laurent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Gerya, Taras

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between subduction dynamics and magma genesis have been intensely investigated, resulting in several conceptual models derived from geological, geochemical and geophysical data. To provide physico-chemical constraints on these conceptual models, self-consistent numerical simulations containing testable thermo-mechanical parameters are required, especially considering the three-dimensional (3D) natural complexity of subduction systems. Here, we use a 3D high-resolution petrological and thermo-mechanical numerical model to quantify the relative contribution of oceanic and continental subduction/collision, slab roll-back and tearing to magma genesis and transport processes. Our modeling results suggest that the space and time distribution and composition of magmas in the overriding plate is controlled by the 3D slab dynamics and related asthenospheric flow. Moreover, the decrease of the bulk lithospheric strength induced by mantle- and crust-derived magmas promotes the propagation of strike-slip and extensional fault zones through the overriding crust as response to slab roll-back and continental collision. Reduction of the lithosphere/asthenosphere rheological contrast by lithospheric weakening also favors the transmission of velocities from the flowing mantle to the crust. Similarities between our modeling results and the late Cenozoic tectonic and magmatic evolution across the eastern Mediterranean region suggest an efficient control of mantle flow on the magmatic activity in this region, which in turn promotes lithospheric deformation by mantle drag via melt-induced weakening effects.

  15. Anisotropic rheology of a polycrystalline aggregate and convection in planetary mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouilloux, L. S.; Labrosse, S.; Kaminski, E.

    2011-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy in the Earth mantle is often related to the crystal preferred orientation of polycrystalline aggregates. In this case, the physical properties depends on the direction and require the use of tensors to be fully described. In particular, the viscosity must be defined as a fourth order tensor whereas the thermal conductivity is a 2nd order tensor. However, the dynamical implications of such physical properties have received little attention until now. In this work, we present the mathematical formulation for an anisotropic medium and the relationship with dislocation creep deformation. We explore extensively the problem of the onset of Rayleigh-Bénard convection with such anisotropic properties. We finally presents some numerical results on the time-dependent problem using an orthotropic law for an ice polycrystal. Geophysical implications of this work related to the dynamics of planetary mantles are discussed, especially the potential of anisotropic rheology to localize deformation.

  16. Examining In-Cloud Convective Turbulence in Relation to Total Lightning and the 3D Wind Field of Severe Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momar, S. A.; Deierling, W.; Williams, J. K.; Hoffman, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Convectively induced turbulence (CIT) is commonly listed as a cause or factor in weather-related commercial aviation accidents. In-cloud CIT is generated in part by shears between convective updrafts and downdrafts. Total lightning is also dependent on a robust updraft and the resulting storm electrification. The relationship between total lightning and turbulence could prove useful in operational aviation settings with the use of future measurements from the geostationary lightning mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-R satellite. Providing nearly hemispheric coverage of total lightning, the GLM could help identify CIT in otherwise data-sparse locations. For a severe thunderstorm case on 7 June 2012 in northeast Colorado, in-cloud eddy dissipation rate estimates from the NCAR/NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm were compared with cloud electrification data from the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array and radar products from the Denver, Colorado WSR-88D. These comparisons showed that high concentrations of very high frequency (VHF) source densities emitted by lightning occurred near and downstream of the storm's convective core. Severe turbulence was also shown to occur near this area, extending near the melting level of the storm and spreading upward and outward. Additionally, increases/decreases in VHF sources and turbulence volumes occurred within a few minutes of each other; although, light turbulence was shown to increase near one storm's dissipation. This may be due to increased shear from the now downdraft dominate storm. The 3D wind field from this case, obtained by either a dual-Doppler or a Variational Doppler Radar Assimilation System (VDRAS) analysis, will also be examined to further study the relationships between total lightning and thunderstorm kinematics. If these results prove to be robust, lightning may serve as a strong indicator of the location of moderate or greater turbulence.

  17. Global mantle convection: Evidence from carbon and nitrogen isotopes in super-deep diamonds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palot, M.; Cartigny, P.; Harris, J.; Kaminsky, F. V.; Stachel, T.

    2009-12-01

    Constraining the convective regime of the Earth’s mantle has profound implications for our understanding of the Earth’s cooling and the geodynamics of plate tectonics. Although subducting plates seem to be occasionally deflected at 660 km, evidence from seismic tomography and fluid dynamics suggest that substantial amounts of material reach the core-mantle boundary. Most geochemists, on the other hand, based on evidence from noble gases, would argue for the presence of separate upper and lower mantle reservoirs. Diamond provides a unique opportunity to sample those parts of the mantle that remains inaccessible by any other means. Some mineral associations in diamond, such as majoritic garnet, calcic and magnesian perovskite and manganoan ilmenite with ferropericlase have been recognised as originated from the transition zone down to the lower mantle (Stachel et al., 1999; Kaminsky et al., 2001). In addition, nitrogen in these diamonds is potentially a good tracer for mantle geodynamics. Exchanges between an inner reservoir (characterised by negative δ15N) via degassing at oceanic ridges with an outer reservoir (characterised by positive δ15N) via recycling at a subduction zones can lead to isotopic contrast in a stratified mantle. Because of common super-deep mineral inclusion assemblages in diamonds from Juina (Brazil) and Kankan (Guinea), we carried out a detailed study of nitrogen and carbon isotopes. The Juina diamonds show broadly similar ranges of δ15N from +3.8‰ down to -8.8‰ for both upper (UM) and lower (LM) mantle diamonds. This important feature is also found for UM and LM diamonds from Kankan, although the range of δ15N differs with values from +9.6‰ down to -39.4‰. Both sets of results suggest extensive material-isotopic exchange through the 660km discontinuity, contrary to the idea of an isolated reservoir. Transition zone (TZ) diamonds are enriched in 13C with δ13C from -3.1‰ up to +3.8‰ at Kankan but those of Juina are depleted

  18. EFFECTS OF STELLAR FLUX ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS: DEGREE-1 MANTLE CONVECTION AND LOCAL MAGMA PONDS

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, S. E.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Seager, S. E-mail: ltelkins@mit.edu

    2011-07-10

    We model the geodynamical evolution of super-Earth exoplanets in synchronous rotation about their star. While neglecting the effects of a potential atmosphere, we explore the parameter spaces of both the Rayleigh number and intensity of incoming stellar flux, and identify two main stages of mantle convection evolution. The first is a transient stage in which a lithospheric temperature and thickness dichotomy emerges between the substellar and the antistellar hemispheres, while the style of mantle convection is dictated by the Rayleigh number. The second stage is the development of degree-1 mantle convection. Depending on mantle properties, the timescale of onset of this second stage of mantle evolution varies from order 1 to 100 billion years of simulated planetary evolution. Planets with higher Rayleigh numbers (due to, for instance, larger planetary radii than the Earth) and planets whose incoming stellar flux is high (likely for most detectable exoplanets) will develop degree-1 mantle convection most quickly, on the order of 1 billion years, which is within the age of many planetary systems. Surface temperatures range from 220 K to 830 K, implying the possibility of liquid water in some regions near the surface. These results are discussed in the context of stable molten magma ponds on hotter planets, and the habitability of super-Earths which may lie outside the Habitable Zone.

  19. A two Layer Convecting Mantle With Exchange : A Unified Model Based on Geochemical, Seismic and Heat Flow Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, C. J.; Jaupart, C.; Nolet, G.

    2007-12-01

    The question of layered versus whole mantle convection has been pending since early models of mantle convection (Oxburgh and Turcotte, 1967; McKenzie and Richter, 1978). In a first phase, layered mantle models appeared to be the winners, because they explained most of geochemical observations. They of course also explained the seismic focal solutions (compressive/ non compressive) in subducting plate and the heat flow constraints (Richter, 1980). Later on, the discovery that slabs could penetrate the lower mantle was considered as proof of whole mantle convection. Most numerical experiments were then developed in this context, overlooking many geochemical observations such as rare gas isotopes or radioactive elements. In this presentation, we will examine the different data one by one. a) geochemical constraints include the budget equations for Sr, Nd, Hf, isotopes, the budget equation for He, Ne, Ar, the budget for heat producing elements U, Th, K (including Th/U and K/U ratios). (Allègre and al., 1979, 1982; De Paolo and Wasserburg, 1977; O'Nions and al.,1977). b) Constrains linking geochemical observations and geodynamics. How the so-called depleted mantle is generated ? Continuities and affinities between MORB and OIB, including the Dupal and Non Dupal provinces: The non-pristine source for OIB based on Pb isotope data. The marble cake structure for upper mantle. Continental crust recycling via sediments and delamination processes. In thise respect, we emphasize the difference in statistical variance of isotope or trace element ratios in the different/types of basalts reflecting the difference in stirring intensity in their sources. We also use information from extinct radioactivities 142Nd and 129Xe. In each case, we estimate the errors for measurements and models. c) The seismic evidence of slab penetration into the lower mantle are from Creager and Jordan(1984) to Van der Hilst et al.(1991), Sparkman and al.(1993), with the counter example of non

  20. Iron isotopic evidence for convective resurfacing of recycled arc-front mantle beneath back-arc basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, O.; Arculus, R. J.; Sossi, P. A.; Jenner, F. E.; Whan, T. H. E.

    2013-11-01

    observations suggest sub-arc convective flow transports melt-exhausted and metasomatized wedge mantle into deeper mantle regions. Reciprocally, asthenospheric, fertile mantle may supply back-arc ridges distal to the trench by shallow, lateral mantle ingress, insinuating initial wedge mantle depletion in its back-arc region. Here we show that light Fe isotope compositions of the Central Lau Spreading Centre located in the Lau back-arc basin on the farside of the Tonga-Kermadec arc are indicative for derivation from a modified arc-front mantle with elemental and Nd-isotopic memory of former slab fluid addition. We propose that this shallow wedge material has been transported from the sub-arc mantle to the back-arc either convectively or in a buoyant diapir. This implies that melt-depleted mantle in subduction zones is, at least in parts, recycled in a resurfacing loop. This can explain the depletion in back-arc regions, and the progressively depleted nature of island arc sources in maturing arc systems.

  1. Deep Structures and Initiation of Plate Tectonics in Thermochemical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Stein, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recently deep thermochemical structures have been studied intensively. The observed large anomalies with reduced seismic velocities (LLSVPs) beneath Africa and the Pacific are obtained in numerical models as an initial dense layer at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is pushed up to piles by the convective flow (e.g., McNamara et al., EPSL 229, 1-9, 2010). Adding a dense CMB layer to a model featuring active plate tectonics, Trim et al. (EPSL 405, 1-14, 2014) find that surface mobility is strongly hindered by the dense material and can even vanish completely for a CMB layer that has a too high density or too large a volume.In a further study we employed a fully rheological model in which oceanic plates form self-consistently. We observe that an initial dense CMB layer strongly affects the formation of plates and therefore the onset time of plate tectonics. We present a systematic 2D parameter study exploring the time of plate initiation and discuss the resulting deep thermal and thermochemical structures in a self-consistent thermochemical mantle convection system.

  2. Methods for thermochemical convection in Earth's mantle with force-balanced plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.; van Keken, P. E.

    2007-11-01

    Models of convection in the mantle can be used to study the effects of differentiation and remixing on the geochemical evolution of the Earth. Implementation of melting and degassing at mid-ocean ridges and subduction zones requires an adequate approximation of plate tectonics as well as temperature-dependent rheology. We have developed a new two-dimensional cylindrical model that combines a force-balance method for energetically consistent stiff plates with tracer-discretized chemical buoyancy. Basaltic crust is extracted at distinct spreading centers and is subducted into the lower mantle. We find that the unmodified implementation of the force-balance equations in a full cylinder causes occasional spurious rotations by amplification of numerical discretization errors. The method is stable if a single internal symmetry boundary condition is used, but this causes artificial pooling of dense crust near the boundary where it is easily disrupted. This results in artificially enhanced remixing of dense crust. We modify the force-balance equations to damp net lateral plate movement. The energetic consistency of this modification is then demonstrated by comparison to a one-plate, single convection cell calculation. With the removal of the symmetry boundary condition a more continuous rate of crustal pooling is observed. This suggests that models with symmetry boundary conditions may overpredict the rate of pooling and remixing of ancient crust.

  3. Low velocity crustal flow and crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan, SE Tibet, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haopeng; Zhu, Liangbao; Su, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    We used teleseismic data recorded by a permanent seismic network in Yunnan, SE Tibet, and measured the interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 10 and 60 s. A two-step inversion scheme was used to invert for the 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy structure of 10-110 km. The results show that there are two low velocity channels between depths of 20-30 km in Yunnan and that the fast axes are sub-parallel to the strikes of the low velocity channels, which supports the crustal flow model. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern is quite complicated and reveals a complex crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan. The N-S trending Lüzhijiang Fault separates the Dianzhong Block into two parts. In the western Dianzhong Block, the fast axis of the S-wave changes with depth, which indicates that the crust and the lithospheric mantle are decoupled. In the eastern Dianzhong Block and the western Yangtze Craton, the crust and the lithospheric mantle may be decoupled because of crustal flow, despite a coherent S-wave fast axis at depths of 10-110 km. In addition, the difference between the S-wave fast axis in the lithosphere and the SKS splitting measurement suggests that the lithosphere and the upper mantle are decoupled there. In the Baoshan Block, the stratified anisotropic pattern suggests that the crust and the upper mantle are decoupled.

  4. Parameters controlling dynamically self-consistent plate tectonics and single-sided subduction in global models of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in numerical modeling allow global models of mantle convection to more realistically reproduce the behavior at convergent plate boundaries; in particular, the inclusion of a free surface at the outer boundary has been shown to facilitate self-consistent development of single-sided subduction. This allows for a more extensive study of subduction in the context of global mantle convection, as opposed to commonly used regional models. Our first study already indicated important differences between mantle convection with single-sided subduction and mantle convection with double-sided subduction. Here we further investigate the effect of various physical parameters and complexities on inducing Earth-like plate tectonics and its evolution in time. Results reinforce the previous finding that using a free surface instead of a free-slip outer boundary dramatically changes subduction style, with free surface cases displaying many episodes of single-sided subduction, which leads to more realistic slab dip, stress state, trench retreat rate, and slab-induced mantle flow. Longevity of single-sided subduction is promoted by a layer of hydrated crust with a low yield strength to lubricate the subduction channel, a low-viscosity asthenosphere, and a high strength of the slab (determined by a combination of high-diffusion creep viscosity and intermediate friction coefficient), although its effective viscosity is in the observationally constrained range in the bending region. The time evolution displays interesting events including subduction polarity reversals, subduction shut-off, and slab break-off.

  5. Counter-intuitive features of the dynamic topography unveiled by tectonically realistic 3D numerical models of mantle-lithosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Evgueni; Gerya, Taras

    2013-04-01

    It has been long assumed that the dynamic topography associated with mantle-lithosphere interactions should be characterized by long-wavelength features (> 1000 km) correlating with morphology of mantle flow and expanding beyond the scale of tectonic processes. For example, debates on the existence of mantle plumes largely originate from interpretations of expected signatures of plume-induced topography that are compared to the predictions of analytical and numerical models of plume- or mantle-lithosphere interactions (MLI). Yet, most of the large-scale models treat the lithosphere as a homogeneous stagnant layer. We show that in continents, the dynamic topography is strongly affected by rheological properties and layered structure of the lithosphere. For that we reconcile mantle- and tectonic-scale models by introducing a tectonically realistic continental plate model in 3D large-scale plume-mantle-lithosphere interaction context. This model accounts for stratified structure of continental lithosphere, ductile and frictional (Mohr-Coulomb) plastic properties and thermodynamically consistent density variations. The experiments reveal a number of important differences from the predictions of the conventional models. In particular, plate bending, mechanical decoupling of crustal and mantle layers and intra-plate tension-compression instabilities result in transient topographic signatures such as alternating small-scale surface features that could be misinterpreted in terms of regional tectonics. Actually thick ductile lower crustal layer absorbs most of the "direct" dynamic topography and the features produced at surface are mostly controlled by the mechanical instabilities in the upper and intermediate crustal layers produced by MLI-induced shear and bending at Moho and LAB. Moreover, the 3D models predict anisotropic response of the lithosphere even in case of isotropic solicitations by axisymmetric mantle upwellings such as plumes. In particular, in presence of

  6. Characterization of two monoclonal antibodies (UCL4D12 and UCL3D3) that discriminate between human mantle zone and marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Smith-Ravin, J; Spencer, J; Beverley, P C; Isaacson, P G

    1990-10-01

    Two new monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), UCL3D3 and UCL4D12 were obtained following immunization with follicular lymphoma (UCL3D3) or low-grade primary B cell gastric lymphoma cells (UCL4D12). In normal splenic white pulp, tonsil and small intestinal Peyer's patches, UCL4D12 recognizes marginal zone B cells and a subpopulation of follicle centre cells, whereas mantle zone B cells are UCL4D12 negative. In contrast, UCL3D3 recognizes mantle zone B cells and follicular dendritic cells, but not marginal zone B cells or follicle centre B cells. Double-immunofluorescence studies showed that in the splenic white pulp, these antibodies stain reciprocally. The majority of UCL3D3+ cells are sIgM+ and sIgD+ whereas a higher proportion of UCL4D12+ cells express surface IgM (sIgM) but not surface IgD (sIgD). Less than 10% of splenic B cells express both 3D3 and 4D12 antigens. None of the cell lines tested expressed either antigen. Functional studies showed that both antigens play a role in B cell activation as the MoAbs increase the mitogenic effect of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I on tonsil B cells. This effect was maximal at 72 h in culture. TPA activation was reduced, and no effect was observed with anti-immunoglobulin (anti mu) or CDw40 (G28.5). UCL3D3 and UCL4D12 did not show any stimulatory effect on their own. Biochemical studies show that both MoAbs recognize proteins of 80-90 kD under reducing conditions. These two MoAbs appear to recognize new B cell surface antigens which may be useful for identifying subpopulations of B cells. PMID:2208792

  7. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Neamtu, C.; Di Giuseppe, E.

    2014-12-01

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm3 convection tank is filled with a water-based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  8. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Surducan, E; Surducan, V; Limare, A; Neamtu, C; Di Giuseppe, E

    2014-12-01

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm(3) convection tank is filled with a water‑based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  9. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Neamtu, C.; Limare, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.

    2014-12-15

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm{sup 3} convection tank is filled with a water‑based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  10. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Surducan, E; Surducan, V; Limare, A; Neamtu, C; Di Giuseppe, E

    2014-12-01

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm(3) convection tank is filled with a water‑based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals. PMID:25554309

  11. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Convection: Advection and Diffusion Schemes for Marker Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's deep mantle can be studied by modeling vigorous convection in a chemically heterogeneous fluid. Numerical modeling of such a system poses several computational challenges. Dominance of heat advection over the diffusive heat transport, and a negligible amount of chemical diffusion results in sharp gradients of thermal and chemical fields. The exponential dependence of the viscosity of mantle materials on temperature also leads to high gradients of the velocity field. The accuracy of many numerical advection schemes degrades quickly with increasing gradient of the solution, while the computational effort, in terms of the scheme complexity and required resolution, grows. Additional numerical challenges arise due to a large range of length-scales characteristic of a thermochemical convection system with highly variable viscosity. To examplify, the thickness of the stem of a rising thermal plume may be a few percent of the mantle thickness. An even thinner filament of an anomalous material that is entrained by that plume may consitute less than a tenth of a percent of the mantle thickness. We have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermochemical convection in a hollow cylinder domain, with a depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity representative of the mantle (Steinberger and Calderwood, 2006). We use marker-in-cell method for advection of chemical and thermal fields. The main advantage of perfoming advection using markers is absence of numerical diffusion during the advection step, as opposed to the more diffusive field-methods. However, in the common implementation of the marker-methods, the solution of the momentum and energy equations takes place on a computational grid, and nodes do not generally coincide with the positions of the markers. Transferring velocity-, temperature-, and chemistry- information between nodes and markers introduces errors inherent to inter- and extrapolation. In the numerical scheme

  12. Fluctuations in seafloor spreading predicted by tectonic reconstructions and mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, Nicolas; Seton, Maria; Rolf, Tobias; Müller, R. Dietmar; Tackley, Paul J.

    2013-04-01

    The theory of plate tectonics theory has enabled possible the reconstruction of the ancient seafloor and paleogeography. Over 50 years of data collection and kinematic reconstruction efforts, plate models have improved significantly (Seton et al., 2012) although reconstructions of ancient seafloor are naturally limited by the limited preservation of of very old seafloor. It is challenging to reconstruct ancient ocean basins and associated plate boundaries for times earlier than 200 Ma, since seafloor of this age is not preserved. This means we can merely reconstruct only 5% of the history of the planet in this fashion. However, geodynamic models can now help evaluate how seafloor spreading may evolve over longer time periods, since recent developments of numerical models of mantle convection with pseudo-plasticity can generate long-term solutions that simulate a form of seafloor spreading (Moresi and Solomatov, 1998; Tackley, 2000a; Tackley, 2000b). The introduction of models of continental lithosphere further improves the quality of the predictions: the computed distribution of seafloor ages reproduces the consumption of young seafloor as observed on the present-day Earth (Coltice et al., 2012). The time-dependence of the production of new seafloor has long been debated and there is no consensus on how much it has varied in the past 150My, and how it could have fluctuated over longer time-scales. Using plate reconstructions, Parsons (1982) and Rowley (2002) proposed the area vs. age distribution of the seafloor could have experienced limited fluctuations in the past 150My while others suggest stronger variations would fit the observations equally well (Seton et al., 2009. Here we propose to investigate the global dynamics of seafloor spreading using state-of-the-art plate reconstructions and geodynamic models. We focus on the evolution of the distribution of seafloor ages because fundamental geophysical observations like mantle heat flow or sea level provide

  13. Compositional Density Structure of the Upper Mantle from Constrained 3-D Inversion of Gravity Anomaly: A Case Study of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Q.; Chen, C.; Kaban, M. K.; Thomas, M.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle density structure is a key for tectonics. The density variations in the upper mantle are affected by temperature and composition. Seismic tomography method has been widely applied to obtain the P- and S-wave velocity structure in the mantle, which is then used to calculate the density perturbation. However, the velocity model is mainly due to the thermal effects but not the compositional effects. A method of 3-D inversion of gravity anomaly developed in spherical coordinates is used to image the large-scale density structure of upper mantle in Southeast Asia. The mantle gravity anomalies used in inversion are calculated by removing the crustal effects from the observed gravity. With constraints of thermal density model from seismic tomography, the integrative density structure is estimated from gravity inversion. Consequently, we obtain the compositional density by subtracting the thermal density from the integrative structure. The result of inversion shows the anisotropic composition of subduction zones, Cratons and plates boundary in Southeast Asia. In the shallow depth, the compositional density anomalies of large scales present uniform features in oceanic and continental mantle. In depth of 75-175 km, there are differences between the thermal and the compositional variations. The density anomalies at these depths are both affected by temperature and composition of the upper mantle. Below 175-km depth, the density anomalies are dominated by the compositional variations. Furthermore, comparing with high seismicity occurred at moderate-depth (50-300 km), we found that the compositional density variations is one of the factor that inducing earthquakes. The constrained inversion of mantle gravity anomaly has possibility to reveal the subduction which is not clearly seen from low-resolution tomography data, and may reveal the relation of seismicity and composition in the upper mantle. This study is supported by the Program of International Science and

  14. On the Generation of Supercontinent Cycles from Mantle Convection with Self-Consistent Plate Tectonics and Mobile Continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.; Coltice, N.

    2012-12-01

    exterior. The former represents the Archaean cratons on Earth, which hardly deform and are thought be tectonically stable since > 2.5 Ga. The weak material represents the mobile belts from the Proterozoic or Phanerozoic. In the present study we investigate in 2D and 3D numerical models how the properties of the mobile belts as well as those of the convective flow (mode of heating, yield strength of the lithosphere) control the existence of a supercontinent cycle and its periodicity. In order to generate a supercontinent cycle a harmonic degree-1 convection pattern is needed to assemble the continental fragments, which is disturbed by the onset of higher degree structures when a supercontinent splits. References [1] D. G. Pearson, S. W. Parman, G. M. Nowell (2007), A link between large scale mantle melting and continent growth seen in osmium isotopes, Nature, 449, 202-205. [2] J. J. W. Rogers, M. Santosh (2003), Supercontinents in Earth History, Gondwana Res., 6, 357-368. [3] T. Rolf, N. Coltice, P. J. Tackley (2012), Linking continental drift, plate tectonics and the thermal state of the Earth's mantle, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2012.07.011

  15. Influence of Intrusive vs. Extrusive Magmatism on Venus' Tectonics and long-term Mantle Evolution: 2D and 3D Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Here we extend the models of [1]. Numerical convection models of the thermochemical evolution of Venus are compared to present-day topography and geoid, recent resurfacing history and surface deformation. The models include melting, magmatism, decaying heat-producing elements, core cooling, realistic temperature-dependent viscosity and either stagnant lid or episodic lithospheric overturn. In [1] it was found that in stagnant lid convection the dominant mode of heat loss is magmatic heat pipe, which requires massive magmatism and produces very thick, cold crust, inconsistent with observations. Partitioning of heat-producing elements into the crust helps but does not help enough. Episodic lid overturn interspersed by periods of quiescence effectively loses Venus's heat while giving lower rates of volcanism and a thinner crust. Calculations predict 5-8 overturn events over Venus's history, each lasting ˜150 Myr, initiating in one place and then spreading globally. During quiescent periods convection keeps the lithosphere thin. Magmatism keeps the mantle temperature constant over Venus's history. Crustal recycling occurs by entrainment in stagnant lid convection, and by lid overturn in episodic mode. Venus-like amplitudes of topography and geoid can be produced in either stagnant or episodic modes, with a viscosity profile that is Earth-like but shifted to higher values. The basalt density inversion below the olivine-perovskite transition causes compositional stratification around 730 km; breakdown of this layering increases episodicity but far less than episodic lid overturn. The classical stagnant lid mode with interior temperature approximately a rheological temperature scale lower than T_CMB is not reached because mantle temperature is controlled by magmatism while the core cools slowly from a superheated start. Core heat flow decreases with time, possibly shutting off the dynamo, particularly in episodic cases. Here we extend [1] by considering intrusive

  16. Physical Parameters Controlling Subduction Dynamics and Surface Topography in Self-consistent Global Models of Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, F.; Pears, M. I.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in numerical modelling allow global models of mantle convection to realistically reproduce the behaviour at convergent plate boundaries (Crameri et al., 2012a). This allows for a more extensive study of subduction that, in contrast to the numerous regional models, incorporates the complete framework of mantle convection. Here, we focus on different aspects of mantle convection including (i) slab dip variations, (ii) variations in radial mantle viscosity, and (iii) the presence of localised mantle upwellings and discuss their control on the dynamics of Earth-like plate tectonics. Additionally, we present the effect these parameter variations have on measurable quantities like dynamic topography and plate velocity. The models are calculated by the finite-volume code Stag-YY (e.g., Tackley 2008) using a multi-grid method on a fully staggered grid. Second, the sticky-air method (Matsumoto and Tomoda 1983; Schmeling et al, 2008) is applied and thus approximates a free surface when the sticky-air parameters are chosen carefully (Crameri et al., 2012b). Overall, this study demonstrates the ability of various parameters to significantly influence both subduction dynamics and surface topography. REFERENCES Crameri, F., et al. (2012a), Geophys. Res. Lett., 39(3). Crameri, F., et al. (2012b), Geophys. J. Int., 189(1). Matsumoto, T., and Y. Tomoda (1983), J. Phys. Earth, 31(3). Schmeling, H., et al. (2008), Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 171(1-4). Tackley, P. J. (2008), Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 171(1-4).

  17. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  18. Spectral-finite element approach to present-time mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, N.; Martinec, Z.

    2005-12-01

    We present a spectral-finite element approach to the forward modelling of present-time mantle convection. The differential Stokes problem for an incompressible viscous flow in a spherical shell is reformulated in weak sense by means of a variational principle. The integral equations obtained are then parametrized by vector and tensor spherical harmonics in the angular direction and by piecewise linear finite elements over the radial direction. The solution is obtained using the Galerkin method, that leads to the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations. The earth-viscosity structure is described using a two-dimensional spherical grid, that allows us to treat various kinds of lateral variation, with viscosity contrasts of several order of magnitude. The method is first tested for the case of a one-dimensional viscosity structure. After prescribing the internal load in the form of a Dirac-delta, Green's functions for the surface topography, core topography and geoid are computed and compared with those obtained by solving the problem with the traditional matrix propagator technique. The approach is then applied to two different axisymmetric viscosity structures consisting either of one or two highly viscous cratonic bodies embedded in the upper mantle. We compute the corresponding Green's functions, showing and discussing the non-linear coupling of various spherical-harmonic modes, and the resulting angular dependence of the flow velocity.

  19. Global 3-D imaging of mantle electrical conductivity based on inversion of observatory C-responses - I. An approach and its verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey; Semenov, Alexey

    2012-06-01

    We present a novel frequency-domain inverse solution to recover the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution in the mantle. The solution is based on analysis of local C-responses. It exploits an iterative gradient-type method - limited-memory quasi-Newton method - for minimizing the penalty function consisting of data misfit and regularization terms. The integral equation code is used as a forward engine to calculate responses and data misfit gradients during inversion. An adjoint approach is implemented to compute misfit gradients efficiently. Further improvements in computational load come from parallelizing the scheme with respect to frequencies, and from setting the most time-consuming part of the forward calculations - calculation of Green's tensors - apart from the inversion loop. Convergence, performance, and accuracy of our 3-D inverse solution are demonstrated with a synthetic numerical example. A companion paper applies the strategy set forth here to real data.

  20. Boundary Layer Dynamics and Sub-Adiabaticity in Convecting Planetary Mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, W. B.

    2007-05-01

    A broad range of phenomena are influenced by the behavior of thermal boundary layers in planetary mantles including plume temperatures, lithospheric stresses, resistance to plate motions, and the temperature structure of the mantle as a whole. The textbook picture of the temperature profile in a convecting layer consists of two boundary layers separated by a well-mixed, adiabatic interior. The sum of the temperature drops across the upper and lower boundary layers is equal to super-adiabatic temperature drop across the entire layer. This picture does not accurately describe, however, the horizontally averaged temperature structure derived from numerical solutions of the equations of infinite Prandtl number, Boussinesq convection. The sum of the average temperature drops across the boundary layers in such models is always greater than the super-adiabatic drop across the whole layer, with the result that some portions of the interior are sub-adiabatic. The excess average temperature drop across each boundary layer is due to the arrival of material from the other boundary layer which has not equilibrated with the well-mixed interior. It is this material which transfers heat conductively across the boundary and thus controls the heat transport of the layer. Internal heating breaks the symmetry of the boundary layers (as does temperature dependence of viscosity), and it is the interaction between the two boundary layers that sets the equilibrium temperature drops. The scaling of the temperature drop across each boundary layer is controlled by two competing factors which depend on the Rayleigh number in different ways: the scale of boundary layer instabilities and the velocity of plumes (hot and cold). Furthermore, these scalings change as the system becomes time-dependent at moderate Rayleigh number. At very high Rayleigh number, beyond that of most planetary mantles, the plumes do equilibrate with the interior and the textbook picture applies. A scaling theory for the

  1. Thermal perturbations caused by large impacts and consequences for mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, W. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Hager, B. H.

    2009-02-01

    We examine the effects of thermal perturbations on a convecting layer of incompressible fluid with uniform viscosity in the limit of infinite Prandtl number, for two upper boundary conditions (free- and no-slip) and heat sources (100% volumetric heating and 100% bottom heating) in 2-D Cartesian finite element simulations. Small, low-temperature perturbations are swept into nearby downflows and have almost no effect on the ambient flow field. Large, high-temperature perturbations are rapidly buoyed and flattened, and spread along the layer's upper boundary as a viscous gravity current. The spreading flow severs and displaces downwellings in its path, and also thins and stabilizes the upper thermal boundary layer (TBL), preventing new instabilities from growing until the spreading motion stops. A return flow driven by the spreading current displaces the roots of plumes toward the center of the spreading region and inhibits nascent plumes in the basal TBL. When spreading halts, the flow field is reorganized as convection reinitiates. We obtain an expression for the spreading time scale, t s , in terms of the Rayleigh number and a dimensionless perturbation temperature (Θ), as well as a size (Λ), and a condition that indicates when convection is slowed at a system-wide scale. We also describe a method for calculating the heat deposited by shock waves at the increased temperatures and pressures of terrestrial mantles, and supply estimates for projectile radii in the range 200 to 900 km and vertical incident velocities in the range 7 to 20 km s-1. We also consider potential applications of this work for understanding the history of early Mars.

  2. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomography is currently evolving towards 3D earth models that satisfy full seismic waveforms at increasingly high frequencies. This evolution is possible thanks to the advent of powerful numerical methods such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) that allow accurate computation of the seismic wavefield in complex media, and the drastic increase of computational resources. However, the production of such models requires handling complex misfit functions with more than one local minimum. Standard linearized inversion methods (such as gradient methods) have two main drawbacks: 1) they produce solution models highly dependent on the starting model; 2) they do not provide a means of estimating true model uncertainties. However, these issues can be addressed with stochastic methods that can sample the space of possible solutions efficiently. Such methods are prohibitively challenging computationally in 3D, but increasingly accessible in 1D. In previous work (Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010; Yuan et al., 2011) we developed a continental scale anisotropic upper mantle model of north America based on a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, showing the pervasive presence of layering of anisotropy in the cratonic lithosphere with significant variations in depth of the mid-lithospheric boundary. The radial anisotropy part of the model has been recently updated using the spectral element method for forward wavefield computations and waveform data from the latest deployments of USarray (Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013). However, the long period waveforms (periods > 40s) themselves only provide a relatively smooth view of the mantle if the starting model is smooth, and the mantle discontinuities necessary for geodynamical interpretation are not imaged. Increasing the frequency of the computations to constrain smaller scale features is possible, but challenging computationally, and at the risk of falling in local minima of the misfit function. In

  3. 3-D Modeling for Upper Mantle Anisotropy Beneath Idaho-Oregon (IDOR) Region Using Sks Splitting Intensity Measurements from IDOR Passive Seismic Project Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongsresawat, S.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Bremner, P. M.; Torpey, M. E.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We used data recorded at 86 broadband seismic stations of the IDOR Passive Seismic Project to determine upper mantle anisotropy across the suture along which Blue Mountain island-arc terranes accreted to North America during Cretaceous. This suture is currently associated with the Western Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), a narrow, highly-deformed ductile fault that was the locus of both dextral strike-slip along, and subduction beneath, the Paleozoic margin of the North American craton. We measured shear wave splitting intensity (SI), a seismic observable that is suitable for use in 3-D inversions of upper mantle seismic anisotropy, to determine these fabrics beneath the IDOR network. SI fast-polarization directions are spatially coherent across the region, and fall into three main groups: a group with fast azimuths trending ENE-WSW, observed at stations in eastern Oregon and the NW-SE-striking western Snake River Plain; a group with E-W trending fast azimuths observed at stations along the WISZ and the Idaho Batholith, which outcrops immediately east of the suture zone; and a group with ENE-WSW trending fast azimuths observed at stations situated in the Basin-and-Range extended region of southeastern Idaho. SI delay times range from 0.46 to 1.85 seconds, with a mean of 1.1 s. We also used backazimuthal variations of SI at all stations to invert for for 3-D anisotropic fabric using the finite-frequency approach called vectorial tomography (Chevrot and Monteiller, 2009). Our preliminary results are consistent with alignment of upper mantle fabrics in the extension direction as Basin-and-Range extension propagates northward into less-extended regions of Idaho and Oregon.

  4. Numerical studies on convective stability and flow pattern in three-dimensional spherical mantle of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Kameyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    We explore thermal convection of a fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity in a basally heated three-dimensional spherical shell using linear stability analyses and numerical experiments, while considering the application of our results to terrestrial planets. The inner to outer radius ratio of the shell f assumed in the linear stability analyses is in the range of 0.11-0.88. The critical Rayleigh number Rc for the onset of thermal convection decreases by two orders of magnitude as f increases from 0.11 to 0.88, when the viscosity depends sensitively on the temperature, as is the case for real mantle materials. Numerical simulations carried out in the range of f = 0.11-0.55 show that a thermal boundary layer (TBL) develops both along the surface and bottom boundaries to induce cold and hot plumes, respectively, when f is 0.33 or larger. However, for smaller f values, a TBL develops only on the bottom boundary. Convection occurs in the stagnant-lid regime where the root mean square velocity on the surface boundary is less than 1% of its maximum at depth, when the ratio of the viscosity at the surface boundary to that at the bottom boundary exceeds a threshold that depends on f. The threshold decreases from 106.5 at f = 0.11 to 104 at f = 0.55. If the viscosity at the base of the convecting mantle is 1020-1021 Pa s, the Rayleigh number exceeds Rc for Mars, Venus and the Earth, but does not for the Moon and Mercury; convection is unlikely to occur in the latter planets unless the mantle viscosity is much lower than 1020 Pa s and/or the mantle contains a strong internal heat source.

  5. New constraints on the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle underneath Southern Scandinavia revealed from non-linear tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Roy, C.

    2013-08-01

    We analyse travel times of shear waves, which were recorded at the MAGNUS network, to determine the 3D shear wave velocity (vS) structure underneath Southern Scandinavia. The travel time residuals are corrected for the known crustal structure of Southern Norway and weighted to account for data quality and pick uncertainties. The resulting residual pattern of subvertically incident waves is very uniform and simple. It shows delayed arrivals underneath Southern Norway compared to fast arrivals underneath the Oslo Graben and the Baltic Shield. The 3D upper mantle vS structure underneath the station network is determined by performing non-linear travel time tomography. As expected from the residual pattern the resulting tomographic model shows a simple and continuous vS perturbation pattern: a negative vS anomaly is visible underneath Southern Norway relative to the Baltic Shield in the east with a contrast of up to 4% vS and a sharp W-E dipping transition zone. Reconstruction tests reveal besides vertical smearing a good lateral reconstruction of the dipping vS transition zone and suggest that a deep-seated anomaly at 330-410 km depth is real and not an inversion artefact. The upper part of the reduced vS anomaly underneath Southern Norway (down to 250 km depth) might be due to an increase in lithospheric thickness from the Caledonian Southern Scandes in the west towards the Proterozoic Baltic Shield in Sweden in the east. The deeper-seated negative vS anomaly (330-410 km depth) could be caused by a temperature anomaly possibly combined with effects due to fluids or hydrous minerals. The determined simple 3D vS structure underneath Southern Scandinavia indicates that mantle processes might influence and contribute to a Neogene uplift of Southern Norway.

  6. 3-D multi-observable probabilistic inversion for the compositional and thermal structure of the lithosphere and upper mantle. II: General methodology and resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, J. C.; Fullea, J.; Yang, Y.; Connolly, J. A. D.; Jones, A. G.

    2013-04-01

    Here we present a 3-D multi-observable probabilistic inversion method, particularly designed for high-resolution (regional) thermal and compositional mapping of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle that circumvents the problems associated with traditional inversion methods. The key aspects of the method are as follows: (a) it exploits the increasing amount and quality of geophysical datasets; (b) it combines multiple geophysical observables (Rayleigh and Love dispersion curves, body-wave tomography, magnetotelluric, geothermal, petrological, gravity, elevation, and geoid) with different sensitivities to deep/shallow, thermal/compositional anomalies into a single thermodynamic-geophysical framework; (c) it uses a general probabilistic (Bayesian) formulation to appraise the data; (d) no initial model is needed; (e) compositional a priori information relies on robust statistical analyses of a large database of natural mantle samples; and (f) it provides a natural platform to estimate realistic uncertainties. In addition, the modular nature of the method/algorithm allows for incorporating or isolating specific forward operators according to available data. The strengths and limitations of the method are thoroughly explored with synthetic models. It is shown that the a posteriori probability density function (i.e., solution to the inverse problem) satisfactorily captures spatial variations in bulk composition and temperature with high resolution, as well as sharp discontinuities in these fields. Our results indicate that only temperature anomalies of ΔT ⪆150°C and large compositional anomalies of ΔMg# > 3 (or bulk ΔAl2O3 > 1.5) can be expected to be resolved simultaneously when combining high-quality geophysical data. This resolving power is sufficient to explore some long-standing problems regarding the nature and evolution of the lithosphere (e.g., vertical stratification of cratonic mantle, compositional versus temperature signatures in seismic

  7. a Multiple Data Set Joint Inversion Global 3d P-Velocity Model of the Earth's Crust and Mantle for Improved Seismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, S.; Begnaud, M. L.; Hipp, J. R.; Chael, E. P.; Encarnacao, A.; Maceira, M.; Yang, X.; Young, C. J.; Phillips, W.

    2013-12-01

    SALSA3D is a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle developed specifically to provide seismic event locations that are more accurate and more precise than are locations from 1D and 2.5D models. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, for the first time jointly derived from multiple types of data: body wave travel times, surface wave group velocities, and gravity. The latter two are added to provide information in areas with poor body wave coverage, and are down-weighted in areas where body wave coverage is good. To constrain the inversions, we invoked empirical relations among the density, S velocity, and P velocity. We demonstrate the ability of the new SALSA3D model to reduce mislocations and generate statistically robust uncertainty estimates for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. We obtain path-dependent travel time prediction uncertainties for our model by computing the full 3D model covariance matrix of our tomographic system and integrating the model slowness variance and covariance along paths of interest. This approach yields very low travel time prediction uncertainties for well-sampled paths through the Earth and higher uncertainties for paths that are poorly represented in the data set used to develop the model. While the calculation of path-dependent prediction uncertainties with this approach is computationally expensive, uncertainties can be pre-computed for a network of stations and stored in 3D lookup tables that can be quickly and efficiently interrogated using GeoTess software.

  8. Earthquake calamity warning from space station: orbital dynamics coupling geology mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Liu, Han-Shou

    2009-04-01

    It is not surprising that the earthquakes happened among clashing tectonic plate boundaries where numerous earthquake stations exist. Then, why do we need more? The significance of Sichuan and Tongshan earthquakes of China is a wakeup call that major earthquakes of logarithmic Richter scales beyond 7 could happen exactly within a single tectonic plate surprisingly. Thus, the previous border surveillance is broadened to areas coverage. Judging the success of archival survey of NASA with the gravitational potential by Liu et al., we review a unified earthquakes theory covering both the peripheral and the central plate in this paper, so that we can take seriously the need of a comprehensive global surveillance of natural calamity in the Space. The earth surface crust, like a kitchen kettle lid, covers tightly the melted mantle rock layer, like a pea soup cooking in the kettle. Given the time they will all become bubbling, rattling & shaking, known as the Bernard instability. This instability is ubiquitous for any liquid state matter being heated from below, if and only if it has a real positive thermal expansion coefficient. Likewise, the earth mantle is being cooked from below by an enormously hot fireball of the size of a moon. The heat comes from the radioactive decay confined within the core over eon's age. Due to the enormous gravitation attraction being always real positive and additive, the inner core is bifurcated into 2 regimes, a heat-melted liquid metal regime, where the earth magnetic field is produced and predicted by Faraday induction law. And further inside there exists a tightly squeezed solid metal ball regime, due to the gigantic weight compression, as confirmed by sonar experiments. The complexity of earth Bernard instability is due to the extra rotational Coriolis force that makes the up-down thermal convection side-way, creating the mass imbalance and permitting in-situ measurements feasible at a distance.

  9. Effect of partial melting on small scale convection atop a mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.; Gonzalez, A.

    2014-12-01

    A lithospheric plate passing atop a mantle plume is likely to be thermally thinned or "rejuvenated". Geophysical data on the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth beneath active hotspots partly validate this prediction, but there is a large variation of the LAB upwelling estimated from different methods. Numerical simulations of plume-lithosphere interactions show that the development of small-scale convection (SSC) in the plume pancake spreading out along the base of the lithosphere is a mechanism able to rejuvenate the lithosphere, even for a fast-moving plate. The triggering of SSC has been shown to depend on the rheological behaviour of the unstable layer underlying the stagnant upper part of the thermal boundary layer (TBL), but the stability of the this layer may also be affected by partial melting.We analyze, using a 2D petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical model, the influence of partial melting on the dynamics of time-dependent SSC instabilities and the resulting rejuvenation of a lithosphere passing atop a mantle plume. These models show a complex behavior, with either an acceleration, no change or a slight decceleration of the SSC onset, due to the competing effects of the latent heat of melting, which cools the plume material, and of the buoyancy increase associated with melting, among which the dominant effect is the depletion in heavy elements of the solid fraction. The viscosity reduction, though significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) is too localized to affect the SSC dynamics. Despite the presence of partial melting, the mechanical lithosphere erosion in not enhanced significantly relatively to melt-free models.

  10. 3-D Modeling of Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Temperature and Concentration Fields Coupling via Materials Properties Dependence and via Double Diffusive Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the HgCdTe growth by the vertical Bridgman method was performed using FIDAP finite element code. Double-diffusive melt convection is analyzed, as the primary factor at controls inhomogeneity of the solidified material. Temperature and concentration fields in the model are also coupled via material properties, such as thermal and solutal expansion coefficients with the dependence on both temperature and concentration, and melting temperature evaluation from pseudobinary CdTe-HgTe phase diagram. Experimental measurements were used to obtain temperature boundary conditions. Parametric study of the melt convection dependence on the gravity conditions was undertaken. It was found, that the maximum convection velocity in the melt can be reduced under certain conditions. Optimal conditions to obtain a near flat solidified interface are discussed. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D calculations are compared with previous 2- D findings. A video film featuring 3-D melt convection will be presented.

  11. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from high-order accurate numerical simulations in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupathi, S.; Schiemenz, A. R.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.; Hesthaven, J.

    2013-12-01

    The style and mode of melt migration in the mantle are important to the interpretation of basalts erupted on the surface. Both grain-scale diffuse porous flow and channelized melt migration have been proposed. To better understand the mechanisms and consequences of melt migration in a heterogeneous mantle, we have undertaken a numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling and viscously deformable mantle where solubility of pyroxene increases upwards. Our setup is similar to that described in [1], except we use a larger domain size in 2D and 3D and a new numerical method. To enable efficient simulations in 3D through parallel computing, we developed a high-order accurate numerical method for the magma dynamics problem using discontinuous Galerkin methods and constructed the problem using the numerical library deal.II [2]. Linear stability analyses of the reactive dissolution problem reveal three dynamically distinct regimes [3] and the simulations reported in this study were run in the stable regime and the unstable wave regime where small perturbations in porosity grows periodically. The wave regime is more relevant to melt migration beneath the mid-ocean ridges but computationally more challenging. Extending the 2D simulations in the stable regime in [1] to 3D using various combinations of sustained perturbations in porosity at the base of the upwelling column (which may result from a viened mantle), we show the geometry and distribution of dunite channel and high-porosity melt channels are highly correlated with inflow perturbation through superposition. Strong nonlinear interactions among compaction, dissolution, and upwelling give rise to porosity waves and high-porosity melt channels in the wave regime. These compaction-dissolution waves have well organized but time-dependent structures in the lower part of the simulation domain. High-porosity melt channels nucleate along nodal lines of the porosity waves, growing downwards. The wavelength scales

  12. Electromagnetic mini arrays (EMMA project). 3D modeling/inversion for mantle conductivity in the Archaean of the Fennoscandian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, M. Yu.; Korja, T.; Pedersen, L. B.

    2009-04-01

    Two electromagnetic arrays are used in the EMMA project to study conductivity structure of the Archaean lithosphere in the Fennoscandian Shield. The first array was operated during almost one year, while the second one was running only during the summer time. Twelve 5-components magnetotelluric instruments with fluxgate magnetometers recorded simultaneously time variations of Earth's natural electromagnetic field at the sites separated by c. 30 km. To better control the source field and to obtain galvanic distortion free responses we have applied horizontal spatial gradient (HSG) technique to the data. The study area is highly inhomogeneous, thus classical HSG might give erroneous results. The method was extended to include anomalous field effects by implementing multivariate analysis. The HSG transfer functions were then used to control static shift distortions of apparent resistivities. During the BEAR experiment 1997-2002, the conductance map of entire Fennoscandia was assembled and finally converted into 3D volume resistivity model. We have used the model, refined it to get denser grid around measurement area and calculated MT transfer functions after 3D modeling. We have used trial-and-error method in order to further improve the model. The data set was also inverted using 3D code of Siripunvaraporn (2005). In the first stage we have used homogeneous halfspace as starting model for the inversion. In the next step we have used final 3D forward model as apriori model. The usage of apriori information significantly stabilizes the inverse solution, especially in case of a limited amount of data available. The results show that in the Archaean Domain a conductive layer is found in the upper/middle crust on contrary to previous results from other regions of the Archaean crust in the Fennoscandian Shield. Data also suggest enhanced conductivity at the depth of c. 100 km. Conductivity below the depth of 200-250 km is lower than that of the laboratory based estimates

  13. Linear analysis on the onset of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids with variable physical properties: Implications for the mantle convection of super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    A series of our linear analysis on the onset of thermal convection was applied to that of highly compressible fluids in a planar layer whose thermal conductivity and viscosity vary in space, in order to study the influences of spatial variations in physical properties expected in the mantles of massive terrestrial planets. The thermal conductivity and viscosity are assumed to exponentially depend on depth and temperature, respectively, while the variations in thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity and reference density) with depth are taken to be relevant for the super-Earths with 10 times the Earth's. Our analysis demonstrated that the nature of incipient thermal convection is strongly affected by the interplay between the adiabatic compression and spatial variations in physical properties of fluids. Owing to the effects of adiabatic compression, a `stratosphere' can occur in the deep mantles of super-Earths, where a vertical motion is insignificant. An emergence of `stratosphere' is greatly enhanced by the increase in thermal conductivity with depth, while it is suppressed by the decrease in thermal expansivity with depth. In addition, by the interplay between the static stability and strong temperature dependence in viscosity, convection cells tend to be confined in narrow regions around the `tropopause' at the interface between the `stratosphere' of stable stratification and the `troposphere' of unstable stratification. We also found that, depending on the variations in physical properties, two kinds of stagnant regions can separately develop in the fluid layer. One is well-known `stagnant-lids' of cold and highly viscous fluids, and the other is `basal stagnant regions' of hot and less viscous fluids. The occurrence of `basal stagnant regions' may imply that convecting motions can be insignificant in the lowermost part of the mantles of massive super-Earths, even in the absence of strong increase in viscosity with pressure (or depth).

  14. Influence of Intrusive vs. Extrusive Magmatism on Venus' Tectonics and long-term Mantle Evolution: 2D and 3D Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Here we extend the numerical convection models of Venus models of [1], which included melting, magmatism, decaying heat-producing elements, core cooling, realistic temperature-dependent viscosity and either stagnant lid or episodic lithospheric overturn. In [1] it was found that for stagnant lid convection the dominant mode of heat loss is magmatic heat pipe, which requires massive magmatism and produces very thick, cold crust, inconsistent with observations. In contrast, episodic lid overturn interspersed by periods of quiescence effectively loses Venus's heat while giving lower rates of volcanism and a thinner crust. Calculations predict 5-8 overturn events over Venus's history, each lasting ˜150 Myr, initiating in one place and then spreading globally. Venus-like amplitudes of topography and geoid can be produced in either stagnant or episodic modes, with a viscosity profile that is Earth-like but shifted to higher values. Here we extend [1] by considering intrusive magmatism as an alternative to the purely extrusive magmatism previously assumed. Intrusive magmatism warms and weakens the crust, resulting in substantial surface deformation and a thinner crust. This is further enhanced by using a basaltic rheology for the crust instead of assuming the same rheological parameters as for the mantle. In some cases massive intrusive magmatism can even lead to episodic lithospheric overturn events without plastic yielding. Here we quantitatively analyse the resulting surface deformation and other signatures, and compare to observations in order to constrain the likely ratio of intrusive to extrusive magmatism. [1] Armann, M., and P. J. Tackley (2012), Simulating the thermochemical magmatic and tectonic evolution of Venus's mantle and lithosphere: Two-dimensional models, J. Geophys. Res., 117, E12003, doi:10.1029/2012JE004231.

  15. Effect of width, amplitude, and position of a core mantle boundary hot spot on core convection and dynamo action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Wieland; Wicht, Johannes; Hori, Kumiko

    2015-12-01

    Within the fluid iron cores of terrestrial planets, convection and the resulting generation of global magnetic fields are controlled by the overlying rocky mantle. The thermal structure of the lower mantle determines how much heat is allowed to escape the core. Hot lower mantle features, such as the thermal footprint of a giant impact or hot mantle plumes, will locally reduce the heat flux through the core mantle boundary (CMB), thereby weakening core convection and affecting the magnetic field generation process. In this study, we numerically investigate how parametrised hot spots at the CMB with arbitrary sizes, amplitudes, and positions affect core convection and hence the dynamo. The effect of the heat flux anomaly is quantified by changes in global flow symmetry properties, such as the emergence of equatorial antisymmetric, axisymmetric (EAA) zonal flows. For purely hydrodynamic models, the EAA symmetry scales almost linearly with the CMB amplitude and size, whereas self-consistent dynamo simulations typically reveal either suppressed or drastically enhanced EAA symmetry depending mainly on the horizontal extent of the heat flux anomaly. Our results suggest that the length scale of the anomaly should be on the same order as the outer core radius to significantly affect flow and field symmetries. As an implication to Mars and in the range of our model, the study concludes that an ancient core field modified by a CMB heat flux anomaly is not able to heterogeneously magnetise the crust to the present-day level of north-south asymmetry on Mars. The resulting magnetic fields obtained using our model either are not asymmetric enough or, when they are asymmetric enough, show rapid polarity inversions, which are incompatible with thick unidirectional magnetisation.

  16. Determination of sub-lithospheric stress due to mantle convection using GOCE gradiometric data over Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Romeshkani, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    Sub-lithospheric stress due to mantle convection can be determined from gravimetric data based on Runcorn's theory. In this paper, the satellite gradiometric data of the recent European satellite mission, the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) is used to determine the sub-lithospheric stress locally in Iran. The method of S function (SF) with numerical differentiation is developed further and an integral equation connecting satellite gradiometric data to SF is presented. The integral equation will be used to invert the real gradiometric data of GOCE to recover the SF. Later on, the sub-lithospheric shear stresses, which are the northward and eastward derivatives of the SF, are computed numerically. Our numerical results show that the mean squares error of the recovered SF is smaller than the values of the SF meaning that the recovery process is successful. Also, the recovered stress has a good agreement with the tectonic boundaries and active seismic points of the world stress map (WSM) database. This stress reaches amplitude of 100 MPa in the territory.

  17. 3-D multiobservable probabilistic inversion for the compositional and thermal structure of the lithosphere and upper mantle. I: a priori petrological information and geophysical observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, J. C.; Fullea, J.; Griffin, W. L.; Yang, Y.; Jones, A. G.; D. Connolly, J. A.; O'Reilly, S. Y.

    2013-05-01

    of natural mantle samples collected from different tectonic settings (xenoliths, abyssal peridotites, ophiolite samples, etc.). This strategy relaxes more typical and restrictive assumptions such as the use of local/limited xenolith data or compositional regionalizations based on age-composition relations. We demonstrate that the combination of our ρ(m) with a L(m) that exploits the differential sensitivities of specific geophysical observables provides a general and robust inference platform to address the thermochemical structure of the lithosphere and sublithospheric upper mantle. An accompanying paper deals with the integration of these two functions into a general 3-D multiobservable Bayesian inversion method and its computational implementation.

  18. Fingering convection induced by atomic diffusion in stars: 3D numerical computations and applications to stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskova, Varvara; Garaud, Pascale; Deal, Morgan; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2014-11-10

    Iron-rich layers are known to form in the stellar subsurface through a combination of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Their presence, nature, and detailed structure can affect the excitation process of various stellar pulsation modes and must therefore be modeled carefully in order to better interpret Kepler asteroseismic data. In this paper, we study the interplay between atomic diffusion and fingering convection in A-type stars, as well as its role in the establishment and evolution of iron accumulation layers. To do so, we use a combination of three-dimensional idealized numerical simulations of fingering convection (which neglect radiative transfer and complex opacity effects) and one-dimensional realistic stellar models. Using the three-dimensional simulations, we first validate the mixing prescription for fingering convection recently proposed by Brown et al. (within the scope of the aforementioned approximation) and identify what system parameters (total mass of iron, iron diffusivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.) play a role in the overall evolution of the layer. We then implement the Brown et al. prescription in the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code to study the evolution of the iron abundance profile beneath the stellar surface. We find, as first discussed by Théado et al., that when the concurrent settling of helium is ignored, this accumulation rapidly causes an inversion in the mean molecular weight profile, which then drives fingering convection. The latter mixes iron with the surrounding material very efficiently, and the resulting iron layer is very weak. However, taking helium settling into account partially stabilizes the iron profile against fingering convection, and a large iron overabundance can accumulate. The opacity also increases significantly as a result, and in some cases it ultimately triggers dynamical convection. The direct effects of radiative acceleration on the dynamics of fingering convection (especially in the

  19. Fingering Convection Induced by Atomic Diffusion in Stars: 3D Numerical Computations and Applications to Stellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Varvara; Garaud, Pascale; Deal, Morgan; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    Iron-rich layers are known to form in the stellar subsurface through a combination of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Their presence, nature, and detailed structure can affect the excitation process of various stellar pulsation modes and must therefore be modeled carefully in order to better interpret Kepler asteroseismic data. In this paper, we study the interplay between atomic diffusion and fingering convection in A-type stars, as well as its role in the establishment and evolution of iron accumulation layers. To do so, we use a combination of three-dimensional idealized numerical simulations of fingering convection (which neglect radiative transfer and complex opacity effects) and one-dimensional realistic stellar models. Using the three-dimensional simulations, we first validate the mixing prescription for fingering convection recently proposed by Brown et al. (within the scope of the aforementioned approximation) and identify what system parameters (total mass of iron, iron diffusivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.) play a role in the overall evolution of the layer. We then implement the Brown et al. prescription in the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code to study the evolution of the iron abundance profile beneath the stellar surface. We find, as first discussed by Théado et al., that when the concurrent settling of helium is ignored, this accumulation rapidly causes an inversion in the mean molecular weight profile, which then drives fingering convection. The latter mixes iron with the surrounding material very efficiently, and the resulting iron layer is very weak. However, taking helium settling into account partially stabilizes the iron profile against fingering convection, and a large iron overabundance can accumulate. The opacity also increases significantly as a result, and in some cases it ultimately triggers dynamical convection. The direct effects of radiative acceleration on the dynamics of fingering convection (especially in the

  20. Mixing in mantle convection models with self-consistent plate tectonics and melting and crustal production: Application to mixing in the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    It is generally thought that the early Earth's mantle was hotter than today, which using conventional convective scalings should have led to vigorous convection and mixing. Geochemical observations, however, suggest that mixing was not as rapid as would be expected, leading to the suggestion that early Earth had stagnant lid convection (Debaille et al., EPSL 2013). Additionally, the mantle's thermal evolution is difficult to explain using conventional scalings because early heat loss would have been too rapid, which has led to the hypothesis that plate tectonics convection does not follow the conventional convective scalings (Korenaga, GRL 2003). One physical process that could be important in this context is partial melting leading to crustal production, which has been shown to have the major effects of buffering mantle temperature and carrying a significant fraction of the heat from hot mantle (Nakagawa and Tackley, EPSL 2012), making plate tectonics easier (Lourenco et al., submitted), and causing compositional differentiation of the mantle that can buffer core heat loss (Nakagawa and Tackley, GCubed 2010). Here, the influence of this process on mantle mixing is examined, using secular thermo-chemical models that simulate Earth's evolution over 4.5 billion years. Mixing is quantified both in terms of how rapidly stretching occurs, and in terms of dispersion: how rapidly initially close heterogeneities are dispersed horizontally and vertically through the mantle. These measures are quantified as a function of time through Earth's evolution. The results will then be related to geochemically-inferred mixing rates.

  1. Convection experiments in a centrifuge and the generation of plumes in a very viscous fluid. [for earth mantle models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nataf, H.-C.; Hager, B. H.; Scott, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, experiments are described for which inertial effects are negligible. A small aspect-ratio tank filled with a very viscous fluid (Pr = 10 to the 6th) is used to observe the behavior of convection for Rayleigh numbers up to 6.3 x 10 to the 5th. These high values are reached by conducting the experiment in a centrifuge which provides a 130-fold increase in apparent gravity. Rotational effects are small, but cannot be totally dismissed. In this geometry, thermal boundary layer instabilities are indeed observed, and are found to be very similar to their lower Prandtl number counterparts. It is tentatively concluded that once given a certain degree of 'vulnerability' convection can develop 'plume' like instabilities, even when the Prandtl number is infinite. The concept is applied to the earth's mantle and it is speculated that 'plumes' could well be the dominant mode of small-scale convection under the lithospheric plates.

  2. Crustal and upper mantle 3D shear wave velocity structure of the High Lava Plains, Oregon, determined from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Hedgecock, S.; Wagner, L.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of inversions for 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon using data from ~300 broadband stations of the High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA). The High Lava Plains (HLP) is a WNW progressive silicic volcanism, initiated ~14.5 Ma near the Owyhee Plateau and is currently active at the Newberry caldera. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic track is temporally contemporaneous with the HLP, but trends to the northeast, parallel to North American plate motion. The cause of volcanism along the HLP is debated and has been variously attributed to Basin and Range extension, back-arc extension, rollback of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and an intra-continental hotspot/plume source. Additionally the relationship between the HLP, YSRP, and Columbia River Basalts (CRB), the three major post-17Ma intracontinental volcanic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, is not well understood. The 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle to ~65km depth is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh wave ambient noise phase velocity maps at periods up to 40s. The use of ambient noise tomography with the dense station spacing of the combined High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) datasets allows the shallow structure of the High Lava Plains to be imaged in finer detail than previous ANT studies that focused on the entire western United States. In the crust, low velocities in central Oregon are observed in association with the Brothers Fault Zone, Jordan and Diamond Craters and Steens Mountain regions in addition to the strong low velocity zone associated with the Cascades to the west. To the east of the HLP, low velocities are observed to about 10km depth in the western SRP. In the eastern SRP we observe a shallow veneer of low velocities underlain by a ~10km thick high velocity

  3. 3-D patterns and volumes of decompression melting fueled by asthenospheric flow: comparison and interaction of shear-driven upwelling with small-scale convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Conrad, C. P.; Harmon, N.; Bianco, T. A.; Smith, E. I.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanism far from plate boundaries is typically ascribed to mantle plumes. Related hotspot melting can indeed explain a wide range of observations at a fair number of age-progressive volcano lineaments. Various other sites of intraplate volcanism, however, such as in the western US and the south Pacific, require alternative explanations, for which candidates are asthenospheric flow and lithospheric cracking. While cracking mechanisms presume abundant metastable melt in the asthenosphere, upward flow in the asthenosphere can generate significant amounts of decompression melting to support intraplate volcanism. Shear-driven upwellings (SDU) arise from rheological heterogeneity in the asthenosphere, a configuration that can redirect vigorous horizontal shearing into localized upwellings. Thermally-driven instabilities (small-scale convection, or SSC) develop at the base of cool and relatively thick lithosphere. It has been shown that areas with abundant non-hotspot volcanism indeed statistically correlate with regions of large asthenospheric shear [Conrad et al., 2011, see URL below]. In three-dimensional thermochemical numerical simulations, we investigate the relevance of SDU and SSC for mantle melting and intraplate volcanism. Depending on ambient mantle viscosity, plate thickness, asthenospheric shear, as well as the geometry and viscosity contrast of rheological heterogeneity (i.e., low-viscosity pockets), either SDU or SSC dominates asthenospheric flow and decompression melting. SDU is promoted over SSC by high viscosities, young plates, high shear, as well as wide, shallow, and strongly contrasting heterogeneity. Once melting initiates, it is amplified through the positive feedback effects of melt buoyancy (buoyant melting instability, or BMI), and lubrication. However, degrees of melting are effectively capped by stiffening of the residue upon melt and water extraction. In some cases, the dominance of SDU over SSC or vice-versa is transient, since

  4. Calibration of 3D Upper Mantle Structure in Eurasia Using Regional and Teleseismic Full Waveform Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara Romanowicz; Mark Panning

    2005-04-23

    Adequate path calibrations are crucial for improving the accuracy of seismic event location and origin time, size, and mechanism, as required for CTBT monitoring. There is considerable information on structure in broadband seismograms that is currently not fully utilized. The limitations have been largely theoretical. the development and application to solid earth problems of powerful numerical techniques, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM), has opened a new era, and theoretically, it should be possible to compute the complete predicted wavefield accurately without any restrictions on the strength or spatial extent of heterogeneity. This approach requires considerable computational power, which is currently not fully reachable in practice. We propose an approach which relies on a cascade of increasingly accurate theoretical approximations for the computation of the seismic wavefield to develop a model of regional structure for the area of Eurasia located between longitudes of 30 and 150 degrees E, and latitudes of -10 to 60 degrees North. The selected area is particularly suitable for the purpose of this experiment, as it is highly heterogeneous, presenting a challenge for calibration purposes, but it is well surrounded by earthquake sources and, even though they are sparsely distributed, a significant number of high quality broadband digital stations exist, for which data are readily accessible through IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) and the FDSN (Federation of Digital Seismic Networks). The starting models used will be a combination of a-priori 3D models recently developed for this region, combining various geophysical and seismological data, and a major goal of this study will be to refine these models so as to fit a variety of seismic waveforms and phases.

  5. Quantifying melt production and degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges from global mantle convection models with plate motion history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingming; Black, Benjamin; Zhong, Shijie; Manga, Michael; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Olson, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The Earth's surface volcanism exerts first-order controls on the composition of the atmosphere and the climate. On Earth, the majority of surface volcanism occurs at mid-ocean ridges. In this study, based on the dependence of melt fraction on temperature, pressure, and composition, we compute melt production and degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges from three-dimensional global mantle convection models with plate motion history as the surface velocity boundary condition. By incorporating melting in global mantle convection models, we connect deep mantle convection to surface volcanism, with deep and shallow mantle processes internally consistent. We compare two methods to compute melt production: a tracer method and an Eulerian method. Our results show that melt production at mid-ocean ridges is mainly controlled by surface plate motion history, and that changes in plate tectonic motion, including plate reorganizations, may lead to significant deviation of melt production from the expected scaling with seafloor production rate. We also find a good correlation between melt production and degassing rate beneath mid-ocean ridges. The calculated global melt production and CO2 degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges varies by as much as a factor of 3 over the past 200 Myr. We show that mid-ocean ridge melt production and degassing rate would be much larger in the Cretaceous, and reached maximum values at ˜150-120 Ma. Our results raise the possibility that warmer climate in the Cretaceous could be due in part to high magmatic productivity and correspondingly high outgassing rates at mid-ocean ridges during that time.

  6. Temporal and Spatial Scales of Sub-Continental Mantle Convection: Comparison of Modern and Geological Observations of Dynamic Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. M.; Lovell, B.; Crosby, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    The topographies of Africa and Antarctica form patterns of interlocking swells. The admittance between swell topography and free-air gravity indicates that these swells are dynamically supported by mantle convection, with swell diameters of 1850±450 km and full heights between 800 and 1800 m. The implication is that mantle convection not only supports swells surrounding hotspots but also influences topography across the entire surface areas of Africa and Antarctica. Topographic swells and associated gravity anomalies with diameters over 1000 km are observed on other continents and throughout the oceans. Numerical models support the idea that dynamically supported swell topography is a worldwide phenomenon. We investigate whether dynamically supported swells are also observed throughout the geological record, focussing on intensively studied Mesozoic- Cenozoic sedimentary rocks around Britain and Ireland. Since 200 Ma, this region was affected by three dynamically supported swells that peaked during the Middle Jurassic, Early Cretaceous and Eocene (c. 175, 146 and 56 Ma), each several thousand kilometres in diameter, and the region now lies on the edge of the modern swell centred on Iceland. The diameters and maximum heights of the Mesozoic British swells and the modern African and Antarctic swells are similar. The ancient British swells grew in 5--10 Myr and decayed over 20--30 Myr, suggesting vertical motion rates comparable to those estimated from geomorphological studies of Africa. Igneous production rate and swell height are not correlated in the modern and the geological records. Vertical motions of Britain and Ireland, a typical piece of continental lithosphere far from a destructive plate boundary, have been demonstrably affected by convective support for over half of the past 200 Ma period. Mantle convection should be considered as a common control on regional sea-level at time periods from 10s down to 1 Myr or less, and with vertical motion rates in the

  7. Localization of toroidal motion and shear heating in 3-D high Rayleigh number convection with temperature-dependent viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandar, S.; Yuen, D. A.; Reuteler, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have applied spectral-transform methods to study three-dimensional thermal convection with temperature-dependent viscosity. The viscosity varies exponentially with the form exp(-BT), where B controls the viscosity contrast and T is temperature. Solutions for high Rayleigh numbers, up to an effective Ra of 6.25 x 10(exp 6), have been obtained for an aspect-ratio of 5x5x1 and a viscosity contrast of 25. Solutions show the localization of toroidal velocity fields with increasing vigor of convection to a coherent network of shear-zones. Viscous dissipation increases with Rayleigh number and is particularly strong in regions of convergent flows and shear deformation. A time-varying depth-dependent mean-flow is generated because of the correlation between laterally varying viscosity and velocity gradients.

  8. A global 3D P-Velocity model of the Earth%3CU%2B2019%3Es crust and mantle for improved event location.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sanford; Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Young, Christopher John; Chang, Marcus C.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D (SAndia LoS Alamos) version 1.4, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is > 55%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model

  9. Rheological transition in mantle convection with a composite temperature-dependent, non-Newtonian and Newtonian rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Den Berg, Arie P.; Yuen, David A.; Van Keken, Peter E.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations of mantle convection with a composite temperature-dependent, Newtonian and non-Newtonian creep law have revealed a transition in the dominant creep mechanism with the increasing vigour of convection. Newtonian creep is found to dominate in the low Rayleigh number regime. With sufficiently high effective Rayleigh number, the overall creep mechanism in the convective flow becomes non-Newtonian. The transitional Rayleigh number increases strongly with the activation energy. These results would suggest a scenario that in the early epochs of Earth the flow in the mantle would have been governed by non-Newtonian rheology and would have exhibited both strong spatial and temporal fluctuations. With time the flow mechanism would behave like a Newtonian fluid and would have a different time-dependent character. In time-dependent Newtonian-dominated flows there are still localized features with distinctly non-Newtonian character. Our analysis of the relative contributions to the lateral viscosity field supports the idea that the inference of the nature of lateral viscosity heterogeneities by seismic tomography may be strongly contaminated by the dominant non-Newtonian contributions to the total lateral viscosity field.

  10. Mixing in the transition to strong turbulence in infinite Prandtl number thermal convection as applied to the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, David A.; Langenberger, Sherri E.; Hansen, Ulrich

    1991-05-01

    Recently there has developed a great deal of interest in the transition to hard turbulence in thermal convection. This transition and the corresponding hard turbulence regime has been the subject of laboratory and numerical experiments. Our study of convection at high Rayleigh numbers (Ra) has been motivated by the phenomenon of subsolidus mantle convection, whose Ra may range between 5×105 and O(108), depending on the still uncertain estimates of the lower-mantle viscosity. We have conducted a series of calculations at Ra spanning between 5×105 and 108 because we are interested in the transition from weak to strong turbulence in mantle convection and the effects this transition would have on mixing. We have employed a two-dimensional finite-element method, combined with an implicit, predictor-corrector, time-stepping scheme to advance the evolutionary temperature equation. The biharmonic equation for the streamfunction is solved exactly by a variational equation at each time step. We present direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional, high Ra thermal convection for constant property fluids with both base-heated and partially internally heated configurations in large-aspect-ratio boxes (up to 10). We will emphasize the importance of visualization of these strongly time-dependent results, as they present a formidable challenge in the management and analysis of the data. First, an adequate resolution of the boundary layer and mixing layer requires high resolution. In our large (10) aspect-ratio box runs we have employed around 27 000 unevenly spaced elements, resulting in about 105 unknowns per time step. Each run goes up to between 105 and 106 time steps in order to get many overturns of the dominant cells. We will present videos displaying the evolution of the physical fields, in particular the temperature and vorticity fields, which give a vivid portrayal of the mixing dynamics. Visualization is a handy medium for illustrating and also for discovering the

  11. A Two Colorable Fourth Order Compact Difference Scheme and Parallel Iterative Solution of the 3D Convection Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ge, Lixin; Kouatchou, Jules

    2000-01-01

    A new fourth order compact difference scheme for the three dimensional convection diffusion equation with variable coefficients is presented. The novelty of this new difference scheme is that it Only requires 15 grid points and that it can be decoupled with two colors. The entire computational grid can be updated in two parallel subsweeps with the Gauss-Seidel type iterative method. This is compared with the known 19 point fourth order compact differenCe scheme which requires four colors to decouple the computational grid. Numerical results, with multigrid methods implemented on a shared memory parallel computer, are presented to compare the 15 point and the 19 point fourth order compact schemes.

  12. What causes the large extensions of red supergiant atmospheres?. Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1D hydrostatic, 3D convection, and 1D pulsating model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Scholz, M.; Freytag, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Wood, P. R.; Abellan, F. J.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: This research has two main goals. First, we present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants (RSGs), increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. Methods: We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of the RSGs V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 in the near-infrared K-band (1.92-2.47 μm) with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution (R ~ 1500). To categorize and comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3D convection, and new 1D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Results: Our near-infrared flux spectra of V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict the large observed extensions of molecular layers, most remarkably in the CO bands. Likewise, the 3D convection models and the 1D pulsation models with typical parameters of RSGs lead to compact atmospheric structures as well, which are similar to the structure of the hydrostatic PHOENIX models. They can also not explain the observed decreases in the visibilities and thus the large atmospheric molecular extensions. The full sample of our RSGs indicates increasing observed atmospheric extensions with increasing luminosity and decreasing surface gravity, and no correlation with effective temperature or variability amplitude. Conclusions: The location of our RSG sources in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is confirmed to be consistent with the red limits of recent evolutionary tracks

  13. Stress Coupling Relationship between Mantle Convection and Seismogenic Layer in Southeastern Tibetan Plateau and its Geodynamic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, H.

    2015-12-01

    The lithospheric stress states and interlayer coupling interaction is of great significant in studying plate driven mechanism and seismogenic environment. The coupling relationship between mantle convection generated drag stress in the lithospheric base and seismogenic layer stress in the crust represents the lithospheric mechanical coupling intensity level. We calculate the lithospheric bottom mantle convection stress field of the southeastern Tibetan Plateau using 11~36 spherical harmonic coefficients of gravity model EGM2008. Meanwhile we collect and organize the focal mechanism of 1131 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to now in Sichuan-Yunnan region. The current seismogenic layer stress and stress field before Lushan earthquake are calculated by the damping regional stress tensor inversion. We further analyze the correlation between the two kinds of stress fields, then discuss the relation between mechanics coupling situation and strong earthquakes in different regions. The results show that: (1) Most of Sichuan-Yunnan region is located in the coupling and decoupling intermediate zone. Coupling zones distribute on the basis of block, the eastern South China block has strong coupling, and the coupling phenomenon also exists in parts of the northern Tibet block, Balyanlkalla block in the northwest and southwest Yunnan block. The decoupling mainly occurs in Songpan-Ganzi block, connecting with the strong coupling South China block and Longmenshan fault zone is their boundary. (2) We have analyzed seismogenic mechanism, then proposed the border zone of strong and weak coupling relation between mantle convection stress and seismogenic layer stress exists high seismic risk. The current coupling situation shows that Longmenshan fault zone is still in the large varying gradient area of coupling intensity level, it has conditions to accumulate energy and develop earthquakes. Other dangerous areas are: Mingjiang, Xianshuihe, Anninghe, Zemuhe, the Red River, Nantinghe

  14. Two-Body Convection in the Mantle of the Earth: E/W Asymmetry, Under Astronomically Determined Tilt in g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostrom, R. C.

    2002-12-01

    Under purely geocentric gravity, over time displacement under mantle convection is globally symmetrical, resulting in zero net lithosphere rotation. The effect is here explored of substituting the asymmetric Earth-Moon field, gconv, prevalent in actuality. The gravity responsible for mantle convection is defined as the vector sum of a vertical component and the day-averaged attraction of masses lagging tidal equilibrium. The increasingly accurately measured lunar recession may then be used to delimit the internal field in terms of the secular luni-tidal interval of the Earth as a whole, some 600 seconds [1], without having to identify tidal components i.e. separate marine from body tides. In context the astronomic phase-lag may be viewed as a global isostatic anomaly, in which the longitude circles marking Earth's gravimetric figure are located east of those describing its perpetually unattained equilibrium figure by some 89 km at the Equator. Reference the hydrostatic ellipsoid gconv is tilted by the astronomically delimited amount, albeit that the phase lag is attributable in part to the convection itself. As with the convection, the tectonic significance of its asymmetry is determinable geodetically. Using present art-state a strategically located GPS grid [2] would provide continuously more precise separation of the asymmetric component of surface displacement. In developing plate-motion models including members of the Nuvel series, it would be logical to follow up rather than discard the set permitting minor asymmetrical convection sans net torque, such as an element of net-lithosphere-rotation relative to plumes. To conserve system angular-momentum, this may be the only valid set. Characteristics of the convection to be expected accord with 'paradoxical' features of plate tectonics under purely radial gravity, including: difficulty in closing plate-motion circuits; net-lithosphere-rotation refce. hot-spots, sans net torque; geotectonic maps ranging from

  15. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  16. Model of the Arctic evolution since the Cretaceous to present, based on upper mantle convection linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2015-04-01

    The present paper comprises a model of Arctic basin evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. The model is based on the mechanism of upper mantle substance circulation beneath the Arctic lithosphere linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction. Seismic tomography data obtained for the Pacific-Eurasia-Arctic joint area indicate that Pacific lithosphere slab sinking to the mantle in subduction zone transforms into the horizontal layer upon reaching the upper mantle foot, this layer extending for two or more thousands km beneath the Eurasian continent. This pattern of seismic tomography indicates the presence of a horizontal convective cell where a flow of substance moving along the upper mantle foot from a subduction zone into the continent is compensated by a return flow moving along the lithosphere foot towards the subduction zone. The return mantle flow makes continental lithosphere extension, giving rise to processes of rifting, magmatism and spreading. The convective cell being continuously supplied with new substance which is transported through the subduction zone it is sure to expand horizontally. The above cell expansion occurs first, due to ocean ward movement of subduction zone (roll back) and secondly, due to the cell front propagation into the continent. The given model allows to understand main features for the Arctic evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. Numerous seismic profiling data obtained for shelf and deep water sedimentary basins in the Arctic Ocean as well as on land geological investigation reveal that since Aptian up to present the Arctic region has been characterized by sublatitudinal lithosphere extension. This extension is explained by the effect the return mantle flow related to the subduction of the Northern part of the Pacific plate acts on the Arctic lithosphere foot. The model shows the phenomenon of Arctic plume to be caused by the convective cell uprising flow. In fact lower horizontal flow of convective cell moving

  17. Modelling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul J.

    2008-12-01

    Here it is documented how an existing code for modelling mantle convection in a cartesian domain, Stag3D, has been converted to model a 3D spherical shell by using the recently introduced yin-yang grid. StagYY is thus the latest evolution of a code that has been in continuous use and development for about 15 years so incorporates much physics and several features including compressibility, phase transitions, compositional variations, non-linear rheology, parallelisation, tracers to track composition, partial melting and melt migration, and the ability to also model spherical patches, cartesian boxes, and various 2D geometries by changing one input switch. StagYY uses a multigrid solver to obtain a velocity-pressure solution at each timestep on a staggered grid, a finite-volume scheme for advection of temperature and tracers to track composition. Convergence of multigrid solvers in the presence of realistically large viscosity variations has always been a problem; here a new pressure interpolation scheme is presented that can dramatically improve the robustness of the iterations to large viscosity variations, with up to 19 orders of magnitude variation in presented tests. Benchmark tests show that StagYY produces results that are consistent with those produced by other codes. Performance tests show reasonable scaling on a parallel Beowulf cluster up to 64 CPUs, with up to 1.2 billion unknowns solved for in a few minutes. StagYY is designed to be a stand-alone application with no libraries required and if MPI is installed it can be run in parallel. Technical issues and goals for the future are discussed.

  18. The earth's geoid and the large-scale structure of mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Mark A.; Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that most of the earth's low-degree geoid power is derived from density heterogeneity in the lower mantle. Much of the remaining geoid power is due to high-density slabs in active subduction zones. The compensated topography and lithospheric or crustal thickness variations contribute significantly to the observed geoid only for harmonic degrees greater than or equal to 6.

  19. Multi-Scale Dynamics and Rheology of Mantle Convection with Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisic, Laura

    Fundamental issues in our understanding of plate and mantle dynamics remain unresolved, including the rheology and state of stress of plates and slabs; the coupling between plates, slabs and mantle; the small-scale dynamics in subduction zones; the flow around slabs; and the cause of rapid changes in plate motions. To address these questions, models of global mantle flow with plates are computed using adaptive finite elements, and compared to a variety of observational constraints. These dynamically consistent instantaneous models include a composite rheology with yielding, and incorporate details of the thermal buoyancy field. Around plate boundaries, the local mesh size is 1 km, which allows us to study highly detailed features in a globally consistent framework. Models that best fit plateness criteria and plate motion data have strong slabs with high viscosities around 1024 Pa s, and stresses of ~100 MPa. We find a strong dependence of global plate motions, trench rollback, net rotation, plateness, and strain rate on the stress-exponent in the nonlinear viscosity. Due to significant coupling between plates, slabs, and the surrounding mantle, the presence of lower mantle anomalies affect plate motions. The flow in and around slabs, microplate motion, and trench rollback are intimately linked to the amount of yielding in the subducting slab hinge, slab morphology, and the presence of high viscosity structures in the lower mantle beneath the slab. The lateral flow around slabs is generally trench-perpendicular, induced by the strongly coupled downward motion of the subducting slabs, and therefore our models do not account for the trench-parallel flow inferred from shear-wave splitting analysis. Flow models before and after the plate reorganization around 50 Ma are not able to reproduce the rapid change in Pacific plate motion from northwest to west that is associated with the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, despite a nonlinear rheology and the incorporation of

  20. Local Recovery of Sub-crustal Stress Due to Mantle Convection from Satellite-to-satellite Tracking Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šprlák, Michal; Eshagh, Mehdi

    2016-08-01

    Two integral transformations between the stress function, differentiation of which gives the meridian and prime vertical components of the sub-crustal stress due to mantle convection, and the satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) data are presented in this article. In the first one, the SST data are the disturbing potential differences between twin-satellites and in the second one the line-of-sight (LOS) gravity disturbances. It is shown that the corresponding integral kernels are well-behaving and therefore suitable for inversion and recovery of the stress function from the SST data. Recovery of the stress function and the stress components is also tested in numerical experiments using simulated SST data. Numerical studies over the Himalayas show that inverting the disturbing potential differences leads to a smoother stress function than from inverting LOS gravity disturbances. Application of the presented integral formulae allows for recovery of the stress from the satellite mission GRACE and its planned successor.

  1. Variations in timing of lithospheric failure on terrestrial planets due to chaotic nature of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Teresa; Solomatov, Viatcheslav S.

    2016-05-01

    We perform numerical simulations of lithospheric failure in the stagnant lid regime of temperature-dependent viscosity convection, using the yield stress approach. We find that the time of failure can vary significantly for the same values of the controlling parameters due to the chaotic nature of the convective system. The general trend of the dependence of the time of lithospheric failure on the yield stress can be explained by treating lithospheric failure as a type of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This study suggests that it is important to address not only the question of whether plate tectonics can occur on a planet but also when it would occur if conditions are favorable.

  2. Decreasing µ142Nd Variation in the Archean Convecting Mantle from 4.0 to 2.5 Ga: Heterogeneous Domain Mixing or Crustal Recycling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, A. D.; Debaille, V.

    2014-12-01

    The 146Sm-142Nd (t1/2=68 Ma) chronometer can be used to examine silicate differentiation in the first 400 Ma of Earth history. Early fractionation between Sm and Nd is recorded in cratonic Archean rocks in their 142Nd/144Nd ratios that that deviate up to ±20 ppm, or μ142Nd - ppm deviation relative to the present-day convecting mantle at 0. These values likely record early extraction of incompatible trace element (ITE) enriched material with -μ142Nd, either as crust or late stage residual melt from a magma ocean, and resulting in a complimentary ITE depleted residual mantle with +μ142Nd. If this early-formed ITE-enriched material was re-incorporated rapidly back into the convecting mantle, both ITE-enriched and ITE-depleted mantle domains would have been established in the Hadean. Alternatively, if it was early-formed crust that remained stable it could have slowly eroded and progressively remixed into the convecting mantle as subducted sediment during the Archean. Each of these scenarios could potentially explain the decrease in the maximum variation in µ142Nd from ±20 at 4.0 Ga to 0 at 2.5 Ga [1,2,3]. In the scenario where these variations reflect mixing of mantle domains, this implies long mantle mixing times of greater than 1 Ga in the Archean in order to preserve the early-formed heterogeneities. This can be achieved in a stagnant lid tectonic regime in the Archean with sporadic and short subduction cycles [2]. This scenario would also indicate that mixing times in the convecting mantle were much slower than the previously proposed 100 Ma in the Hadean and Archean. In the alternative scenario, sediment with -µ142Nd was progressively mixed into the mantle via subduction in the Archean [3]. This scenario doesn't require slow mantle mixing times or a stagnant-lid regime. It requires crustal resident times of up to 750 Ma to maintain a steady supply of ancient sediment recycling over the Archean. Each of these scenarios evoke very contrasting conditions for

  3. Combining Mantle Convection Modeling With Gravity and Topography Spectra to Constrain the Dynamic Evolution of the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolf, T.; Werner, S. C.; Steinberger, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    From some perspective the terrestrial planets of our Solar System appear very similar, for instance in their bulk composition and the differentiation in core, silicate mantle and crust. However, from other perspectives they appear significantly different, perhaps most strikingly in their current tectonic mode: while Earth is the only planet with currently ongoing plate tectonics, Venus is likely to be in a regime of episodic resurfacing. Mars features the stagnant lid mode and so might Mercury, if its mantle is still undergoing large-scale convection at all. Understanding the similarities and differences in the dynamic evolution of the different planets can thus provide important information about the conditions needed to initialize and maintain plate tectonics and shed light on the question why Earth is unique in this respect. Reliable constraints for planets other than Earth are difficult to make and are mostly limited to the planetary surface. However, measuring a planet's gravity field provides one, though not unique, way to constrain the internal structure of a planet. Additionally, the planet's moment of inertia factor and surface topography may help to limit the number of possible structures. All of these, moment of inertia, gravity and topography are reasonably well known for the terrestrial planets from various satellite missions. Here, we use such measurements to constrain the radial structure of the planetary mantles. Dynamic forward modeling is then used to analyze the different evolutions and dynamic features that cause the inferred structures and the resulting geoid and topography spectra to evolve. Using dynamic models also enables us to estimate the role of lateral variations, particularly in viscosity. In this first step, we focus on a comparison between the Earth and Venus.

  4. Innovative radar products for the 3D, high-resolution and real-time monitoring of the convective activity in the airspace around airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabary, P.; Bousquet, O.; Sénési, S.; Josse, P.

    2009-09-01

    Airports are recognized to become critical areas in the future given the expected doubling in air traffic by 2020. The increased density of aircrafts in the airport airspaces calls for improved systems and products to monitor in real-time potential hazards and thus meet the airport objectives in terms of safety and throughput. Among all meteorological hazards, convection is certainly the most impacting one. We describe here some innovative radar products that have recently been developed and tested at Météo France around the Paris airports. Those products rely on the French Doppler radar network consisting today of 24 elements with some of them being polarimetric. Reflectivity and Doppler volumetric data are concentrated from all 24 radar sites in real-time at the central level (Toulouse) where 3D Cartesian mosaics covering the entire French territory (i.e. a typical 1,000 by 1,000 km² area) are elaborated. The innovation with respect to what has been done previously is that the three components of the wind are retrieved by operational combination of the radial velocities. The final product, available in real-time every 15 minutes with a spatial resolution of 2.5 km horizontally and 500 m vertically, is a 3D grid giving the interpolated reflectivity and wind field (u, v and w) values. The 2.5 km resolution, arising from the fact that the retrieval is carried out every 15 minutes from radars typically spaced apart by 150 km, is not sufficient for airport airspace monitoring but is valuable for en-route monitoring. Its extension to the entire European space is foreseen. To address the specific needs in the airport areas, a downscaling technique has been proposed to merge the above-mentioned low-resolution 3D wind and reflectivity fields with the high resolution (5 minutes and 1 km²) 2D imagery of the Trappes radar that is the one that covers the Paris airports. The merging approach is based on the assumption that the Vertical Profile of Reflectivity (i.e. the

  5. Seismic Tomography of the Arctic: Continental Cratons, Ancient Orogens, Oceanic Lithosphere and Convecting Mantle Beneath (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral variations in seismic velocities in the upper mantle, mapped by seismic tomography, reflect primarily the variations in the temperature of the rock at depth. Seismic tomography thus reveals lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere; it maps deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and with different age of the lithosphere. Our new global, shear-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle and the crust is constrained by an unprecedentedly large number of broadband waveform fits (nearly one million seismograms, with both surface and S waves included) and provides improved resolution of the lithosphere across the whole of the Arctic region, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to 150-200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The northern boundaries of the Canadian Shield's and Greenland's cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with the Greenland and North American cratons clearly separated from each other. In Eurasia, in contrast, cratonic lithosphere extends hundreds of kilometres north of the coast of the continent, beneath the Barents and eastern Kara Seas. The boundaries of the Archean cratons mapped by tomography indicate the likely offshore extensions of major Phanerozoic sutures in northern Eurasia. The old oceanic lithosphere of the Canada Basin is much colder and thicker than the younger lithosphere beneath the adjacent Amundsen Basin, north of the Gakkel Ridge. Beneath the slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, we detect the expected low-velocity anomaly associated with partial melting in the uppermost mantle; the anomaly is weaker, however, than beneath faster-spreading ridges globally. South of the ridge, the Nansen Basin shows higher seismic velocities in the upper mantle beneath it, compared to the Amundsen Basin. At 150-250 km depth, most of the oceanic portions of the central Arctic (the

  6. Pattern and evolution of the 3-D subduction-induced mantle flow in the laboratory: from generic models to case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strak, Vincent; Schellart, Wouter P.

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional self-evolving subduction models have been quantitatively analysed in the laboratory by means of a stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (sPIV) technique. The purpose is (1) to provide information on the pattern of the quasi-toroidal mantle flow induced by subduction, particularly focusing on the location and magnitude of upwellings, and (2) to study the evolution of mantle upwellings in terms of location and magnitude. These generic models simulating a narrow subduction zone of ~750 km wide indicate that 4 types of upwelling are generated by subduction in a Newtonian mantle. One of these upwellings occurs laterally away from the sub-slab domain and is of high magnitude, suggesting that it could potentially trigger decompression melting, thereby producing intraplate volcanism. Another set of experiments has been performed to investigate how slab width controls the pattern of mantle flow. Crucial points to study are (1) how the lateral extent of the slab controls the position and magnitude of mantle upwellings located laterally away from the sub-slab domain, and (2) what is the relationship between slab width and the extent of the toroidal-component cells. We tested slab widths ranging from narrow (e.g., Calabria) to wider (e.g., Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi) subduction zones. The models show that both the magnitude of the upwelling occurring laterally away from the sub-slab domain and the extent of the toroidal-component of mantle flow increase non-linearly with increasing slab width.

  7. Local heat transfer estimation in microchannels during convective boiling under microgravity conditions: 3D inverse heat conduction problem using BEM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, S.; LeNiliot, C.

    2008-11-01

    Two-phase and boiling flow instabilities are complex, due to phase change and the existence of several interfaces. To fully understand the high heat transfer potential of boiling flows in microscale's geometry, it is vital to quantify these transfers. To perform this task, an experimental device has been designed to observe flow patterns. Analysis is made up by using an inverse method which allows us to estimate the local heat transfers while boiling occurs inside a microchannel. In our configuration, the direct measurement would impair the accuracy of the searched heat transfer coefficient because thermocouples implanted on the surface minichannels would disturb the established flow. In this communication, we are solving a 3D IHCP which consists in estimating using experimental data measurements the surface temperature and the surface heat flux in a minichannel during convective boiling under several gravity levels (g, 1g, 1.8g). The considered IHCP is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem and solved using the boundary element method (BEM).

  8. A parameterized model for the evolution of isotopic heterogeneities in a convecting system. [for earth mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, F. M.; Daly, S. F.; Nataf, H.-C.

    1982-01-01

    It is experimentally shown that, although steady convective flows are efficient means to heterogeneity within a single cell, they do not produce a dispersal of heterogeneous material over scales that are large by comparison to their depth, which requires that the flow be time-dependent on a time scale comparable to the overturn time. Convection in an internally heated layer does possess this property, and numerical solutions are presently used to study the way in which it disperses a set of neutrally bouyant particles initially confined to a small space. The derived concept of effective diffusivity is applied to the isotopic evolution of the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systems, with spatial variations generated by horizontal variations in degree of melting 1.8 billion years ago.

  9. Chemical Exchange Between the Core and the Convecting Mantle of the Earth: Evidence from Highly Siderophile Elements (HSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G.; Palme, H.; Kratz, K. L.

    1995-09-01

    , and Au with a slightly modified neutron activation analysis in combination with a NiS extraction method [16]. All samples (except peridotitic xenoliths) have essentially unfractionated patterns (except Pd/Ir) despite significant variations in absolute abundances [17]. Os/Re ratios from massive peridotitic rocks from Zabargad are chondritic. Peridotitic xenoliths generally have Os/Re-ratios much higher than the chondritic ratio [2]. The Pd/Ir ratios from all studied peridotites are approximately two times and the Rh/Ir ratios are approximately 1.5 times higher than the chondritic ratio of 1.21 and 0.29, respectively. This is in qualitative agreement with estimates of Pd and Ir in primitive undepleted mantle [1]. The non-chondritic Pd/Ir and Rh/Ir ratios is either the result of Pd and Rh addition or these elements are not quantitatively removed from the mantle in the process of core formation [10]. Extrapolation of experimentally determined palladium and iridium metal/silicate partition coefficients to 3500 K are 3.8x10^3 and 2x10^8, respectively [18,19]. The observed non-chondritic ratio of Ir to Pd in the upper mantle is in qualitative agreement with experimentally determined metal/silicate partition coefficients for Ir and Pd. This could support recent speculation on the possibility of chemical exchange between the outer liquid shell of the core and the convecting mantle of the Earth. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by DFG. References: [1] Morgan J. W. (1986) JGR, 91, 12375-12387. [2] Morgan J. W. et al. (1981) Tectonophys., 75, 47-67. [3] Anders E. (1968) Acc. Chem. Res., 1, 289-298. [4] Turekian K. K. and Clark S. P. (1969) EPSL, 6, 346-348. [5] Kimura K. et al. (1974) GCA, 38, 683-701. [6] Ganapathy R. and Anders E. (1974) Proc. LPSC. [7] Chou C.-L. (1978) Proc. LPSC 9th, 219-230. [8] Jagoutz E. et al. (1979) Proc. LPSC 10th, 2031-2050. [9] Wanke H. (1981) Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, A303, 287-302. [10] Jones J. H. and Drake M. J. (1986) Nature, 322

  10. Mantle dynamics following supercontinent formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.

    explored in over 600 2D and over 20 3D numerical simulations to better understand how modelling method affects conclusions on mantle convection studies. The results from this thesis show that the failure to model tectonic plates, a high vigour of convection, and a (pseudo) temperature-dependent viscosity would distort the role of mantle plumes, continent insulation, and subduction in the thermal evolution of mantle dynamics.

  11. Different Tectonic Styles in a Self-Consistent Mantle Convection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.

    2002-12-01

    By using a complex rheology in a three-dimensional numerical convection model, we are able to explain, in a self-consistent manner, some features of the surface behaviour of various terrestrial planets. With a temperature-, stress- and pressure-dependent viscosity, the plate-like behaviour of the Earth appears for small yield stresses, the episodic behaviour of Venus for intermediate values, and the stagnant lid convection of Mars and Mercury is found at high yield stresses. This last regime is, for an asymptotical value of the yield stress, identical to purely thermoviscous convection. In the episodic regime, the subduction is faster than the conductive cooling from above, leading to an intermittent behaviour. But in the Earth-like regime we have smoothly evolving extended plates. Due to the slow subduction, we have slowly moving plates. Furthermore, we find cylindrical upwellings, sheetlike downwellings and trench migration. The transitions to the different regimes as well as some diagnostical values (surface velocity, boundary-plate ratio, toroidal-poloidal ratio) are strongly influenced by the rheological parameters used. For example, we find that for a high amount of internal heating and a strongly depth-dependent thermal expansivity the stagnant lid regime exists over a wide range of yield stresses. In general we find, that the surface velocity, for example, decreases with stronger depth dependance but increases with a higher amount of internal heating or a higher Rayleigh number.

  12. Constraining central Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructions with mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlich, Rainer; Colli, Lorenzo; Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Schuberth, Bernhard; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2016-09-01

    A striking feature of the Indian Ocean is a distinct geoid low south of India, pointing to a regionally anomalous mantle density structure. Equally prominent are rapid plate convergence rate variations between India and SE Asia, particularly in Late Cretaceous/Paleocene times. Both observations are linked to the central Neo-Tethys Ocean subduction history, for which competing scenarios have been proposed. Here we evaluate three alternative reconstructions by assimilating their associated time-dependent velocity fields in global high-resolution geodynamic Earth models, allowing us to predict the resulting seismic mantle heterogeneity and geoid signal. Our analysis reveals that a geoid low similar to the one observed develops naturally when a long-lived back-arc basin south of Eurasia's paleomargin is assumed. A quantitative comparison to seismic tomography further supports this model. In contrast, reconstructions assuming a single northward dipping subduction zone along Eurasia's margin or models incorporating a temporary southward dipping intraoceanic subduction zone cannot sufficiently reproduce geoid and seismic observations.

  13. Eclogite xenoliths from the Lace kimberlite, Kaapvaal craton: From convecting mantle source to palaeo-ocean floor and back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, S.; Viljoen, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Major- and trace-element compositions of eclogite and pyroxenite xenoliths of ≥2.5 Ga age (in situ Pb-Pb data on clinopyroxene) from the Lace kimberlite on the Kaapvaal craton were investigated in order to constrain: (1) the nature and evolution of their protoliths; (2) the extent to which they preserve information on the state of the asthenospheric mantle source that gave rise to their low-pressure protoliths; and (3) the effect of their deep recycling on the radiogenic isotope evolution of the convecting mantle. Their elemental relationships are consistent with low-pressure fractionation of olivine ± plagioclase and clinopyroxene during oceanic crust formation, whereby the residual melt was enriched in rare-earth elements (REE), high field-strength elements and Y, producing inverse correlations of ΣREE with the size of Eu- and Sr-anomalies. LREE-depletion may indicate loss of on average 20% of a partial melt upon subduction and metamorphism (eclogitisation) of oceanic crust, which did not, however, contribute to juvenile growth of continental crust. The eclogites have median Sm/Nd (0.40) and Lu/Hf (0.27) similar to Depleted Mantle, and lower U/Pb (0.02) and Th/Pb (0.02). If deeply subducted, these rocks cannot explain unradiogenic Nd and Hf, and radiogenic Pb isotope compositions in the sources of some modern ocean island basalts. Low incompatible trace-element contents similar to picrites, and Yb concentrations at a given TiO2 content similar to modern MORB, indicate derivation of the protoliths by average melt fractions of ∼ 0.20- 0.25 that left a spinel peridotite residue at pressures ≤2.5 to 3.0 GPa. This shallow intersection of the peridotite solidus suggests moderate Archaean ambient mantle potential temperatures of ≤1420 to 1470 °C. Samples filtered for clinopyroxene fractionation and metasomatism have V/Sc (4.7 ± 1.2; n = 11) indicating lower fO2 (-1.9 relative to the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer = ΔFMQ) than modern MORB. This is in part

  14. Shear wave splitting hints at dynamical features of mantle convection: a global study of homogeneously processed source and receiver side upper mantle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpole, J.; Wookey, J. M.; Masters, G.; Kendall, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The asthenosphere is embroiled in the process of mantle convection. Its viscous properties allow it to flow around sinking slabs and deep cratonic roots as it is displaced by intruding material and dragged around by the moving layer above. As the asthenosphere flows it develops a crystalline fabric with anisotropic crystals preferentially aligned in the direction of flow. Meanwhile, the lithosphere above deforms as it is squeezed and stretched by underlying tectonic processes, enabling anisotropic fabrics to develop and become fossilised in the rigid rock and to persist over vast spans of geological time. As a shear wave passes through an anisotropic medium it splits into two orthogonally polarised quasi shear waves that propagate at different velocities (this phenomenon is known as shear wave splitting). By analysing the polarisation and the delay time of many split waves that have passed through a region it is possible to constrain the anisotropy of the medium in that region. This anisotropy is the key to revealing the deformation history of the deep Earth. In this study we present measurements of shear wave splitting recorded on S, SKS, and SKKS waves from earthquakes recorded at stations from the IRIS DMC catalogue (1976-2010). We have used a cluster analysis phase picking technique [1] to pick hundreds of thousands of high signal to noise waveforms on long period data. These picks are used to feed the broadband data into an automated processing workflow that recovers shear wave splitting parameters [2,3]. The workflow includes a new method for making source and receiver corrections, whereby the stacked error surfaces are used as input to correction rather than a single set of parameters, this propagates uncertainty information into the final measurement. Using SKS, SKKS, and source corrected S, we recover good measurements of anisotropy beneath 1,569 stations. Using receiver corrected S we recover good measurements of anisotropy beneath 470 events. We compare

  15. Interaction of mantle plume heads with the earth's surface and onset of small-scale convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, R. W.; Campbell, I. H.

    1991-10-01

    The interaction of a mantle plume head with the earth's surface was examined by studying the behavior of a spherical blob of a buoyant fluid under the effect of gravity which forces it toward either a rigid horizontal boundary or a free surface. In the experiments, buoyant spheres of diapir fluid having no surface tension and extremely small Reynolds numbers but diameters as large as are practical in the laboratory were injected into wide cylindrical tanks filled with viscous (nu = 149 sq cm/sec) glucose syrup. Experimental results are presented for the thinning and lateral spreading of the bouyant fluid and for the thinning of the squeeze layer for both the case of a rigid, nonslip boundary (a rigid Perspex lid) and that of a free surface. These are compared with similarity scaling laws based on a balance between the buoyancy of the diapir and the viscous stresses in the diapir's surroundings.

  16. Lithospheric deformation and mantle/crust coupling related to slab roll-back and tearing processes: the role of magma-related rheological weakening highlighted by 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, Armel; Jolivet, Laurent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Sternai, Pietro; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Active convergent margins are the locus of various large-scale lithospheric processes including subduction, back-arc opening, lithospheric delamination, slab tearing and break-off. Coexistence of such processes results in a complex lithospheric deformation pattern through the rheological stratification of the overriding lithosphere. In this context, another major feature is the development of an intense arc- and back-arc-related magmatism whose effects on lithospheric deformation by rheological weakening are largely unknown. Quantifying this magma-related weakening effect and integrating the three-dimensional (3D) natural complexity of subduction system is however challenging because of the large number of physico-chemical processes involved (e.g. heat advection, dehydration of subducted material, partial melting of the mantle wedge). We present here a set of 3D high-resolution petrological and thermo-mechanical numerical experiments to assess the role of low-viscosity magmatic phases on lithospheric deformation associated with coeval oceanic and continental subduction, followed by slab retreat and tearing processes. Results in terms of crustal kinematics, patterns of lithospheric deformation and distribution and composition of magmatic phases are then compared to a natural example displaying a similar geodynamical evolution: the eastern Mediterranean subduction zone. Our modeling results suggest that the asthenospheric flow controls the ascending trajectories of mantle-derived magmatic sources developed in the mantle wedge in response to dehydration of oceanic slab. Once stored at the base of the overriding continental crust, low-viscosity mantle- and crustal-derived magmatic phases allow to decrease the lithospheric strength. This weakening then enhances the propagation of localized extensional and strike-slip deformation in response to slab roll-back and extrusion tectonics respectively. In addition, we show that storage of large amounts of low-viscosity magmas

  17. Recent upper mantle structure beneath Siberia and surrounding areas according to a seismic tomography and numerical thermogravitational convection modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushenkova, N.; Chervov, V.; Koulakov, I.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the interaction between the recent lithosphere structure and dynamics of the upper mantle beneath a big segment of Asia. This study is based on the results of seismic tomography using travel times from the ISC catalog (1964-2007) and numerical thermogravitational modeling. The model contains thick lithosphere blocks of the Siberian Craton, the Tarim plate, and remnant parts of the Mongol-Tuva microcontinent. These blocks are alternated with weaker younger lithosphere corresponding to the West-Siberian plate, orogenic belts in southern Siberia and the Arctic shelves to the north. In the tomography part, we have updated a previously published model by Koulakov and Bushenkova (2010) based on a larger dataset including reflected PP and teleseismic P travel times from global catalogues. The lithosphere thickness has been estimated based on seismic anomalies at 250 km depth according to a technique described in (Bushenkova et al., 2008). These estimates were used to define the lithosphere thickness which is then implemented for setting the boundary conditions in numerical modeling and for joint interpretation of the final results. When computing the mantle dynamics, we consider the viscosity which is depends from temperature and pressure. Calculations are performed in the spherical coordinates. To minimize the boundary effects and to take into account the effect of the outside features, we considerably enlarged the calculation area by including the Russian, North- and South China Cratons and the Indian Plate. The modeling results demonstrate formation of steady ascending flows caused by overheating under the cratons (the average temperature of the upper mantle under a craton increases to ~100°) and descending flows on their periphery. The ascending flows spread along the bottom of the cratonic lithosphere and propagate towards its edges which cause smaller-scale convection cells nearly the borders of the cratons. The computed temperature distribution is

  18. On the ever-changing morphology of mantle convection and Low-Seismic Velocity Provinces: the interplay between plate tectonics and compositional heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, A.; Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Besse, J.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomographic images shows the existence of two large low-velocity provinces (LLSVP) in the deep mantle, separated by rings of subduction. The pattern of current mantle convection seems therefore organized in two main "boxes". Geochemistry and mineral physics further show that LLSVP material consists of remnants of primitive material as well as subducted plates. Moreover, reconstructions suggest that large igneous provinces in the last 250 Myr were mainly issued from the edges of the two LLSVP. The question is then whether the number and geometry of LLSVPs have been steady over longer time scales. We carried out laboratory experiments of convection in a compositionally heterogeneous mantle, using complex rheology fluids (a mixture of silica colloidal suspensions and glycerol, showing Newtonian to visco-elasto-plastic to brittle behavior as a function of temperature, water or salt content). Initially a layer of denser material was deposited at the bottom of the tank, so that thermochemical convection, producing plumes, dense piles and/or oscillating thermo-chemical domes, could develop. Because of the complex rheology, true continuous plate tectonics was produced at the surface, with asymmetric subduction of denser plates. Rayleigh numbers characterizing the intensity of thermal convection ranged between 106 and 109, and the buoyancy ratio B (compositional density over thermal density anomalies) characterizing the degree of heterogeneity of the mantle bottom ranged between 0 and 5. These heterogeneities were due to the initial denser material but also to part of the subducted material. In all cases, we observed several scales of convection with a cold network of downwelling slabs defining several cells. Within each cells, several hot instabilities could develop. Strong thermochemical plumes were observed preferentially to develop on the edges of the cells, while domes would develop inside the cells. For B > 0.5, the denser material could persist for several

  19. A hypothesis for Proterozoic-Phanerozoic supercontinent cyclicity, with implications for mantle convection, plate tectonics and Earth system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenholm, Mikael; Scherstén, Anders

    2015-11-01

    relation to mantle convection and Earth system evolution.

  20. An Analytic Parameterized Thermal Convection Model Predicting Multiple Convective Regimes and Transition Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, J. W.; O'Connell, R. J.; Höink, T.

    2010-12-01

    Plates and mantle convection experience resistance to motion due to deformation associated with subduction. Parameterized models for thermal convection have attempted to incorporate this through the addition of a plate bending dissipation term in the energy balance (e.g. Conrad and Hager [1999, 2001]). However, these models assume that the plate velocity is approximately equal to the mantle flow velocity. This assumption loses validity for non-isoviscous convection. It leads to unreasonably high dissipation rates for plate bending in cases of strongly temperature dependent viscosity in which a sluggish or stagnant lid exists above a rapidly convecting mantle. We present an analytic parameterized model for thermal convection with a finite-strength plate and depth-dependent viscosity. The model allows for a convective flow in which the plate velocity can become small compared to mantle flow velocities. Our model predicts the plate velocity, plate thickness and heat flow, as well as the laterally averaged horizontal flow profile for a convective cell. The model reproduces the classic scaling laws when the plate is weak and the mantle isoviscous. The presence of an asthenosphere in our model allows for the asthenospheric flow channelization observed by Höink and Lenardic [2010]. Furthermore, our model is able to reproduce the plate velocity and flow profiles from their 2D and 3D numerical convection simulations. We find that the introduction of a strong plate has a significant impact on the behavior of the system. Solutions predicted by our model span several convective regimes: the mobile-lid, sluggish-lid and near stagnant-lid regimes. For some model parameters (mantle temperature, viscosities, material properties, etc) multiple solutions can occur. The existence of multiple solutions suggests that the system can move between states and/or that the convective state of the system is history dependent. Preliminary comparisons with 3D spherical numerical simulations

  1. Numerical modeling of convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction in big mantle wedge: Implications for the destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lijuan

    2014-04-01

    The deep subduction of the Pacific Plate underneath East Asia is thought to have played a key role in the destruction of the North China Craton (NCC). To test this hypothesis, this paper presents a new 2-D model that includes an initial stable equilibrated craton, the formation of a big mantle wedge (BMW), and erosion by vigorous mantle convection. The model shows that subduction alone cannot thin the cold solid craton, but it can form a low-viscosity BMW. The amount of convective erosion is directly proportional to viscosity within the BMW (η0bmw), and the rheological boundary layer thins linearly with decreasing log10(η0bmw), thereby contributing to an increase in heat flow at the lithospheric base. This model also differs from previous modeling in that the increase in heat flow decays linearly with t1/2, meaning that the overall thinning closely follows a natural log relationship over time. Nevertheless, convection alone can only cause a limited thinning due to a minor increase in basal heat flow. The lowering of melting temperature by peridotite-melt interaction can accelerate thinning during the early stages of this convection. The two combined actions can thin the craton significantly over tens of Myr. This modeling, combined with magmatism and heat flow data, indicates that the NCC evolution has involved four distinct stages: modification in the Jurassic by Pacific Plate subduction and BMW formation, destruction during the Early Cretaceous under combined convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction, extension in the Late Cretaceous, and cooling since the late Cenozoic.

  2. 3-D Modeling of Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe Growth Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical calculation for a non-dilute alloy solidification was performed using the FIDAP finite element code. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. Estimates of convection contributions for various gravity conditions was performed parametrically. For gravity levels higher then 1 0 -7 of earth's gravity it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by factor of 50% for precise orientation of the ampoule in the microgravity environment. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D modeling are compared with previous 2-D finding. A video film featuring melt convection will be presented.

  3. Retrodicting the Cenozoic evolution of the mantle: Implications for dynamic surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro; Rowley, David; Simmons, Nathan; Grand, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography is the essential starting ingredient for constructing realistic models of the mantle convective flow and for successfully predicting a wide range of convection-related surface observables. However, the lack of knowledge of the initial thermal state of the mantle in the geological past is still an outstanding problem in mantle convection. The resolution of this problem requires models of 3-D mantle evolution that yield maximum consistency with a wide suite of geophysical constraints. Quantifying the robustness of the reconstructed thermal evolution is another major concern. We have carried out mantle dynamic simulations (Glišović & Forte, EPSL 2014) using a pseudo-spectral solution for compressible-flow thermal convection in 3-D spectral geometry that directly incorporate: 1) joint seismic-geodynamic inversions of mantle density structure with constraints provided by mineral physics data (Simmons et al., GJI 2009); and 2) constraints on mantle viscosity inferred by inversion of a suite of convection-related and glacial isostatic adjustment data sets (Mitrovica & Forte, EPSL 2004) characterised by Earth-like Rayleigh numbers. These time-reversed convection simulations reveal how the buoyancy associated with hot, active upwellings is a major driver of the mantle-wide convective circulation and the changes in dynamic topography at the Earth's surface. These simulations reveal, for example, a stable and long-lived superplume under the East Pacific Rise (centred under the Easter and Pitcairn hotspots) that was previously identified by Rowley et al. (AGU 2011, Nature in review) on the basis of plate kinematic data. We also present 65 Myr reconstructions of the Reunion plume that gave rise to the Deccan Traps.

  4. Impact of Phase Change Kinetics on the Mariana Slab Within the Framework of 2-D Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.; Yoshioka, S.; Torii, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies of high pressure and high temperature experiments indicate that metastable olivine might persist in a cold core of a slab due to the low rate of reaction of olivine to wadsleyite phase transformation. These experimental results correlate with recent seismological observations that a metastable olivine wedge may survive up to a depth of 630 km in the Mariana slab. To study the problem of a non-equilibrium phase transformation in detail, we developed a 2D Cartesian numerical code which incorporates self-consistently transition kinetic effects into a thermo-mechanical convection model. The kinetics of the 410-km olivine to wadsleyite and the 660-km ringwoodite to Pv+Mw phase transformations, including effects of water content at the 410-km phase boundary and latent heat release (respectively absorption), are taken into account. The results show a positive correlation for some of the controlling parameter with respect to the size of the metastable olivine wedge: A thicker and deeper metastable olivine wedge is obtainable by a higher dip angle, a faster subduction velocity, an older slab age, and/or by less water content of the subducting mantle lithosphere. The effects of latent heat release is enhanced with increasing depth; heating of about 100 °C occurs when olivine transforms into wadsleyite at depths deeper than 550 km. We also attempted to explain the recent seismological observations, by calculating the temperature and phase structures in the Mariana slab. Assuming an age of 150 Myr and a subducting velocity of 10 cm/yr for the Mariana slab, a grain-boundary nucleated reaction for the olivine to wadsleyite transformation and a water content of 700 wt. ppm, the metastable olivine wedge survives to a depth of 630 km, which is in good agreement with the seismological observation and available experimental data. This suggests that the Mariana slab is relatively dry. Furthermore, assuming that depression of the 660-km discontinuity by ~ 20-30 km

  5. A 3-d modeling approach for studying the formation, maintenance, and decay of Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) cirrus associated with deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henz, D.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Smith, E. A.

    2009-04-01

    This study is being conducted to examine the distribution, variability, and formation-decay processes of TTL cirrus associated with tropical deep convection using the University of Wisconsin Non-Hydrostatic modeling system (NMS). The experimental design is based on Tripoli, Hack and Kiehl (1992) which explicitly simulates the radiative-convective equilibrium of the tropical atmosphere over extended periods of weeks or months using a 2D periodic cloud resolving model. The experiment design includes a radiation parameterization to explicitly simulate radiative transfer through simulated crystals. Advanced Microphysics Prediction System (AMP) will be used to simulate microphysics by employing SHIPS (Spectral Habit Ice Prediction System) for ice, SLiPS (Spectral Liquid Prediction System) for droplets, and SAPS (Spectral Aerosol Prediction System) for aerosols. The period of integration is 1 month enough to achieve a radiative equilibrium. The purpose of this study is to determine the relative contributions of Deep convection outflow versus local radiation-aerosol interactions to the formation of the cirrus observed in the TTL. On going studies also consider the role of gravity waves shed by convective towers and their role in TTL cirrus formation and maintenance.

  6. Local Discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) Method for Advection of Active Compositional Fields with Discontinuous Boundaries: Demonstration and Comparison with Other Methods in the Mantle Convection Code ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Billen, M. I.; Puckett, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Flow in the Earth's mantle is driven by thermo-chemical convection in which the properties and geochemical signatures of rocks vary depending on their origin and composition. For example, tectonic plates are composed of compositionally-distinct layers of crust, residual lithosphere and fertile mantle, while in the lower-most mantle there are large compositionally distinct "piles" with thinner lenses of different material. Therefore, tracking of active or passive fields with distinct compositional, geochemical or rheologic properties is important for incorporating physical realism into mantle convection simulations, and for investigating the long term mixing properties of the mantle. The difficulty in numerically advecting fields arises because they are non-diffusive and have sharp boundaries, and therefore require different methods than usually used for temperature. Previous methods for tracking fields include the marker-chain, tracer particle, and field-correction (e.g., the Lenardic Filter) methods: each of these has different advantages or disadvantages, trading off computational speed with accuracy in tracking feature boundaries. Here we present a method for modeling active fields in mantle dynamics simulations using a new solver implemented in the deal.II package that underlies the ASPECT software. The new solver for the advection-diffusion equation uses a Local Discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) algorithm, which combines features of both finite element and finite volume methods, and is particularly suitable for problems with a dominant first-order term and discontinuities. Furthermore, we have applied a post-processing technique to insure that the solution satisfies a global maximum/minimum. One potential drawback for the LDG method is that the total number of degrees of freedom is larger than the finite element method. To demonstrate the capabilities of this new method we present results for two benchmarks used previously: a falling cube with distinct buoyancy and

  7. Local Discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) Method for Advection of Active Compositional Fields with Discontinuous Boundaries: Demonstration and Comparison with Other Methods in the Mantle Convection Code ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. K.; Armada, L. T.; Yeh, Y. C.; Bacolcol, T. C.; Dimalanta, C. B.; Doo, W. B.; Liang, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Flow in the Earth's mantle is driven by thermo-chemical convection in which the properties and geochemical signatures of rocks vary depending on their origin and composition. For example, tectonic plates are composed of compositionally-distinct layers of crust, residual lithosphere and fertile mantle, while in the lower-most mantle there are large compositionally distinct "piles" with thinner lenses of different material. Therefore, tracking of active or passive fields with distinct compositional, geochemical or rheologic properties is important for incorporating physical realism into mantle convection simulations, and for investigating the long term mixing properties of the mantle. The difficulty in numerically advecting fields arises because they are non-diffusive and have sharp boundaries, and therefore require different methods than usually used for temperature. Previous methods for tracking fields include the marker-chain, tracer particle, and field-correction (e.g., the Lenardic Filter) methods: each of these has different advantages or disadvantages, trading off computational speed with accuracy in tracking feature boundaries. Here we present a method for modeling active fields in mantle dynamics simulations using a new solver implemented in the deal.II package that underlies the ASPECT software. The new solver for the advection-diffusion equation uses a Local Discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) algorithm, which combines features of both finite element and finite volume methods, and is particularly suitable for problems with a dominant first-order term and discontinuities. Furthermore, we have applied a post-processing technique to insure that the solution satisfies a global maximum/minimum. One potential drawback for the LDG method is that the total number of degrees of freedom is larger than the finite element method. To demonstrate the capabilities of this new method we present results for two benchmarks used previously: a falling cube with distinct buoyancy and

  8. A new method to simulate convection with strongly temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity in a spherical shell: Applications to the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, K.; Harder, H.; Hansen, U.

    2006-08-01

    We present a new finite volume code for modeling three-dimensional thermal convection in a spherical shell with strong temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity. A new discretization formulation of the viscous term, tailored to the finite volume method on a colocated grid, enables laterally variable viscosity. A smoothed cubed-sphere grid is used to avoid pole problems which occur in latitude-longitude grids with spherical coordinates. The spherical shell is topologically divided into six cubes. The equations are formulated in primitive variables, and are treated in the Cartesian cubes. In order to ensure mass conservation a SIMPLER pressure correction procedure is applied and to handle strong viscosity variations of Δ η = 10 7 and high Rayleigh numbers of Ra = 10 8 the pressure correction algorithm is combined with a pressure weighted interpolation method to satisfy the incompressibility condition and to avoid oscillatory pressure solutions. The model is validated by a comparison of diagnostical parameters of steady-state cubic and tetrahedral convection with other published spherical models and a detailed convergence test on successively refined grids. Lateral variable fluid properties have a significant influence on the convection pattern and heat flow dynamics. The influence of temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity on the flow is systematically analyzed for basal and mixed-mode heated thermal convection in the spherical shell. A new method to classify the simulations to the mobile, transitional or stagnant-lid regime is given by means of a comparison of selected diagnostical parameters, a significantly improved classification as compared to the common surface layer mobility criterion. A scaling law for the interior temperature and viscosity in the stagnant-lid regime is given. Purely basal heating and strongly temperature-dependent rheology stabilize plume positions and yield with a weak time dependence of the convecting system, while the amount

  9. A new estimate of the effective elastic thickness of the Canadian shield from admittance analyses using the wavelet transform, and models of flexure and mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, J. F.; Swain, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The flexural rigidity of the Earth's cratonic regions is a topic of much controversy. While many studies have suggested that cratons possess high elastic strength, others maintain that the continental lithosphere is everywhere weak. In this study we focus on the Canadian shield, and show that perceived evidence for weak cratonic lithosphere is compromised by shortcomings of the spectral analysis technique. Here we compare estimates of the admittance between free-air gravity and topography in the spectral domain from wavelet and multitaper methods. We apply particular attention to their long wavelength values, since it is here that the signals from mantle convection, glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and flexure are often present together. Our results show that, when used with certain parameter values, the multitaper method has a comparatively poor resolution at long wavelengths, and hence is not always able to distinguish between the harmonics due to convection and flexural processes. This renders it unreliable for estimating the flexural rigidity. We then show that the wavelet method does have the requisite properties to make this distinction, since it is able to correctly resolve a low-admittance dip at long wavelengths in both synthetic and real data. When the observed wavelet admittance of the Canadian shield is inverted against the predictions of a combined flexural, convection and GIA model, we find that the shield possesses a core of high effective elastic thickness (Te), greater than 118 km to 95% confidence, located to the immediate south-west of Hudson Bay.

  10. 3D stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of a liquid metal layer in the presence of a magnetic field—effect of wall electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopoulos, Dimitrios; Pelekasis, Nikos A.

    2014-10-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard stability of a liquid metal layer of rectangular cross section is examined in the presence of a strong magnetic field that is aligned with the horizontal direction of the cross section. The latter is much longer than the vertical direction and the cross section assumes a large aspect ratio. The side walls are treated as highly conducting. Linear stability analysis is performed allowing for three-dimensional instabilities that develop along the longitudinal direction. The finite element methodology is employed for the discretization of the stability analysis formulation while accounting for the electrical conductivity of the cavity walls. The Arnoldi method provides the dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the problem. In order to facilitate parallel implementation of the numerical solution at large Hartmann numbers, Ha, domain decomposition is employed along the horizontal direction of the cross section. As the Hartmann number increases a real eigenvalue emerges as the dominant unstable eigenmode, signifying the onset of thermal convection, whose major vorticity component in the core of the layer is aligned with the direction of the magnetic field. Its wavelength along the longitudinal direction of the layer is on the order of twice its height and increases as Ha increases. The critical Grashof was obtained for large Ha and it was seen to scale like Ha 2 signifying the balance between buoyancy and Lorentz forces. For well conducting side walls, the nature of the emerging flow pattern is determined by the combined conductivity of Hartmann walls and Hartmann layers, cH + Ha -1. When poor conducting Hartmann walls are considered, cH ≪ 1, the critical eigensolution is characterized by well defined Hartmann and side layers. The side layers are characterized by fast fluid motion in the magnetic field direction as a result of the electromagnetic pumping in the vicinity of the Hartmann walls. Increasing the electrical conductivity of the Hartmann

  11. The impact of non-local buoyancy flux on the convective boundary layer development as simulated by a 3-D TKE-based subgrid mixing scheme in a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Bao, Jian-Wen; Chen, Baode

    2016-04-01

    This presentation highlights a study in which a series of dry convective boundary layer (CBL) simulations are carried out using a generalized 3-dimensional (3-D) TKE-based parameterization scheme of sub-grid turbulent mixing in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulated characteristics of dry CBL are analyzed for the purpose of evaluating this scheme in comparison with a commonly-used scheme for sub-grid turbulent mixing in NWP models (i.e., the Mellor-Yamada 1.5-order TKE scheme). The same surface layer scheme is used in all the simulations so that only the sensitivity of the WRF model to different parameterizations of the sub-grid turbulent mixing above the surface layer is examined. The effect of horizontal grid resolution on the simulated CBL is also examined by running the model with grid sizes of 200, 400 m, 600 m, 1 km and 3 km. We will first compare the characteristics of the simulated CBL using the two schemes with the WRF LES dataset. We will then illustrate the importance of including the non-local component in the vertical buoyancy specification in the 3-D TKE-based scheme. Finally, comparing the results from the simulations against coarse-grained WRF LES dataset, we will show the feasibility and advantage of replacing conventional planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes with a scale-aware 3-D TKE-based scheme in the WRF model.

  12. Insights on slab-driven mantle flow from advances in three-dimensional modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, Margarete A.

    2016-10-01

    The wealth of seismic observations collected over the past 20 years has raised intriguing questions about the three-dimensional (3D) nature of the mantle flow field close to subduction zones and provided a valuable constraint for how the plate geometry may influence mantle flow proximal to the slab. In geodynamics, there has been a new direction of subduction zone modelling that has explored the 3D nature of slab-driven mantle flow, motivated in part by the observations from shear wave splitting, but also by the observed variations in slab geometries worldwide. Advances in high-performance computing are now allowing for an unprecedented level of detail to be incorporated into numerical models of subduction. This paper summarizes recent advances from 3D geodynamic models that reveal the complex nature of slab-driven mantle flow, including trench parallel flow, toroidal flow around slab edges, mantle upwelling at lateral slab edges, and small scale convection within the mantle wedge. This implies slab-driven mantle deformation zones occur in the asthenosphere proximal to the slab, wherein the mantle may commonly flow in a different direction and rate than the surface plates, implying laterally variable plate-mantle coupling. The 3D slab-driven mantle flow can explain, in part, the lateral transport of geochemical signatures in subduction zones. In addition, high-resolution geographically referenced models can inform the interpretation of slab structure, where seismic data are lacking. The incorporation of complex plate boundaries into high-resolution, 3D numerical models opens the door to a new avenue of research in model construction, data assimilation, and modelling workflows, and gives 3D immersive visualization a new role in scientific discovery.

  13. The effect of convective life cycle stage on microwave brightness temperature/rainrate relations as determined from 3-D cloud model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Prasad, N.; Yeh, H.-Y. M.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rain rate and the brightness temperature (Tb) was investigated using a cloud model/microwave radiative transfer model combination to obtain the rain-rate/Tb relations for four different frequencies: 10, 19, 37, and 86 GHz. The results at 19, 37, and 86 GHz were found to be significantly affected by ice in the modeled convective system, while the results at 10 GHz showed very little effect. Nonprecipitating cloud water was found to affect Tb in two ways. First, at low rain rates, the presence of significant cloud water produced higher Tb values than in cases with little cloud water. The second effects occurs at 19, 37, and 86 GHz at higher rainrates associated with significant ice formation; the scattering by ice lowered the Tb.

  14. Seismic-geodynamic constraints on three-dimensional structure, vertical flow, and heat transfer in the mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forte, A.M.; Woodward, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Joint inversions of seismic and geodynamic data are carried out in which we simultaneously constrain global-scale seismic heterogeneity in the mantle as well as the amplitude of vertical mantle flow across the 670 km seismic discontinuity. These inversions reveal the existence of a family of three-dimensional (3-D) mantle models that satisfy the data while at the same time yielding predictions of layered mantle flow. The new 3-D mantle models we obtain demonstrate that the buoyancy forces due to the undulations of the 670 km phase-change boundary strongly inhibit the vertical flow between the upper and lower mantle. The strong stabilizing effect of the 670 km topography also has an important impact on the predicted dynamic topography of the Earth's solid surface and on the surface gravity anomalies. The new 3-D models that predict strongly or partially layered mantle flow provide essentially identical fits to the global seismic data as previous models that have, until now, predicted only whole-mantle flow. The convective vertical transport of heat across the mantle predicted on the basis of the new 3-D models shows that the heat flow is a minimum at 1000 km depth. This suggests the presence at this depth of a globally defined horizon across which the pattern of lateral heterogeneity changes rapidly. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Dynamic coupling of bulk chemistry, trace elements and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.; Heck, H. V.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully dynamical models that not only track the evolution of chemical heterogeneities through the mantle, but also incorporate the effect of chemical heterogeneities on the dynamics of mantle convection are now emerging. Since in general analytical solutions to these complex problems are lacking, careful testing and investigations of the effect and usefulness of these models is needed. We extend our existing numerical mantle convection code that can track fluid flow in 3D spherical geometry and tracks both bulk chemical components (basal fraction) and different trace elements. The chemical components fractionate upon melting when and where the solidus is crossed. Now, the chemical information will effect the flow of the fluid in the following ways: The bulk composition will link to density and the (radioactive) trace element abundance to heat production. Results will be reported of the effect of different density structures; either starting with a primordial dense layer at the base of the mantle, having all density variation originate from melting (basalt production), or a combination between these two end-member scenarios. In particular we will focus on the connection between large scale bulk chemical structures in the (deep) mantle and the evolution of the distribution of noble gasses (He and Ar). The distribution of noble gasses depend upon 1) assumptions on the initial distributions in the mantle, 2) the mantle flow, 3) radioactive production and, 4) outgassing to the atmosphere upon melting close to the surface.

  16. Influences on the positioning of mantle plumes following supercontinent formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.; Lowman, Julian P.; Stein, Claudia

    2015-05-01

    Several mantle convection studies analyzing the effects of supercontinent formation and dispersal show that the genesis of subcontinental plumes results from the formation of subduction zones at the edges of the supercontinent rather than from the effect of continental thermal insulation or thermochemical piles. However, the influence of subduction zone location on the position of subcontinental plumes has received little attention. This study analyzes 2-D and 3-D numerical models of supercontinent formation (in an isochemical mantle) to assess the role of subduction and mantle viscosity contrast in the generation of subcontinental mantle plumes. We find that once a critical supercontinent width is reached, plumes do not form under the center of a supercontinent. In studies featuring a low viscosity lower mantle, the surface positions of the initial plumes (arriving within 90 Myr of supercontinent assembly) become locked beneath the continent at a distance 2000-3000 km from the continental margin. However, the broad downwellings in simulations that feature a high-viscosity lower mantle trigger plumes at a greater distance from the continental margin subduction. For all mantle viscosity profiles, subcontinental plumes show dependence on the location of supercontinent margin subduction. As theories differ on the role of core-mantle boundary chemical piles in plume formation, it is significant that our isochemical models show that the formation of subduction zones at the margins of a supercontinent has a profound effect on subcontinental mantle dynamics. Our results may help to explain what determined the eruption sites of past (and future) large igneous provinces.

  17. The simulation of a convective cloud in a 3D model with explicit microphysics. Part II: Dynamical and microphysical aspects of cloud merger

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Y.L.; Shapiro, A.

    1996-09-01

    The development and merger of pairs of convective clouds in a shear-free environment were simulated in an explicit microphysical cloud model. The occurrence or nonoccurrence of updraft merger and the timing of merger depended critically on the initial spacing of the thermal perturbations imposed in the model`s initialization. In the unmerged cases the presence of a neighbor cloud was detrimental to cloud development at all times. In the merged cases this negative interaction was still operating but only until the onset of updraft merger. Based on the visual form of the updraft merger, it was hypothesized that low-level merger was a consequence of mutual advection, that is, that each cloud caught its neighbor in its radial inflow and advected it inward. This low-level advection hypothesis was quantified by considering a potential flow induced by two line sinks whose strengths were set equal to the low-level mass flux into the numerically simulated clouds. The merger times obtained from the advection hypothesis were in good agreement with the merger times observed in the simulations. Moreover, if merger did not occur, the advection hypothesis suggested that merger should not have occurred. The merger process was accompanied by the presence of trimodal drop spectra at the upper levels of the cloud. It was shown that the drop size distribution depends not only on the autoconversion and accretion rates, but also on the nonlinear interaction between various source and sink terms affecting rain formation, particularly on the rates of condensation-evaporation, sedimentation, and breakup processes. The analysis of raindrop trajectories showed the details of rain formation in different cloud regions and the effect of dynamical conditions on the growth of rain particles. 41 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Reconstructing the Cenozoic evolution of the mantle: Implications for mantle plume dynamics under the Pacific and Indian plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2014-03-01

    The lack of knowledge of the initial thermal state of the mantle in the geological past is an outstanding problem in mantle convection. The resolution of this problem also requires the modelling of 3-D mantle evolution that yields maximum consistency with a wide suite of geophysical constraints. Quantifying the robustness of the reconstructed thermal evolution is another major concern. To solve and estimate the robustness of the time-reversed (inverse) problem of mantle convection, we analyse two different numerical techniques: the quasi-reversible (QRV) and the backward advection (BAD) methods. Our investigation extends over the 65 Myr interval encompassing the Cenozoic era using a pseudo-spectral solution for compressible-flow thermal convection in 3-D spherical geometry. We find that the two dominant issues for solving the inverse problem of mantle convection are the choice of horizontally-averaged temperature (i.e., geotherm) and mechanical surface boundary conditions. We find, in particular, that the inclusion of thermal boundary layers that yield Earth-like heat flux at the top and bottom of the mantle has a critical impact on the reconstruction of mantle evolution. We have developed a new regularisation scheme for the QRV method using a time-dependent regularisation function. This revised implementation of the QRV method delivers time-dependent reconstructions of mantle heterogeneity that reveal: (1) the stability of Pacific and African ‘large low shear velocity provinces’ (LLSVP) over the last 65 Myr; (2) strong upward deflections of the CMB topography at 65 Ma beneath: the North Atlantic, the south-central Pacific, the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the eastern Antarctica; (3) an anchored deep-mantle plume ascending directly under the EPR (Easter and Pitcairn hotspots) throughout the Cenozoic era; and (4) the appearance of the transient Reunion plume head beneath the western edge of the Deccan Plateau at 65 Ma. Our reconstructions of Cenozoic mantle

  19. Peridotite xenoliths from the Polynesian Austral and Samoa hotspots: Implications for the destruction of ancient 187Os and 142Nd isotopic domains and the preservation of Hadean 129Xe in the modern convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. G.; Shirey, S. B.; Hauri, E. H.; Kurz, M. D.; Rizo, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Re-Os systematics in 13 peridotite xenoliths hosted in young (<0.39 myr) rejuvenated lavas from the Samoan island of Savai'i and 8 peridotite xenoliths from 6 to 10 myr old lavas from the Austral island of Tubuai have been examined to evaluate the history of the oceanic mantle in this region. Modal mineralogy, trace element compositions and 187Os/188Os ratios suggest that these peridotites are not cognate or residual to mantle plumes but rather samples of Pacific oceanic lithosphere created at the ridge. Savai'i and Tubuai islands lie along a flow line in the Pacific plate, and provide two snapshots (separated by over 40 Ma in time) of Pacific mantle that originated in the same region of the East Pacific rise. Tubuai xenoliths exhibit 187Os/188Os from 0.1163 to 0.1304, and Savai'i (Samoa) xenoliths span a smaller range from 0.1173 to 0.1284. The 187Os/188Os ratios measured in Tubuai xenoliths are lower than (and show no overlap with) basalts from Tubuai. The 187Os/188Os of the Savai'i xenoliths overlap the isotopic compositions of lavas from the island of Savai'i, but also extend to lower 187Os/188Os than the lavas. 3He/4He measurements of a subset of the xenoliths range from 2.5 to 6.4 Ra for Tubuai and 10.8 to 12.4 Ra for Savai'i. Like abyssal peridotites and xenoliths from oceanic hotspots that sample the convecting mantle, Os isotopes from the Savai'i and Tubuai xenolith suites are relatively unradiogenic, but do not preserve a record of depleted early-formed (Hadean and Archean) mantle domains expected from earlier cycles of ridge-related depletion, continent extraction, or subcontinental lithospheric mantle erosion. The lack of preservation of early-formed, geochemically-depleted Os-isotopic and 142Nd/144Nd domains in the modern convecting mantle contrasts with the preservation of early-formed (early-Hadean) 129Xe/130Xe isotopic heterogeneities in the convecting mantle. This can be explained if the initial isotopic signatures in Re-Os and Sm-Nd systems

  20. On the temporal evolution of long-wavelength mantle structure of the Earth since the early Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shijie; Rudolph, Maxwell L.

    2015-05-01

    The seismic structure of the Earth's lower mantle is characterized by a dominantly degree-2 pattern with the African and Pacific large low shear velocity provinces (i.e., LLSVP) that are separated by circum-Pacific seismically fast anomalies. It is important to understand the origin of such a degree-2 mantle structure and its temporal evolution. In this study, we investigated the effects of plate motion history and mantle viscosity on the temporal evolution of the lower mantle structure since the early Paleozoic by formulating 3-D spherical shell models of thermochemical convection. For convection models with realistic mantle viscosity and no initial structure, it takes about ˜50 Myr to develop dominantly degree-2 lower mantle structure using the published plate motion models for the last either 120 Ma or 250 Ma. However, it takes longer time to develop the mantle structure for more viscous mantle. While the circum-Pangea subduction in plate motion history models promotes the formation of degree-2 mantle structure, the published pre-Pangea plate motions before 330 Ma produce relatively cold lower mantle in the African hemisphere and significant degree-1 structure in the early Pangea (˜300 Ma) or later times, even if the lower mantle has an initially degree-2 structure and a viscosity as high as 1023 Pas. This suggests that the African LLSVP may not be stationary since the early Paleozoic. With the published plate motion models and lower mantle viscosity of 1022 Pas, our mantle convection models suggest that the present-day degree-2 mantle structure may have largely been formed by ˜200 Ma.

  1. Neoproterozic Re-Os age of a sulfide inclusion in a superdeep diamond: Implications for mantle convection beneath Juina, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.; Smit, K.; Nestola, F.; Steele, A.; Bulanova, G.; Smith, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Diamonds from the Juina area Brazil have long been known for their sublithospheric or superdeep (e.g. from depths of 300-800 km) origins. These diamonds have yielded new information about high pressure mantle mineralogy, deep crustal recycling, diamond source fluids, and mantle transition zone water content. A type II (low N) diamond (sample J1) from the 93.1±1.5 myr old (Heaman 7IKC 1998 ) Collier 4 kimberlite was studied previously (Walter et al. Nature 2008; Bulanova et al. CMP 2010) as part of a larger suite of eclogitic-composition, inclusion-bearing type II Collier 4 diamonds with complex internal growth structure. Major and trace element analyses of mineral inclusions in these diamonds include Ca-Ti-Si perovskite, Ca-rich majoritic-garnet, clinopyroxene, olivine, jeffbenite, minerals with stoichiometries of CAS and K-hollandite phases, SiO2, FeO, native iron, low-Ni sulfides, and Ca-Mg-carbonate. The C isotopic compositions of the diamond hosts range from a δ13C of -25 to -5‰ ( J1 being -15‰). Collier 4 diamonds have been interpreted to crystallize from carbonatitic melts derived from the recycling of oceanic lithosphere at TransitionZone depths (Walter et al. Nature 2008; Bulanova et al. CMP 2010). A rare Fe-sulfide inclusion in the core of diamond J1 has been dated with the Re-Os system in order to provide age and compositional constraints on the proposed oceanic slab recycling. The rim of J1 contained inclusions of Ca-Ti-Si perovskite that yielded U-Pb age of 101±7 Ma and eclogitic (low Cr, high Ca) majorite that yielded formation pressures (Si - Al+Cr geobarometry) >8 GPa (Bulanova et al. CMP 2010). The Fe-sulfide analyzed was low Ni pyrrhotite determined to be Fe10S11 of a rare 11T polytype by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The 27 ug interior pyrrhotite had a high Re/Os (187Re/188Os = 854) typical of MORB (Re/Os ~100) and radiogenic Os isotopic composition (187Os/188Os = 8.50±1.38) that yields a 602±16 Ma model age relative to normal mantle

  2. Global correlation of volcanic centers on Venus with uplands and with extension: Influence of mantle convection and altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Head, James W., III; Aubele, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The observed distribution of volcanism on Venus and its associations with geologic and tectonic characteristics are examined for significant global-scale tectonic, mantle, and volcanic influences. We find that volcanic centers are correlated geologically with zones of extension, infrequent in lowland regions, and infrequent in regions with evidence for tectonic shortening. In addition, volcanic centers are significantly concentrated in a broad region at least 10,000 km in diameter between Beta, Alta, and Themis Regiones. This area is nearly hemispheric in scale and coincides spatially with the area of greatest concentration of extensional characteristics. Our analysis suggests that the observed distribution patterns of volcanic centers reflect the regional patterns of extension, the origin of the extension and volcanism are closely related, and the hemispheric scale of both patterns implies a deep-seated origin such as large-scale interior mantle dynamic patterns. However, altitude-dependent effects on both the formation and preservation of volcanic centers could also strongly influence the observed distribution pattern.

  3. The impacts of mantle phase transitions and the iron spin crossover in ferropericlase on convective mixing—is the evidence for compositional convection definitive? New results from a Yin-Yang overset grid-based control volume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnas, M. H.; Peltier, W. R.

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution seismic tomographic images from several subduction zones provide evidence for the inhibition of the downwelling of subducting slabs at the level of the 660 km depth seismic discontinuity. Furthermore, the inference of old (~140 Myr) sinking slabs below fossil subduction zones in the lower mantle has yet to be explained. We employ a control volume methodology to develop a new anelastically compressible model of three-dimensional thermal convection in the "mantle" of a terrestrial planet that fully incorporates the influence of large variations in material properties. The model also incorporates the influence of (1) multiple solid-solid pressure-induced phase transitions, (2) transformational superplasticity at 660 km depth, and (3) the high spin-low spin iron spin transition in ferropericlase at midmantle pressures. The message passing interface-parallelized code is successfully tested against previously published benchmark results. The high-resolution control volume models exhibit the same degree of radial layering as previously shown to be characteristic of otherwise identical 2-D axisymmetric spherical models. The layering is enhanced by the presence of moderate transformational superplasticity, and in the presence of the spin crossover in ferropericlase, stagnation of cold downwellings occurs in the range of spin crossover depths (~1700 km). Although this electronic spin transition has been suggested to be invisible seismically, recent high-pressure ab initio calculations suggest it to have a clear signature in body wave velocities which could provide an isochemical explanation of a seismological signature involving the onset of decorrelation between Vp and Vs that has come to be interpreted as requiring compositional layering.

  4. The Role of Subduction and Mantle Plumes in the Supercontinent Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P. J.; Lowman, J. P.; Stein, C.

    2014-12-01

    Several processes unfold during the supercontinent cycle, more than one of which might result in an elevation in subcontinental mantle temperatures through the generation of mantle plumes. Geodynamic modeling motivated by paleogeographic plate reconstructions has indicated that subcontinental mantle upwellings appear below large continents that are extensively ringed by subduction zones. Moreover, several numerical simulations of supercontinent formation and dispersal show that the genesis of subcontinental plumes follows the formation of subduction zones on the edges of the supercontinent, rather than resulting from continental thermal insulation. However, the influence of the location of mantle downwellings on the position of subcontinental plumes has received little attention. Using 2D and 3D numerical mantle convection models, featuring geotherm- and pressure- dependent viscosity profiles with thermally and mechanically distinct oceanic and continental plates, we examine the evolution of mantle dynamics after continental accretion at a subduction zone (as occurred during the formation of Pangea). In simulations of vigorous mantle convection, we consider a range of supercontinent areas and change the upper and lower mantle viscosity contrast to determine their relation to plume formation. The results presented show that the formation of subduction zones at the margins of a supercontinent has a profound effect on mantle dynamics, and may help to explain how the sites of previous (and future) large igneous provinces were (or will be) determined. Subcontinental plume locations for all viscosity profiles show varying degrees of dependence on the location of continental margin subduction post-supercontinent formation. Furthermore, we find that changing the viscosity structure for mantle convection simulations (with similar surface heat flux) can determine the position (and number) of subcontinental plumes penetrating the upper mantle post-supercontinent formation.

  5. 3-D Spherical modelling of the thermo-chemical evolution of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armann, M.; Tackley, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Several first-order aspects of the dynamics of Venus' mantle remain poorly understood. These include (i) how Venus' mantle loses its radiogenic heat (presumably about the same as Earth's) despite the presence of stagnant lid convection. Hypotheses that have been advanced (summarised in [1]) are conduction through a thin lithosphere, episodic overturn of the lithosphere, magmatic heat transport, and concentration of almost all heat-producing elements into the crust, but there are problems with all of these taken individually. A thick lithosphere may not be consistent with admittance ratios, magmatic heat transport would require a too-large resurfacing rate, and a large concentration of heat-producing elements in the crust would cause weakness and possibly melting in the deep crust. (ii) The relatively long-wavelength distribution of surface features, which is surprising because numerical models and analogue laboratory experiments of stagnant-lid convection produce relatively short-wavelength convective cells. (iii) The inferred (from crater distributions [2]) relatively uniform surface age of 500-700 Ma. (iv) Whether the highlands are above mantle downwellings as on Earth or above mantle upwellings [3]. (v) How the mantle can have outgassing only 25% of 40Ar [4] but supposedly most of its water [5]. (vi) The cause of coronae and relationship to mantle processes [6]. To study some of these questions, we are performing integrated thermo-chemical convection modelling of Venus' evolution over 4.5 billion years, in 3-D spherical geometry as well as 2-D spherical annulus geometry [7]. These models include realistic ("laboratory") rheological parameters for diffusion creep and dislocation creep based on [8][9], which are also composition-dependent, and plastic yielding based on Byerlee's law, which might cause changes in tectonic regime (e.g., episodic plate tectonics). Crustal formation and the resulting differentiation of the crust and mantle are modelled using a self

  6. Thermally-Driven Mantle Plumes Reconcile Hot-spot Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D.; Davies, J.

    2008-12-01

    Hot-spots are anomalous regions of magmatism that cannot be directly associated with plate tectonic processes (e.g. Morgan, 1972). They are widely regarded as the surface expression of upwelling mantle plumes. Hot-spots exhibit variable life-spans, magmatic productivity and fixity (e.g. Ito and van Keken, 2007). This suggests that a wide-range of upwelling structures coexist within Earth's mantle, a view supported by geochemical and seismic evidence, but, thus far, not reproduced by numerical models. Here, results from a new, global, 3-D spherical, mantle convection model are presented, which better reconcile hot-spot observations, the key modification from previous models being increased convective vigor. Model upwellings show broad-ranging dynamics; some drift slowly, while others are more mobile, displaying variable life-spans, intensities and migration velocities. Such behavior is consistent with hot-spot observations, indicating that the mantle must be simulated at the correct vigor and in the appropriate geometry to reproduce Earth-like dynamics. Thermally-driven mantle plumes can explain the principal features of hot-spot volcanism on Earth.

  7. Impact of phase change kinetics on the Mariana slab within the framework of 2-D mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shoichi; Torii, Yoku; Riedel, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    Recent high-pressure and high-temperature experiments indicate that metastable olivine might persist in the cold core of a slab due to the low reaction rate of the olivine-wadsleyite phase transformation. Recent seismological observations detected a metastable olivine wedge that survives to a depth of 630 km in the Mariana slab. To consider the problem of non-equilibrium phase transformation, we developed a two-dimensional (2-D) Cartesian numerical code that incorporates the effects of kinetics into a thermal convection model. We consider the kinetics of the 410-km olivine-wadsleyite and the 660-km ringwoodite-Pv + Mw phase transformations, including the effects of water content at the 410-km phase boundary. The latent heat release of the 410-km non-equilibrium phase transformations inside the slab is also considered. The results show positive correlations between some of the controlling parameters and the length of the metastable olivine wedge: the faster the subducting velocity, and the lower the water content, the deeper is the metastable olivine wedge. With increasing depth of phase transformation, the effect of latent heat release is enhanced: heating of, at most, 100 °C occurs if olivine transforms into wadsleyite at a depth of approximately 570 km in our model setting. Temperature increase due to the latent heat released stimulates further phase transformation, resulting in further temperature increase, acting as a positive feedback effect. We also attempt to explain the seismological observations by calculating the temperature and phase structures in the Mariana slab. If we assume that the age of the Mariana slab is 150 Myr, the subduction velocity is 9.5 cm/yr, phase transformation occurs from the grain boundary of the parental phase, and the water content is 250 wt. ppm for a grain size of 1 mm, 300 wt. ppm for one of 5 mm, and 100 wt. ppm for intracrystalline transformation, then the metastable olivine wedge survives to a depth of 630 km, which is in

  8. 3D models of slow motions in the Earth's crust and upper mantle in the source zones of seismically active regions and their comparison with highly accurate observational data: I. Main relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodenskii, S. M.; Molodenskii, M. S.; Begitova, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    Constructing detailed models for postseismic and coseismic deformations of the Earth's surface has become particularly important because of the recently established possibility to continuously monitor the tectonic stresses in the source zones based on the data on the time variations in the tidal tilt amplitudes. Below, a new method is suggested for solving the inverse problem about the coseismic and postseismic deformations in the real non-ideally elastic, radially and horizontally heterogeneous, self-gravitating Earth with a hydrostatic distribution of the initial stresses from the satellite data on the ground surface displacements. The solution of this problem is based on decomposing the parameters determining the geometry of the fault surface and the distribution of the dislocation vector on this surface and elastic modules in the source in the orthogonal bases. The suggested approach includes four steps: 1. Calculating (by the perturbation method) the variations in Green's function for the radial and tangential ground surface displacements with small 3D variations in the mechanical parameters and geometry of the source area (i.e., calculating the functional derivatives of the three components of Green's function on the surface from the distributions of the elastic moduli and creep function within the volume of the source area and Burgers' vector on the surface of the dislocations); 2. Successive orthogonalization of the functional derivatives; 3. Passing from the decompositions of the residuals between the observed and modeled surface displacements in the system of nonorthogonalized functional derivatives to their decomposition in the system of orthogonalized derivatives; finding the corrections to the distributions of the sought parameters from the coefficients of their decompositions in the orthogonalized basis; and 4. Analyzing the ambiguity of the inverse problem solution by constructing the orthogonal complement to the obtained basis. The described

  9. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  10. Chemical stratification of the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    A possible scenario for the chemical stratification of the earth's mantle is presented. Differentiation of the mantle by either the production of basaltic magmas or partial melting by the upper mantle is proposed to lead to a thick basalt layer, the lower part of which is converted to eclogite as the earth cools. Density estimates indicate that the eclogite formed would not be able to sink to below 670 km. The eclogite layer is thus demonstrated to be trapped as a result of whole-mantle convection and possible irreversible differentiation of the mantle into eclogite and overlying residual peridotite layers.

  11. Mechanism of Hot Finger Formation in Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M. Y.; Tamura, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Processes of mantle melting and volcanic eruptions along subduction zones are often illustrated by the use of two-dimensional cross-section models of convergent margins. However, Quaternary volcanoes in the NE Japan arc could be grouped into ten volcano clusters striking transverse to the arc; these have an average width of ~ 50 km, and are separated by parallel gaps 30-75 km wide (Tamura et al., 2002). Moreover, the structure of the mantle wedge and arc crust beneath the NE Japan arc and the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, respectively, suggest that the third dimension, lying along the strike of the arc, is necessary to understand the actual production of magmas in subduction zones (e.g., Nakajima et al., 2001; Hasegawa & Nakajima, 2004; Kodaira et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2008). Common periodic structural variations, having wavelengths of 80-100 km, can be observed in both areas. This grouping of volcanoes and the structural variations may be related to locally developed hot regions within the mantle wedge that have the form of inclined, 50 km-wide fingers (hot fingers). The 'hot fingers' models (Tamura et al., 2002) may play an important role in linking the 3D structures within the mantle wedge and overlying arc crust to volcanic eruptions at the surface. To explore a physical and mathematical mechanism to produce a hot finger pattern, we develop a hydrodynamic model of mantle convection in mantle wedge. A hypothesis incorporated in our model is a double diffusive mechanism of mantle materials; diffusion of composition of mantle materials is much weaker than temperature diffusion. We show that our model shows a spatiotemporal pattern in a mantle material composition, temperature, and velocity that are similar to the spatiotemporal patterns observed in the NE Japan arc.

  12. Double Diffusive Layering In The Early Earth's Mantle- Consequences For Thermal History And Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Dude, S.

    2011-12-01

    The thermal history of the Earth, it's chemical differentiation and also the reaction of the interior with the atmosphere is largely determined by convective processes within the Earth's mantle. A simple physical model, resembling the situation, shortly after core formation, consists of a compositionally stably stratified mantle, due to magma ocean differentiation , which is heated from below and/or cooled from above. Additionally internal heat sources will serve to power the mantle dynamics. Under such circumstances double diffusive convection will eventually lead to self organized layer formation, even without the existence of jumps is material properties. We have conducted 2D and 3D numerical experiments in Cartesian and spherical geometry, taking into account mantle realistic values, especially a strong temperature dependent viscosity. The experiments show that in a wide parameter rage distinct convective layers evolve in this scenario. The layering strongly controls the heat loss from the core. In the most intensely explored scenario, convection starts at the core-mantle boundary and a stack of layers grow from the lower mantle to the top. Mobilization of the surface occurs after a time span of about 2.5 Gyears. We observe several events of intermittent breakdown of individual layers. This can potentially explain periods of strongly increasing heat flow at the Earth's surface. Alternative models of magma ocean differentiation suggest a freezing of the magma ocean from below. Under such conditions an initially unstable situation may emerge. We observe an initial Rayleigh Taylor instability, again followed by a phase of layered convection, as described above.

  13. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  14. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  15. Implementation of a flexible and scalable particle-in-cell method for massively parallel computations in the mantle convection code ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmöller, Rene; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Particle-in-cell methods have a long history and many applications in geodynamic modelling of mantle convection, lithospheric deformation and crustal dynamics. They are primarily used to track material information, the strain a material has undergone, the pressure-temperature history a certain material region has experienced, or the amount of volatiles or partial melt present in a region. However, their efficient parallel implementation - in particular combined with adaptive finite-element meshes - is complicated due to the complex communication patterns and frequent reassignment of particles to cells. Consequently, many current scientific software packages accomplish this efficient implementation by specifically designing particle methods for a single purpose, like the advection of scalar material properties that do not evolve over time (e.g., for chemical heterogeneities). Design choices for particle integration, data storage, and parallel communication are then optimized for this single purpose, making the code relatively rigid to changing requirements. Here, we present the implementation of a flexible, scalable and efficient particle-in-cell method for massively parallel finite-element codes with adaptively changing meshes. Using a modular plugin structure, we allow maximum flexibility of the generation of particles, the carried tracer properties, the advection and output algorithms, and the projection of properties to the finite-element mesh. We present scaling tests ranging up to tens of thousands of cores and tens of billions of particles. Additionally, we discuss efficient load-balancing strategies for particles in adaptive meshes with their strengths and weaknesses, local particle-transfer between parallel subdomains utilizing existing communication patterns from the finite element mesh, and the use of established parallel output algorithms like the HDF5 library. Finally, we show some relevant particle application cases, compare our implementation to a

  16. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  17. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  18. Dynamical Generation of the Transition Zone in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Stemmer, K.

    2005-12-01

    The internal structure of the Earth is made up by a series of layers, though it is unclear how many layers exist and if there are layers invisible to remote sensing techniques. The transition zone is likely to be a boundary layer separating the convective systems in the lower and upper mantle. It seems likely that currently there is some mass exchange across this boundary, rather than the two systems beeing strictly separated.a Double-diffusive convection(d.d.c) is a vital mechanism which can generate layered structure and may thus be an important mmical machinery behind the formation of the transition zone. Double-diffusive convection determines the dynamics of systems whose density is influenced by at least two components with different molecular diffusivities.In the mantle, composition and temperature play the role of those two components. By means of numerical experiments we demonstrate that under mantle relevant conditions d.d.c typically leads to the formation of a transition zone. The calculations encompass two- and three dimensional Cartesian geometries as well as fully 3D spherical domains. We have further included strongly temperature dependent viscosity and find that this leads to even more pronounced layering. In most cases a layered flow pattern emerges, where two layers with a transition zone in between resembles a quasistationary state. Thus, the transition zone can be the result of a self organization process of the convective flow in the mantle. The presence of a phase transition further helps to stabilize the boundary against overturning, even on a time scale on the order of the age of the Earth.

  19. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Archean Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Archean conditions using a plume-lid tectonics model setup. For varying crustal compositions and a mantle potential temperature increase ΔTp = 250K (compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanic and plutonic magmatism. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and production of new crust which in turn influences the dynamics. On short-term (10 ‑ 20Myr) rising diapirs and sinking basaltic crust lead to crustal overturn and to the formation of the typical Archean dome-and-keel pattern. On long-term a long (˜ 80Myr) passive 'growth phase' with strong growth of crust and lithosphere is observed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermochemical instabilities assisted by lower crustal eclogitisation and a subcrustal small-scale convection area. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere is initiated by linear or cylindrical eclogite drips and occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within a 20Myr 'removal phase'.

  20. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Archean Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Archean conditions using a plume-lid tectonics model setup. For varying crustal compositions and a mantle potential temperature increase ΔTp = 250K (compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanic and plutonic magmatism. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and production of new crust which in turn influences the dynamics. On short-term (10 - 20Myr) rising diapirs and sinking basaltic crust lead to crustal overturn and to the formation of the typical Archean dome-and-keel pattern. On long-term a long (˜ 80Myr) passive 'growth phase' with strong growth of crust and lithosphere is observed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermochemical instabilities assisted by lower crustal eclogitisation and a subcrustal small-scale convection area. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere is initiated by linear or cylindrical eclogite drips and occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within a 20Myr 'removal phase'.

  1. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2014-12-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of remaining radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contributed to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the style of Early Earth tectonics. For a minor increase in temperature ΔTp < 175 K a subduction-collision style ensues which is largely similar to present day plate tectonics. For a moderate increase in ΔTp = 175-250 K subduction can still occur, however plates are strongly weakened and buckling, delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor style dripping of the plate is observed in addition. For higher temperatures ΔTp > 250 K no subduction can be observed anymore and tectonics is dominated by delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We conduct 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions and a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and an increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp, a thermal anomaly in the bottom temperature boundary introduces a plume. The model is able to self-sufficiently form depleted mantle lithosphere after repeated melt removal. New crust can be produced in the form of volcanics or plutonics. To simulate differentiation the newly formed crust can have a range in composition from basaltic over dacitic to granitic depending on its source rock. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of new formed crust which in turn influences the dynamics. Mantle and crust are convecting separately. Dome-shaped plutons of mafic or felsic composition can be observed in the crust. Between these domes elongated belts of upper crust, volcanics and sediments are formed. These structures look similar to, for example, the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa where the elongated shape of the Barberton

  2. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  3. Mantle dynamics and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, T; Lay, T

    2000-11-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of the Earth's interior, called seismic tomography, has achieved breakthrough advances in the last two decades, revealing fundamental geodynamical processes throughout the Earth's mantle and core. Convective circulation of the entire mantle is taking place, with subducted oceanic lithosphere sinking into the lower mantle, overcoming the resistance to penetration provided by the phase boundary near 650-km depth that separates the upper and lower mantle. The boundary layer at the base of the mantle has been revealed to have complex structure, involving local stratification, extensive structural anisotropy, and massive regions of partial melt. The Earth's high Rayleigh number convective regime now is recognized to be much more interesting and complex than suggested by textbook cartoons, and continued advances in seismic tomography, geodynamical modeling, and high-pressure-high-temperature mineral physics will be needed to fully quantify the complex dynamics of our planet's interior.

  4. 3D models of slow motions in the Earth's crust and upper mantle in the source zones of seismically active regions and their comparison with highly accurate observational data: II. Results of numerical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodenskii, S. M.; Molodenskii, M. S.; Begitova, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the first part of the paper, a new method was developed for solving the inverse problem of coseismic and postseismic deformations in the real (imperfectly elastic, radially and horizontally heterogeneous, self-gravitating) Earth with hydrostatic initial stresses from highly accurate modern satellite data. The method is based on the decomposition of the sought parameters in the orthogonalized basis. The method was suggested for estimating the ambiguity of the solution of the inverse problem for coseismic and postseismic deformations. For obtaining this estimate, the orthogonal complement is constructed to the n-dimensional space spanned by the system of functional derivatives of the residuals in the system of n observed and model data on the coseismic and postseismic displacements at a variety of sites on the ground surface with small variations in the models. Below, we present the results of the numerical modeling of the elastic displacements of the ground surface, which were based on calculating Green's functions of the real Earth for the plane dislocation surface and different orientations of the displacement vector as described in part I of the paper. The calculations were conducted for the model of a horizontally homogeneous but radially heterogeneous selfgravitating Earth with hydrostatic initial stresses and the mantle rheology described by the Lomnitz logarithmic creep function according to (M. Molodenskii, 2014). We compare our results with the previous numerical calculations (Okado, 1985; 1992) for the simplest model of a perfectly elastic nongravitating homogeneous Earth. It is shown that with the source depths starting from the first hundreds of kilometers and with magnitudes of about 8.0 and higher, the discrepancies significantly exceed the errors of the observations and should therefore be taken into account. We present the examples of the numerical calculations of the creep function of the crust and upper mantle for the coseismic deformations. We

  5. NASA's 3-D Animation of Tropical Storm Ulika from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ulika using GPM's Radar data showed some strong convective storms inside the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 187 mm (7.4 inches)...

  6. 2D and 3D Numerical Experiments Assessing the Necessary Conditions for a Plume-fed Asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, C.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Hasenclever, J.

    2008-12-01

    In past years we have presented observation evidence which suggests to us that in Earth's mantle there exists a buoyant asthenosphere layer fed by upwelling in mantle plumes, and consumed by accretion and transformation into overlying lithosphere by ridge upwelling and melt-extraction (which creates a ~60km-thick layer of compositional lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges), by plate cooling (which accretes a further ~40km of asthenosphere after 100 Ma of near-surface cooling), and by dragdown by subducting slabs (which drags a further ~20km sheet of buoyant asthenosphere on either side of the subducting slab). This scenario has been recently reviewed in Yamamoto et al (GSA Vol. 431). We believe that the reason this mode of mantle convection has not yet been seen in numerical models of mantle convection is due to the inability of current models to model the correct upwelling rates in focused lower-viscosity plumes (i.e. that, due to numerical resolution problems they currently underpredict plume upwelling) and to correctly model the magnitude of downdragging of a more buoyant but lower viscosity asthenosphere layer by subducting slabs (which they currently overpredict, cf. Phipps Morgan et al., Terra Nova, 2007). Here we present results from a suite of 2D and 3D calculations that include the effects of ridge accretion, plate cooling and well-resolved asthenosphere dragdown by subducting slabs. In the 2D experiments we do not let mantle plumes spontaneously form at the hot base of the mantle. Instead we extract mantle at a prescribed rate from a single region near the bottom of the mantle (the base of the 'plume stem') and inject this hot material into the uppermost mantle using a local dilation element 'source'. The point is to bypass an incorrect 2D treatment of plume upwelling (plumes should be pipes that only slightly disrupt surrounding flow instead of sheets that break 2D mantle flow), in order to explore what upwelling flux is needed to form a persistent plume

  7. Mantle structure beneath eastern Africa: Evidence for a through going-mantle anomaly and its implications for the origin of Cenozoic tectonism in eastern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulibo, G.; Tugume, F.; Julia, J.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, teleseismic earthquakes recorded on over 60 temporary AfricaArray seismic stations deployed in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia between 2007 and 2011 are used to invert P and S travel time residuals, together with travel time residuals from previous deployments, for a 3D image of mantle wave speeds and for examining relief on transition zone discontinuities using receiver function stacks. Tomographic images reveal a low wave speed anomaly (LWA) that dips to the SW beneath northern Zambia, extending to a depth of at least 900 km. The anomaly appears to be continuous across the transition zone, extending into the lower mantle. Receiver function stacks reveal an average transition zone thickness (TZT) across a wide region extending from central Zambia to the NE through Tanzania and into Kenya, which is ~30-40 km thinner than the global average. These results are not easily explained by models for the origin of the Cenozoic tectonism in eastern Africa that invoke a plume head or small scale convection either by edge flow or passive stretching of the lithosphere. However, the depth extent of the LWA coincident with a thin transition zone is consistent with a model invoking a through-going mantle anomaly beneath eastern Africa that links anomalous upper mantle to the African Superplume anomaly in the lower mantle beneath southern Africa. This finding indicates that geodynamic processes deep in the lower mantle are influencing surface dynamics across the Afro-Arabian rift system.

  8. A convective forecast experiment of global tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, Nicolas; Giering, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Modeling jointly the deep convective motions in the mantle and the deformation of the lithosphere in a self-consistent way is a long-standing quest, for which significant advances have been made in the late 1990's. The complexities used in lithospheric models are making their way into the models of mantle convection (density variations, pseudo-plasticity, elasticity, free surface), hence global models of mantle motions can now display tectonics at their surface, evolving self-consistantly and showing some of the most important properties of plate tectonics on Earth (boundaries, types of boundaries, plate sizes, seafloor spreading properties, continental drift). The goal of this work is to experiment the forecasting power of such convection models with plate-like behavior, being here StagYY (Tackley, 2008). We generate initial conditions for a 3D spherical model in the past (50Ma and younger), using models with imposed plate velocities from 200Ma. By doing this, we introduce errors in the initial conditions that propagate afterwards. From these initial conditions, we run the convection models free, without imposing any sort of motion, letting the self-organization take place. We compare the forecast to the present-day plate velocities and plate boundaries. To investigate the optimal parameterization, and also have a flavor of the sensitivity of the results to rheological parameters, we compute the derivatives of the misfit of the surface velocities relative to the yield stress, the magnitude of the viscosity jump at 660km and the properties of a weak crust. These derivates are computed thanks to the tangent linear model of StagYY, that is built through the automatic differentiation software TAF (Giering and Kaminski, 2003). References Tackley, P. J., Modeling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 171, 7-18 (2008). Giering, R., Kaminski, T., Applying TAF

  9. The Galicia 3D experiment: an Introduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Martinez Loriente, Sara; Holroyd, Luke; Merry, Tobias; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Shillington, Donna; Gibson, James; Minshull, Tim; Karplus, Marianne; Bayracki, Gaye; Davy, Richard; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Ranero, Cesar; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Martinez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In June and July 2013, scientists from 8 institutions took part in the Galicia 3D seismic experiment, the first ever crustal -scale academic 3D MCS survey over a rifted margin. The aim was to determine the 3D structure of a critical portion of the west Galicia rifted margin. At this margin, well-defined tilted fault blocks, bound by west-dipping faults and capped by synrift sediments are underlain by a bright reflection, undulating on time sections, termed the S reflector and thought to represent a major detachment fault of some kind. Moving west, the crust thins to zero thickness and mantle is unroofed, as evidence by the "Peridotite Ridge" first reported at this margin, but since observed at many other magma-poor margins. By imaging such a margin in detail, the experiment aimed to resolve the processes controlling crustal thinning and mantle unroofing at a type example magma poor margin. The experiment set out to collect several key datasets: a 3D seismic reflection volume measuring ~20x64km and extending down to ~14s TWT, a 3D ocean bottom seismometer dataset suitable for full wavefield inversion (the recording of the complete 3D seismic shots by 70 ocean bottom instruments), the "mirror imaging" of the crust using the same grid of OBS, a single 2D combined reflection/refraction profile extending to the west to determine the transition from unroofed mantle to true oceanic crust, and the seismic imaging of the water column, calibrated by regular deployment of XBTs to measure the temperature structure of the water column. We collected 1280 km2 of seismic reflection data, consisting of 136533 shots recorded on 1920 channels, producing 260 million seismic traces, each ~ 14s long. This adds up to ~ 8 terabytes of data, representing, we believe, the largest ever academic 3D MCS survey in terms of both the area covered and the volume of data. The OBS deployment was the largest ever within an academic 3D survey.

  10. 3D grain boundary migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. K.; Bons, P. D.

    2009-04-01

    Microstructures of rocks play an important role in determining rheological properties and help to reveal the processes that lead to their formation. Some of these processes change the microstructure significantly and may thus have the opposite effect in obliterating any fabrics indicative of the previous history of the rocks. One of these processes is grain boundary migration (GBM). During static recrystallisation, GBM may produce a foam texture that completely overprints a pre-existing grain boundary network and GBM actively influences the rheology of a rock, via its influence on grain size and lattice defect concentration. We here present a new numerical simulation software that is capable of simulating a whole range of processes on the grain scale (it is not limited to grain boundary migration). The software is polyhedron-based, meaning that each grain (or phase) is represented by a polyhedron that has discrete boundaries. The boundary (the shell) of the polyhedron is defined by a set of facets which in turn is defined by a set of vertices. Each structural entity (polyhedron, facets and vertices) can have an unlimited number of parameters (depending on the process to be modeled) such as surface energy, concentration, etc. which can be used to calculate changes of the microstructre. We use the processes of grain boundary migration of a "regular" and a partially molten rock to demonstrate the software. Since this software is 3D, the formation of melt networks in a partially molten rock can also be studied. The interconnected melt network is of fundamental importance for melt segregation and migration in the crust and mantle and can help to understand the core-mantle differentiation of large terrestrial planets.

  11. Modeling Mantle Heterogeneity Development in Earth's Mantle Using Multidisciplinary Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. M. S.; Finlayson, V.; Gu, T.; Li, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Cormier, V. F.

    2014-12-01

    The process of subduction provides continuous chemical and thermal heterogeneity to Earth's mantle. How heterogeneity is stirred, stretched and distributed depends on the detail of mantle convection as well as chemical and physical properties of mantle materials. Seismic observations have revealed heterogeneities in Earth's mantle at varying scales. Seismic velocities are controlled by physical parameters such as density, bulk modulus and shear modulus, which are a function of temperature, pressure and composition. Thus, understanding the origin of seismic heterogeneities play an important role in understanding the thermal and chemical state of the present Earth's mantle. Originating from the CIDER 2014 workshop, our goal is to take a multidisciplinary approach to tackle a variety of questions, foremost what length scales of heterogeneity might we expect from the convecting process and how do they manifest themselves in seismic imaging. This touches upon fundamental issues such as the composition of the mantle, the nature of stirring and mixing, and the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings (LLSVPs). We will investigate the development of heterogeneity in response to various compositions and redox states using existing and new thermochemical mantle convection simulations, and test the sensitivity of seismic measurements to different length scales of chemical heterogeneity. We try to reconcile large differences in length scales of heterogeneity as well as fractional perturbations of seismic velocity and density predicted by tomography and scattering seismic experiments. Preliminary results from the CIDER workshop initiate with conversion of geodynamic models to profiles of seismic velocity and density which are then taken as input models to predict multiply scattered, high frequency, P wave coda envelopes synthesized by a radiative transport technique. The predicted sensitivity of P coda envelopes to varying chemical compositions and heterogeneity length scales

  12. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  13. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  14. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  15. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  16. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  17. Dynamical Generation of a Bumpy Layer at the Core-Mantle-Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Stemmer, K.

    2006-12-01

    Convection in the Earth's mantle is largely influenced by the strong dependence of the viscosity of the mantle material on temperature. A temperature difference of several orders of magnitude leads to a pronounced asymmetry between the upper- and lower boundary of the convecting system. While different scenarios for the upper boundary have been explored (stagnant lid plate-like behavior), the effects on the the lower boundary are less clear. In view of the dynamical formation of structures at the Core-mantle boundary, we apply fully three dimensional models in cartesian and in spherical geometry, in order to study the evolving patterns at the lower boundary in convection with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity at high Rayleigh number. We apply viscosity contrasts of six orders of magnitude. Rayleigh numbers are chosen to ensure that convection is vigorous (Nusselt numbers between 30 and 50 are reached). Under this circumstances the flow typically develops a complex system of channels at the bottom which connect the several existing plumes. Material flows channels, creating a 'bumpy' layer at the Core-mantle boundary (CMB). In order to determine the dynamically induced topography at the CMB, the pressure field will be analyzed.. Additional pressure- dependence of the viscosity has been speculated to prevent plumes from the CMB. We will demonstrate that pressure dependence can enhance, rather than reduce the strength of plumes. Finally we present a new relation between Nusselt- and Rayleigh number for convection with strongly temperature dependent viscosity, based on an extensive data-set from 3D models. This will allow to better estimate the thermal history of the Earth and other planets.

  18. The role of small-scale convection on the formation of volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hunen, J.; Phethean, J. J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Several models have been presented in the literature to explain volcanic passive margins (VPMs), including variation in rifting speed or history, enhanced melting from mantle plumes, and enhanced flow through the melting zone by small-scale convection (SSC) driven by lithospheric detachments. Understanding the mechanism is important to constrain the paleo-heat flow and petroleum potential of VPM. Using 2D and 3D numerical models, we investigate the influence of SSC on the rate of crust production during continental rifting. Conceptually, SSC results in up/downwellings with a typical spacing of a few-100 km, and may lead to enhanced decompression melting. Subsequent mantle depletion changes buoyancy (from latent heat consumption and compositional changes), and affects mantle dynamics under the MOR and potentially any further melting. Decompression melting leads to a colder, thermally denser residue (from consumption of latent heat of melting), but also a compositionally more buoyant one. A parameter sensitivity study of the effects of mantle viscosity, spreading rate, mantle temperature, and a range material parameters indicates that competition between thermal and compositional buoyancy determines the mantle dynamics. For mantle viscosities ηm > ~1022 Pa s, no SSC occurs, and a uniform 7-8 km-thick oceanic crust forms. For ηm < ~1021 Pa s, SSC is vigorous and can form VPMs with > 10-20 km crust. If thermal density effects dominate, a vigorous (inverted) convection may drive significant decompression melting, and create VPMs. Such dynamics could also explain the continent-dipping normal faults that are commonly observed at VPMs. After the initial rifting phase, the crustal thickness reduces significantly, but not always to a uniformly thick 7-8 km, as would be appropriate for mature oceanic basins. Transverse convection rolls may result in margin-parallel crustal thickness variation, possibly related to observations such as the East-Coast Magnetic Anomaly.

  19. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  20. Constraining mantle viscosity structure for a thermochemical mantle using the geoid observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Zhong, Shijie

    2016-03-01

    Long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and viscosity structure. Previous studies have successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically inferred buoyancy in whole-mantle convection models. However, it has been suggested that large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath Pacific and Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and are likely denser than the ambient mantle. We formulate instantaneous flow models based on seismic tomographic models to compute the geoid and constrain mantle viscosity by assuming both thermochemical and whole-mantle convection. Geoid modeling for the thermochemical model is performed by considering the compensation effect of dense thermochemical piles and removing buoyancy structure of the compensation layer in the lower mantle. Thermochemical models well reproduce the observed geoid, thus reconciling the geoid with the interpretation of LLSVPs as dense thermochemical piles. The viscosity structure inverted for thermochemical models is nearly identical to that of whole-mantle models. In the preferred model, the lower mantle viscosity is ˜10 times higher than the upper mantle viscosity that is ˜10 times higher than the transition zone viscosity. The weak transition zone is consistent with the proposed high water content there. The geoid in thermochemical mantle models is sensitive to seismic structure at midmantle depths, suggesting a need to improve seismic imaging resolution there. The geoid modeling constrains the vertical extent of dense and stable chemical piles to be within ˜500 km above CMB. Our results have implications for mineral physics, seismic tomographic studies, and mantle convection modeling.

  1. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  2. Subduction History and the Evolution of Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Abigail; Shephard, Grace; Torsvik, Trond

    2016-04-01

    , geometry and morphology of lower mantle structures can be influenced by the movement of subducting slabs, and thus by the motions of tectonic plates at the surface. Alternatively, a long-term stability for both LLSVPs, which would suggest a first-order dissociation from the effects of surface plate motions, is hypothesised by recent studies which propose a geographic correlation between the reconstructed surface eruption sites of kimberlites and Large Igneous Provinces with the margins of the LLSVPs. If the surface volcanism was sourced from the lower mantle, such a link would suggest that the LLSVPs may have remained stationary for at least the age of the volcanic rocks (> 500 Myr) and further that the anomalies were largely insensitive to the formation and subsequent breakup of Pangea, and thus to Earth's plate motion history. Here we discuss the evolution of lower mantle structure, LLSVPs and surface volcanics in terms of subduction dynamics. We integrate high-resolution plate tectonic histories and numerical models of mantle convection and perform a series of 3D spherical calculations with Earth-like boundary conditions to investigate the role that subduction history plays in the development and evolution of lower mantle structures. To test whether such an interaction exists, and if so, to what degree over time, we apply varying shifts to the absolute reference frame of the plate reconstruction. We incorporate global shifts in both longitude and latitude, with the correction applied over timescales of 230-50 Myrs. With this method, the location of subduction at the surface and thus the global flow field can be altered. This in turn affects the time-dependent sinking of lithospheric slabs and may affect their interaction with the lower mantle and the LLSVPs at both their margins and top surfaces. We aim to understand how the subduction history has affected mantle structure on a global scale. We show that shifts to the surface history of subduction, even for extreme and

  3. Subduction History and the Evolution of Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Abigail; Shephard, Grace; Torsvik, Trond

    2016-04-01

    , geometry and morphology of lower mantle structures can be influenced by the movement of subducting slabs, and thus by the motions of tectonic plates at the surface. Alternatively, a long-term stability for both LLSVPs, which would suggest a first-order dissociation from the effects of surface plate motions, is hypothesised by recent studies which propose a geographic correlation between the reconstructed surface eruption sites of kimberlites and Large Igneous Provinces with the margins of the LLSVPs. If the surface volcanism was sourced from the lower mantle, such a link would suggest that the LLSVPs may have remained stationary for at least the age of the volcanic rocks (> 500 Myr) and further that the anomalies were largely insensitive to the formation and subsequent breakup of Pangea, and thus to Earth's plate motion history. Here we discuss the evolution of lower mantle structure, LLSVPs and surface volcanics in terms of subduction dynamics. We integrate high-resolution plate tectonic histories and numerical models of mantle convection and perform a series of 3D spherical calculations with Earth-like boundary conditions to investigate the role that subduction history plays in the development and evolution of lower mantle structures. To test whether such an interaction exists, and if so, to what degree over time, we apply varying shifts to the absolute reference frame of the plate reconstruction. We incorporate global shifts in both longitude and latitude, with the correction applied over timescales of 230-50 Myrs. With this method, the location of subduction at the surface and thus the global flow field can be altered. This in turn affects the time-dependent sinking of lithospheric slabs and may affect their interaction with the lower mantle and the LLSVPs at both their margins and top surfaces. We aim to understand how the subduction history has affected mantle structure on a global scale. We show that shifts to the surface history of subduction, even for extreme and

  4. The statistical upper mantle assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Anders; Anderson, Don L.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in modern mantle geochemistry is to link geochemical data with geological and geophysical observations. Most of the early geochemical models involved a layered mantle and the concept of geochemical reservoirs. Indeed, the two layer mantle model has been implicit in almost all geochemical literature and the provenance of oceanic island basalt (OIB) and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) [van Keken et al., Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 30 (2002) 493-525]. Large-scale regions in the mantle, such as the 'convective' (i.e. well-stirred, homogeneous) upper mantle, sub-continental lithosphere, and the lower mantle were treated as distinct and accessible geochemical reservoirs. Here we discuss evidence for a ubiquitous distribution of small- to moderate-scale (i.e. 10 2-10 5 m) heterogeneity in the upper mantle, which we refer to as the statistical upper mantle assemblage (SUMA). This heterogeneity forms as the result of long-term plate tectonic recycling of sedimentary and crustal components. The SUMA model does not require a convectively homogenized MORB mantle reservoir, which has become a frequently used concept in geochemistry. Recently, Kellogg et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 204 (2002) 183-202] modeled MORB and OIB Sr and Nd isotopic compositions as local mantle averages of random distributions of depleted residues and recycled continental crustal material. In this model, homogenization of the MORB source region is achieved by convective stirring and mixing. In contrast, in the SUMA model, the isotopic compositions of MORB and OIB are the outcome of homogenization during sampling, by partial melting and magma mixing (e.g. [Helffrich and Wood, Nature 412 (2001) 501-507]), of a distribution of small- to moderate-scale upper mantle heterogeneity, as predicted by the central limit theorem. Thus, the 'SUMA' acronym also captures what we consider the primary homogenization process: sampling upon melting and averaging. SUMA does not require the

  5. Heat Flow Partitioning Between Continents and Oceans - from 2D to 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Cooper, C. M.; Lenardic, A.

    2010-12-01

    Scalings derived from thermal network theory explain how the presence of continents can influence the Earth’s overall heat loss. Intuitively, it may seem that increasing the proportion of a planet’s surface area covered by continents would decrease the efficiency of heat transfer given that continents do not participate in convective overturn. However, this ignores the potential feedback between the insulating effect of continents and the temperature-dependent viscosity of the mantle (Lenardic et al, 2005, Cooper et al, 2007). When this feedback is considered, a clear regime exists in which the partial stagnation and insulation of the surface by buoyant continental crust can lead to an increase in heat flow compared to the uninsulated case. The numerical results used to verify the scalings have mostly been conducted in two dimensions in order to cover a very wide range of Rayleigh number, fraction of continental coverage, and continental thickness. However as more recent results show that the configuration of the crust also plays a role in determining the heat flow partitioning and global heat flow (See Lenardic et al, “Continents, Super-Continents, Mantle Thermal Mixing, and Mantle Thermal Isolation” in this session), we have begun to repeat this exhaustive and exhausting 2D study in 3D. Cooper, C.M., A. Lenardic, and L.-N. Moresi "Effects of continental insulation and the partioning of heat producing elements on the Earth's heat loss." Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 ,10.1029, 2006. Lenardic, A., L.-N. Moresi, A.M. Jellinek, and M. Manga "Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents." Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 234 ,317-333, 2005.

  6. Intraplate volcanism and mantle dynamics in East Asia: Big mantle wedge (BMW) model (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2009-12-01

    In the East Asia continent there are many Cenozoic volcanoes, but only a few are still active now, such as the Changbai, Wudalianchi, and Tengchong volcanoes which have erupted several times in the past 1000 years. Although many studies have been made by using various approaches, the origin of the intraplate volcanoes in East Asia is still not very clear. Recently we used regional and global seismic tomography to determine high-resolution 3-D mantle structure under Western Pacific to East Asia (Zhao, 2004; Huang and Zhao, 2006; Zhao et al., 2009). Our results show prominent low-velocity anomalies from the surface down to 410 km depth beneath the intraplate volcanoes and a broad high-velocity anomaly in the mantle transition zone under East Asia. Focal-mechanism solutions of deep earthquakes indicate that the subducting Pacific slab under the Japan Sea and the East Asia margin is subject to compressive stress regime. These results suggest that the Pacific slab meets strong resistance at the 660-km discontinuity and so it becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone under East Asia. The Philippine Sea slab has also subducted down to the mantle transition zone under western Japan and the Ryukyu back-arc region. The western edge of the stagnant slab is generally parallel with the Japan trench and the Ryukyu trench and roughly coincides with a prominent surface topography and gravity boundary in East China, which is located approximately 1800 km west of the trenches. The upper mantle under East Asia has formed a big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab. The BMW exhibits low seismic-velocity and high electrical-conductivity, which is hot and wet because of the deep dehydration reactions of the stagnant slab and the convective circulation process in the BMW. These processes lead to the upwelling of hot and wet asthenospheric materials and thinning and fracturing of the continental lithosphere, leading to the formation of the active intraplate volcanoes in East

  7. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  8. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  9. Partial melting and the efficiency of mantle outgasing in one-plate planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    The generation of partial melting can have a major impact on the thermo-chemical evolution of a terrestrial body by the depletion of the mantle material in incompatible elements such as radioactive elements and volatiles, crust formation and volcanic outgassing. During some period in the thermal history of a terrestrial planet, the temperature in regions of the upper mantle, either below tectonic plates or a stagnant lid, rises above the solidus - the temperature at which the mineral with the lowest melting temperature among those that form the silicate mantle mixture starts to melt. The melt than rises toward the surface, forms the crust, and releases volatiles into the atmosphere. In case of one-plate (stagnant lid) planets the thickness of the present-day crust can 'tell' us already about the efficiency of mantle melting and mantle degassing - the thicker the crust the more mantle material experienced melting and thus the more efficient can be the outgassing. However, it has been shown with parameterized convection models [1] but also 2-3D convection models [2] that crustal delamination is a common process in one-plate planets. Crustal delamination allows that possibly much more crust is produced during the entire evolution (and thus more mantle material experienced differentiation) than what is observed today, implying also more efficient outgassing than expected. Crustal delamination is therefore a process that may help to generate a substantial planetary atmosphere. In the present work we investigate the influence of partial melt on mantle dynamics and the volcanic outgassing of one-plate planets using the mantle convection code GAIA [3] in a 2D cylindrical geometry. We consider the depletion of the mantle, redistribution of radioactive heat sources between mantle and crust, as well as mantle dehydration and volcanic outgassing [4]. When melt is extracted to form the crust, the mantle material left behind is more buoyant than its parent material and depleted

  10. Birch's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Francis Birch's 1952 paper started the sciences of mineral physics and physics of the Earth's interior. Birch stressed the importance of pressure, compressive strain and volume in mantle physics. Although this may seem to be an obvious lesson many modern paradoxes in the internal constitution of the Earth and mantle dynamics can be traced to a lack of appreciation for the role of compression. The effect of pressure on thermal properties such as expansivity can gravitational stratify the Earth irreversibly during accretion and can keep it chemically stratified. The widespread use of the Boussinesq approximation in mantle geodynamics is the antithesis of Birchian physics. Birch pointed out that eclogite was likely to be an important component of the upper mantle. Plate tectonic recycling and the bouyancy of oceanic crust at midmantle depths gives credence to this suggestion. Although peridotite dominates the upper mantle, variations in eclogite-content may be responsible for melting- or fertility-spots. Birch called attention to the Repetti Discontinuity near 900 km depth as an important geodynamic boundary. This may be the chemical interface between the upper and lower mantles. Recent work in geodynamics and seismology has confirmed the importance of this region of the mantle as a possible barrier. Birch regarded the transition region (TR ; 400 to 1000 km ) as the key to many problems in Earth sciences. The TR contains two major discontinuities ( near 410 and 650 km ) and their depths are a good mantle thermometer which is now being exploited to suggest that much of plate tectonics is confined to the upper mantle ( in Birch's terminology, the mantle above 1000 km depth ). The lower mantle is homogeneous and different from the upper mantle. Density and seismic velocity are very insensitive to temperature there, consistent with tomography. A final key to the operation of the mantle is Birch's suggestion that radioactivities were stripped out of the deeper parts of

  11. Traveltime dispersion in an isotropic elastic mantle: strong lower-mantle signal in differential-frequency residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, Bernhard S. A.; Zaroli, Christophe; Nolet, Guust

    2015-12-01

    We study wavefield effects of direct P- and S-waves in elastic and isotropic 3-D seismic structures derived from the temperature field of a high-resolution mantle circulation model. More specifically, we quantify the dispersion of traveltime residuals caused by diffraction in structures with dynamically constrained length scales and magnitudes of the lateral variations in seismic velocities and density. 3-D global wave propagation is simulated using a spectral element method. Intrinsic attenuation (i.e. dissipation of seismic energy) is deliberately neglected, so that any variation of traveltimes with frequency can be attributed to structural effects. Traveltime residuals are measured at 15, 22.5, 34 and 51 s dominant periods by cross-correlation of 3-D and 1-D synthetic waveforms. Additional simulations are performed for a model in which 3-D structure is removed in the upper 800 km to isolate the dispersion signal of the lower mantle. We find that the structural length scales inherent to a vigorously convecting mantle give rise to significant diffraction-induced body-wave traveltime dispersion. For both P- and S-waves, the difference between long-period and short-period residuals for a given source-receiver pair can reach up to several seconds for the period bands considered here. In general, these `differential-frequency' residuals tend to increase in magnitude with increasing short-period delay. Furthermore, the long-period signal typically is smaller in magnitude than the short-period one; that is, wave-front healing is efficient independent of the sign of the residuals. Unlike the single-frequency residuals, the differential-frequency residuals are surprisingly similar between the `lower-mantle' and the `whole-mantle' model for corresponding source-receiver pairs. The similarity is more pronounced in case of S-waves and varies between different combinations of period bands. The traveltime delay acquired in the upper mantle seems to cancel in these differential

  12. Scales of mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Akber-Knutson, S.; Konter, J.; Kellogg, J.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Romanowicz, B.

    2004-12-01

    A long-standing question in mantle dynamics concerns the scale of heterogeneity in the mantle. Mantle convection tends to both destroy (through stirring) and create (through melt extraction and subduction) heterogeneity in bulk and trace element composition. Over time, these competing processes create variations in geochemical composition along mid-oceanic ridges and among oceanic islands, spanning a range of scales from extremely long wavelength (for example, the DUPAL anomaly) to very small scale (for example, variations amongst melt inclusions). While geochemical data and seismic observations can be used to constrain the length scales of mantle heterogeneity, dynamical mixing calculations can illustrate the processes and timescales involved in stirring and mixing. At the Summer 2004 CIDER workshop on Relating Geochemical and Seismological Heterogeneity in the Earth's Mantle, an interdisciplinary group evaluated scales of heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a combined analysis of geochemical data, seismological data and results of numerical models of mixing. We mined the PetDB database for isotopic data from glass and whole rock analyses for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR), projecting them along the ridge length. We examined Sr isotope variability along the East Pacific rise by looking at the difference in Sr ratio between adjacent samples as a function of distance between the samples. The East Pacific Rise exhibits an overall bowl shape of normal MORB characteristics, with higher values in the higher latitudes (there is, however, an unfortunate gap in sampling, roughly 2000 km long). These background characteristics are punctuated with spikes in values at various locations, some, but not all of which are associated with off-axis volcanism. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram for unevenly spaced data was utilized to construct a power spectrum of the scale lengths of heterogeneity along both ridges. Using the same isotopic systems (Sr, Nd

  13. Subsolidus convective cooling histories of terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The subsolidus convective cooling histories of terrestrial planets evolving from hot initial states are investigated quantitatively. A simple analytic model simulating average heat flux from a vigorously convecting mantle and incorporating a mantle viscosity proportional to mantle temperature and a lithosphere which thickens as the planet cools is employed. Heat flux from the convecting mantle is calculated on the basis of a power law relation between Nusselt number and Rayleigh number. The temperature distribution in the lithosphere is assumed to be linear throughout the cooling history of the planet. Cooling histories have been determined for the earth, Mars, Mercury and the moon and the mantle temperature decreases, mantle viscosity increases and decreases of heat flux to the surface and to the base of the lithosphere and of Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers are illustrated for each planet. It is found that primordial heat can contribute substantially to the present surface heat flux of a planet.

  14. Self organized layering in the Earth's mantle, phase- and compositional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Dude, S.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal history of Earth an other planets, their chemical differentiation and reaction of the interior with the atmosphere was largely determined by convective processes. Convection does not always tend to homogenize the interior. Convection can rather establish structures and as such reservoirs which can stay intact for geological significant time. We employ. numerical models, ranging from simple 2D scenarios to fully 3D configurations with strongly temperature , pressure and compositionally dependent rheology , to explore the formation of such reservoirs. Layer formation plays a special role in the pattern formation process. . It will be shown that distinct convective layers can form as self-organized structures from non-layered states, without pre-existing density jumps., once effects of thermal - and compositional contributions to the density are taken into account. A stable compositional gradient, heated from below and/or cooled from above resembles one reasonable scenario for Earth-mantle after core formation. In this configuration a layered mantle structure emerges. the individual layers display different degrees of stability. Intermittent breakdown of individual layers leads to a strong episodicity in the thermal and chemical evolution. In a series of experiments we study the onset of plate tectonics in such a scenario by employing stress dependent rheologies We further investigate the effecfts of a pressure dependent thermal expansivity. Clearly, under these conditions even a small initial compositional density gradient strongly effects the dynamics We also investigate the scenario including a phase boundary and the combined effect of phase - and compositional boundaries on the dynamics .

  15. Water circulation and global mantle dynamics: Insight from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Nakakuki, Tomoeki; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2015-05-01

    We investigate water circulation and its dynamical effects on global-scale mantle dynamics in numerical thermochemical mantle convection simulations. Both dehydration-hydration processes and dehydration melting are included. We also assume the rheological properties of hydrous minerals and density reduction caused by hydrous minerals. Heat transfer due to mantle convection seems to be enhanced more effectively than water cycling in the mantle convection system when reasonable water dependence of viscosity is assumed, due to effective slab dehydration at shallow depths. Water still affects significantly the global dynamics by weakening the near-surface oceanic crust and lithosphere, enhancing the activity of surface plate motion compared to dry mantle case. As a result, including hydrous minerals, the more viscous mantle is expected with several orders of magnitude compared to the dry mantle. The average water content in the whole mantle is regulated by the dehydration-hydration process. The large-scale thermochemical anomalies, as is observed in the deep mantle, is found when a large density contrast between basaltic material and ambient mantle is assumed (4-5%), comparable to mineral physics measurements. Through this study, the effects of hydrous minerals in mantle dynamics are very important for interpreting the observational constraints on mantle convection.

  16. Mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, M.; Hawkesworth, C.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of metasomatism and its role in the geochemical enrichment and depletion processes in upper mantle rocks remains contentious. This volume makes a comprehensive contribution to the study of metasomatic and enrichment processes: origin and importance in determining trace element and isotopic heterogeneity in the lithospheric mantle. It begins with a theoretical thermodynamic and experimental justification for metasomatism and proceeds to present evidence for this process from the study of mantle xenoliths. Finally the importance of metasomatism in relation to basaltic volcanism is assessed. The contents are as follows: Dynamics of Translithospheric Migration of Metasomatic Fluid and Alkaline Magma. Solubility of Major and Trace Elements in Mantle Metasomatic Fluids: Experimental Constraints. Mineralogic and Geochemical Evidence for Differing Styles of Metasomatism in Spinel Lherzolite Xenoliths: Enriched Mantle Source Regions of Basalts. Characterization of Mantle Metasomatic Fluids in Spinel Lherzolites and Alkali Clinophyroyxenites from the West Eifel and South-West Uganda. Metasomatised Harzburgites in Kimberlite and Alkaline Magmas: Enriched Resites and ''Flushed'' Lherzolites. Metasomatic and Enrichment Phenomena in Garnet-Peridotite Facies Mantle Xenoliths from the Matsoku Kimberlite Pipe Lesotho. Evidence for Mantle Metasomatism in Periodite Nodules from the Kimberley Pipes South Africa. Metasomatic and Enrichment Processes in Lithospheric Peridotites, an Effective of Asthenosphere-Lithosphere Interaction. Isotope Variations in Recent Volcanics: A Trace Element Perspective. Source Regions of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts: Evidence for Enrichment Processes. The Mantle Source for the Hawaiian Islands: Constraints from the Lavas and Ultramafic Inclusions.

  17. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  19. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  20. Consequences of a Viscosity Peak in the Lower Mantle for the Evolution of Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Yuen, D. A.; Stein, C.

    2001-12-01

    Recent work has indicated the existence of a 'viscosity hill' situated in the lower mantle between 1800 and 2000 km. We have employed 2d and 3d numerical models to examine the dynamical consequences of such a hill in the high Rayleigh number regime. Most numerical models are based on the extended Boussinesq approximation, including the effects of viscous dissipation and adiabatic (de)compression. All models include a decrease of thermal expansivity with depth. The viscosity increase in the lower mantle was assumed to range between 150 and 1000. In order to delineate effects we separately run cases with a purely depth dependent viscosity profile and such with a superimposed temperature dependence of the viscosity.The 'viscosity hill' leads to a transient stage which closely resembles the 'doming regime' as found in thermo chemical convection. Further, the 'hill' acts similar to a phase transition. Plume branching occurs in the mid lower mantle as seemingly found in tomographic studies. The lower mantle is characterized by the presence of big plumes which experience branching during ascent. The most remarkable consequence of the hill is that plumes are significantly cooler in the upper mantle.

  1. Thermal Evolution Of The Core And Mantle Of Mars: Effects Of A Sequence Of Basin-Forming Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, James; Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    2015-04-01

    Several giant impact basins have been identified on Mars [1-2]. The youngest of these basins [1] are completely demagnetized [3], indicating that a global magnetic field [4] vanished in the mid-Noachian. Shock heating from the seven largest impacts penetrates below the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [5]. Previous investigations of coupled core cooling and mantle convection [5-6] showed that a single basin-forming impact could halt dynamo activity for 100 My, and that the core would not become fully convective again for nearly 1 Gy after the impact. However, the interval between impacts [1] is shorter than the timescale for dynamo activity to resume following an impact. Sub-sequent impacts may delay this recovery. Here, we expand this investigation into 3D and consider the full sequence of basin-forming impacts large enough to affect the core. Our goal is to obtain a better estimate of the timescale for resumption of dynamo activity. We compute the shock heating due to formation of the seven largest impact basins in the core and mantle using ray-tracing and scaling laws [7-8]. We model 3D mantle convection using CitcomS [9-10], and core cooling with a 1-D parametrization [5]. The temperature is initially adiabatic, with thermal boundary layers (TBL) at the surface and both sides of the CMB. At the time of each impact [1] we introduce a temperature perturbation resulting from shock heating into the core and mantle, and allow the core to stratify [11]. At a given timestep, we fix the mantle temperature and solve the 1D enthalpy equation in the core and lower TBL of the mantle over a time corresponding to a mantle timestep. We update the temperature at the CMB and TBL, and let the mantle convection progress for another timestep. We continue this iteration until the next impact occurs, or until the entire core is again convecting. Only the outermost core is affected by the impact heating. Because the conductivity of the core is higher than that of the mantle, the top of the

  2. Traveltime dispersion in an isotropic elastic mantle: strong lower-mantle signal in differential-frequency residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, Bernhard; Zaroli, Christophe; Nolet, Guust

    2016-04-01

    Recently, we developed a joint forward modelling approach to test geodynamic hypotheses directly against seismic observations. By computing 3-D global wave propagation in seismic models derived from simulations of mantle flow, synthetic seismograms are generated independent of any seismic data. Here, we now show that this is also an excellent tool to study wavefield effects in a consistent manner, as length scales and magnitudes of seismic heterogeneity in the models are constrained by the dynamics of the flow. In this study, we quantify the traveltime dispersion of P- and S-waves caused by diffraction in our elastic and isotropic 3-D synthetic seismic structures. Intrinsic attenuation (i.e. dissipation of seismic energy) is deliberately neglected, so that any variation of traveltimes with frequency can be attributed to structural effects. Traveltime residuals are measured at 15, 22.5, 34 and 51 s dominant periods by cross-correlation of 3-D and 1-D synthetic waveforms. Additional simulations are performed for a model in which 3-D structure is removed in the upper 800 km to isolate the dispersion signal of the lower mantle. We find that the structural length scales inherent to a vigorously convecting mantle give rise to significant diffraction-induced body-wave traveltime dispersion. For both P- and S-waves, the difference between long-period and short-period residuals for a given source-receiver pair can reach up to several seconds for the period bands considered here. In general, these 'differential-frequency' residuals tend to increase in magnitude with increasing short-period delay. Furthermore, the long-period signal typically is smaller in magnitude than the short-period one; that is, wave-front healing is efficient independent of the sign of the residuals. Unlike the single-frequency residuals, the differential-frequency residuals are surprisingly similar between the 'lower-mantle' and the 'whole-mantle' model for corresponding source-receiver pairs. The

  3. 3D strength map of the Asia region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebetskiy, Y. L.; Baranov, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    The Southern and Central Asia is a tectonically complex region which characterized by the great collision between the Asian and Indian plates. Its tectonic evolution is strongly related to the active subduction process along the Pacific border. Stress investigation in the continental crust is a very important problem not only for science but also for the practical purposes. There are four main factors which produce tectonic stresses: gravity anomalies of the crust, density inhomogeneities, deformation from area with intraplate collision, residual elastic deformations and underthrust stresses conditions from convective mantle. We present the stress model of the crust and lithosphere for the Central and Southern Asia on the basis of the finite element modeling. For the crust we take the elasto-plastic rheology with Drucker-Prager criterion. In the lithosphere the elasto-plastic model with von Mises criterion is assumed. We investigated stresses which are produced by the crustal density inhomogeneities and surface relief. The calculations are done using the U-WAY finite element code developed at the Institute of Applied Mechanics Russian Academy of Sciences. (similar to the Nastran program) Density inhomogeneities are based on the AsCRUST-08 crustal model (Baranov, 2008), which has resolution of 1 x 1 degree. AsCRUST-08 was built using the data of deep seismic reflection, refraction and receiver functions studies from published papers. The complex 3D crustal model consists of three layers: upper, middle, and lower crust. Besides depth of the boundaries, we provided average P-wave velocities in the upper, middle and lower parts of the crystalline crust and sediments. The seismic P-velocity data was also recalculated to the densities and the elastic moduli of the crustal layers using the rheological properties and geological constraints. Strength parameters of rocks strongly depend on temperature, tectonic and fluid pressure. Fluid pressure can reduce resistance forces

  4. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  5. Using mineral elasticities to link geodynamics and seismic observations in the lowermost mantle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wookey, J.; Walker, A. M.; Nowacki, A.; Walpole, J.; Kendall, J.

    2012-12-01

    created integrated models based on static flow fields estimated from seismic tomography. These are used to generate strain histories for a grid of points in the lowermost mantle, which in turn are used in conjunction with predicted elasticities and proposed deformation mechanisms to perform viscoplastic self-consistent modelling to generate models of general anisotropy for the lowermost mantle. We have compared these with both tomographic and local determinations of D″ anisotropy in a variety of regions using raytracing, however more robust comparison requires full waveform modelling. To this end we have modified a spectral finite-element code to allow a fully general anisotropic model, and produced waveforms which can be compared directly to observation. These show the complexity of the effect of anisotropy, and underline the importance of understanding the contributing elasticities to make robust dynamic inferences. Ultimately, properties derived from the complex mineralogy (such as the rheology) also needs to feed back into the geodynamic calculations, as developing texture changes parameters such as viscosity. Our current generation of models (which integrate texture development modelling into 3D mantle convection simulation) are a step toward this.

  6. Mantle Plume Dynamics Constrained by Seismic Tomography and Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisovic, P.; Forte, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    We construct a time-dependent, compressible mantle convection model in three-dimensional spherical geometry that is consistent with tomography-based instantaneous flow dynamics, using an updated and revised pseudo-spectral numerical method [Glisovic et al., Geophys. J. Int. 2012]. We explored the impact of two end-member surface boundary conditions, for a rigid and plate-like surface, along with geodynamically-inferred radial viscosity profiles. In each case we find that deep-mantle hot upwellings are durable and stable features in the mantle-wide convective circulation. These deeply-rooted mantle plumes show remarkable longevity over very long geological time spans (several hundred million years), mainly owing to the high viscosity in the lower mantle. Our very-long time convection simulations suggest that the deep-mantle plumes beneath the following hotspots: Pitcairn, Easter, Galapagos, Crozet, Kerguelen, Caroline and Cape Verde, are most reliably resolved in the present-day tomographic images.

  7. The Onset of Plate tectonics in a Compositionally Stratified mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Dude, S.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the geodynamical evolution of the Earth after the crystallization of the magma ocean. This situation is resembled by a scenario, displaying a compositionally stratified mantle being heated from below and within, while also cooled from above. The evolution of the system is dependent on initial conditions and further strongly on the assumed rheology. We have employed numerical models in 2D and 3d cartesian , as well as in spherical geometry to explore possible evolutionary paths of the Early Earth. A common feature of all models featuring a strongly temperature dependent viscosity is the self-organized generation of separately convecting layers. Such layers reduce the heat flow from the core and also delay instabilities from the top layer. Thus this type of model favors a late onset of l arge scale plate tectonics, possibly as late as 2Gyears after formation. A typical feature of this scenario is the intermittent breakdown of layers in the mantle leading to strong pulses of the heat flow. A different picture emerges for a more pressure dominated rheology. Even a slightly stable compositional stratification is sufficient to suppress global convection. Instead the surface is destabilized and small scale plate tectonics sets in immediately. We further investigated the effect of fractional crystallization and a resulting unstable compositional gradient. In all models we observed an Rayleigh-Taylor instability and subseuqtly a long term evolution being very similar to the scenario with the initially stable gradient. According to these results both, a fractional or homogeneous crystallization would lead to a similar long term evolution of the mantle.

  8. Exploring the Mantle of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.; Martel, L. M. V.

    2012-10-01

    About 65 Mars specialists met at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas, September 10-12, 2012, to discuss what we know about the mantle of Mars from meteorites, high-pressure experiments, geophysical and remote sensing data, and theory. The valuable but incomplete meteorite record shows clearly that Mars melted and differentiated into a dense iron-rich core and rocky mantle 4.5 billion years ago. This event produced chemically distinct regions of the mantle that finally melted hundreds of millions of years ago to make the magmas that produced the meteorites. Other melting events produced the older portions of the crust, most of which formed before 3.5 billion years ago. Still unknown are how many distinctive source regions formed, when they melted to form magmas, how they melted, the vigor of mantle convection and how the distinctive regions were preserved during convection, and whether the mantle has mineralogical changes with depth. Planetary scientists hope that additional meteorite samples, the current Curiosity rover mission, the geophysical InSight mission, and the future Mars Sample Return mission will give them crucial information to answer these questions.

  9. Three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure in the Atlantic upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Esther Kezia Candace

    Oceanic lithosphere constitutes the upper boundary layer of the Earth's convecting mantle. Its structure and evolution provide a vital window on the dynamics of the mantle and important clues to how the motions of Earth's surface plates are coupled to convection in the mantle below. The three-dimensional shear-velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Atlantic Ocean is investigated to gain insight into processes that drive formation of oceanic lithosphere. Travel times are measured for approximately 10,000 fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves, in the period range 30-130 seconds, traversing the Atlantic basin. Paths with >30% of their length through continental upper mantle are excluded to maximize sensitivity to the oceanic upper mantle. The lateral distribution of Rayleigh wave phase velocity in the Atlantic upper mantle is explored with two approaches. One, phase velocity is allowed to vary only as a function of seafloor age. Two, a general two-dimensional parameterization is utilized in order to capture perturbations to age-dependent structure. Phase velocity shows a strong dependence on seafloor age, and removing age-dependent velocity from the 2-D maps highlights areas of anomalously low velocity, almost all of which are proximal to locations of hotspot volcanism. Depth-dependent variations in vertically-polarized shear velocity (Vsv) are determined with two sets of 3-D models: a layered model that requires constant VSV in each depth layer, and a splined model that allows VSV to vary continuously with depth. At shallow depths (˜75 km) the seismic structure shows the expected dependence on seafloor age. At greater depths (˜200 km) high-velocity lithosphere is found only beneath the oldest seafloor; velocity variations beneath younger seafloor may result from temperature or compositional variations within the asthenosphere. The age-dependent phase velocities are used to constrain temperature in the mantle and show that, in contrast to previous results for

  10. Slab Driven Mantle Deformation and Plate-Mantle Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Fischer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting derived from local sources in subduction zones suggest viscous flow in the mantle wedge is commonly non-parallel to both the subducting plate velocity vector and the motion of the overriding plate. However, far from the subduction zone trench, observations indicate the fast axis of shear wave splitting tends to align with the velocity vector of the surface plates. Similarly, previous 3D geodynamic models show the slab can drive local decoupling of the mantle and surface plates, in both direction and speed. This suggests that there is some distance from the trench over which there is significant decoupling of the mantle flow from surface plate motion, and that this decoupling zone then decays with continued distance from the trench, resulting in far-field plate-mantle coupling. Here we present results from geodynamic models of subduction coupled with calculations of olivine fabric deformation and synthetic splitting to 1) examine the influence of slab strength, slab dip, and non-Newtonian viscosity on the deformation fabric in the mantle wedge and subslab mantle and 2) quantify the spatial extent and intensity of this slab driven decoupling zone. We compare the deformation fabric in a 2D corner flow solution with varying dip to that of a 2D free subduction model with varying initial dip and slab strength. The results show that using an experimentally derived flow law to define viscosity (both diffusion creep and dislocation creep deformation mechanisms) has a first order effect on the viscosity structure and flow velocity in the upper mantle. The free subduction models using the composite viscosity formulation produce a zone of subduction induced mantle weakening that results in reduced viscous support of the slab and lateral variability in coupling of the mantle to the base of the surface plates. The maximum yield stress, which places an upper bound on the slab strength, can also have a significant impact on the viscosity

  11. Structure of axisymmetric mantle plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Peter; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The structure of axisymmetric subsolidus thermal plumes in the earth's lower mantle is inferred from calculations of axisymmetric thermal plumes in an infinite Prandtl number fluid with thermally activated viscosity. The velocity and temperature distribution is determined for axisymmetric convection above a heated disk in an incompressible fluid cylinder 2,400 km in height and 1,200 km in diameter. Several calculations of plumes with heat transport in the range 100-400 GW, similar to the advective heat transport at the Hawaiian hotspot, are presented. Hotspot formation by plumes originating at the base of the mantle requires both large viscosity variations and a minimum heat transport.

  12. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  13. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  14. The stratified mantle and its evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javoy, M.

    2003-04-01

    The present geophysical data are unable to give precise indications on the chemical composition of the deep mantle and on its hypothetical heterogeneity. The main constraint given presently by high-pressure mineralogical data is limited to the link between density and iron content. It is less and less evident geochemically that lower mantle contributes significantly to the flux of mantle products to the surface . Hence the geochemical explanation of the low contrast lower mantle images, wether seismologic or tomographic, needs an external help, from geochemistry and cosmochemistry. Geochemists make a misleadingly careless use of the term chondritic, leading all Earth scientists to believe that primitive meteorites, the chondrites, have a unique composition which could be called chondritic, whereas they display huge chemical variations. The only chondritic material isotopically consistent with the Earth mantle and Redox-consistent with the Earth as a whole is that of EH chondrites. It is also the most remote in composition from that used by the average Earth modelist. The EH provide the bulk Earth composition, which helps to show that the lower mantle has necessarily a composition significantly different from that of the upper mantle, with a higher Si/Mg ratio. Schematically it is very close to pure Fe-Mg perovskite It is also distinctly poorer in radioactive elements than the primitive upper mantle. Hence the density contrast between both mantles has a strong chemical component which stabilizes the two-level convection mantle inherited from the earth's formation time, the great impact and core formation. The lower and upper mantles initially had essentially equal masses, whose frontier is witnessed by the tomographic surfaces observed around 1000 kilometers depth. The 650 kilometers discontinuity is only a phase transition limit, whose presence strongly impedes the convection in the upper mantle and helps develop transition zone characteristics in the region

  15. Coupled Atmosphere-Hydrosphre-Mantle Evolution: Exploring Mantle Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, W. B.

    2008-12-01

    Venus is, in bulk, nearly Earth's twin, yet the tectonic styles of the two planets are radically different. Suggested explanations for this extreme difference have invoked the lack of liquid water on Venus, the greater degree of crustal differentiation on Venus, and recently, the effect of the elevated surface temperature on convective stresses. These explanations generally involve an interaction between the state of the atmosphere/hydrosphere and the state of the mantle. Atmospheric evolution models have long considered the interaction between different reservoirs, including the mantle, but have never considered the feedback between rates of mantle processes and volatile recycling rates. Coupled atmospheric- hydrosphere-mantle dynamics models will be presented that explore the relationships between water recycling, mantle viscosities, lithospheric stresses, melt production rates and plate yielding. The models include two-dimensional solutions of mantle flow that include water-dependent viscosity and solidus behavior, volatile recycling and outgassing, and a parameterized greenhouse atmosphere with both carbon dioxide and water reservoirs. The complex system of feedbacks yields multiple equilibira and quasi-stable oscillatory states.

  16. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  17. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  19. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  20. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  1. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  2. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  3. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  4. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. Upper and mid mantle fabric developing during subduction-induced mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, Manuele

    2013-04-01

    Subduction zones are convergent margins where the rigid lithosphere sinks into the Earth's mantle inducing complex 3D flow patterns. Seismic anisotropy generated by strain-induced lattice/crystal preferred orientation (LPO/CPO) of intrinsically anisotropic minerals is commonly used to study flow in the mantle and its relations with plate motions. We computed the seismic anisotropy of the upper and mid mantle due to strain-induced LPO in 3D mechanical models of dynamic subduction by using, respectively, D-Rex and Underworld. Subsequently, FSTRACK was used to compute seismogram synthetics and SKS splitting patterns. Strong anisotropy develops in the upper mantle, while weak or null seismic anisotropy is formed in the upper transition zone/lower mantle and lower transition zone, respectively. The distribution of the fabric in the mantle depends on the distribution and amount of the deformation, and not on the rate at which the slab subducts. The SKS splitting patterns are controlled by the anisotropy in the upper mantle because SKS waves are more sensitive to the anisotropy in the shallowest layers. Horizontally propagating shear waves in the mid mantle originating from local earthquakes are characterized by significant splitting that is mostly due to the fabric in the uppermost lower mantle. We discuss the implications of our results for real subduction settings like Tonga, where a discrete amount of observations have been collected in the past 10 years on the anisotropy in the upper and mid mantle.

  8. Role of rheology in reconstructing slab morphology in global mantle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Léa; Coltice, Nicolas; Tackley, Paul; Müller, Dietmar

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the 3D structure of the Earth's mantle has been a challenge for geodynamicists for about 40 years. Although numerical models and computational capabilities have incredibly progressed, parameterizations used for modeling convection forced by plate motions are far from being Earth-like. Among the set of parameters, rheology is fundamental because it defines in a non-linear way the dynamics of slabs and plumes, and the organization of the lithosphere. Previous studies have employed diverse viscosity laws, most of them being temperature and depth dependent with relatively small viscosity contrasts. In this study, we evaluate the role of the temperature dependence of viscosity (variations up to 6 orders of magnitude) on reconstructing slab evolution in 3D spherical models of convection driven by plate history models. We also investigate the importance of pseudo-plasticity in such models. We show that strong temperature dependence of viscosity combined with pseudo-plasticity produce laterally and vertically continuous slabs, and flat subduction where trench retreat is fast (North, Central and South America). Moreover, pseudo-plasticity allows a consistent coupling between imposed plate motions and global convection, which is not possible with temperature-dependent viscosity only. However, even our most sophisticated model is not able to reproduce unambiguously stagnant slabs probably because of the simplicity of material properties we use here. The differences between models employing different viscosity laws are very large, larger than the differences between two models with the same rheology but using two different plate reconstructions or initial conditions.

  9. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  10. Constraints on the mantle and lithosphere dynamics from the observed geoid with the effect of visco-elasto-plastic rheology in the upper 300 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei Tutu, Anthony; Steinberger, Bernhard; Rogozhina, Irina; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    used. Finally, given significant dispersion of geodynamic predictions from different seismic tomography models currently available, we further look for seismic models that provide predictions closest to observations at both regional and global scales. References 1. Hager B.H & O'Connell R.J., 1981. A simple global model of plate dynamics and mantle convection, J.Geophys. Res. 86, 4843-4867 2. Popov A.A., Sobolev S.V., 2008. SLIM3D: A tool for three-dimensional thermo- mechanical modelling of lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology, J.pepi.2008.03.007 3. Steinberger B., 2014. Dynamic topography: A comparison between observations and models based on seismic tomography. (Submitted) 4. Becker T and Boschi L., 2002, A comparison of tomographic and geodynamic mantle models. , J.Geophys. Res. 115, 0148-0227

  11. Pattern recognition constrains mantle properties, past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, S.; Rozel, A. B.; Valentine, A. P.; Tackley, P.; Trampert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and modelling mantle convection requires knowledge of many mantle properties, such as viscosity, chemical structure and thermal proerties such as radiogenic heating rate. However, many of these parameters are only poorly constrained. We demonstrate a new method for inverting present day Earth observations for mantle properties. We use neural networks to represent the posterior probability density functions of many different mantle properties given the present structure of the mantle. We construct these probability density functions by sampling a wide range of possible mantle properties and running forward simulations, using the convection code StagYY. Our approach is particularly powerful because of its flexibility. Our samples are selected in the prior space, rather than being targeted towards a particular observation, as would normally be the case for probabilistic inversion. This means that the same suite of simulations can be used for inversions using a wide range of geophysical observations without the need to resample. Our method is probabilistic and non-linear and is therefore compatible with non-linear convection, avoiding some of the limitations associated with other methods for inverting mantle flow. This allows us to consider the entire history of the mantle. We also need relatively few samples for our inversion, making our approach computationally tractable when considering long periods of mantle history. Using the present thermal and density structure of the mantle, we can constrain rheological and compositional parameters such as viscosity and yield stress. We can also use the present day mantle structure to make inferences about the initial conditions for convection 4.5 Gyr ago. We can constrain initial mantle conditions including the initial concentration of heat producing elements in the mantle and the initial thickness of primordial material at the CMB. Currently we use density and temperature structure for our inversions, but we can

  12. Thermal and Chemical Structures at the Core-Mantle Boundary: Implications for the Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Mertens, M.; Hansen, U.

    2013-12-01

    The core-mantle boundary (CMB) represents the lower boundary layer of the actively convecting Earth's mantle and is structurally very complex. For example, large low shear wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) but also small-scale ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been detected seismically. Thermal and chemical structures such as thermal plumes and thermochemical piles have been considered to explain the complexities. Both affect the dynamics of the Earth's mantle and its temporal evolution. But also the surface plates are an essential aspect of mantle convection that strongly influence the dynamics of the interior. Cold subducting slabs penetrating the lower boundary layer will also affect the CMB topography. To study the structure and dynamics of the lower mantle we use numerical thermochemical models of mantle convection with a complex rheological approach, including a strong temperature-, stress- and pressure-dependent viscosity. This allows for the investigation of thermal plumes and thermochemical piles in combination with plate-like surface motion and deep subduction. In thermochemical convection dense material is viscously trapped by the flow and piled beneath plumes. The presence of the dense layer reduces the mobility of the surface plates but during plate evolution we find a variety of plume classes (plumes, thermals, line-plumes) leaving a complex structure in the CMB topography.

  13. Venus: Mantle convection, hotspots, and tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The putative paradigm that planets of the same size and mass have the same tectonic style led to the adaptation of the mechanisms of terrestrial plate tectonics as the a priori model of the way Venus should behave. Data acquired over the last decade by Pioneer Venus, Venera, and ground-based radar have modified this view sharply and have illuminated the lack of detailed understanding of the plate tectonic mechanism. For reference, terrestrial mechanisms are briefly reviewed. Venusian lithospheric divergence, hotspot model, and horizontal deformation theories are proposed and examined.

  14. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  15. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  16. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  17. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  18. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  19. The effects of mantle compressibility on mantle dynamics, magmatism and degassing for super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of extra-solar planets, especially massive terrestrial super-Earths, prompts studies of surface and internal characteristics of super-Earths that may help characterize super-Earths and understand their surface environments and habitability. An important question is related to the formation and evolution of super-Earth’s atmosphere for which mantle degassing resulting from magmatism has important controls. Similar to terrestrial planets in our Solar system, volcanism and magmatism for super-Earths, as a form of heat release from planetary interiors, are likely controlled by the dynamics of mantle convection, and more specifically plate tectonic process and mantle upwelling plumes. However, compared with that for terrestrial planets in our Solar system, the dynamics of mantle convection for super-Earths due to their larger size and mass should be more dissipative and display larger compressibility effects. Using a radius scaling with mass for super-Earths by Valencia et al. [2007], it can be inferred that the mantle dissipation number Di for super-Earths with ~10 Earth’s mass may be 4 times larger than that for the Earth. This may lead to rapid cooling of mantle upwellings and warming of mantle downwellings for super-Earths, thus diminishing mantle buoyancy driving mantle convection. With the large dissipation number, we found that the excess temperature of mantle upwelling plumes may decrease by one order of magnitude as they ascend through the mantle, thus greatly reducing plume-related magmatism and degassing. Another important control on Super-Earth’s magmatism and degassing comes from their increased surface gravitational acceleration that for super-Earths with ~10 Earth’s mass may be three times larger than that at the Earth’s surface. This limits the melting to relatively shallow depths and within small depth ranges, thus posing additional difficulties for plume-related magmatism and degassing. This implies that degassing for super

  20. Viscosity profile of the lower mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, K.; Schubert, G.; Sammis, C. G.

    1985-01-01

    The viscosity of the earth's mantle is an important factor in studies of mantle convection and other problems in geodynamics. The present investigation is concerned with a determination of the variation of effective viscosity across the lower mantle from models of the Gibb's free energy of activation G(asterisk) and the adiabatic temperature profile. The variation of G(asterisk) with depth is calculated using both an elastic strain energy model, in which G(asterisk) is related to the seismic velocities, and a model which assumes G(asterisk) is proportional to the melting temperature.

  1. 3D Compressible Melt Transport with Mesh Adaptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, J.; Heister, T.

    2015-12-01

    Melt generation and migration have been the subject of numerous investigations. However, their typical time and length scales are vastly different from mantle convection, and the material properties are highly spatially variable and make the problem strongly non-linear. These challenges make it difficult to study these processes in a unified framework and in three dimensions. We present our extension of the mantle convection code ASPECT that allows for solving additional equations describing the behavior of melt percolating through and interacting with a viscously deforming host rock. One particular advantage is ASPECT's adaptive mesh refinement, as the resolution can be increased in areas where melt is present and viscosity gradients are steep, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. Our approach includes both melt migration and melt generation, allowing for different melting parametrizations. In contrast to previous formulations, we consider the individual compressibilities of the solid and fluid phases in addition to compaction flow. This ensures self-consistency when linking melt generation to processes in the deeper mantle, where the compressibility of the solid phase becomes more important. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of benchmarks and applications, including solitary waves, magmatic shear bands and melt generation and transport in a rising mantle plume. We compare results of the compressible and incompressible formulation and find melt volume differences of up to 15%. Moreover, we demonstrate that adaptive mesh refinement has the potential to reduce the runtime of a computation by more than one order of magnitude. Our model of magma dynamics provides a framework for investigating links between the deep mantle and melt generation and migration. This approach could prove particularly useful applied to modeling the generation of komatiites or other melts originating in greater depths.

  2. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D