Science.gov

Sample records for 3-d monte-carlo analysis

  1. NOTE: A software tool for 2D/3D visualization and analysis of phase-space data generated by Monte Carlo modelling of medical linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Aljarrah, Khaled M.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2005-10-01

    A computer program has been developed for novel 2D/3D visualization and analysis of the phase-space parameters of Monte Carlo simulations of medical accelerator radiation beams. The software is written in the IDL language and reads the phase-space data generated in the BEAMnrc/BEAM Monte Carlo code format. Contour and colour-wash plots of the fluence, mean energy, energy fluence, mean angle, spectra distribution, energy fluence distribution, angular distribution, and slices and projections of the 3D ZLAST distribution can be calculated and displayed. Based on our experience of using it at Massachusetts General Hospital, the software has proven to be a useful tool for analysis and verification of the Monte Carlo generated phase-space files. The software is in the public domain.

  2. Monte Carlo Ion Transport Analysis Code.

    2009-04-15

    Version: 00 TRIPOS is a versatile Monte Carlo ion transport analysis code. It has been applied to the treatment of both surface and bulk radiation effects. The media considered is composed of multilayer polyatomic materials.

  3. Monte Carlo Shielding Analysis Capabilities with MAVRIC

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo shielding analysis capabilities in SCALE 6 are centered on the CADIS methodology Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. CADIS is used to create an importance map for space/energy weight windows as well as a biased source distribution. New to SCALE 6 are the Monaco functional module, a multi-group fixed-source Monte Carlo transport code, and the MAVRIC sequence (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction Using Importance Calculations). MAVRIC uses the Denovo code (also new to SCALE 6) to compute coarse-mesh discrete ordinates solutions which are used by CADIS to form an importance map and biased source distribution for the Monaco Monte Carlo code. MAVRIC allows the user to optimize the Monaco calculation for a specify tally using the CADIS method with little extra input compared to a standard Monte Carlo calculation. When computing several tallies at once or a mesh tally over a large volume of space, an extension of the CADIS method called FW-CADIS can be used to help the Monte Carlo simulation spread particles over phase space to get more uniform relative uncertainties.

  4. A highly heterogeneous 3D PWR core benchmark: deterministic and Monte Carlo method comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Damian, F.; Douce, S.; Lopez, F.; Guenaut, C.; Aggery, A.; Poinot-Salanon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Physical analyses of the LWR potential performances with regards to the fuel utilization require an important part of the work dedicated to the validation of the deterministic models used for theses analyses. Advances in both codes and computer technology give the opportunity to perform the validation of these models on complex 3D core configurations closed to the physical situations encountered (both steady-state and transient configurations). In this paper, we used the Monte Carlo Transport code TRIPOLI-4®; to describe a whole 3D large-scale and highly-heterogeneous LWR core. The aim of this study is to validate the deterministic CRONOS2 code to Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®; in a relevant PWR core configuration. As a consequence, a 3D pin by pin model with a consistent number of volumes (4.3 millions) and media (around 23,000) is established to precisely characterize the core at equilibrium cycle, namely using a refined burn-up and moderator density maps. The configuration selected for this analysis is a very heterogeneous PWR high conversion core with fissile (MOX fuel) and fertile zones (depleted uranium). Furthermore, a tight pitch lattice is selcted (to increase conversion of 238U in 239Pu) that leads to harder neutron spectrum compared to standard PWR assembly. In these conditions two main subjects will be discussed: the Monte Carlo variance calculation and the assessment of the diffusion operator with two energy groups for the core calculation.

  5. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  6. CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR CALCULATING GENERALIZED RESPONSE SENSITIVITIES USING TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces a new approach for calculating sensitivity coefficients for generalized neutronic responses to nuclear data uncertainties using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. The approach presented in this paper, known as the GEAR-MC method, allows for the calculation of generalized sensitivity coefficients for multiple responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with no nuclear data perturbations or knowledge of nuclear covariance data. The theory behind the GEAR-MC method is presented here, and proof of principle is demonstrated by using the GEAR-MC method to calculate sensitivity coefficients for responses in several 3D, continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications.

  7. Improving light propagation Monte Carlo simulations with accurate 3D modeling of skin tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Price, Jeffery R; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D light propagation model to simulate multispectral reflectance images of large skin surface areas. In particular, we aim to simulate more accurately the effects of various physiological properties of the skin in the case of subcutaneous vein imaging compared to existing models. Our method combines a Monte Carlo light propagation model, a realistic three-dimensional model of the skin using parametric surfaces and a vision system for data acquisition. We describe our model in detail, present results from the Monte Carlo modeling and compare our results with those obtained with a well established Monte Carlo model and with real skin reflectance images.

  8. Monte Carlo generators for studies of the 3D structure of the nucleon

    DOE PAGES

    Avakian, Harut; D'Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.

    2015-01-23

    In this study, extraction of transverse momentum and space distributions of partons from measurements of spin and azimuthal asymmetries requires development of a self consistent analysis framework, accounting for evolution effects, and allowing control of systematic uncertainties due to variations of input parameters and models. Development of realistic Monte-Carlo generators, accounting for TMD evolution effects, spin-orbit and quark-gluon correlations will be crucial for future studies of quark-gluon dynamics in general and 3D structure of the nucleon in particular.

  9. Geometrically-compatible 3-D Monte Carlo and discrete-ordinates methods

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.E.; Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.; Evans, T.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was two-fold. The first purpose was to develop a deterministic discrete-ordinates neutral-particle transport scheme for unstructured tetrahedral spatial meshes, and implement it in a computer code. The second purpose was to modify the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code to use adjoint solutions from the tetrahedral-mesh discrete-ordinates code to reduce the statistical variance of Monte Carlo solutions via a weight-window approach. The first task has resulted in a deterministic transport code that is much more efficient for modeling complex 3-D geometries than any previously existing deterministic code. The second task has resulted in a powerful new capability for dramatically reducing the cost of difficult 3-D Monte Carlo calculations.

  10. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    1998-01-13

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  11. A quasi-Monte Carlo approach to efficient 3-D migration: Field data test

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Chen, J.; Schuster, G.T.; Smith, B.A.

    1999-10-01

    The quasi-Monte Carlo migration algorithm is applied to a 3-D seismic data set from West Texas. The field data were finely sampled at approximately 220-ft intervals in the in-line direction but were sampled coarsely at approximately 1,320-ft intervals in the cross-line direction. The traces at the quasi-Monte Carlo points were obtained by an interpolation of the regularly sampled traces. The subsampled traces at the quasi-Monte Carlo points were migrated, and the resulting images were compared to those obtained by migrating both regular and uniform grids of traces. Results show that, consistent with theory, the quasi-Monte Carlo migration images contain fewer migration aliasing artifacts than the regular or uniform grid images. For these data, quasi-Monte Carlo migration apparently requires fewer than half the number of the traces needed by regular-grid or uniform-grid migration to give images of comparable quality. These results agree with related migration tests on synthetic data computed for point scatterer models. Results suggest that better migration images might result from data recorded on a coarse quasi-random grid compared to regular or uniform coarse grids.

  12. Economic Risk Analysis: Using Analytical and Monte Carlo Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Brendan R.; Hickner, Michael A.; Barna, Bruce A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development and instructional use of a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet template that facilitates analytical and Monte Carlo risk analysis of investment decisions. Discusses a variety of risk assessment methods followed by applications of the analytical and Monte Carlo methods. Uses a case study to illustrate use of the spreadsheet tool…

  13. Vectorized Monte Carlo methods for reactor lattice analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, F. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the new computational methods and equivalent mathematical representations of physics models used in the MCV code, a vectorized continuous-enery Monte Carlo code for use on the CYBER-205 computer are discussed. While the principal application of MCV is the neutronics analysis of repeating reactor lattices, the new methods used in MCV should be generally useful for vectorizing Monte Carlo for other applications. For background, a brief overview of the vector processing features of the CYBER-205 is included, followed by a discussion of the fundamentals of Monte Carlo vectorization. The physics models used in the MCV vectorized Monte Carlo code are then summarized. The new methods used in scattering analysis are presented along with details of several key, highly specialized computational routines. Finally, speedups relative to CDC-7600 scalar Monte Carlo are discussed.

  14. Full 3D visualization tool-kit for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Frambati, S.; Frignani, M.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a package of tools capable of translating the geometric inputs and outputs of many Monte Carlo and deterministic radiation transport codes into open source file formats. These tools are aimed at bridging the gap between trusted, widely-used radiation analysis codes and very powerful, more recent and commonly used visualization software, thus supporting the design process and helping with shielding optimization. Three main lines of development were followed: mesh-based analysis of Monte Carlo codes, mesh-based analysis of deterministic codes and Monte Carlo surface meshing. The developed kit is considered a powerful and cost-effective tool in the computer-aided design for radiation transport code users of the nuclear world, and in particular in the fields of core design and radiation analysis. (authors)

  15. Variance reduction in Monte Carlo analysis of rarefied gas diffusion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of rarefied diffusion between parallel walls is solved using the Monte Carlo method. The diffusing molecules are evaporated or emitted from one of the two parallel walls and diffuse through another molecular species. The Monte Carlo analysis treats the diffusing molecule as undergoing a Markov random walk, and the local macroscopic properties are found as the expected value of the random variable, the random walk payoff. By biasing the transition probabilities and changing the collision payoffs, the expected Markov walk payoff is retained but its variance is reduced so that the Monte Carlo result has a much smaller error.

  16. Coupling 3D Monte Carlo light transport in optically heterogeneous tissues to photoacoustic signal generation

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The generation of photoacoustic signals for imaging objects embedded within tissues is dependent on how well light can penetrate to and deposit energy within an optically absorbing object, such as a blood vessel. This report couples a 3D Monte Carlo simulation of light transport to stress wave generation to predict the acoustic signals received by a detector at the tissue surface. The Monte Carlo simulation allows modeling of optically heterogeneous tissues, and a simple MATLAB™ acoustic algorithm predicts signals reaching a surface detector. An example simulation considers a skin with a pigmented epidermis, a dermis with a background blood perfusion, and a 500-μm-dia. blood vessel centered at a 1-mm depth in the skin. The simulation yields acoustic signals received by a surface detector, which are generated by a pulsed 532-nm laser exposure before and after inserting the blood vessel. A MATLAB™ version of the acoustic algorithm and a link to the 3D Monte Carlo website are provided. PMID:25426426

  17. Coupling 3D Monte Carlo light transport in optically heterogeneous tissues to photoacoustic signal generation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Steven L

    2014-12-01

    The generation of photoacoustic signals for imaging objects embedded within tissues is dependent on how well light can penetrate to and deposit energy within an optically absorbing object, such as a blood vessel. This report couples a 3D Monte Carlo simulation of light transport to stress wave generation to predict the acoustic signals received by a detector at the tissue surface. The Monte Carlo simulation allows modeling of optically heterogeneous tissues, and a simple MATLAB™ acoustic algorithm predicts signals reaching a surface detector. An example simulation considers a skin with a pigmented epidermis, a dermis with a background blood perfusion, and a 500-μm-dia. blood vessel centered at a 1-mm depth in the skin. The simulation yields acoustic signals received by a surface detector, which are generated by a pulsed 532-nm laser exposure before and after inserting the blood vessel. A MATLAB™ version of the acoustic algorithm and a link to the 3D Monte Carlo website are provided.

  18. 3-D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo modeling of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Su, C.; Finklenburg, S.; Rubin, M.; Ip, W.; Keller, H.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.; Lai, I.; Skorov, Y.; Thomas, N.; Wu, J.; Chen, Y.

    2014-07-01

    After deep-space hibernation, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has been successfully woken up and obtained the first images of comet 67P /Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) in March 2014. It is expected that Rosetta will rendezvous with comet 67P and start to observe the nucleus and coma of the comet in the middle of 2014. As the comet approaches the Sun, a significant increase in activity is expected. Our aim is to understand the physical processes in the coma with the help of modeling in order to interpret the resulting measurements and establish observational and data analysis strategies. DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) [1] is a very powerful numerical method to study rarefied gas flows such as cometary comae and has been used by several authors over the past decade to study cometary outflow [2,3]. Comparisons between DSMC and fluid techniques have also been performed to establish the limits of these techniques [2,4]. The drawback with 3D DSMC is that it is computationally highly intensive and thus time consuming. However, the performance can be dramatically increased with parallel computing on Graphic Processor Units (GPUs) [5]. We have already studied a case with comet 9P/Tempel 1 where the Deep Impact observations were used to define the shape of the nucleus and the outflow was simulated with the DSMC approach [6,7]. For comet 67P, we intend to determine the gas flow field in the innermost coma and the surface outgassing properties from analyses of the flow field, to investigate dust acceleration by gas drag, and to compare with observations (including time variability). The boundary conditions are implemented with a nucleus shape model [8] and thermal models which are based on the surface heat-balance equation. Several different parameter sets have been investigated. The calculations have been performed using the PDSC^{++} (Parallel Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) code [9] developed by Wu and his coworkers [10-12]. Simulation tasks can be accomplished within 24

  19. Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code System.

    2013-06-24

    Version 07 TART2012 is a coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code designed to use three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial geometry. Neutron and/or photon sources as well as neutron induced photon production can be tracked. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2012 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared tomore » other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2012 extends the general utility of the code to even more areas of application than available in previous releases by concentrating on improving the physics, particularly with regard to improved treatment of neutron fission, resonance self-shielding, molecular binding, and extending input options used by the code. Several utilities are included for creating input files and displaying TART results and data. TART2012 uses the latest ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, data. New for TART2012 is the use of continuous energy neutron cross sections, in addition to its traditional multigroup cross sections. For neutron interaction, the data are derived using ENDF-ENDL2005 and include both continuous energy cross sections and 700 group neutron data derived using a combination of ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, and ENDL data. The 700 group structure extends from 10-5 eV up to 1 GeV. Presently nuclear data are only available up to 20 MeV, so that only 616 of the groups are currently used. For photon interaction, 701 point photon data were derived using the Livermore EPDL97 file. The new 701 point structure extends from 100 eV up to 1 GeV, and is currently used over this entire energy range. TART2012 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that one use only the most recent version of TART2012 and its data files. Check author’s homepage for related information: http

  20. Tool for Rapid Analysis of Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; McCall, Kurt E.; Hurtado, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Designing a spacecraft, or any other complex engineering system, requires extensive simulation and analysis work. Oftentimes, the large amounts of simulation data generated are very di cult and time consuming to analyze, with the added risk of overlooking potentially critical problems in the design. The authors have developed a generic data analysis tool that can quickly sort through large data sets and point an analyst to the areas in the data set that cause specific types of failures. The Tool for Rapid Analysis of Monte Carlo simulations (TRAM) has been used in recent design and analysis work for the Orion vehicle, greatly decreasing the time it takes to evaluate performance requirements. A previous version of this tool was developed to automatically identify driving design variables in Monte Carlo data sets. This paper describes a new, parallel version, of TRAM implemented on a graphical processing unit, and presents analysis results for NASA's Orion Monte Carlo data to demonstrate its capabilities.

  1. 2D/3D Monte Carlo Feature Profile Simulator FPS-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulation of etching/deposition profiles is important for semiconductor industry, as it allows analysis and prediction of the outcome of materials processing on a micron and sub-micron scale. The difficulty, however, is in making such a simulator a reliable, general, and easy to use tool applicable to different situations, for example, with different ratios of ion to neutral fluxes, different chemistries, different energies of incoming particles, and different angular and energy dependencies for surface reactions, without recompiling the code each time when the parameters change. The FPS-3D simulator [1] does not need recompilation when the features, materials, gases, or plasma are changed -- modifications to input, chemistry, and flux files are enough. The code allows interaction of neutral low-energy species with the surface mono-layer, while considering finite penetration depth into the volume for fast particles and ions. The FPS-3D code can simulate etching and deposition processes, both for 2D and 3D geometries. FPS-3D is using an advanced graphics package from HFS for presenting real-time process and profile evolution. The presentation will discuss the FPS-3D code with examples for different process conditions. The author is thankful to Drs. S.-Y. Kang of TEL TDC and P. Miller of HFS for valuable discussions. [4pt] [1] P. Moroz, URP.00101, GEC, Saratoga, NY, 2009.

  2. APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN MONTE CARLO ANALYSIS TO A LAGRANGIAN PHOTOCHEMICAL AIR QUALITY MODEL. (R824792)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uncertainties in ozone concentrations predicted with a Lagrangian photochemical air quality model have been estimated using Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) analysis. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis provides a means of combining subjective "prior" uncertainty estimates developed ...

  3. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, E.; Monasterio, P.R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-20

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  4. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  5. A 3D polarized Monte Carlo LIDAR system simulator for studying effects of cirrus inhomogeneities on CALIOP/CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczap, F.; Cornet, C.; Alqassem, A.; Gour, Y.; C.-Labonnote, L.; Jourdan, O.

    2013-05-01

    To estimate cirrus inhomogeneity effects on the apparent backscatter and on the apparent depolarization ratio measured by CALIOP/CALIPSO, a 3D polarized Monte Carlo LIDAR simulator was developed. Comparisons were done with the fast Hogan's LIDAR simulator. Early results show that clouds inhomogeneous effects seem to be negligible on the apparent backscatter but not on the apparent depolarization ratio.

  6. Improvement of 3d Monte Carlo Localization Using a Depth Camera and Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, S.; Hatakeyama, R.; Date, H.

    2015-05-01

    Effective and accurate localization method in three-dimensional indoor environments is a key requirement for indoor navigation and lifelong robotic assistance. So far, Monte Carlo Localization (MCL) has given one of the promising solutions for the indoor localization methods. Previous work of MCL has been mostly limited to 2D motion estimation in a planar map, and a few 3D MCL approaches have been recently proposed. However, their localization accuracy and efficiency still remain at an unsatisfactory level (a few hundreds millimetre error at up to a few FPS) or is not fully verified with the precise ground truth. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to improve an accuracy and efficiency of 6DOF motion estimation in 3D MCL for indoor localization. Firstly, a terrestrial laser scanner is used for creating a precise 3D mesh model as an environment map, and a professional-level depth camera is installed as an outer sensor. GPU scene simulation is also introduced to upgrade the speed of prediction phase in MCL. Moreover, for further improvement, GPGPU programming is implemented to realize further speed up of the likelihood estimation phase, and anisotropic particle propagation is introduced into MCL based on the observations from an inertia sensor. Improvements in the localization accuracy and efficiency are verified by the comparison with a previous MCL method. As a result, it was confirmed that GPGPU-based algorithm was effective in increasing the computational efficiency to 10-50 FPS when the number of particles remain below a few hundreds. On the other hand, inertia sensor-based algorithm reduced the localization error to a median of 47mm even with less number of particles. The results showed that our proposed 3D MCL method outperforms the previous one in accuracy and efficiency.

  7. 3D Visualization of Monte-Carlo Simulation's of HZE Track Structure and Initial Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ions biophysics is important for space radiation risk assessment [1] and hadron-therapy [2]. The characteristic of heavy ions tracks include a very high energy deposition region close to the track (<20 nm) denoted as the track core, and an outer penumbra region consisting of individual secondary electrons (6-rays). A still open question is the radiobiological effects of 6- rays relative to the track core. Of importance is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) [3] and oxidative damage to the biomolecules and the tissue matrix, considered the most important lesions for acute and long term effects of radiation. In this work, we have simulated a 56Fe26+ ion track of 1 GeV/amu with our Monte-Carlo code RITRACKS [4]. The simulation results have been used to calculate the energy depiction and initial chemical species in a "voxelized" space, which is then visualized in 3D. Several voxels with dose >1000 Gy are found in the penumbra, some located 0.1 mm from the track core. In computational models, the DSB induction probability is calculated with radial dose [6], which may not take into account the higher RBE of electron track ends for DSB induction. Therefore, these simulations should help improve models of DSB induction and our understanding of heavy ions biophysics.

  8. Monte Carlo study of a 3D Compton imaging device with GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we investigate, with a detailed Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4, the novel approach of Lenti (2008) [1] to 3D imaging with photon scattering. A monochromatic and well collimated gamma beam is used to illuminate the object to be imaged and the photons Compton scattered are detected by means of a surrounding germanium strip detector. The impact position and the energy of the photons are measured with high precision and the scattering position along the beam axis is calculated. We study as an application of this technique the case of brain imaging but the results can be applied as well to situations where a lighter object, with localized variations of density, is embedded in a denser container. We report here the attainable sensitivity in the detection of density variations as a function of the beam energy, the depth inside the object and size and density of the inclusions. Using a 600 keV gamma beam, for an inclusion with a density increase of 30% with respect to the surrounding tissue and thickness along the beam of 5 mm, we obtain at midbrain position a resolution of about 2 mm and a contrast of 12%. In addition the simulation indicates that for the same gamma beam energy a complete brain scan would result in an effective dose of about 1 mSv.

  9. New insights into photodynamic therapy treatment through the use of 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. L.; Wood, Kenneth; Brown, C. Tom A.; Moseley, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been theoretically investigated using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer (MCRT) model. By including complex three dimensional (3D) tumour models a more appropriate representation of the treatment was achieved. The 3D clustered tumour model was compared to a smooth model, resulting in a significantly deeper penetration associated with the clustered model. The results from the work presented here indicates that light might penetrate deeper than suggested by 2D or simple layered models.

  10. A Post-Monte-Carlo Sensitivity Analysis Code

    2000-04-04

    SATOOL (Sensitivity Analysis TOOL) is a code for sensitivity analysis, following an uncertainity analysis with Monte Carlo simulations. Sensitivity analysis identifies those input variables, whose variance contributes dominatly to the variance in the output. This analysis can be used to reduce the variance in the output variables by redefining the "sensitive" variables with greater precision, i.e. with lower variance. The code identifies a group of sensitive variables, ranks them in the order of importance andmore » also quantifies the relative importance among the sensitive variables.« less

  11. Adaptive multi-GPU Exchange Monte Carlo for the 3D Random Field Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Cristóbal A.; Huang, Wei; Deng, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    This work presents an adaptive multi-GPU Exchange Monte Carlo approach for the simulation of the 3D Random Field Ising Model (RFIM). The design is based on a two-level parallelization. The first level, spin-level parallelism, maps the parallel computation as optimal 3D thread-blocks that simulate blocks of spins in shared memory with minimal halo surface, assuming a constant block volume. The second level, replica-level parallelism, uses multi-GPU computation to handle the simulation of an ensemble of replicas. CUDA's concurrent kernel execution feature is used in order to fill the occupancy of each GPU with many replicas, providing a performance boost that is more notorious at the smallest values of L. In addition to the two-level parallel design, the work proposes an adaptive multi-GPU approach that dynamically builds a proper temperature set free of exchange bottlenecks. The strategy is based on mid-point insertions at the temperature gaps where the exchange rate is most compromised. The extra work generated by the insertions is balanced across the GPUs independently of where the mid-point insertions were performed. Performance results show that spin-level performance is approximately two orders of magnitude faster than a single-core CPU version and one order of magnitude faster than a parallel multi-core CPU version running on 16-cores. Multi-GPU performance is highly convenient under a weak scaling setting, reaching up to 99 % efficiency as long as the number of GPUs and L increase together. The combination of the adaptive approach with the parallel multi-GPU design has extended our possibilities of simulation to sizes of L = 32 , 64 for a workstation with two GPUs. Sizes beyond L = 64 can eventually be studied using larger multi-GPU systems.

  12. Variance reduction in Monte Carlo analysis of rarefied gas diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.

    1972-01-01

    The present analysis uses the Monte Carlo method to solve the problem of rarefied diffusion between parallel walls. The diffusing molecules are evaporated or emitted from one of two parallel walls and diffused through another molecular species. The analysis treats the diffusing molecule as undergoing a Markov random walk and the local macroscopic properties are found as the expected value of the random variable, the random walk payoff. By biasing the transition probabilities and changing the collision payoffs the expected Markov walk payoff is retained but its variance is reduced so that the M. C. result has a much smaller error.

  13. Conceptual detector development and Monte Carlo simulation of a novel 3D breast computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegle, Jens; Müller, Bernhard H.; Neumann, Bernd; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    A new 3D breast computed tomography (CT) system is under development enabling imaging of microcalcifications in a fully uncompressed breast including posterior chest wall tissue. The system setup uses a steered electron beam impinging on small tungsten targets surrounding the breast to emit X-rays. A realization of the corresponding detector concept is presented in this work and it is modeled through Monte Carlo simulations in order to quantify first characteristics of transmission and secondary photons. The modeled system comprises a vertical alignment of linear detectors hold by a case that also hosts the breast. Detectors are separated by gaps to allow the passage of X-rays towards the breast volume. The detectors located directly on the opposite side of the gaps detect incident X-rays. Mechanically moving parts in an imaging system increase the duration of image acquisition and thus can cause motion artifacts. So, a major advantage of the presented system design is the combination of the fixed detectors and the fast steering electron beam which enable a greatly reduced scan time. Thereby potential motion artifacts are reduced so that the visualization of small structures such as microcalcifications is improved. The result of the simulation of a single projection shows high attenuation by parts of the detector electronics causing low count levels at the opposing detectors which would require a flat field correction, but it also shows a secondary to transmission ratio of all counted X-rays of less than 1 percent. Additionally, a single slice with details of various sizes was reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The smallest detail which was still visible in the reconstructed image has a size of 0.2mm.

  14. Assessment of a fully 3D Monte Carlo reconstruction method for preclinical PET with iodine-124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, M.; Buvat, I.; Ammour, L.; Chouin, N.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.; Chérel, M.; Carlier, T.

    2015-03-01

    Iodine-124 is a radionuclide well suited to the labeling of intact monoclonal antibodies. Yet, accurate quantification in preclinical imaging with I-124 is challenging due to the large positron range and a complex decay scheme including high-energy gammas. The aim of this work was to assess the quantitative performance of a fully 3D Monte Carlo (MC) reconstruction for preclinical I-124 PET. The high-resolution small animal PET Inveon (Siemens) was simulated using GATE 6.1. Three system matrices (SM) of different complexity were calculated in addition to a Siddon-based ray tracing approach for comparison purpose. Each system matrix accounted for a more or less complete description of the physics processes both in the scanned object and in the PET scanner. One homogeneous water phantom and three heterogeneous phantoms including water, lungs and bones were simulated, where hot and cold regions were used to assess activity recovery as well as the trade-off between contrast recovery and noise in different regions. The benefit of accounting for scatter, attenuation, positron range and spurious coincidences occurring in the object when calculating the system matrix used to reconstruct I-124 PET images was highlighted. We found that the use of an MC SM including a thorough modelling of the detector response and physical effects in a uniform water-equivalent phantom was efficient to get reasonable quantitative accuracy in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Modelling the phantom heterogeneities in the SM did not necessarily yield the most accurate estimate of the activity distribution, due to the high variance affecting many SM elements in the most sophisticated SM.

  15. Stratified source-sampling techniques for Monte Carlo eigenvalue analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.

    1998-07-10

    In 1995, at a conference on criticality safety, a special session was devoted to the Monte Carlo ''Eigenvalue of the World'' problem. Argonne presented a paper, at that session, in which the anomalies originally observed in that problem were reproduced in a much simplified model-problem configuration, and removed by a version of stratified source-sampling. In this paper, stratified source-sampling techniques are generalized and applied to three different Eigenvalue of the World configurations which take into account real-world statistical noise sources not included in the model problem, but which differ in the amount of neutronic coupling among the constituents of each configuration. It is concluded that, in Monte Carlo eigenvalue analysis of loosely-coupled arrays, the use of stratified source-sampling reduces the probability of encountering an anomalous result over that if conventional source-sampling methods are used. However, this gain in reliability is substantially less than that observed in the model-problem results.

  16. Monte Carlo Test Assembly for Item Pool Analysis and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    A new test assembly algorithm based on a Monte Carlo random search is presented in this article. A major advantage of the Monte Carlo test assembly over other approaches (integer programming or enumerative heuristics) is that it performs a uniform sampling from the item pool, which provides every feasible item combination (test) with an equal…

  17. Iterative Monte Carlo analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, W.; Kuhn, S. E.; Ethier, J. J.; Accardi, A.; Jefferson Lab Angular Momentum Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We present a comprehensive new global QCD analysis of polarized inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, including the latest high-precision data on longitudinal and transverse polarization asymmetries from Jefferson Lab and elsewhere. The analysis is performed using a new iterative Monte Carlo fitting technique which generates stable fits to polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) with statistically rigorous uncertainties. Inclusion of the Jefferson Lab data leads to a reduction in the PDF errors for the valence and sea quarks, as well as in the gluon polarization uncertainty at x ≳0.1 . The study also provides the first determination of the flavor-separated twist-3 PDFs and the d2 moment of the nucleon within a global PDF analysis.

  18. Applicability of 3D Monte Carlo simulations for local values calculations in a PWR core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Jacquet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN has been developing the MORET Monte Carlo code for many years in the framework of criticality safety assessment and is now working to extend its application to reactor physics. For that purpose, beside the validation for criticality safety (more than 2000 benchmarks from the ICSBEP Handbook have been modeled and analyzed), a complementary validation phase for reactor physics has been started, with benchmarks from IRPHEP Handbook and others. In particular, to evaluate the applicability of MORET and other Monte Carlo codes for local flux or power density calculations in large power reactors, it has been decided to contribute to the "Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark" (hosted by OECD/NEA). The aim of this benchmark is to monitor, in forthcoming decades, the performance progress of detailed Monte Carlo full core calculations. More precisely, it measures their advancement towards achieving high statistical accuracy in reasonable computation time for local power at fuel pellet level. A full PWR reactor core is modeled to compute local power densities for more than 6 million fuel regions. This paper presents results obtained at IRSN for this benchmark with MORET and comparisons with MCNP. The number of fuel elements is so large that source convergence as well as statistical convergence issues could cause large errors in local tallies, especially in peripheral zones. Various sampling or tracking methods have been implemented in MORET, and their operational effects on such a complex case have been studied. Beyond convergence issues, to compute local values in so many fuel regions could cause prohibitive slowing down of neutron tracking. To avoid this, energy grid unification and tallies preparation before tracking have been implemented, tested and proved to be successful. In this particular case, IRSN obtained promising results with MORET compared to MCNP, in terms of local power densities, standard

  19. The X-43A Six Degree of Freedom Monte Carlo Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Ethan; Bahm, Catherine; Strovers, Brian; Beck, Roger

    2008-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the Hyper-X research vehicle Monte Carlo analysis conducted with the six-degree-of-freedom simulation. The methodology and model uncertainties used for the Monte Carlo analysis are presented as permitted. In addition, the process used to select hardware validation test cases from the Monte Carlo data is described. The preflight Monte Carlo analysis indicated that the X-43A control system was robust to the preflight uncertainties and provided the Hyper-X project an important indication that the vehicle would likely be successful in accomplishing the mission objectives. The X-43A inflight performance is compared to the preflight Monte Carlo predictions and shown to exceed the Monte Carlo bounds in several instances. Possible modeling shortfalls are presented that may account for these discrepancies. The flight control laws and guidance algorithms were robust enough as a result of the preflight Monte Carlo analysis that the unexpected in-flight performance did not have undue consequences. Modeling and Monte Carlo analysis lessons learned are presented.

  20. The X-43A Six Degree of Freedom Monte Carlo Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Ethan; Bahm, Catherine; Strovers, Brian; Beck, Roger; Richard, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the Hyper-X research vehicle Monte Carlo analysis conducted with the six-degree-of-freedom simulation. The methodology and model uncertainties used for the Monte Carlo analysis are presented as permitted. In addition, the process used to select hardware validation test cases from the Monte Carlo data is described. The preflight Monte Carlo analysis indicated that the X-43A control system was robust to the preflight uncertainties and provided the Hyper-X project an important indication that the vehicle would likely be successful in accomplishing the mission objectives. The X-43A in-flight performance is compared to the preflight Monte Carlo predictions and shown to exceed the Monte Carlo bounds in several instances. Possible modeling shortfalls are presented that may account for these discrepancies. The flight control laws and guidance algorithms were robust enough as a result of the preflight Monte Carlo analysis that the unexpected in-flight performance did not have undue consequences. Modeling and Monte Carlo analysis lessons learned are presented.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for light propagation in 3D tooth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yongji; Jacques, Steven L.

    2011-03-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was implemented in a three dimensional tooth model to simulate the light propagation in the tooth for antibiotic photodynamic therapy and other laser therapy. The goal of this research is to estimate the light energy deposition in the target region of tooth with given light source information, tooth optical properties and tooth structure. Two use cases were presented to demonstrate the practical application of this model. One case was comparing the isotropic point source and narrow beam dosage distribution and the other case was comparing different incident points for the same light source. This model will help the doctor for PDT design in the tooth.

  2. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random number and for measuring the time of simulation.

  3. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random numbermore » and for measuring the time of simulation.« less

  4. Interpretation of 3D void measurements with Tripoli4.6/JEFF3.1.1 Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, P.; Colomba, A.

    2012-07-01

    The present work details the first analysis of the 3D void phase conducted during the EPICURE/UM17x17/7% mixed UOX/MOX configuration. This configuration is composed of a homogeneous central 17x17 MOX-7% assembly, surrounded by portions of 17x17 1102 assemblies with guide-tubes. The void bubble is modelled by a small waterproof 5x5 fuel pin parallelepiped box of 11 cm height, placed in the centre of the MOX assembly. This bubble, initially placed at the core mid-plane, is then moved in different axial positions to study the evolution in the core of the axial perturbation. Then, to simulate the growing of this bubble in order to understand the effects of increased void fraction along the fuel pin, 3 and 5 bubbles have been stacked axially, from the core mid-plane. The C/E comparison obtained with the Monte Carlo code Tripoli4 for both radial and axial fission rate distributions, and in particular the reproduction of the very important flux gradients at the void/water interfaces, changing as the bubble is displaced along the z-axis are very satisfactory. It demonstrates both the capability of the code and its library to reproduce this kind of situation, as the very good quality of the experimental results, confirming the UM-17x17 as an excellent experimental benchmark for 3D code validation. This work has been performed within the frame of the V and V program for the future APOLL03 deterministic code of CEA starting in 2012, and its V and V benchmarking database. (authors)

  5. Commissioning a CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Justus; Newton, Joseph; Yang Yun; Steffey, Beverly; Cai, Jing; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark; Chino, Junzo; Craciunescu, Oana

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the geometric and dose attenuation characteristics of a new commercially available CT-compatible LDR tandem and ovoid (T and O) applicator using Monte Carlo calculation and 3D dosimetry. Methods: For geometric characterization, we quantified physical dimensions and investigated a systematic difference found to exist between nominal ovoid angle and the angle at which the afterloading buckets fall within the ovoid. For dosimetric characterization, we determined source attenuation through asymmetric gold shielding in the buckets using Monte Carlo simulations and 3D dosimetry. Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to simulate 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} photon histories from a {sup 137}Cs source placed in the bucket to achieve statistical uncertainty of 1% at a 6 cm distance. For 3D dosimetry, the distribution about an unshielded source was first measured to evaluate the system for {sup 137}Cs, after which the distribution was measured about sources placed in each bucket. Cylindrical PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} dosimeters (9.5 cm diameter, 9.2 cm height) with a central channel bored for source placement were supplied by Heuris Inc. The dosimeters were scanned with the Duke Large field of view Optical CT-Scanner before and after delivering a nominal dose at 1 cm of 5-8 Gy. During irradiation the dosimeter was placed in a water phantom to provide backscatter. Optical CT scan time lasted 15 min during which 720 projections were acquired at 0.5 Degree-Sign increments, and a 3D distribution was reconstructed with a (0.05 cm){sup 3} isotropic voxel size. The distributions about the buckets were used to calculate a 3D distribution of transmission rate through the bucket, which was applied to a clinical CT-based T and O implant plan. Results: The systematic difference in bucket angle relative to the nominal ovoid angle (105 Degree-Sign ) was 3.1 Degree-Sign -4.7 Degree-Sign . A systematic difference in bucket angle of 1 Degree-Sign , 5 Degree-Sign , and

  6. Monte Carlo isotopic inventory analysis for complex nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phruksarojanakun, Phiphat

    Monte Carlo Inventory Simulation Engine (MCise) is a newly developed method for calculating isotopic inventory of materials. It offers the promise of modeling materials with complex processes and irradiation histories, which pose challenges for current, deterministic tools, and has strong analogies to Monte Carlo (MC) neutral particle transport. The analog method, including considerations for simple, complex and loop flows, is fully developed. In addition, six variance reduction tools provide unique capabilities of MCise to improve statistical precision of MC simulations. Forced Reaction forces an atom to undergo a desired number of reactions in a given irradiation environment. Biased Reaction Branching primarily focuses on improving statistical results of the isotopes that are produced from rare reaction pathways. Biased Source Sampling aims at increasing frequencies of sampling rare initial isotopes as the starting particles. Reaction Path Splitting increases the population by splitting the atom at each reaction point, creating one new atom for each decay or transmutation product. Delta Tracking is recommended for high-frequency pulsing to reduce the computing time. Lastly, Weight Window is introduced as a strategy to decrease large deviations of weight due to the uses of variance reduction techniques. A figure of merit is necessary to compare the efficiency of different variance reduction techniques. A number of possibilities for figure of merit are explored, two of which are robust and subsequently used. One is based on the relative error of a known target isotope (1/R 2T) and the other on the overall detection limit corrected by the relative error (1/DkR 2T). An automated Adaptive Variance-reduction Adjustment (AVA) tool is developed to iteratively define parameters for some variance reduction techniques in a problem with a target isotope. Sample problems demonstrate that AVA improves both precision and accuracy of a target result in an efficient manner

  7. Parametric 3D Atmospheric Reconstruction in Highly Variable Terrain with Recycled Monte Carlo Paths and an Adapted Bayesian Inference Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langmore, Ian; Davis, Anthony B.; Bal, Guillaume; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a method for accelerating a 3D Monte Carlo forward radiative transfer model to the point where it can be used in a new kind of Bayesian retrieval framework. The remote sensing challenge is to detect and quantify a chemical effluent of a known absorbing gas produced by an industrial facility in a deep valley. The available data is a single low resolution noisy image of the scene in the near IR at an absorbing wavelength for the gas of interest. The detected sunlight has been multiply reflected by the variable terrain and/or scattered by an aerosol that is assumed partially known and partially unknown. We thus introduce a new class of remote sensing algorithms best described as "multi-pixel" techniques that call necessarily for a 3D radaitive transfer model (but demonstrated here in 2D); they can be added to conventional ones that exploit typically multi- or hyper-spectral data, sometimes with multi-angle capability, with or without information about polarization. The novel Bayesian inference methodology uses adaptively, with efficiency in mind, the fact that a Monte Carlo forward model has a known and controllable uncertainty depending on the number of sun-to-detector paths used.

  8. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  9. Development of a randomized 3D cell model for Monte Carlo microdosimetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, Michael; Bezak, Eva; Penfold, Scott

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of the current work was to develop an algorithm for growing a macroscopic tumor volume from individual randomized quasi-realistic cells. The major physical and chemical components of the cell need to be modeled. It is intended to import the tumor volume into GEANT4 (and potentially other Monte Carlo packages) to simulate ionization events within the cell regions. Methods: A MATLAB Copyright-Sign code was developed to produce a tumor coordinate system consisting of individual ellipsoidal cells randomized in their spatial coordinates, sizes, and rotations. An eigenvalue method using a mathematical equation to represent individual cells was used to detect overlapping cells. GEANT4 code was then developed to import the coordinate system into GEANT4 and populate it with individual cells of varying sizes and composed of the membrane, cytoplasm, reticulum, nucleus, and nucleolus. Each region is composed of chemically realistic materials. Results: The in-house developed MATLAB Copyright-Sign code was able to grow semi-realistic cell distributions ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cells in 1 cm{sup 3}) in under 36 h. The cell distribution can be used in any number of Monte Carlo particle tracking toolkits including GEANT4, which has been demonstrated in this work. Conclusions: Using the cell distribution and GEANT4, the authors were able to simulate ionization events in the individual cell components resulting from 80 keV gamma radiation (the code is applicable to other particles and a wide range of energies). This virtual microdosimetry tool will allow for a more complete picture of cell damage to be developed.

  10. Time series analysis of Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Brian Robert

    A time series based approach is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) fission source distribution to calculate the non-fundamental mode eigenvalues of the system. The approach applies Principal Oscillation Patterns (POPs) to the fission source distribution, transforming the problem into a simple autoregressive order one (AR(1)) process. Proof is provided that the stationary MC process is linear to first order approximation, which is a requirement for the application of POPs. The autocorrelation coefficient of the resulting AR(1) process corresponds to the ratio of the desired mode eigenvalue to the fundamental mode eigenvalue. All modern k-eigenvalue MC codes calculate the fundamental mode eigenvalue, so the desired mode eigenvalue can be easily determined. The strength of this approach is contrasted against the Fission Matrix method (FMM) in terms of accuracy versus computer memory constraints. Multi-dimensional problems are considered since the approach has strong potential for use in reactor analysis, and the implementation of the method into production codes is discussed. Lastly, the appearance of complex eigenvalues is investigated and solutions are provided.

  11. Quasi Monte Carlo-based Isotropic Distribution of Gradient Directions for Improved Reconstruction Quality of 3D EPR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Deng, Yuanmu; Vikram, Deepti S.; Clymer, Bradley; Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Zweier, Jay L.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2007-01-01

    In continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), high quality of reconstructed image along with fast and reliable data acquisition is highly desirable for many biological applications. An accurate representation of uniform distribution of projection data is necessary to ensure high reconstruction quality. The current techniques for data acquisition suffer from nonuniformities or local anisotropies in the distribution of projection data and present a poor approximation of a true uniform and isotropic distribution. In this work, we have implemented a technique based on Quasi-Monte Carlo method to acquire projections with more uniform and isotropic distribution of data over a 3D acquisition space. The proposed technique exhibits improvements in the reconstruction quality in terms of both mean-square-error and visual judgment. The effectiveness of the suggested technique is demonstrated using computer simulations and 3D EPRI experiments. The technique is robust and exhibits consistent performance for different object configurations and orientations. PMID:17095271

  12. Monte-Carlo Application for Nondestructive Nuclear Waste Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Engels, R.; Frank, M.; Furletov, S.; Furletova, J.; Genreith, C.; Havenith, A.; Kemmerling, G.; Kettler, J.; Krings, T.; Ma, J.-L.; Mauerhofer, E.; Neike, D.; Payan, E.; Perot, B.; Rossbach, M.; Schitthelm, O.; Schumann, M.; Vasquez, R.

    2014-06-01

    Radioactive waste has to undergo a process of quality checking in order to check its conformance with national regulations prior to its transport, intermediate storage and final disposal. Within the quality checking of radioactive waste packages non-destructive assays are required to characterize their radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents. The Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety of the Forschungszentrum Jülich develops in the framework of cooperation nondestructive analytical techniques for the routine characterization of radioactive waste packages at industrial-scale. During the phase of research and development Monte Carlo techniques are used to simulate the transport of particle, especially photons, electrons and neutrons, through matter and to obtain the response of detection systems. The radiological characterization of low and intermediate level radioactive waste drums is performed by segmented γ-scanning (SGS). To precisely and accurately reconstruct the isotope specific activity content in waste drums by SGS measurement, an innovative method called SGSreco was developed. The Geant4 code was used to simulate the response of the collimated detection system for waste drums with different activity and matrix configurations. These simulations allow a far more detailed optimization, validation and benchmark of SGSreco, since the construction of test drums covering a broad range of activity and matrix properties is time consuming and cost intensive. The MEDINA (Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation) test facility was developed to identify and quantify non-radioactive elements and substances in radioactive waste drums. MEDINA is based on prompt and delayed gamma neutron activation analysis (P&DGNAA) using a 14 MeV neutron generator. MCNP simulations were carried out to study the response of the MEDINA facility in terms of gamma spectra, time dependence of the neutron energy spectrum

  13. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  14. Hydrogen analysis depth calibration by CORTEO Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Reichart, P.; Bergmaier, A.; Greubel, C.; Schiettekatte, F.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen imaging with sub-μm lateral resolution and sub-ppm sensitivity has become possible with coincident proton-proton (pp) scattering analysis (Reichart et al., 2004). Depth information is evaluated from the energy sum signal with respect to energy loss of both protons on their path through the sample. In first order, there is no angular dependence due to elastic scattering. In second order, a path length effect due to different energy loss on the paths of the protons causes an angular dependence of the energy sum. Therefore, the energy sum signal has to be de-convoluted depending on the matrix composition, i.e. mainly the atomic number Z, in order to get a depth calibrated hydrogen profile. Although the path effect can be calculated analytically in first order, multiple scattering effects lead to significant deviations in the depth profile. Hence, in our new approach, we use the CORTEO Monte-Carlo code (Schiettekatte, 2008) in order to calculate the depth of a coincidence event depending on the scattering angle. The code takes individual detector geometry into account. In this paper we show, that the code correctly reproduces measured pp-scattering energy spectra with roughness effects considered. With more than 100 μm thick Mylar-sandwich targets (Si, Fe, Ge) we demonstrate the deconvolution of the energy spectra on our current multistrip detector at the microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab. As a result, hydrogen profiles can be evaluated with an accuracy in depth of about 1% of the sample thickness.

  15. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  16. Analytical band Monte Carlo analysis of electron transport in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoh, K. H.; Ong, D. S.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Yong, T. K.; Lim, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    An analytical band Monte Carlo (AMC) with linear energy band dispersion has been developed to study the electron transport in suspended silicene and silicene on aluminium oxide (Al2O3) substrate. We have calibrated our model against the full band Monte Carlo (FMC) results by matching the velocity-field curve. Using this model, we discover that the collective effects of charge impurity scattering and surface optical phonon scattering can degrade the electron mobility down to about 400 cm2 V-1 s-1 and thereafter it is less sensitive to the changes of charge impurity in the substrate and surface optical phonon. We also found that further reduction of mobility to ˜100 cm2 V-1 s-1 as experimentally demonstrated by Tao et al (2015 Nat. Nanotechnol. 10 227) can only be explained by the renormalization of Fermi velocity due to interaction with Al2O3 substrate.

  17. Accelerated Monte Carlo Simulation for Safety Analysis of the Advanced Airspace Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, David

    2010-01-01

    Safe separation of aircraft is a primary objective of any air traffic control system. An accelerated Monte Carlo approach was developed to assess the level of safety provided by a proposed next-generation air traffic control system. It combines features of fault tree and standard Monte Carlo methods. It runs more than one order of magnitude faster than the standard Monte Carlo method while providing risk estimates that only differ by about 10%. It also preserves component-level model fidelity that is difficult to maintain using the standard fault tree method. This balance of speed and fidelity allows sensitivity analysis to be completed in days instead of weeks or months with the standard Monte Carlo method. Results indicate that risk estimates are sensitive to transponder, pilot visual avoidance, and conflict detection failure probabilities.

  18. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  19. Comparison of basis functions for 3D PET reconstruction using a Monte Carlo system matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Jorge; Rafecas, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    In emission tomography, iterative statistical methods are accepted as the reconstruction algorithms that achieve the best image quality. The accuracy of these methods relies partly on the quality of the system response matrix (SRM) that characterizes the scanner. The more physical phenomena included in the SRM, the higher the SRM quality, and therefore higher image quality is obtained from the reconstruction process. High-resolution small animal scanners contain as many as 103-104 small crystal pairs, while the field of view (FOV) is divided into hundreds of thousands of small voxels. These two characteristics have a significant impact on the number of elements to be calculated in the SRM. Monte Carlo (MC) methods have gained popularity as a way of calculating the SRM, due to the increased accuracy achievable, at the cost of introducing some statistical noise and long simulation times. In the work presented here the SRM is calculated using MC methods exploiting the cylindrical symmetries of the scanner, significantly reducing the simulation time necessary to calculate a high statistical quality SRM and the storage space necessary. The use of cylindrical symmetries makes polar voxels a convenient basis function. Alternatively, spherically symmetric basis functions result in improved noise properties compared to cubic and polar basis functions. The quality of reconstructed images using polar voxels, spherically symmetric basis functions on a polar grid, cubic voxels and post-reconstruction filtered polar and cubic voxels is compared from a noise and spatial resolution perspective. This study demonstrates that polar voxels perform as well as cubic voxels, reducing the simulation time necessary to calculate the SRM and the disk space necessary to store it. Results showed that spherically symmetric functions outperform polar and cubic basis functions in terms of noise properties, at the cost of slightly degraded spatial resolution, larger SRM file size and longer

  20. Feasibility of a Monte Carlo-deterministic hybrid method for fast reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, W.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.; Yun, S.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo and deterministic hybrid method is investigated for the analysis of fast reactors in this paper. Effective multi-group cross sections data are generated using a collision estimator in the MCNP5. A high order Legendre scattering cross section data generation module was added into the MCNP5 code. Both cross section data generated from MCNP5 and TRANSX/TWODANT using the homogeneous core model were compared, and were applied to DIF3D code for fast reactor core analysis of a 300 MWe SFR TRU burner core. For this analysis, 9 groups macroscopic-wise data was used. In this paper, a hybrid calculation MCNP5/DIF3D was used to analyze the core model. The cross section data was generated using MCNP5. The k{sub eff} and core power distribution were calculated using the 54 triangle FDM code DIF3D. A whole core calculation of the heterogeneous core model using the MCNP5 was selected as a reference. In terms of the k{sub eff}, 9-group MCNP5/DIF3D has a discrepancy of -154 pcm from the reference solution, 9-group TRANSX/TWODANT/DIF3D analysis gives -1070 pcm discrepancy. (authors)

  1. pyNSMC: A Python Module for Null-Space Monte Carlo Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J.; Brakefield, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    The null-space monte carlo technique is a non-linear uncertainty analyses technique that is well-suited to high-dimensional inverse problems. While the technique is powerful, the existing workflow for completing null-space monte carlo is cumbersome, requiring the use of multiple commandline utilities, several sets of intermediate files and even a text editor. pyNSMC is an open-source python module that automates the workflow of null-space monte carlo uncertainty analyses. The module is fully compatible with the PEST and PEST++ software suites and leverages existing functionality of pyEMU, a python framework for linear-based uncertainty analyses. pyNSMC greatly simplifies the existing workflow for null-space monte carlo by taking advantage of object oriented design facilities in python. The core of pyNSMC is the ensemble class, which draws and stores realized random vectors and also provides functionality for exporting and visualizing results. By relieving users of the tedium associated with file handling and command line utility execution, pyNSMC instead focuses the user on the important steps and assumptions of null-space monte carlo analysis. Furthermore, pyNSMC facilitates learning through flow charts and results visualization, which are available at many points in the algorithm. The ease-of-use of the pyNSMC workflow is compared to the existing workflow for null-space monte carlo for a synthetic groundwater model with hundreds of estimable parameters.

  2. Improved analysis of bias in Monte Carlo criticality safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Thomas C.

    2000-08-01

    Criticality safety, the prevention of nuclear chain reactions, depends on Monte Carlo computer codes for most commercial applications. One major shortcoming of these codes is the limited accuracy of the atomic and nuclear data files they depend on. In order to apply a code and its data files to a given criticality safety problem, the code must first be benchmarked against similar problems for which the answer is known. The difference between a code prediction and the known solution is termed the "bias" of the code. Traditional calculations of the bias for application to commercial criticality problems are generally full of assumptions and lead to large uncertainties which must be conservatively factored into the bias as statistical tolerances. Recent trends in storing commercial nuclear fuel---narrowed regulatory margins of safety, degradation of neutron absorbers, the desire to use higher enrichment fuel, etc.---push the envelope of criticality safety. They make it desirable to minimize uncertainty in the bias to accommodate these changes, and they make it vital to understand what assumptions are safe to make under what conditions. A set of improved procedures is proposed for (1) developing multivariate regression bias models, and (2) applying multivariate regression bias models. These improved procedures lead to more accurate estimates of the bias and much smaller uncertainties about this estimate, while also generally providing more conservative results. The drawback is that the procedures are not trivial and are highly labor intensive to implement. The payback in savings in margin to criticality and conservatism for calculations near regulatory and safety limits may be worth this cost. To develop these procedures, a bias model using the statistical technique of weighted least squares multivariate regression is developed in detail. Problems that can occur from a weak statistical analysis are highlighted, and a solid statistical method for developing the bias

  3. Phonon transport analysis of semiconductor nanocomposites using monte carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malladi, Mayank

    Nanocomposites are composite materials which incorporate nanosized particles, platelets or fibers. The addition of nanosized phases into the bulk matrix can lead to significantly different material properties compared to their macrocomposite counterparts. For nanocomposites, thermal conductivity is one of the most important physical properties. Manipulation and control of thermal conductivity in nanocomposites have impacted a variety of applications. In particular, it has been shown that the phonon thermal conductivity can be reduced significantly in nanocomposites due to the increase in phonon interface scattering while the electrical conductivity can be maintained. This extraordinary property of nanocomposites has been used to enhance the energy conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric devices which is proportional to the ratio of electrical to thermal conductivity. This thesis investigates phonon transport and thermal conductivity in Si/Ge semiconductor nanocomposites through numerical analysis. The Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is adopted for description of phonon thermal transport in the nanocomposites. The BTE employs the particle-like nature of phonons to model heat transfer which accounts for both ballistic and diffusive transport phenomenon. Due to the implementation complexity and computational cost involved, the phonon BTE is difficult to solve in its most generic form. Gray media (frequency independent phonons) is often assumed in the numerical solution of BTE using conventional methods such as finite volume and discrete ordinates methods. This thesis solves the BTE using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique which is more convenient and efficient when non-gray media (frequency dependent phonons) is considered. In the MC simulation, phonons are displaced inside the computational domain under the various boundary conditions and scattering effects. In this work, under the relaxation time approximation, thermal transport in the nanocomposites are

  4. Analysis of real-time networks with monte carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclair, C.; Durrieu, G.

    2013-12-01

    Communication networks in embedded systems are ever more large and complex. A better understanding of the dynamics of these networks is necessary to use them at best and lower costs. Todays tools are able to compute upper bounds of end-to-end delays that a packet being sent through the network could suffer. However, in the case of asynchronous networks, those worst end-to-end delay (WEED) cases are rarely observed in practice or through simulations due to the scarce situations that lead to worst case scenarios. A novel approach based on Monte Carlo methods is suggested to study the effects of the asynchrony on the performances.

  5. IM3D: A parallel Monte Carlo code for efficient simulations of primary radiation displacements and damage in 3D geometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong Gang; Yang, Yang; Short, Michael P.; Ding, Ze Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Ju

    2015-01-01

    SRIM-like codes have limitations in describing general 3D geometries, for modeling radiation displacements and damage in nanostructured materials. A universal, computationally efficient and massively parallel 3D Monte Carlo code, IM3D, has been developed with excellent parallel scaling performance. IM3D is based on fast indexing of scattering integrals and the SRIM stopping power database, and allows the user a choice of Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) or Finite Element Triangle Mesh (FETM) method for constructing 3D shapes and microstructures. For 2D films and multilayers, IM3D perfectly reproduces SRIM results, and can be ∼102 times faster in serial execution and > 104 times faster using parallel computation. For 3D problems, it provides a fast approach for analyzing the spatial distributions of primary displacements and defect generation under ion irradiation. Herein we also provide a detailed discussion of our open-source collision cascade physics engine, revealing the true meaning and limitations of the “Quick Kinchin-Pease” and “Full Cascades” options. The issues of femtosecond to picosecond timescales in defining displacement versus damage, the limitation of the displacements per atom (DPA) unit in quantifying radiation damage (such as inadequacy in quantifying degree of chemical mixing), are discussed. PMID:26658477

  6. Monte Carlo entropic sampling applied to Ising-like model for 2D and 3D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jureschi, C. M.; Linares, J.; Dahoo, P. R.; Alayli, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present the Monte Carlo entropic sampling (MCES) applied to an Ising-like model for 2D and 3D system in order to show the interaction influence of the edge molecules of the system with their local environment. We show that, as for the 1D and the 2D spin crossover (SCO) systems, the origin of multi steps transition in 3D SCO is the effect of the edge interaction molecules with its local environment together with short and long range interactions. Another important result worth noting is the co-existence of step transitions with hysteresis and without hysteresis. By increasing the value of the edge interaction, L, the transition is shifted to the lower temperatures: it means that the role of edge interaction is equivalent to an applied negative pressure because the edge interaction favours the HS state while the applied pressure favours the LS state. We also analyse, in this contribution, the role of the short- and long-range interaction, J respectively G, with respect to the environment interaction, L.

  7. Skin Dose in Longitudinal and Transverse Linac-MRIs using Monte-Carlo and realistic 3D MRI field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvanloo Shahrestanaky, Amirmohamad

    The integration of a clinical linear accelerator (linac) with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system would provide real-time tumor tracking. The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient skin dose. In this work, we used Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate realistic 3D magnetic field models of longitudinal and transverse linac-MR systems to accurately quantify the changes in skin dose. The results show that fringe fields of realistic 3D B-fields decay rapidly and have a very small magnitude at the linac’s head. As a result, for longitudinal linac-MR systems only a small increase in the entrance skin dose is predicted. For transverse linac-MR systems, changes to the entrance skin dose are small for most scenarios. On the exit side, however, a fairly large increase is observed for perpendicular beams due to the electron return effect, but significantly drops for large oblique angles of incidence.

  8. An Advanced Neutronic Analysis Toolkit with Inline Monte Carlo capability for BHTR Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Martin; John C. Lee

    2009-12-30

    Monte Carlo capability has been combined with a production LWR lattice physics code to allow analysis of high temperature gas reactor configurations, accounting for the double heterogeneity due to the TRISO fuel. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 has been used in conjunction with CPM3, which was the testbench lattice physics code for this project. MCNP5 is used to perform two calculations for the geometry of interest, one with homogenized fuel compacts and the other with heterogeneous fuel compacts, where the TRISO fuel kernels are resolved by MCNP5.

  9. A novel image reconstruction methodology based on inverse Monte Carlo analysis for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Haris A.

    2001-04-01

    A three dimensional (3D) reconstruction procedure for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) based on inverse Monte Carlo analysis is presented. PET is a medical imaging modality which employs a positron emitting radio-tracer to give functional images of an organ's metabolic activity. This makes PET an invaluable tool in the detection of cancer and for in-vivo biochemical measurements. There are a number of analytical and iterative algorithms for image reconstruction of PET data. Analytical algorithms are computationally fast, but the assumptions intrinsic in the line integral model limit their accuracy. Iterative algorithms can apply accurate models for reconstruction and give improvements in image quality, but at an increased computational cost. These algorithms require the explicit calculation of the system response matrix, which may not be easy to calculate. This matrix gives the probability that a photon emitted from a certain source element will be detected in a particular detector line of response. The ``Three Dimensional Stochastic Sampling'' (SS3D) procedure implements iterative algorithms in a manner that does not require the explicit calculation of the system response matrix. It uses Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the process of photon emission from a source distribution and interaction with the detector. This technique has the advantage of being able to model complex detector systems and also take into account the physics of gamma ray interaction within the source and detector systems, which leads to an accurate image estimate. A series of simulation studies was conducted to validate the method using the Maximum Likelihood - Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. The accuracy of the reconstructed images was improved by using an algorithm that required a priori knowledge of the source distribution. Means to reduce the computational time for reconstruction were explored by using parallel processors and algorithms that had faster convergence rates

  10. 3D imaging using combined neutron-photon fan-beam tomography: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, J; Yazdanpanah, A Pour; Barzilov, A; Regentova, E

    2016-05-01

    The application of combined neutron-photon tomography for 3D imaging is examined using MCNP5 simulations for objects of simple shapes and different materials. Two-dimensional transmission projections were simulated for fan-beam scans using 2.5MeV deuterium-deuterium and 14MeV deuterium-tritium neutron sources, and high-energy X-ray sources, such as 1MeV, 6MeV and 9MeV. Photons enable assessment of electron density and related mass density, neutrons aid in estimating the product of density and material-specific microscopic cross section- the ratio between the two provides the composition, while CT allows shape evaluation. Using a developed imaging technique, objects and their material compositions have been visualized. PMID:26953978

  11. 3D Continuum Radiative Transfer. An adaptive grid construction algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccolini, G.; Alcolea, J.

    Solving the radiative transfer problem is a common problematic to may fields in astrophysics. With the increasing angular resolution of spatial or ground-based telescopes (VLTI, HST) but also with the next decade instruments (NGST, ALMA, ...), astrophysical objects reveal and will certainly reveal complex spatial structures. Consequently, it is necessary to develop numerical tools being able to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions in order to model and interpret these observations. I present a 3D radiative transfer program, using a new method for the construction of an adaptive spatial grid, based on the Monte Claro method. With the help of this tools, one can solve the continuum radiative transfer problem (e.g. a dusty medium), computes the temperature structure of the considered medium and obtain the flux of the object (SED and images).

  12. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H; Liu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  15. 3D polymer gel dosimetry and Geant4 Monte Carlo characterization of novel needle based X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sozontov, E.; Safronov, V.; Gutman, G.; Strumban, E.; Jiang, Q.; Li, S.

    2010-11-01

    In the recent years, there have been a few attempts to develop a low energy x-ray radiation sources alternative to conventional radioisotopes used in brachytherapy. So far, all efforts have been centered around the intent to design an interstitial miniaturized x-ray tube. Though direct irradiation of tumors looks very promising, the known insertable miniature x-ray tubes have many limitations: (a) difficulties with focusing and steering the electron beam to the target; (b)necessity to cool the target to increase x-ray production efficiency; (c)impracticability to reduce the diameter of the miniaturized x-ray tube below 4mm (the requirement to decrease the diameter of the x-ray tube and the need to have a cooling system for the target have are mutually exclusive); (c) significant limitations in changing shape and energy of the emitted radiation. The specific aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept for an insertable low-energy needle x-ray device based on simulation with Geant4 Monte Carlo code and to measure the dose rate distribution for low energy (17.5 keV) x-ray radiation with the 3D polymer gel dosimetry.

  16. A study of the earth radiation budget using a 3D Monte-Carlo radiative transer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Sato, Y.; Inoue, T.; Donovan, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the earth's radiation budget when data are available from satellite-borne active sensors, i.e. cloud profiling radar (CPR) and lidar, and a multi-spectral imager (MSI) in the project of the Earth Explorer/EarthCARE mission. For this purpose, we first developed forward and backward 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes that can treat a broadband solar flux calculation including thermal infrared emission calculation by k-distribution parameters of Sekiguchi and Nakajima (2008). In order to construct the 3D cloud field, we tried the following three methods: 1) stochastic cloud generated by randomized optical thickness each layer distribution and regularly-distributed tilted clouds, 2) numerical simulations by a non-hydrostatic model with bin cloud microphysics model and 3) Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as explained later. As for the method-2 (numerical modeling method), we employed numerical simulation results of Californian summer stratus clouds simulated by a non-hydrostatic atmospheric model with a bin-type cloud microphysics model based on the JMA NHM model (Iguchi et al., 2008; Sato et al., 2009, 2012) with horizontal (vertical) grid spacing of 100m (20m) and 300m (20m) in a domain of 30km (x), 30km (y), 1.5km (z) and with a horizontally periodic lateral boundary condition. Two different cell systems were simulated depending on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration. In the case of horizontal resolution of 100m, regionally averaged cloud optical thickness, , and standard deviation of COT, were 3.0 and 4.3 for pristine case and 8.5 and 7.4 for polluted case, respectively. In the MIDPM method, we first construct a library of pair of observed vertical profiles from active sensors and collocated imager products at the nadir footprint, i.e. spectral imager radiances, cloud optical thickness (COT), effective particle radius (RE) and cloud top temperature (Tc). We then select a

  17. General purpose dynamic Monte Carlo with continuous energy for transient analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sjenitzer, B. L.; Hoogenboom, J. E.

    2012-07-01

    For safety assessments transient analysis is an important tool. It can predict maximum temperatures during regular reactor operation or during an accident scenario. Despite the fact that this kind of analysis is very important, the state of the art still uses rather crude methods, like diffusion theory and point-kinetics. For reference calculations it is preferable to use the Monte Carlo method. In this paper the dynamic Monte Carlo method is implemented in the general purpose Monte Carlo code Tripoli4. Also, the method is extended for use with continuous energy. The first results of Dynamic Tripoli demonstrate that this kind of calculation is indeed accurate and the results are achieved in a reasonable amount of time. With the method implemented in Tripoli it is now possible to do an exact transient calculation in arbitrary geometry. (authors)

  18. Advanced Mesh-Enabled Monte carlo capability for Multi-Physics Reactor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Paul; Evans, Thomas; Tautges, Tim

    2012-12-24

    This project will accumulate high-precision fluxes throughout reactor geometry on a non- orthogonal grid of cells to support multi-physics coupling, in order to more accurately calculate parameters such as reactivity coefficients and to generate multi-group cross sections. This work will be based upon recent developments to incorporate advanced geometry and mesh capability in a modular Monte Carlo toolkit with computational science technology that is in use in related reactor simulation software development. Coupling this capability with production-scale Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can provide advanced and extensible test-beds for these developments. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are generally considered to be the most accurate computational tool for simulating radiation transport in complex geometries, particularly neutron transport in reactors. Nevertheless, there are several limitations for their use in reactor analysis. Most significantly, there is a trade-off between the fidelity of results in phase space, statistical accuracy, and the amount of computer time required for simulation. Consequently, to achieve an acceptable level of statistical convergence in high-fidelity results required for modern coupled multi-physics analysis, the required computer time makes Monte Carlo methods prohibitive for design iterations and detailed whole-core analysis. More subtly, the statistical uncertainty is typically not uniform throughout the domain, and the simulation quality is limited by the regions with the largest statistical uncertainty. In addition, the formulation of neutron scattering laws in continuous energy Monte Carlo methods makes it difficult to calculate adjoint neutron fluxes required to properly determine important reactivity parameters. Finally, most Monte Carlo codes available for reactor analysis have relied on orthogonal hexahedral grids for tallies that do not conform to the geometric boundaries and are thus generally not well

  19. Discrete ordinates-Monte Carlo coupling: A comparison of techniques in NERVA radiation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. G.; Normand, E.; Wilcox, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    In the radiation analysis of the NERVA nuclear rocket system, two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations are sufficient to provide detail in the pressure vessel and reactor assembly. Other parts of the system, however, require three-dimensional Monte Carlo analyses. To use these two methods in a single analysis, a means of coupling was developed whereby the results of a discrete ordinates calculation can be used to produce source data for a Monte Carlo calculation. Several techniques for producing source detail were investigated. Results of calculations on the NERVA system are compared and limitations and advantages of the coupling techniques discussed.

  20. A multi-group Monte Carlo core analysis method and its application in SCWR design

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Wang, K.; Yu, G.

    2012-07-01

    Complex geometry and spectrum have been the characteristics of many newly developed nuclear energy systems, so the suitability and precision of the traditional deterministic codes are doubtable while being applied to simulate these systems. On the contrary, the Monte Carlo method has the inherent advantages of dealing with complex geometry and spectrum. The main disadvantage of Monte Carlo method is that it takes long time to get reliable results, so the efficiency is too low for the ordinary core designs. A new Monte Carlo core analysis scheme is developed, aimed to increase the calculation efficiency. It is finished in two steps: Firstly, the assembly level simulation is performed by continuous energy Monte Carlo method, which is suitable for any geometry and spectrum configuration, and the assembly multi-group constants are tallied at the same time; Secondly, the core level calculation is performed by multi-group Monte Carlo method, using the assembly group constants generated in the first step. Compared with the heterogeneous Monte Carlo calculations of the whole core, this two-step scheme is more efficient, and the precision is acceptable for the preliminary analysis of novel nuclear systems. Using this core analysis scheme, a SCWR core was designed based on a new SCWR assembly design. The core output is about 1,100 MWe, and a cycle length of about 550 EFPDs can be achieved with 3-batch refueling pattern. The average and maximum discharge burn-up are about 53.5 and 60.9 MWD/kgU respectively. (authors)

  1. Determining the Number of Principal Components to Retain via Parallel Analysis: Alternatives to Monte Carlo Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lautenschlager, Gary J.

    The parallel analysis method for determining the number of components to retain in a principal components analysis has received a recent resurgence of support and interest. However, researchers and practitioners desiring to use this criterion have been hampered by the required Monte Carlo analyses needed to develop the criteria. Two recent…

  2. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach to Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis has a rich tradition in both the structural equation modeling and item response theory frameworks. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate a novel combination of various Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation routines to estimate parameters of a wide variety of confirmatory item factor analysis models. Further, I show…

  3. Taxometrics, Polytomous Constructs, and the Comparison Curve Fit Index: A Monte Carlo Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; McGrath, Robert E.; Knight, Raymond A.

    2010-01-01

    The taxometric method effectively distinguishes between dimensional (1-class) and taxonic (2-class) latent structure, but there is virtually no information on how it responds to polytomous (3-class) latent structure. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that the mean comparison curve fit index (CCFI; Ruscio, Haslam, & Ruscio, 2006) obtained with 3…

  4. Errors associated with metabolic control analysis. Application Of Monte-Carlo simulation of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, E K; Brand, M D

    1998-09-21

    The errors associated with experimental application of metabolic control analysis are difficult to assess. In this paper, we give examples where Monte-Carlo simulations of published experimental data are used in error analysis. Data was simulated according to the mean and error obtained from experimental measurements and the simulated data was used to calculate control coefficients. Repeating the simulation 500 times allowed an estimate to be made of the error implicit in the calculated control coefficients. In the first example, state 4 respiration of isolated mitochondria, Monte-Carlo simulations based on the system elasticities were performed. The simulations gave error estimates similar to the values reported within the original paper and those derived from a sensitivity analysis of the elasticities. This demonstrated the validity of the method. In the second example, state 3 respiration of isolated mitochondria, Monte-Carlo simulations were based on measurements of intermediates and fluxes. A key feature of this simulation was that the distribution of the simulated control coefficients did not follow a normal distribution, despite simulation of the original data being based on normal distributions. Consequently, the error calculated using simulation was greater and more realistic than the error calculated directly by averaging the original results. The Monte-Carlo simulations are also demonstrated to be useful in experimental design. The individual data points that should be repeated in order to reduce the error in the control coefficients can be highlighted.

  5. MCMini: Monte Carlo on GPGPU

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Ryan C.

    2012-07-25

    MCMini is a proof of concept that demonstrates the possibility for Monte Carlo neutron transport using OpenCL with a focus on performance. This implementation, written in C, shows that tracing particles and calculating reactions on a 3D mesh can be done in a highly scalable fashion. These results demonstrate a potential path forward for MCNP or other Monte Carlo codes.

  6. Applying Monte Carlo Simulation to Launch Vehicle Design and Requirements Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, J. M.; Beard, B. B.

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Publication (TP) is meant to address a number of topics related to the application of Monte Carlo simulation to launch vehicle design and requirements analysis. Although the focus is on a launch vehicle application, the methods may be applied to other complex systems as well. The TP is organized so that all the important topics are covered in the main text, and detailed derivations are in the appendices. The TP first introduces Monte Carlo simulation and the major topics to be discussed, including discussion of the input distributions for Monte Carlo runs, testing the simulation, how many runs are necessary for verification of requirements, what to do if results are desired for events that happen only rarely, and postprocessing, including analyzing any failed runs, examples of useful output products, and statistical information for generating desired results from the output data. Topics in the appendices include some tables for requirements verification, derivation of the number of runs required and generation of output probabilistic data with consumer risk included, derivation of launch vehicle models to include possible variations of assembled vehicles, minimization of a consumable to achieve a two-dimensional statistical result, recontact probability during staging, ensuring duplicated Monte Carlo random variations, and importance sampling.

  7. Uncertainty Analysis of Power Grid Investment Capacity Based on Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Junsong; Liu, Bingyi; Niu, Dongxiao

    By analyzing the influence factors of the investment capacity of power grid, to depreciation cost, sales price and sales quantity, net profit, financing and GDP of the second industry as the dependent variable to build the investment capacity analysis model. After carrying out Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, get the probability distribution of each influence factor. Finally, obtained the grid investment capacity uncertainty of analysis results by Monte Carlo simulation.

  8. Risk analysis and Monte Carlo simulation applied to the generation of drilling AFE estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.K.; Murtha, J.A.; Schneider, F.F.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents a method for developing an authorization-for-expenditure (AFE)-generating model and illustrates the technique with a specific offshore field development case study. The model combines Monte Carlo simulation and statistical analysis of historical drilling data to generate more accurate, risked, AFE estimates. In addition to the general method, two examples of making AFE time estimates for North Sea wells with the presented techniques are given.

  9. Vectorized Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the global algorithms and local kernels of conventional general-purpose Monte Carlo codes shows that multigroup Monte Carlo methods have sufficient structure to permit efficient vectorization. A structured multigroup Monte Carlo algorithm for vector computers is developed in which many particle events are treated at once on a cell-by-cell basis. Vectorization of kernels for tracking and variance reduction is described, and a new method for discrete sampling is developed to facilitate the vectorization of collision analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new method, a vectorized Monte Carlo code for multigroup radiation transport analysis was developed. This code incorporates many features of conventional general-purpose production codes, including general geometry, splitting and Russian roulette, survival biasing, variance estimation via batching, a number of cutoffs, and generalized tallies of collision, tracklength, and surface crossing estimators with response functions. Predictions of vectorized performance characteristics for the CYBER-205 were made using emulated coding and a dynamic model of vector instruction timing. Computation rates were examined for a variety of test problems to determine sensitivities to batch size and vector lengths. Significant speedups are predicted for even a few hundred particles per batch, and asymptotic speedups by about 40 over equivalent Amdahl 470V/8 scalar codes arepredicted for a few thousand particles per batch. The principal conclusion is that vectorization of a general-purpose multigroup Monte Carlo code is well worth the significant effort required for stylized coding and major algorithmic changes.

  10. Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainty propagation in a stratospheric model. 2: Uncertainties due to reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Butler, D. M.; Rundel, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A concise stratospheric model was used in a Monte-Carlo analysis of the propagation of reaction rate uncertainties through the calculation of an ozone perturbation due to the addition of chlorine. Two thousand Monte-Carlo cases were run with 55 reaction rates being varied. Excellent convergence was obtained in the output distributions because the model is sensitive to the uncertainties in only about 10 reactions. For a 1 ppby chlorine perturbation added to a 1.5 ppby chlorine background, the resultant 1 sigma uncertainty on the ozone perturbation is a factor of 1.69 on the high side and 1.80 on the low side. The corresponding 2 sigma factors are 2.86 and 3.23. Results are also given for the uncertainties, due to reaction rates, in the ambient concentrations of stratospheric species.

  11. Monte Carlo Analysis as a Trajectory Design Driver for the TESS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickel, Craig; Lebois, Ryan; Lutz, Stephen; Dichmann, Donald; Parker, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be injected into a highly eccentric Earth orbit and fly 3.5 phasing loops followed by a lunar flyby to enter a mission orbit with lunar 2:1 resonance. Through the phasing loops and mission orbit, the trajectory is significantly affected by lunar and solar gravity. We have developed a trajectory design to achieve the mission orbit and meet mission constraints, including eclipse avoidance and a 30-year geostationary orbit avoidance requirement. A parallelized Monte Carlo simulation was performed to validate the trajectory after injecting common perturbations, including launch dispersions, orbit determination errors, and maneuver execution errors. The Monte Carlo analysis helped identify mission risks and is used in the trajectory selection process.

  12. Mercury + VisIt: Integration of a Real-Time Graphical Analysis Capability into a Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Validation of the problem definition and analysis of the results (tallies) produced during a Monte Carlo particle transport calculation can be a complicated, time-intensive processes. The time required for a person to create an accurate, validated combinatorial geometry (CG) or mesh-based representation of a complex problem, free of common errors such as gaps and overlapping cells, can range from days to weeks. The ability to interrogate the internal structure of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometry, prior to running the transport calculation, can improve the user's confidence in the validity of the problem definition. With regard to the analysis of results, the process of extracting tally data from printed tables within a file is laborious and not an intuitive approach to understanding the results. The ability to display tally information overlaid on top of the problem geometry can decrease the time required for analysis and increase the user's understanding of the results. To this end, our team has integrated VisIt, a parallel, production-quality visualization and data analysis tool into Mercury, a massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport code. VisIt provides an API for real time visualization of a simulation as it is running. The user may select which plots to display from the VisIt GUI, or by sending VisIt a Python script from Mercury. The frequency at which plots are updated can be set and the user can visualize the simulation results as it is running.

  13. Time Series Analysis of Monte Carlo Fission Sources - I: Dominance Ratio Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Taro; Brown, Forrest B.; Parsons, D. Kent; Warsa, James S.

    2004-11-15

    In the nuclear engineering community, the error propagation of the Monte Carlo fission source distribution through cycles is known to be a linear Markov process when the number of histories per cycle is sufficiently large. In the statistics community, linear Markov processes with linear observation functions are known to have an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) representation of orders p and p - 1. Therefore, one can perform ARMA fitting of the binned Monte Carlo fission source in order to compute physical and statistical quantities relevant to nuclear criticality analysis. In this work, the ARMA fitting of a binary Monte Carlo fission source has been successfully developed as a method to compute the dominance ratio, i.e., the ratio of the second-largest to the largest eigenvalues. The method is free of binning mesh refinement and does not require the alteration of the basic source iteration cycle algorithm. Numerical results are presented for problems with one-group isotropic, two-group linearly anisotropic, and continuous-energy cross sections. Also, a strategy for the analysis of eigenmodes higher than the second-largest eigenvalue is demonstrated numerically.

  14. Monte Carlo model for neutron capture prompt gamma-ray analysis of coal in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, R.Y.

    1984-01-01

    In order to relate the detector response to the elemental concentration, a great number of elaborate experimental standards are needed. It is tedious and curbs, among other factors, the wider use of the neutron capture prompt gamma-ray analysis (NCPGRA). A Monte Carlo model therefore has been developed to predict the photopeak detector response at all elemental concentrations of interest in the host matrix simultaneously, and an experimental system which simulates the on-line analysis of coal on a conveyor belt has been built to test this model and increase the extent of its readiness for industrial application. Variance reduction techniques, including an expected value technique followed by Russian Roulette, are used extensively to reduce computation effort. Each of the various shielding components of the analyzer is considered with respect to both neutron transport and prompt gamma-ray attenuation. Further, the free gas model is employed to simulate thermal neutron interaction. Results of this Monte Carlo model are generally in good agreement with photopeak detector responses on those major and minor elements measurable by NCPGRA in coal, and the agreement is excellent on the variation in detector response with elemental concentration for sulfur and titanium. Therefore, it gives high confidence in the validity of the Monte Carlo model. The model is thus expected to be generally useful for calibrating NCPGRA analyzers in transmission geometry.

  15. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images.

    PubMed

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2013-11-21

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 10(8) primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  16. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images*

    PubMed Central

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  17. MC21 analysis of the nuclear energy agency Monte Carlo performance benchmark problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D. J.; Sutton, T. M.; Wilson, S. C.

    2012-07-01

    Due to the steadily decreasing cost and wider availability of large scale computing platforms, there is growing interest in the prospects for the use of Monte Carlo for reactor design calculations that are currently performed using few-group diffusion theory or other low-order methods. To facilitate the monitoring of the progress being made toward the goal of practical full-core reactor design calculations using Monte Carlo, a performance benchmark has been developed and made available through the Nuclear Energy Agency. A first analysis of this benchmark using the MC21 Monte Carlo code was reported on in 2010, and several practical difficulties were highlighted. In this paper, a newer version of MC21 that addresses some of these difficulties has been applied to the benchmark. In particular, the confidence-interval-determination method has been improved to eliminate source correlation bias, and a fission-source-weighting method has been implemented to provide a more uniform distribution of statistical uncertainties. In addition, the Forward-Weighted, Consistent-Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology has been applied to the benchmark problem. Results of several analyses using these methods are presented, as well as results from a very large calculation with statistical uncertainties that approach what is needed for design applications. (authors)

  18. Uncertainty Optimization Applied to the Monte Carlo Analysis of Planetary Entry Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John; Way, David

    2001-01-01

    Recently, strong evidence of liquid water under the surface of Mars and a meteorite that might contain ancient microbes have renewed interest in Mars exploration. With this renewed interest, NASA plans to send spacecraft to Mars approx. every 26 months. These future spacecraft will return higher-resolution images, make precision landings, engage in longer-ranging surface maneuvers, and even return Martian soil and rock samples to Earth. Future robotic missions and any human missions to Mars will require precise entries to ensure safe landings near science objective and pre-employed assets. Potential sources of water and other interesting geographic features are often located near hazards, such as within craters or along canyon walls. In order for more accurate landings to be made, spacecraft entering the Martian atmosphere need to use lift to actively control the entry. This active guidance results in much smaller landing footprints. Planning for these missions will depend heavily on Monte Carlo analysis. Monte Carlo trajectory simulations have been used with a high degree of success in recent planetary exploration missions. These analyses ascertain the impact of off-nominal conditions during a flight and account for uncertainty. Uncertainties generally stem from limitations in manufacturing tolerances, measurement capabilities, analysis accuracies, and environmental unknowns. Thousands of off-nominal trajectories are simulated by randomly dispersing uncertainty variables and collecting statistics on forecast variables. The dependability of Monte Carlo forecasts, however, is limited by the accuracy and completeness of the assumed uncertainties. This is because Monte Carlo analysis is a forward driven problem; beginning with the input uncertainties and proceeding to the forecasts outputs. It lacks a mechanism to affect or alter the uncertainties based on the forecast results. If the results are unacceptable, the current practice is to use an iterative, trial

  19. Uncertainty optimization applied to the Monte Carlo analysis of planetary entry trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, David Wesley

    2001-10-01

    Future robotic missions to Mars, as well as any human missions, will require precise entries to ensure safe landings near science objectives and pre-deployed assets. Planning for these missions will depend heavily on Monte Carlo analyses to evaluate active guidance algorithms, assess the impact of off-nominal conditions, and account for uncertainty. The dependability of Monte Carlo forecasts, however, is limited by the accuracy and completeness of the assumed uncertainties. This is because Monte Carlo analysis is a forward driven problem; beginning with the input uncertainties and proceeding to the forecast output statistics. An improvement to the Monte Carlo analysis is needed that will allow the problem to be worked in reverse. In this way, the largest allowable dispersions that achieve the required mission objectives can be determined quantitatively. This thesis proposes a methodology to optimize the uncertainties in the Monte Carlo analysis of spacecraft landing footprints. A metamodel is used to first write polynomial expressions for the size of the landing footprint as functions of the independent uncertainty extrema. The coefficients of the metamodel are determined by performing experiments. The metamodel is then used in a constrained optimization procedure to minimize a cost-tolerance function. First, a two-dimensional proof-of-concept problem was used to evaluate the feasibility of this optimization method. Next, the optimization method was further demonstrated on the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. The purpose of this example was to demonstrate that the methodology developed during the proof-of-concept could be scaled to solve larger, more complicated, "real world" problems. This research has shown that is possible to control the size of the landing footprint and establish tolerances for mission uncertainties. A simplified metamodel was developed, which is enabling for realistic problems with more than just a few uncertainties. A confidence interval on

  20. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  1. Monte Carlo Neutronics and Thermal Hydraulics Analysis of Reactor Cores with Multilevel Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernnat, W.; Mattes, M.; Guilliard, N.; Lapins, J.; Zwermann, W.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.

    2014-06-01

    Power reactors are composed of assemblies with fuel pin lattices or other repeated structures with several grid levels, which can be modeled in detail by Monte Carlo neutronics codes such as MCNP6 using corresponding lattice options, even for large cores. Except for fresh cores at beginning of life, there is a varying material distribution due to burnup in the different fuel pins. Additionally, for power states the fuel and moderator temperatures and moderator densities vary according to the power distribution and cooling conditions. Therefore, a coupling of the neutronics code with a thermal hydraulics code is necessary. Depending on the level of detail of the analysis, a very large number of cells with different materials and temperatures must be regarded. The assignment of different material properties to all elements of a multilevel grid is very elaborate and may exceed program limits if the standard input procedure is used. Therefore, an internal assignment is used which overrides uniform input parameters. The temperature dependency of continuous energy cross sections, probability tables for the unresolved resonance region and thermal neutron scattering laws is taken into account by interpolation, requiring only a limited number of data sets generated for different temperatures. The method is applied with MCNP6 and proven for several full core reactor models. For the coupling of MCNP6 with thermal hydraulics appropriate interfaces were developed for the GRS system code ATHLET for liquid coolant and the IKE thermal hydraulics code ATTICA-3D for gaseous coolant. Examples will be shown for different applications for PWRs with square and hexagonal lattices, fast reactors (SFR) with hexagonal lattices and HTRs with pebble bed and prismatic lattices.

  2. The influence of the IMRT QA set-up error on the 2D and 3D gamma evaluation method as obtained by using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Su; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kang, Seong-Hee; Cho, Min-Seok; Suh, Tae Suk

    2015-11-01

    The phantom-alignment error is one of the factors affecting delivery quality assurance (QA) accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Accordingly, a possibility of inadequate use of spatial information in gamma evaluation may exist for patient-specific IMRT QA. The influence of the phantom-alignment error on gamma evaluation can be demonstrated experimentally by using the gamma passing rate and the gamma value. However, such experimental methods have a limitation regarding the intrinsic verification of the influence of the phantom set-up error because experimentally measuring the phantom-alignment error accurately is impossible. To overcome this limitation, we aimed to verify the effect of the phantom set-up error within the gamma evaluation formula by using a Monte Carlo simulation. Artificial phantom set-up errors were simulated, and the concept of the true point (TP) was used to represent the actual coordinates of the measurement point for the mathematical modeling of these effects on the gamma. Using dose distributions acquired from the Monte Carlo simulation, performed gamma evaluations in 2D and 3D. The results of the gamma evaluations and the dose difference at the TP were classified to verify the degrees of dose reflection at the TP. The 2D and the 3D gamma errors were defined by comparing gamma values between the case of the imposed phantom set-up error and the TP in order to investigate the effect of the set-up error on the gamma value. According to the results for gamma errors, the 3D gamma evaluation reflected the dose at the TP better than the 2D one. Moreover, the gamma passing rates were higher for 3D than for 2D, as is widely known. Thus, the 3D gamma evaluation can increase the precision of patient-specific IMRT QA by applying stringent acceptance criteria and setting a reasonable action level for the 3D gamma passing rate.

  3. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results.

  4. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results. PMID:27134562

  5. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for 99mTc-hynic-Tyr3-octreotide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr3-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. 99mTc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of 99mhynic-Tyr3-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results. PMID:27134562

  6. Nesting Monte Carlo EM for high-dimensional item factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    An, Xinming; Bentler, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The item factor analysis model for investigating multidimensional latent spaces has proved to be useful. Parameter estimation in this model requires computationally demanding high-dimensional integrations. While several approaches to approximate such integrations have been proposed, they suffer various computational difficulties. This paper proposes a Nesting Monte Carlo Expectation-Maximization (MCEM) algorithm for item factor analysis with binary data. Simulation studies and a real data example suggest that the Nesting MCEM approach can significantly improve computational efficiency while also enjoying the good properties of stable convergence and easy implementation. PMID:23329857

  7. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Modelling of the Inner Gas Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: A Parameter Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Su, C. C.; Marschall, R.; Wu, J. S.; Rubin, M.; Lai, I. L.; Ip, W. H.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.; Skorov, Y. V.; Thomas, N.

    2016-03-01

    Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is a powerful numerical method to study rarefied gas flows such as cometary comae and has been used by several authors over the past decade to study cometary outflow. However, the investigation of the parameter space in simulations can be time consuming since 3D DSMC is computationally highly intensive. For the target of ESA's Rosetta mission, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, we have identified to what extent modification of several parameters influence the 3D flow and gas temperature fields and have attempted to establish the reliability of inferences about the initial conditions from in situ and remote sensing measurements. A large number of DSMC runs have been completed with varying input parameters. In this work, we present the simulation results and conclude on the sensitivity of solutions to certain inputs. It is found that among cases of water outgassing, the surface production rate distribution is the most influential variable to the flow field.

  8. A Monte Carlo Uncertainty Analysis of Ozone Trend Predictions in a Two Dimensional Model. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, D. B.; Stolarski, R. S.; Hollandsworth, S. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    We use Monte Carlo analysis to estimate the uncertainty in predictions of total O3 trends between 1979 and 1995 made by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) two-dimensional (2D) model of stratospheric photochemistry and dynamics. The uncertainty is caused by gas-phase chemical reaction rates, photolysis coefficients, and heterogeneous reaction parameters which are model inputs. The uncertainty represents a lower bound to the total model uncertainty assuming the input parameter uncertainties are characterized correctly. Each of the Monte Carlo runs was initialized in 1970 and integrated for 26 model years through the end of 1995. This was repeated 419 times using input parameter sets generated by Latin Hypercube Sampling. The standard deviation (a) of the Monte Carlo ensemble of total 03 trend predictions is used to quantify the model uncertainty. The 34% difference between the model trend in globally and annually averaged total O3 using nominal inputs and atmospheric trends calculated from Nimbus 7 and Meteor 3 total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) version 7 data is less than the 46% calculated 1 (sigma), model uncertainty, so there is no significant difference between the modeled and observed trends. In the northern hemisphere midlatitude spring the modeled and observed total 03 trends differ by more than 1(sigma) but less than 2(sigma), which we refer to as marginal significance. We perform a multiple linear regression analysis of the runs which suggests that only a few of the model reactions contribute significantly to the variance in the model predictions. The lack of significance in these comparisons suggests that they are of questionable use as guides for continuing model development. Large model/measurement differences which are many multiples of the input parameter uncertainty are seen in the meridional gradients of the trend and the peak-to-peak variations in the trends over an annual cycle. These discrepancies unambiguously indicate model formulation

  9. A Monte Carlo analysis of the Viking lander dynamics at touchdown. [soft landing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. J.; Campbell, J. W.; King, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of the Viking lander has been evaluated by using a Monte Carlo simulation, and all results are presented in statistical form. The primary objectives of this analysis were as follows: (1) to determine the three sigma design values of maximum rigid body accelerations and the minimum clearance of the lander body during landing; (2) to determine the probability of an unstable landing; and (3) to determine the probability of the lander body striking a rock. Two configurations were analyzed with the only difference being in the ability of the primary landing gear struts to carry tension loads.

  10. Microlens assembly error analysis for light field camera based on Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sai; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Wei; Liu, Bin; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes numerical analysis of microlens assembly errors in light field cameras using the Monte Carlo method. Assuming that there were no manufacturing errors, home-built program was used to simulate images of coupling distance error, movement error and rotation error that could appear during microlens installation. By researching these images, sub-aperture images and refocus images, we found that the images present different degrees of fuzziness and deformation for different microlens assembly errors, while the subaperture image presents aliasing, obscured images and other distortions that result in unclear refocus images.

  11. Nuclear spectroscopy for in situ soil elemental analysis: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski L.; Doron, O.

    2012-07-01

    We developed a model to simulate a novel inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system for in situ non-destructive analysis of soil using standard Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP5a) transport code. The volumes from which 90%, 95%, and 99% of the total signal are detected were estimated to be 0.23 m{sup 3}, 0.37 m{sup 3}, and 0.79 m{sup 3}, respectively. Similarly, we assessed the instrument's sampling footprint and depths. In addition we discuss the impact of the carbon's depth distribution on sampled depth.

  12. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Furuta, T; Maeyama, T; Ishikawa, K L; Fukunishi, N; Fukasaku, K; Takagi, S; Noda, S; Himeno, R; Hayashi, S

    2015-08-21

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning. PMID:26266894

  13. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, T.; Maeyama, T.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Fukunishi, N.; Fukasaku, K.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning.

  14. Monte Carlo Benchmark

    2010-10-20

    The "Monte Carlo Benchmark" (MCB) is intended to model the computatiional performance of Monte Carlo algorithms on parallel architectures. It models the solution of a simple heuristic transport equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The MCB employs typical features of Monte Carlo algorithms such as particle creation, particle tracking, tallying particle information, and particle destruction. Particles are also traded among processors using MPI calls.

  15. Monte Carlo Experiments: Design and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxton, Pamela; Curran, Patrick J.; Bollen, Kenneth A.; Kirby, Jim; Chen, Feinian

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates the design and planning of Monte Carlo simulations, presenting nine steps in planning and performing a Monte Carlo analysis from developing a theoretically derived question of interest through summarizing the results. Uses a Monte Carlo simulation to illustrate many of the relevant points. (SLD)

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation for Perusal and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.; Barcikowski, Robert S.; Robey, Randall R.

    The meaningful investigation of many problems in statistics can be solved through Monte Carlo methods. Monte Carlo studies can help solve problems that are mathematically intractable through the analysis of random samples from populations whose characteristics are known to the researcher. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the values of a statistic are…

  17. Uncertainty analysis in environmental radioactivity measurements using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Ortiz, J.; Ródenas, J.; Verdú, G.; Villanueva, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors are widely used for environmental radioactivity measurements due to their excellent energy resolution. Monte Carlo (MC) codes are a useful tool to complement experimental measurements in calibration procedures at the laboratory. However, the efficiency curve of the detector can vary due to uncertainties associated with measurements. These uncertainties can be classified into some categories: geometrical parameters of the measurement (distance source-detector, volume of the source), properties of the radiation source (radionuclide activity, branching ratio), and detector characteristics (Ge dead layer, active volume, end cap thickness). The Monte Carlo simulation can be also affected by other kind of uncertainties mainly related to cross sections and to the calculation itself. Normally, all these uncertainties are not well known and it required a deep analysis to determine their effect on the detector efficiency. In this work, the Noether-Wilks formula is used to carry out the uncertainty analysis. A Probability Density Function (PDF) is assigned to each variable involved in the sampling process. The size of the sampling is determined from the characteristics of the tolerance intervals by applying the Noether-Wilks formula. Results of the analysis transform the efficiency curve into a region of possible values into the tolerance intervals. Results show a good agreement between experimental measurements and simulations for two different matrices (water and sand).

  18. Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in the Netherlands greenhouse gas emission inventory for 1990-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Andrea; de Keizer, Corry; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P.; Olivier, Jos; Brandes, Laurens

    This paper presents an assessment of the value added of a Monte Carlo analysis of the uncertainties in the Netherlands inventory of greenhouse gases over a Tier 1 analysis. It also examines which parameters contributed the most to the total emission uncertainty and identified areas of high priority for the further improvement of the accuracy and quality of the inventory. The Monte Carlo analysis resulted in an uncertainty range in total GHG emissions of 4.1% in 2004 and 5.4% in 1990 (with LUCF) and 5.3% (in 1990) and 3.9% (in 2004) for GHG emissions without LUCF. Uncertainty in the trend was estimated at 4.5%. The values are in the same order of magnitude as those estimated in the Tier 1. The results show that accounting for correlation among parameters is important, and for the Netherlands inventory it has a larger impact on the uncertainty in the trend than on the uncertainty in the total GHG emissions. The main contributors to overall uncertainty are found to be related to N 2O emissions from agricultural soils, the N 2O implied emission factors of Nitric Acid Production, CH 4 from managed solid waste disposal on land, and the implied emission factor of CH 4 from manure management from cattle.

  19. Wavelet-Monte Carlo Hybrid System for HLW Nuclide Migration Modeling and Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nasif, Hesham; Neyama, Atsushi

    2003-02-26

    This paper presents results of an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for performance of the different barriers of high level radioactive waste repositories. SUA is a tool to perform the uncertainty and sensitivity on the output of Wavelet Integrated Repository System model (WIRS), which is developed to solve a system of nonlinear partial differential equations arising from the model formulation of radionuclide transport through repository. SUA performs sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) on a sample output from Monte Carlo simulation. The sample is generated by WIRS and contains the values of the output values of the maximum release rate in the form of time series and values of the input variables for a set of different simulations (runs), which are realized by varying the model input parameters. The Monte Carlo sample is generated with SUA as a pure random sample or using Latin Hypercube sampling technique. Tchebycheff and Kolmogrov confidence bounds are compute d on the maximum release rate for UA and effective non-parametric statistics to rank the influence of the model input parameters SA. Based on the results, we point out parameters that have primary influences on the performance of the engineered barrier system of a repository. The parameters found to be key contributor to the release rate are selenium and Cesium distribution coefficients in both geosphere and major water conducting fault (MWCF), the diffusion depth and water flow rate in the excavation-disturbed zone (EDZ).

  20. Monte Carlo analysis of energy dependent anisotropy of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kakonyi, Robert; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szabo, Gabor

    2009-09-15

    The energy resolved emission angle dependence of x-ray spectra was analyzed by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N particle Monte Carlo) simulator. It was shown that the spectral photon flux had a maximum at a well-defined emission angle due to the anisotropy of the bremsstrahlung process. The higher the relative photon energy, the smaller the emission angle belonging to the maximum was. The trends predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations were experimentally verified. The Monte Carlo results were compared to both the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine spectra table and the SPEKCALCV1.0 code.

  1. Analysis of fatigue fractographic data of a rod end housing using a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shgimokawa, Toshiyuki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    1994-02-01

    This paper presents a new method using a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate a life distribution of fatigue crack propagation on the basis of crack length versus striation spacing data. This simulation is based on the distributions of two parameter estimates of a regression line and the reasonable correlation of the two parameter estimates. One cycle of the Monte Carlo scheme generates a set of parameter estimates which give a life of fatigue crack propagation. The analyzed data were obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of a fatigue fracture surface of the rod end housing of a hydraulic actuator, which was used for a main landing gear in transport aircraft. A conventional regression analysis provides a set of two deterministic-parameter estimates, a life estimate of fatigue crack propagation, and the statistical properties of striation spacing. Stochastic-process modes of crack growth and practical probabilistic methods including the proposed method are used to estimate the life distributions of fatigue crack propagation on the basis of the results of the regression analysis. The obtained results are discussed and compared. The proposed method approximates the fatigue life of the rod end housing as the B-allowable life when the initial crack length is assumed to be 0 mm.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for slip rate sensitivity analysis in Cimandiri fault area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, Cecep; Meilano, Irwan; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Slip rate is used to estimate earthquake recurrence relationship which is the most influence for hazard level. We examine slip rate contribution of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), in probabilistic seismic hazard maps (10% probability of exceedance in 50 years or 500 years return period). Hazard curve of PGA have been investigated for Sukabumi using a PSHA (Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis). We observe that the most influence in the hazard estimate is crustal fault. Monte Carlo approach has been developed to assess the sensitivity. Then, Monte Carlo simulations properties have been assessed. Uncertainty and coefficient of variation from slip rate for Cimandiri Fault area has been calculated. We observe that seismic hazard estimates is sensitive to fault slip rate with seismic hazard uncertainty result about 0.25 g. For specific site, we found seismic hazard estimate for Sukabumi is between 0.4904 - 0.8465 g with uncertainty between 0.0847 - 0.2389 g and COV between 17.7% - 29.8%.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation for slip rate sensitivity analysis in Cimandiri fault area

    SciTech Connect

    Pratama, Cecep; Meilano, Irwan; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Slip rate is used to estimate earthquake recurrence relationship which is the most influence for hazard level. We examine slip rate contribution of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), in probabilistic seismic hazard maps (10% probability of exceedance in 50 years or 500 years return period). Hazard curve of PGA have been investigated for Sukabumi using a PSHA (Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis). We observe that the most influence in the hazard estimate is crustal fault. Monte Carlo approach has been developed to assess the sensitivity. Then, Monte Carlo simulations properties have been assessed. Uncertainty and coefficient of variation from slip rate for Cimandiri Fault area has been calculated. We observe that seismic hazard estimates is sensitive to fault slip rate with seismic hazard uncertainty result about 0.25 g. For specific site, we found seismic hazard estimate for Sukabumi is between 0.4904 – 0.8465 g with uncertainty between 0.0847 – 0.2389 g and COV between 17.7% – 29.8%.

  4. Markov chain Monte Carlo segregation and linkage analysis for oligogenic models.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, S C

    1997-01-01

    A new method for segregation and linkage analysis, with pedigree data, is described. Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used to implement a sampling scheme in which the Markov chain can jump between parameter subspaces corresponding to models with different numbers of quantitative-trait loci (QTL's). Joint estimation of QTL number, position, and effects is possible, avoiding the problems that can arise from misspecification of the number of QTL's in a linkage analysis. The method is illustrated by use of a data set simulated for the 9th Genetic Analysis Workshop; this data set had several oligogenic traits, generated by use of a 1,497-member pedigree. The mixing characteristics of the method appear to be good, and the method correctly recovers the simulated model from the test data set. The approach appears to have great potential both for robust linkage analysis and for the answering of more general questions regarding the genetic control of complex traits. PMID:9326339

  5. Advanced Monte Carlo methods for analysis of very high temperature reactors: On-the-fly Doppler broadening and deterministic/Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan

    Two of the primary challenges associated with the neutronic analysis of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are accounting for resonance self-shielding in the particle fuel (contributing to the double heterogeneity) and accounting for temperature feedback due to Doppler broadening. The double heterogeneity challenge is addressed by defining a "double heterogeneity factor" (DHF) that allows conventional light water reactor (LWR) lattice physics codes to analyze VHTR configurations. The challenge of treating Doppler broadening is addressed by a new "on-the-fly" methodology that is applied during the random walk process with negligible impact on computational efficiency. Although this methodology was motivated by the need to treat temperature feedback in a VHTR, it is applicable to any reactor design. The on-the-fly Doppler methodology is based on a combination of Taylor and asymptotic series expansions. The type of series representation was determined by investigating the temperature dependence of U238 resonance cross sections in three regions: near the resonance peaks, mid-resonance, and the resonance wings. The coefficients for these series expansions were determined by regressions over the energy and temperature range of interest. The comparison of the broadened cross sections using this methodology with the NJOY cross sections was excellent. A Monte Carlo code was implemented to apply the combined regression model and used to estimate the additional computing cost which was found to be less than 1%. The DHF accounts for the effect of the particle heterogeneity on resonance absorption in particle fuel. The first level heterogeneity posed by the VHTR fuel particles is a unique characteristic that cannot be accounted for by conventional LWR lattice physics codes. On the other hand, Monte Carlo codes can take into account the detailed geometry of the VHTR including resolution of individual fuel particles without performing any type of resonance approximation

  6. A bottom collider vertex detector design, Monte-Carlo simulation and analysis package

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, P.

    1990-10-01

    A detailed simulation of the BCD vertex detector is underway. Specifications and global design issues are briefly reviewed. The BCD design based on double sided strip detector is described in more detail. The GEANT3-based Monte-Carlo program and the analysis package used to estimate detector performance are discussed in detail. The current status of the expected resolution and signal to noise ratio for the golden'' CP violating mode B{sub d} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} is presented. These calculations have been done at FNAL energy ({radical}s = 2.0 TeV). Emphasis is placed on design issues, analysis techniques and related software rather than physics potentials. 20 refs., 46 figs.

  7. Monte Carlo based statistical power analysis for mediation models: methods and software.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    The existing literature on statistical power analysis for mediation models often assumes data normality and is based on a less powerful Sobel test instead of the more powerful bootstrap test. This study proposes to estimate statistical power to detect mediation effects on the basis of the bootstrap method through Monte Carlo simulation. Nonnormal data with excessive skewness and kurtosis are allowed in the proposed method. A free R package called bmem is developed to conduct the power analysis discussed in this study. Four examples, including a simple mediation model, a multiple-mediator model with a latent mediator, a multiple-group mediation model, and a longitudinal mediation model, are provided to illustrate the proposed method.

  8. Noninvasive spectral imaging of skin chromophores based on multiple regression analysis aided by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Wiswadarma, Aditya; Hase, Yota; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Maeda, Takaaki; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2011-08-01

    In order to visualize melanin and blood concentrations and oxygen saturation in human skin tissue, a simple imaging technique based on multispectral diffuse reflectance images acquired at six wavelengths (500, 520, 540, 560, 580 and 600nm) was developed. The technique utilizes multiple regression analysis aided by Monte Carlo simulation for diffuse reflectance spectra. Using the absorbance spectrum as a response variable and the extinction coefficients of melanin, oxygenated hemoglobin, and deoxygenated hemoglobin as predictor variables, multiple regression analysis provides regression coefficients. Concentrations of melanin and total blood are then determined from the regression coefficients using conversion vectors that are deduced numerically in advance, while oxygen saturation is obtained directly from the regression coefficients. Experiments with a tissue-like agar gel phantom validated the method. In vivo experiments with human skin of the human hand during upper limb occlusion and of the inner forearm exposed to UV irradiation demonstrated the ability of the method to evaluate physiological reactions of human skin tissue.

  9. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  10. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  11. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-“coupled”- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz–Kalos–Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary

  12. Marathon: An Open Source Software Library for the Analysis of Markov-Chain Monte Carlo Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rechner, Steffen; Berger, Annabell

    2016-01-01

    We present the software library marathon, which is designed to support the analysis of sampling algorithms that are based on the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo principle. The main application of this library is the computation of properties of so-called state graphs, which represent the structure of Markov chains. We demonstrate applications and the usefulness of marathon by investigating the quality of several bounding methods on four well-known Markov chains for sampling perfect matchings and bipartite graphs. In a set of experiments, we compute the total mixing time and several of its bounds for a large number of input instances. We find that the upper bound gained by the famous canonical path method is often several magnitudes larger than the total mixing time and deteriorates with growing input size. In contrast, the spectral bound is found to be a precise approximation of the total mixing time. PMID:26824442

  13. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent, cycle 3. Appendix C: Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of three nonlinear the Monte Carlo dispersion analyses for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) Orbiter Descent Operational Flight Profile, Cycle 3 are presented. Fifty randomly selected simulation for the end of mission (EOM) descent, the abort once around (AOA) descent targeted line are steep target line, and the AOA descent targeted to the shallow target line are analyzed. These analyses compare the flight environment with system and operational constraints on the flight environment and in some cases use simplified system models as an aid in assessing the STS-1 descent flight profile. In addition, descent flight envelops are provided as a data base for use by system specialists to determine the flight readiness for STS-1. The results of these dispersion analyses supersede results of the dispersion analysis previously documented.

  14. Techno-economic and Monte Carlo probabilistic analysis of microalgae biofuel production system.

    PubMed

    Batan, Liaw Y; Graff, Gregory D; Bradley, Thomas H

    2016-11-01

    This study focuses on the characterization of the technical and economic feasibility of an enclosed photobioreactor microalgae system with annual production of 37.85 million liters (10 million gallons) of biofuel. The analysis characterizes and breaks down the capital investment and operating costs and the production cost of unit of algal diesel. The economic modelling shows total cost of production of algal raw oil and diesel of $3.46 and $3.69 per liter, respectively. Additionally, the effects of co-products' credit and their impact in the economic performance of algal-to-biofuel system are discussed. The Monte Carlo methodology is used to address price and cost projections and to simulate scenarios with probabilities of financial performance and profits of the analyzed model. Different markets for allocation of co-products have shown significant shifts for economic viability of algal biofuel system.

  15. Contrast to Noise Ratio and Contrast Detail Analysis in Mammography:A Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, V.; Delis, H.; Kalogeropoulou, C.; Zampakis, P.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The mammographic spectrum is one of the major factors affecting image quality in mammography. In this study, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model was used to evaluate image quality characteristics of various mammographic spectra. The anode/filter combinations evaluated, were those traditionally used in mammography, for tube voltages between 26 and 30 kVp. The imaging performance was investigated in terms of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and Contrast Detail (CD) analysis, by involving human observers, utilizing a mathematical CD phantom. Soft spectra provided the best characteristics in terms of both CNR and CD scores, while tube voltage had a limited effect. W-anode spectra filtered with k-edge filters demonstrated an improved performance, that sometimes was better compared to softer x-ray spectra, produced by Mo or Rh anode. Regarding the filter material, k-edge filters showed superior performance compared to Al filters.

  16. Application analysis of Monte Carlo to estimate the capacity of geothermal resources in Lawu Mount

    SciTech Connect

    Supriyadi; Srigutomo, Wahyu; Munandar, Arif

    2014-03-24

    Monte Carlo analysis has been applied in calculation of geothermal resource capacity based on volumetric method issued by Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI). A deterministic formula is converted into a stochastic formula to take into account the nature of uncertainties in input parameters. The method yields a range of potential power probability stored beneath Lawu Mount geothermal area. For 10,000 iterations, the capacity of geothermal resources is in the range of 139.30-218.24 MWe with the most likely value is 177.77 MWe. The risk of resource capacity above 196.19 MWe is less than 10%. The power density of the prospect area covering 17 km{sup 2} is 9.41 MWe/km{sup 2} with probability 80%.

  17. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Evans, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear operator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approximation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage fraction of stochastic histories from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem to test the models for symmetric operators. In general, the derived approximations show good agreement with measured computational results. (authors)

  18. Marathon: An Open Source Software Library for the Analysis of Markov-Chain Monte Carlo Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rechner, Steffen; Berger, Annabell

    2016-01-01

    We present the software library marathon, which is designed to support the analysis of sampling algorithms that are based on the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo principle. The main application of this library is the computation of properties of so-called state graphs, which represent the structure of Markov chains. We demonstrate applications and the usefulness of marathon by investigating the quality of several bounding methods on four well-known Markov chains for sampling perfect matchings and bipartite graphs. In a set of experiments, we compute the total mixing time and several of its bounds for a large number of input instances. We find that the upper bound gained by the famous canonical path method is often several magnitudes larger than the total mixing time and deteriorates with growing input size. In contrast, the spectral bound is found to be a precise approximation of the total mixing time.

  19. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Commissioning Phase Maneuvers of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jessica L.; Bhat, Ramachandra S.; You, Tung-Han

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will perform soil moisture content and freeze/thaw state observations from a low-Earth orbit. The observatory is scheduled to launch in October 2014 and will perform observations from a near-polar, frozen, and sun-synchronous Science Orbit for a 3-year data collection mission. At launch, the observatory is delivered to an Injection Orbit that is biased below the Science Orbit; the spacecraft will maneuver to the Science Orbit during the mission Commissioning Phase. The delta V needed to maneuver from the Injection Orbit to the Science Orbit is computed statistically via a Monte Carlo simulation; the 99th percentile delta V (delta V99) is carried as a line item in the mission delta V budget. This paper details the simulation and analysis performed to compute this figure and the delta V99 computed per current mission parameters.

  20. Converting Boundary Representation Solid Models to Half-Space Representation Models for Monte Carlo Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis JE, Eddy MJ, Sutton TM, Altomari TJ

    2007-03-01

    Solid modeling computer software systems provide for the design of three-dimensional solid models used in the design and analysis of physical components. The current state-of-the-art in solid modeling representation uses a boundary representation format in which geometry and topology are used to form three-dimensional boundaries of the solid. The geometry representation used in these systems is cubic B-spline curves and surfaces--a network of cubic B-spline functions in three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate space. Many Monte Carlo codes, however, use a geometry representation in which geometry units are specified by intersections and unions of half-spaces. This paper describes an algorithm for converting from a boundary representation to a half-space representation.

  1. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-31

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  2. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-01

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  3. Techno-economic and Monte Carlo probabilistic analysis of microalgae biofuel production system.

    PubMed

    Batan, Liaw Y; Graff, Gregory D; Bradley, Thomas H

    2016-11-01

    This study focuses on the characterization of the technical and economic feasibility of an enclosed photobioreactor microalgae system with annual production of 37.85 million liters (10 million gallons) of biofuel. The analysis characterizes and breaks down the capital investment and operating costs and the production cost of unit of algal diesel. The economic modelling shows total cost of production of algal raw oil and diesel of $3.46 and $3.69 per liter, respectively. Additionally, the effects of co-products' credit and their impact in the economic performance of algal-to-biofuel system are discussed. The Monte Carlo methodology is used to address price and cost projections and to simulate scenarios with probabilities of financial performance and profits of the analyzed model. Different markets for allocation of co-products have shown significant shifts for economic viability of algal biofuel system. PMID:27475330

  4. Marathon: An Open Source Software Library for the Analysis of Markov-Chain Monte Carlo Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Rechner, Steffen; Berger, Annabell

    2016-01-01

    We present the software library marathon, which is designed to support the analysis of sampling algorithms that are based on the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo principle. The main application of this library is the computation of properties of so-called state graphs, which represent the structure of Markov chains. We demonstrate applications and the usefulness of marathon by investigating the quality of several bounding methods on four well-known Markov chains for sampling perfect matchings and bipartite graphs. In a set of experiments, we compute the total mixing time and several of its bounds for a large number of input instances. We find that the upper bound gained by the famous canonical path method is often several magnitudes larger than the total mixing time and deteriorates with growing input size. In contrast, the spectral bound is found to be a precise approximation of the total mixing time. PMID:26824442

  5. An analysis of the convergence of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzine, Cyril; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-05-01

    In this article, a rigorous framework for the analysis of the convergence of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is presented. It is applied to the simulation of two test cases: an axisymmetric jet at a Knudsen number of 0.01 and Mach number of 1 and a two-dimensional cylinder flow at a Knudsen of 0.05 and Mach 10. The rate of convergence of sampled quantities is found to be well predicted by an extended form of the Central Limit Theorem that takes into account the correlation of samples but requires the calculation of correlation spectra. A simplified analytical model that does not require correlation spectra is then constructed to model the effect of sample correlation. It is then used to obtain an a priori estimate of the convergence error.

  6. Monte Carlo Example Programs

    2006-05-09

    The Monte Carlo example programs VARHATOM and DMCATOM are two small, simple FORTRAN programs that illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Mathematical technique for calculating the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom.

  7. Monte Carlo - Metropolis Investigations of Shape and Matrix Effects in 2D and 3D Spin-Crossover Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerroudj, Salim; Caballero, Rafael; De Zela, Francisco; Jureschi, Catalin; Linares, Jorge; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    The Ising like model, taking into account short-, long-range interaction as well as surface effects is used to investigate size and shape effects on the thermal behaviour of 2D and 3D spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. We analyze the role of the parametert, representing the ratio between the number of surface and volume molecules, on the unusual thermal hysteresis behaviour (appearance of the hysteresis and a re-entrance phase transition) at small scales.

  8. The effect of load imbalances on the performance of Monte Carlo algorithms in LWR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, A.R.; Smith, K.; Romano, P.K.; Forget, B.; Felker, K.

    2013-02-15

    A model is developed to predict the impact of particle load imbalances on the performance of domain-decomposed Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithms. Expressions for upper bound performance “penalties” are derived in terms of simple machine characteristics, material characterizations and initial particle distributions. The hope is that these relations can be used to evaluate tradeoffs among different memory decomposition strategies in next generation Monte Carlo codes, and perhaps as a metric for triggering particle redistribution in production codes.

  9. Generation of SFR few-group constants using the Monte Carlo code Serpent

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, E.; Rachamin, R.; Shwageraus, E.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the Serpent Monte Carlo code was used as a tool for preparation of homogenized few-group cross sections for the nodal diffusion analysis of Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) cores. Few-group constants for two reference SFR cores were generated by Serpent and then employed by nodal diffusion code DYN3D in 2D full core calculations. The DYN3D results were verified against the references full core Serpent Monte Carlo solutions. A good agreement between the reference Monte Carlo and nodal diffusion results was observed demonstrating the feasibility of using Serpent for generation of few-group constants for the deterministic SFR analysis. (authors)

  10. Reliability analysis of a wastewater treatment plant using fault tree analysis and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Taheriyoun, Masoud; Moradinejad, Saber

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of a wastewater treatment plant is a critical issue when the effluent is reused or discharged to water resources. Main factors affecting the performance of the wastewater treatment plant are the variation of the influent, inherent variability in the treatment processes, deficiencies in design, mechanical equipment, and operational failures. Thus, meeting the established reuse/discharge criteria requires assessment of plant reliability. Among many techniques developed in system reliability analysis, fault tree analysis (FTA) is one of the popular and efficient methods. FTA is a top down, deductive failure analysis in which an undesired state of a system is analyzed. In this study, the problem of reliability was studied on Tehran West Town wastewater treatment plant. This plant is a conventional activated sludge process, and the effluent is reused in landscape irrigation. The fault tree diagram was established with the violation of allowable effluent BOD as the top event in the diagram, and the deficiencies of the system were identified based on the developed model. Some basic events are operator's mistake, physical damage, and design problems. The analytical method is minimal cut sets (based on numerical probability) and Monte Carlo simulation. Basic event probabilities were calculated according to available data and experts' opinions. The results showed that human factors, especially human error had a great effect on top event occurrence. The mechanical, climate, and sewer system factors were in subsequent tier. Literature shows applying FTA has been seldom used in the past wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) risk analysis studies. Thus, the developed FTA model in this study considerably improves the insight into causal failure analysis of a WWTP. It provides an efficient tool for WWTP operators and decision makers to achieve the standard limits in wastewater reuse and discharge to the environment.

  11. Patient-Specific 3D Pretreatment and Potential 3D Online Dose Verification of Monte Carlo-Calculated IMRT Prostate Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Boggula, Ramesh; Jahnke, Lennart; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Fast and reliable comprehensive quality assurance tools are required to validate the safety and accuracy of complex intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for prostate treatment. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the COMPASS system for both off-line and potential online procedures for the verification of IMRT treatment plans. Methods and Materials: COMPASS has a dedicated beam model and dose engine, it can reconstruct three-dimensional dose distributions on the patient anatomy based on measured fluences using either the MatriXX two-dimensional (2D) array (offline) or a 2D transmission detector (T2D) (online). For benchmarking the COMPASS dose calculation, various dose-volume indices were compared against Monte Carlo-calculated dose distributions for five prostate patient treatment plans. Gamma index evaluation and absolute point dose measurements were also performed in an inhomogeneous pelvis phantom using extended dose range films and ion chamber for five additional treatment plans. Results: MatriXX-based dose reconstruction showed excellent agreement with the ion chamber (<0.5%, except for one treatment plan, which showed 1.5%), film ({approx}100% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3 mm) and mean dose-volume indices (<2%). The T2D based dose reconstruction showed good agreement as well with ion chamber (<2%), film ({approx}99% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3 mm), and mean dose-volume indices (<5.5%). Conclusion: The COMPASS system qualifies for routine prostate IMRT pretreatment verification with the MatriXX detector and has the potential for on-line verification of treatment delivery using T2D.

  12. Analysis of polytype stability in PVT grown silicon carbide single crystal using competitive lattice model Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hui-Jun; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xi; Gao, Pan; Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Xin, Jun; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Zheng, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jian-Hua; Shi, Er-Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polytype stability is very important for high quality SiC single crystal growth. However, the growth conditions for the 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes are similar, and the mechanism of polytype stability is not clear. The kinetics aspects, such as surface-step nucleation, are important. The kinetic Monte Carlo method is a common tool to study surface kinetics in crystal growth. However, the present lattice models for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations cannot solve the problem of the competitive growth of two or more lattice structures. In this study, a competitive lattice model was developed for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the competition growth of the 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC. The site positions are fixed at the perfect crystal lattice positions without any adjustment of the site positions. Surface steps on seeds and large ratios of diffusion/deposition have positive effects on the 4H polytype stability. The 3D polytype distribution in a physical vapor transport method grown SiC ingot showed that the facet preserved the 4H polytype even if the 6H polytype dominated the growth surface. The theoretical and experimental results of polytype growth in SiC suggest that retaining the step growth mode is an important factor to maintain a stable single 4H polytype during SiC growth.

  13. Derivation of landslide-triggering thresholds by Monte Carlo simulation and ROC analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, David Johnny; Cancelliere, Antonino

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall thresholds of landslide-triggering are useful in early warning systems to be implemented in prone areas. Direct statistical analysis of historical records of rainfall and landslide data presents different shortcomings typically due to incompleteness of landslide historical archives, imprecise knowledge of the triggering instants, unavailability of a rain gauge located near the landslides, etc. In this work, a Monte Carlo approach to derive and evaluate landslide triggering thresholds is presented. Such an approach contributes to overcome some of the above mentioned shortcomings of direct empirical analysis of observed data. The proposed Monte Carlo framework consists in the combination of a rainfall stochastic model with hydrological and slope-stability model. Specifically, 1000-years long hourly synthetic rainfall and related slope stability factor of safety data are generated by coupling the Neyman-Scott rectangular pulses model with the TRIGRS unsaturated model (Baum et al., 2008) and a linear-reservoir water table recession model. Triggering and non-triggering rainfall events are then distinguished and analyzed to derive stochastic-input physically based thresholds that optimize the trade-off between correct and wrong predictions. For this purpose, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) indices are used. An application of the method to the highly landslide-prone area of the Peloritani mountains in north-eastern Sicily (Italy) is carried out. A threshold for the area is derived and successfully validated by comparison with thresholds proposed by other researchers. Moreover, the uncertainty in threshold derivation due to variability of rainfall intensity within events and to antecedent rainfall is investigated. Results indicate that variability of intensity during rainfall events influences significantly rainfall intensity and duration associated with landslide triggering. A representation of rainfall as constant-intensity hyetographs globally leads to

  14. Improving Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms in LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnesis, N.; Nofrarias, M.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Lobo, A.

    2012-06-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission (LPF) aims to test key technologies for the future LISA mission. The LISA Technology Package (LTP) on-board LPF will consist of an exhaustive suite of experiments and its outcome will be crucial for the future detection of gravitational waves. In order to achieve maximum sensitivity, we need to have an understanding of every instrument on-board and parametrize the properties of the underlying noise models. The Data Analysis team has developed algorithms for parameter estimation of the system. A very promising one implemented for LISA Pathfinder data analysis is the Markov Chain Monte Carlo. A series of experiments are going to take place during flight operations and each experiment is going to provide us with essential information for the next in the sequence. Therefore, it is a priority to optimize and improve our tools available for data analysis during the mission. Using a Bayesian framework analysis allows us to apply prior knowledge for each experiment, which means that we can efficiently use our prior estimates for the parameters, making the method more accurate and significantly faster. This, together with other algorithm improvements, will lead us to our main goal, which is no other than creating a robust and reliable tool for parameter estimation during the LPF mission.

  15. Comparison of a 3-D multi-group SN particle transport code with Monte Carlo for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kent A; Wareing, Todd A; Failla, Gregory; Horton, John L; Eifel, Patricia J; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-12-03

    A patient dose distribution was calculated by a 3D multi-group S N particle transport code for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri and compared to previously published Monte Carlo results. A Cs-137 LDR intracavitary brachytherapy CT data set was chosen from our clinical database. MCNPX version 2.5.c, was used to calculate the dose distribution. A 3D multi-group S N particle transport code, Attila version 6.1.1 was used to simulate the same patient. Each patient applicator was built in SolidWorks, a mechanical design package, and then assembled with a coordinate transformation and rotation for the patient. The SolidWorks exported applicator geometry was imported into Attila for calculation. Dose matrices were overlaid on the patient CT data set. Dose volume histograms and point doses were compared. The MCNPX calculation required 14.8 hours, whereas the Attila calculation required 22.2 minutes on a 1.8 GHz AMD Opteron CPU. Agreement between Attila and MCNPX dose calculations at the ICRU 38 points was within +/- 3%. Calculated doses to the 2 cc and 5 cc volumes of highest dose differed by not more than +/- 1.1% between the two codes. Dose and DVH overlays agreed well qualitatively. Attila can calculate dose accurately and efficiently for this Cs-137 CT-based patient geometry. Our data showed that a three-group cross-section set is adequate for Cs-137 computations. Future work is aimed at implementing an optimized version of Attila for radiotherapy calculations.

  16. Development of Monte Carlo code for coincidence prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaogang

    Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) offers a non-destructive, relatively rapid on-line method for determination of elemental composition of bulk and other samples. However, PGNAA has an inherently large background. These backgrounds are primarily due to the presence of the neutron excitation source. It also includes neutron activation of the detector and the prompt gamma rays from the structure materials of PGNAA devices. These large backgrounds limit the sensitivity and accuracy of PGNAA. Since most of the prompt gamma rays from the same element are emitted in coincidence, a possible approach for further improvement is to change the traditional PGNAA measurement technique and introduce the gamma-gamma coincidence technique. It is well known that the coincidence techniques can eliminate most of the interference backgrounds and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A new Monte Carlo code, CEARCPG has been developed at CEAR to simulate gamma-gamma coincidence spectra in PGNAA experiment. Compared to the other existing Monte Carlo code CEARPGA I and CEARPGA II, a new algorithm of sampling the prompt gamma rays produced from neutron capture reaction and neutron inelastic scattering reaction, is developed in this work. All the prompt gamma rays are taken into account by using this new algorithm. Before this work, the commonly used method is to interpolate the prompt gamma rays from the pre-calculated gamma-ray table. This technique works fine for the single spectrum. However it limits the capability to simulate the coincidence spectrum. The new algorithm samples the prompt gamma rays from the nucleus excitation scheme. The primary nuclear data library used to sample the prompt gamma rays comes from ENSDF library. Three cases are simulated and the simulated results are benchmarked with experiments. The first case is the prototype for ETI PGNAA application. This case is designed to check the capability of CEARCPG for single spectrum simulation. The second

  17. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; James, Scott C.

    2013-06-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (3H) and sodium-22 (22Na ), and the retarding solute uranium-232 (232U). The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single-porosity and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows single-porosity and double-porosity models are structurally deficient, yielding late-time residual bias that grows with time. On the other hand, the multirate model yields unbiased predictions consistent with the late-time -5/2 slope diagnostic of multirate mass transfer. The analysis indicates the multirate model is better suited to describing core-scale solute breakthrough in the Culebra Dolomite than the other two models.

  18. Risk analysis of gravity dam instability using credibility theory Monte Carlo simulation model.

    PubMed

    Xin, Cao; Chongshi, Gu

    2016-01-01

    Risk analysis of gravity dam stability involves complicated uncertainty in many design parameters and measured data. Stability failure risk ratio described jointly by probability and possibility has deficiency in characterization of influence of fuzzy factors and representation of the likelihood of risk occurrence in practical engineering. In this article, credibility theory is applied into stability failure risk analysis of gravity dam. Stability of gravity dam is viewed as a hybrid event considering both fuzziness and randomness of failure criterion, design parameters and measured data. Credibility distribution function is conducted as a novel way to represent uncertainty of influence factors of gravity dam stability. And combining with Monte Carlo simulation, corresponding calculation method and procedure are proposed. Based on a dam section, a detailed application of the modeling approach on risk calculation of both dam foundation and double sliding surfaces is provided. The results show that, the present method is feasible to be applied on analysis of stability failure risk for gravity dams. The risk assessment obtained can reflect influence of both sorts of uncertainty, and is suitable as an index value.

  19. Risk analysis of gravity dam instability using credibility theory Monte Carlo simulation model.

    PubMed

    Xin, Cao; Chongshi, Gu

    2016-01-01

    Risk analysis of gravity dam stability involves complicated uncertainty in many design parameters and measured data. Stability failure risk ratio described jointly by probability and possibility has deficiency in characterization of influence of fuzzy factors and representation of the likelihood of risk occurrence in practical engineering. In this article, credibility theory is applied into stability failure risk analysis of gravity dam. Stability of gravity dam is viewed as a hybrid event considering both fuzziness and randomness of failure criterion, design parameters and measured data. Credibility distribution function is conducted as a novel way to represent uncertainty of influence factors of gravity dam stability. And combining with Monte Carlo simulation, corresponding calculation method and procedure are proposed. Based on a dam section, a detailed application of the modeling approach on risk calculation of both dam foundation and double sliding surfaces is provided. The results show that, the present method is feasible to be applied on analysis of stability failure risk for gravity dams. The risk assessment obtained can reflect influence of both sorts of uncertainty, and is suitable as an index value. PMID:27386264

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of image analysis for flexible and high-resolution registration metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnz, M.; Klose, G.; Troll, G.; Beyer, D.; Mueller, A.

    2009-01-01

    The continuous progress of PROVE, the new photomask registration and overlay measurement tool currently under development at Carl Zeiss has been reported at mask related conferences since it's first publication at EMLC 2008. The project has moved in the past year from a final design on paper to functional hardware in the lab. Major tool components such as the climate control unit, the automated mask handling system and the metrology stage have been assembled and successfully tested. The scope of this paper is to report on the current status of PROVE and furthermore present results from simulations utilizing the image analysis routines of the tool. Monte-Carlo simulations were used to analyze the impact of several realistic tool limitations (camera noise, stage and focus noise and imaging telecentricity) on the image analysis process. The evaluation itself was based on a conventional threshold approach to perform both registration and CD measurement simultaneously. The results show, that the routines can deal with the tool imperfections and limit the contribution to the reproducibility error for standard registration markers to a negligible part. Even single contact holes suffer only from small errors, when camera noise is low and image averaging is increased. Employing a generally used test pattern the CD test results also confirm a sufficiently small error contribution to the CD non-uniformity reproducibility.

  1. A Monte Carlo error analysis program for near-Mars, finite-burn, orbital transfer maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Hoffman, L. H.; Young, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program was developed which performs an error analysis of a minimum-fuel, finite-thrust, transfer maneuver between two Keplerian orbits in the vicinity of Mars. The method of analysis is the Monte Carlo approach where each off-nominal initial orbit is targeted to the desired final orbit. The errors in the initial orbit are described by two covariance matrices of state deviations and tracking errors. The function of the program is to relate these errors to the resulting errors in the final orbit. The equations of motion for the transfer trajectory are those of a spacecraft maneuvering with constant thrust and mass-flow rate in the neighborhood of a single body. The thrust vector is allowed to rotate in a plane with a constant pitch rate. The transfer trajectory is characterized by six control parameters and the final orbit is defined, or partially defined, by the desired target parameters. The program is applicable to the deboost maneuver (hyperbola to ellipse), orbital trim maneuver (ellipse to ellipse), fly-by maneuver (hyperbola to hyperbola), escape maneuvers (ellipse to hyperbola), and deorbit maneuver.

  2. Monte Carlo analysis of thermochromatography as a fast separation method for nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear forensic science has become increasingly important for global nuclear security, and enhancing the timeliness of forensic analysis has been established as an important objective in the field. New, faster techniques must be developed to meet this objective. Current approaches for the analysis of minor actinides, fission products, and fuel-specific materials require time-consuming chemical separation coupled with measurement through either nuclear counting or mass spectrometry. These very sensitive measurement techniques can be hindered by impurities or incomplete separation in even the most painstaking chemical separations. High-temperature gas-phase separation or thermochromatography has been used in the past for the rapid separations in the study of newly created elements and as a basis for chemical classification of that element. This work examines the potential for rapid separation of gaseous species to be applied in nuclear forensic investigations. Monte Carlo modeling has been used to evaluate the potential utility of the thermochromatographic separation method, albeit this assessment is necessarily limited due to the lack of available experimental data for validation.

  3. Development and testing of a Monte Carlo code system for analysis of ionization chamber responses

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    To predict the perturbation of interactions between radiation and material by the presence of a detector, a differential Monte Carlo computer code system entitled MICAP was developed and tested. This code system determines the neutron, photon, and total response of an ionization chamber to mixed field radiation environments. To demonstrate the ability of MICAP in calculating an ionization chamber response function, a comparison was made to 05S, an established Monte Carlo code extensively used to accurately calibrate liquid organic scintillators. Both code systems modeled an organic scintillator with a parallel beam of monoenergetic neutrons incident on the scintillator. (LEW)

  4. Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo analysis of the electrons in spatially inhomogeneous, bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubert, G. K.; Loffhagen, D.

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the electrons in spatially inhomogeneous, bounded plasmas have been performed by means of two different numerical techniques: the solution of the space-dependent electron Boltzmann equation (BE) using a multiterm approximation of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the electron velocity distribution function and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Appropriate conditions at the boundaries of gas discharge plasmas have been deduced, which are adequate for the direct comparison of electron BE and MC simulation results. In particular, extended boundary conditions at the electron emitting cathode are represented and discussed. The investigations are performed for dc discharges in oxygen at conditions typical of abnormal glow discharges. The analysis of the results shows extreme alterations of the properties of the electrons in the discharge region, where pronounced groups of electrons are found, which are generated by electron impact dissociation processes and ionization processes when assuming equal energy sharing in ionizing collisions and isotropic scattering in inelastic electron collisions. The influence of these assumptions on the results obtained is discussed. The very good agreement between the results of the BE and MC calculations verifies the consistence of the derived extended boundary conditions at the cathode and of both the kinetic approaches.

  5. A Monte Carlo Analysis of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Process Load Cell Data

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, James R; Whitaker, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    As uranium enrichment plants increase in number, capacity, and types of separative technology deployed (e.g., gas centrifuge, laser, etc.), more automated safeguards measures are needed to enable the IAEA to maintain safeguards effectiveness in a fiscally constrained environment. Monitoring load cell data can significantly increase the IAEA s ability to efficiently achieve the fundamental safeguards objective of confirming operations as declared (i.e., no undeclared activities), but care must be taken to fully protect the operator s proprietary and classified information related to operations. Staff at ORNL, LANL, JRC/ISPRA, and University of Glasgow are investigating monitoring the process load cells at feed and withdrawal (F/W) stations to improve international safeguards at enrichment plants. A key question that must be resolved is what is the necessary frequency of recording data from the process F/W stations? Several studies have analyzed data collected at a fixed frequency. This paper contributes to load cell process monitoring research by presenting an analysis of Monte Carlo simulations to determine the expected errors caused by low frequency sampling and its impact on material balance calculations.

  6. Atmospheric deposition of PBDEs to the Great Lakes featuring a Monte Carlo analysis of errors.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Hites, Ronald A

    2008-12-15

    The first estimates of atmospheric deposition of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) into the Great Lakes are presented. Precipitation samples were collected monthly from 2005 to 2006 at five sites located in the Great Lakes region. Volume weighted mean concentrations of total PBDEs in precipitation ranged from 94 +/- 19 ng L(-1) at the urban site of Chicago to 0.65 +/- 0.14 ng L(-1) for the rural site of Sturgeon Point Using gas and particle phase concentrations previously obtained in our laboratory and concentrations in precipitation measured in this study, the total annual net mass transfer rates to each lake and their relative errors were calculated using Monte Carlo analysis. The highest net mass transfer rates for BDE-47, and total PBDEs were measured for Lake Michigan (150 +/- 40 and 310 +/- 79 kg y(-1), respectively) while the highest net mass transfer rate for BDE-209 was measured for Lake Erie (79 +/- 56 kg y(-1)). We found good agreement between atmospheric and sediment net mass transfer rates for Lake Superior, but we found a significant imbalance of BDE-209 for the other two lakes and of BDE-47 for Lake Michigan. These findings suggest that Chicago might be a preferential source of BDE-47 to Lake Michigan and that Cleveland might be a preferential source of BDE-209 to Lake Erie.

  7. Monte Carlo analysis of the enhanced transcranial penetration using distributed near-infrared emitter array.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lan; Humayun, Mark S

    2015-08-01

    Transcranial near-infrared (NIR) treatment of neurological diseases has gained recent momentum. However, the low NIR dose available to the brain, which shows severe scattering and absorption of the photons by human tissues, largely limits its effectiveness in clinical use. Hereby, we propose to take advantage of the strong scattering effect of the cranial tissues by applying an evenly distributed multiunit emitter array on the scalp to enhance the cerebral photon density while maintaining each single emitter operating under the safe thermal limit. By employing the Monte Carlo method, we simulated the transcranial propagation of the array emitted light and demonstrated markedly enhanced intracranial photon flux as well as improved uniformity of the photon distribution. These enhancements are correlated with the source location, density, and wavelength of light. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first systematic analysis of the intracranial light field established by the scalp-applied multisource array and reveal a strategy for the optimization of the therapeutic effects of the NIR radiation.

  8. Cost-utility analysis of antihypertensive combination therapy in Japan by a Monte Carlo simulation model.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Makoto; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Mori, Asuka; Kawasugi, Kaname; Saruta, Takao

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the cost-effectiveness of lifetime antihypertensive therapy with angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) monotherapy, calcium channel blocker (CCB) monotherapy, or ARB plus CCB (ARB+CCB) combination therapy in Japan. Based on the results of large-scale clinical trials and epidemiological data, we constructed a Markov model for patients with essential hypertension. Our Markov model comprised coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and progression of diabetic nephropathy submodels. Based on this model, analysis of the prognosis of each patient was repeatedly conducted by Monte Carlo simulation. The three treatment strategies were compared in hypothetical 55-year-old patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 160 mmHg in the absence and presence of comorbid diabetes. Olmesartan medoxomil 20 mg/d was the ARB and azelnidipine 16 mg/d the CCB in our model. On-treatment SBP was assumed to be 125, 140, and 140 mmHg in the ARB+CCB, ARB alone, and CCB alone groups, respectively. Costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were discounted by 3%/year. The ARB+CCB group was the most cost-effective both in male and female patients with or without diabetes. In conclusion, ARB plus CCB combination therapy may be a more cost-effective lifetime antihypertensive strategy than monotherapy with either agent alone. PMID:18957808

  9. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    DOE PAGES

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakagemore » frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.« less

  10. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.

  11. The use of Monte Carlo analysis for exposure assessment of an estuarine food web

    SciTech Connect

    Iannuzzi, T.J.; Shear, N.M.; Harrington, N.W.; Henning, M.H.

    1995-12-31

    Despite apparent agreement within the scientific community that probabilistic methods of analysis offer substantially more informative exposure predictions than those offered by the traditional point estimate approach, few risk assessments conducted or approved by state and federal regulatory agencies have used probabilistic methods. Among the likely deterrents to application of probabilistic methods to ecological risk assessment is the absence of ``standard`` data distributions that are considered applicable to most conditions for a given ecological receptor. Indeed, point estimates of ecological exposure factor values for a limited number of wildlife receptors have only recently been published. The Monte Carlo method of probabilistic modeling has received increasing support as a promising technique for characterizing uncertainty and variation in estimates of exposure to environmental contaminants. An evaluation of literature on the behavior, physiology, and ecology of estuarine organisms was conducted in order to identify those variables that most strongly influence uptake of xenobiotic chemicals from sediments, water and food sources. The ranges, central tendencies, and distributions of several key parameter values for polychaetes (Nereis sp.), mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in east coast estuaries were identified. Understanding the variation in such factors, which include feeding rate, growth rate, feeding range, excretion rate, respiration rate, body weight, lipid content, food assimilation efficiency, and chemical assimilation efficiency, is critical to the understanding the mechanisms that control the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals in aquatic organisms, and to the ability to estimate bioaccumulation from chemical exposures in the aquatic environment.

  12. Monte Carlo analysis of dissociation and recombination behind strong shock waves in nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, I. D.

    1991-01-01

    Computations are presented for the relaxation zone behind strong, 1D shock waves in nitrogen. The analysis is performed with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The DSMC code is vectorized for efficient use on a supercomputer. The code simulates translational, rotational and vibrational energy exchange and dissociative and recombinative chemical reactions. A model is proposed for the treatment of three body-recombination collisions in the DSMC technique which usually simulates binary collision events. The model improves previous models because it can be employed with a large range of chemical-rate data, does not introduce into the flow field troublesome pairs of atoms which may recombine upon further collision (pseudoparticles) and is compatible with the vectorized code. The computational results are compared with existing experimental data. It is shown that the derivation of chemical-rate coefficients must account for the degree of vibrational nonequilibrium in the flow. A nonequilibrium-chemistry model is employed together with equilibrium-rate data to compute the flow in several different nitrogen shock waves.

  13. Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis to constrain dark matter properties with directional detection

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, J.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D.

    2011-04-01

    Directional detection is a promising dark matter search strategy. Indeed, weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-induced recoils would present a direction dependence toward the Cygnus constellation, while background-induced recoils exhibit an isotropic distribution in the Galactic rest frame. Taking advantage of these characteristic features, and even in the presence of a sizeable background, it has recently been shown that data from forthcoming directional detectors could lead either to a competitive exclusion or to a conclusive discovery, depending on the value of the WIMP-nucleon cross section. However, it is possible to further exploit these upcoming data by using the strong dependence of the WIMP signal with: the WIMP mass and the local WIMP velocity distribution. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of recoil events, we show for the first time the possibility to constrain the unknown WIMP parameters, both from particle physics (mass and cross section) and Galactic halo (velocity dispersion along the three axis), leading to an identification of non-baryonic dark matter.

  14. A Monte Carlo/response surface strategy for sensitivity analysis: application to a dynamic model of vegetative plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, J. T.; Gold, H. J.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    We describe the application of a strategy for conducting a sensitivity analysis for a complex dynamic model. The procedure involves preliminary screening of parameter sensitivities by numerical estimation of linear sensitivity coefficients, followed by generation of a response surface based on Monte Carlo simulation. Application is to a physiological model of the vegetative growth of soybean plants. The analysis provides insights as to the relative importance of certain physiological processes in controlling plant growth. Advantages and disadvantages of the strategy are discussed.

  15. Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenet, Rémi

    2013-07-01

    Bayesian inference often requires integrating some function with respect to a posterior distribution. Monte Carlo methods are sampling algorithms that allow to compute these integrals numerically when they are not analytically tractable. We review here the basic principles and the most common Monte Carlo algorithms, among which rejection sampling, importance sampling and Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods. We give intuition on the theoretical justification of the algorithms as well as practical advice, trying to relate both. We discuss the application of Monte Carlo in experimental physics, and point to landmarks in the literature for the curious reader.

  16. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  17. Methodology of full-core Monte Carlo calculations with leakage parameter evaluations for benchmark critical experiment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboev, A. G.; Ilyashenko, A. S.; Vetrova, O. A.

    1997-02-01

    The method of bucking evaluation, realized in the MOnte Carlo code MCS, is described. This method was applied for calculational analysis of well known light water experiments TRX-1 and TRX-2. The analysis of this comparison shows, that there is no coincidence between Monte Carlo calculations, obtained by different ways: the MCS calculations with given experimental bucklings; the MCS calculations with given bucklings evaluated on base of full core MCS direct simulations; the full core MCNP and MCS direct simulations; the MCNP and MCS calculations, where the results of cell calculations are corrected by the coefficients taking into the account the leakage from the core. Also the buckling values evaluated by full core MCS calculations have differed from experimental ones, especially in the case of TRX-1, when this difference has corresponded to 0.5 percent increase of Keff value.

  18. Computer program uses Monte Carlo techniques for statistical system performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, D. P.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program with Monte Carlo sampling techniques determines the effect of a component part of a unit upon the overall system performance. It utilizes the full statistics of the disturbances and misalignments of each component to provide unbiased results through simulated random sampling.

  19. Effect of lag time distribution on the lag phase of bacterial growth - a Monte Carlo analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to use Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the effect of lag time distribution of individual bacterial cells incubated under isothermal conditions on the development of lag phase. The growth of bacterial cells of the same initial concentration and mean lag phase durati...

  20. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators. PMID:25811254

  1. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators.

  2. Identification of Thyroid Receptor Ant/Agonists in Water Sources Using Mass Balance Analysis and Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Wei, Si; Hu, Xin-xin; Hu, Guan-jiu; Chen, Cu-lan; Wang, Xin-ru; Giesy, John P.; Yu, Hong-xia

    2013-01-01

    Some synthetic chemicals, which have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormone (TH) function, have been detected in surface waters and people have the potential to be exposed through water-drinking. Here, the presence of thyroid-active chemicals and their toxic potential in drinking water sources in Yangtze River Delta were investigated by use of instrumental analysis combined with cell-based reporter gene assay. A novel approach was developed to use Monte Carlo simulation, for evaluation of the potential risks of measured concentrations of TH agonists and antagonists and to determine the major contributors to observed thyroid receptor (TR) antagonist potency. None of the extracts exhibited TR agonist potency, while 12 of 14 water samples exhibited TR antagonistic potency. The most probable observed antagonist equivalents ranged from 1.4 to 5.6 µg di-n-butyl phthalate (DNBP)/L, which posed potential risk in water sources. Based on Monte Carlo simulation related mass balance analysis, DNBP accounted for 64.4% for the entire observed antagonist toxic unit in water sources, while diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) also contributed. The most probable observed equivalent and most probable relative potency (REP) derived from Monte Carlo simulation is useful for potency comparison and responsible chemicals screening. PMID:24204563

  3. Investing in a robotic milking system: a Monte Carlo simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, J; Engel, P

    2002-09-01

    This paper uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to estimate the breakeven value for a robotic milking system (RMS) on a dairy farm in the United States. The breakeven value indicates the maximum amount that could be paid for the robots given the costs of alternative milking equipment and other important factors (e.g., milk yields, prices, length of useful life of technologies). The analysis simulates several scenarios under three herd sizes, 60, 120, and 180 cows. The base-case results indicate that the mean breakeven values are $192,056, $374,538, and $553,671 for each of the three progressively larger herd sizes. These must be compared to the per-unit RMS cost (about $125,000 to $150,000) and the cost of any construction or installation of other equipment that accompanies the RMS. Sensitivity analysis shows that each additional dollar spent on milking labor in the parlor increases the breakeven value by $4.10 to $4.30. Each dollar increase in parlor costs increases the breakeven value by $0.45 to $0.56. Also, each additional kilogram of initial milk production (under a 2x system in the parlor) decreases the breakeven by $9.91 to $10.64. Finally, each additional year of useful life for the RMS increases the per-unit breakeven by about $16,000 while increasing the life of the parlor by 1 yr decreases the breakeven value by between $5,000 and $6,000.

  4. Using Monte Carlo techniques and parallel processing for fragmentation analysis of explosive payloads

    SciTech Connect

    LaFarge, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) launched the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sponsored ZEST flight test program from the SNL Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in the summer of 1991. The ZEST program had about 255 pounds of high explosive (HE) aboard a Talos-Castor launch vehicle. Naturally, such undertakings raise questions about the safety of personnel and the environment in the event of a premature detonation of the HE. These questions pertain not only to KTF and the island of Kauai but to the neighboring islands as well. The ability to determine realistically P{sub I}, the probability of an explosively generated fragment impacting a given exclusion area, is an important factor in the safety analysis of any flight test involving explosive payloads. Once P{sub I} is known, the casualty expectations C{sub E} can be computed based on local demographics. A set of two computer codes was developed to determine P{sub I} based on computed fragment impacts. One of these codes, SAFETIE1 (Sandia Analysis of FragmEnt TrajectorIEs), computes files of trajectory initial conditions generated in a Monte Carlo sense for a set of n explosions each containing m fragments. These initial condition files are then used to compute trajectories in a parallel processing environment using a local area network (LAN) of 40 Sun workstations. This approach saves the equivalent of 40 hours of Cray YMP time. The other code, SAFETIE2, is a postprocessor that uses an AMEER output file generated by SAFETIE1, to determine how many explosions have at least one fragment in a user defined exclusion area. The average number of fragments per explosion in the exclusion area ({bar N}) is also computed (for C{sub E} considerations). 12 refs.

  5. Multi-wavelength simulations of atmospheric radiation from Io with a 3-D spherical-shell backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratiy, Sergey L.; Walker, Andrew C.; Levin, Deborah A.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.

    2010-05-01

    Conflicting observations regarding the dominance of either sublimation or volcanism as the source of the atmosphere on Io and disparate reports on the extent of its spatial distribution and the absolute column abundance invite the development of detailed computational models capable of improving our understanding of Io's unique atmospheric structure and origin. Improving upon previous models, Walker et al. (Walker, A.C., Gratiy, S.L., Levin, D.A., Goldstein, D.B., Varghese, P.L., Trafton, L.M., Moore, C.H., Stewart, B. [2009]. Icarus) developed a fully 3-D global rarefied gas dynamics model of Io's atmosphere including both sublimation and volcanic sources of SO 2 gas. The fidelity of the model is tested by simulating remote observations at selected wavelength bands and comparing them to the corresponding astronomical observations of Io's atmosphere. The simulations are performed with a new 3-D spherical-shell radiative transfer code utilizing a backward Monte Carlo method. We present: (1) simulations of the mid-infrared disk-integrated spectra of Io's sunlit hemisphere at 19 μm, obtained with TEXES during 2001-2004; (2) simulations of disk-resolved images at Lyman- α obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) during 1997-2001; and (3) disk-integrated simulations of emission line profiles in the millimeter wavelength range obtained with the IRAM-30 m telescope in October-November 1999. We found that the atmospheric model generally reproduces the longitudinal variation in band depth from the mid-infrared data; however, the best match is obtained when our simulation results are shifted ˜30° toward lower orbital longitudes. The simulations of Lyman- α images do not reproduce the mid-to-high latitude bright patches seen in the observations, suggesting that the model atmosphere sustains columns that are too high at those latitudes. The simulations of emission line profiles in the millimeter spectral region support

  6. Spray cooling simulation implementing time scale analysis and the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzer, Paul Joseph

    Spray cooling research is advancing the field of heat transfer and heat rejection in high power electronics. Smaller and more capable electronics packages are producing higher amounts of waste heat, along with smaller external surface areas, and the use of active cooling is becoming a necessity. Spray cooling has shown extremely high levels of heat rejection, of up to 1000 W/cm 2 using water. Simulations of spray cooling are becoming more realistic, but this comes at a price. A previous researcher has used CFD to successfully model a single 3D droplet impact into a liquid film using the level set method. However, the complicated multiphysics occurring during spray impingement and surface interactions increases computation time to more than 30 days. Parallel processing on a 32 processor system has reduced this time tremendously, but still requires more than a day. The present work uses experimental and computational results in addition to numerical correlations representing the physics occurring on a heated impingement surface. The current model represents the spray behavior of a Spraying Systems FullJet 1/8-g spray nozzle. Typical spray characteristics are indicated as follows: flow rate of 1.05x10-5 m3/s, normal droplet velocity of 12 m/s, droplet Sauter mean diameter of 48 microm, and heat flux values ranging from approximately 50--100 W/cm2 . This produces non-dimensional numbers of: We 300--1350, Re 750--3500, Oh 0.01--0.025. Numerical and experimental correlations have been identified representing crater formation, splashing, film thickness, droplet size, and spatial flux distributions. A combination of these methods has resulted in a Monte Carlo spray impingement simulation model capable of simulating hundreds of thousands of droplet impingements or approximately one millisecond. A random sequence of droplet impingement locations and diameters is generated, with the proper radial spatial distribution and diameter distribution. Hence the impingement, lifetime

  7. In-silico analysis on biofabricating vascular networks using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qi

    2014-03-01

    We present a computational modeling approach to study the fusion of multicellular aggregate systems in a novel scaffold-less biofabrication process, known as 'bioprinting'. In this novel technology, live multicellular aggregates are used as fundamental building blocks to make tissues or organs (collectively known as the bio-constructs,) via the layer-by-layer deposition technique or other methods; the printed bio-constructs embedded in maturogens, consisting of nutrient-rich bio-compatible hydrogels, are then placed in bioreactors to undergo the cellular aggregate fusion process to form the desired functional bio-structures. Our approach reported here is an agent-based modeling method, which uses the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm to evolve the cellular system on a lattice. In this method, the cells and the hydrogel media, in which cells are embedded, are coarse-grained to material's points on a three-dimensional (3D) lattice, where the cell-cell and cell-medium interactions are quantified by adhesion and cohesion energies. In a multicellular aggregate system with a fixed number of cells and fixed amount of hydrogel media, where the effect of cell differentiation, proliferation and death are tactically neglected, the interaction energy is primarily dictated by the interfacial energy between cell and cell as well as between cell and medium particles on the lattice, respectively, based on the differential adhesion hypothesis. By using the transition state theory to track the time evolution of the multicellular system while minimizing the interfacial energy, KMC is shown to be an efficient time-dependent simulation tool to study the evolution of the multicellular aggregate system. In this study, numerical experiments are presented to simulate fusion and cell sorting during the biofabrication process of vascular networks, in which the bio-constructs are fabricated via engineering designs. The results predict the feasibility of fabricating the vascular structures

  8. Monte-Carlo based Uncertainty Analysis For CO2 Laser Microchanneling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashi; Kumar, Nitish; Kumar, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    CO2 laser microchanneling has emerged as a potential technique for the fabrication of microfluidic devices on PMMA (Poly-methyl-meth-acrylate). PMMA directly vaporizes when subjected to high intensity focused CO2 laser beam. This process results in clean cut and acceptable surface finish on microchannel walls. Overall, CO2 laser microchanneling process is cost effective and easy to implement. While fabricating microchannels on PMMA using a CO2 laser, the maximum depth of the fabricated microchannel is the key feature. There are few analytical models available to predict the maximum depth of the microchannels and cut channel profile on PMMA substrate using a CO2 laser. These models depend upon the values of thermophysical properties of PMMA and laser beam parameters. There are a number of variants of transparent PMMA available in the market with different values of thermophysical properties. Therefore, for applying such analytical models, the values of these thermophysical properties are required to be known exactly. Although, the values of laser beam parameters are readily available, extensive experiments are required to be conducted to determine the value of thermophysical properties of PMMA. The unavailability of exact values of these property parameters restrict the proper control over the microchannel dimension for given power and scanning speed of the laser beam. In order to have dimensional control over the maximum depth of fabricated microchannels, it is necessary to have an idea of uncertainty associated with the predicted microchannel depth. In this research work, the uncertainty associated with the maximum depth dimension has been determined using Monte Carlo method (MCM). The propagation of uncertainty with different power and scanning speed has been predicted. The relative impact of each thermophysical property has been determined using sensitivity analysis.

  9. Empirical Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Model by Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2013-04-01

    The stochastic volatility model is one of volatility models which infer latent volatility of asset returns. The Bayesian inference of the stochastic volatility (SV) model is performed by the hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm which is superior to other Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in sampling volatility variables. We perform the HMC simulations of the SV model for two liquid stock returns traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and measure the volatilities of those stock returns. Then we calculate the accuracy of the volatility measurement using the realized volatility as a proxy of the true volatility and compare the SV model with the GARCH model which is one of other volatility models. Using the accuracy calculated with the realized volatility we find that empirically the SV model performs better than the GARCH model.

  10. An analysis on the theory of pulse oximetry by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shangchun; Cai, Rui; Xing, Weiwei; Liu, Changting; Chen, Guangfei; Wang, Junfeng

    2008-10-01

    The pulse oximetry is a kind of electronic instrument that measures the oxygen saturation of arterial blood and pulse rate by non-invasive techniques. It enables prompt recognition of hypoxemia. In a conventional transmittance type pulse oximeter, the absorption of light by oxygenated and reduced hemoglobin is measured at two wavelength 660nm and 940nm. But the accuracy and measuring range of the pulse oximeter can not meet the requirement of clinical application. There are limitations in the theory of pulse oximetry, which is proved by Monte Carlo method. The mean paths are calculated in the Monte Carlo simulation. The results prove that the mean paths are not the same between the different wavelengths.

  11. Neutron-Gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo method streaming analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Kawai, M.; Seki, Y.

    1986-11-01

    The neutron-gamma-ray-coupled albedo Monte Carlo (AMC) method has been developed and implemented in MORSE-I. The energy- and angle-dependent differential albedo data, which include secondary gamma rays, are calculated for a slab layer with one dimensional transport theory. Fundamental formulas for this method are described. The applicability to shielding design of fusion reactors is confirmed by analyzing the radiation streaming experiment conducted at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The AMC method has reproduced well the experimental data of radiation dose rates and spectra with an accuracy of approximately 10%. It is shown that the AMC method is several times more efficient than the ordinary Monte Carlo calculation in obtaining data necessary for the design with expected accuracy.

  12. Monte Carlo Solutions for Selected Problems in Gamma-Ray Spectrometry and Nuclear Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sima, Octavian

    2008-08-14

    A comprehensive calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers cannot be obtained purely on experimental basis. Problems like self-attenuation effects, coincidence-summing effects and non-uniform source distribution (resulting e.g. from neutron self-shielding in NAA) can be efficiently solved by Monte Carlo simulation. The application of the GESPECOR code to these problems is presented and the associated uncertainty is discussed.

  13. Final Technical Report - Large Deviation Methods for the Analysis and Design of Monte Carlo Schemes in Physics and Chemistry - DE-SC0002413

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, Paul

    2014-03-14

    This proposal is concerned with applications of Monte Carlo to problems in physics and chemistry where rare events degrade the performance of standard Monte Carlo. One class of problems is concerned with computation of various aspects of the equilibrium behavior of some Markov process via time averages. The problem to be overcome is that rare events interfere with the efficient sampling of all relevant parts of phase space. A second class concerns sampling transitions between two or more stable attractors. Here, rare events do not interfere with the sampling of all relevant parts of phase space, but make Monte Carlo inefficient because of the very large number of samples required to obtain variance comparable to the quantity estimated. The project uses large deviation methods for the mathematical analyses of various Monte Carlo techniques, and in particular for algorithmic analysis and design. This is done in the context of relevant application areas, mainly from chemistry and biology.

  14. Calibration-constrained Monte Carlo analysis of highly parameterized models using subspace techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkin, Matthew; Doherty, John

    2009-12-01

    We describe a subspace Monte Carlo (SSMC) technique that reduces the burden of calibration-constrained Monte Carlo when undertaken with highly parameterized models. When Monte Carlo methods are used to evaluate the uncertainty in model outputs, ensuring that parameter realizations reproduce the calibration data requires many model runs to condition each realization. In the new SSMC approach, the model is first calibrated using a subspace regularization method, ideally the hybrid Tikhonov-TSVD "superparameter" approach described by Tonkin and Doherty (2005). Sensitivities calculated with the calibrated model are used to define the calibration null-space, which is spanned by parameter combinations that have no effect on simulated equivalents to available observations. Next, a stochastic parameter generator is used to produce parameter realizations, and for each a difference is formed between the stochastic parameters and the calibrated parameters. This difference is projected onto the calibration null-space and added to the calibrated parameters. If the model is no longer calibrated, parameter combinations that span the calibration solution space are reestimated while retaining the null-space projected parameter differences as additive values. The recalibration can often be undertaken using existing sensitivities, so that conditioning requires only a small number of model runs. Using synthetic and real-world model applications we demonstrate that the SSMC approach is general (it is not limited to any particular model or any particular parameterization scheme) and that it can rapidly produce a large number of conditioned parameter sets.

  15. Monte Carlo investigation of the increased radiation deposition due to gold nanoparticles using kilovoltage and megavoltage photons in a 3D randomized cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, Michael; Bezak, Eva; Penfold, Scott

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Investigation of increased radiation dose deposition due to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using a 3D computational cell model during x-ray radiotherapy.Methods: Two GNP simulation scenarios were set up in Geant4; a single 400 nm diameter gold cluster randomly positioned in the cytoplasm and a 300 nm gold layer around the nucleus of the cell. Using an 80 kVp photon beam, the effect of GNP on the dose deposition in five modeled regions of the cell including cytoplasm, membrane, and nucleus was simulated. Two Geant4 physics lists were tested: the default Livermore and custom built Livermore/DNA hybrid physics list. 10{sup 6} particles were simulated at 840 cells in the simulation. Each cell was randomly placed with random orientation and a diameter varying between 9 and 13 {mu}m. A mathematical algorithm was used to ensure that none of the 840 cells overlapped. The energy dependence of the GNP physical dose enhancement effect was calculated by simulating the dose deposition in the cells with two energy spectra of 80 kVp and 6 MV. The contribution from Auger electrons was investigated by comparing the two GNP simulation scenarios while activating and deactivating atomic de-excitation processes in Geant4.Results: The physical dose enhancement ratio (DER) of GNP was calculated using the Monte Carlo model. The model has demonstrated that the DER depends on the amount of gold and the position of the gold cluster within the cell. Individual cell regions experienced statistically significant (p < 0.05) change in absorbed dose (DER between 1 and 10) depending on the type of gold geometry used. The DER resulting from gold clusters attached to the cell nucleus had the more significant effect of the two cases (DER {approx} 55). The DER value calculated at 6 MV was shown to be at least an order of magnitude smaller than the DER values calculated for the 80 kVp spectrum. Based on simulations, when 80 kVp photons are used, Auger electrons have a statistically insignificant (p

  16. Monte Carlo-based multiphysics coupling analysis of x-ray pulsar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liansheng; Deng, Loulou; Mei, Zhiwu; Zuo, Fuchang; Zhou, Hao

    2015-10-01

    X-ray pulsar telescope (XPT) is a complex optical payload, which involves optical, mechanical, electrical and thermal disciplines. The multiphysics coupling analysis (MCA) plays an important role in improving the in-orbit performance. However, the conventional MCA methods encounter two serious problems in dealing with the XTP. One is that both the energy and reflectivity information of X-ray can't be taken into consideration, which always misunderstands the essence of XPT. Another is that the coupling data can't be transferred automatically among different disciplines, leading to computational inefficiency and high design cost. Therefore, a new MCA method for XPT is proposed based on the Monte Carlo method and total reflective theory. The main idea, procedures and operational steps of the proposed method are addressed in detail. Firstly, it takes both the energy and reflectivity information of X-ray into consideration simultaneously. And formulate the thermal-structural coupling equation and multiphysics coupling analysis model based on the finite element method. Then, the thermalstructural coupling analysis under different working conditions has been implemented. Secondly, the mirror deformations are obtained using construction geometry function. Meanwhile, the polynomial function is adopted to fit the deformed mirror and meanwhile evaluate the fitting error. Thirdly, the focusing performance analysis of XPT can be evaluated by the RMS. Finally, a Wolter-I XPT is taken as an example to verify the proposed MCA method. The simulation results show that the thermal-structural coupling deformation is bigger than others, the vary law of deformation effect on the focusing performance has been obtained. The focusing performances of thermal-structural, thermal, structural deformations have degraded 30.01%, 14.35% and 7.85% respectively. The RMS of dispersion spot are 2.9143mm, 2.2038mm and 2.1311mm. As a result, the validity of the proposed method is verified through

  17. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  18. Predictive uncertainty analysis of a saltwater intrusion model using null-space Monte Carlo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herckenrath, Daan; Langevin, Christian D.; Doherty, John

    2011-01-01

    Because of the extensive computational burden and perhaps a lack of awareness of existing methods, rigorous uncertainty analyses are rarely conducted for variable-density flow and transport models. For this reason, a recently developed null-space Monte Carlo (NSMC) method for quantifying prediction uncertainty was tested for a synthetic saltwater intrusion model patterned after the Henry problem. Saltwater intrusion caused by a reduction in fresh groundwater discharge was simulated for 1000 randomly generated hydraulic conductivity distributions, representing a mildly heterogeneous aquifer. From these 1000 simulations, the hydraulic conductivity distribution giving rise to the most extreme case of saltwater intrusion was selected and was assumed to represent the "true" system. Head and salinity values from this true model were then extracted and used as observations for subsequent model calibration. Random noise was added to the observations to approximate realistic field conditions. The NSMC method was used to calculate 1000 calibration-constrained parameter fields. If the dimensionality of the solution space was set appropriately, the estimated uncertainty range from the NSMC analysis encompassed the truth. Several variants of the method were implemented to investigate their effect on the efficiency of the NSMC method. Reducing the dimensionality of the null-space for the processing of the random parameter sets did not result in any significant gains in efficiency and compromised the ability of the NSMC method to encompass the true prediction value. The addition of intrapilot point heterogeneity to the NSMC process was also tested. According to a variogram comparison, this provided the same scale of heterogeneity that was used to generate the truth. However, incorporation of intrapilot point variability did not make a noticeable difference to the uncertainty of the prediction. With this higher level of heterogeneity, however, the computational burden of

  19. Predictive uncertainty analysis of a saltwater intrusion model using null-space Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Langevin, Christian D.; Doherty, John

    2011-05-01

    Because of the extensive computational burden and perhaps a lack of awareness of existing methods, rigorous uncertainty analyses are rarely conducted for variable-density flow and transport models. For this reason, a recently developed null-space Monte Carlo (NSMC) method for quantifying prediction uncertainty was tested for a synthetic saltwater intrusion model patterned after the Henry problem. Saltwater intrusion caused by a reduction in fresh groundwater discharge was simulated for 1000 randomly generated hydraulic conductivity distributions, representing a mildly heterogeneous aquifer. From these 1000 simulations, the hydraulic conductivity distribution giving rise to the most extreme case of saltwater intrusion was selected and was assumed to represent the "true" system. Head and salinity values from this true model were then extracted and used as observations for subsequent model calibration. Random noise was added to the observations to approximate realistic field conditions. The NSMC method was used to calculate 1000 calibration-constrained parameter fields. If the dimensionality of the solution space was set appropriately, the estimated uncertainty range from the NSMC analysis encompassed the truth. Several variants of the method were implemented to investigate their effect on the efficiency of the NSMC method. Reducing the dimensionality of the null-space for the processing of the random parameter sets did not result in any significant gains in efficiency and compromised the ability of the NSMC method to encompass the true prediction value. The addition of intrapilot point heterogeneity to the NSMC process was also tested. According to a variogram comparison, this provided the same scale of heterogeneity that was used to generate the truth. However, incorporation of intrapilot point variability did not make a noticeable difference to the uncertainty of the prediction. With this higher level of heterogeneity, however, the computational burden of

  20. Source convergence diagnostics using Boltzmann entropy criterion application to different OECD/NEA criticality benchmarks with the 3-D Monte Carlo code Tripoli-4

    SciTech Connect

    Dumonteil, E.; Le Peillet, A.; Lee, Y. K.; Petit, O.; Jouanne, C.; Mazzolo, A.

    2006-07-01

    The measurement of the stationarity of Monte Carlo fission source distributions in k{sub eff} calculations plays a central role in the ability to discriminate between fake and 'true' convergence (in the case of a high dominant ratio or in case of loosely coupled systems). Recent theoretical developments have been made in the study of source convergence diagnostics, using Shannon entropy. We will first recall those results, and we will then generalize them using the expression of Boltzmann entropy, highlighting the gain in terms of the various physical problems that we can treat. Finally we will present the results of several OECD/NEA benchmarks using the Tripoli-4 Monte Carlo code, enhanced with this new criterion. (authors)

  1. Comparison of Bootstrapping and Markov Chain Monte Carlo for Copula Analysis of Hydrological Droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Ng, T. L.; Yang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Effective water resources management depends on the reliable estimation of the uncertainty of drought events. Confidence intervals (CIs) are commonly applied to quantify this uncertainty. A CI seeks to be at the minimal length necessary to cover the true value of the estimated variable with the desired probability. In drought analysis where two or more variables (e.g., duration and severity) are often used to describe a drought, copulas have been found suitable for representing the joint probability behavior of these variables. However, the comprehensive assessment of the parameter uncertainties of copulas of droughts has been largely ignored, and the few studies that have recognized this issue have not explicitly compared the various methods to produce the best CIs. Thus, the objective of this study to compare the CIs generated using two widely applied uncertainty estimation methods, bootstrapping and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). To achieve this objective, (1) the marginal distributions lognormal, Gamma, and Generalized Extreme Value, and the copula functions Clayton, Frank, and Plackett are selected to construct joint probability functions of two drought related variables. (2) The resulting joint functions are then fitted to 200 sets of simulated realizations of drought events with known distribution and extreme parameters and (3) from there, using bootstrapping and MCMC, CIs of the parameters are generated and compared. The effect of an informative prior on the CIs generated by MCMC is also evaluated. CIs are produced for different sample sizes (50, 100, and 200) of the simulated drought events for fitting the joint probability functions. Preliminary results assuming lognormal marginal distributions and the Clayton copula function suggest that for cases with small or medium sample sizes (~50-100), MCMC to be superior method if an informative prior exists. Where an informative prior is unavailable, for small sample sizes (~50), both bootstrapping and MCMC

  2. Reassessing benzene risks using internal doses and Monte-Carlo uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, L A

    1996-01-01

    Human cancer risks from benzene have been estimated from epidemiological data, with supporting evidence from animal bioassay data. This article reexamines the animal-based risk assessments using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of benzene metabolism in animals and humans. Internal doses (total benzene metabolites) from oral gavage experiments in mice are well predicted by the PBPK model. Both the data and the PBPK model outputs are also well described by a simple nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) regression model, as previously used by Bailer and Hoel [Metabolite-based internal doses used in risk assessment of benzene. Environ Health Perspect 82:177-184 (1989)]. Refitting the multistage model family to internal doses changes the maximum-likelihood estimate (MLE) dose-response curve for mice from linear-quadratic to purely cubic, so that low-dose risk estimates are smaller than in previous risk assessments. In contrast to Bailer and Hoel's findings using interspecies dose conversion, the use of internal dose estimates for humans from a PBPK model reduces estimated human risks at low doses. Sensitivity analyses suggest that the finding of a nonlinear MLE dose-response curve at low doses is robust to changes in internal dose definitions and more consistent with epidemiological data than earlier risk models. A Monte-Carlo uncertainty analysis based on maximum-entropy probabilities and Bayesian conditioning is used to develop an entire probability distribution for the true but unknown dose-response function. This allows the probability of a positive low-dose slope to be quantified: It is about 10%. An upper 95% confidence limit on the low-dose slope of excess risk is also obtained directly from the posterior distribution and is similar to previous q1* values. This approach suggests that the excess risk due to benzene exposure may be nonexistent (or even negative) at sufficiently low doses. Two types of biological information about benzene effects

  3. Monte Carlo-based calibration and uncertainty analysis of a coupled plant growth and hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houska, T.; Multsch, S.; Kraft, P.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2014-04-01

    Computer simulations are widely used to support decision making and planning in the agriculture sector. On the one hand, many plant growth models use simplified hydrological processes and structures - for example, by the use of a small number of soil layers or by the application of simple water flow approaches. On the other hand, in many hydrological models plant growth processes are poorly represented. Hence, fully coupled models with a high degree of process representation would allow for a more detailed analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the soil-plant interface. We coupled two of such high-process-oriented independent models and calibrated both models simultaneously. The catchment modelling framework (CMF) simulated soil hydrology based on the Richards equation and the van Genuchten-Mualem model of the soil hydraulic properties. CMF was coupled with the plant growth modelling framework (PMF), which predicts plant growth on the basis of radiation use efficiency, degree days, water shortage and dynamic root biomass allocation. The Monte Carlo-based generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) method was applied to parameterize the coupled model and to investigate the related uncertainty of model predictions. Overall, 19 model parameters (4 for CMF and 15 for PMF) were analysed through 2 × 106 model runs randomly drawn from a uniform distribution. The model was applied to three sites with different management in Müncheberg (Germany) for the simulation of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a cross-validation experiment. Field observations for model evaluation included soil water content and the dry matter of roots, storages, stems and leaves. The shape parameter of the retention curve n was highly constrained, whereas other parameters of the retention curve showed a large equifinality. We attribute this slightly poorer model performance to missing leaf senescence, which is currently not implemented in PMF. The most constrained parameters for the

  4. Symbolic implicit Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, E.D. III )

    1989-08-01

    We introduce a new implicit Monte Carlo technique for solving time dependent radiation transport problems involving spontaneous emission. In the usual implicit Monte Carlo procedure an effective scattering term in dictated by the requirement of self-consistency between the transport and implicitly differenced atomic populations equations. The effective scattering term, a source of inefficiency for optically thick problems, becomes an impasse for problems with gain where its sign is negative. In our new technique the effective scattering term does not occur and the excecution time for the Monte Carlo portion of the algorithm is independent of opacity. We compare the performance and accuracy of the new symbolic implicit Monte Carlo technique to the usual effective scattering technique for the time dependent description of a two-level system in slab geometry. We also examine the possibility of effectively exploiting multiprocessors on the algorithm, obtaining supercomputer performance using shared memory multiprocessors based on cheap commodity microprocessor technology. {copyright} 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. The applicability of certain Monte Carlo methods to the analysis of interacting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Krapp, D.M. Jr.

    1998-05-01

    The authors consider polymers, modeled as self-avoiding walks with interactions on a hexagonal lattice, and examine the applicability of certain Monte Carlo methods for estimating their mean properties at equilibrium. Specifically, the authors use the pivoting algorithm of Madras and Sokal and Metroplis rejection to locate the phase transition, which is known to occur at {beta}{sub crit} {approx} 0.99, and to recalculate the known value of the critical exponent {nu} {approx} 0.58 of the system for {beta} = {beta}{sub crit}. Although the pivoting-Metropolis algorithm works well for short walks (N < 300), for larger N the Metropolis criterion combined with the self-avoidance constraint lead to an unacceptably small acceptance fraction. In addition, the algorithm becomes effectively non-ergodic, getting trapped in valleys whose centers are local energy minima in phase space, leading to convergence towards different values of {nu}. The authors use a variety of tools, e.g. entropy estimation and histograms, to improve the results for large N, but they are only of limited effectiveness. Their estimate of {beta}{sub crit} using smaller values of N is 1.01 {+-} 0.01, and the estimate for {nu} at this value of {beta} is 0.59 {+-} 0.005. They conclude that even a seemingly simple system and a Monte Carlo algorithm which satisfies, in principle, ergodicity and detailed balance conditions, can in practice fail to sample phase space accurately and thus not allow accurate estimations of thermal averages. This should serve as a warning to people who use Monte Carlo methods in complicated polymer folding calculations. The structure of the phase space combined with the algorithm itself can lead to surprising behavior, and simply increasing the number of samples in the calculation does not necessarily lead to more accurate results.

  6. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for statistical analysis of RF photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Piels, Molly; Zibar, Darko

    2016-02-01

    The microwave reflection coefficient is commonly used to characterize the impedance of high-speed optoelectronic devices. Error and uncertainty in equivalent circuit parameters measured using this data are systematically evaluated. The commonly used nonlinear least-squares method for estimating uncertainty is shown to give unsatisfactory and incorrect results due to the nonlinear relationship between the circuit parameters and the measured data. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are shown to provide superior results, both for individual devices and for assessing within-die variation. PMID:26906783

  7. Monte Carlo analysis of lobular gas-surface scattering in tubes applied to thermal transpiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. D.; Raquet, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A model of rarefied gas flow in tubes was developed which combines a lobular distribution with diffuse reflection at the wall. The model with Monte Carlo techniques was used to explain previously observed deviations in the free molecular thermal transpiration ratio which suggest molecules can have a greater tube transmission probability in a hot-to-cold direction than in a cold-to-hot direction. The model yields correct magnitudes of transmission probability ratios for helium in Pyrex tubing (1.09 to 1.14), and some effects of wall-temperature distribution, tube surface roughness, tube dimensions, gas temperature, and gas molecular mass.

  8. Data analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of a cosmic background radiation anisotropy experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vittorio, N.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Scaramella, R.; Roma Universita; Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste )

    1989-06-01

    Data from an experiment by Davies et al. (1987), in which a temperature fluctuation of the microwave sky was detected, using the same method, but considering the temperature correlation functions predicted by gravitational instability scenarios. It is found that the Davies et al. data are consistent with either white noise or scale invariant primordial density fluctuations and that these are preferred among other scale-free spectra. However, the statistical significance of this result is low, as shown by Monte Carlo simulations of the microwave sky and of the specific experiment. 8 refs.

  9. Analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of near-terminal aircraft flight paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Matthews, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    The flight paths of arriving and departing aircraft at an airport are stochastically represented. Radar data of the aircraft movements are used to decompose the flight paths into linear and curvilinear segments. Variables which describe the segments are derived, and the best fitting probability distributions of the variables, based on a sample of flight paths, are found. Conversely, given information on the probability distribution of the variables, generation of a random sample of flight paths in a Monte Carlo simulation is discussed. Actual flight paths at Dulles International Airport are analyzed and simulated.

  10. Comparison of marker types and map assumptions using Markov chain Monte Carlo-based linkage analysis of COGA data

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, Weiva; Basu, Saonli; Fu, Audrey Q; Rothstein, Joseph H; Scheet, Paul A; Stewart, William CL; Sung, Yun J; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2005-01-01

    We performed multipoint linkage analysis of the electrophysiological trait ECB21 on chromosome 4 in the full pedigrees provided by the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). Three Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC)-based approaches were applied to the provided and re-estimated genetic maps and to five different marker panels consisting of microsatellite (STRP) and/or SNP markers at various densities. We found evidence of linkage near the GABRB1 STRP using all methods, maps, and marker panels. Difficulties encountered with SNP panels included convergence problems and demanding computations. PMID:16451566

  11. Analysis of an Energy Localization Approximation applied to three-dimensional Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golenbiewski, Kyle L.; Schulze, Tim P.

    2016-10-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth involves depositing one material onto another with a different lattice spacing. This misfit leads to long-range elastic stresses that affect the behavior of the film. Previously, an Energy Localization Approximation was applied to Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of two-dimensional growth in which the elastic field is updated using a sequence of nested domains. We extend the analysis of this earlier work to a three-dimensional setting and show that while it scales with the increase in dimensionality, a more intuitive Energy Truncation Approximation does not.

  12. An Analysis of the Nuclear Data Libraries' Impact on the Criticality Computations Performed using Monte Carlo Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugiu, E. D.; Ellis, R. J.; Dumitrache, I.; Constantin, M.

    2005-05-01

    The major aim of this work is a sensitivity analysis related to the influence of the different nuclear data libraries on the k-infinity values and on the void coefficient estimations performed for various CANDU fuel projects, and on the simulations related to the replacement of the original stainless steel adjuster rods by cobalt assemblies in the CANDU reactor core. The computations are performed using the Monte Carlo transport codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS 1.0 for the actual, detailed geometry and material composition of the fuel bundles and reactivity devices. Some comparisons with deterministic and probabilistic codes involving the WIMS library are also presented.

  13. Analysis of Correlated Coupling of Monte Carlo Forward and Adjoint Histories

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Taro; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2001-02-15

    In Monte Carlo correlated coupling, forward and adjoint particle histories are initiated in exactly opposite directions at an arbitrarily placed surface between a physical source and a physical detector. It is shown that this coupling calculation can become more efficient than standard forward calculations. In many cases, the basic form of correlated coupling is less efficient than standard forward calculations. This inherent inefficiency can be overcome by applying a black absorber perturbation to either the forward or the adjoint problem and by processing the product of batch averages as one statistical entity. The usage of the black absorber is based on the invariance of the response flow integral with a material perturbation in either the physical detector side volume in the forward problem or the physical source side volume in the adjoint problem. The batch-average product processing makes use of a quadratic increase of the nonzero coupled-score probability. All the developments have been done in such a way that improved efficiency schemes available in widely distributed Monte Carlo codes can be applied to both the forward and adjoint simulations. Also, the physical meaning of the black absorber perturbation is interpreted based on surface crossing and is numerically validated. In addition, the immediate reflection at the intermediate surface with a controlled direction change is investigated within the invariance framework. This approach can be advantageous for a void streaming problem.

  14. Monte Carlo Analysis of Pion Contribution to Absorbed Dose from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghara, S.K.; Battnig, S.R.; Norbury, J.W.; Singleterry, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction, particle production and transport is necessary to estimate the radiation damage to equipment used on spacecraft and the biological effects of space radiation. For long duration astronaut missions, both on the International Space Station and the planned manned missions to Moon and Mars, the shielding strategy must include a comprehensive knowledge of the secondary radiation environment. The distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is a function of the type, energy and population of these secondary products. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) comprised of protons and heavier nuclei have energies from a few MeV per nucleon to the ZeV region, with the spectra reaching flux maxima in the hundreds of MeV range. Therefore, the MeV - GeV region is most important for space radiation. Coincidentally, the pion production energy threshold is about 280 MeV. The question naturally arises as to how important these particles are with respect to space radiation problems. The space radiation transport code, HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport), currently used by NASA, performs neutron, proton and heavy ion transport explicitly, but it does not take into account the production and transport of mesons, photons and leptons. In this paper, we present results from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), showing the effect of leptons and mesons when they are produced and transported in a GCR environment.

  15. Analysis and modeling of localized heat generation by tumor-targeted nanoparticles (Monte Carlo methods)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanattalab, Ehsan; SalmanOgli, Ahmad; Piskin, Erhan

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the tumor-targeted nanoparticles that influence heat generation. We suppose that all nanoparticles are fully functionalized and can find the target using active targeting methods. Unlike the commonly used methods, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment procedure proposed in this study is purely noninvasive, which is considered to be a significant merit. It is found that the localized heat generation due to targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher than other areas. By engineering the optical properties of nanoparticles, including scattering, absorption coefficients, and asymmetry factor (cosine scattering angle), the heat generated in the tumor's area reaches to such critical state that can burn the targeted tumor. The amount of heat generated by inserting smart agents, due to the surface Plasmon resonance, will be remarkably high. The light-matter interactions and trajectory of incident photon upon targeted tissues are simulated by MIE theory and Monte Carlo method, respectively. Monte Carlo method is a statistical one by which we can accurately probe the photon trajectories into a simulation area.

  16. GUINEVERE experiment: Kinetic analysis of some reactivity measurement methods by deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, G.; Burgio, N.; Carta, M.; Peluso, V.; Fabrizio, V.; Ricci, L.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE experiment (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) is an experimental program in support of the ADS technology presently carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol (Belgium). In the experiment a modified lay-out of the original thermal VENUS critical facility is coupled to an accelerator, built by the French body CNRS in Grenoble, working in both continuous and pulsed mode and delivering 14 MeV neutrons by bombardment of deuterons on a tritium-target. The modified lay-out of the facility consists of a fast subcritical core made of 30% U-235 enriched metallic Uranium in a lead matrix. Several off-line and on-line reactivity measurement techniques will be investigated during the experimental campaign. This report is focused on the simulation by deterministic (ERANOS French code) and Monte Carlo (MCNPX US code) calculations of three reactivity measurement techniques, Slope ({alpha}-fitting), Area-ratio and Source-jerk, applied to a GUINEVERE subcritical configuration (namely SC1). The inferred reactivity, in dollar units, by the Area-ratio method shows an overall agreement between the two deterministic and Monte Carlo computational approaches, whereas the MCNPX Source-jerk results are affected by large uncertainties and allow only partial conclusions about the comparison. Finally, no particular spatial dependence of the results is observed in the case of the GUINEVERE SC1 subcritical configuration. (authors)

  17. Monte Carlo analysis of pion contribution to absorbed dose from Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, S. K.; Blattnig, S. R.; Norbury, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.

    2009-04-01

    Accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction, particle production and transport is necessary to estimate the radiation damage to equipment used on spacecraft and the biological effects of space radiation. For long duration astronaut missions, both on the International Space Station and the planned manned missions to Moon and Mars, the shielding strategy must include a comprehensive knowledge of the secondary radiation environment. The distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is a function of the type, energy and population of these secondary products. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) comprised of protons and heavier nuclei have energies from a few MeV per nucleon to the ZeV region, with the spectra reaching flux maxima in the hundreds of MeV range. Therefore, the MeV-GeV region is most important for space radiation. Coincidentally, the pion production energy threshold is about 280 MeV. The question naturally arises as to how important these particles are with respect to space radiation problems. The space radiation transport code, HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport), currently used by NASA, performs neutron, proton and heavy ion transport explicitly, but it does not take into account the production and transport of mesons, photons and leptons. In this paper, we present results from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), showing the effect of leptons and mesons when they are produced and transported in a GCR environment.

  18. A boundary-dispatch Monte Carlo (Exodus) method for analysis of conductive heat transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Naraghi, M.H.N.; Shunchang Tsai

    1993-12-01

    A boundary-dispatch Monte Carlo (Exodus) method, in which the particles are dispatched from the boundaries of a conductive medium or source of heat, is developed. A fixed number of particles are dispatched from a boundary node to the nearest internal node. These particles make random walks within the medium similar to that of the conventional Monte Carlo method. Once a particle visits an internal node, a number equal to the temperature of the boundary node from which particles are dispatched is added to a counter. Performing this procedure for all boundary nodes, the temperature of a node can be determined by dividing the flag, or the counter of this node by the total number of particle visits to this node. Two versions of the boundary-dispatch method (BDM) are presented, multispecies and bispecies BDM. The results of bispecies BDM based on the Exodus dispatching method compare well with the Gauss-Seidel method in both accuracy and computational time. Its computational time is much less than the shrinking-boundary Exodus method.

  19. Oxygen distribution in tumors: A qualitative analysis and modeling study providing a novel Monte Carlo approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To construct a Monte Carlo (MC)-based simulation model for analyzing the dependence of tumor oxygen distribution on different variables related to tumor vasculature [blood velocity, vessel-to-vessel proximity (vessel proximity), and inflowing oxygen partial pressure (pO{sub 2})]. Methods: A voxel-based tissue model containing parallel capillaries with square cross-sections (sides of 10 μm) was constructed. Green's function was used for diffusion calculations and Michaelis-Menten's kinetics to manage oxygen consumption. The model was tuned to approximately reproduce the oxygenational status of a renal carcinoma; the depth oxygenation curves (DOC) were fitted with an analytical expression to facilitate rapid MC simulations of tumor oxygen distribution. DOCs were simulated with three variables at three settings each (blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO{sub 2}), which resulted in 27 combinations of conditions. To create a model that simulated variable oxygen distributions, the oxygen tension at a specific point was randomly sampled with trilinear interpolation in the dataset from the first simulation. Six correlations between blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO{sub 2} were hypothesized. Variable models with correlated parameters were compared to each other and to a nonvariable, DOC-based model to evaluate the differences in simulated oxygen distributions and tumor radiosensitivities for different tumor sizes. Results: For tumors with radii ranging from 5 to 30 mm, the nonvariable DOC model tended to generate normal or log-normal oxygen distributions, with a cut-off at zero. The pO{sub 2} distributions simulated with the six-variable DOC models were quite different from the distributions generated with the nonvariable DOC model; in the former case the variable models simulated oxygen distributions that were more similar to in vivo results found in the literature. For larger tumors, the oxygen distributions became truncated in the

  20. Monte Carlo based calibration and uncertainty analysis of a coupled plant growth and hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houska, T.; Multsch, S.; Kraft, P.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2013-12-01

    Computer simulations are widely used to support decision making and planning in the agriculture sector. On the one hand, many plant growth models use simplified hydrological processes and structures, e.g. by the use of a small number of soil layers or by the application of simple water flow approaches. On the other hand, in many hydrological models plant growth processes are poorly represented. Hence, fully coupled models with a high degree of process representation would allow a more detailed analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the soil-plant interface. We used the Python programming language to couple two of such high process oriented independent models and to calibrate both models simultaneously. The Catchment Modelling Framework (CMF) simulated soil hydrology based on the Richards equation and the van-Genuchten-Mualem retention curve. CMF was coupled with the Plant growth Modelling Framework (PMF), which predicts plant growth on the basis of radiation use efficiency, degree days, water shortage and dynamic root biomass allocation. The Monte Carlo based Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) method was applied to parameterize the coupled model and to investigate the related uncertainty of model predictions to it. Overall, 19 model parameters (4 for CMF and 15 for PMF) were analysed through 2 × 106 model runs randomly drawn from an equally distributed parameter space. Three objective functions were used to evaluate the model performance, i.e. coefficient of determination (R2), bias and model efficiency according to Nash Sutcliffe (NSE). The model was applied to three sites with different management in Muencheberg (Germany) for the simulation of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a cross-validation experiment. Field observations for model evaluation included soil water content and the dry matters of roots, storages, stems and leaves. Best parameter sets resulted in NSE of 0.57 for the simulation of soil moisture across all three sites. The

  1. Monte Carlo Based Calibration and Uncertainty Analysis of a Coupled Plant Growth and Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houska, Tobias; Multsch, Sebastian; Kraft, Philipp; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Computer simulations are widely used to support decision making and planning in the agriculture sector. On the one hand, many plant growth models use simplified hydrological processes and structures, e.g. by the use of a small number of soil layers or by the application of simple water flow approaches. On the other hand, in many hydrological models plant growth processes are poorly represented. Hence, fully coupled models with a high degree of process representation would allow a more detailed analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the soil-plant interface. We used the Python programming language to couple two of such high process oriented independent models and to calibrate both models simultaneously. The Catchment Modelling Framework (CMF) simulated soil hydrology based on the Richards equation and the Van-Genuchten-Mualem retention curve. CMF was coupled with the Plant growth Modelling Framework (PMF), which predicts plant growth on the basis of radiation use efficiency, degree days, water shortage and dynamic root biomass allocation. The Monte Carlo based Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) method was applied to parameterize the coupled model and to investigate the related uncertainty of model predictions to it. Overall, 19 model parameters (4 for CMF and 15 for PMF) were analysed through 2 x 106 model runs randomly drawn from an equally distributed parameter space. Three objective functions were used to evaluate the model performance, i.e. coefficient of determination (R2), bias and model efficiency according to Nash Sutcliffe (NSE). The model was applied to three sites with different management in Muencheberg (Germany) for the simulation of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a cross-validation experiment. Field observations for model evaluation included soil water content and the dry matters of roots, storages, stems and leaves. Best parameter sets resulted in NSE of 0.57 for the simulation of soil moisture across all three sites. The shape

  2. Development of a generalized perturbation theory method for sensitivity analysis using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods

    DOE PAGES

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools of the ORNL SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system that have been developed over the last decade have proven indispensable for numerous application and design studies for nuclear criticality safety and reactor physics. SCALE contains tools for analyzing the uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, but cannot quantify uncertainty in important neutronic parameters such as multigroup cross sections, fuel fission rates, activation rates, and neutron fluence rates with realistic three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. A more complete understanding of the sources of uncertainty in these design-limiting parameters could lead to improvements in processmore » optimization, reactor safety, and help inform regulators when setting operational safety margins. A novel approach for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was recently explored as academic research and has been found to accurately and rapidly calculate sensitivity coefficients in criticality safety applications. The work presented here describes a new method, known as the GEAR-MC method, which extends the CLUTCH theory for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients to enable sensitivity coefficient calculations and uncertainty analysis for a generalized set of neutronic responses using high-fidelity continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations. Here, several criticality safety systems were examined to demonstrate proof of principle for the GEAR-MC method, and GEAR-MC was seen to produce response sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with reference direct perturbation sensitivity coefficients.« less

  3. Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis for patient level simulation models: efficient estimation of mean and variance using ANOVA.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Anthony; Stevenson, Matt; Madan, Jason

    2007-10-01

    Probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) is required to account for uncertainty in cost-effectiveness calculations arising from health economic models. The simplest way to perform PSA in practice is by Monte Carlo methods, which involves running the model many times using randomly sampled values of the model inputs. However, this can be impractical when the economic model takes appreciable amounts of time to run. This situation arises, in particular, for patient-level simulation models (also known as micro-simulation or individual-level simulation models), where a single run of the model simulates the health care of many thousands of individual patients. The large number of patients required in each run to achieve accurate estimation of cost-effectiveness means that only a relatively small number of runs is possible. For this reason, it is often said that PSA is not practical for patient-level models. We develop a way to reduce the computational burden of Monte Carlo PSA for patient-level models, based on the algebra of analysis of variance. Methods are presented to estimate the mean and variance of the model output, with formulae for determining optimal sample sizes. The methods are simple to apply and will typically reduce the computational demand very substantially.

  4. Photoelectric Franck-Hertz experiment and its kinetic analysis by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Péter; Korolov, Ihor; Donkó, Zoltán

    2012-05-01

    The electrical characteristics of a photoelectric Franck-Hertz cell are measured in argon gas over a wide range of pressure, covering conditions where elastic collisions play an important role, as well as conditions where ionization becomes significant. Photoelectron pulses are induced by the fourth harmonic UV light of a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser. The electron kinetics, which is far more complex compared to the naive picture of the Franck-Hertz experiment, is analyzed via Monte Carlo simulation. The computations provide the electrical characteristics of the cell, the energy and velocity distribution functions, and the transport parameters of the electrons, as well as the rate coefficients of different elementary processes. A good agreement is obtained between the cell's measured and calculated electrical characteristics, the peculiarities of which are understood by the simulation studies.

  5. Analysis of vibrational-translational energy transfer using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.

    1991-01-01

    A new model is proposed for energy transfer between the vibrational and translational modes for use in the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The model modifies the Landau-Teller theory for a harmonic oscillator and the rate transition is related to an experimental correlation for the vibrational relaxation time. Assessment of the model is made with respect to three different computations: relaxation in a heat bath, a one-dimensional shock wave, and hypersonic flow over a two-dimensional wedge. These studies verify that the model achieves detailed balance, and excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained in the shock wave calculation. The wedge flow computation reveals that the usual phenomenological method for simulating vibrational nonequilibrium in the DSMC technique predicts much higher vibrational temperatures in the wake region.

  6. A Monte Carlo analysis of the liquid xenon TPC as gamma ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, E.; Bolotnikov, A.; Chen, D.; Mukherjee, R.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive Monte Carlo modeling of a coded aperture x ray telescope based on a high resolution liquid xenon TPC has been performed. Results on efficiency, background reduction capability and source flux sensitivity are presented. We discuss in particular the development of a reconstruction algorithm for events with multiple interaction points. From the energy and spatial information, the kinematics of Compton scattering is used to identify and reduce background events, as well as to improve the detector response in the few MeV region. Assuming a spatial resolution of 1 mm RMS and an energy resolution of 4.5 percent FWHM at 1 MeV, the algorithm is capable of reducing by an order of magnitude the background rate expected at balloon altitude, thus significantly improving the telescope sensitivity.

  7. Analysis of QUADOS problem on TLD-ALBEDO personal dosemeter responses using discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kodeli, Ivo; Tanner, Rick

    2005-01-01

    In the scope of QUADOS, a Concerted Action of the European Commission, eight calculational problems were prepared in order to evaluate the use of computational codes for dosimetry in radiation protection and medical physics, and to disseminate "good practice" throughout the radiation dosimetry community. This paper focuses on the analysis of the P4 problem on the 'TLD-albedo dosemeter: neutron and/or photon response of a four-element TL-dosemeter mounted on a standard ISO slab phantom'. Altogether 17 solutions were received from the participants, 14 of those transported neutrons and 15 photons. Most participants (16 out of 17) used Monte Carlo methods. These calculations are time-consuming, requiring several days of CPU time to perform the whole set of calculations and achieve good statistical precision. The possibility of using deterministic discrete ordinates codes as an alternative to Monte Carlo was therefore investigated and is presented here. In particular the capacity of the adjoint mode calculations is shown. PMID:16381782

  8. Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo forward projection for statistical analysis in epidemic modelling of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Korostil, Igor A; Peters, Gareth W; Cornebise, Julien; Regan, David G

    2013-05-20

    A Bayesian statistical model and estimation methodology based on forward projection adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo is developed in order to perform the calibration of a high-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations representing an epidemic model for human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 (HPV-6, HPV-11). The model is compartmental and involves stratification by age, gender and sexual-activity group. Developing this model and a means to calibrate it efficiently is relevant because HPV is a very multi-typed and common sexually transmitted infection with more than 100 types currently known. The two types studied in this paper, types 6 and 11, are causing about 90% of anogenital warts. We extend the development of a sexual mixing matrix on the basis of a formulation first suggested by Garnett and Anderson, frequently used to model sexually transmitted infections. In particular, we consider a stochastic mixing matrix framework that allows us to jointly estimate unknown attributes and parameters of the mixing matrix along with the parameters involved in the calibration of the HPV epidemic model. This matrix describes the sexual interactions between members of the population under study and relies on several quantities that are a priori unknown. The Bayesian model developed allows one to estimate jointly the HPV-6 and HPV-11 epidemic model parameters as well as unknown sexual mixing matrix parameters related to assortativity. Finally, we explore the ability of an extension to the class of adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms to incorporate a forward projection strategy for the ordinary differential equation state trajectories. Efficient exploration of the Bayesian posterior distribution developed for the ordinary differential equation parameters provides a challenge for any Markov chain sampling methodology, hence the interest in adaptive Markov chain methods. We conclude with simulation studies on synthetic and recent actual data. PMID

  9. The D0 Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Womersley, J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-10-01

    The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron began its first data taking run in May 1992. For analysis of the expected 25 pb[sup [minus]1] data sample, roughly half a million simulated events will be needed. The GEANT-based Monte Carlo program used to generate these events is described, together with comparisons to test beam data. Some novel techniques used to speed up execution and simplify geometrical input are described.

  10. Program system for three-dimensional coupled Monte Carlo-deterministic shielding analysis with application to the accelerator-based IFMIF neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.

    2005-10-01

    A program system for three-dimensional coupled Monte Carlo-deterministic shielding analysis has been developed to solve problems with complex geometry and bulk shield by integrating the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code TORT and a coupling interface program. A newly-proposed mapping approach is implemented in the interface program to calculate the angular flux distribution from the scored Monte Carlo particle tracks and generate the boundary source file for the use of TORT. Test calculations were performed with comparison to MCNP solutions. Satisfactory agreements were obtained between the results calculated by these two approaches. The program system has been chosen to treat the complicated shielding problem of the accelerator-based IFMIF neutron source. The successful application demonstrates that coupling scheme with the program system is a useful computational tool for the shielding analysis of complex and large nuclear facilities.

  11. Estimate of the melanin content in human hairs by the inverse Monte-Carlo method using a system for digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, Elina A; Kochubei, V I; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2006-12-31

    Based on the digital image analysis and inverse Monte-Carlo method, the proximate analysis method is deve-loped and the optical properties of hairs of different types are estimated in three spectral ranges corresponding to three colour components. The scattering and absorption properties of hairs are separated for the first time by using the inverse Monte-Carlo method. The content of different types of melanin in hairs is estimated from the absorption coefficient. It is shown that the dominating type of melanin in dark hairs is eumelanin, whereas in light hairs pheomelanin dominates. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  12. Monte Carlo neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate that the effects of matter upon neutrino propagation may be recast as the scattering of the initial neutrino wave function. Exchanging the differential, Schrodinger equation for an integral equation for the scattering matrix S permits a Monte Carlo method for the computation of S that removes many of the numerical difficulties associated with direct integration techniques.

  13. Baseball Monte Carlo Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houser, Larry L.

    1981-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are used to simulate activities in baseball such as a team's "hot streak" and a hitter's "batting slump." Student participation in such simulations is viewed as a useful method of giving pupils a better understanding of the probability concepts involved. (MP)

  14. Analysis of Radiation Effects in Silicon using Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    DOE PAGES

    Hehr, Brian Douglas

    2014-11-25

    The transient degradation of semiconductor device performance under irradiation has long been an issue of concern. Neutron irradiation can instigate the formation of quasi-stable defect structures, thereby introducing new energy levels into the bandgap that alter carrier lifetimes and give rise to such phenomena as gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Normally, the initial defect formation phase is followed by a recovery phase in which defect-defect or defect-dopant interactions modify the characteristics of the damaged structure. A kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code has been developed to model both thermal and carrier injection annealing of initial defect structures in semiconductor materials.more » The code is employed to investigate annealing in electron-irradiated, p-type silicon as well as the recovery of base current in silicon transistors bombarded with neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) “Blue Room” facility. Our results reveal that KMC calculations agree well with these experiments once adjustments are made, within the appropriate uncertainty bounds, to some of the sensitive defect parameters.« less

  15. Markov chain Monte Carlo based analysis of post-translationally modified VDAC gating kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Shivendra G.; Zhou, Yifan; Otto, Bradley J.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Beard, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main conduit for permeation of solutes (including nucleotides and metabolites) of up to 5 kDa across the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Recent studies suggest that VDAC activity is regulated via post-translational modifications (PTMs). Yet the nature and effect of these modifications is not understood. Herein, single channel currents of wild-type, nitrosated, and phosphorylated VDAC are analyzed using a generalized continuous-time Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This developed method describes three distinct conducting states (open, half-open, and closed) of VDAC activity. Lipid bilayer experiments are also performed to record single VDAC activity under un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated conditions, and are analyzed using the developed stochastic search method. Experimental data show significant alteration in VDAC gating kinetics and conductance as a result of PTMs. The effect of PTMs on VDAC kinetics is captured in the parameters associated with the identified Markov model. Stationary distributions of the Markov model suggest that nitrosation of VDAC not only decreased its conductance but also significantly locked VDAC in a closed state. On the other hand, stationary distributions of the model associated with un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated VDAC suggest a reversal in channel conformation from relatively closed state to an open state. Model analyses of the nitrosated data suggest that faster reaction of nitric oxide with Cys-127 thiol group might be responsible for the biphasic effect of nitric oxide on basal VDAC conductance. PMID:25628567

  16. Analysis of Radiation Effects in Silicon using Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Brian Douglas

    2014-11-25

    The transient degradation of semiconductor device performance under irradiation has long been an issue of concern. Neutron irradiation can instigate the formation of quasi-stable defect structures, thereby introducing new energy levels into the bandgap that alter carrier lifetimes and give rise to such phenomena as gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Normally, the initial defect formation phase is followed by a recovery phase in which defect-defect or defect-dopant interactions modify the characteristics of the damaged structure. A kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code has been developed to model both thermal and carrier injection annealing of initial defect structures in semiconductor materials. The code is employed to investigate annealing in electron-irradiated, p-type silicon as well as the recovery of base current in silicon transistors bombarded with neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) “Blue Room” facility. Our results reveal that KMC calculations agree well with these experiments once adjustments are made, within the appropriate uncertainty bounds, to some of the sensitive defect parameters.

  17. Markov chain Monte Carlo based analysis of post-translationally modified VDAC gating kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Zhou, Yifan; Otto, Bradley J; Dash, Ranjan K; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Beard, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main conduit for permeation of solutes (including nucleotides and metabolites) of up to 5 kDa across the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Recent studies suggest that VDAC activity is regulated via post-translational modifications (PTMs). Yet the nature and effect of these modifications is not understood. Herein, single channel currents of wild-type, nitrosated, and phosphorylated VDAC are analyzed using a generalized continuous-time Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This developed method describes three distinct conducting states (open, half-open, and closed) of VDAC activity. Lipid bilayer experiments are also performed to record single VDAC activity under un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated conditions, and are analyzed using the developed stochastic search method. Experimental data show significant alteration in VDAC gating kinetics and conductance as a result of PTMs. The effect of PTMs on VDAC kinetics is captured in the parameters associated with the identified Markov model. Stationary distributions of the Markov model suggest that nitrosation of VDAC not only decreased its conductance but also significantly locked VDAC in a closed state. On the other hand, stationary distributions of the model associated with un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated VDAC suggest a reversal in channel conformation from relatively closed state to an open state. Model analyses of the nitrosated data suggest that faster reaction of nitric oxide with Cys-127 thiol group might be responsible for the biphasic effect of nitric oxide on basal VDAC conductance. PMID:25628567

  18. Monte Carlo analysis of thermal transpiration effects in capacitance diaphragm gauges with helicoidal baffle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Wüest, M.; Stefanov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Capacitance Diaphragm Gauge (CDG) is one of the most widely used vacuum gauges in low and middle vacuum ranges. This device consists basically of a very thin ceramic or metal diaphragm which forms one of the electrodes of a cap acitor. The pressure is determined by measuring the variation in the capacitance due to the deflection of the diaphragm caused by the pressure difference established across the membrane. In order to minimize zero drift, some CDGs are operated keeping the sensor at a higher temperature. This difference in the temperature between the sensor and the vacuum chamber makes the behaviour of the gauge non-linear due to thermal transpiration effects. This effect becomes more significant when we move from the transitional flow to the free molecular regime. Besides, CDGs may incorporate different baffle systems to avoid the condensation on the membrane or its contamination. In this work, the thermal transpiration effect on the behaviour of a rarefied gas and on the measurements in a CDG with a helicoidal baffle system is investigated by using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The study covers the behaviour of the system under the whole range of rarefaction, from the continuum up to the free molecular limit and the results are compared with empirical results. Moreover, the influence of the boundary conditions on the thermal transpiration effects is investigated by using Maxwell boundary conditions.

  19. IR imaging simulation and analysis for aeroengine exhaust system based on reverse Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Lihai; Mo, Dongla; Shi, Jingcheng

    2014-11-01

    The IR radiation characteristics of aeroengine are the important basis for IR stealth design and anti-stealth detection of aircraft. With the development of IR imaging sensor technology, the importance of aircraft IR stealth increases. An effort is presented to explore target IR radiation imaging simulation based on Reverse Monte Carlo Method (RMCM), which combined with the commercial CFD software. Flow and IR radiation characteristics of an aeroengine exhaust system are investigated, which developing a full size geometry model based on the actual parameters, using a flow-IR integration structured mesh, obtaining the engine performance parameters as the inlet boundary conditions of mixer section, and constructing a numerical simulation model of engine exhaust system of IR radiation characteristics based on RMCM. With the above models, IR radiation characteristics of aeroengine exhaust system is given, and focuses on the typical detecting band of IR spectral radiance imaging at azimuth 20°. The result shows that: (1) in small azimuth angle, the IR radiation is mainly from the center cone of all hot parts; near the azimuth 15°, mixer has the biggest radiation contribution, while center cone, turbine and flame stabilizer equivalent; (2) the main radiation components and space distribution in different spectrum is different, CO2 at 4.18, 4.33 and 4.45 micron absorption and emission obviously, H2O at 3.0 and 5.0 micron absorption and emission obviously.

  20. Energy transport analysis in ultrashort pulse laser ablation through combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Wenqian; Shin, Yung C.; King, Galen

    2010-09-01

    Mechanisms of energy transport during ultrashort laser pulses (USLPs) ablation are investigated in this paper. Nonequilibrium electron-transport, material ionization, as well as density change effects, are studied using atomistic models--the molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods, in addition to the previously studied laser absorption, heat conduction, and stress wave propagation. The target material is treated as consisting of two subsystems: valence-electron system and lattice system. MD method is applied to analyze the motion of atoms while MC method is applied for simulating electron dynamics and multiscattering events between particles. Early-time laser-energy absorption and redistribution as well as later-time material ablation and expansion processes are analyzed. This model is validated in terms of ablation depth, lattice/electron temperature distribution as well as evolution, and plume front velocity, through comparisons with experimental or theoretical results in literature. It is generally believed that the hydrodynamic motion of the ablated material is negligible for USLP but this study shows it is true only for its effect on laser-energy deposition. This study shows that the consideration of hydrodynamic expansion and fast density change in both electron and lattice systems is important for obtaining a reliable energy transport mechanism in the locally heated zone.

  1. Monte Carlo analysis on probe performance for endoscopic diffuse optical spectroscopy of tubular organ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunyao; Zhu, Jingping; Cui, Weiwen; Nie, Wei; Li, Jie; Xu, Zhenghong

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the performance of endoscopic diffuse optical spectroscopy probes with circular or linear fiber arrangements for tubular organ cancer detection. Probe performance was measured by penetration depth. A Monte Carlo model was employed to simulate light transport in the hollow cylinder that both emits and receives light from the inner boundary of the sample. The influence of fiber configurations and tissue optical properties on penetration depth was simulated. The results show that under the same condition, probes with circular fiber arrangement penetrate deeper than probes with linear fiber arrangement, and the difference between the two probes' penetration depth decreases with an increase in the 'distance between source and detector (SD)' and the radius of the probe. Other results show that the penetration depths and their differences both decrease with an increase in the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient but remain constant with changes in the anisotropy factor. Moreover, the penetration depth was more affected by the absorption coefficient than the reduced scattering coefficient. It turns out that in NIR band, probes with linear fiber arrangements are more appropriate for diagnosing superficial cancers, whereas probes with circular fiber arrangements should be chosen for diagnosing adenocarcinoma. But in UV-VIS band, the two probe configurations exhibit nearly the same. These results are useful in guiding endoscopic diffuse optical spectroscopy-based diagnosis for esophageal, cervical, colorectal and other cancers.

  2. Analysis of probabilistic short run marginal cost using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Alcaraz, G.; Navarrete, N.; Tovar-Hernandez, J.H.; Fuerte-Esquivel, C.R.; Mota-Palomino, R.

    1999-11-01

    The structure of the Electricity Supply Industry is undergoing dramatic changes to provide new services options. The main aim of this restructuring is allowing generating units the freedom of selling electricity to anybody they wish at a price determined by market forces. Several methodologies have been proposed in order to quantify different costs associated with those new services offered by electrical utilities operating under a deregulated market. The new wave of pricing is heavily influenced by economic principles designed to price products to elastic market segments on the basis of marginal costs. Hence, spot pricing provides the economic structure for many of new services. At the same time, the pricing is influenced by uncertainties associated to the electric system state variables which defined its operating point. In this paper, nodal probabilistic short run marginal costs are calculated, considering as random variables the load, the production cost and availability of generators. The effect of the electrical network is evaluated taking into account linearized models. A thermal economic dispatch is used to simulate each operational condition generated by Monte Carlo method on small fictitious power system in order to assess the effect of the random variables on the energy trading. First, this is carry out by introducing each random variable one by one, and finally considering the random interaction of all of them.

  3. Time series analysis and Monte Carlo methods for eigenvalue separation in neutron multiplication problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nease, Brian R. Ueki, Taro

    2009-12-10

    A time series approach has been applied to the nuclear fission source distribution generated by Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport in order to calculate the non-fundamental mode eigenvalues of the system. The novel aspect is the combination of the general technical principle of projection pursuit for multivariate data with the neutron multiplication eigenvalue problem in the nuclear engineering discipline. Proof is thoroughly provided that the stationary MC process is linear to first order approximation and that it transforms into one-dimensional autoregressive processes of order one (AR(1)) via the automated choice of projection vectors. The autocorrelation coefficient of the resulting AR(1) process corresponds to the ratio of the desired mode eigenvalue to the fundamental mode eigenvalue. All modern MC codes for nuclear criticality calculate the fundamental mode eigenvalue, so the desired mode eigenvalue can be easily determined. This time series approach was tested for a variety of problems including multi-dimensional ones. Numerical results show that the time series approach has strong potential for three dimensional whole reactor core. The eigenvalue ratio can be updated in an on-the-fly manner without storing the nuclear fission source distributions at all previous iteration cycles for the mean subtraction. Lastly, the effects of degenerate eigenvalues are investigated and solutions are provided.

  4. MicroExposure Monte Carlo analysis modeling PCB exposures through fish ingestion from the Upper Hudson River

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, E.S.; Price, P.S.; McCrodden, J.L.; Ducey, J.S.; Keenan, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The risks associated with exposures to mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the consumption of fish in the vicinity of Superfund sites traditionally have been evaluated by using simple algebraic equations to calculate the dose received by a highly successful angler. A Lifetime Average Daily Dose (LADD) is estimated using default assumptions concerning the quantity of fish consumed, an angler`s body weight, an angler`s exposure duration, and a static measure of PCB levels in fish. Recent changes in EPA`s policies and guidelines, however, have focused on improving the management of environmental risks by providing decision-makers with a distribution of possible risks rather than a single point estimate. MicroExposure Monte Carlo analysis is a recent development in probabilistic exposure assessment in which a LADD for a given angler is calculated as the sum of many individual doses received over the course of a lifetime from individual exposure events. Data on concentrations of PCBs in individual fish are thereby incorporated into the analysis as are other temporal changes in the various exposure parameters. In this paper, the MicroExposure Monte Carlo model is applied to characterize the distribution of PCB dose rates in a hypothetical population of recreational anglers who might potentially consume fish from the Upper Hudson River in the absence of a fishing ban. The analysis uses probabilistic techniques to account for temporal and age-related changes in exposure parameters and as a means of properly considering meal-to-meal variation in fish concentrations, cooking practices, and fish species.

  5. Comparative analysis of discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators used in Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Carole K.; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relative error of Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport that employ two commonly used estimators that account for absorption differently, either discretely, at interaction points, or continuously, between interaction points. We provide a rigorous derivation of these discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators within a stochastic model that we show to be equivalent to an analytic model, based on the radiative transport equation (RTE). We establish that both absorption weighting estimators are unbiased and, therefore, converge to the solution of the RTE. An analysis of spatially resolved reflectance predictions provided by these two estimators reveals no advantage to either in cases of highly scattering and highly anisotropic media. However, for moderate to highly absorbing media or isotropically scattering media, the discrete estimator provides smaller errors at proximal source locations while the continuous estimator provides smaller errors at distal locations. The origin of these differing variance characteristics can be understood through examination of the distribution of exiting photon weights. PMID:24562029

  6. Development of synthetic velocity - depth damage curves using a Weighted Monte Carlo method and Logistic Regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozinaki, Anthi Eirini K.; Karatzas, George P.; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2014-05-01

    Damage curves are the most significant component of the flood loss estimation models. Their development is quite complex. Two types of damage curves exist, historical and synthetic curves. Historical curves are developed from historical loss data from actual flood events. However, due to the scarcity of historical data, synthetic damage curves can be alternatively developed. Synthetic curves rely on the analysis of expected damage under certain hypothetical flooding conditions. A synthetic approach was developed and presented in this work for the development of damage curves, which are subsequently used as the basic input to a flood loss estimation model. A questionnaire-based survey took place among practicing and research agronomists, in order to generate rural loss data based on the responders' loss estimates, for several flood condition scenarios. In addition, a similar questionnaire-based survey took place among building experts, i.e. civil engineers and architects, in order to generate loss data for the urban sector. By answering the questionnaire, the experts were in essence expressing their opinion on how damage to various crop types or building types is related to a range of values of flood inundation parameters, such as floodwater depth and velocity. However, the loss data compiled from the completed questionnaires were not sufficient for the construction of workable damage curves; to overcome this problem, a Weighted Monte Carlo method was implemented, in order to generate extra synthetic datasets with statistical properties identical to those of the questionnaire-based data. The data generated by the Weighted Monte Carlo method were processed via Logistic Regression techniques in order to develop accurate logistic damage curves for the rural and the urban sectors. A Python-based code was developed, which combines the Weighted Monte Carlo method and the Logistic Regression analysis into a single code (WMCLR Python code). Each WMCLR code execution

  7. PDF Weaving - Linking Inventory Data and Monte Carlo Uncertainty Analysis in the Study of how Disturbance Affects Forest Carbon Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, S. P.; Patterson, P.; Garrard, C.

    2014-12-01

    Altered disturbance regimes are likely a primary mechanism by which a changing climate will affect storage of carbon in forested ecosystems. Accordingly, the National Forest System (NFS) has been mandated to assess the role of disturbance (harvests, fires, insects, etc.) on carbon storage in each of its planning units. We have developed a process which combines 1990-era maps of forest structure and composition with high-quality maps of subsequent disturbance type and magnitude to track the impact of disturbance on carbon storage. This process, called the Forest Carbon Management Framework (ForCaMF), uses the maps to apply empirically calibrated carbon dynamics built into a widely used management tool, the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS). While ForCaMF offers locally specific insights into the effect of historical or hypothetical disturbance trends on carbon storage, its dependence upon the interaction of several maps and a carbon model poses a complex challenge in terms of tracking uncertainty. Monte Carlo analysis is an attractive option for tracking the combined effects of error in several constituent inputs as they impact overall uncertainty. Monte Carlo methods iteratively simulate alternative values for each input and quantify how much outputs vary as a result. Variation of each input is controlled by a Probability Density Function (PDF). We introduce a technique called "PDF Weaving," which constructs PDFs that ensure that simulated uncertainty precisely aligns with uncertainty estimates that can be derived from inventory data. This hard link with inventory data (derived in this case from FIA - the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis program) both provides empirical calibration and establishes consistency with other types of assessments (e.g., habitat and water) for which NFS depends upon FIA data. Results from the NFS Northern Region will be used to illustrate PDF weaving and insights gained from ForCaMF about the role of disturbance in carbon

  8. Dosimetric analysis of a shielded applicator for nasopharyngeal carcinoma intracavitary brachytherapy: Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Xin; Liu, Xiao Wei; You, Ri An; Qian, Jian Yang; Qi, Zhen Yu; Deng, Xiao Wu; Tsao, Shiu Ying

    2006-03-01

    In nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) intracavitary brachytherapy, an anatomical dose reference point (in line with that for gynecology work), e.g., at the sphenoid floor, is more precise than the empirical point of 1 cm from the source. However, such increases of the single-source-plan treatment distances may deliver excessive doses inferiorly, to the soft palate. As shielding may help, its efficacy was studied by Monte Carlo simulations in water for 20 and 30 mm diameter spherical NP applicators (representing extremes of sizes for the small NP cavity), with/without lead shielding inferiorly, using a single linear Ir-192, 2 mm steps, equal dwell times for 5 (5DP) and 9 dwell positions (9DP). Dose reductions of the selected points of interest ranged from 1.2% to 40.5% for the 20 mm shielded applicator and a range of 2.9% to 17.9%, for the 30 mm shielded applicator. Dose volume histograms of the "region of interest" (ROI)-a cuboid of 4 x 4 x 0.5 cm3 at the most inferior aspect of the applicator, also differed significantly. The highest doses of the 50% (D50) and 20% (D20) volumes of ROI (for 5DP and 9DP plans) were reduced by 11.9% to 17.9% for the 20 mm applicator and a range of 9.0% to 11.5% for the 30 mm shielded applicator. Doses in unshielded directions were insignificantly changed, for example, with a 20 mm applicator simulated in a 5DP plan, the dose distribution close to the source in the unshielded direction has less than 4% difference at the 50% isodose relative to the dose prescription point. For the 30 mm shielded applicator, despite smaller dose reduction percentages, a more pronounced effective dose reduction was obtained than nominal values when considering radiobiological equivalent doses. Our system was demonstrated to be ready for clinical assessment.

  9. Dosimetric analysis of a shielded applicator for nasopharyngeal carcinoma intracavitary brachytherapy: Monte Carlo calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixin; Liu Xiaowei; You Rian

    2006-03-15

    In nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) intracavitary brachytherapy, an anatomical dose reference point (in line with that for gynecology work), e.g., at the sphenoid floor, is more precise than the empirical point of 1 cm from the source. However, such increases of the single-source-plan treatment distances may deliver excessive doses inferiorly, to the soft palate. As shielding may help, its efficacy was studied by Monte Carlo simulations in water for 20 and 30 mm diameter spherical NP applicators (representing extremes of sizes for the small NP cavity), with/without lead shielding inferiorly, using a single linear Ir-192, 2 mm steps, equal dwell times for 5 (5DP) and 9 dwell positions (9DP). Dose reductions of the selected points of interest ranged from 1.2% to 40.5% for the 20 mm shielded applicator and a range of 2.9% to 17.9%, for the 30 mm shielded applicator. Dose volume histograms of the 'region of interest' (ROI) - a cuboid of 4x4x0.5 cm{sup 3} at the most inferior aspect of the applicator, also differed significantly. The highest doses of the 50% (D{sub 50}) and 20% (D{sub 20}) volumes of ROI (for 5DP and 9DP plans) were reduced by 11.9% to 17.9% for the 20 mm applicator and a range of 9.0% to 11.5% for the 30 mm shielded applicator. Doses in unshielded directions were insignificantly changed, for example, with a 20 mm applicator simulated in a 5DP plan, the dose distribution close to the source in the unshielded direction has less than 4% difference at the 50% isodose relative to the dose prescription point. For the 30 mm shielded applicator, despite smaller dose reduction percentages, a more pronounced effective dose reduction was obtained than nominal values when considering radiobiological equivalent doses. Our system was demonstrated to be ready for clinical assessment.

  10. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System To Simulate Time-Analysis Quantities.

    2012-04-15

    Version: 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. The Monte Carlo simulation of correlation measurements that rely on the detection of fast neutrons and photons from fission requires that particle emissions and interactions following a fission event be described as close to reality as possible. The -PoliMi extension to MCNP and to MCNPX was developed to simulate correlated-particle and the subsequent interactions as close as possible to the physical behavior. Initially, MCNP-PoliMi, a modification of MCNP4C, wasmore » developed. The first version was developed in 2001-2002 and released in early 2004 to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). It was developed for research purposes, to simulate correlated counts in organic scintillation detectors, sensitive to fast neutrons and gamma rays. Originally, the field of application was nuclear safeguards; however subsequent improvements have enhanced the ability to model measurements in other research fields as well. During 2010-2011 the -PoliMi modification was ported into MCNPX-2.7.0, leading to the development of MCNPX-PoliMi. Now the -PoliMi v2.0 modifications are distributed as a patch to MCNPX-2.7.0 which currently is distributed in the RSICC PACKAGE BCC-004 MCNP6_BETA2/MCNP5/MCNPX. Also included in the package is MPPost, a versatile code that provides simulated detector response. By taking advantage of the modifications in MCNPX-PoliMi, MPPost can provide an accurate simulation of the detector response for a variety of detection scenarios.« less

  11. Power dissipation analysis in N2O RF discharges using Monte Carlo modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, G.; Despax, B.; Yousfi, M.; Caquineau, H.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, a microscopic approach for the calculation of partial and total power dissipation from energy losses by collisions is considered and applied in the case of N2O low pressure RF discharges. This approach is based on a Monte Carlo technique in a particle model permitting sampling of the energy deposited by different inelastic electron-N2O collisions. The calculated power densities presented in this paper are in good agreement with the experimental results and those obtained by the classical macroscopic formula based on spatio-temporal integration of the product of current density and electrical field. This microscopic approach presents, however, a major advantage in comparison with the classical method (which only offers the possibility to calculate the global power dissipation) by making possible the calculation of all the power density terms, thereby permitting one to examine the relative contribution of each collision process in the power dissipation. Its application to N2O electronegative discharges, at 503 K gas temperature, several RF voltages and two different gas pressures shows how the power is dissipated through electron-gas processes. The power density variation is found to be proportional to the electron density variation brought about by the changes in attachment (i.e. e + N2O → N2 + O-), detachment (i.e. NO- + N2O → NO + N2O + e) and ionization (i.e. e + N2 O → N2O+ + 2e) processes. The role of each of these processes is fully studied with our particle model in order to explain the dissipated power variation.

  12. Diffusion of Single layer Clusters: Langevin Analysis and Monte Carlo Simulations^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, S. V.

    1996-03-01

    In recent observations of Brownian motion of islands of adsorbed atoms and of vacancies with mean radius R, the cluster diffusion constant Dc is found to vary as R-1 and R-2 in studies by Wen et al. ( J. M. Wen, S. -L. Chang, J. W. Burnett, J. W. Evans and P. A. Thiel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73), 2591 (1994). and Morgenstern et al. (K. Morgenstern, G. Rosenfeld, B. Poelsema, and G. Comsa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 2058 (1995)., repectively. From an analytical continuum description of the cluster's step-like boundary, we find a single Langevin equation for the motion of the cluster boundary. From this we determine the cluster diffusion constant and the fluctuations of the shape around an assumed equilibrium circular shape. In three limiting cases this leads to the scaling of the diffusion constant with the radius as Dc ~ R^-α and the scaling of a shape fluctuations correlation function with the elapsed time as t^1/(1+α ). These three cases correspond to the three microscopic surface mass-transport mechanisms of straight steps, namely: evaporation condensation (EC) giving α=1, terrace diffusion (TD) implying α=2 and periphery diffusion (PD) yielding α = 3. We thereby provide a unified treatment of the dynamics of steps and of clusters ( S. V. Khare, N. C. Bartelt, and T. L. Einstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 2148 (1995); in preparation.. To check how well the continuum results apply to real systems with finite lattice constants, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of simple lattice gas models for these three cases. We also relate the the experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of the clusters to atomic diffusion parameters. ^* This work was done in collaboration with N. C. Bartelt and T. L. Einstein and was supported in part by NSF DMR-MRG 91-03031.

  13. Monte Carlo-based interval transformation analysis for multi-criteria decision analysis of groundwater management strategies under uncertain naphthalene concentrations and health risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lixia; He, Li; Lu, Hongwei; Chen, Yizhong

    2016-08-01

    A new Monte Carlo-based interval transformation analysis (MCITA) is used in this study for multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) of naphthalene-contaminated groundwater management strategies. The analysis can be conducted when input data such as total cost, contaminant concentration and health risk are represented as intervals. Compared to traditional MCDA methods, MCITA-MCDA has the advantages of (1) dealing with inexactness of input data represented as intervals, (2) mitigating computational time due to the introduction of Monte Carlo sampling method, (3) identifying the most desirable management strategies under data uncertainty. A real-world case study is employed to demonstrate the performance of this method. A set of inexact management alternatives are considered in each duration on the basis of four criteria. Results indicated that the most desirable management strategy lied in action 15 for the 5-year, action 8 for the 10-year, action 12 for the 15-year, and action 2 for the 20-year management.

  14. Clinical implementation of the Peregrine Monte Carlo dose calculations system for photon beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, N; Bergstrom, P M; Daly, T P; Descalle, M; Garrett, D; House, R K; Knapp, D K; May, S; Patterson, R W; Siantar, C L; Verhey, L; Walling, R S; Welczorek, D

    1999-07-01

    PEREGRINE is a 3D Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed to serve as a dose calculation engine for clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. Taking advantage of recent advances in low-cost computer hardware, modern multiprocessor architectures and optimized Monte Carlo transport algorithms, PEREGRINE performs mm-resolution Monte Carlo calculations in times that are reasonable for clinical use. PEREGRINE has been developed to simulate radiation therapy for several source types, including photons, electrons, neutrons and protons, for both teletherapy and brachytherapy. However the work described in this paper is limited to linear accelerator-based megavoltage photon therapy. Here we assess the accuracy, reliability, and added value of 3D Monte Carlo transport for photon therapy treatment planning. Comparisons with clinical measurements in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms demonstrate PEREGRINE's accuracy. Studies with variable tissue composition demonstrate the importance of material assignment on the overall dose distribution. Detailed analysis of Monte Carlo results provides new information for radiation research by expanding the set of observables.

  15. Monte Carlo Error Analysis Applied to Core Formation: The Single-stage Model Revived

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, E.; Walter, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion of studies that scrutinize whether or not the siderophile element budget of the modern mantle can plausibly be explained by metal-silicate equilibration in a deep magma ocean during core formation. The single-stage equilibrium scenario is seductive because experiments that equilibrate metal and silicate can then serve as a proxy for the early earth, and the physical and chemical conditions of core formation can be identified. Recently, models have become more complex as they try to accommodate the proliferation of element partitioning data sets, each of which sets its own limits on the pressure, temperature, and chemistry of equilibration. The ability of single stage models to explain mantle chemistry has subsequently been challenged, resulting in the development of complex multi-stage core formation models. Here we show that the extent to which extant partitioning data are consistent with single-stage core formation depends heavily upon (1) the assumptions made when regressing experimental partitioning data (2) the certainty with which regression coefficients are known and (3) the certainty with which the core/mantle concentration ratios of the siderophile elements are known. We introduce a Monte Carlo algorithm coded in MATLAB that samples parameter space in pressure and oxygen fugacity for a given mantle composition (nbo/t) and liquidus, and returns the number of equilibrium single-stage liquidus “solutions” that are permissible, taking into account the uncertainty in regression parameters and range of acceptable core/mantle ratios. Here we explore the consequences of regression parameter uncertainty and the impact of regression construction on model outcomes. We find that the form of the partition coefficient (Kd with enforced valence state, or D) and the handling of the temperature effect (based on 1-atm free energy data or high P-T experimental observations) critically affects model outcomes. We consider the most

  16. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  17. Monte Carlo analysis of the Titan III/Transfer Orbit Stage guidance system for the Mars Observer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Stephen C.; Ginsburg, Marc A.; Rao, Prabhakara P.

    1993-01-01

    An important part of space launch vehicle mission planning for a planetary mission is the integrated analysis of guidance and performance dispersions for both booster and upper stage vehicles. For the Mars Observer mission, an integrated trajectory analysis was used to maximize the scientific payload and to minimize injection errors by optimizing the energy management of both vehicles. This was accomplished by designing the Titan III booster vehicle to inject into a hyperbolic departure plane, and the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) to correct any booster dispersions. An integrated Monte Carlo analysis of the performance and guidance dispersions of both vehicles provided sensitivities, an evaluation of their guidance schemes and an injection error covariance matrix. The polynomial guidance schemes used for the Titan III variable flight azimuth computations and the TOS solid rocket motor ignition time and burn direction derivations accounted for a wide variation of launch times, performance dispersions, and target conditions. The Mars Observer spacecraft was launched on 25 September 1992 on the Titan III/TOS vehicle. The post flight analysis indicated that a near perfect park orbit injection was achieved, followed by a trans-Mars injection with less than 2sigma errors.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of parameter confidence intervals for non-linear regression analysis of biological data using Microsoft Excel.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ronald J W; Mytilinaios, Ioannis; Maitland, Luke; Brown, Angus M

    2012-08-01

    This study describes a method to obtain parameter confidence intervals from the fitting of non-linear functions to experimental data, using the SOLVER and Analysis ToolPaK Add-In of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Previously we have shown that Excel can fit complex multiple functions to biological data, obtaining values equivalent to those returned by more specialized statistical or mathematical software. However, a disadvantage of using the Excel method was the inability to return confidence intervals for the computed parameters or the correlations between them. Using a simple Monte-Carlo procedure within the Excel spreadsheet (without recourse to programming), SOLVER can provide parameter estimates (up to 200 at a time) for multiple 'virtual' data sets, from which the required confidence intervals and correlation coefficients can be obtained. The general utility of the method is exemplified by applying it to the analysis of the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, the growth inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by chlorhexidine and the further analysis of the electrophysiological data from the compound action potential of the rodent optic nerve.

  19. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  20. Using calibration constrained Monte Carlo analysis of alternative conceptual models in land use management of drained fens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Pekka; Ala-aho, Pertti; Doherty, John; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Quantification of groundwater model uncertainties is one of the key aspects when using models to direct land use or water management. An esker aquifer with a size of 90 km2 was studied to understand how the surrounding peatland forestry drainage, groundwater abstraction and climate variability can affect the aquifer groundwater level and the water levels of groundwater dependent lakes of the area. Aquifer was studied with steady state groundwater models using three alternative conceptual geological models of the esker and running calibration constrained Null Space Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis and linear analysis to each model. This kind of simulation approach has not been used in peatland management previously. Models and analyses were used to observe effects of different land use scenarios, e.g. peatland drainage restoration or water abstraction for a nearby city, and climate variability. Data from the models and analyses give the decision makers insight of how different management practices in peatlands can affect the groundwater system given the uncertainties arising from the geological understanding, hydrological measurements, and model conceptualization. Results from the models can be used, for example, to pinpoint restoration or conservation of specific peatland drainage areas in which the models suggest clearest connection to aquifer water level.

  1. Microscopic structure and interaction analysis for supercritical carbon dioxide-ethanol mixtures: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhao; Yang, Jichu; Hu, Yinyu

    2009-04-01

    Configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble using the TraPPE-UA force field were performed to study the microscopic structures and molecular interactions of mixtures containing supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) and ethanol (EtOH). The binary vapor-liquid coexisting curves were calculated at 298.17, 333.2, and 353.2 K and are in excellent agreement with experimental results. For the first time, three important interactions, i.e., EtOH-EtOH hydrogen bonding, EtOH-CO(2) hydrogen bonding, and EtOH-CO(2) electron donor-acceptor (EDA) bonding, in the mixtures were fully analyzed and compared. The EtOH mole fraction, temperature, and pressure effect on the three interactions was investigated and then explained by the competition of interactions between EtOH and CO(2) molecules. Analysis of the microscopic structures indicates a strong preference for the formation of EtOH-CO(2) hydrogen-bonded tetramers and pentamers at higher EtOH compositions. The distribution of aggregation sizes and types shows that a very large EtOH-EtOH hydrogen-bonded network exists in the mixtures, while only linear EtOH-CO(2) hydrogen-bonded and EDA-bonded dimers and trimers are present. Further analysis shows that EtOH-CO(2) EDA complex is more stable than the hydrogen-bonded one.

  2. Novel hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of parallelized Monte Carlo parametric expectation maximization estimation method for population pharmacokinetic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Ng, C M

    2013-10-01

    The development of a population PK/PD model, an essential component for model-based drug development, is both time- and labor-intensive. A graphical-processing unit (GPU) computing technology has been proposed and used to accelerate many scientific computations. The objective of this study was to develop a hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of parallelized Monte Carlo parametric expectation maximization (MCPEM) estimation algorithm for population PK data analysis. A hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of the MCPEM algorithm (MCPEMGPU) and identical algorithm that is designed for the single CPU (MCPEMCPU) were developed using MATLAB in a single computer equipped with dual Xeon 6-Core E5690 CPU and a NVIDIA Tesla C2070 GPU parallel computing card that contained 448 stream processors. Two different PK models with rich/sparse sampling design schemes were used to simulate population data in assessing the performance of MCPEMCPU and MCPEMGPU. Results were analyzed by comparing the parameter estimation and model computation times. Speedup factor was used to assess the relative benefit of parallelized MCPEMGPU over MCPEMCPU in shortening model computation time. The MCPEMGPU consistently achieved shorter computation time than the MCPEMCPU and can offer more than 48-fold speedup using a single GPU card. The novel hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of parallelized MCPEM algorithm developed in this study holds a great promise in serving as the core for the next-generation of modeling software for population PK/PD analysis.

  3. Risk Assessment and Prediction of Flyrock Distance by Combined Multiple Regression Analysis and Monte Carlo Simulation of Quarry Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaghani, Danial Jahed; Mahdiyar, Amir; Hasanipanah, Mahdi; Faradonbeh, Roohollah Shirani; Khandelwal, Manoj; Amnieh, Hassan Bakhshandeh

    2016-09-01

    Flyrock is considered as one of the main causes of human injury, fatalities, and structural damage among all undesirable environmental impacts of blasting. Therefore, it seems that the proper prediction/simulation of flyrock is essential, especially in order to determine blast safety area. If proper control measures are taken, then the flyrock distance can be controlled, and, in return, the risk of damage can be reduced or eliminated. The first objective of this study was to develop a predictive model for flyrock estimation based on multiple regression (MR) analyses, and after that, using the developed MR model, flyrock phenomenon was simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) approach. In order to achieve objectives of this study, 62 blasting operations were investigated in Ulu Tiram quarry, Malaysia, and some controllable and uncontrollable factors were carefully recorded/calculated. The obtained results of MC modeling indicated that this approach is capable of simulating flyrock ranges with a good level of accuracy. The mean of simulated flyrock by MC was obtained as 236.3 m, while this value was achieved as 238.6 m for the measured one. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was also conducted to investigate the effects of model inputs on the output of the system. The analysis demonstrated that powder factor is the most influential parameter on fly rock among all model inputs. It is noticeable that the proposed MR and MC models should be utilized only in the studied area and the direct use of them in the other conditions is not recommended.

  4. A MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO ALGORITHM FOR ANALYSIS OF LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, J. B.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Huey, Greg; Gorski, K. M.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wandelt, B. D. E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no

    2009-05-20

    We present a new Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for cosmic microwave background (CMB) analysis in the low signal-to-noise regime. This method builds on and complements the previously described CMB Gibbs sampler, and effectively solves the low signal-to-noise inefficiency problem of the direct Gibbs sampler. The new algorithm is a simple Metropolis-Hastings sampler with a general proposal rule for the power spectrum, C {sub l}, followed by a particular deterministic rescaling operation of the sky signal, s. The acceptance probability for this joint move depends on the sky map only through the difference of {chi}{sup 2} between the original and proposed sky sample, which is close to unity in the low signal-to-noise regime. The algorithm is completed by alternating this move with a standard Gibbs move. Together, these two proposals constitute a computationally efficient algorithm for mapping out the full joint CMB posterior, both in the high and low signal-to-noise regimes.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray fluorescence analysis of gold in kidney using 99mTc radiopharmaceutical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Naser; Shamsaei, Mojtaba; Shafaei, Mostafa; Rabiei, Ali

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to design a system in order to analyze gold and other heavy elements in internal organs using in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Monte Carlo N Particle code MCNP was used to simulate phantoms and sources. A source of 99mTc was simulated in kidney to excite the gold x-rays. Changes in K XRF response due to variations in tissue thickness overlying the kidney at the measurement site were investigated. Different simulations having tissue thicknesses of 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mm were performed. Kα1 and Kα2 for all depths were measured. The linearity of the XRF system was also studied by increasing the gold concentration in the kidney phantom from 0 to 500 µg g-1 kidney tissue. The results show that gold concentration between 3 and 10 µg g-1 kidney tissue can be detected for distance between the skin and the kidney surface of 20-60 mm. The study also made a comparison between the skin doses for the source outside and inside the phantom.

  6. Predicting morphological changes DS New Naga-Hammadi Barrage for extreme Nile flood flows: A Monte Carlo analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Ahmed M.A.; Raslan, Yasser M.

    2013-01-01

    While construction of the Aswan High Dam (AHD) has stopped concurrent flooding events, River Nile is still subject to low intensity flood waves resulting from controlled release of water from the dam reservoir. Analysis of flow released from New Naga-Hammadi Barrage, which is located at 3460 km downstream AHD indicated an increase in magnitude of flood released from the barrage in the past 10 years. A 2D numerical mobile bed model is utilized to investigate the possible morphological changes in the downstream of Naga-Hammadi Barrage from possible higher flood releases. Monte Carlo simulation analyses (MCS) is applied to the deterministic results of the 2D model to account for and assess the uncertainty of sediment parameters and formulations in addition to sacristy of field measurements. Results showed that the predicted volume of erosion yielded the highest uncertainty and variation from deterministic run, while navigation velocity yielded the least uncertainty. Furthermore, the error budget method is used to rank various sediment parameters for their contribution in the total prediction uncertainty. It is found that the suspended sediment contributed to output uncertainty more than other sediment parameters followed by bed load with 10% less order of magnitude. PMID:25685476

  7. Application of Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis to biomathematical modeling of respirable dust in US and UK coal miners

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Parker, Ann; Haber, Lynne T.; Tran, C. Lang; Kuempel, Eileen D.

    2015-01-01

    A biomathematical model was previously developed to describe the long-term clearance and retention of particles in the lungs of coal miners. The model structure was evaluated and parameters were estimated in two data sets, one from the United States and one from the United Kingdom. The three-compartment model structure consists of deposition of inhaled particles in the alveolar region, competing processes of either clearance from the alveolar region or translocation to the lung interstitial region, and very slow, irreversible sequestration of interstitialized material in the lung-associated lymph nodes. Point estimates of model parameter values were estimated separately for the two data sets. In the current effort, Bayesian population analysis using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation was used to recalibrate the model while improving assessments of parameter variability and uncertainty. When model parameters were calibrated simultaneously to the two data sets, agreement between the derived parameters for the two groups was very good, and the central tendency values were similar to those derived from the deterministic approach. These findings are relevant to the proposed update of the ICRP human respiratory tract model with revisions to the alveolar-interstitial region based on this long-term particle clearance and retention model. PMID:23454101

  8. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Joint Analysis of Chandra X-Ray Imaging Spectroscopy and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimillano; Joy, Marshall K.; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; LaRoque, Samuel J.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect data can be combined to determine the distance to galaxy clusters. High-resolution X-ray data are now available from Chandra, which provides both spatial and spectral information, and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect data were obtained from the BIMA and Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) arrays. We introduce a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure for the joint analysis of X-ray and Sunyaev- Zel'dovich effect data. The advantages of this method are the high computational efficiency and the ability to measure simultaneously the probability distribution of all parameters of interest, such as the spatial and spectral properties of the cluster gas and also for derivative quantities such as the distance to the cluster. We demonstrate this technique by applying it to the Chandra X-ray data and the OVRO radio data for the galaxy cluster A611. Comparisons with traditional likelihood ratio methods reveal the robustness of the method. This method will be used in follow-up paper to determine the distances to a large sample of galaxy cluster.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo analysis of a charge ordered insulating antiferromagnet: The Ti4O7 Magneli phase

    DOE PAGES

    Benali, Anouar; Shulenburger, Luke; Krogel, Jaron T.; Zhong, Xiaoling; Kent, Paul R. C.; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-06-07

    The Magneli phase Ti4O7 is an important transition metal oxide with a wide range of applications because of its interplay between charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom. At low temperatures, it has non-trivial magnetic states very close in energy, driven by electronic exchange and correlation interactions. We have examined three low- lying states, one ferromagnetic and two antiferromagnetic, and calculated their energies as well as Ti spin moment distributions using highly accurate Quantum Monte Carlo methods. We compare our results to those obtained from density functional theory- based methods that include approximate corrections for exchange and correlation. Our resultsmore » confirm the nature of the states and their ordering in energy, as compared with density-functional theory methods. However, the energy differences and spin distributions differ. Here, a detailed analysis suggests that non-local exchange-correlation functionals, in addition to other approximations such as LDA+U to account for correlations, are needed to simultaneously obtain better estimates for spin moments, distributions, energy differences and energy gaps.« less

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo analysis of a charge ordered insulating antiferromagnet: the Ti4O7 Magnéli phase.

    PubMed

    Benali, Anouar; Shulenburger, Luke; Krogel, Jaron T; Zhong, Xiaoliang; Kent, Paul R C; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-07-21

    The Magnéli phase Ti4O7 is an important transition metal oxide with a wide range of applications because of its interplay between charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom. At low temperatures, it has non-trivial magnetic states very close in energy, driven by electronic exchange and correlation interactions. We have examined three low-lying states, one ferromagnetic and two antiferromagnetic, and calculated their energies as well as Ti spin moment distributions using highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo methods. We compare our results to those obtained from density functional theory-based methods that include approximate corrections for exchange and correlation. Our results confirm the nature of the states and their ordering in energy, as compared with density-functional theory methods. However, the energy differences and spin distributions differ. A detailed analysis suggests that non-local exchange-correlation functionals, in addition to other approximations such as LDA+U to account for correlations, are needed to simultaneously obtain better estimates for spin moments, distributions, energy differences and energy gaps. PMID:27334262

  11. Predicting morphological changes DS New Naga-Hammadi Barrage for extreme Nile flood flows: A Monte Carlo analysis.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Ahmed M A; Raslan, Yasser M

    2014-01-01

    While construction of the Aswan High Dam (AHD) has stopped concurrent flooding events, River Nile is still subject to low intensity flood waves resulting from controlled release of water from the dam reservoir. Analysis of flow released from New Naga-Hammadi Barrage, which is located at 3460 km downstream AHD indicated an increase in magnitude of flood released from the barrage in the past 10 years. A 2D numerical mobile bed model is utilized to investigate the possible morphological changes in the downstream of Naga-Hammadi Barrage from possible higher flood releases. Monte Carlo simulation analyses (MCS) is applied to the deterministic results of the 2D model to account for and assess the uncertainty of sediment parameters and formulations in addition to sacristy of field measurements. Results showed that the predicted volume of erosion yielded the highest uncertainty and variation from deterministic run, while navigation velocity yielded the least uncertainty. Furthermore, the error budget method is used to rank various sediment parameters for their contribution in the total prediction uncertainty. It is found that the suspended sediment contributed to output uncertainty more than other sediment parameters followed by bed load with 10% less order of magnitude. PMID:25685476

  12. Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis: A Multi-Parameter Markov Chain Monte Carlo Model for Consistency of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin; Chu, Chi-Ming; Su, Sui-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Conventional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been proven to be a successful strategy for identifying genetic variants associated with complex human traits. However, there is still a large heritability gap between GWAS and transitional family studies. The "missing heritability" has been suggested to be due to lack of studies focused on epistasis, also called gene-gene interactions, because individual trials have often had insufficient sample size. Meta-analysis is a common method for increasing statistical power. However, sufficient detailed information is difficult to obtain. A previous study employed a meta-regression-based method to detect epistasis, but it faced the challenge of inconsistent estimates. Here, we describe a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, called "Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis" (ETMA), which uses genotype summary data to obtain consistent estimates of epistasis effects in meta-analysis. We defined a series of conditions to generate simulation data and tested the power and type I error rates in ETMA, individual data analysis and conventional meta-regression-based method. ETMA not only successfully facilitated consistency of evidence but also yielded acceptable type I error and higher power than conventional meta-regression. We applied ETMA to three real meta-analysis data sets. We found significant gene-gene interactions in the renin-angiotensin system and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism pathway, with strong supporting evidence. In addition, glutathione S-transferase (GST) mu 1 and theta 1 were confirmed to exert independent effects on cancer. We concluded that the application of ETMA to real meta-analysis data was successful. Finally, we developed an R package, etma, for the detection of epistasis in meta-analysis [etma is available via the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/etma/index.html]. PMID:27045371

  13. Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis: A Multi-Parameter Markov Chain Monte Carlo Model for Consistency of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin; Chu, Chi-Ming; Su, Sui-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Conventional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been proven to be a successful strategy for identifying genetic variants associated with complex human traits. However, there is still a large heritability gap between GWAS and transitional family studies. The "missing heritability" has been suggested to be due to lack of studies focused on epistasis, also called gene-gene interactions, because individual trials have often had insufficient sample size. Meta-analysis is a common method for increasing statistical power. However, sufficient detailed information is difficult to obtain. A previous study employed a meta-regression-based method to detect epistasis, but it faced the challenge of inconsistent estimates. Here, we describe a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, called "Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis" (ETMA), which uses genotype summary data to obtain consistent estimates of epistasis effects in meta-analysis. We defined a series of conditions to generate simulation data and tested the power and type I error rates in ETMA, individual data analysis and conventional meta-regression-based method. ETMA not only successfully facilitated consistency of evidence but also yielded acceptable type I error and higher power than conventional meta-regression. We applied ETMA to three real meta-analysis data sets. We found significant gene-gene interactions in the renin-angiotensin system and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism pathway, with strong supporting evidence. In addition, glutathione S-transferase (GST) mu 1 and theta 1 were confirmed to exert independent effects on cancer. We concluded that the application of ETMA to real meta-analysis data was successful. Finally, we developed an R package, etma, for the detection of epistasis in meta-analysis [etma is available via the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/etma/index.html].

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    A library of Monte Carlo subroutines has been developed for the purpose of design of neutron scattering instruments. Using small-angle scattering as an example, the philosophy and structure of the library are described and the programs are used to compare instruments at continuous wave (CW) and long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) neutron facilities. The Monte Carlo results give a count-rate gain of a factor between 2 and 4 using time-of-flight analysis. This is comparable to scaling arguments based on the ratio of wavelength bandwidth to resolution width.

  15. Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis: A Multi-Parameter Markov Chain Monte Carlo Model for Consistency of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin; Chu, Chi-Ming; Su, Sui-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Conventional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been proven to be a successful strategy for identifying genetic variants associated with complex human traits. However, there is still a large heritability gap between GWAS and transitional family studies. The “missing heritability” has been suggested to be due to lack of studies focused on epistasis, also called gene–gene interactions, because individual trials have often had insufficient sample size. Meta-analysis is a common method for increasing statistical power. However, sufficient detailed information is difficult to obtain. A previous study employed a meta-regression-based method to detect epistasis, but it faced the challenge of inconsistent estimates. Here, we describe a Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, called “Epistasis Test in Meta-Analysis” (ETMA), which uses genotype summary data to obtain consistent estimates of epistasis effects in meta-analysis. We defined a series of conditions to generate simulation data and tested the power and type I error rates in ETMA, individual data analysis and conventional meta-regression-based method. ETMA not only successfully facilitated consistency of evidence but also yielded acceptable type I error and higher power than conventional meta-regression. We applied ETMA to three real meta-analysis data sets. We found significant gene–gene interactions in the renin–angiotensin system and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism pathway, with strong supporting evidence. In addition, glutathione S-transferase (GST) mu 1 and theta 1 were confirmed to exert independent effects on cancer. We concluded that the application of ETMA to real meta-analysis data was successful. Finally, we developed an R package, etma, for the detection of epistasis in meta-analysis [etma is available via the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/etma/index.html]. PMID:27045371

  16. Statistically Differentiating between Interaction and Nonlinearity in Multiple Regression Analysis: A Monte Carlo Investigation of a Recommended Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Foster-Johnson, Lynn

    1999-01-01

    Shows that the procedure recommended by D. Lubinski and L. Humphreys (1990) for differentiating between moderated and nonlinear regression models evidences statistical problems characteristic of stepwise procedures. Interprets Monte Carlo results in terms of the researchers' need to differentiate between exploratory and confirmatory aspects of…

  17. Modelling of dissolved oxygen in the Danube River using artificial neural networks and Monte Carlo Simulation uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antanasijević, Davor; Pocajt, Viktor; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra; Ristić, Mirjana

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the training, validation, testing and uncertainty analysis of general regression neural network (GRNN) models for the forecasting of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the Danube River. The main objectives of this work were to determine the optimum data normalization and input selection techniques, the determination of the relative importance of uncertainty in different input variables, as well as the uncertainty analysis of model results using the Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) technique. Min-max, median, z-score, sigmoid and tanh were validated as normalization techniques, whilst the variance inflation factor, correlation analysis and genetic algorithm were tested as input selection techniques. As inputs, the GRNN models used 19 water quality variables, measured in the river water each month at 17 different sites over a period of 9 years. The best results were obtained using min-max normalized data and the input selection based on the correlation between DO and dependent variables, which provided the most accurate GRNN model, and in combination the smallest number of inputs: Temperature, pH, HCO3-, SO42-, NO3-N, Hardness, Na, Cl-, Conductivity and Alkalinity. The results show that the correlation coefficient between measured and predicted DO values is 0.85. The inputs with the greatest effect on the GRNN model (arranged in descending order) were T, pH, HCO3-, SO42- and NO3-N. Of all inputs, variability of temperature had the greatest influence on the variability of DO content in river body, with the DO decreasing at a rate similar to the theoretical DO decreasing rate relating to temperature. The uncertainty analysis of the model results demonstrate that the GRNN can effectively forecast the DO content, since the distribution of model results are very similar to the corresponding distribution of real data.

  18. Assessment of parameter uncertainty in hydrological model using a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo-based multilevel-factorial-analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junlong; Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe; Chen, Xi; Bao, Anming

    2016-07-01

    Without a realistic assessment of parameter uncertainty, decision makers may encounter difficulties in accurately describing hydrologic processes and assessing relationships between model parameters and watershed characteristics. In this study, a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo-based multilevel-factorial-analysis (MCMC-MFA) method is developed, which can not only generate samples of parameters from a well constructed Markov chain and assess parameter uncertainties with straightforward Bayesian inference, but also investigate the individual and interactive effects of multiple parameters on model output through measuring the specific variations of hydrological responses. A case study is conducted for addressing parameter uncertainties in the Kaidu watershed of northwest China. Effects of multiple parameters and their interactions are quantitatively investigated using the MCMC-MFA with a three-level factorial experiment (totally 81 runs). A variance-based sensitivity analysis method is used to validate the results of parameters' effects. Results disclose that (i) soil conservation service runoff curve number for moisture condition II (CN2) and fraction of snow volume corresponding to 50% snow cover (SNO50COV) are the most significant factors to hydrological responses, implying that infiltration-excess overland flow and snow water equivalent represent important water input to the hydrological system of the Kaidu watershed; (ii) saturate hydraulic conductivity (SOL_K) and soil evaporation compensation factor (ESCO) have obvious effects on hydrological responses; this implies that the processes of percolation and evaporation would impact hydrological process in this watershed; (iii) the interactions of ESCO and SNO50COV as well as CN2 and SNO50COV have an obvious effect, implying that snow cover can impact the generation of runoff on land surface and the extraction of soil evaporative demand in lower soil layers. These findings can help enhance the hydrological model

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of the Sheet Metal Stamping Processes Based on Inverse Finite Element Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Maolin; Du, R.

    2005-08-05

    Sheet metal stamping is one of the most commonly used manufacturing processes, and hence, much research has been carried for economic gain. Searching through the literatures, however, it is found that there are still a lots of problems unsolved. For example, it is well known that for a same press, same workpiece material, and same set of die, the product quality may vary owing to a number of factors, such as the inhomogeneous of the workpice material, the loading error, the lubrication, and etc. Presently, few seem able to predict the quality variation, not to mention what contribute to the quality variation. As a result, trial-and-error is still needed in the shop floor, causing additional cost and time delay. This paper introduces a new approach to predict the product quality variation and identify the sensitive design / process parameters. The new approach is based on a combination of inverse Finite Element Modeling (FEM) and Monte Carlo Simulation (more specifically, the Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) approach). With an acceptable accuracy, the inverse FEM (also called one-step FEM) requires much less computation load than that of the usual incremental FEM and hence, can be used to predict the quality variations under various conditions. LHS is a statistical method, through which the sensitivity analysis can be carried out. The result of the sensitivity analysis has clear physical meaning and can be used to optimize the die design and / or the process design. Two simulation examples are presented including drawing a rectangular box and drawing a two-step rectangular box.

  20. Evaluating the adequacy of maximum contaminant levels as health-protective cleanup goals: an analysis based on Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Finley, B L; Scott, P; Paustenbach, D J

    1993-12-01

    At many sites in the United States, health-based remediation goals for contaminated groundwater have been set at levels far below USEPA's drinking water standards (i.e., maximum contaminant levels or MCLs). This is due to the fact that, while the USEPA must often consider technical and economic factors (e.g., cost of compliance, risk/benefit analysis) when setting MCLs for public water systems, cleanup goals for contaminated groundwater are often based solely on conservative "point" estimates of exposure. One of the more recent refinements in the risk assessment process is the use of ranges of exposure estimates or "probability density functions" (PDFs), rather than fixed point estimates, to estimate exposure and chemical uptake. This approach provides a more thorough description of the range of potential risks, rather than a single "worst-case" value, and allows one to understand the conservatism inherent in assessments based on regulatory default parameters. This paper uses a number of PDFs and the Monte Carlo technique to assess whether the USEPA's MCLs for drinking water are sufficiently low to protect persons exposed to these levels. A case study involving daily exposure to tapwater containing MCL concentrations of tetrachloroethylene, chloroform, bromoform, and vinyl chloride is presented. Several direct and indirect exposure pathways are evaluated, including inhalation and dermal contact while showering, direct ingestion, and inhalation of emissions from household fixtures and appliances. PDFs for each exposure factor are based on the most recent and applicable data available. Our analysis indicates that the estimated increased cancer risks at the 50th and 95th percentile of exposure are within the range of increased cancer risks typically considered acceptable at Superfund sites (10(-4)-10(-6)). These results suggest that, at least for some chemicals, groundwater need not be cleaned-up to concentrations less than drinking water standards (i.e., MCLs) to

  1. Water and tissue equivalence of a new PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} formulation for 3D proton beam dosimetry: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Gorjiara, Tina; Kuncic, Zdenka; Doran, Simon; Adamovics, John; Baldock, Clive

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the water and tissue equivalence of a new PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} 3D dosimeter for proton therapy. Methods: The GEANT4 software toolkit was used to calculate and compare total dose delivered by a proton beam with mean energy 62 MeV in a PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} dosimeter, water, and soft tissue. The dose delivered by primary protons and secondary particles was calculated. Depth-dose profiles and isodose contours of deposited energy were compared for the materials of interest. Results: The proton beam range was found to be Almost-Equal-To 27 mm for PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, 29.9 mm for soft tissue, and 30.5 mm for water. This can be attributed to the lower collisional stopping power of water compared to soft tissue and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }. The difference between total dose delivered in PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} and total dose delivered in water or tissue is less than 2% across the entire water/tissue equivalent range of the proton beam. The largest difference between total dose in PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} and total dose in water is 1.4%, while for soft tissue it is 1.8%. In both cases, this occurs at the distal end of the beam. Nevertheless, the authors find that PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} dosimeter is overall more tissue-equivalent than water-equivalent before the Bragg peak. After the Bragg peak, the differences in the depth doses are found to be due to differences in primary proton energy deposition; PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} and soft tissue stop protons more rapidly than water. The dose delivered by secondary electrons in the PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} differs by less than 1% from that in soft tissue and water. The contribution of secondary particles to the total dose is less than 4% for electrons and Almost-Equal-To 1% for protons in all the materials of interest. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that the new PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} formula may be considered both a tissue- and water

  2. A Monte Carlo Investigation of the Analysis of Variance Applied to Non-Independent Bernoulli Variates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John F., Jr.

    The applicability of the Analysis of Variance, ANOVA, procedures to the analysis of dichotomous repeated measure data is described. The design models for which data were simulated in this investigation were chosen to represent simple cases of two experimental situations: situation one, in which subjects' responses to a single randomly selected set…

  3. BOOTSTRAPPING AND MONTE CARLO METHODS OF POWER ANALYSIS USED TO ESTABLISH CONDITION CATEGORIES FOR BIOTIC INDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic indices have been used ot assess biological condition by dividing index scores into condition categories. Historically the number of categories has been based on professional judgement. Alternatively, statistical methods such as power analysis can be used to determine the ...

  4. Monte Carlo Criticality Analysis of Simple Geometrics COntaining Tungsten Rhenium Alloys Engrained with Uranium Dioxide and Uranium Mononitride

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan A. Webb; Indrajit Charit

    2011-08-01

    The critical mass and dimensions of simple geometries containing highly enriched uraniumdioxide (UO2) and uraniummononitride (UN) encapsulated in tungsten-rhenium alloys are determined using MCNP5 criticality calculations. Spheres as well as cylinders with length to radius ratios of 1.82 are computationally built to consist of 60 vol.% fuel and 40 vol.% metal matrix. Within the geometries the uranium is enriched to 93 wt.% uranium-235 and the rhenium content within the metal alloy was modeled over a range of 0 to 30 at.%. The spheres containing UO2 were determined to have a critical radius of 18.29 cm to 19.11 cm and a critical mass ranging from 366 kg to 424 kg. The cylinders containing UO2 were found to have a critical radius ranging from 17.07 cm to 17.844 cm with a corresponding critical mass of 406 kg to 471 kg. Spheres engrained with UN were determined to have a critical radius ranging from 14.82 cm to 15.19 cm and a critical mass between 222 kg and 242 kg. Cylinders which were engrained with UN were determined to have a critical radius ranging from 13.811 cm to 14.155 cm with a corresponding critical mass of 245 kg to 267 kg. The critical geometries were also computationally submerged in a neutronaically infinite medium of fresh water to determine the effects of rhenium addition on criticality accidents due to water submersion. The monte carlo analysis demonstrated that rhenium addition of up to 30 at.% can reduce the excess reactivity due to water submersion by up to $5.07 for UO2 fueled cylinders, $3.87 for UO2 fueled spheres and approximately $3.00 for UN fueled spheres and cylinders.

  5. Factor Analysis with Ordinal Indicators: A Monte Carlo Study Comparing DWLS and ULS Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forero, Carlos G.; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2009-01-01

    Factor analysis models with ordinal indicators are often estimated using a 3-stage procedure where the last stage involves obtaining parameter estimates by least squares from the sample polychoric correlations. A simulation study involving 324 conditions (1,000 replications per condition) was performed to compare the performance of diagonally…

  6. A Comparison of Alternatives to Conducting Monte Carlo Analyses for Determining Parallel Analysis Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lautenschlager, Gary J.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures for implementing parallel analysis (PA) criteria in practice were compared, examining regression equation methods that can be used to estimate random data eigenvalues from known values of the sample size and number of variables. More internally accurate methods for determining PA criteria are presented. (SLD)

  7. Monte Carlo Algorithms for a Bayesian Analysis of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, Jeffrey B.; Eriksen, H. K.; ODwyer, I. J.; Wandelt, B. D.; Gorski, K.; Knox, L.; Chu, M.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the review of Bayesian approach to Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) analysis, numerical implementation with Gibbs sampling, a summary of application to WMAP I and work in progress with generalizations to polarization, foregrounds, asymmetric beams, and 1/f noise is given.

  8. Monte Carlo Analysis of Airport Throughput and Traffic Delays Using Self Separation Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Sturdy, James L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of three simulation studies of throughput and delay times of arrival and departure operations performed at non-towered, non-radar airports using self-separation procedures. The studies were conducted as part of the validation process of the Small Aircraft Transportation Systems Higher Volume Operations (SATS HVO) concept and include an analysis of the predicted airport capacity using with different traffic conditions and system constraints under increasing levels of demand. Results show that SATS HVO procedures can dramatically increase capacity at non-towered, non-radar airports and that the concept offers the potential for increasing capacity of the overall air transportation system.

  9. Quantum Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Fantoni, Riccardo; Moroni, Saverio

    2014-09-21

    We present a path integral Monte Carlo method which is the full quantum analogue of the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo method of Panagiotopoulos to study the gas-liquid coexistence line of a classical fluid. Unlike previous extensions of Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo to include quantum effects, our scheme is viable even for systems with strong quantum delocalization in the degenerate regime of temperature. This is demonstrated by an illustrative application to the gas-superfluid transition of {sup 4}He in two dimensions.

  10. Monte Carlo characterization of an ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Medich, David C; Tries, Mark A; Munro, John J

    2006-01-01

    An ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source, distinguished by an intensity-weighted average photon energy of 92.7 keV and a 32.015 +/- 0.009 day half-life, is characterized in terms of the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 specifications using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo computer code. In accordance with these specifications, the investigation included Monte Carlo simulations both in water and air with the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove low-energy photons below 10 keV. TG-43 dosimetric data including S(K), D(r, lamda), lambda, gL(r), F(r, lamda), phi an(r), and phi(an) were calculated and statistical uncertainties in these parameters were derived and calculated in the appendix.

  11. Wormhole Hamiltonian Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Shiwei; Streets, Jeffrey; Shahbaba, Babak

    2015-01-01

    In machine learning and statistics, probabilistic inference involving multimodal distributions is quite difficult. This is especially true in high dimensional problems, where most existing algorithms cannot easily move from one mode to another. To address this issue, we propose a novel Bayesian inference approach based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Our method can effectively sample from multimodal distributions, especially when the dimension is high and the modes are isolated. To this end, it exploits and modifies the Riemannian geometric properties of the target distribution to create wormholes connecting modes in order to facilitate moving between them. Further, our proposed method uses the regeneration technique in order to adapt the algorithm by identifying new modes and updating the network of wormholes without affecting the stationary distribution. To find new modes, as opposed to redis-covering those previously identified, we employ a novel mode searching algorithm that explores a residual energy function obtained by subtracting an approximate Gaussian mixture density (based on previously discovered modes) from the target density function. PMID:25861551

  12. Acoustic effects analysis utilizing speckle pattern with fixed-particle Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Ali; Hollmann, Joseph A.; Holt, R. Glynn; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging in a turbid medium is limited because of multiple scattering a photon undergoes while traveling through the medium. Therefore, optical imaging is unable to provide high resolution information deep in the medium. In the case of soft tissue, acoustic waves unlike light, can travel through the medium with negligible scattering. However, acoustic waves cannot provide medically relevant contrast as good as light. Hybrid solutions have been applied to use the benefits of both imaging methods. A focused acoustic wave generates a force inside an acoustically absorbing medium known as acoustic radiation force (ARF). ARF induces particle displacement within the medium. The amount of displacement is a function of mechanical properties of the medium and the applied force. To monitor the displacement induced by the ARF, speckle pattern analysis can be used. The speckle pattern is the result of interfering optical waves with different phases. As light travels through the medium, it undergoes several scattering events. Hence, it generates different scattering paths which depends on the location of the particles. Light waves that travel along these paths have different phases (different optical path lengths). ARF induces displacement to scatterers within the acoustic focal volume, and changes the optical path length. In addition, temperature rise due to conversion of absorbed acoustic energy to heat, changes the index of refraction and therefore, changes the optical path length of the scattering paths. The result is a change in the speckle pattern. Results suggest that the average change in the speckle pattern measures the displacement of particles and temperature rise within the acoustic wave focal area, hence can provide mechanical and thermal properties of the medium.

  13. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  14. SCALE Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Depletion with Parallel KENO in TRITON

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, Sedat; Bekar, Kursat B; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system is a powerful and robust tool for performing multigroup (MG) reactor physics analysis using either the 2-D deterministic solver NEWT or the 3-D Monte Carlo transport code KENO. However, as with all MG codes, the accuracy of the results depends on the accuracy of the MG cross sections that are generated and/or used. While SCALE resonance self-shielding modules provide rigorous resonance self-shielding, they are based on 1-D models and therefore 2-D or 3-D effects such as heterogeneity of the lattice structures may render final MG cross sections inaccurate. Another potential drawback to MG Monte Carlo depletion is the need to perform resonance self-shielding calculations at each depletion step for each fuel segment that is being depleted. The CPU time and memory required for self-shielding calculations can often eclipse the resources needed for the Monte Carlo transport. This summary presents the results of the new continuous-energy (CE) calculation mode in TRITON. With the new capability, accurate reactor physics analyses can be performed for all types of systems using the SCALE Monte Carlo code KENO as the CE transport solver. In addition, transport calculations can be performed in parallel mode on multiple processors.

  15. Efficiency enhancement of optimized Latin hypercube sampling strategies: Application to Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis and meta-modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Mohammad Mahdi; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Janssen, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The majority of literature regarding optimized Latin hypercube sampling (OLHS) is devoted to increasing the efficiency of these sampling strategies through the development of new algorithms based on the combination of innovative space-filling criteria and specialized optimization schemes. However, little attention has been given to the impact of the initial design that is fed into the optimization algorithm, on the efficiency of OLHS strategies. Previous studies, as well as codes developed for OLHS, have relied on one of the following two approaches for the selection of the initial design in OLHS: (1) the use of random points in the hypercube intervals (random LHS), and (2) the use of midpoints in the hypercube intervals (midpoint LHS). Both approaches have been extensively used, but no attempt has been previously made to compare the efficiency and robustness of their resulting sample designs. In this study we compare the two approaches and show that the space-filling characteristics of OLHS designs are sensitive to the initial design that is fed into the optimization algorithm. It is also illustrated that the space-filling characteristics of OLHS designs based on midpoint LHS are significantly better those based on random LHS. The two approaches are compared by incorporating their resulting sample designs in Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) for uncertainty propagation analysis, and then, by employing the sample designs in the selection of the training set for constructing non-intrusive polynomial chaos expansion (NIPCE) meta-models which subsequently replace the original full model in MCSs. The analysis is based on two case studies involving numerical simulation of density dependent flow and solute transport in porous media within the context of seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers. We show that the use of midpoint LHS as the initial design increases the efficiency and robustness of the resulting MCSs and NIPCE meta-models. The study also illustrates that this

  16. Behavioral Analysis of Visitors to a Medical Institution’s Website Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent with the “attention, interest, desire, memory, action” (AIDMA) model of consumer behavior, patients collect information about available medical institutions using the Internet to select information for their particular needs. Studies of consumer behavior may be found in areas other than medical institution websites. Such research uses Web access logs for visitor search behavior. At this time, research applying the patient searching behavior model to medical institution website visitors is lacking. Objective We have developed a hospital website search behavior model using a Bayesian approach to clarify the behavior of medical institution website visitors and determine the probability of their visits, classified by search keyword. Methods We used the website data access log of a clinic of internal medicine and gastroenterology in the Sapporo suburbs, collecting data from January 1 through June 31, 2011. The contents of the 6 website pages included the following: home, news, content introduction for medical examinations, mammography screening, holiday person-on-duty information, and other. The search keywords we identified as best expressing website visitor needs were listed as the top 4 headings from the access log: clinic name, clinic name + regional name, clinic name + medical examination, and mammography screening. Using the search keywords as the explaining variable, we built a binomial probit model that allows inspection of the contents of each purpose variable. Using this model, we determined a beta value and generated a posterior distribution. We performed the simulation using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods with a noninformation prior distribution for this model and determined the visit probability classified by keyword for each category. Results In the case of the keyword “clinic name,” the visit probability to the website, repeated visit to the website, and contents page for medical examination was positive. In the case of the

  17. CMB quadrupole depression produced by early fast-roll inflation: Monte Carlo Markov chains analysis of WMAP and SDSS data

    SciTech Connect

    Destri, C.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-07-15

    Generically, the classical evolution of the inflaton has a brief fast-roll stage that precedes the slow-roll regime. The fast-roll stage leads to a purely attractive potential in the wave equations of curvature and tensor perturbations (while the potential is purely repulsive in the slow-roll stage). This attractive potential leads to a depression of the CMB quadrupole moment for the curvature and B-mode angular power spectra. A single new parameter emerges in this way in the early universe model: the comoving wave number k{sub 1} characteristic scale of this attractive potential. This mode k{sub 1} happens to exit the horizon precisely at the transition from the fast-roll to the slow-roll stage. The fast-roll stage dynamically modifies the initial power spectrum by a transfer function D(k). We compute D(k) by solving the inflaton evolution equations. D(k) effectively suppresses the primordial power for kMonte Carlo Markov chain analysis of the WMAP and SDSS data including the fast-roll stage and find the value k{sub 1}=0.266 Gpc{sup -1}. The quadrupole mode k{sub Q}=0.242 Gpc{sup -1} exits the horizon earlier than k{sub 1}, about one-tenth of an e-fold before the end of fast roll. We compare the fast-roll fit with a fit without fast roll but including a sharp lower cutoff on the primordial power. Fast roll provides a slightly better fit than a sharp cutoff for the temperature-temperature, temperature-E modes, and E modes-E modes. Moreover, our fits provide nonzero lower bounds for r, while the values of the other cosmological parameters are essentially those of the pure {lambda}CDM model. We display the real space two point C{sup TT}({theta}) correlator. The fact that k{sub Q} exits the horizon before the slow-roll stage implies an upper bound in the total number of e-folds N{sub tot} during inflation. Combining this with estimates during the

  18. Predicting hourly air pollutant levels using artificial neural networks coupled with uncertainty analysis by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Arhami, Mohammad; Kamali, Nima; Rajabi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2013-07-01

    Recent progress in developing artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels has paved the way for reliable use of these models in the prediction of air pollutant concentrations in urban atmosphere. However, improvement of prediction performance, proper selection of input parameters and model architecture, and quantification of model uncertainties remain key challenges to their practical use. This study has three main objectives: to select an ensemble of input parameters for ANN metamodels consisting of meteorological variables that are predictable by conventional weather forecast models and variables that properly describe the complex nature of pollutant source conditions in a major city, to optimize the ANN models to achieve the most accurate hourly prediction for a case study (city of Tehran), and to examine a methodology to analyze uncertainties based on ANN and Monte Carlo simulations (MCS). In the current study, the ANNs were constructed to predict criteria pollutants of nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen monoxide (NO), ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 μm (PM10) in Tehran based on the data collected at a monitoring station in the densely populated central area of the city. The best combination of input variables was comprehensively investigated taking into account the predictability of meteorological input variables and the study of model performance, correlation coefficients, and spectral analysis. Among numerous meteorological variables, wind speed, air temperature, relative humidity and wind direction were chosen as input variables for the ANN models. The complex nature of pollutant source conditions was reflected through the use of hour of the day and month of the year as input variables and the development of different models for each day of the week. After that, ANN models were constructed and validated, and a methodology of computing prediction intervals (PI) and

  19. Predicting hourly air pollutant levels using artificial neural networks coupled with uncertainty analysis by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Arhami, Mohammad; Kamali, Nima; Rajabi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2013-07-01

    Recent progress in developing artificial neural network (ANN) metamodels has paved the way for reliable use of these models in the prediction of air pollutant concentrations in urban atmosphere. However, improvement of prediction performance, proper selection of input parameters and model architecture, and quantification of model uncertainties remain key challenges to their practical use. This study has three main objectives: to select an ensemble of input parameters for ANN metamodels consisting of meteorological variables that are predictable by conventional weather forecast models and variables that properly describe the complex nature of pollutant source conditions in a major city, to optimize the ANN models to achieve the most accurate hourly prediction for a case study (city of Tehran), and to examine a methodology to analyze uncertainties based on ANN and Monte Carlo simulations (MCS). In the current study, the ANNs were constructed to predict criteria pollutants of nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen monoxide (NO), ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 μm (PM10) in Tehran based on the data collected at a monitoring station in the densely populated central area of the city. The best combination of input variables was comprehensively investigated taking into account the predictability of meteorological input variables and the study of model performance, correlation coefficients, and spectral analysis. Among numerous meteorological variables, wind speed, air temperature, relative humidity and wind direction were chosen as input variables for the ANN models. The complex nature of pollutant source conditions was reflected through the use of hour of the day and month of the year as input variables and the development of different models for each day of the week. After that, ANN models were constructed and validated, and a methodology of computing prediction intervals (PI) and

  20. Neutron analysis of spent fuel storage installation using parallel computing and advance discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Daniel; Haghighat, Alireza

    2005-01-01

    In the United States, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 mandated centralised storage of spent nuclear fuel by 1988. However, the Yucca Mountain project is currently scheduled to start accepting spent nuclear fuel in 2010. Since many nuclear power plants were only designed for -10 y of spent fuel pool storage, > 35 plants have been forced into alternate means of spent fuel storage. In order to continue operation and make room in spent fuel pools, nuclear generators are turning towards independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). Typical vertical concrete ISFSIs are -6.1 m high and 3.3 m in diameter. The inherently large system, and the presence of thick concrete shields result in difficulties for both Monte Carlo (MC) and discrete ordinates (SN) calculations. MC calculations require significant variance reduction and multiple runs to obtain a detailed dose distribution. SN models need a large number of spatial meshes to accurately model the geometry and high quadrature orders to reduce ray effects, therefore, requiring significant amounts of computer memory and time. The use of various differencing schemes is needed to account for radial heterogeneity in material cross sections and densities. Two P3, S12, discrete ordinate, PENTRAN (parallel environment neutral-particle TRANsport) models were analysed and different MC models compared. A multigroup MCNP model was developed for direct comparison to the SN models. The biased A3MCNP (automated adjoint accelerated MCNP) and unbiased (MCNP) continuous energy MC models were developed to assess the adequacy of the CASK multigroup (22 neutron, 18 gamma) cross sections. The PENTRAN SN results are in close agreement (5%) with the multigroup MC results; however, they differ by -20-30% from the continuous-energy MC predictions. This large difference can be attributed to the expected difference between multigroup and continuous energy cross sections, and the fact that the CASK library is based on the old ENDF

  1. Neutron analysis of spent fuel storage installation using parallel computing and advance discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Daniel; Haghighat, Alireza

    2005-01-01

    In the United States, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 mandated centralised storage of spent nuclear fuel by 1988. However, the Yucca Mountain project is currently scheduled to start accepting spent nuclear fuel in 2010. Since many nuclear power plants were only designed for -10 y of spent fuel pool storage, > 35 plants have been forced into alternate means of spent fuel storage. In order to continue operation and make room in spent fuel pools, nuclear generators are turning towards independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). Typical vertical concrete ISFSIs are -6.1 m high and 3.3 m in diameter. The inherently large system, and the presence of thick concrete shields result in difficulties for both Monte Carlo (MC) and discrete ordinates (SN) calculations. MC calculations require significant variance reduction and multiple runs to obtain a detailed dose distribution. SN models need a large number of spatial meshes to accurately model the geometry and high quadrature orders to reduce ray effects, therefore, requiring significant amounts of computer memory and time. The use of various differencing schemes is needed to account for radial heterogeneity in material cross sections and densities. Two P3, S12, discrete ordinate, PENTRAN (parallel environment neutral-particle TRANsport) models were analysed and different MC models compared. A multigroup MCNP model was developed for direct comparison to the SN models. The biased A3MCNP (automated adjoint accelerated MCNP) and unbiased (MCNP) continuous energy MC models were developed to assess the adequacy of the CASK multigroup (22 neutron, 18 gamma) cross sections. The PENTRAN SN results are in close agreement (5%) with the multigroup MC results; however, they differ by -20-30% from the continuous-energy MC predictions. This large difference can be attributed to the expected difference between multigroup and continuous energy cross sections, and the fact that the CASK library is based on the old ENDF

  2. Monte Carlo analysis of a time-dependent neutron and secondary gamma-ray integral experiment on a thick concrete and steel shield

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.; Roussin, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    A Monte Carlo analysis of a time-dependent neutron and secondary gamma-ray integral experiment on a thick concrete and steel shield is presented. The energy range covered in the analysis is 15-2 MeV for neutron source energies. The multigroup MORSE code was used with the VITAMIN C 171-36 neutron-gamma-ray cross-section data set. Both neutron and gamma-ray count rates and unfolded energy spectra are presented and compared, with good general agreement, with experimental results.

  3. Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo for grey Implicit Monte Carlo simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, J. D.; Urbatsch, T. J.; Evans, T. M.; Buksas, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a hybrid transport-diffusion method for Monte Carlo simulations in diffusive media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Thus, DDMC produces accurate solutions while increasing the efficiency of the Monte Carlo calculation. In this paper, we extend previously developed DDMC techniques in several ways that improve the accuracy and utility of DDMC for grey Implicit Monte Carlo calculations. First, we employ a diffusion equation that is discretized in space but is continuous time. Not only is this methodology theoretically more accurate than temporally discretized DDMC techniques, but it also has the benefit that a particle's time is always known. Thus, there is no ambiguity regarding what time to assign a particle that leaves an optically thick region (where DDMC is used) and begins transporting by standard Monte Carlo in an optically thin region. In addition, we treat particles incident on an optically thick region using the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition. This interface technique can produce accurate solutions even if the incident particles are distributed anisotropically in angle. Finally, we develop a method for estimating radiation momentum deposition during the DDMC simulation. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our improved DDMC method.

  4. Analysis of ion mobility and diffusion in atmospheric gaseous mixtures from Monte Carlo simulation and macroscopic laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhenni, M.; Yousfi, M.; Bekstein, A.; Eichwald, O.; Merbahi, N.

    2006-11-01

    The reduced mobility and diffusion coefficients of N_{2}^{+} and O- are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation for the gas mixtures N2-H2O (50%, 50%) and O2-N2 (80%N2, 20%O2), respectively, from measured and calculated elastic and inelastic cross sections. These mobility and longitudinal diffusion coefficients have been compared with the standard Blanc's law and with the common mean energy (CME) procedure. Good agreement between these three calculation methods was found for the mobility and diffusion of N_{2}^{+} in the N2-H2O mixture at high reduced fields where inelastic processes are relatively uninfluential. However, a strong deviation between Blanc's law and both CME procedure and our Monte Carlo calculations for the reduced mobility and the diffusion coefficient of N_{2}^{+} in this gas mixture N2-H2O was observed at low reduced fields, because inelastic processes are significant. On the contrary, for the case of the N2-O2 mixture, where inelastic processes are small over the reduced electric field range 1-8000 Td, the three calculation methods led to similar results. The elastic collision cross sections used were determined from a semi-classical JWKB approximation by using a rigid core potential model for both symmetric N_{2}^{+}/N_{2} and asymmetric N_{2}^{+}/H_{2}O , O-/O2 and O-/N2 ion-neutral systems. Moreover, the inelastic cross sections were extended to low N_{2}^{+} energies from appropriate approximations. These cross section sets were validated from the good agreement between our Monte Carlo calculated N_{2}^{+} reduced mobilities in N2 and H2O, O- in O2 and N2 and either measured values for the systems N_{2}^{+}/N_{2} and O-/O2 or physical properties of the systems N_{2}^{+}/H_{2}O and O-/N2.

  5. VESTA 2.1.5 - Monte Carlo Depletion Interface Code; AURORA 1.0.0 - Depletion Analysis Tool.

    2013-03-21

    Version 01 RSICC is authorized to distribute VESTA 2.1.5 for research and education purposes only. Requesters from NEA Data Bank member countries are advised to order VESTA 2.1.5 from the NEA Data Bank. Non-commercial and non-profit users from other OECD member countries (specifically Canada and the United States) may order VESTA 2.1.5 from RSICC. Users from non-OECD member countries and all commercial requesters are advised to contact the IRSN. VESTA is a Monte Carlo depletionmore » interface code that is currently under development at IRSN (France). From its inception, VESTA is intended to be a “generic” interface code so that it will ultimately be capable of using any Monte-Carlo code or depletion module and that can be completely tailored to the user’s needs on practically all aspects of the code. For the current version, VESTA allows for the use of any version of MCNP(X) as the transport module and ORIGEN 2.2 or the built in PHOENIX module as the depletion module. A short overview of the main features of this version of the code is detailed in the Abstract.« less

  6. Exhaustive Metropolis Monte Carlo sampling and analysis of polyalanine conformations adopted under the influence of hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A; Wild, David L

    2005-10-01

    We propose a novel Metropolis Monte Carlo procedure for protein modeling and analyze the influence of hydrogen bonding on the distribution of polyalanine conformations. We use an atomistic model of the polyalanine chain with rigid and planar polypeptide bonds, and elastic alpha carbon valence geometry. We adopt a simplified energy function in which only hard-sphere repulsion and hydrogen bonding interactions between the atoms are considered. Our Metropolis Monte Carlo procedure utilizes local crankshaft moves and is combined with parallel tempering to exhaustively sample the conformations of 16-mer polyalanine. We confirm that Flory's isolated-pair hypothesis (the steric independence between the dihedral angles of individual amino acids) does not hold true in long polypeptide chains. In addition to 3(10)- and alpha-helices, we identify a kink stabilized by 2 hydrogen bonds with a shared acceptor as a common structural motif. Varying the strength of hydrogen bonds, we induce the helix-coil transition in the model polypeptide chain. We compare the propensities for various hydrogen bonding patterns and determine the degree of cooperativity of hydrogen bond formation in terms of the Hill coefficient. The observed helix-coil transition is also quantified according to Zimm-Bragg theory. PMID:16049911

  7. VESTA 2.1.5 - Monte Carlo Depletion Interface Code; AURORA 1.0.0 - Depletion Analysis Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    HAECK, WIM

    2013-03-21

    Version 01 RSICC is authorized to distribute VESTA 2.1.5 for research and education purposes only. Requesters from NEA Data Bank member countries are advised to order VESTA 2.1.5 from the NEA Data Bank. Non-commercial and non-profit users from other OECD member countries (specifically Canada and the United States) may order VESTA 2.1.5 from RSICC. Users from non-OECD member countries and all commercial requesters are advised to contact the IRSN. VESTA is a Monte Carlo depletion interface code that is currently under development at IRSN (France). From its inception, VESTA is intended to be a “generic” interface code so that it will ultimately be capable of using any Monte-Carlo code or depletion module and that can be completely tailored to the user’s needs on practically all aspects of the code. For the current version, VESTA allows for the use of any version of MCNP(X) as the transport module and ORIGEN 2.2 or the built in PHOENIX module as the depletion module. A short overview of the main features of this version of the code is detailed in the Abstract.

  8. Monte Carlo Shower Counter Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. David

    1991-01-01

    Activities and accomplishments related to the Monte Carlo shower counter studies are summarized. A tape of the VMS version of the GEANT software was obtained and installed on the central computer at Gallaudet University. Due to difficulties encountered in updating this VMS version, a decision was made to switch to the UNIX version of the package. This version was installed and used to generate the set of data files currently accessed by various analysis programs. The GEANT software was used to write files of data for positron and proton showers. Showers were simulated for a detector consisting of 50 alternating layers of lead and scintillator. Each file consisted of 1000 events at each of the following energies: 0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 10, 44, and 200 GeV. Data analysis activities related to clustering, chi square, and likelihood analyses are summarized. Source code for the GEANT user subprograms and data analysis programs are provided along with example data plots.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A.; Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  10. Predictive uncertainty analysis of a highly heterogeneous field-scale groundwater model using null-space Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D.; Yoon, H.; McKenna, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of prediction uncertainty resulting from estimated parameters is critical to provide accurate predictive models for field-scale groundwater flow and transport problems. We examine and compare two approaches to defining predictive uncertainty where both approaches utilize pilot points to parameterize spatially heterogeneous fields. The first approach is the independent calibration of multiple initial "seed" fields created through geostatistical simulation and conditioned to observation data, resulting in an ensemble of calibrated property fields that defines uncertainty in the calibrated parameters. The second approach is the null-space Monte Carlo (NSMC) method that employs a decomposition of the Jacobian matrix from a single calibration to define a minimum number of linear combinations of parameters that account for the majority of the sensitivity of the overall calibration to the observed data. Random vectors are applied to the remaining linear combinations of parameters, the null space, to create an ensemble of fields, each of which remains calibrated to the data. We compare these two approaches using a highly-parameterized groundwater model of the Culebra dolomite in southeastern New Mexico. Observation data include two decades of steady-state head measurements and pumping test results. The predictive performance measure is advective travel time from a point to a prescribed boundary. Calibrated parameters at a set of pilot points include transmissivity, the horizontal hydraulic anisotropy, the storativity, and a section of recharge (> 1200 parameters in total). First, we calibrate 200 multiple random seed fields generated through geostatistical simulation conditioned to observation data. The 11 fields that contain the best and worst scenarios in terms of calibration and travel time analysis among the best 100 calibrated results provide a basis for the NSMC method. The NSMC method is used to generate 200 calibration-constrained parameter fields

  11. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  12. Applications of Maxent to quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.; Sivia, D.S.; Gubernatis, J.E. ); Jarrell, M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    We consider the application of maximum entropy methods to the analysis of data produced by computer simulations. The focus is the calculation of the dynamical properties of quantum many-body systems by Monte Carlo methods, which is termed the Analytical Continuation Problem.'' For the Anderson model of dilute magnetic impurities in metals, we obtain spectral functions and transport coefficients which obey Kondo Universality.'' 24 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Prediction of time to growth of Listeria monocytogenes using Monte Carlo simulation or regression analysis, influenced by sublethal heat and recovery conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Marina; Guevara, Leymaya; Palop, Alfredo; Fernández, Pablo S

    2010-06-01

    Stochastic models, including the variability in extent and probability of microbial growth, are useful for estimating the risk of foodborne illness (i.e. Nauta, 2000). Risk assessment typically has to embrace all sources of variability. In this paper, a stochastic approach to evaluate growth of heat damaged Listeria monocytogenes cells influenced by different stresses (pH and presence of eugenol) was performed, using an individual-based approach of growth through OD measurements. Both the lag phase duration and the "work to be done" (h(0) parameter) were derived from the growth curves obtained. From results obtained histograms of the lag phase were generated and distributions were fitted. Histograms showed a shift to longer lag phases and an increase in variability with high stress levels. Using the distributions fitted, predictions of time to unacceptable growth (10(2) cfu/g) of L. monocytogenes were established by Monte Carlo simulation and they were compared with results from statistical methods. It was evidenced that both methods (Monte Carlo and regression analysis) gave a good indication of the probability of a certain level of growth other than the average. Tornado plots were obtained to establish a sensitivity analysis of the influence of the conditions tested (heat, pH, eugenol) applied to the microorganism and their combinations.

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of exospheric bodies - Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. R.; Broadfoot, A. L.; Wallace, L.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study the interaction with the surface, a Monte Carlo program is developed to determine the distribution with altitude as well as the global distribution of density at the surface in a single operation. The analysis presented shows that the appropriate source distribution should be Maxwell-Boltzmann flux if the particles in the distribution are to be treated as components of flux. Monte Carlo calculations with a Maxwell-Boltzmann flux source are compared with Mariner 10 UV spectrometer data. Results indicate that the presently operating models are not capable of fitting the observed Mercury exosphere. It is suggested that an atmosphere calculated with a barometric source distribution is suitable for more realistic future exospheric models.

  15. Performance analysis of short-range NLOS UV communication system using Monte Carlo simulation based on measured channel parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pengfei; Zhang, Min; Han, Dahai; Li, Qing

    2012-10-01

    The research presented in this paper is a performance study of short-range NLOS ultraviolet (UV) communication system, using a Monte-Carlo-based system-level model, in which the channel parameters, such as the path loss and the background noise are experimentally measured using an outdoor UV communication test-bed. Various transceiver geometry and background noise condition are considered. Furthermore, 4 modulation schemes are compared, which provides an insight into the performance prediction and the system trade-offs among the path loss, the optical power, the distance, the link geometry, the bit rate and the bit error rate. Finally, advices are given on UV system design and performance improvement.

  16. A Monte Carlo based lookup table for spectrum analysis of turbid media in the reflectance probe regime

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Wen; Xiewei Zhong; Tingting Yu; Dan Zhu

    2014-07-31

    Fibre-optic diffuse reflectance spectroscopy offers a method for characterising phantoms of biotissue with specified optical properties. For a commercial reflectance probe (six source fibres surrounding a central collection fibre with an inter-fibre spacing of 480 μm; R400-7, Ocean Optics, USA) we have constructed a Monte Carlo based lookup table to create a function called getR(μ{sub a}, μ'{sub s}), where μ{sub a} is the absorption coefficient and μ'{sub s} is the reduced scattering coefficient. Experimental measurements of reflectance from homogeneous calibrated phantoms with given optical properties are compared with the predicted reflectance from the lookup table. The deviation between experiment and prediction is on average 12.1%. (laser biophotonics)

  17. Multilevel sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    DOE PAGES

    Beskos, Alexandros; Jasra, Ajay; Law, Kody; Tempone, Raul; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-24

    Here, we study the approximation of expectations w.r.t. probability distributions associated to the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs); this scenario appears routinely in Bayesian inverse problems. In practice, one often has to solve the associated PDE numerically, using, for instance finite element methods and leading to a discretisation bias, with the step-size level hL. In addition, the expectation cannot be computed analytically and one often resorts to Monte Carlo methods. In the context of this problem, it is known that the introduction of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method can reduce the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error. This is achieved via a telescoping identity associated to a Monte Carlo approximation of a sequence of probability distributions with discretisation levelsmore » $${\\infty}$$ >h0>h1 ...>hL. In many practical problems of interest, one cannot achieve an i.i.d. sampling of the associated sequence of probability distributions. A sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) version of the MLMC method is introduced to deal with this problem. In conclusion, it is shown that under appropriate assumptions, the attractive property of a reduction of the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error, can be maintained within the SMC context.« less

  18. Monte Carlo calculations of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear many-body calculations have the complication of strong spin- and isospin-dependent potentials. In these lectures the author discusses the variational and Green`s function Monte Carlo techniques that have been developed to address this complication, and presents a few results.

  19. Combinatorial geometry domain decomposition strategies for Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Deng, L.; Mo, Z.; Liu, Z.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Li, S.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis and modeling of nuclear reactors can lead to memory overload for a single core processor when it comes to refined modeling. A method to solve this problem is called 'domain decomposition'. In the current work, domain decomposition algorithms for a combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code are developed on the JCOGIN (J Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo transport INfrastructure). Tree-based decomposition and asynchronous communication of particle information between domains are described in the paper. Combination of domain decomposition and domain replication (particle parallelism) is demonstrated and compared with that of MERCURY code. A full-core reactor model is simulated to verify the domain decomposition algorithms using the Monte Carlo particle transport code JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport Code), which has being developed on the JCOGIN infrastructure. Besides, influences of the domain decomposition algorithms to tally variances are discussed. (authors)

  20. Enhancements in Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Capabilities in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B; Celik, Cihangir; Wiarda, Dorothea; Peplow, Douglas E.; Rearden, Bradley T; Dunn, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo tools in SCALE are commonly used in criticality safety calculations as well as sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, depletion, and criticality alarm system analyses. Recent improvements in the continuous-energy data generated by the AMPX code system and significant advancements in the continuous-energy treatment in the KENO Monte Carlo eigenvalue codes facilitate the use of SCALE Monte Carlo codes to model geometrically complex systems with enhanced solution fidelity. The addition of continuous-energy treatment to the SCALE Monaco code, which can be used with automatic variance reduction in the hybrid MAVRIC sequence, provides significant enhancements, especially for criticality alarm system modeling. This paper describes some of the advancements in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes within the SCALE code system.

  1. Monte Carlo verification of polymer gel dosimetry applied to radionuclide therapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gear, J. I.; Charles-Edwards, E.; Partridge, M.; Flux, G. D.

    2011-11-01

    This study evaluates the dosimetric performance of the polymer gel dosimeter 'Methacrylic and Ascorbic acid in Gelatin, initiated by Copper' and its suitability for quality assurance and analysis of I-131-targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry. Four batches of gel were manufactured in-house and sets of calibration vials and phantoms were created containing different concentrations of I-131-doped gel. Multiple dose measurements were made up to 700 h post preparation and compared to equivalent Monte Carlo simulations. In addition to uniformly filled phantoms the cross-dose distribution from a hot insert to a surrounding phantom was measured. In this example comparisons were made with both Monte Carlo and a clinical scintigraphic dosimetry method. Dose-response curves generated from the calibration data followed a sigmoid function. The gels appeared to be stable over many weeks of internal irradiation with a delay in gel response observed at 29 h post preparation. This was attributed to chemical inhibitors and slow reaction rates of long-chain radical species. For this reason, phantom measurements were only made after 190 h of irradiation. For uniformly filled phantoms of I-131 the accuracy of dose measurements agreed to within 10% when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. A radial cross-dose distribution measured using the gel dosimeter compared well to that calculated with Monte Carlo. Small inhomogeneities were observed in the dosimeter attributed to non-uniform mixing of monomer during preparation. However, they were not detrimental to this study where the quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution of polymer gel dosimetry were far superior to that calculated using scintigraphy. The difference between Monte Carlo and gel measurements was of the order of a few cGy, whilst with the scintigraphic method differences of up to 8 Gy were observed. A manipulation technique is also presented which allows 3D scintigraphic dosimetry measurements to be compared to polymer

  2. Development of Monte Carlo Capability for Orion Parachute Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Parachute test programs employ Monte Carlo simulation techniques to plan testing and make critical decisions related to parachute loads, rate-of-descent, or other parameters. This paper describes the development and use of a MATLAB-based Monte Carlo tool for three parachute drop test simulations currently used by NASA. The Decelerator System Simulation (DSS) is a legacy 6 Degree-of-Freedom (DOF) simulation used to predict parachute loads and descent trajectories. The Decelerator System Simulation Application (DSSA) is a 6-DOF simulation that is well suited for modeling aircraft extraction and descent of pallet-like test vehicles. The Drop Test Vehicle Simulation (DTVSim) is a 2-DOF trajectory simulation that is convenient for quick turn-around analysis tasks. These three tools have significantly different software architectures and do not share common input files or output data structures. Separate Monte Carlo tools were initially developed for each simulation. A recently-developed simulation output structure enables the use of the more sophisticated DSSA Monte Carlo tool with any of the core-simulations. The task of configuring the inputs for the nominal simulation is left to the existing tools. Once the nominal simulation is configured, the Monte Carlo tool perturbs the input set according to dispersion rules created by the analyst. These rules define the statistical distribution and parameters to be applied to each simulation input. Individual dispersed parameters are combined to create a dispersed set of simulation inputs. The Monte Carlo tool repeatedly executes the core-simulation with the dispersed inputs and stores the results for analysis. The analyst may define conditions on one or more output parameters at which to collect data slices. The tool provides a versatile interface for reviewing output of large Monte Carlo data sets while preserving the capability for detailed examination of individual dispersed trajectories. The Monte Carlo tool described in

  3. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO MULTIPLE RADIATION SCATTERING IN RANDOM MEDIA: Estimate of the melanin content in human hairs by the inverse Monte-Carlo method using a system for digital image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, Elina A.; Kochubei, V. I.; Tuchin, Valerii V.

    2006-12-01

    Based on the digital image analysis and inverse Monte-Carlo method, the proximate analysis method is deve-loped and the optical properties of hairs of different types are estimated in three spectral ranges corresponding to three colour components. The scattering and absorption properties of hairs are separated for the first time by using the inverse Monte-Carlo method. The content of different types of melanin in hairs is estimated from the absorption coefficient. It is shown that the dominating type of melanin in dark hairs is eumelanin, whereas in light hairs pheomelanin dominates.

  4. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. The Impact of Measurement Error in the Analysis of Log-Linear Rate Models: Monte Carlo Findings. Part III, Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Glenn R.; And Others

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. The chapter advocates the analysis of event-histories (data giving the number, timing, and sequence of changes in a categorical dependent variable) with maximum likelihood estimators (MLE) applied to log-linear rate models. Results from a Monte Carlo investigation of the impact…

  5. Integrated Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of primordial non-Gaussianity (f{sub NL}) in the recent CMB data

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung

    2011-04-01

    We have made a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of primordial non-Gaussianity (f{sub NL}) using the WMAP bispectrum and power spectrum. In our analysis, we have simultaneously constrained f{sub NL} and cosmological parameters so that the uncertainties of cosmological parameters can properly propagate into the f{sub NL} estimation. Investigating the parameter likelihoods deduced from MCMC samples, we find slight deviation from Gaussian shape, which makes a Fisher matrix estimation less accurate. Therefore, we have estimated the confidence interval of f{sub NL} by exploring the parameter likelihood without using the Fisher matrix. We find that the best-fit values of our analysis make a good agreement with other results, but the confidence interval is slightly different.

  6. DS86 neutron dose: Monte Carlo analysis for depth profile of 152Eu activity in a large stone sample.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Iwatani, K; Oka, T; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Imanaka, T; Takada, J; Fujita, S; Hasai, H

    1999-06-01

    The depth profile of 152Eu activity induced in a large granite stone pillar by Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons was calculated by a Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). The pillar was on the Motoyasu Bridge, located at a distance of 132 m (WSW) from the hypocenter. It was a square column with a horizontal sectional size of 82.5 cm x 82.5 cm and height of 179 cm. Twenty-one cells from the north to south surface at the central height of the column were specified for the calculation and 152Eu activities for each cell were calculated. The incident neutron spectrum was assumed to be the angular fluence data of the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). The angular dependence of the spectrum was taken into account by dividing the whole solid angle into twenty-six directions. The calculated depth profile of specific activity did not agree with the measured profile. A discrepancy was found in the absolute values at each depth with a mean multiplication factor of 0.58 and also in the shape of the relative profile. The results indicated that a reassessment of the neutron energy spectrum in DS86 is required for correct dose estimation.

  7. A Monte Carlo Analysis of Weight Data from UF6 Cylinder Feed and Withdrawal Stations

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, James R; Whitaker, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    As the number of nuclear facilities handling uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders (e.g., UF6 production, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) increase in number and throughput, more automated safeguards measures will likely be needed to enable the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to achieve its safeguards objectives in a fiscally constrained environment. Monitoring the process data from the load cells built into the cylinder feed and withdrawal (F/W) stations (i.e., cylinder weight data) can significantly increase the IAEA’s ability to efficiently achieve the fundamental safeguards task of confirming operations as declared (i.e., no undeclared activities). Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Joint Research Center (in Ispra, Italy), and University of Glasgow are investigating how this weight data can be used for IAEA safeguards purposes while fully protecting the operator’s proprietary and sensitive information related to operations. A key question that must be resolved is, what is the necessary frequency of recording data from the process F/W stations to achieve safeguards objectives? This paper summarizes Monte Carlo simulations of typical feed, product, and tails withdrawal cycles and evaluates longer sampling frequencies to determine the expected errors caused by low-frequency sampling and its impact on material balance calculations.

  8. Neutron streaming through a slit and duct in concrete shields and comparison with a Monte Carlo analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki, H.; Hideshi, F.; Masatsugu, A.; Shigehiro, A.; Yoshiaki, O.

    1983-08-01

    A series of measurements of about14-MeV deuterium-tritium neutrons streaming through a slit and a duct in concrete shields has been carried out using a Cockcroft-Walton-type neutron generator. Measured neutron energy spectra are compared with calculations in six configurations of the shields. The configurations are the simplified geometries of streaming paths of tokamak reactors, such as a divertor throat and a neutral beam injection port. The measured data were obtained with an NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma-ray pulse height data and using a spectral unfolding code to convert these data to energy spectra. The experiments were analyzed by a Monte Carlo code. The calculated neutron energy spectra slightly underestimate the measured data, especially in the range of 6 to 8 MeV. The agreement between the calculated and measured integral flux above 2.2 MeV ranges from 87.5 to 72.% depending on the configurations.

  9. A Monte Carlo simulator for noise analysis of avalanche photodiode pixels in low-light image sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resetar, Tomislav; Süss, Andreas; Vermandere, Elke; Karpiak, Bogdan; Puers, Robert; Van Hoof, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Noise performance of avalanche photodiodes in light detection is typically described by the excessive noise factor, taking into account only the increase of the variance of the output electron count distribution with respect to the input. This approach is attractive since the excessive noise factor, together with the avalanche gain, can easily be included into the signal-to-noise ratio expression of the complete detection chain. For low-light applications down to single-photon counting, that description is typically not sufficient since one is also interested in the higher moments of the output distribution. Analytical derivation of the output electron count distributions of avalanche photodiodes is typically possible only for very simple electric field profile approximations, which is often not a sufficient description of reality. This work presents a Monte Carlo simulator for numerical prediction of the output distribution that can be applied to any arbitrary electric field profile as well as any light absorption profile and therefore serve as a useful tool for device design and optimization. Comparison with the standard McIntyre theory is provided for a constant field profile showing good agreement. Furthermore, the presented method is used to predict the avalanche noise performance of the recently presented pinned avalanche photodiode pixel (PAPD) with the electric field profile extracted from a finite-element simulation. The pixel is aiming for improvements in high-speed and low-light level image detection in minimally-modified CMOS image sensor technology.

  10. Monte Carlo model for the analysis and development of III-V Tunnel-FETs and Impact Ionization-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbo, V.; Mateos, J.; González, T.; Lechaux, Y.; Wichmann, N.; Bollaert, S.; Vasallo, B. G.

    2015-10-01

    Impact-ionization metal-oxide-semiconductor FETs (I-MOSFETs) are in competition with tunnel FETs (TFETs) in order to achieve the best behaviour for low power logic circuits. Concretely, III-V I-MOSFETs are being explored as promising devices due to the proper reliability, since the impact ionization events happen away from the gate oxide, and the high cutoff frequency, due to high electron mobility. To facilitate the design process from the physical point of view, a Monte Carlo (MC) model which includes both impact ionization and band-to-band tunnel is presented. Two ungated InGaAs and InAlAs/InGaAs 100 nm PIN diodes have been simulated. In both devices, the tunnel processes are more frequent than impact ionizations, so that they are found to be appropriate for TFET structures and not for I- MOSFETs. According to our simulations, other narrow bandgap candidates for the III-V heterostructure, such as InAs or GaSb, and/or PININ structures must be considered for a correct I-MOSFET design.

  11. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Koonin, S.E.; Dean, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of {gamma}-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs.

  12. Monte Carlo methods in ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1997-06-24

    Monte Carlo methods appropriate to simulate the transport of x-rays, neutrons, ion and electrons in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets are described and analyzed. The Implicit Monte Carlo method of x-ray transport handles symmetry within indirect drive ICF hohlraums well, but can be improved 50X in efficiency by angular biasing the x-rays towards the fuel capsule. Accurate simulation of thermonuclear burns nd burn diagnostics involves detailed particle source spectra, charged particle ranges, inflight reaction kinematics, corrections for bulk and thermal Doppler effects and variance reduction to obtain adequate statistics for rare events. It is found that the effects of angular Coulomb scattering must be included in models of charged particle transport through heterogeneous materials.

  13. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent cycle 3. Appendix D: GRTLS six degree of freedom Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montez, M. N.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a six degree of freedom (6-DOF) nonlinear Monte Carlo dispersion analysis for the latest glide return to landing site (GRTLS) abort trajectory for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight are presented. For this GRTLS, the number two main engine fails at 262.5 seconds ground elapsed time. Fifty randomly selected simulations, initialized at external tank separation, are analyzed. The initial covariance matrix is a 20 x 20 matrix and includes navigation errors and dispersions in position and velocity, time, accelerometer bias, and inertial platform misalinements. In all 50 samples, speedbrake, rudder, elevon, and body flap hinge moments are acceptable. Transitions to autoland begin before 9,000 feet and there are no tailscrapes. Navigation derived dynamic pressure accuracies exceed the flight control system constraints above Mach 2.5. Three out of 50 landings exceeded tire specification limit speed of 222 knots. Pilot manual landings are expected to reduce landing speed by landing farther downrange.

  14. A Monte Carlo Sensitivity Analysis of CF2 and CF Radical Densities in a c-C4F8 Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Rauf, Shahid; Hash, D. B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    A Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis is used to build a plasma chemistry model for octacyclofluorobutane (c-C4F8) which is commonly used in dielectric etch. Experimental data are used both quantitatively and quantitatively to analyze the gas phase and gas surface reactions for neutral radical chemistry. The sensitivity data of the resulting model identifies a few critical gas phase and surface aided reactions that account for most of the uncertainty in the CF2 and CF radical densities. Electron impact dissociation of small radicals (CF2 and CF) and their surface recombination reactions are found to be the rate-limiting steps in the neutral radical chemistry. The relative rates for these electron impact dissociation and surface recombination reactions are also suggested. The resulting mechanism is able to explain the measurements of CF2 and CF densities available in the literature and also their hollow spatial density profiles.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of kagome lattices with magnetic dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumer, Martin; Holden, Mark; Way, Andrew; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Southern, Byron

    Monte Carlo simulations of classical spins on the two-dimensional kagome lattice with only dipolar interactions are presented. In addition to revealing the sixfold-degenerate ground state, the nature of the finite-temperature phase transition to long-range magnetic order is discussed. Low-temperature states consisting of mixtures of degenerate ground-state configurations separated by domain walls can be explained as a result of competing exchange-like and shape-anisotropy-like terms in the dipolar coupling. Fluctuations between pairs of degenerate spin configurations are found to persist well into the ordered state as the temperature is lowered until locking in to a low-energy state. Results suggest that the system undergoes a continuous phase transition at T ~ 0 . 43 in agreement with previous MC simulations but the nature of the ordering process differs. Preliminary results which extend this analysis to the 3D fcc ABC-stacked kagome systems will be presented.

  16. Three dimensional Monte-Carlo modeling of laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N A; Kim, B M; London, R A; Trauner, K B

    1999-03-12

    A full three dimensional Monte-Carlo program was developed for analysis of the laser-tissue interactions. This project was performed as a part of the LATIS3D (3-D Laser-Tissue interaction) project. The accuracy was verified against results from a public domain two dimensional axisymmetric program. The code was used for simulation of light transport in simplified human knee geometry. Using the real human knee meshes which will be extracted from MRI images in the near future, a full analysis of dosimetry and surgical strategies for photodynamic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis will be followed.

  17. Finding starting points for Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of genetic data from large and complex pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqun; Lin, Shili

    2003-07-01

    Genetic data from founder populations are advantageous for studies of complex traits that are often plagued by the problem of genetic heterogeneity. However, the desire to analyze large and complex pedigrees that often arise from such populations, coupled with the need to handle many linked and highly polymorphic loci simultaneously, poses challenges to current standard approaches. A viable alternative to solving such problems is via Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedures, where a Markov chain, defined on the state space of a latent variable (e.g., genotypic configuration or inheritance vector), is constructed. However, finding starting points for the Markov chains is a difficult problem when the pedigree is not single-locus peelable; methods proposed in the literature have not yielded completely satisfactory solutions. We propose a generalization of the heated Gibbs sampler with relaxed penetrances (HGRP) of Lin et al., ([1993] IMA J. Math. Appl. Med. Biol. 10:1-17) to search for starting points. HGRP guarantees that a starting point will be found if there is no error in the data, but the chain usually needs to be run for a long time if the pedigree is extremely large and complex. By introducing a forcing step, the current algorithm substantially reduces the state space, and hence effectively speeds up the process of finding a starting point. Our algorithm also has a built-in preprocessing procedure for Mendelian error detection. The algorithm has been applied to both simulated and real data on two large and complex Hutterite pedigrees under many settings, and good results are obtained. The algorithm has been implemented in a user-friendly package called START. PMID:12813723

  18. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  19. A Comparison of Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain and Maximum Likelihood Estimation Methods for the Statistical Analysis of Geodetic Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, G.; Teferle, F. N.

    2013-12-01

    Geodetic time series provide information which helps to constrain theoretical models of geophysical processes. It is well established that such time series, for example from GPS, superconducting gravity or mean sea level (MSL), contain time-correlated noise which is usually assumed to be a combination of a long-term stochastic process (characterized by a power-law spectrum) and random noise. Therefore, when fitting a model to geodetic time series it is essential to also estimate the stochastic parameters beside the deterministic ones. Often the stochastic parameters include the power amplitudes of both time-correlated and random noise, as well as, the spectral index of the power-law process. To date, the most widely used method for obtaining these parameter estimates is based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). We present an integration method, the Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) method, which, by using Markov chains, provides a sample of the posteriori distribution of all parameters and, thereby, using Monte Carlo integration, all parameters and their uncertainties are estimated simultaneously. This algorithm automatically optimizes the Markov chain step size and estimates the convergence state by spectral analysis of the chain. We assess the MCMC method through comparison with MLE, using the recently released GPS position time series from JPL and apply it also to the MSL time series from the Revised Local Reference data base of the PSMSL. Although the parameter estimates for both methods are fairly equivalent, they suggest that the MCMC method has some advantages over MLE, for example, without further computations it provides the spectral index uncertainty, is computationally stable and detects multimodality.

  20. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy/Monte Carlo simulation approach for the non-destructive analysis of corrosion patina-bearing alloys in archaeological bronzes: The case of the bowl from the Fareleira 3 site (Vidigueira, South Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottaini, C.; Mirão, J.; Figuereido, M.; Candeias, A.; Brunetti, A.; Schiavon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-known technique for non-destructive and in situ analysis of archaeological artifacts both in terms of the qualitative and quantitative elemental composition because of its rapidity and non-destructiveness. In this study EDXRF and realistic Monte Carlo simulation using the X-ray Monte Carlo (XRMC) code package have been combined to characterize a Cu-based bowl from the Iron Age burial from Fareleira 3 (Southern Portugal). The artifact displays a multilayered structure made up of three distinct layers: a) alloy substrate; b) green oxidized corrosion patina; and c) brownish carbonate soil-derived crust. To assess the reliability of Monte Carlo simulation in reproducing the composition of the bulk metal of the objects without recurring to potentially damaging patina's and crust's removal, portable EDXRF analysis was performed on cleaned and patina/crust coated areas of the artifact. Patina has been characterized by micro X-ray Diffractometry (μXRD) and Back-Scattered Scanning Electron Microscopy + Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (BSEM + EDS). Results indicate that the EDXRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + crust surface coating is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample.

  1. Present status of vectorized Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    Monte Carlo applications have traditionally been limited by the large amounts of computer time required to produce acceptably small statistical uncertainties, so the immediate benefit of vectorization is an increase in either the number of jobs completed or the number of particles processed per job, typically by one order of magnitude or more. This results directly in improved engineering design analyses, since Monte Carlo methods are used as standards for correcting more approximate methods. The relatively small number of vectorized programs is a consequence of the newness of vectorized Monte Carlo, the difficulties of nonportability, and the very large development effort required to rewrite or restructure Monte Carlo codes for vectorization. Based on the successful efforts to date, it may be concluded that Monte Carlo vectorization will spread to increasing numbers of codes and applications. The possibility of multitasking provides even further motivation for vectorizing Monte Carlo, since the step from vector to multitasked vector is relatively straightforward.

  2. Benchmarking of Proton Transport in Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfeng; Li, Gui; Song, Jing; Zheng, Huaqing; Sun, Guangyao; Hao, Lijuan; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been traditionally applied in nuclear design and analysis due to its capability of dealing with complicated geometries and multi-dimensional physics problems as well as obtaining accurate results. The Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC) is developed by FDS Team in China for fusion, fission, and other nuclear applications. The simulations of radiation transport, isotope burn-up, material activation, radiation dose, and biology damage could be performed using SuperMC. Complicated geometries and the whole physical process of various types of particles in broad energy scale can be well handled. Bi-directional automatic conversion between general CAD models and full-formed input files of SuperMC is supported by MCAM, which is a CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for neutronics and radiation transport simulation. Mixed visualization of dynamical 3D dataset and geometry model is supported by RVIS, which is a nuclear radiation virtual simulation and assessment system. Continuous-energy cross section data from hybrid evaluated nuclear data library HENDL are utilized to support simulation. Neutronic fixed source and critical design parameters calculates for reactors of complex geometry and material distribution based on the transport of neutron and photon have been achieved in our former version of SuperMC. Recently, the proton transport has also been intergrated in SuperMC in the energy region up to 10 GeV. The physical processes considered for proton transport include electromagnetic processes and hadronic processes. The electromagnetic processes include ionization, multiple scattering, bremsstrahlung, and pair production processes. Public evaluated data from HENDL are used in some electromagnetic processes. In hadronic physics, the Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with exitons, preequilibrium model, nucleus explosion model, fission model, and evaporation model are incorporated to treat the intermediate energy nuclear

  3. Multidimensional stochastic approximation Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zablotskiy, Sergey V; Ivanov, Victor A; Paul, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) has been established as a mathematically founded powerful flat-histogram Monte Carlo method, used to determine the density of states, g(E), of a model system. We show here how it can be generalized for the determination of multidimensional probability distributions (or equivalently densities of states) of macroscopic or mesoscopic variables defined on the space of microstates of a statistical mechanical system. This establishes this method as a systematic way for coarse graining a model system, or, in other words, for performing a renormalization group step on a model. We discuss the formulation of the Kadanoff block spin transformation and the coarse-graining procedure for polymer models in this language. We also apply it to a standard case in the literature of two-dimensional densities of states, where two competing energetic effects are present g(E_{1},E_{2}). We show when and why care has to be exercised when obtaining the microcanonical density of states g(E_{1}+E_{2}) from g(E_{1},E_{2}). PMID:27415383

  4. Multidimensional stochastic approximation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskiy, Sergey V.; Ivanov, Victor A.; Paul, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) has been established as a mathematically founded powerful flat-histogram Monte Carlo method, used to determine the density of states, g (E ) , of a model system. We show here how it can be generalized for the determination of multidimensional probability distributions (or equivalently densities of states) of macroscopic or mesoscopic variables defined on the space of microstates of a statistical mechanical system. This establishes this method as a systematic way for coarse graining a model system, or, in other words, for performing a renormalization group step on a model. We discuss the formulation of the Kadanoff block spin transformation and the coarse-graining procedure for polymer models in this language. We also apply it to a standard case in the literature of two-dimensional densities of states, where two competing energetic effects are present g (E1,E2) . We show when and why care has to be exercised when obtaining the microcanonical density of states g (E1+E2) from g (E1,E2) .

  5. Monte Carlo surface flux tallies

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A

    2010-11-19

    Particle fluxes on surfaces are difficult to calculate with Monte Carlo codes because the score requires a division by the surface-crossing angle cosine, and grazing angles lead to inaccuracies. We revisit the standard practice of dividing by half of a cosine 'cutoff' for particles whose surface-crossing cosines are below the cutoff. The theory behind this approximation is sound, but the application of the theory to all possible situations does not account for two implicit assumptions: (1) the grazing band must be symmetric about 0, and (2) a single linear expansion for the angular flux must be applied in the entire grazing band. These assumptions are violated in common circumstances; for example, for separate in-going and out-going flux tallies on internal surfaces, and for out-going flux tallies on external surfaces. In some situations, dividing by two-thirds of the cosine cutoff is more appropriate. If users were able to control both the cosine cutoff and the substitute value, they could use these parameters to make accurate surface flux tallies. The procedure is demonstrated in a test problem in which Monte Carlo surface fluxes in cosine bins are converted to angular fluxes and compared with the results of a discrete ordinates calculation.

  6. Uncertainty Propagation with Fast Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; van der Marck, S. C.; Koning, A. J.; Sjöstrand, H.; Zwermann, W.

    2014-04-01

    Two new and faster Monte Carlo methods for the propagation of nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo nuclear simulations are presented (the "Fast TMC" and "Fast GRS" methods). They are addressing the main drawback of the original Total Monte Carlo method (TMC), namely the necessary large time multiplication factor compared to a single calculation. With these new methods, Monte Carlo simulations can now be accompanied with uncertainty propagation (other than statistical), with small additional calculation time. The new methods are presented and compared with the TMC methods for criticality benchmarks.

  7. Neutron Fluence, Dosimetry and Damage Response Determination in In-Core/Ex-Core Components of the VENUS CEN/SCK LWR Using 3-D Monte Carlo Simulations: NEA's VENUS-3 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Perlado, J. Manuel; Marian, Jaime; Sanz, Jesus Garcia

    2000-03-15

    Validating state-of-the-art methods used to predict fluence exposure to reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) has become an important issue in identifying the sources of uncertainty in the estimated RPV fluence for pressurized water reactors. This is a very important aspect in evaluating irradiation damage leading to the hardening and embrittlement of such structural components. One of the major benchmark experiments carried out to test three-dimensional methodologies is the VENUS-3 Benchmark Experiment in which three-dimensional Monte Carlo and S{sub n} codes have proved more efficient than synthesis methods. At the Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (DENIM) at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, a detailed full three-dimensional model of the Venus Critical Facility has been developed making use of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP4B. The problem geometry and source modeling are described, and results, including calculated versus experimental (C/E) ratios as well as additional studies, are presented. Evidence was found that the great majority of C/E values fell within the 10% tolerance and most within 5%. Tolerance limits are discussed on the basis of evaluated data library and fission spectra sensitivity, where a value ranging between 10 to 15% should be accepted. Also, a calculation of the atomic displacement rate has been carried out in various locations throughout the reactor, finding that values of 0.0001 displacements per atom in external components such as the core barrel are representative of this type of reactor during a 30-yr time span.

  8. Four decades of implicit Monte Carlo

    DOE PAGES

    Wollaber, Allan B.

    2016-04-25

    In 1971, Fleck and Cummings derived a system of equations to enable robust Monte Carlo simulations of time-dependent, thermal radiative transfer problems. Denoted the “Implicit Monte Carlo” (IMC) equations, their solution remains the de facto standard of high-fidelity radiative transfer simulations. Over the course of 44 years, their numerical properties have become better understood, and accuracy enhancements, novel acceleration methods, and variance reduction techniques have been suggested. In this review, we rederive the IMC equations—explicitly highlighting assumptions as they are made—and outfit the equations with a Monte Carlo interpretation. We put the IMC equations in context with other approximate formsmore » of the radiative transfer equations and present a new demonstration of their equivalence to another well-used linearization solved with deterministic transport methods for frequency-independent problems. We discuss physical and numerical limitations of the IMC equations for asymptotically small time steps, stability characteristics and the potential of maximum principle violations for large time steps, and solution behaviors in an asymptotically thick diffusive limit. We provide a new stability analysis for opacities with general monomial dependence on temperature. Here, we consider spatial accuracy limitations of the IMC equations and discussion acceleration and variance reduction techniques.« less

  9. Development of a Space Radiation Monte Carlo Computer Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, Lawrence S.

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate purpose of this effort is to undertake the development of a computer simulation of the radiation environment encountered in spacecraft which is based upon the Monte Carlo technique. The current plan is to adapt and modify a Monte Carlo calculation code known as FLUKA, which is presently used in high energy and heavy ion physics, to simulate the radiation environment present in spacecraft during missions. The initial effort would be directed towards modeling the MIR and Space Shuttle environments, but the long range goal is to develop a program for the accurate prediction of the radiation environment likely to be encountered on future planned endeavors such as the Space Station, a Lunar Return Mission, or a Mars Mission. The longer the mission, especially those which will not have the shielding protection of the earth's magnetic field, the more critical the radiation threat will be. The ultimate goal of this research is to produce a code that will be useful to mission planners and engineers who need to have detailed projections of radiation exposures at specified locations within the spacecraft and for either specific times during the mission or integrated over the entire mission. In concert with the development of the simulation, it is desired to integrate it with a state-of-the-art interactive 3-D graphics-capable analysis package known as ROOT, to allow easy investigation and visualization of the results. The efforts reported on here include the initial development of the program and the demonstration of the efficacy of the technique through a model simulation of the MIR environment. This information was used to write a proposal to obtain follow-on permanent funding for this project.

  10. Particle in cell/Monte Carlo collision analysis of the problem of identification of impurities in the gas by the plasma electron spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusoglu Sarikaya, C.; Rafatov, I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The work deals with the Particle in Cell/Monte Carlo Collision (PIC/MCC) analysis of the problem of detection and identification of impurities in the nonlocal plasma of gas discharge using the Plasma Electron Spectroscopy (PLES) method. For this purpose, 1d3v PIC/MCC code for numerical simulation of glow discharge with nonlocal electron energy distribution function is developed. The elastic, excitation, and ionization collisions between electron-neutral pairs and isotropic scattering and charge exchange collisions between ion-neutral pairs and Penning ionizations are taken into account. Applicability of the numerical code is verified under the Radio-Frequency capacitively coupled discharge conditions. The efficiency of the code is increased by its parallelization using Open Message Passing Interface. As a demonstration of the PLES method, parallel PIC/MCC code is applied to the direct current glow discharge in helium doped with a small amount of argon. Numerical results are consistent with the theoretical analysis of formation of nonlocal EEDF and existing experimental data.

  11. Spatial assessment of the economic feasibility of short rotation coppice on radioactively contaminated land in Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. II. Monte Carlo analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Der Perk, Marcel; Burema, Jiske; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Goor, François; Timofeyev, Sergei

    2004-09-01

    A Monte Carlo analysis of two sequential GIS-embedded submodels, which evaluate the economic feasibility of short rotation coppice (SRC) production and energy conversion in areas contaminated by Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs, was performed to allow for variability of environmental conditions that was not contained in the spatial model inputs. The results from this analysis were compared to the results from the deterministic model presented in part I of this paper. It was concluded that, although the variability in the model results due to within-gridcell variability of the model inputs was considerable, the prediction of the areas where SRC and energy conversion is potentially profitable was robust. If the additional variability in the model input that is not contained in the input maps is also taken into account, the SRC production and energy conversion appears to be potentially profitable at more locations for both the small scale and large scale production scenarios than the model predicted using the deterministic model.

  12. Uncertainty of modelled urban peak O3 concentrations and its sensitivity to input data perturbations based on the Monte Carlo analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda Rojas, Andrea L.; Venegas, Laura E.; Mazzeo, Nicolás A.

    2016-09-01

    A simple urban air quality model [MODelo de Dispersión Atmosférica Ubana - Generic Reaction Set (DAUMOD-GRS)] was recently developed. One-hour peak O3 concentrations in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (MABA) during the summer estimated with the DAUMOD-GRS model have shown values lower than 20 ppb (the regional background concentration) in the urban area and levels greater than 40 ppb in its surroundings. Due to the lack of measurements outside the MABA, these relatively high ozone modelled concentrations constitute the only estimate for the area. In this work, a methodology based on the Monte Carlo analysis is implemented to evaluate the uncertainty in these modelled concentrations associated to possible errors of the model input data. Results show that the larger 1-h peak O3 levels in the MABA during the summer present larger uncertainties (up to 47 ppb). On the other hand, multiple linear regression analysis is applied at selected receptors in order to identify the variables explaining most of the obtained variance. Although their relative contributions vary spatially, the uncertainty of the regional background O3 concentration dominates at all the analysed receptors (34.4-97.6%), indicating that their estimations could be improved to enhance the ability of the model to simulate peak O3 concentrations in the MABA.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulations for Radiobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Nicole; Bazalova, Magdalena; Chang, Kevin; Graves, Edward

    2012-02-01

    The relationship between tumor response and radiation is currently modeled as dose, quantified on the mm or cm scale through measurement or simulation. This does not take into account modern knowledge of cancer, including tissue heterogeneities and repair mechanisms. We perform Monte Carlo simulations utilizing Geant4 to model radiation treatment on a cellular scale. Biological measurements are correlated to simulated results, primarily the energy deposit in nuclear volumes. One application is modeling dose enhancement through the use of high-Z materials, such gold nanoparticles. The model matches in vitro data and predicts dose enhancement ratios for a variety of in vivo scenarios. This model shows promise for both treatment design and furthering our understanding of radiobiology.

  14. Monte Carlo Form-Finding Method for Tensegrity Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cao, Yan-Ping

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a Monte Carlo-based approach to solve tensegrity form-finding problems. It uses a stochastic procedure to find the deterministic equilibrium configuration of a tensegrity structure. The suggested Monte Carlo form-finding (MCFF) method is highly efficient because it does not involve complicated matrix operations and symmetry analysis and it works for arbitrary initial configurations. Both regular and non-regular tensegrity problems of large scale can be solved. Some representative examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of this versatile method.

  15. Diffusion of oxygen interstitials in UO2+x using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations: Role of O/M ratio and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Rakesh K.; Watanabe, Taku; Andersson, David A.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Deo, Chaitanya S.

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen interstitials in UO2+x significantly affect the thermophysical properties and microstructural evolution of the oxide nuclear fuel. In hyperstoichiometric Urania (UO2+x), these oxygen interstitials form different types of defect clusters, which have different migration behavior. In this study we have used kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to evaluate diffusivities of oxygen interstitials accounting for mono- and di-interstitial clusters. Our results indicate that the predicted diffusivities increase significantly at higher non-stoichiometry (x > 0.01) for di-interstitial clusters compared to a mono-interstitial only model. The diffusivities calculated at higher temperatures compare better with experimental values than at lower temperatures (< 973 K). We have discussed the resulting activation energies achieved for diffusion with all the mono- and di-interstitial models. We have carefully performed sensitivity analysis to estimate the effect of input di-interstitial binding energies on the predicted diffusivities and activation energies. While this article only discusses mono- and di-interstitials in evaluating oxygen diffusion response in UO2+x, future improvements to the model will primarily focus on including energetic definitions of larger stable interstitial clusters reported in the literature. The addition of larger clusters to the kMC model is expected to improve the comparison of oxygen transport in UO2+x with experiment.

  16. Analysis of intervention strategies for inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated lung cancer risk based on a Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to evaluate and compare interventions for reducing exposure to air pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a widely found air pollutant in both indoor and outdoor air. This study presents the first application of the Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model to quantify the effects of different intervention strategies on inhalation exposure to PAHs and the associated lung cancer risk. The method was applied to the population in Beijing, China, in the year 2006. Several intervention strategies were designed and studied, including atmospheric cleaning, smoking prohibition indoors, use of clean fuel for cooking, enhancing ventilation while cooking and use of indoor cleaners. Their performances were quantified by population attributable fraction (PAF) and potential impact fraction (PIF) of lung cancer risk, and the changes in indoor PAH concentrations and annual inhalation doses were also calculated and compared. The results showed that atmospheric cleaning and use of indoor cleaners were the two most effective interventions. The sensitivity analysis showed that several input parameters had major influence on the modeled PAH inhalation exposure and the rankings of different interventions. The ranking was reasonably robust for the remaining majority of parameters. The method itself can be extended to other pollutants and in different places. It enables the quantitative comparison of different intervention strategies and would benefit intervention design and relevant policy making.

  17. A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Thrust Imbalance for the Space Launch System Booster During Both the Ignition Transient and Steady State Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Crowder, Winston; Steadman, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of statistical analyses performed to predict the thrust imbalance between two solid rocket motor boosters to be used on the Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. Two legacy internal ballistics codes developed for the Space Shuttle program were coupled with a Monte Carlo analysis code to determine a thrust imbalance envelope for the SLS vehicle based on the performance of 1000 motor pairs. Thirty three variables which could impact the performance of the motors during the ignition transient and thirty eight variables which could impact the performance of the motors during steady state operation of the motor were identified and treated as statistical variables for the analyses. The effects of motor to motor variation as well as variations between motors of a single pair were included in the analyses. The statistical variations of the variables were defined based on data provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the upgraded five segment booster and from the Space Shuttle booster when appropriate. The results obtained for the statistical envelope are compared with the design specification thrust imbalance limits for the SLS launch vehicle.

  18. A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Thrust Imbalance for the RSRMV Booster During Both the Ignition Transient and Steady State Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Crowder, Winston; Steadman, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of statistical analyses performed to predict the thrust imbalance between two solid rocket motor boosters to be used on the Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. Two legacy internal ballistics codes developed for the Space Shuttle program were coupled with a Monte Carlo analysis code to determine a thrust imbalance envelope for the SLS vehicle based on the performance of 1000 motor pairs. Thirty three variables which could impact the performance of the motors during the ignition transient and thirty eight variables which could impact the performance of the motors during steady state operation of the motor were identified and treated as statistical variables for the analyses. The effects of motor to motor variation as well as variations between motors of a single pair were included in the analyses. The statistical variations of the variables were defined based on data provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the upgraded five segment booster and from the Space Shuttle booster when appropriate. The results obtained for the statistical envelope are compared with the design specification thrust imbalance limits for the SLS launch vehicle

  19. Application of a XMM-Newton EPIC Monte Carlo to Analysis And Interpretation of Data for Abell 1689, RXJ0658-55 And the Centaurus Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Karl E.; Peterson, J.R.; Madejski, G.M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    We propose a new Monte Carlo method to study extended X-ray sources with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard XMM Newton. The Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) technique, described in a companion paper, is applied here to the EPIC data for the clusters of galaxies Abell 1689, Centaurus and RXJ 0658-55 (the ''bullet cluster''). We aim to show the advantages of this method of simultaneous spectral-spatial modeling over traditional X-ray spectral analysis. In Abell 1689 we confirm our earlier findings about structure in temperature distribution and produce a high resolution temperature map. We also confirm our findings about velocity structure within the gas. In the bullet cluster, RXJ 0658-55, we produce the highest resolution temperature map ever to be published of this cluster allowing us to trace what looks like the motion of the bullet in the cluster. We even detect a south to north temperature gradient within the bullet itself. In the Centaurus cluster we detect, by dividing up the luminosity of the cluster in bands of gas temperatures, a striking feature to the north-east of the cluster core. We hypothesize that this feature is caused by a subcluster left over from a substantial merger that slightly displaced the core. We conclude that our method is very powerful in determining the spatial distributions of plasma temperatures and very useful for systematic studies in cluster structure.

  20. Analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green dye dilution with Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudra, Regina M.; Nadler, Andreas; Keller, Emanuela; Niederer, Peter F.

    2006-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with indocyanine green (ICG) dilution is applied externally on the head to determine the cerebral hemodynamics of neurointensive care patients. We applied Monte Carlo simulation for the analysis of a number of problems associated with this method. First, the contamination of the optical density (OD) signal due to the extracerebral tissue was assessed. Second, the measured OD signal depends essentially on the relative blood content (with respect to its absorption) in the various transilluminated tissues. To take this into account, we weighted the calculated densities of the photon distribution under baseline conditions within the different tissues with the changes and aberration of the relative blood volumes that are typically observed under healthy and pathologic conditions. Third, in case of NIRS ICG dye dilution, an ICG bolus replaces part of the blood such that a transient change of absorption in the brain tissues occurs that can be recorded in the OD signal. Our results indicate that for an exchange fraction of Δ=30% of the relative blood volume within the intracerebral tissue, the OD signal is determined from 64 to 74% by the gray matter and between 8 to 16% by the white matter maximally for a distance of d=4.5 cm.

  1. Analysis of Intervention Strategies for Inhalation Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Associated Lung Cancer Risk Based on a Monte Carlo Population Exposure Assessment Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to evaluate and compare interventions for reducing exposure to air pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a widely found air pollutant in both indoor and outdoor air. This study presents the first application of the Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model to quantify the effects of different intervention strategies on inhalation exposure to PAHs and the associated lung cancer risk. The method was applied to the population in Beijing, China, in the year 2006. Several intervention strategies were designed and studied, including atmospheric cleaning, smoking prohibition indoors, use of clean fuel for cooking, enhancing ventilation while cooking and use of indoor cleaners. Their performances were quantified by population attributable fraction (PAF) and potential impact fraction (PIF) of lung cancer risk, and the changes in indoor PAH concentrations and annual inhalation doses were also calculated and compared. The results showed that atmospheric cleaning and use of indoor cleaners were the two most effective interventions. The sensitivity analysis showed that several input parameters had major influence on the modeled PAH inhalation exposure and the rankings of different interventions. The ranking was reasonably robust for the remaining majority of parameters. The method itself can be extended to other pollutants and in different places. It enables the quantitative comparison of different intervention strategies and would benefit intervention design and relevant policy making. PMID:24416436

  2. Histogram analysis as a method for determining the line tension of a three-phase contact region by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Yuri

    2005-11-01

    A method is proposed for determining the line tension, which is the main physical characteristic of a three-phase contact region, by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The key idea of the proposed method is that if a three-phase equilibrium involves a three-phase contact region, the probability distribution of states of a system as a function of two order parameters depends not only on the surface tension, but also on the line tension. This probability distribution can be obtained as a normalized histogram by appropriate MC simulations, so one can use the combination of histogram analysis and finite-size scaling to study the properties of a three phase contact region. Every histogram and results extracted therefrom will depend on the size of the simulated system. Carrying out MC simulations for a series of system sizes and extrapolating the results, obtained from the corresponding series of histograms, to infinite size, one can determine the line tension of the three phase contact region and the interfacial tensions of all three interfaces (and hence the contact angles) in an infinite system. To illustrate the proposed method, it is applied to the three-dimensional ternary fluid mixture, in which molecular pairs of like species do not interact whereas those of unlike species interact as hard spheres. The simulated results are in agreement with expectations.

  3. Temporal relation between the ADC and DC potential responses to transient focal ischemia in the rat: a Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin D; Crowder, Martin J; Hand, David J; Harris, Neil G; Williams, Stephen R; Obrenovitch, Tihomir P; Gadian, David G

    2003-06-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation was used in a reanalysis of the longitudinal data obtained by Harris et al. (J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 20:28-36) in a study of the direct current (DC) potential and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) responses to focal ischemia. The main purpose was to provide a formal analysis of the temporal relationship between the ADC and DC responses, to explore the possible involvement of a common latent (driving) process. A Bayesian nonlinear hierarchical random coefficients model was adopted. DC and ADC transition parameter posterior probability distributions were generated using three parallel Markov chains created using the Metropolis algorithm. Particular attention was paid to the within-subject differences between the DC and ADC time course characteristics. The results show that the DC response is biphasic, whereas the ADC exhibits monophasic behavior, and that the two DC components are each distinguishable from the ADC response in their time dependencies. The DC and ADC changes are not, therefore, driven by a common latent process. This work demonstrates a general analytical approach to the multivariate, longitudinal data-processing problem that commonly arises in stroke and other biomedical research. PMID:12796716

  4. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Sean E.; Brown, Forrest B.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-09-05

    In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a

  5. Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Bergstrom, P.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Cox, L.J.; Daly, T.P.; Garrett, D.; House, R.K.; Moses, E.I.; Powell, C.L.; Patterson, R.W.; Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    1997-11-11

    The purpose of the PEREGRINE program is to bring high-speed, high- accuracy, high-resolution Monte Carlo dose calculations to the desktop in the radiation therapy clinic. PEREGRINE is a three- dimensional Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed specifically for radiation therapy planning. It provides dose distributions from external beams of photons, electrons, neutrons, and protons as well as from brachytherapy sources. Each external radiation source particle passes through collimator jaws and beam modifiers such as blocks, compensators, and wedges that are used to customize the treatment to maximize the dose to the tumor. Absorbed dose is tallied in the patient or phantom as Monte Carlo simulation particles are followed through a Cartesian transport mesh that has been manually specified or determined from a CT scan of the patient. This paper describes PEREGRINE capabilities, results of benchmark comparisons, calculation times and performance, and the significance of Monte Carlo calculations for photon teletherapy. PEREGRINE results show excellent agreement with a comprehensive set of measurements for a wide variety of clinical photon beam geometries, on both homogeneous and heterogeneous test samples or phantoms. PEREGRINE is capable of calculating >350 million histories per hour for a standard clinical treatment plan. This results in a dose distribution with voxel standard deviations of <2% of the maximum dose on 4 million voxels with 1 mm resolution in the CT-slice plane in under 20 minutes. Calculation times include tracking particles through all patient specific beam delivery components as well as the patient. Most importantly, comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculations with currently-used algorithms reveal significantly different dose distributions for a wide variety of treatment sites, due to the complex 3-D effects of missing tissue, tissue heterogeneities, and accurate modeling of the radiation source.

  6. Novel Quantum Monte Carlo Approaches for Quantum Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, Brenda M.

    the eventual hope is to apply this algorithm to the exploration of yet unidentified high-pressure, low-temperature phases of hydrogen, I employ this algorithm to determine whether or not quantum hard spheres can form a low-temperature bcc solid if exchange is not taken into account. In the final chapter of this thesis, I use Path Integral Monte Carlo once again to explore whether glassy para-hydrogen exhibits superfluidity. Physicists have long searched for ways to coax hydrogen into becoming a superfluid. I present evidence that, while glassy hydrogen does not crystallize at the temperatures at which hydrogen might become a superfluid, it nevertheless does not exhibit superfluidity. This is because the average binding energy per p-H2 molecule poses a severe barrier to exchange regardless of whether the system is crystalline. All in all, this work extends the reach of Quantum Monte Carlo methods to new systems and brings the power of existing methods to bear on new problems. Portions of this work have been published in Rubenstein, PRE (2010) and Rubenstein, PRA (2012) [167;169]. Other papers not discussed here published during my Ph.D. include Rubenstein, BPJ (2008) and Rubenstein, PRL (2012) [166;168]. The work in Chapters 6 and 7 is currently unpublished. [166] Brenda M. Rubenstein, Ivan Coluzza, and Mark A. Miller. Controlling the folding and substrate-binding of proteins using polymer brushes. Physical Review Letters, 108(20):208104, May 2012. [167] Brenda M. Rubenstein, J.E. Gubernatis, and J.D. Doll. Comparative monte carlo efficiency by monte carlo analysis. Physical Review E, 82(3):036701, September 2010. [168] Brenda M. Rubenstein and Laura J. Kaufman. The role of extracellular matrix in glioma invasion: A cellular potts model approach. Biophysical Journal, 95(12):5661-- 5680, December 2008. [169] Brenda M. Rubenstein, Shiwei Zhang, and David R. Reichman. Finite-temperature auxiliary-field quantum monte carlo for bose-fermi mixtures. Physical Review A, 86

  7. Application of MINERVA Monte Carlo simulations to targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Descalle, Marie-Anne; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L; Dauffy, Lucile; Nigg, David W; Wemple, Charles A; Yuan, Aina; DeNardo, Gerald L

    2003-02-01

    Recent clinical results have demonstrated the promise of targeted radionuclide therapy for advanced cancer. As the success of this emerging form of radiation therapy grows, accurate treatment planning and radiation dose simulations are likely to become increasingly important. To address this need, we have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA system. The goal of the MINERVA dose calculation system is to provide 3-D Monte Carlo simulation-based dosimetry for radiation therapy, focusing on experimental and emerging applications. For molecular targeted radionuclide therapy applications, MINERVA calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using computed tomography to describe the patient anatomy, combined with a user-defined 3-D radiation source. This paper describes the validation of the 3-D Monte Carlo transport methods to be used in MINERVA for molecular targeted radionuclide dosimetry. It reports comparisons of MINERVA dose simulations with published absorbed fraction data for distributed, monoenergetic photon and electron sources, and for radioisotope photon emission. MINERVA simulations are generally within 2% of EGS4 results and 10% of MCNP results, but differ by up to 40% from the recommendations given in MIRD Pamphlets 3 and 8 for identical medium composition and density. For several representative source and target organs in the abdomen and thorax, specific absorbed fractions calculated with the MINERVA system are generally within 5% of those published in the revised MIRD Pamphlet 5 for 100 keV photons. However, results differ by up to 23% for the adrenal glands, the smallest of our target organs. Finally, we show examples of Monte Carlo simulations in a patient-like geometry for a source of uniform activity located in the kidney. PMID:12667310

  8. Quasi-Monte Carlo based global uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in modeling free product migration and recovery from petroleum-contaminated aquifers.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Huang, Gordon; Lu, Hongwei; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Yi

    2012-06-15

    This paper presents a global uncertainty and sensitivity analysis (GUSA) framework based on global sensitivity analysis (GSA) and generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) methods. Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) is employed by GUSA to obtain realizations of uncertain parameters, which are then input to the simulation model for analysis. Compared to GLUE, GUSA can not only evaluate global sensitivity and uncertainty of modeling parameter sets, but also quantify the uncertainty in modeling prediction sets. Moreover, GUSA's another advantage lies in alleviation of computational effort, since those globally-insensitive parameters can be identified and removed from the uncertain-parameter set. GUSA is applied to a practical petroleum-contaminated site in Canada to investigate free product migration and recovery processes under aquifer remediation operations. Results from global sensitivity analysis show that (1) initial free product thickness has the most significant impact on total recovery volume but least impact on residual free product thickness and recovery rate; (2) total recovery volume and recovery rate are sensitive to residual LNAPL phase saturations and soil porosity. Results from uncertainty predictions reveal that the residual thickness would remain high and almost unchanged after about half-year of skimmer-well scheme; the rather high residual thickness (0.73-1.56 m 20 years later) indicates that natural attenuation would not be suitable for the remediation. The largest total recovery volume would be from water pumping, followed by vacuum pumping, and then skimmer. The recovery rates of the three schemes would rapidly decrease after 2 years (less than 0.05 m(3)/day), thus short-term remediation is not suggested.

  9. MORSE Monte Carlo radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, M.B.

    1983-02-01

    This report is an addendum to the MORSE report, ORNL-4972, originally published in 1975. This addendum contains descriptions of several modifications to the MORSE Monte Carlo Code, replacement pages containing corrections, Part II of the report which was previously unpublished, and a new Table of Contents. The modifications include a Klein Nishina estimator for gamma rays. Use of such an estimator required changing the cross section routines to process pair production and Compton scattering cross sections directly from ENDF tapes and writing a new version of subroutine RELCOL. Another modification is the use of free form input for the SAMBO analysis data. This required changing subroutines SCORIN and adding new subroutine RFRE. References are updated, and errors in the original report have been corrected. (WHK)

  10. Coherent scatter imaging Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Laila; MacDonald, Carolyn A

    2016-07-01

    Conventional mammography can suffer from poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is an imaging technique which provides additional information and is compatible with conventional mammography. A Monte Carlo simulation of coherent scatter slot scan imaging was performed to assess its performance and provide system optimization. Coherent scatter could be exploited using a system similar to conventional slot scan mammography system with antiscatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage, tilt angle, grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. The simulated carcinomas were detectable for tumors as small as 5 mm in diameter, so coherent scatter analysis using a wide-slot setup could be promising as an enhancement for screening mammography. Employing coherent scatter information simultaneously with conventional mammography could yield a conventional high spatial resolution image with additional coherent scatter information. PMID:27610397

  11. Monte Carlo shipping cask calculations using an automated biasing procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.S.; Hoffman, T.J.; Childs, R.L.; Parks, C.V.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an automated biasing procedure for Monte Carlo shipping cask calculations within the SCALE system - a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation. The SCALE system was conceived and funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to satisfy a strong need for performing standardized criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of nuclear systems.

  12. MODELING LEACHING OF VIRUSES BY THE MONTE CARLO METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A predictive screening model was developed for fate and transport
    of viruses in the unsaturated zone. A database of input parameters
    allowed Monte Carlo analysis with the model. The resulting kernel
    densities of predicted attenuation during percolation indicated very ...

  13. The conformations of cyclic (1-->2)-beta-D-glucans: application of multidimensional clustering analysis to conformational data sets obtained by Metropolis Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    York, W S; Thomsen, J U; Meyer, B

    1993-10-01

    Sets containing up to 1.3 x 10(6) energetically accessible conformations of linear (1-->2)-beta-D-glucan oligosaccharides were obtained by Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) calculations performed with the GEGOP (GEometry of GlycOProteins) program. Quantitative analyses of the data sets (which were expressed in terms of the glycosidic dihedral angle coordinates) were obtained by two different clustering methods: (i) the three-distance hierarchical clustering method (3-DM), published by Jure Zupan, and (ii) a nonhierarchical clustering method (Population-Density Projection, PDP) which, through a segmentation analysis of two-dimensional projections of the population-density surface, establishes a partitioning of conformational space into a set of "cluster regions", followed by a clustering step where each conformation of the data set is assigned to one of these regions. Computer programs (MCLUST and PDPCLUST) were developed to perform the 3-DM and PDP analyses, respectively. The two types of analysis provided very similar sets of conformational families (clusters), which could be expressed as combinations of distinct conformations of the glycosidic torsional angles (phi, psi) centered at (50 degrees, 10 degrees) for conformation A, (40 degrees, 160 degrees) for conformation B, (55 degrees, -160 degrees) for conformation B', and (170 degrees, 10 degrees) for conformation C. The analysis provided the populations of the families, along with relative rates for transitions between families. Examination of the frequencies of the A, B, and C glycosidic bond conformations with respect to their relative positions in the sequence revealed the tendency of the (1-->2)-beta-D-glucan to adopt conformational repeating structures of the general form [AnB], where n = 3 or 6. These repeating structures combine in an energetically cooperative fashion to give low-energy cyclic conformations having, for example C5 symmetry [AAAB]5 for the eicosamer, and C3 symmetry [AAAAAAB]3 for the

  14. A Monte Carlo Investigation of Conjoint Analysis Index-of-Fit: Goodness of Fit, Significance and Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umesh, U. N.; Mishra, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Major issues related to index-of-fit conjoint analysis were addressed in this simulation study. Goals were to develop goodness-of-fit criteria for conjoint analysis; develop tests to determine the significance of conjoint analysis results; and calculate the power of the test of the null hypothesis of random data distribution. (SLD)

  15. Monte Carlo Capabilities of the SCALE Code System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rearden, B. T.; Petrie, L. M.; Peplow, D. E.; Bekar, K. B.; Wiarda, D.; Celik, C.; Perfetti, C. M.; Ibrahim, A. M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    SCALE is a widely used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a "plug-and-play" framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE's graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2, to be released in 2014, will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. An overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  16. Monte Carlo capabilities of the SCALE code system

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T.; Petrie, Jr., Lester M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Bekar, Kursat B.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Celik, Cihangir; Perfetti, Christopher M.; Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, Michael E.; Marshall, William J.

    2014-09-12

    SCALE is a broadly used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a “plug-and-play” framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE’s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Finally, an overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  17. Monte Carlo capabilities of the SCALE code system

    DOE PAGES

    Rearden, Bradley T.; Petrie, Jr., Lester M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Bekar, Kursat B.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Celik, Cihangir; Perfetti, Christopher M.; Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, Michael E.; et al

    2014-09-12

    SCALE is a broadly used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a “plug-and-play” framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport asmore » well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE’s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Finally, an overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.« less

  18. Quantitative Phylogenomics of Within-Species Mitogenome Variation: Monte Carlo and Non-Parametric Analysis of Phylogeographic Structure among Discrete Transatlantic Breeding Areas of Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus).

    PubMed

    Carr, Steven M; Duggan, Ana T; Stenson, Garry B; Marshall, H Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenomic analysis of highly-resolved intraspecific phylogenies obtained from complete mitochondrial DNA genomes has had great success in clarifying relationships within and among human populations, but has found limited application in other wild species. Analytical challenges include assessment of random versus non-random phylogeographic distributions, and quantification of differences in tree topologies among populations. Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus Erxleben, 1777) have a biogeographic distribution based on four discrete trans-Atlantic breeding and whelping populations located on "fast ice" attached to land in the White Sea, Greenland Sea, the Labrador ice Front, and Southern Gulf of St Lawrence. This East to West distribution provides a set of a priori phylogeographic hypotheses. Outstanding biogeographic questions include the degree of genetic distinctiveness among these populations, in particular between the Greenland Sea and White Sea grounds. We obtained complete coding-region DNA sequences (15,825 bp) for 53 seals. Each seal has a unique mtDNA genome sequence, which differ by 6 ~ 107 substitutions. Six major clades / groups are detectable by parsimony, neighbor-joining, and Bayesian methods, all of which are found in breeding populations on either side of the Atlantic. The species coalescent is at 180 KYA; the most recent clade, which accounts for 66% of the diversity, reflects an expansion during the mid-Wisconsinan glaciation 40~60 KYA. FST is significant only between the White Sea and Greenland Sea or Ice Front populations. Hierarchal AMOVA of 2-, 3-, or 4-island models identifies small but significant ΦSC among populations within groups, but not among groups. A novel Monte-Carlo simulation indicates that the observed distribution of individuals within breeding populations over the phylogenetic tree requires significantly fewer dispersal events than random expectation, consistent with island or a priori East to West 2- or 3-stepping

  19. Quantitative Phylogenomics of Within-Species Mitogenome Variation: Monte Carlo and Non-Parametric Analysis of Phylogeographic Structure among Discrete Transatlantic Breeding Areas of Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus)

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Steven M.; Duggan, Ana T.; Stenson, Garry B.; Marshall, H. Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenomic analysis of highly-resolved intraspecific phylogenies obtained from complete mitochondrial DNA genomes has had great success in clarifying relationships within and among human populations, but has found limited application in other wild species. Analytical challenges include assessment of random versus non-random phylogeographic distributions, and quantification of differences in tree topologies among populations. Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus Erxleben, 1777) have a biogeographic distribution based on four discrete trans-Atlantic breeding and whelping populations located on “fast ice” attached to land in the White Sea, Greenland Sea, the Labrador ice Front, and Southern Gulf of St Lawrence. This East to West distribution provides a set of a priori phylogeographic hypotheses. Outstanding biogeographic questions include the degree of genetic distinctiveness among these populations, in particular between the Greenland Sea and White Sea grounds. We obtained complete coding-region DNA sequences (15,825 bp) for 53 seals. Each seal has a unique mtDNA genome sequence, which differ by 6 ~ 107 substitutions. Six major clades / groups are detectable by parsimony, neighbor-joining, and Bayesian methods, all of which are found in breeding populations on either side of the Atlantic. The species coalescent is at 180 KYA; the most recent clade, which accounts for 66% of the diversity, reflects an expansion during the mid-Wisconsinan glaciation 40 ~ 60 KYA. FST is significant only between the White Sea and Greenland Sea or Ice Front populations. Hierarchal AMOVA of 2-, 3-, or 4-island models identifies small but significant ΦSC among populations within groups, but not among groups. A novel Monte-Carlo simulation indicates that the observed distribution of individuals within breeding populations over the phylogenetic tree requires significantly fewer dispersal events than random expectation, consistent with island or a priori East to West 2- or 3-stepping

  20. Quantitative Phylogenomics of Within-Species Mitogenome Variation: Monte Carlo and Non-Parametric Analysis of Phylogeographic Structure among Discrete Transatlantic Breeding Areas of Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus).

    PubMed

    Carr, Steven M; Duggan, Ana T; Stenson, Garry B; Marshall, H Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenomic analysis of highly-resolved intraspecific phylogenies obtained from complete mitochondrial DNA genomes has had great success in clarifying relationships within and among human populations, but has found limited application in other wild species. Analytical challenges include assessment of random versus non-random phylogeographic distributions, and quantification of differences in tree topologies among populations. Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus Erxleben, 1777) have a biogeographic distribution based on four discrete trans-Atlantic breeding and whelping populations located on "fast ice" attached to land in the White Sea, Greenland Sea, the Labrador ice Front, and Southern Gulf of St Lawrence. This East to West distribution provides a set of a priori phylogeographic hypotheses. Outstanding biogeographic questions include the degree of genetic distinctiveness among these populations, in particular between the Greenland Sea and White Sea grounds. We obtained complete coding-region DNA sequences (15,825 bp) for 53 seals. Each seal has a unique mtDNA genome sequence, which differ by 6 ~ 107 substitutions. Six major clades / groups are detectable by parsimony, neighbor-joining, and Bayesian methods, all of which are found in breeding populations on either side of the Atlantic. The species coalescent is at 180 KYA; the most recent clade, which accounts for 66% of the diversity, reflects an expansion during the mid-Wisconsinan glaciation 40~60 KYA. FST is significant only between the White Sea and Greenland Sea or Ice Front populations. Hierarchal AMOVA of 2-, 3-, or 4-island models identifies small but significant ΦSC among populations within groups, but not among groups. A novel Monte-Carlo simulation indicates that the observed distribution of individuals within breeding populations over the phylogenetic tree requires significantly fewer dispersal events than random expectation, consistent with island or a priori East to West 2- or 3-stepping

  1. Fast Monte Carlo-assisted simulation of cloudy Earth backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Richtsmeier, Steven C.; Berk, Alexander; Duff, James W.

    2012-11-01

    A calculation method has been developed for rapidly synthesizing radiometrically accurate ultraviolet through longwavelengthinfrared spectral imagery of the Earth for arbitrary locations and cloud fields. The method combines cloudfree surface reflectance imagery with cloud radiance images calculated from a first-principles 3-D radiation transport model. The MCScene Monte Carlo code [1-4] is used to build a cloud image library; a data fusion method is incorporated to speed convergence. The surface and cloud images are combined with an upper atmospheric description with the aid of solar and thermal radiation transport equations that account for atmospheric inhomogeneity. The method enables a wide variety of sensor and sun locations, cloud fields, and surfaces to be combined on-the-fly, and provides hyperspectral wavelength resolution with minimal computational effort. The simulations agree very well with much more time-consuming direct Monte Carlo calculations of the same scene.

  2. SU-E-J-09: A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Relationship Between Cherenkov Light Emission and Dose for Electrons, Protons, and X-Ray Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, A; Zhang, R; Gladstone, D; Pogue, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A number of recent studies have proposed that light emitted by the Cherenkov effect may be used for a number of radiation therapy dosimetry applications. Here we investigate the fundamental nature and accuracy of the technique for the first time by using a theoretical and Monte Carlo based analysis. Methods: Using the GEANT4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) and BEAMnrc for phase space file generation, the light yield, material variability, field size and energy dependence, and overall agreement between the Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition for electron, proton, and flattened, unflattened, and parallel opposed x-ray photon beams was explored. Results: Due to the exponential attenuation of x-ray photons, Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition were identical for monoenergetic pencil beams. However, polyenergetic beams exhibited errors with depth due to beam hardening, with the error being inversely related to beam energy. For finite field sizes, the error with depth was inversely proportional to field size, and lateral errors in the umbra were greater for larger field sizes. For opposed beams, the technique was most accurate due to an averaging out of beam hardening in a single beam. The technique was found to be not suitable for measuring electron beams, except for relative dosimetry of a plane at a single depth. Due to a lack of light emission, the technique was found to be unsuitable for proton beams. Conclusions: The results from this exploratory study suggest that optical dosimetry by the Cherenkov effect may be most applicable to near monoenergetic x-ray photon beams (e.g. Co-60), dynamic IMRT and VMAT plans, as well as narrow beams used for SRT and SRS. For electron beams, the technique would be best suited for superficial dosimetry, and for protons the technique is not applicable due to a lack of light emission. NIH R01CA109558 and R21EB017559.

  3. An analysis on changes in reservoir fluid based on numerical simulation of neutron log using a Monte Carlo N-Particle algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, B.; Nam, M.

    2012-12-01

    Neutron logging has been widely used to estimate neutron porosity to evaluate formation properties in oil industry. More recently, neutron logging has been highlighted for monitoring the behavior of CO2 injected into reservoir for geological CO2 sequestration. For a better understanding of neutron log interpretation, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) algorithm is used to illustrate the response of a neutron tool. In order to obtain calibration curves for the neutron tool, neutron responses are simulated in water-filled limestone, sandstone and dolomite formations of various porosities. Since the salinities (concentration of NaCl) of borehole fluid and formation water are important factors for estimating formation porosity, we first compute and analyze neutron responses for brine-filled formations with different porosities. Further, we consider changes in brine saturation of a reservoir due to hydrocarbon production or geological CO2 sequestration to simulate corresponding neutron logging data. As gas saturation decreases, measured neutron porosity confirms gas effects on neutron logging, which is attributed to the fact that gas has slightly smaller number of hydrogen than brine water. In the meantime, increase in CO2 saturation due to CO2 injection reduces measured neutron porosity giving a clue to estimation the CO2 saturation, since the injected CO2 substitute for the brine water. A further analysis on the reduction gives a strategy for estimating CO2 saturation based on time-lapse neutron logging. This strategy can help monitoring not only geological CO2 sequestration but also CO2 flood for enhanced-oil-recovery. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Energy Efficiency & Resources of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 2012T100201588). Myung Jin Nam was partially supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea

  4. Physiologically-based toxicokinetic model for cadmium using Markov-chain Monte Carlo analysis of concentrations in blood, urine, and kidney cortex from living kidney donors.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Martin Niclas; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Akerstrom, Magnus; Johanson, Gunnar

    2014-10-01

    The health effects of low-level chronic exposure to cadmium are increasingly recognized. To improve the risk assessment, it is essential to know the relation between cadmium intake, body burden, and biomarker levels of cadmium. We combined a physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model for cadmium with a data set from healthy kidney donors to re-estimate the model parameters and to test the effects of gender and serum ferritin on systemic uptake. Cadmium levels in whole blood, blood plasma, kidney cortex, and urinary excretion from 82 men and women were used to calculate posterior distributions for model parameters using Markov-chain Monte Carlo analysis. For never- and ever-smokers combined, the daily systemic uptake was estimated at 0.0063 μg cadmium/kg body weight in men, with 35% increased uptake in women and a daily uptake of 1.2 μg for each pack-year per calendar year of smoking. The rate of urinary excretion from cadmium accumulated in the kidney was estimated at 0.000042 day(-1), corresponding to a half-life of 45 years in the kidneys. We have provided an improved model of cadmium kinetics. As the new parameter estimates derive from a single study with measurements in several compartments in each individual, these new estimates are likely to be more accurate than the previous ones where the data used originated from unrelated data sets. The estimated urinary excretion of cadmium accumulated in the kidneys was much lower than previous estimates, neglecting this finding may result in a marked under-prediction of the true kidney burden.

  5. The Accuracy, Robustness and Relationships Among Correlational Models for Social Analysis: A Monte Carlo Simulation. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Brent M.

    A large number of correlational models for cross-tabular analysis are available for utilization by social scientists for data description. Criteria for selection (such as levels of measurement and proportional reduction in error) do not lead to conclusive model choice. Moreover, such criteria may be irrelevant. More pertinent criteria are…

  6. Performance of Empirical Bayes Estimators of Level-2 Random Parameters in Multilevel Analysis: A Monte Carlo Study for Longitudinal Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candel, Math J. J. M.; Winkens, Bjorn

    2003-01-01

    Multilevel analysis is a useful technique for analyzing longitudinal data. To describe a person's development across time, the quality of the estimates of the random coefficients, which relate time to individual changes in a relevant dependent variable, is of importance. The present study compares three estimators of the random coefficients: the…

  7. Deciding on the Number of Classes in Latent Class Analysis and Growth Mixture Modeling: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nylund, Karen L.; Asparouhov, Tihomir; Muthen, Bengt O.

    2007-01-01

    Mixture modeling is a widely applied data analysis technique used to identify unobserved heterogeneity in a population. Despite mixture models' usefulness in practice, one unresolved issue in the application of mixture models is that there is not one commonly accepted statistical indicator for deciding on the number of classes in a study…

  8. Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gupta, R.; Wilson, K. G.; Umrigar, C.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive program to analyze critical systems using an Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method (IMCRG) being undertaken at LANL and Cornell is described. Here we first briefly review the method and then list some of the topics being investigated.

  9. Analytical Applications of Monte Carlo Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guell, Oscar A.; Holcombe, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described are analytical applications of the theory of random processes, in particular solutions obtained by using statistical procedures known as Monte Carlo techniques. Supercomputer simulations, sampling, integration, ensemble, annealing, and explicit simulation are discussed. (CW)

  10. Computational radiology and imaging with the MCNP Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1995-05-01

    MCNP, a 3D coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently used in medical applications such as cancer radiation treatment planning, interpretation of diagnostic radiation images, and treatment beam optimization. This paper will discuss MCNP`s current uses and capabilities, as well as envisioned improvements that would further enhance MCNP role in computational medicine. It will be demonstrated that the methodology exists to simulate medical images (e.g. SPECT). Techniques will be discussed that would enable the construction of 3D computational geometry models of individual patients for use in patient-specific studies that would improve the quality of care for patients.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of aorta autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, A. A.; Pushkareva, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    Results of numerical simulation of autofluorescence of the aorta by the method of Monte Carlo are reported. Two states of the aorta, normal and with atherosclerotic lesions, are studied. A model of the studied tissue is developed on the basis of information about optical, morphological, and physico-chemical properties. It is shown that the data obtained by numerical Monte Carlo simulation are in good agreement with experimental results indicating adequacy of the developed model of the aorta autofluorescence.

  12. Analysis of the radiation shielding of the bunker of a 230MeV proton cyclotron therapy facility; comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Sunil, C

    2016-04-01

    The neutron ambient dose equivalent outside the radiation shield of a proton therapy cyclotron vault is estimated using the unshielded dose equivalent rates and the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature and by simulations carried out with the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The source terms derived from the literature and that obtained from the FLUKA calculations differ by a factor of 2-3, while the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature differ by 20-40%. The instantaneous dose equivalent rates outside the shield differ by a few orders of magnitude, not only in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation results, but also with the results obtained by line of sight attenuation calculations with the different parameters obtained from the literature. The attenuation of neutrons caused by the presence of bulk iron, such as magnet yokes is expected to reduce the dose equivalent by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude outside the shield walls. PMID:26844542

  13. Uncertainty propagation in a stratospheric model. I - Development of a concise stratospheric model. II - Monte Carlo analysis of imprecisions due to reaction rates. [for ozone depletion prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundel, R. D.; Butler, D. M.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of a concise stratospheric model which uses iteration to obtain coupling between interacting species. The one-dimensional, steady-state, diurnally-averaged model generates diffusion equations with appropriate sources and sinks for species odd oxygen, H2O, H2, CO, N2O, odd nitrogen, CH4, CH3Cl, CCl4, CF2Cl2, CFCl3, and odd chlorine. The model evaluates steady-state perturbations caused by injections of chlorine and NO(x) and may be used to predict ozone depletion. The model is used in a Monte Carlo study of the propagation of reaction-rate imprecisions by calculating an ozone perturbation caused by the addition of chlorine. Since the model is sensitive to only 10 of the more than 50 reaction rates considered, only about 1000 Monte Carlo cases are required to span the space of possible results.

  14. Analysis of dpa rates in the HFIR reactor vessel using a hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic method

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which began full-power operation in 1966, provides one of the highest steady-state neutron flux levels of any research reactor in the world. An ongoing vessel integrity analysis program to assess radiation-induced embrittlement of the HFIR reactor vessel requires the calculation of neutron and gamma displacements per atom (dpa), particularly at locations near the beam tube nozzles, where radiation streaming effects are most pronounced. In this study we apply the Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS) technique in the ADVANTG code to develop variance reduction parameters for use in the MCNP radiation transport code. We initially evaluated dpa rates for dosimetry capsule locations, regions in the vicinity of the HB-2 beamline, and the vessel beltline region. We then extended the study to provide dpa rate maps using three-dimensional cylindrical mesh tallies that extend from approximately 12 below to approximately 12 above the axial extent of the core. The mesh tally structures contain over 15,000 mesh cells, providing a detailed spatial map of neutron and photon dpa rates at all locations of interest. Relative errors in the mesh tally cells are typically less than 1%.

  15. Analysis of OH, CN, and C2 Gas Jets in Comet Hale-Bopp through Monte Carlo Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Campins, H.; Lisse, C. M.

    2000-10-01

    We present an analysis of OH, CN, and C2 jets observed in Comet Hale-Bopp during April 22-26, 1997. We conclude that an extended source, which does not peak in productivity at the nucleus, is responsible for the observed morphology in all three species. Sub-micron organic CHON grains are the favored candidate for the extended source. Our model indicates that approximately 40% of the OH, 50% of the C2, and 75% of the CN is produced by the extended source. The balance for each is created by a nuclear gas source. Compared with the nuclear gas source, the composition of the extended source is depleted in OH by a factor of ~4-7, and depleted in C2 by a factor of ~2. We have constrained the number (5) and the locations of the gas jets necessary to reproduce the observed coma morphology on these dates, for all three species. Four of the five active areas on the comet's surface appear to be emitting the same relative mixture of OH, CN and C2. The fifth area (located at ~12S latitude) is richer in OH than the other active areas. This suggests that the composition of the nucleus is not entirely homogeneous. A high thermal inertia, which would allow production of the radicals throughout the cometary night, is not necessary to explain the existence of the anti-sunward gas jets. Instead, active areas that exist in near-twilight conditions throughout the comet's rotation period produce the bulk of the anti-sunward morphology. This work was supported by NASA.

  16. Analysis of dpa Rates in the HFIR Reactor Vessel using a Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risner, J. M.; Blakeman, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    The Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which began full-power operation in 1966, provides one of the highest steady-state neutron flux levels of any research reactor in the world. An ongoing vessel integrity analysis program to assess radiation-induced embrittlement of the HFIR reactor vessel requires the calculation of neutron and gamma displacements per atom (dpa), particularly at locations near the beam tube nozzles, where radiation streaming effects are most pronounced. In this study we apply the Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS) technique in the ADVANTG code to develop variance reduction parameters for use in the MCNP radiation transport code. We initially evaluated dpa rates for dosimetry capsule locations, regions in the vicinity of the HB-2 beamline, and the vessel beltline region. We then extended the study to provide dpa rate maps using three-dimensional cylindrical mesh tallies that extend from approximately 12 in. below to approximately 12 in. above the height of the core. The mesh tally structures contain over 15,000 mesh cells, providing a detailed spatial map of neutron and photon dpa rates at all locations of interest. Relative errors in the mesh tally cells are typically less than 1%. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC0500OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The US Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the US Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for the US Government purposes.

  17. Reconstruction of Human Monte Carlo Geometry from Segmented Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Cheng, Mengyun; Fan, Yanchang; Wang, Wen; Long, Pengcheng; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    Human computational phantoms have been used extensively for scientific experimental analysis and experimental simulation. This article presented a method for human geometry reconstruction from a series of segmented images of a Chinese visible human dataset. The phantom geometry could actually describe detailed structure of an organ and could be converted into the input file of the Monte Carlo codes for dose calculation. A whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female has been established by FDS Team which is named Rad-HUMAN with about 28.8 billion voxel number. For being processed conveniently, different organs on images were segmented with different RGB colors and the voxels were assigned with positions of the dataset. For refinement, the positions were first sampled. Secondly, the large sums of voxels inside the organ were three-dimensional adjacent, however, there were not thoroughly mergence methods to reduce the cell amounts for the description of the organ. In this study, the voxels on the organ surface were taken into consideration of the mergence which could produce fewer cells for the organs. At the same time, an indexed based sorting algorithm was put forward for enhancing the mergence speed. Finally, the Rad-HUMAN which included a total of 46 organs and tissues was described by the cuboids into the Monte Carlo Monte Carlo Geometry for the simulation. The Monte Carlo geometry was constructed directly from the segmented images and the voxels was merged exhaustively. Each organ geometry model was constructed without ambiguity and self-crossing, its geometry information could represent the accuracy appearance and precise interior structure of the organs. The constructed geometry largely retaining the original shape of organs could easily be described into different Monte Carlo codes input file such as MCNP. Its universal property was testified and high-performance was experimentally verified

  18. Use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of methylmercury to estimate exposures in US women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bruce C; Hack, C Eric; Clewell, Harvey J

    2007-08-01

    A Bayesian approach, implemented using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis, was applied with a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of methylmercury (MeHg) to evaluate the variability of MeHg exposure in women of childbearing age in the U.S. population. The analysis made use of the newly available National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) blood and hair mercury concentration data for women of age 16-49 years (sample size, 1,582). Bayesian analysis was performed to estimate the population variability in MeHg exposure (daily ingestion rate) implied by the variation in blood and hair concentrations of mercury in the NHANES database. The measured variability in the NHANES blood and hair data represents the result of a process that includes interindividual variation in exposure to MeHg and interindividual variation in the pharmacokinetics (distribution, clearance) of MeHg. The PBPK model includes a number of pharmacokinetic parameters (e.g., tissue volumes, partition coefficients, rate constants for metabolism and elimination) that can vary from individual to individual within the subpopulation of interest. Using MCMC analysis, it was possible to combine prior distributions of the PBPK model parameters with the NHANES blood and hair data, as well as with kinetic data from controlled human exposures to MeHg, to derive posterior distributions that refine the estimates of both the population exposure distribution and the pharmacokinetic parameters. In general, based on the populations surveyed by NHANES, the results of the MCMC analysis indicate that a small fraction, less than 1%, of the U.S. population of women of childbearing age may have mercury exposures greater than the EPA RfD for MeHg of 0.1 microg/kg/day, and that there are few, if any, exposures greater than the ATSDR MRL of 0.3 microg/kg/day. The analysis also indicates that typical exposures may be greater than previously estimated from food consumption surveys, but that the variability

  19. Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment for irregularly shaped food product volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Siswantoro, Joko; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Abdullah, Azizi; Idrus, Bahari

    2014-01-01

    Volume measurement plays an important role in the production and processing of food products. Various methods have been proposed to measure the volume of food products with irregular shapes based on 3D reconstruction. However, 3D reconstruction comes with a high-priced computational cost. Furthermore, some of the volume measurement methods based on 3D reconstruction have a low accuracy. Another method for measuring volume of objects uses Monte Carlo method. Monte Carlo method performs volume measurements using random points. Monte Carlo method only requires information regarding whether random points fall inside or outside an object and does not require a 3D reconstruction. This paper proposes volume measurement using a computer vision system for irregularly shaped food products without 3D reconstruction based on Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment. Five images of food product were captured using five cameras and processed to produce binary images. Monte Carlo integration with heuristic adjustment was performed to measure the volume based on the information extracted from binary images. The experimental results show that the proposed method provided high accuracy and precision compared to the water displacement method. In addition, the proposed method is more accurate and faster than the space carving method.

  20. The Physical Models and Statistical Procedures Used in the RACER Monte Carlo Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, T.M.; Brown, F.B.; Bischoff, F.G.; MacMillan, D.B.; Ellis, C.L.; Ward, J.T.; Ballinger, C.T.; Kelly, D.J.; Schindler, L.

    1999-07-01

    This report describes the MCV (Monte Carlo - Vectorized)Monte Carlo neutron transport code [Brown, 1982, 1983; Brown and Mendelson, 1984a]. MCV is a module in the RACER system of codes that is used for Monte Carlo reactor physics analysis. The MCV module contains all of the neutron transport and statistical analysis functions of the system, while other modules perform various input-related functions such as geometry description, material assignment, output edit specification, etc. MCV is very closely related to the 05R neutron Monte Carlo code [Irving et al., 1965] developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 05R evolved into the 05RR module of the STEMB system, which was the forerunner of the RACER system. Much of the overall logic and physics treatment of 05RR has been retained and, indeed, the original verification of MCV was achieved through comparison with STEMB results. MCV has been designed to be very computationally efficient [Brown, 1981, Brown and Martin, 1984b; Brown, 1986]. It was originally programmed to make use of vector-computing architectures such as those of the CDC Cyber- 205 and Cray X-MP. MCV was the first full-scale production Monte Carlo code to effectively utilize vector-processing capabilities. Subsequently, MCV was modified to utilize both distributed-memory [Sutton and Brown, 1994] and shared memory parallelism. The code has been compiled and run on platforms ranging from 32-bit UNIX workstations to clusters of 64-bit vector-parallel supercomputers. The computational efficiency of the code allows the analyst to perform calculations using many more neutron histories than is practical with most other Monte Carlo codes, thereby yielding results with smaller statistical uncertainties. MCV also utilizes variance reduction techniques such as survival biasing, splitting, and rouletting to permit additional reduction in uncertainties. While a general-purpose neutron Monte Carlo code, MCV is optimized for reactor physics calculations. It has the

  1. Monte Carlo Markov chains analysis of WMAP3 and SDSS data points to broken symmetry inflaton potentials and provides a lower bound on the tensor to scalar ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Destri, C.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-02-15

    We perform a Monte Carlo Markov chains (MCMC) analysis of the available cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large scale structure (LSS) data (including the three years WMAP data) with single field slow-roll new inflation and chaotic inflation models. We do this within our approach to inflation as an effective field theory in the Ginsburg-Landau spirit with fourth degree trinomial potentials in the inflaton field {phi}. We derive explicit formulae and study in detail the spectral index n{sub s} of the adiabatic fluctuations, the ratio r of tensor to scalar fluctuations, and the running index dn{sub s}/dlnk. We use these analytic formulas as hard constraints on n{sub s} and r in the MCMC analysis. Our analysis differs in this crucial aspect from previous MCMC studies in the literature involving the WMAP3 data. Our results are as follows: (i) The data strongly indicate the breaking (whether spontaneous or explicit) of the {phi}{yields}-{phi} symmetry of the inflaton potentials both for new and for chaotic inflation. (ii) Trinomial new inflation naturally satisfies this requirement and provides an excellent fit to the data. (iii) Trinomial chaotic inflation produces the best fit in a very narrow corner of the parameter space. (iv) The chaotic symmetric trinomial potential is almost certainly ruled out (at 95% C.L.). In trinomial chaotic inflation the MCMC runs go towards a potential in the boundary of the parameter space and which resembles a spontaneously symmetry broken potential of new inflation. (v) The above results and further physical analysis here lead us to conclude that new inflation gives the best description of the data. (vi) We find a lower bound for r within trinomial new inflation potentials: r>0.016(95%CL) and r>0.049(68%CL). (vii) The preferred new inflation trinomial potential is a double well, even function of the field with a moderate quartic coupling yielding as most probable values: n{sub s}{approx_equal}0.958, r{approx_equal}0.055. This value

  2. Monte Carlo Volcano Seismic Moment Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, G. P.; Brill, K. A.; Lanza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling of volcano seismic sources can provide insight into the geometry and dynamics of volcanic conduits. But given the logistical challenges of working on an active volcano, seismic networks are typically deficient in spatial and temporal coverage; this potentially leads to large errors in source models. In addition, uncertainties in the centroid location and moment-tensor components, including volumetric components, are difficult to constrain from the linear inversion results, which leads to a poor understanding of the model space. In this study, we employ a nonlinear inversion using a Monte Carlo scheme with the objective of defining robustly resolved elements of model space. The model space is randomized by centroid location and moment tensor eigenvectors. Point sources densely sample the summit area and moment tensors are constrained to a randomly chosen geometry within the inversion; Green's functions for the random moment tensors are all calculated from modeled single forces, making the nonlinear inversion computationally reasonable. We apply this method to very-long-period (VLP) seismic events that accompany minor eruptions at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. The library of single force Green's functions is computed with a 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm through a homogeneous velocity-density model that includes topography, for a 3D grid of nodes, spaced 40 m apart, within the summit region. The homogenous velocity and density model is justified by long wavelength of VLP data. The nonlinear inversion reveals well resolved model features and informs the interpretation through a better understanding of the possible models. This approach can also be used to evaluate possible station geometries in order to optimize networks prior to deployment.

  3. Dairy goat kids fed liquid diets in substitution of goat milk and slaughtered at different ages: an economic viability analysis using Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Knupp, L S; Veloso, C M; Marcondes, M I; Silveira, T S; Silva, A L; Souza, N O; Knupp, S N R; Cannas, A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the economic viability of producing dairy goat kids fed liquid diets in alternative of goat milk and slaughtered at two different ages. Forty-eight male newborn Saanen and Alpine kids were selected and allocated to four groups using a completely randomized factorial design: goat milk (GM), cow milk (CM), commercial milk replacer (CMR) and fermented cow colostrum (FC). Each group was then divided into two groups: slaughter at 60 and 90 days of age. The animals received Tifton hay and concentrate ad libitum. The values of total costs of liquid and solid feed plus labor, income and average gross margin were calculated. The data were then analyzed using the Monte Carlo techniques with the @Risk 5.5 software, with 1000 iterations of the variables being studied through the model. The kids fed GM and CMR generated negative profitability values when slaughtered at 60 days (US$ -16.4 and US$ -2.17, respectively) and also at 90 days (US$ -30.8 and US$ -0.18, respectively). The risk analysis showed that there is a 98% probability that profitability would be negative when GM is used. In this regard, CM and FC presented low risk when the kids were slaughtered at 60 days (8.5% and 21.2%, respectively) and an even lower risk when animals were slaughtered at 90 days (5.2% and 3.8%, respectively). The kids fed CM and slaughtered at 90 days presented the highest average gross income (US$ 67.88) and also average gross margin (US$ 18.43/animal). For the 60-day rearing regime to be economically viable, the CMR cost should not exceed 11.47% of the animal-selling price. This implies that the replacer cannot cost more than US$ 0.39 and 0.43/kg for the 60- and 90-day feeding regimes, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the variables with the greatest impact on the final model's results were animal selling price, liquid diet cost, final weight at slaughter and labor. In conclusion, the production of male dairy goat kids can be economically

  4. Dairy goat kids fed liquid diets in substitution of goat milk and slaughtered at different ages: an economic viability analysis using Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Knupp, L S; Veloso, C M; Marcondes, M I; Silveira, T S; Silva, A L; Souza, N O; Knupp, S N R; Cannas, A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the economic viability of producing dairy goat kids fed liquid diets in alternative of goat milk and slaughtered at two different ages. Forty-eight male newborn Saanen and Alpine kids were selected and allocated to four groups using a completely randomized factorial design: goat milk (GM), cow milk (CM), commercial milk replacer (CMR) and fermented cow colostrum (FC). Each group was then divided into two groups: slaughter at 60 and 90 days of age. The animals received Tifton hay and concentrate ad libitum. The values of total costs of liquid and solid feed plus labor, income and average gross margin were calculated. The data were then analyzed using the Monte Carlo techniques with the @Risk 5.5 software, with 1000 iterations of the variables being studied through the model. The kids fed GM and CMR generated negative profitability values when slaughtered at 60 days (US$ -16.4 and US$ -2.17, respectively) and also at 90 days (US$ -30.8 and US$ -0.18, respectively). The risk analysis showed that there is a 98% probability that profitability would be negative when GM is used. In this regard, CM and FC presented low risk when the kids were slaughtered at 60 days (8.5% and 21.2%, respectively) and an even lower risk when animals were slaughtered at 90 days (5.2% and 3.8%, respectively). The kids fed CM and slaughtered at 90 days presented the highest average gross income (US$ 67.88) and also average gross margin (US$ 18.43/animal). For the 60-day rearing regime to be economically viable, the CMR cost should not exceed 11.47% of the animal-selling price. This implies that the replacer cannot cost more than US$ 0.39 and 0.43/kg for the 60- and 90-day feeding regimes, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the variables with the greatest impact on the final model's results were animal selling price, liquid diet cost, final weight at slaughter and labor. In conclusion, the production of male dairy goat kids can be economically

  5. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML.; Crucillà, V.; Gulino, M.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; and others

    2015-02-24

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called 'narrow systems' because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of 'hot hydrogen burning' are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as {sup 13}N and {sup 18}F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of {sup 18}F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of {sup 18}F. Among these, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction, using a beam of {sup 18}F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo code

  6. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucillà, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; de Séréville, N.

    2015-02-01

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called "narrow systems" because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of "hot hydrogen burning" are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as 13N and 18F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of 18F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of 18F . Among these, the 18F(p,α)15O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction, using a beam of 18F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo code developed to be used in the data analysis process.

  7. MONTE CARLO ADVANCES FOR THE EOLUS ASCI PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. HENDRICK; G. W. MCKINNEY; L. J. COX

    2000-01-01

    The Eolus ASCI project includes parallel, 3-D transport simulation for various nuclear applications. The codes developed within this project provide neutral and charged particle transport, detailed interaction physics, numerous source and tally capabilities, and general geometry packages. One such code is MCNPW which is a general purpose, 3-dimensional, time-dependent, continuous-energy Monte Carlo fully-coupled N-Particle transport code. Significant advances are also being made in the areas of modern software engineering and parallel computing. These advances are described in detail.

  8. Studying the information content of TMDs using Monte Carlo generators

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, H.; Matevosyan, H.; Pasquini, B.; Schweitzer, P.

    2015-02-05

    Theoretical advances in studies of the nucleon structure have been spurred by recent measurements of spin and/or azimuthal asymmetries worldwide. One of the main challenges still remaining is the extraction of the parton distribution functions, generalized to describe transverse momentum and spatial distributions of partons from these observables with no or minimal model dependence. In this topical review we present the latest developments in the field with emphasis on requirements for Monte Carlo event generators, indispensable for studies of the complex 3D nucleon structure, and discuss examples of possible applications.

  9. Monte Carlo Production Management at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudoul, G.; Franzoni, G.; Norkus, A.; Pol, A.; Srimanobhas, P.; Vlimant, J.-R.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of the LHC data at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment requires the production of a large number of simulated events. During the RunI of LHC (20102012), CMS has produced over 12 Billion simulated events, organized in approximately sixty different campaigns each emulating specific detector conditions and LHC running conditions (pile up). In order to aggregate the information needed for the configuration and prioritization of the events production, assure the book-keeping of all the processing requests placed by the physics analysis groups, and to interface with the CMS production infrastructure, the web- based service Monte Carlo Management (McM) has been developed and put in production in 2013. McM is based on recent server infrastructure technology (CherryPy + AngularJS) and relies on a CouchDB database back-end. This contribution covers the one and half year of operational experience managing samples of simulated events for CMS, the evolution of its functionalities and the extension of its capability to monitor the status and advancement of the events production.

  10. Shell model the Monte Carlo way

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The formalism for the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the nuclear shell model is presented. The method is based on a linearization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian in an imaginary-time propagator using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The foundation of the method, as applied to the nuclear many-body problem, is discussed. Topics presented in detail include: (1) the density-density formulation of the method, (2) computation of the overlaps, (3) the sign of the Monte Carlo weight function, (4) techniques for performing Monte Carlo sampling, and (5) the reconstruction of response functions from an imaginary-time auto-correlation function using MaxEnt techniques. Results obtained using schematic interactions, which have no sign problem, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, while an extrapolation method for realistic Hamiltonians is presented. In addition, applications at finite temperature are outlined.

  11. Pattern Recognition for a Flight Dynamics Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; Hurtado, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The design, analysis, and verification and validation of a spacecraft relies heavily on Monte Carlo simulations. Modern computational techniques are able to generate large amounts of Monte Carlo data but flight dynamics engineers lack the time and resources to analyze it all. The growing amounts of data combined with the diminished available time of engineers motivates the need to automate the analysis process. Pattern recognition algorithms are an innovative way of analyzing flight dynamics data efficiently. They can search large data sets for specific patterns and highlight critical variables so analysts can focus their analysis efforts. This work combines a few tractable pattern recognition algorithms with basic flight dynamics concepts to build a practical analysis tool for Monte Carlo simulations. Current results show that this tool can quickly and automatically identify individual design parameters, and most importantly, specific combinations of parameters that should be avoided in order to prevent specific system failures. The current version uses a kernel density estimation algorithm and a sequential feature selection algorithm combined with a k-nearest neighbor classifier to find and rank important design parameters. This provides an increased level of confidence in the analysis and saves a significant amount of time.

  12. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Fionn D. Lee, D. K. K.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Blunt, N. S.; Shepherd, James J.; Spencer, J. S.

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible.

  13. Monte Carlo electron/photon transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Morel, J.E.; Hughes, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    A review of nonplasma coupled electron/photon transport using Monte Carlo method is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linerarized formalisms at electron energies from 1 keV to 1000 MeV. Applications involving pulse-height estimation, transport in external magnetic fields, and optical Cerenkov production are discussed to underscore the importance of this branch of computational physics. Advances in electron multigroup cross-section generation is reported, and its impact on future code development assessed. Progress toward the transformation of MCNP into a generalized neutral/charged-particle Monte Carlo code is described. 48 refs.

  14. Geodesic Monte Carlo on Embedded Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Simon; Girolami, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods explicitly defined on the manifold of probability distributions have recently been established. These methods are constructed from diffusions across the manifold and the solution of the equations describing geodesic flows in the Hamilton–Jacobi representation. This paper takes the differential geometric basis of Markov chain Monte Carlo further by considering methods to simulate from probability distributions that themselves are defined on a manifold, with common examples being classes of distributions describing directional statistics. Proposal mechanisms are developed based on the geodesic flows over the manifolds of support for the distributions, and illustrative examples are provided for the hypersphere and Stiefel manifold of orthonormal matrices. PMID:25309024

  15. Monte carlo simulations of organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Groves, Chris; Greenham, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are a valuable tool to model the generation, separation, and collection of charges in organic photovoltaics where charges move by hopping in a complex nanostructure and Coulomb interactions between charge carriers are important. We review the Monte Carlo techniques that have been applied to this problem, and describe the results of simulations of the various recombination processes that limit device performance. We show how these processes are influenced by the local physical and energetic structure of the material, providing information that is useful for design of efficient photovoltaic systems.

  16. Fast quantum Monte Carlo on a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsyshyn, Y.

    2015-02-01

    We present a scheme for the parallelization of quantum Monte Carlo method on graphical processing units, focusing on variational Monte Carlo simulation of bosonic systems. We use asynchronous execution schemes with shared memory persistence, and obtain an excellent utilization of the accelerator. The CUDA code is provided along with a package that simulates liquid helium-4. The program was benchmarked on several models of Nvidia GPU, including Fermi GTX560 and M2090, and the Kepler architecture K20 GPU. Special optimization was developed for the Kepler cards, including placement of data structures in the register space of the Kepler GPUs. Kepler-specific optimization is discussed.

  17. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Shepherd, James J; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible.

  18. Geodesic Monte Carlo on Embedded Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Simon; Girolami, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods explicitly defined on the manifold of probability distributions have recently been established. These methods are constructed from diffusions across the manifold and the solution of the equations describing geodesic flows in the Hamilton-Jacobi representation. This paper takes the differential geometric basis of Markov chain Monte Carlo further by considering methods to simulate from probability distributions that themselves are defined on a manifold, with common examples being classes of distributions describing directional statistics. Proposal mechanisms are developed based on the geodesic flows over the manifolds of support for the distributions, and illustrative examples are provided for the hypersphere and Stiefel manifold of orthonormal matrices. PMID:25309024

  19. X-ray microanalysis combined with monte carlo simulation for the analysis of layered thin films: the case of carbon contamination.

    PubMed

    Armigliato, Aldo; Rosa, Rodolfo

    2009-04-01

    A previously developed Monte Carlo code has been extended to the X-ray microanalysis in a (scanning) transmission electron microscope of plan sections, consisting of bilayers and triple layers. To test the validity of this method for quantification purposes, a commercially available NiOx (x 1) thin film, deposited on a carbon layer, has been chosen. The composition and thickness of the NiO film and the thickness of the C support layer are obtained by fitting to the three X-ray intensity ratios I(NiK)/I(OK), I(NiK)/I(CK), and I(OK)/I(CK). Moreover, it has been investigated to what extent the resulting film composition is affected by the presence of a contaminating carbon film at the sample surface. To this end, the sample has been analyzed both in the (recommended) "grid downward" geometry and in the upside/down ("grid upward") situation. It is found that a carbon contaminating film of few tens of nanometers must be assumed in both cases, in addition to the C support film. Consequently, assuming the proper C/NiOx/C stack in the simulations, the Monte Carlo method yields the correct oxygen concentration and thickness of the NiOx film.

  20. Diffusion Monte Carlo in internal coordinates.

    PubMed

    Petit, Andrew S; McCoy, Anne B

    2013-08-15

    An internal coordinate extension of diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) is described as a first step toward a generalized reduced-dimensional DMC approach. The method places no constraints on the choice of internal coordinates other than the requirement that they all be independent. Using H(3)(+) and its isotopologues as model systems, the methodology is shown to be capable of successfully describing the ground state properties of molecules that undergo large amplitude, zero-point vibrational motions. Combining the approach developed here with the fixed-node approximation allows vibrationally excited states to be treated. Analysis of the ground state probability distribution is shown to provide important insights into the set of internal coordinates that are less strongly coupled and therefore more suitable for use as the nodal coordinates for the fixed-node DMC calculations. In particular, the curvilinear normal mode coordinates are found to provide reasonable nodal surfaces for the fundamentals of H(2)D(+) and D(2)H(+) despite both molecules being highly fluxional.

  1. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC) local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA) for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol. PMID:24469314

  2. Markov Chain Monte Carlo and Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottobre, Michela

    2016-06-01

    Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are statistical methods designed to sample from a given measure π by constructing a Markov chain that has π as invariant measure and that converges to π. Most MCMC algorithms make use of chains that satisfy the detailed balance condition with respect to π; such chains are therefore reversible. On the other hand, recent work [18, 21, 28, 29] has stressed several advantages of using irreversible processes for sampling. Roughly speaking, irreversible diffusions converge to equilibrium faster (and lead to smaller asymptotic variance as well). In this paper we discuss some of the recent progress in the study of nonreversible MCMC methods. In particular: i) we explain some of the difficulties that arise in the analysis of nonreversible processes and we discuss some analytical methods to approach the study of continuous-time irreversible diffusions; ii) most of the rigorous results on irreversible diffusions are available for continuous-time processes; however, for computational purposes one needs to discretize such dynamics. It is well known that the resulting discretized chain will not, in general, retain all the good properties of the process that it is obtained from. In particular, if we want to preserve the invariance of the target measure, the chain might no longer be reversible. Therefore iii) we conclude by presenting an MCMC algorithm, the SOL-HMC algorithm [23], which results from a nonreversible discretization of a nonreversible dynamics.

  3. Realistic Monte Carlo Simulation of PEN Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Charles; PEN Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The PEN collaboration undertook to measure the π+ -->e+νe(γ) branching ratio with a relative uncertainty of 5 ×10-4 or less at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This observable is highly susceptible to small non V - A contributions, i.e, non-Standard Model physics. The detector system included a beam counter, mini TPC for beam tracking, an active degrader and stopping target, MWPCs and a plastic scintillator hodoscope for particle tracking and identification, and a spherical CsI EM calorimeter. GEANT 4 Monte Carlo simulation is integral to the analysis as it is used to generate fully realistic events for all pion and muon decay channels. The simulated events are constructed so as to match the pion beam profiles, divergence, and momentum distribution. Ensuring the placement of individual detector components at the sub-millimeter level and proper construction of active target waveforms and associated noise, enables us to more fully understand temporal and geometrical acceptances as well as energy, time, and positional resolutions and calibrations in the detector system. This ultimately leads to reliable discrimination of background events, thereby improving cut based or multivariate branching ratio extraction. Work supported by NSF Grants PHY-0970013, 1307328, and others.

  4. Finding Planet Nine: a Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-06-01

    Planet Nine is a hypothetical planet located well beyond Pluto that has been proposed in an attempt to explain the observed clustering in physical space of the perihelia of six extreme trans-Neptunian objects or ETNOs. The predicted approximate values of its orbital elements include a semimajor axis of 700 au, an eccentricity of 0.6, an inclination of 30°, and an argument of perihelion of 150°. Searching for this putative planet is already under way. Here, we use a Monte Carlo approach to create a synthetic population of Planet Nine orbits and study its visibility statistically in terms of various parameters and focusing on the aphelion configuration. Our analysis shows that, if Planet Nine exists and is at aphelion, it might be found projected against one out of the four specific areas in the sky. Each area is linked to a particular value of the longitude of the ascending node and two of them are compatible with an apsidal anti-alignment scenario. In addition and after studying the current statistics of ETNOs, a cautionary note on the robustness of the perihelia clustering is presented.

  5. Monte Carlo and detector simulation in OOP (Object-Oriented Programming)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; Blankenbecler, R.; Kunz, P. ); Burnett, T.; Storr, K.M. . ECP Div.)

    1990-10-01

    Object-Oriented Programming techniques are explored with an eye toward applications in High Energy Physics codes. Two prototype examples are given: McOOP (a particle Monte Carlo generator) and GISMO (a detector simulation/analysis package).

  6. Advanced interacting sequential Monte Carlo sampling for inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, F.; Minvielle, P.; Del Moral, P.

    2013-09-01

    The following electromagnetism (EM) inverse problem is addressed. It consists in estimating the local radioelectric properties of materials recovering an object from global EM scattering measurements, at various incidences and wave frequencies. This large scale ill-posed inverse problem is explored by an intensive exploitation of an efficient 2D Maxwell solver, distributed on high performance computing machines. Applied to a large training data set, a statistical analysis reduces the problem to a simpler probabilistic metamodel, from which Bayesian inference can be performed. Considering the radioelectric properties as a hidden dynamic stochastic process that evolves according to the frequency, it is shown how advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo methods—called sequential Monte Carlo or interacting particles—can take benefit of the structure and provide local EM property estimates.

  7. Computer Monte Carlo simulation in quantitative resource estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Root, D.H.; Menzie, W.D.; Scott, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    The method of making quantitative assessments of mineral resources sufficiently detailed for economic analysis is outlined in three steps. The steps are (1) determination of types of deposits that may be present in an area, (2) estimation of the numbers of deposits of the permissible deposit types, and (3) combination by Monte Carlo simulation of the estimated numbers of deposits with the historical grades and tonnages of these deposits to produce a probability distribution of the quantities of contained metal. Two examples of the estimation of the number of deposits (step 2) are given. The first example is for mercury deposits in southwestern Alaska and the second is for lode tin deposits in the Seward Peninsula. The flow of the Monte Carlo simulation program is presented with particular attention to the dependencies between grades and tonnages of deposits and between grades of different metals in the same deposit. ?? 1992 Oxford University Press.

  8. Monte Carlo Methodology Serves Up a Software Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Widely used for the modeling of gas flows through the computation of the motion and collisions of representative molecules, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method has become the gold standard for producing research and engineering predictions in the field of rarefied gas dynamics. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo was first introduced in the early 1960s by Dr. Graeme Bird, a professor at the University of Sydney, Australia. It has since proved to be a valuable tool to the aerospace and defense industries in providing design and operational support data, as well as flight data analysis. In 2002, NASA brought to the forefront a software product that maintains the same basic physics formulation of Dr. Bird's method, but provides effective modeling of complex, three-dimensional, real vehicle simulations and parallel processing capabilities to handle additional computational requirements, especially in areas where computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is not applicable. NASA's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Analysis Code (DAC) software package is now considered the Agency s premier high-fidelity simulation tool for predicting vehicle aerodynamics and aerothermodynamic environments in rarified, or low-density, gas flows.

  9. APR1400 LBLOCA uncertainty quantification by Monte Carlo method and comparison with Wilks' formula

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, M.; Bae, S.; Chung, B. D.

    2012-07-01

    An analysis of the uncertainty quantification for the PWR LBLOCA by the Monte Carlo calculation has been performed and compared with the tolerance level determined by Wilks' formula. The uncertainty range and distribution of each input parameter associated with the LBLOCA accident were determined by the PIRT results from the BEMUSE project. The Monte-Carlo method shows that the 95. percentile PCT value can be obtained reliably with a 95% confidence level using the Wilks' formula. The extra margin by the Wilks' formula over the true 95. percentile PCT by the Monte-Carlo method was rather large. Even using the 3 rd order formula, the calculated value using the Wilks' formula is nearly 100 K over the true value. It is shown that, with the ever increasing computational capability, the Monte-Carlo method is accessible for the nuclear power plant safety analysis within a realistic time frame. (authors)

  10. Analysis of the track- and dose-averaged LET and LET spectra in proton therapy using the geant4 Monte Carlo code

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fada; Peeler, Christopher; Bronk, Lawrence; Geng, Changran; Taleei, Reza; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Ge, Shuaiping; Mirkovic, Dragan; Grosshans, David; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The motivation of this study was to find and eliminate the cause of errors in dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET) calculations from therapeutic protons in small targets, such as biological cell layers, calculated using the geant 4 Monte Carlo code. Furthermore, the purpose was also to provide a recommendation to select an appropriate LET quantity from geant 4 simulations to correlate with biological effectiveness of therapeutic protons. Methods: The authors developed a particle tracking step based strategy to calculate the average LET quantities (track-averaged LET, LETt and dose-averaged LET, LETd) using geant 4 for different tracking step size limits. A step size limit refers to the maximally allowable tracking step length. The authors investigated how the tracking step size limit influenced the calculated LETt and LETd of protons with six different step limits ranging from 1 to 500 μm in a water phantom irradiated by a 79.7-MeV clinical proton beam. In addition, the authors analyzed the detailed stochastic energy deposition information including fluence spectra and dose spectra of the energy-deposition-per-step of protons. As a reference, the authors also calculated the averaged LET and analyzed the LET spectra combining the Monte Carlo method and the deterministic method. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations were performed to illustrate the impact of different LET calculation methods on the RBE-weighted dose. Results: Simulation results showed that the step limit effect was small for LETt but significant for LETd. This resulted from differences in the energy-deposition-per-step between the fluence spectra and dose spectra at different depths in the phantom. Using the Monte Carlo particle tracking method in geant 4 can result in incorrect LETd calculation results in the dose plateau region for small step limits. The erroneous LETd results can be attributed to the algorithm to determine fluctuations in energy deposition along the

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbi, C

    1980-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations done for four-dimensional lattice gauge systems are described, where the gauge group is one of the following: U(1); SU(2); Z/sub N/, i.e., the subgroup of U(1) consisting of the elements e 2..pi..in/N with integer n and N; the eight-element group of quaternions, Q; the 24- and 48-element subgroups of SU(2), denoted by T and O, which reduce to the rotation groups of the tetrahedron and the octahedron when their centers Z/sub 2/, are factored out. All of these groups can be considered subgroups of SU(2) and a common normalization was used for the action. The following types of Monte Carlo experiments are considered: simulations of a thermal cycle, where the temperature of the system is varied slightly every few Monte Carlo iterations and the internal energy is measured; mixed-phase runs, where several Monte Carlo iterations are done at a few temperatures near a phase transition starting with a lattice which is half ordered and half disordered; measurements of averages of Wilson factors for loops of different shape. 5 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  12. Advances in Monte Carlo computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert H.

    2011-03-01

    Since the invention of the Metropolis method in 1953, Monte Carlo methods have been shown to provide an efficient, practical approach to the calculation of physical properties in a wide variety of systems. In this talk, I will discuss some of the advances in the MC simulation of thermodynamics systems, with an emphasis on optimization to obtain a maximum of useful information.

  13. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  14. A comparison of Monte Carlo generators

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz

    2015-05-15

    A comparison of GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE, and NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generators is presented using a set of four observables: protons multiplicity, total visible energy, most energetic proton momentum, and π{sup +} two-dimensional energy vs cosine distribution.

  15. Structural Reliability and Monte Carlo Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, P. J.; Harlow, G.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes a simple boom structure and assesses its reliability using elementary engineering mechanics. Demonstrates the power and utility of Monte-Carlo simulation by showing that such a simulation can be implemented more readily with results that compare favorably to the theoretical calculations. (Author/MM)

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation of Counting Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, Philip M.

    A computer program to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of counting experiments was written. The program was based on a mathematical derivation which started with counts in a time interval. The time interval was subdivided to form a binomial distribution with no two counts in the same subinterval. Then the number of subintervals was extended to…

  17. Noninvasive optical measurement of bone marrow lesions: a Monte Carlo study on visible human dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow is both the main hematopoietic and important immune organ. Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) may cause a series of severe complications and even myeloma. The traditional diagnosis of BMLs rely on mostly bone marrow biopsy/ puncture, and sometimes MRI, X-ray, and etc., which are either invasive and dangerous, or ionizing and costly. A diagnosis technology with advantages in noninvasive, safe, real-time continuous detection, and low cost is requested. Here we reported our preliminary exploration of feasibility verification of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in clinical diagnosis of BMLs by Monte Carlo simulation study. We simulated and visualized the light propagation in the bone marrow quantitatively with a Monte Carlo simulation software for 3D voxelized media and Visible Chinese Human data set, which faithfully represents human anatomy. The results indicate that bone marrow actually has significant effects on light propagation. According to a sequence of simulation and data analysis, the optimal source-detector separation was suggested to be narrowed down to 2.8-3.2cm, at which separation the spatial sensitivity distribution of NIRS cover the most region of bone marrow with high signal-to-noise ratio. The display of the sources and detectors were optimized as well. This study investigated the light transport in spine addressing to the BMLs detection issue and reported the feasibility of NIRS detection of BMLs noninvasively in theory. The optimized probe design of the coming NIRS-based BMLs detector is also provided.

  18. Use of SCALE Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Tools for Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2013-01-01

    The TSUNAMI code within the SCALE code system makes use of eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, such as quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different critical systems, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications has motivated the development of a methodology for calculating sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo applications. The CLUTCH and Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) eigenvalue sensitivity methods were recently implemented in the CE KENO framework to generate the capability for TSUNAMI-3D to perform eigenvalue sensitivity calculations in continuous-energy applications. This work explores the improvements in accuracy that can be gained in eigenvalue and eigenvalue sensitivity calculations through the use of the SCALE CE KENO and CE TSUNAMI continuous-energy Monte Carlo tools as compared to multigroup tools. The CE KENO and CE TSUNAMI tools were used to analyze two difficult models of critical benchmarks, and produced eigenvalue and eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient results that showed a marked improvement in accuracy. The CLUTCH sensitivity method in particular excelled in terms of efficiency and computational memory requirements.

  19. Autocorrelation and Dominance Ratio in Monte Carlo Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Taro; Brown, Forrest B.; Parsons, D. Kent; Kornreich, Drew E.

    2003-11-15

    The cycle-to-cycle correlation (autocorrelation) in Monte Carlo criticality calculations is analyzed concerning the dominance ratio of fission kernels. The mathematical analysis focuses on how the eigenfunctions of a fission kernel decay if operated on by the cycle-to-cycle error propagation operator of the Monte Carlo stationary source distribution. The analytical results obtained can be summarized as follows: When the dominance ratio of a fission kernel is close to unity, autocorrelation of the k-effective tallies is weak and may be negligible, while the autocorrelation of the source distribution is strong and decays slowly. The practical implication is that when one analyzes a critical reactor with a large dominance ratio by Monte Carlo methods, the confidence interval estimation of the fission rate and other quantities at individual locations must account for the strong autocorrelation. Numerical results are presented for sample problems with a dominance ratio of 0.85-0.99, where Shannon and relative entropies are utilized to exclude the influence of initial nonstationarity.

  20. Geometric Templates for Improved Tracking Performance in Monte Carlo Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Brian R.; Millman, David L.; Griesheimer, David P.; Gill, Daniel F.

    2014-06-01

    One of the most fundamental parts of a Monte Carlo code is its geometry kernel. This kernel not only affects particle tracking (i.e., run-time performance), but also shapes how users will input models and collect results for later analyses. A new framework based on geometric templates is proposed that optimizes performance (in terms of tracking speed and memory usage) and simplifies user input for large scale models. While some aspects of this approach currently exist in different Monte Carlo codes, the optimization aspect has not been investigated or applied. If Monte Carlo codes are to be realistically used for full core analysis and design, this type of optimization will be necessary. This paper describes the new approach and the implementation of two template types in MC21: a repeated ellipse template and a box template. Several different models are tested to highlight the performance gains that can be achieved using these templates. Though the exact gains are naturally problem dependent, results show that runtime and memory usage can be significantly reduced when using templates, even as problems reach realistic model sizes.

  1. Accelerating Monte Carlo power studies through parametric power estimation.

    PubMed

    Ueckert, Sebastian; Karlsson, Mats O; Hooker, Andrew C

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the power for a non-linear mixed-effects model-based analysis is challenging due to the lack of a closed form analytic expression. Often, computationally intensive Monte Carlo studies need to be employed to evaluate the power of a planned experiment. This is especially time consuming if full power versus sample size curves are to be obtained. A novel parametric power estimation (PPE) algorithm utilizing the theoretical distribution of the alternative hypothesis is presented in this work. The PPE algorithm estimates the unknown non-centrality parameter in the theoretical distribution from a limited number of Monte Carlo simulation and estimations. The estimated parameter linearly scales with study size allowing a quick generation of the full power versus study size curve. A comparison of the PPE with the classical, purely Monte Carlo-based power estimation (MCPE) algorithm for five diverse pharmacometric models showed an excellent agreement between both algorithms, with a low bias of less than 1.2 % and higher precision for the PPE. The power extrapolated from a specific study size was in a very good agreement with power curves obtained with the MCPE algorithm. PPE represents a promising approach to accelerate the power calculation for non-linear mixed effect models.

  2. Improved diffusion coefficients generated from Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, B. R.; Forget, B.; Smith, K.; Aviles, B. N.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo codes are becoming more widely used for reactor analysis. Some of these applications involve the generation of diffusion theory parameters including macroscopic cross sections and diffusion coefficients. Two approximations used to generate diffusion coefficients are assessed using the Monte Carlo code MC21. The first is the method of homogenization; whether to weight either fine-group transport cross sections or fine-group diffusion coefficients when collapsing to few-group diffusion coefficients. The second is a fundamental approximation made to the energy-dependent P1 equations to derive the energy-dependent diffusion equations. Standard Monte Carlo codes usually generate a flux-weighted transport cross section with no correction to the diffusion approximation. Results indicate that this causes noticeable tilting in reconstructed pin powers in simple test lattices with L2 norm error of 3.6%. This error is reduced significantly to 0.27% when weighting fine-group diffusion coefficients by the flux and applying a correction to the diffusion approximation. Noticeable tilting in reconstructed fluxes and pin powers was reduced when applying these corrections. (authors)

  3. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    We perform a stability analysis of a Monte Carlo method for simulating the Compton scattering of photons by free electron in high energy density applications and develop time-step limits that avoid unstable and oscillatory solutions. Implementing this Monte Carlo technique in multi physics problems typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value, which can lead to this undesirable behavior. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficacy of our time-step limits.

  4. Composite sequential Monte Carlo test for post-market vaccine safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ivair R

    2016-04-30

    Group sequential hypothesis testing is now widely used to analyze prospective data. If Monte Carlo simulation is used to construct the signaling threshold, the challenge is how to manage the type I error probability for each one of the multiple tests without losing control on the overall significance level. This paper introduces a valid method for a true management of the alpha spending at each one of a sequence of Monte Carlo tests. The method also enables the use of a sequential simulation strategy for each Monte Carlo test, which is useful for saving computational execution time. Thus, the proposed procedure allows for sequential Monte Carlo test in sequential analysis, and this is the reason that it is called 'composite sequential' test. An upper bound for the potential power losses from the proposed method is deduced. The composite sequential design is illustrated through an application for post-market vaccine safety surveillance data.

  5. Influence of a fat layer on the near infrared spectra of human muscle: quantitative analysis based on two-layered Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ye; Soyemi, Olusola O.; Landry, Michelle R.; Soller, Babs R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of fat thickness on the diffuse reflectance spectra of muscle in the near infrared (NIR) region is studied by Monte Carlo simulations of a two-layer structure and with phantom experiments. A polynomial relationship was established between the fat thickness and the detected diffuse reflectance. The influence of a range of optical coefficients (absorption and reduced scattering) for fat and muscle over the known range of human physiological values was also investigated. Subject-to-subject variation in the fat optical coefficients and thickness can be ignored if the fat thickness is less than 5 mm. A method was proposed to correct the fat thickness influence. c2005 Optical Society of America.

  6. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. SU-E-T-235: Monte Carlo Analysis of the Dose Enhancement in the Scalp of Patients Due to Titanium Plate Backscatter During Post-Operative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, M; Elson, H; Lamba, M; Wolf, E; Warnick, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the clinically observed dose enhancement adjacent to cranial titanium fixation plates during post-operative radiotherapy. Methods: Irradiation of a titanium burr hole cover was simulated using Monte Carlo code MCNPX for a 6 MV photon spectrum to investigate backscatter dose enhancement due to increased production of secondary electrons within the titanium plate. The simulated plate was placed 3 mm deep in a water phantom, and dose deposition was tallied for 0.2 mm thick cells adjacent to the entrance and exit sides of the plate. These results were compared to a simulation excluding the presence of the titanium to calculate relative dose enhancement on the entrance and exit sides of the plate. To verify simulated results, two titanium burr hole covers (Synthes, Inc. and Biomet, Inc.) were irradiated with 6 MV photons in a solid water phantom containing GafChromic MD-55 film. The phantom was irradiated on a Varian 21EX linear accelerator at multiple gantry angles (0–180 degrees) to analyze the angular dependence of the backscattered radiation. Relative dose enhancement was quantified using computer software. Results: Monte Carlo simulations indicate a relative difference of 26.4% and 7.1% on the entrance and exit sides of the plate respectively. Film dosimetry results using a similar geometry indicate a relative difference of 13% and -10% on the entrance and exit sides of the plate respectively. Relative dose enhancement on the entrance side of the plate decreased with increasing gantry angle from 0 to 180 degrees. Conclusion: Film and simulation results demonstrate an increase in dose to structures immediately adjacent to cranial titanium fixation plates. Increased beam obliquity has shown to alleviate dose enhancement to some extent. These results are consistent with clinically observed effects.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudra, Regina M.; Nadler, Andreas; Keller, Emanuella; Niederer, Peter

    2004-06-01

    When near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is applied noninvasively to the adult head for brain monitoring, extra-cerebral bone and surface tissue exert a substantial influence on the cerebral signal. Most attempts to subtract extra-cerebral contamination involve spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). However, inter-individual variability of anatomy restrict the reliability of SRS. We simulated the light propagation with Monte Carlo techniques on the basis of anatomical structures determined from 3D-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exhibiting a voxel resolution of 0.8 x 0.8 x 0.8 mm3 for three different pairs of T1/T2 values each. The MRI data were used to define the material light absorption and dispersion coefficient for each voxel. The resulting spatial matrix was applied in the Monte Carlo Simulation to determine the light propagation in the cerebral cortex and overlaying structures. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo Simulation was furthermore increased by using a constant optical path length for the photons which was less than the median optical path length of the different materials. Based on our simulations we found a differential pathlength factor (DPF) of 6.15 which is close to with the value of 5.9 found in the literature for a distance of 4.5cm between the external sensors. Furthermore, we weighted the spatial probability distribution of the photons within the different tissues with the probabilities of the relative blood volume within the tissue. The results show that 50% of the NIRS signal is determined by the grey matter of the cerebral cortex which allows us to conclude that NIRS can produce meaningful cerebral blood flow measurements providing that the necessary corrections for extracerebral contamination are included.

  9. Analysis of the track- and dose-averaged LET and LET spectra in proton therapy using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Fada; Peeler, Christopher; Taleei, Reza; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Ge, Shuaiping; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe; Bronk, Lawrence; Geng, Changran; Grosshans, David

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The motivation of this study was to find and eliminate the cause of errors in dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET) calculations from therapeutic protons in small targets, such as biological cell layers, calculated using the GEANT 4 Monte Carlo code. Furthermore, the purpose was also to provide a recommendation to select an appropriate LET quantity from GEANT 4 simulations to correlate with biological effectiveness of therapeutic protons. Methods: The authors developed a particle tracking step based strategy to calculate the average LET quantities (track-averaged LET, LET{sub t} and dose-averaged LET, LET{sub d}) using GEANT 4 for different tracking step size limits. A step size limit refers to the maximally allowable tracking step length. The authors investigated how the tracking step size limit influenced the calculated LET{sub t} and LET{sub d} of protons with six different step limits ranging from 1 to 500 μm in a water phantom irradiated by a 79.7-MeV clinical proton beam. In addition, the authors analyzed the detailed stochastic energy deposition information including fluence spectra and dose spectra of the energy-deposition-per-step of protons. As a reference, the authors also calculated the averaged LET and analyzed the LET spectra combining the Monte Carlo method and the deterministic method. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations were performed to illustrate the impact of different LET calculation methods on the RBE-weighted dose. Results: Simulation results showed that the step limit effect was small for LET{sub t} but significant for LET{sub d}. This resulted from differences in the energy-deposition-per-step between the fluence spectra and dose spectra at different depths in the phantom. Using the Monte Carlo particle tracking method in GEANT 4 can result in incorrect LET{sub d} calculation results in the dose plateau region for small step limits. The erroneous LET{sub d} results can be attributed to the algorithm to

  10. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Shepherd, James J; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible. PMID:26233116

  11. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.; Godfrey, T.N.K.; Schrandt, R.G.; Deutsch, O.L.; Booth, T.E.

    1980-05-01

    Four papers were presented by Group X-6 on April 22, 1980, at the Oak Ridge Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) Seminar-Workshop on Theory and Applications of Monte Carlo Methods. These papers are combined into one report for convenience and because they are related to each other. The first paper (by Thompson and Cashwell) is a general survey about X-6 and MCNP and is an introduction to the other three papers. It can also serve as a resume of X-6. The second paper (by Godfrey) explains some of the details of geometry specification in MCNP. The third paper (by Cashwell and Schrandt) illustrates calculating flux at a point with MCNP; in particular, the once-more-collided flux estimator is demonstrated. Finally, the fourth paper (by Thompson, Deutsch, and Booth) is a tutorial on some variance-reduction techniques. It should be required for a fledging Monte Carlo practitioner.

  12. An enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Li, Peiwu; Mao, Jin; Ma, Fei; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qi

    2015-09-30

    Outlier detection is crucial in building a highly predictive model. In this study, we proposed an enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method by establishing cross-prediction models based on determinate normal samples and analyzing the distribution of prediction errors individually for dubious samples. One simulated and three real datasets were used to illustrate and validate the performance of our method, and the results indicated that this method outperformed Monte Carlo outlier detection in outlier diagnosis. After these outliers were removed, the value of validation by Kovats retention indices and the root mean square error of prediction decreased from 3.195 to 1.655, and the average cross-validation prediction error decreased from 2.0341 to 1.2780. This method helps establish a good model by eliminating outliers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations on SIMD computer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Burmester, C.P.; Gronsky, R.; Wille, L.T.

    1992-03-01

    Algorithmic considerations regarding the implementation of various materials science applications of the Monte Carlo technique to single instruction multiple data (SMM) computer architectures are presented. In particular, implementation of the Ising model with nearest, next nearest, and long range screened Coulomb interactions on the SIMD architecture MasPar MP-1 (DEC mpp-12000) series of massively parallel computers is demonstrated. Methods of code development which optimize processor array use and minimize inter-processor communication are presented including lattice partitioning and the use of processor array spanning tree structures for data reduction. Both geometric and algorithmic parallel approaches are utilized. Benchmarks in terms of Monte Carlo updates per second for the MasPar architecture are presented and compared to values reported in the literature from comparable studies on other architectures.

  14. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of fluid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, K K; Ipsen, John H; Sunil Kumar, P B

    2015-07-15

    Lipid vesicles are closed two dimensional fluid surfaces that are studied extensively as model systems for understanding the physical properties of biological membranes. Here we review the recent developments in the Monte Carlo techniques for simulating fluid vesicles and discuss some of their applications. The technique, which treats the membrane as an elastic sheet, is most suitable for the study of large scale conformations of membranes. The model can be used to study vesicles with fixed and varying topologies. Here we focus on the case of multi-component membranes with the local lipid and protein composition coupled to the membrane curvature leading to a variety of shapes. The phase diagram is more intriguing in the case of fluid vesicles having an in-plane orientational order that induce anisotropic directional curvatures. Methods to explore the steady state morphological structures due to active flux of materials have also been described in the context of Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26087479

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of fluid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, K. K.; Ipsen, John H.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Lipid vesicles are closed two dimensional fluid surfaces that are studied extensively as model systems for understanding the physical properties of biological membranes. Here we review the recent developments in the Monte Carlo techniques for simulating fluid vesicles and discuss some of their applications. The technique, which treats the membrane as an elastic sheet, is most suitable for the study of large scale conformations of membranes. The model can be used to study vesicles with fixed and varying topologies. Here we focus on the case of multi-component membranes with the local lipid and protein composition coupled to the membrane curvature leading to a variety of shapes. The phase diagram is more intriguing in the case of fluid vesicles having an in-plane orientational order that induce anisotropic directional curvatures. Methods to explore the steady state morphological structures due to active flux of materials have also been described in the context of Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Monte Carlo Methods in the Physical Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Kalos, M H

    2007-06-06

    I will review the role that Monte Carlo methods play in the physical sciences. They are very widely used for a number of reasons: they permit the rapid and faithful transformation of a natural or model stochastic process into a computer code. They are powerful numerical methods for treating the many-dimensional problems that derive from important physical systems. Finally, many of the methods naturally permit the use of modern parallel computers in efficient ways. In the presentation, I will emphasize four aspects of the computations: whether or not the computation derives from a natural or model stochastic process; whether the system under study is highly idealized or realistic; whether the Monte Carlo methodology is straightforward or mathematically sophisticated; and finally, the scientific role of the computation.

  18. A dual resolution measurement based Monte Carlo simulation technique for detailed dose analysis of small volume organs in the skull base region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chi-Yuan; Tung, Chuan-Jung; Chao, Tsi-Chain; Lin, Mu-Han; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine dose distribution of a skull base tumor and surrounding critical structures in response to high dose intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a dual resolution sandwich phantom. The measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method (Lin et al., 2009) was adopted for the study. The major components of the MBMC technique involve (1) the BEAMnrc code for beam transport through the treatment head of a Varian 21EX linear accelerator, (2) the DOSXYZnrc code for patient dose simulation and (3) an EPID-measured efficiency map which describes non-uniform fluence distribution of the IMRS treatment beam. For the simulated case, five isocentric 6 MV photon beams were designed to deliver a total dose of 1200 cGy in two fractions to the skull base tumor. A sandwich phantom for the MBMC simulation was created based on the patient's CT scan of a skull base tumor [gross tumor volume (GTV)=8.4 cm3] near the right 8th cranial nerve. The phantom, consisted of a 1.2-cm thick skull base region, had a voxel resolution of 0.05×0.05×0.1 cm3 and was sandwiched in between 0.05×0.05×0.3 cm3 slices of a head phantom. A coarser 0.2×0.2×0.3 cm3 single resolution (SR) phantom was also created for comparison with the sandwich phantom. A particle history of 3×108 for each beam was used for simulations of both the SR and the sandwich phantoms to achieve a statistical uncertainty of <2%. Our study showed that the planning target volume (PTV) receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (VPTV95) was 96.9%, 96.7% and 99.9% for the TPS, SR, and sandwich phantom, respectively. The maximum and mean doses to large organs such as the PTV, brain stem, and parotid gland for the TPS, SR and sandwich MC simulations did not show any significant difference; however, significant dose differences were observed for very small structures like the right 8th cranial nerve, right cochlea, right malleus and right semicircular canal. Dose

  19. Measurement comparison and Monte Carlo analysis for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery verification using the ArcCHECK dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Han; Koren, Sion; Veltchev, Iavor; Li, Jinsheng; Wang, Lu; Price, Robert A; Ma, C-M

    2013-05-06

    The objective of this study is to validate the capabilities of a cylindrical diode array system for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment quality assurance (QA). The VMAT plans were generated by the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) with the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for dose calculation. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized as a validation tool for the TPS calculations and the ArcCHECK measurements. The megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) of the ArcCHECK system was adopted for the geometry reconstruction in the TPS and for MC simulations. A 10 × 10 cm2 open field validation was performed for both the 6 and 10 MV photon beams to validate the absolute dose calibration of the ArcCHECK system and also the TPS dose calculations for this system. The impact of the angular dependency on noncoplanar deliveries was investigated with a series of 10 × 10 cm2 fields delivered with couch rotation 0° to 40°. The sensitivity of detecting the translational (1 to 10 mm) and the rotational (1° to 3°) misalignments was tested with a breast VMAT case. Ten VMAT plans (six prostate, H&N, pelvis, liver, and breast) were investigated to evaluate the agreement of the target dose and the peripheral dose among ArcCHECK measurements, and TPS and MC dose calculations. A customized acrylic plug holding an ion chamber was used to measure the dose at the center of the ArcCHECK phantom. Both the entrance and the exit doses measured by the ArcCHECK system with and without the plug agreed with the MC simulation to 1.0%. The TPS dose calculation with a 2.5 mm grid overestimated the exit dose by up to 7.2% when the plug was removed. The agreement between the MC and TPS calculations for the ArcCHECK without the plug improved significantly when a 1 mm dose calculation grid was used in the TPS. The noncoplanar delivery test demonstrated that the angular dependency has limited impact on the gamma passing rate (< 1.2% drop) for the 2%-3% dose and 2mm-3 mm

  20. Monte Carlo Particle Transport: Algorithm and Performance Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N; Procassini, R; Scott, H

    2005-06-02

    Monte Carlo methods are frequently used for neutron and radiation transport. These methods have several advantages, such as relative ease of programming and dealing with complex meshes. Disadvantages include long run times and statistical noise. Monte Carlo photon transport calculations also often suffer from inaccuracies in matter temperature due to the lack of implicitness. In this paper we discuss the Monte Carlo algorithm as it is applied to neutron and photon transport, detail the differences between neutron and photon Monte Carlo, and give an overview of the ways the numerical method has been modified to deal with issues that arise in photon Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of Alaska wolf survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, S. J.

    1996-02-01

    Alaskan wolves live in a harsh climate and are hunted intensively. Penna's biological aging code, using Monte Carlo methods, has been adapted to simulate wolf survival. It was run on the case in which hunting causes the disruption of wolves' social structure. Social disruption was shown to increase the number of deaths occurring at a given level of hunting. For high levels of social disruption, the population did not survive.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of Touschek effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, A.; Borland, M.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-07-30

    We present a Monte Carlo method implementation in the code elegant for simulating Touschek scattering effects in a linac beam. The local scattering rate and the distribution of scattered electrons can be obtained from the code either for a Gaussian-distributed beam or for a general beam whose distribution function is given. In addition, scattered electrons can be tracked through the beam line and the local beam-loss rate and beam halo information recorded.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo with known sign structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Johan

    We investigate the merits of different Hubbard-Stratonovich transformations (including fermionic ones) for the description of interacting fermion systems, focusing on the single band Hubbard model as a model system. In particular we revisit an old proposal of Batrouni and Forcrand (PRB 48, 589 1993) for determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations, in which the signs of all configurations is known beforehand. We will discuss different ways that this knowledge can be used to make more accurate predictions and simulations.

  4. Monte Carlo Generators for the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worek, M.

    2007-11-01

    The status of two Monte Carlo generators, HELAC-PHEGAS, a program for multi-jet processes and VBFNLO, a parton level program for vector boson fusion processes at NLO QCD, is briefly presented. The aim of these tools is the simulation of events within the Standard Model at current and future high energy experiments, in particular the LHC. Some results related to the production of multi-jet final states at the LHC are also shown.

  5. Treatment planning for a small animal using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.

    2007-12-15

    The development of a small animal model for radiotherapy research requires a complete setup of customized imaging equipment, irradiators, and planning software that matches the sizes of the subjects. The purpose of this study is to develop and demonstrate the use of a flexible in-house research environment for treatment planning on small animals. The software package, called DOSCTP, provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM computed tomography-based Monte Carlo dose calculation using the EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. Validation of the treatment planning was performed by comparing the dose distributions for simple photon beam geometries calculated through the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and measurements. A treatment plan for a mouse based on a CT image set by a 360-deg photon arc is demonstrated. It is shown that it is possible to create 3D conformal treatment plans for small animals with consideration of inhomogeneities using small photon beam field sizes in the diameter range of 0.5-5 cm, with conformal dose covering the target volume while sparing the surrounding critical tissue. It is also found that Monte Carlo simulation is suitable to carry out treatment planning dose calculation for small animal anatomy with voxel size about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the human.

  6. Energy Modulated Photon Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ming, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel treatment modality termed energy modulated photon radiotherapy (EMXRT) was investigated. The first step of EMXRT was to determine beam energy for each gantry angle/anatomy configuration from a pool of photon energy beams (2 to 10 MV) with a newly developed energy selector. An inverse planning system using gradient search algorithm was then employed to optimize photon beam intensity of various beam energies based on presimulated Monte Carlo pencil beam dose distributions in patient anatomy. Finally, 3D dose distributions in six patients of different tumor sites were simulated with Monte Carlo method and compared between EMXRT plans and clinical IMRT plans. Compared to current IMRT technique, the proposed EMXRT method could offer a better paradigm for the radiotherapy of lung cancers and pediatric brain tumors in terms of normal tissue sparing and integral dose. For prostate, head and neck, spine, and thyroid lesions, the EMXRT plans were generally comparable to the IMRT plans. Our feasibility study indicated that lower energy (<6 MV) photon beams could be considered in modern radiotherapy treatment planning to achieve a more personalized care for individual patient with dosimetric gains. PMID:26977413

  7. Modeling multileaf collimators with the PEREGRINE Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, N; Fujino, D H; J Wieczorek

    1999-03-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLCs) are becoming increasingly important for beam shaping and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Their unique design can introduce subtle effects in the patient/phantom dose distribution. The PEREGRINE 3D Monte Carlo dose calculation system predicts dose by implementing a full Monte Carlo simulation of the beam delivery and patient/phantom system. As such, it provides a powerful tool to explore dosimetric effects of MLC designs. We have installed a new MLC modeling package into PEREGRINE. This package simulates full photon and electron transport in the MLC and includes tongue-and-groove construction and curved or straight leaf ends in the leaf shape geometry. We tested the accuracy of the PEREGRINE MLC package by comparing PEREGRINE predictions with ion chamber, diode, and photographic film measurements taken with a Varian 2 1 OOC using 6 and 18 MV photon beams. Profile and depth dose measurements were made for the MLC configured into annulus and comb patterns. In all cases, PEREGRINE modeled these measurements to within experimental uncertainties. Our results demonstrate PEREGRINE's accuracy for modeling MLC characteristics, and suggest that PEREGRINE would be an ideal tool to explore issues such as (1) underdosing between leaves due to the ''tongue-and-groove'' effect when dose from multiple MLC patterns are added together, (2) radiation leakage in the bullnose region, and (3) dose under a single leaf due to scatter in the patient.

  8. A 3DHZETRN Code in a Spherical Uniform Sphere with Monte Carlo Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    The computationally efficient HZETRN code has been used in recent trade studies for lunar and Martian exploration and is currently being used in the engineering development of the next generation of space vehicles, habitats, and extra vehicular activity equipment. A new version (3DHZETRN) capable of transporting High charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation is under development. In the present report, new algorithms for light ion and neutron propagation with well-defined convergence criteria in 3D objects is developed and tested against Monte Carlo simulations to verify the solution methodology. The code will be available through the software system, OLTARIS, for shield design and validation and provides a basis for personal computer software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  9. Monte Carlo small-sample perturbation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, U.; Gelbard, E.; Blomquist, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two different Monte Carlo methods have been developed for benchmark computations of small-sample-worths in simplified geometries. The first is basically a standard Monte Carlo perturbation method in which neutrons are steered towards the sample by roulette and splitting. One finds, however, that two variance reduction methods are required to make this sort of perturbation calculation feasible. First, neutrons that have passed through the sample must be exempted from roulette. Second, neutrons must be forced to undergo scattering collisions in the sample. Even when such methods are invoked, however, it is still necessary to exaggerate the volume fraction of the sample by drastically reducing the size of the core. The benchmark calculations are then used to test more approximate methods, and not directly to analyze experiments. In the second method the flux at the surface of the sample is assumed to be known. Neutrons entering the sample are drawn from this known flux and tracking by Monte Carlo. The effect of the sample or the fission rate is then inferred from the histories of these neutrons. The characteristics of both of these methods are explored empirically.

  10. jTracker and Monte Carlo Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selensky, Lauren; SeaQuest/E906 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    SeaQuest is designed to observe the characteristics and behavior of `sea-quarks' in a proton by reconstructing them from the subatomic particles produced in a collision. The 120 GeV beam from the main injector collides with a fixed target and then passes through a series of detectors which records information about the particles produced in the collision. However, this data becomes meaningful only after it has been processed, stored, analyzed, and interpreted. Several programs are involved in this process. jTracker (sqerp) reads wire or hodoscope hits and reconstructs the tracks of potential dimuon pairs from a run, and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulates dimuon production and background noise from the beam. During track reconstruction, an event must meet the criteria set by the tracker to be considered a viable dimuon pair; this ensures that relevant data is retained. As a check, a comparison between a new version of jTracker and Monte Carlo was made in order to see how accurately jTracker could reconstruct the events created by Monte Carlo. In this presentation, the results of the inquest and their potential effects on the programming will be shown. This work is supported by U.S. DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  11. Path Integral Monte Carlo Methods for Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethan, Ethan; Dubois, Jonathan; Ceperley, David

    2014-03-01

    In general, Quantum Monte Carlo methods suffer from a sign problem when simulating fermionic systems. This causes the efficiency of a simulation to decrease exponentially with the number of particles and inverse temperature. To circumvent this issue, a nodal constraint is often implemented, restricting the Monte Carlo procedure from sampling paths that cause the many-body density matrix to change sign. Unfortunately, this high-dimensional nodal surface is not a priori known unless the system is exactly solvable, resulting in uncontrolled errors. We will discuss two possible routes to extend the applicability of finite-temperatue path integral Monte Carlo. First we extend the regime where signful simulations are possible through a novel permutation sampling scheme. Afterwards, we discuss a method to variationally improve the nodal surface by minimizing a free energy during simulation. Applications of these methods will include both free and interacting electron gases, concluding with discussion concerning extension to inhomogeneous systems. Support from DOE DE-FG52-09NA29456, DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD 10- ERD-058, and the Lawrence Scholar program.

  12. Impact of sewer condition on urban flooding: an uncertainty analysis based on field observations and Monte Carlo simulations on full hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    van Bijnen, M; Korving, H; Clemens, F

    2012-01-01

    In-sewer defects are directly responsible for affecting the performance of sewer systems. Notwithstanding the impact of the condition of the assets on serviceability, sewer performance is usually assessed assuming the absence of in-sewer defects. This leads to an overestimation of serviceability. This paper presents the results of a study in two research catchments on the impact of in-sewer defects on urban pluvial flooding at network level. Impacts are assessed using Monte Carlo simulations with a full hydrodynamic model of the sewer system. The studied defects include root intrusion, surface damage, attached and settled deposits, and sedimentation. These defects are based on field observations and translated to two model parameters (roughness and sedimentation). The calculation results demonstrate that the return period of flooding, number of flooded locations and flooded volumes are substantially affected by in-sewer defects. Irrespective of the type of sewer system, the impact of sedimentation is much larger than the impact of roughness. Further research will focus on comparing calculated and measured behaviour in one of the research catchments.

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of transient electron transport in wurtzite Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O combined with first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Hu, Linlin; Shan, Xuefei; Yang, Yintang; Song, Jiuxu; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2015-01-15

    Transient characteristics of wurtzite Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O are investigated using a three-valley Ensemble Monte Carlo model verified by the agreement between the simulated low-field mobility and the experiment result reported. The electronic structures are obtained by first principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that the peak electron drift velocities of Zn{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}O (x = 11.1%, 16.7%, 19.4%, 25%) at 3000 kV/cm are 3.735 × 10{sup 7}, 2.133 × 10{sup 7}, 1.889 × 10{sup 7}, 1.295 × 10{sup 7} cm/s, respectively. With the increase of Mg concentration, a higher electric field is required for the onset of velocity overshoot. When the applied field exceeds 2000 kV/cm and 2500 kV/cm, a phenomena of velocity undershoot is observed in Zn{sub 0.889}Mg{sub 0.111}O and Zn{sub 0.833}Mg{sub 0.167}O respectively, while it is not observed for Zn{sub 0.806}Mg{sub 0.194}O and Zn{sub 0.75}Mg{sub 0.25}O even at 3000 kV/cm which is especially important for high frequency devices.

  14. Monte-Carlo Analysis of the Composition Dependence of the Flory-Huggins Interaction Parameter in PE-dPE Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Travis; Edwards, Brian; Khomami, Bamin

    2012-02-01

    Experimental SANS research displays a significant concentration dependence of the Flory-Huggins (χ) interaction parameter in isotopic polymer blends. At the extremes of the deuterated polymer concentration (φD< 0.2, φD > 0.8), χ is shown to exhibit a greater than fourfold increase over its value at φD = 0.5. However, despite numerous attempts to theoretically describe the nature of this phenomenon, consensus is still lacking regarding the mechanisms at work in this system. This study uses free-space, spatially discretized Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the χ composition dependence of PE-dPE blends. Initial simulations are run on simple Lennard-Jones fluids to display the capability of the simulation method to track local concentration and energy across the discretized space as well as to investigate the concentration dependence of the radial distribution function, g(r), and structure factor, S(k). After which, MC simulations are performed on the PE-dPE system with varying φD. Both local and average system energies are tracked in addition to g(r) and S(k). The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter is then calculated using the Random Phase Approximation.

  15. How the transition frequencies of microtubule dynamic instability (nucleation, catastrophe, and rescue) regulate microtubule dynamics in interphase and mitosis: analysis using a Monte Carlo computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gliksman, N R; Skibbens, R V; Salmon, E D

    1993-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) in newt mitotic spindles grow faster than MTs in the interphase cytoplasmic microtubule complex (CMTC), yet spindle MTs do not have the long lengths or lifetimes of the CMTC microtubules. Because MTs undergo dynamic instability, it is likely that changes in the durations of growth or shortening are responsible for this anomaly. We have used a Monte Carlo computer simulation to examine how changes in the number of MTs and changes in the catastrophe and rescue frequencies of dynamic instability may be responsible for the cell cycle dependent changes in MT characteristics. We used the computer simulations to model interphase-like or mitotic-like MT populations on the basis of the dynamic instability parameters available from newt lung epithelial cells in vivo. We started with parameters that produced MT populations similar to the interphase newt lung cell CMTC. In the simulation, increasing the number of MTs and either increasing the frequency of catastrophe or decreasing the frequency of rescue reproduced the changes in MT dynamics measured in vivo between interphase and mitosis. Images PMID:8298190

  16. Analysis of neutron and photon response of a TLD-ALBEDO personal dosemeter on an ISO slab phantom using TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K

    2005-01-01

    TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo transport code has been used to evaluate the QUADOS (Quality Assurance of Computational Tools for Dosimetry) problem P4, neutron and photon response of an albedo-type thermoluminescence personal dosemeter (TLD) located on an ISO slab phantom. Two enriched 6LiF and two 7LiF TLD chips were used and they were protected, in front or behind, with a boron-loaded dosemeter-holder. Neutron response of the four chips was determined by counting 6Li(n,t)4He events using ENDF/B-VI.4 library and photon response by estimating absorbed dose (MeV g(-1)). Ten neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV and six photon energies from 33 keV to 1.25 MeV were used to study the energy dependence. The fraction of the neutron and photon response owing to phantom backscatter has also been investigated. Detailed TRIPOLI-4.3 solutions are presented and compared with MCNP-4C calculations. PMID:16381740

  17. Experimental validation of plutonium ageing by Monte Carlo correlated sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Litaize, O.; Bernard, D.; Santamarina, A.

    2006-07-01

    Integral measurements of Plutonium Ageing were performed in two homogeneous MOX cores (MISTRAL2 and MISTRALS) of the French MISTRAL Programme between 1996 and year 2000. The analysis of the MISTRAL2 experiment with JEF-2.2 nuclear data library high-lightened an underestimation of {sup 241}Am capture cross section. The next experiment (MISTRALS) did not conclude in the same way. This paper present a new analysis performed with the recent JEFF-3.1 library and a Monte Carlo perturbation method (correlated sampling) available in the French TRIPOLI4 code. (authors)

  18. Neutronic calculations for CANDU thorium systems using Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldideh, M.; Shayesteh, M.; Eshghi, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the prospects of exploiting the rich world thorium reserves using Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The analysis is performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code in order to understand how much time the reactor is in criticality conduction. Four different fuel compositions have been selected for analysis. We have obtained the infinite multiplication factor, k∞, under full power operation of the reactor over 8 years. The neutronic flux distribution in the full core reactor has already been investigated.

  19. Coherent Scattering Imaging Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Laila Abdulgalil Rafik

    Conventional mammography has poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter potentially provides more information because interference of coherently scattered radiation depends on the average intermolecular spacing, and can be used to characterize tissue types. However, typical coherent scatter analysis techniques are not compatible with rapid low dose screening techniques. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is a novel imaging technique which provides new information with higher contrast. In this work a simulation of coherent scatter was performed for slot scan imaging to assess its performance and provide system optimization. In coherent scatter imaging, the coherent scatter is exploited using a conventional slot scan mammography system with anti-scatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate the coherent scatter imaging. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage, tilt angle, grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. The contrast increased as the grid tilt angle increased beyond the characteristic angle for the modeled carcinoma. A grid tilt angle of 16 degrees yielded the highest contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Also, contrast increased as the source voltage increased. Increasing grid ratio improved contrast at the expense of decreasing SNR. A grid ratio of 10:1 was sufficient to give a good contrast without reducing the intensity to a noise level. The optimal source to sample distance was determined to be such that the source should be located at the focal distance of the grid. A carcinoma lump of 0.5x0.5x0.5 cm3 in size was detectable which is reasonable considering the high noise due to the usage of relatively small number of incident photons for computational reasons. A further study is needed to study the effect of breast density and breast thickness

  20. Comparison of first order analysis and Monte Carlo methods in evaluating groundwater model uncertainty: a case study from an iron ore mine in the Pilbara Region of Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmani, G.; Matta, J.

    2012-04-01

    The expansion of mining in the Pilbara region of Western Australia is resulting in the need to develop better water strategies to make below water table resources accessible, manage surplus water and deal with water demands for processing ore and construction. In all these instances, understanding the local and regional hydrogeology is fundamental to allow sustainable mining; minimising the impacts to the environment. An understanding of the uncertainties of the hydrogeology is necessary to quantify the risks and make objective decisions rather than relying on subjective judgements. The aim of this paper is to review some of the methods proposed by the published literature and find approaches that can be practically implemented in an attempt to estimate model uncertainties. In particular, this paper adopts two general probabilistic approaches that address the parametric uncertainty estimation and its propagation in predictive scenarios: the first order analysis and Monte Carlo simulations. A case example application of the two techniques is also presented for the dewatering strategy of a large below water table open cut iron ore mine in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. This study demonstrates the weakness of the deterministic approach, as the coefficients of variation of some model parameters were greater than 1.0; and suggests a review of the model calibration method and conceptualisation. The uncertainty propagation into predictive scenarios was calculated assuming the parameters with a coefficient of variation higher than 0.25 as deterministic, due to computational difficulties to achieve an accurate result with the Monte Carlo method. The conclusion of this case study was that the first order analysis appears to be a successful and simple tool when the coefficients of variation of calibrated parameters are less than 0.25.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of van der Waals fluids from Monte Carlo simulations and perturbative Monte Carlo theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez, A.; Largo, J.; Solana, J. R.

    2006-08-01

    Computer simulations have been performed for fluids with van der Waals potential, that is, hard spheres with attractive inverse power tails, to determine the equation of state and the excess energy. On the other hand, the first- and second-order perturbative contributions to the energy and the zero- and first-order perturbative contributions to the compressibility factor have been determined too from Monte Carlo simulations performed on the reference hard-sphere system. The aim was to test the reliability of this "exact" perturbation theory. It has been found that the results obtained from the Monte Carlo perturbation theory for these two thermodynamic properties agree well with the direct Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, it has been found that results from the Barker-Henderson [J. Chem. Phys. 47, 2856 (1967)] perturbation theory are in good agreement with those from the exact perturbation theory.

  2. Finding organic vapors - a Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuollekoski, Henri; Boy, Michael; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku

    2010-05-01

    drawbacks in accuracy, the inability to find diurnal variation and the lack of size resolution. Here, we aim to shed some light onto the problem by applying an ad hoc Monte Carlo algorithm to a well established aerosol dynamical model, the University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model (UHMA). By performing a side-by-side comparison with measurement data within the algorithm, this approach has the significant advantage of decreasing the amount of manual labor. But more importantly, by basing the comparison on particle number size distribution data - a quantity that can be quite reliably measured - the accuracy of the results is good.

  3. AVATAR -- Automatic variance reduction in Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Riper, K.A.; Urbatsch, T.J.; Soran, P.D.

    1997-05-01

    AVATAR{trademark} (Automatic Variance And Time of Analysis Reduction), accessed through the graphical user interface application, Justine{trademark}, is a superset of MCNP{trademark} that automatically invokes THREEDANT{trademark} for a three-dimensional deterministic adjoint calculation on a mesh independent of the Monte Carlo geometry, calculates weight windows, and runs MCNP. Computational efficiency increases by a factor of 2 to 5 for a three-detector oil well logging tool model. Human efficiency increases dramatically, since AVATAR eliminates the need for deep intuition and hours of tedious handwork.

  4. Influence of molecular architecture on the entanglement network: topological analysis of linear, long- and short-chain branched polyethylene melts via Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Heum; Kim, Jun Mo; Yoon, Jeongha; Tzoumanekas, Christos; Kröger, Martin; Baig, Chunggi

    2016-04-20

    We present detailed results on the effect of chain branching on the topological properties of entangled polymer melts via an advanced connectivity-altering Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. Eleven representative model linear, short-chain branched (SCB), and long-chain branched (LCB) polyethylene (PE) melts were employed, based on the total chain length and/or the longest linear chain dimension. Directly analyzing the entanglement [or the primitive path (PP)] network of the system via the Z-code, we quantified several important topological measures: (a) the PP contour length Lpp, (b) the number of entanglements Zes per chain, (c) the end-to-end length of an entanglement strand des, (d) the number of carbon atoms per entanglement strand Nes, and (e) the probability distribution for each of these quantities. The results show that the SCB polymer melts have significantly more compact overall chain conformations compared to the linear polymers, exhibiting, relative to the corresponding linear analogues, (a) ∼20% smaller values of 〈Lpp〉 (the statistical average of Lpp), (b) ∼30% smaller values of 〈Zes〉, (c) ∼20% larger values of 〈des〉, and (d) ∼50% larger values of 〈Nes〉. In contrast, despite the intrinsically smaller overall chain dimensions than those of the linear analogues, the LCB (H-shaped and A3AA3 multiarm) PE melts exhibit relatively (a) 7-8% larger values of 〈Lpp〉, (b) 6-11% larger values of 〈Zes〉 for the H-shaped melt and ∼2% smaller values of 〈Zes〉 for the A3AA3 multiarm, (c) 2-5% smaller values of 〈des〉, and (d) 7-11% smaller values of 〈Nes〉. Several interesting features were also found in the results of the probability distribution functions P for each topological measure.

  5. Development of Monte-Carlo simulations for nano-patterning surfaces associated with MM-EPES analysis. Application to different Si(111) nanoporous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Goumet, C.; Mahjoub, M. A.; Monier, G.; Bideux, L.; Chelda, S.; Dupuis, R.; Petit, M.; Hoggan, P.; Gruzza, B.

    2013-12-01

    EPES (elastic peak electron spectroscopy) allows measuring the percentage of elastic backscattered electrons ηe from a surface excited by primary electrons. However, this method must be combined with Monte Carlo simulations to get quantitative information. After a brief description of the algorithm used in this work (named MC2), we focused on the adaptation of this simulation for nanoporous surfaces (named MC2-NP). The theoretical results obtained put in evidence the dependence of ηe versus pore diameter (d), depth of the pores (h) and covering rate (CR) of the pores on the surface. Results obtained on surfaces having cylinder-shaped and cone-shaped holes with nanometer dimensions are presented too. To validate theoretical results obtained with MC2-NP, silicon(111) nanoporous surfaces have been prepared with an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template and by argon ion bombardment in an UHV chamber. Uniform nanohole arrays were formed as a replica of ordered lattice pattern of the template. Then EPES experimental measurements have been performed on planar and nanoporous Si(111) surfaces using a retarding field analyzer (RFA). The experimental results put in evidence that the percentage of the elastically backscattered electrons is influenced by the patterning of the surface. Then comparing values of ηe obtained experimentally with those obtained with MC2-NP simulations, we show the sensitivity of the EPES method for studying nanoporous surfaces. In this way, we expect fast estimation of nanohole's dimensions by in-situ MM-EPES (Multi-Mode EPES) without other techniques such as for example scanning electron microscopy.

  6. The metabolic network of Clostridium acetobutylicum: Comparison of the approximate Bayesian computation via sequential Monte Carlo (ABC-SMC) and profile likelihood estimation (PLE) methods for determinability analysis.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic endospore-forming species which produces acetone, butanol and ethanol via the acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation process, leading to biofuels including butanol. In previous work we looked to estimate the parameters in an ordinary differential equation model of the glucose metabolism network using data from pH-controlled continuous culture experiments. Here we combine two approaches, namely the approximate Bayesian computation via an existing sequential Monte Carlo (ABC-SMC) method (to compute credible intervals for the parameters), and the profile likelihood estimation (PLE) (to improve the calculation of confidence intervals for the same parameters), the parameters in both cases being derived from experimental data from forward shift experiments. We also apply the ABC-SMC method to investigate which of the models introduced previously (one non-sporulation and four sporulation models) have the greatest strength of evidence. We find that the joint approximate posterior distribution of the parameters determines the same parameters as previously, including all of the basal and increased enzyme production rates and enzyme reaction activity parameters, as well as the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for glucose ingestion, while other parameters are not as well-determined, particularly those connected with the internal metabolites acetyl-CoA, acetoacetyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA. We also find that the approximate posterior is strongly non-Gaussian, indicating that our previous assumption of elliptical contours of the distribution is not valid, which has the effect of reducing the numbers of pairs of parameters that are (linearly) correlated with each other. Calculations of confidence intervals using the PLE method back this up. Finally, we find that all five of our models are equally likely, given the data available at present. PMID:26561777

  7. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-03-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Monte Carlo Simulations of Background Spectra in Integral Imager Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Dietz, K. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Predictions of the expected gamma-ray backgrounds in the ISGRI (CdTe) and PiCsIT (Csl) detectors on INTEGRAL due to cosmic-ray interactions and the diffuse gamma-ray background have been made using a coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (HETC, FLUKA, EGS4, and MORSE) and a detailed, 3-D mass model of the spacecraft and detector assemblies. The simulations include both the prompt background component from induced hadronic and electromagnetic cascades and the delayed component due to emissions from induced radioactivity. Background spectra have been obtained with and without the use of active (BGO) shielding and charged particle rejection to evaluate the effectiveness of anticoincidence counting on background rejection.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of ABC stacked kagome lattice films.

    PubMed

    Yerzhakov, H V; Plumer, M L; Whitehead, J P

    2016-05-18

    Properties of films of geometrically frustrated ABC stacked antiferromagnetic kagome layers are examined using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations. The impact of having an easy-axis anisotropy on the surface layers and cubic anisotropy in the interior layers is explored. The spin structure at the surface is shown to be different from that of the bulk 3D fcc system, where surface axial anisotropy tends to align spins along the surface [1 1 1] normal axis. This alignment then propagates only weakly to the interior layers through exchange coupling. Results are shown for the specific heat, magnetization and sub-lattice order parameters for both surface and interior spins in three and six layer films as a function of increasing axial surface anisotropy. Relevance to the exchange bias phenomenon in IrMn3 films is discussed.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of ABC stacked kagome lattice films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerzhakov, H. V.; Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    Properties of films of geometrically frustrated ABC stacked antiferromagnetic kagome layers are examined using Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations. The impact of having an easy-axis anisotropy on the surface layers and cubic anisotropy in the interior layers is explored. The spin structure at the surface is shown to be different from that of the bulk 3D fcc system, where surface axial anisotropy tends to align spins along the surface [1 1 1] normal axis. This alignment then propagates only weakly to the interior layers through exchange coupling. Results are shown for the specific heat, magnetization and sub-lattice order parameters for both surface and interior spins in three and six layer films as a function of increasing axial surface anisotropy. Relevance to the exchange bias phenomenon in IrMn3 films is discussed.

  11. Status of Monte-Carlo Event Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeche, Stefan; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    Recent progress on general-purpose Monte-Carlo event generators is reviewed with emphasis on the simulation of hard QCD processes and subsequent parton cascades. Describing full final states of high-energy particle collisions in contemporary experiments is an intricate task. Hundreds of particles are typically produced, and the reactions involve both large and small momentum transfer. The high-dimensional phase space makes an exact solution of the problem impossible. Instead, one typically resorts to regarding events as factorized into different steps, ordered descending in the mass scales or invariant momentum transfers which are involved. In this picture, a hard interaction, described through fixed-order perturbation theory, is followed by multiple Bremsstrahlung emissions off initial- and final-state and, finally, by the hadronization process, which binds QCD partons into color-neutral hadrons. Each of these steps can be treated independently, which is the basic concept inherent to general-purpose event generators. Their development is nowadays often focused on an improved description of radiative corrections to hard processes through perturbative QCD. In this context, the concept of jets is introduced, which allows to relate sprays of hadronic particles in detectors to the partons in perturbation theory. In this talk, we briefly review recent progress on perturbative QCD in event generation. The main focus lies on the general-purpose Monte-Carlo programs HERWIG, PYTHIA and SHERPA, which will be the workhorses for LHC phenomenology. A detailed description of the physics models included in these generators can be found in [8]. We also discuss matrix-element generators, which provide the parton-level input for general-purpose Monte Carlo.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo for vibrating molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.R. |

    1996-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) has successfully computed the total electronic energies of atoms and molecules. The main goal of this work is to use correlation function quantum Monte Carlo (CFQMC) to compute the vibrational state energies of molecules given a potential energy surface (PES). In CFQMC, an ensemble of random walkers simulate the diffusion and branching processes of the imaginary-time time dependent Schroedinger equation in order to evaluate the matrix elements. The program QMCVIB was written to perform multi-state VMC and CFQMC calculations and employed for several calculations of the H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3} vibrational states, using 7 PES`s, 3 trial wavefunction forms, two methods of non-linear basis function parameter optimization, and on both serial and parallel computers. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions different wavefunctions forms were required for H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3}. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions for C{sub 3}, the non-linear parameters were optimized with respect to the sum of the energies of several low-lying vibrational states. In order to stabilize the statistical error estimates for C{sub 3} the Monte Carlo data was collected into blocks. Accurate vibrational state energies were computed using both serial and parallel QMCVIB programs. Comparison of vibrational state energies computed from the three C{sub 3} PES`s suggested that a non-linear equilibrium geometry PES is the most accurate and that discrete potential representations may be used to conveniently determine vibrational state energies.

  13. Monte Carlo ICRH simulations in fully shaped anisotropic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jucker, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Mellet, N.; Brunner, S.

    2008-11-01

    In order to numerically study the effects of Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) on the fast particle distribution function in general plasma geometries, three codes have been coupled: VMEC generates a general (2D or 3D) MHD equilibrium including full shaping and pressure anisotropy. This equilibrium is then mapped into Boozer coordinates. The full-wave code LEMan then calculates the power deposition and electromagnetic field strength of a wave field generated by a chosen antenna using a warm model. Finally, the single particle Hamiltonian code VENUS combines the outputs of the two previous codes in order to calculate the evolution of the distribution function. Within VENUS, Monte Carlo operators for Coulomb collisions of the fast particles with the background plasma have been implemented, accounting for pitch angle and energy scattering. Also, ICRH is simulated using Monte Carlo operators on the Doppler shifted resonant layer. The latter operators act in velocity space and induce a change of perpendicular and parallel velocity depending on the electric field strength and the corresponding wave vector. Eventually, the change in the distribution function will then be fed into VMEC for generating a new equilibrium and thus a self-consistent solution can be found. This model is an enhancement of previous studies in that it is able to include full 3D effects such as magnetic ripple, treat the effects of non-zero orbit width consistently and include the generation and effects of pressure anisotropy. Here, first results of coupling the three codes will be shown in 2D tokamak geometries.

  14. Discovering correlated fermions using quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lucas K.; Ceperley, David M.

    2016-09-01

    It has become increasingly feasible to use quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods to study correlated fermion systems for realistic Hamiltonians. We give a summary of these techniques targeted at researchers in the field of correlated electrons, focusing on the fundamentals, capabilities, and current status of this technique. The QMC methods often offer the highest accuracy solutions available for systems in the continuum, and, since they address the many-body problem directly, the simulations can be analyzed to obtain insight into the nature of correlated quantum behavior.

  15. Monte Carlo procedure for protein design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbäck, Anders; Peterson, Carsten; Potthast, Frank; Sandelin, Erik

    1998-11-01

    A method for sequence optimization in protein models is presented. The approach, which has inherited its basic philosophy from recent work by Deutsch and Kurosky [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 323 (1996)] by maximizing conditional probabilities rather than minimizing energy functions, is based upon a different and very efficient multisequence Monte Carlo scheme. By construction, the method ensures that the designed sequences represent good folders thermodynamically. A bootstrap procedure for the sequence space search is devised making very large chains feasible. The algorithm is successfully explored on the two-dimensional HP model [K. F. Lau and K. A. Dill, Macromolecules 32, 3986 (1989)] with chain lengths N=16, 18, and 32.

  16. Monte Carlo methods to calculate impact probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, H.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wajer, P.; Gabryszewski, R.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Unraveling the events that took place in the solar system during the period known as the late heavy bombardment requires the interpretation of the cratered surfaces of the Moon and terrestrial planets. This, in turn, requires good estimates of the statistical impact probabilities for different source populations of projectiles, a subject that has received relatively little attention, since the works of Öpik (1951, Proc. R. Irish Acad. Sect. A, 54, 165) and Wetherill (1967, J. Geophys. Res., 72, 2429). Aims: We aim to work around the limitations of the Öpik and Wetherill formulae, which are caused by singularities due to zero denominators under special circumstances. Using modern computers, it is possible to make good estimates of impact probabilities by means of Monte Carlo simulations, and in this work, we explore the available options. Methods: We describe three basic methods to derive the average impact probability for a projectile with a given semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination with respect to a target planet on an elliptic orbit. One is a numerical averaging of the Wetherill formula; the next is a Monte Carlo super-sizing method using the target's Hill sphere. The third uses extensive minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) calculations for a Monte Carlo sampling of potentially impacting orbits, along with calculations of the relevant interval for the timing of the encounter allowing collision. Numerical experiments are carried out for an intercomparison of the methods and to scrutinize their behavior near the singularities (zero relative inclination and equal perihelion distances). Results: We find an excellent agreement between all methods in the general case, while there appear large differences in the immediate vicinity of the singularities. With respect to the MOID method, which is the only one that does not involve simplifying assumptions and approximations, the Wetherill averaging impact probability departs by diverging toward

  17. Monte Carlo radiation transport¶llelism

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J.; Post, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    This talk summarizes the main aspects of the LANL ASCI Eolus project and its major unclassified code project, MCNP. The MCNP code provide a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport to approximately 3000 users world-wide. Almost all hardware platforms are supported because we strictly adhere to the FORTRAN-90/95 standard. For parallel processing, MCNP uses a mixture of OpenMp combined with either MPI or PVM (shared and distributed memory). This talk summarizes our experiences on various platforms using MPI with and without OpenMP. These platforms include PC-Windows, Intel-LINUX, BlueMountain, Frost, ASCI-Q and others.

  18. Monte Carlo algorithm for free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Tong, Ning-Hua

    2015-07-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm for the free energy calculation based on configuration space sampling. An upward or downward temperature scan can be used to produce F(T). We implement this algorithm for the Ising model on a square lattice and triangular lattice. Comparison with the exact free energy shows an excellent agreement. We analyze the properties of this algorithm and compare it with the Wang-Landau algorithm, which samples in energy space. This method is applicable to general classical statistical models. The possibility of extending it to quantum systems is discussed.

  19. Exascale Monte Carlo R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Ryan C.

    2012-07-24

    Overview of this presentation is (1) Exascale computing - different technologies, getting there; (2) high-performance proof-of-concept MCMini - features and results; and (3) OpenCL toolkit - Oatmeal (OpenCL Automatic Memory Allocation Library) - purpose and features. Despite driver issues, OpenCL seems like a good, hardware agnostic tool. MCMini demonstrates the possibility for GPGPU-based Monte Carlo methods - it shows great scaling for HPC application and algorithmic equivalence. Oatmeal provides a flexible framework to aid in the development of scientific OpenCL codes.

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations for light nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R. B.

    1998-10-23

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states for nuclei with A {le} 8 are made using a realistic Hamiltonian that fits NN scattering data. Results for more than 40 different (J{pi}, T) states, plus isobaric analogs, are obtained and the known excitation spectra are reproduced reasonably well. Various density and momentum distributions and electromagnetic form factors and moments have also been computed. These are the first microscopic calculations that directly produce nuclear shell structure from realistic NN interactions.