Science.gov

Sample records for 3-d motion parameters

  1. Recursive estimation of 3D motion and surface structure from local affine flow parameters.

    PubMed

    Calway, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    A recursive structure from motion algorithm based on optical flow measurements taken from an image sequence is described. It provides estimates of surface normals in addition to 3D motion and depth. The measurements are affine motion parameters which approximate the local flow fields associated with near-planar surface patches in the scene. These are integrated over time to give estimates of the 3D parameters using an extended Kalman filter. This also estimates the camera focal length and, so, the 3D estimates are metric. The use of parametric measurements means that the algorithm is computationally less demanding than previous optical flow approaches and the recursive filter builds in a degree of noise robustness. Results of experiments on synthetic and real image sequences demonstrate that the algorithm performs well.

  2. Temporal-spatial reach parameters derived from inertial sensors: Comparison to 3D marker-based motion capture.

    PubMed

    Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Rose, Jessica

    2017-02-08

    Reaching is a well-practiced functional task crucial to daily living activities, and temporal-spatial measures of reaching reflect function for both adult and pediatric populations with upper-extremity motor impairments. Inertial sensors offer a mobile and inexpensive tool for clinical assessment of movement. This research outlines a method for measuring temporal-spatial reach parameters using inertial sensors, and validates these measures with traditional marker-based motion capture. 140 reaches from 10 adults, and 30 reaches from nine children aged 18-20 months, were recorded and analyzed using both inertial-sensor and motion-capture methods. Inertial sensors contained three-axis accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers. Gravitational offset of accelerometer data was measured when the sensor was at rest, and removed using sensor orientation measured at rest and throughout the reach. Velocity was calculated by numeric integration of acceleration, using a null-velocity assumption at reach start. Sensor drift was neglected given the 1-2s required for a reach. Temporal-spatial reach parameters were calculated independently for each data acquisition method. Reach path length and distance, peak velocity magnitude and timing, and acceleration at contact demonstrated consistent agreement between sensor- and motion-capture-based methods, for both adult and toddler reaches, as evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients from 0.61 to 1.00. Taken together with actual difference between method measures, results indicate that these functional reach parameters may be reliably measured with inertial sensors.

  3. 3D Human Motion Editing and Synthesis: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Chen, Qiudi; Wang, Wanliang

    2014-01-01

    The ways to compute the kinematics and dynamic quantities of human bodies in motion have been studied in many biomedical papers. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of 3D human motion editing and synthesis techniques. Firstly, four types of methods for 3D human motion synthesis are introduced and compared. Secondly, motion capture data representation, motion editing, and motion synthesis are reviewed successively. Finally, future research directions are suggested. PMID:25045395

  4. Motion estimation in the 3-D Gabor domain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mu; Reed, Todd R

    2007-08-01

    Motion estimation methods can be broadly classified as being spatiotemporal or frequency domain in nature. The Gabor representation is an analysis framework providing localized frequency information. When applied to image sequences, the 3-D Gabor representation displays spatiotemporal/spatiotemporal-frequency (st/stf) information, enabling the application of robust frequency domain methods with adjustable spatiotemporal resolution. In this work, the 3-D Gabor representation is applied to motion analysis. We demonstrate that piecewise uniform translational motion can be estimated by using a uniform translation motion model in the st/stf domain. The resulting motion estimation method exhibits both good spatiotemporal resolution and substantial noise resistance compared to existing spatiotemporal methods. To form the basis of this model, we derive the signature of the translational motion in the 3-D Gabor domain. Finally, to obtain higher spatiotemporal resolution for more complex motions, a dense motion field estimation method is developed to find a motion estimate for every pixel in the sequence.

  5. [Evaluation of Motion Sickness Induced by 3D Video Clips].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yasuyuki; Takada, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    The use of stereoscopic images has been spreading rapidly. Nowadays, stereoscopic movies are nothing new to people. Stereoscopic systems date back to 280 A.D. when Euclid first recognized the concept of depth perception by humans. Despite the increase in the production of three-dimensional (3D) display products and many studies on stereoscopic vision, the effect of stereoscopic vision on the human body has been insufficiently understood. However, symptoms such as eye fatigue and 3D sickness have been the concerns when viewing 3D films for a prolonged period of time; therefore, it is important to consider the safety of viewing virtual 3D contents as a contribution to society. It is generally explained to the public that accommodation and convergence are mismatched during stereoscopic vision and that this is the main reason for the visual fatigue and visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) during 3D viewing. We have devised a method to simultaneously measure lens accommodation and convergence. We used this simultaneous measurement device to characterize 3D vision. Fixation distance was compared between accommodation and convergence during the viewing of 3D films with repeated measurements. Time courses of these fixation distances and their distributions were compared in subjects who viewed 2D and 3D video clips. The results indicated that after 90 s of continuously viewing 3D images, the accommodative power does not correspond to the distance of convergence. In this paper, remarks on methods to measure the severity of motion sickness induced by viewing 3D films are also given. From the epidemiological viewpoint, it is useful to obtain novel knowledge for reduction and/or prevention of VIMS. We should accumulate empirical data on motion sickness, which may contribute to the development of relevant fields in science and technology.

  6. 3D tongue motion from tagged and cine MR images.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach suffers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information to yield improved estimation of 3D tongue motion. The method uses the harmonic phase (HARP) algorithm to extract motion from tags and diffeomorphic demons to provide surface deformation. It then uses an incompressible deformation estimation algorithm to incorporate both sources of displacement information to form an estimate of the 3D whole tongue motion. Experimental results show that use of combined information improves motion estimation near the tongue surface, a problem that has previously been reported as problematic in HARP analysis, while preserving accurate internal motion estimates. Results on both normal and abnormal tongue motions are shown.

  7. Discerning nonrigid 3D shapes from motion cues

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshul; Zaidi, Qasim

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms and objects deform nonrigidly when moving, requiring perceivers to separate shape changes from object motions. Surprisingly, the abilities of observers to correctly infer nonrigid volumetric shapes from motion cues have not been measured, and structure from motion models predominantly use variants of rigidity assumptions. We show that observers are equally sensitive at discriminating cross-sections of flexing and rigid cylinders based on motion cues, when the cylinders are rotated simultaneously around the vertical and depth axes. A computational model based on motion perspective (i.e., assuming perceived depth is inversely proportional to local velocity) predicted the psychometric curves better than shape from motion factorization models using shape or trajectory basis functions. Asymmetric percepts of symmetric cylinders, arising because of asymmetric velocity profiles, provided additional evidence for the dominant role of relative velocity in shape perception. Finally, we show that inexperienced observers are generally incapable of using motion cues to detect inflation/deflation of rigid and flexing cylinders, but this handicap can be overcome with practice for both nonrigid and rigid shapes. The empirical and computational results of this study argue against the use of rigidity assumptions in extracting 3D shape from motion and for the primacy of motion deformations computed from motion shears. PMID:21205884

  8. Characterisation of walking loads by 3D inertial motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nimmen, K.; Lombaert, G.; Jonkers, I.; De Roeck, G.; Van den Broeck, P.

    2014-09-01

    The present contribution analyses the walking behaviour of pedestrians in situ by 3D inertial motion tracking. The technique is first tested in laboratory experiments with simultaneous registration of the ground reaction forces. The registered motion of the pedestrian allows for the identification of stride-to-stride variations, which is usually disregarded in the simulation of walking forces. Subsequently, motion tracking is used to register the walking behaviour of (groups of) pedestrians during in situ measurements on a footbridge. The calibrated numerical model of the structure and the information gathered using the motion tracking system enables detailed simulation of the step-by-step pedestrian induced vibrations. Accounting for the in situ identified walking variability of the test-subjects leads to a significantly improved agreement between the measured and the simulated structural response.

  9. Nonstationary 3D motion of an elastic spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlakovskii, D. V.; Fedotenkov, G. V.

    2015-03-01

    A 3D model of motion of a thin elastic spherical Timoshenko shell under the action of arbitrarily distributed nonstationary pressure is considered. An approach for splitting the system of equations of 3D motion of the shell is proposed. The integral representations of the solution with kernels in the form of influence functions, which can be determined analytically by using series expansions in the eigenfunctions and the Laplace transform, are constructed. An algorithm for solving the problem on the action of nonstationary normal pressure on the shell is constructed and implemented. The obtained results find practical use in aircraft and rocket construction and in many other industrial fields where thin-walled shell structural members under nonstationary working conditions are widely used.

  10. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  11. Ground Motion and Variability from 3-D Deterministic Broadband Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Kyle Brett

    The accuracy of earthquake source descriptions is a major limitation in high-frequency (> 1 Hz) deterministic ground motion prediction, which is critical for performance-based design by building engineers. With the recent addition of realistic fault topography in 3D simulations of earthquake source models, ground motion can be deterministically calculated more realistically up to higher frequencies. We first introduce a technique to model frequency-dependent attenuation and compare its impact on strong ground motions recorded for the 2008 Chino Hills earthquake. Then, we model dynamic rupture propagation for both a generic strike-slip event and blind thrust scenario earthquakes matching the fault geometry of the 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake along rough faults up to 8 Hz. We incorporate frequency-dependent attenuation via a power law above a reference frequency in the form Q0fn, with high accuracy down to Q values of 15, and include nonlinear effects via Drucker-Prager plasticity. We model the region surrounding the fault with and without small-scale medium complexity in both a 1D layered model characteristic of southern California rock and a 3D medium extracted from the SCEC CVMSi.426 including a near-surface geotechnical layer. We find that the spectral acceleration from our models are within 1-2 interevent standard deviations from recent ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and compare well with that of recordings from strong ground motion stations at both short and long periods. At periods shorter than 1 second, Q(f) is needed to match the decay of spectral acceleration seen in the GMPEs as a function of distance from the fault. We find that the similarity between the intraevent variability of our simulations and observations increases when small-scale heterogeneity and plasticity are included, extremely important as uncertainty in ground motion estimates dominates the overall uncertainty in seismic risk. In addition to GMPEs, we compare with simple

  12. Stereo and motion in the display of 3-D scattergrams

    SciTech Connect

    Littlefield, R.J.

    1982-04-01

    A display technique is described that is useful for detecting structure in a 3-dimensional distribution of points. The technique uses a high resolution color raster display to produce a 3-D scattergram. Depth cueing is provided by motion parallax using a capture-replay mechanism. Stereo vision depth cues can also be provided. The paper discusses some general aspects of stereo scattergrams and describes their implementation as red/green anaglyphs. These techniques have been used with data sets containing over 20,000 data points. They can be implemented on relatively inexpensive hardware. (A film of the display was shown at the conference.)

  13. The effect of motion on IMRT - looking at interplay with 3D measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A.; Yan, H.; Oldham, M.; Juang, T.; Adamovics, J.; Yin, F. F.

    2013-06-01

    Clinical recommendations to address tumor motion management have been derived from studies dealing with simulations and 2D measurements. 3D measurements may provide more insight and possibly alter the current motion management guidelines. This study provides an initial look at true 3D measurements involving leaf motion deliveries by use of a motion phantom and the PRESAGE/DLOS dosimetry system. An IMRT and VMAT plan were delivered to the phantom and analyzed by means of DVHs to determine whether the expansion of treatment volumes based on known imaging motion adequately cover the target. DVHs confirmed that for these deliveries the expansion volumes were adequate to treat the intended target although further studies should be conducted to allow for differences in parameters that could alter the results, such as delivery dose and breathe rate.

  14. Inertial Motion-Tracking Technology for Virtual 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In the 1990s, NASA pioneered virtual reality research. The concept was present long before, but, prior to this, the technology did not exist to make a viable virtual reality system. Scientists had theories and ideas they knew that the concept had potential, but the computers of the 1970s and 1980s were not fast enough, sensors were heavy and cumbersome, and people had difficulty blending fluidly with the machines. Scientists at Ames Research Center built upon the research of previous decades and put the necessary technology behind them, making the theories of virtual reality a reality. Virtual reality systems depend on complex motion-tracking sensors to convey information between the user and the computer to give the user the feeling that he is operating in the real world. These motion-tracking sensors measure and report an object s position and orientation as it changes. A simple example of motion tracking would be the cursor on a computer screen moving in correspondence to the shifting of the mouse. Tracking in 3-D, necessary to create virtual reality, however, is much more complex. To be successful, the perspective of the virtual image seen on the computer must be an accurate representation of what is seen in the real world. As the user s head or camera moves, turns, or tilts, the computer-generated environment must change accordingly with no noticeable lag, jitter, or distortion. Historically, the lack of smooth and rapid tracking of the user s motion has thwarted the widespread use of immersive 3-D computer graphics. NASA uses virtual reality technology for a variety of purposes, mostly training of astronauts. The actual missions are costly and dangerous, so any opportunity the crews have to practice their maneuvering in accurate situations before the mission is valuable and instructive. For that purpose, NASA has funded a great deal of virtual reality research, and benefited from the results.

  15. The Visual Priming of Motion-Defined 3D Objects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiong; Jiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The perception of a stimulus can be influenced by previous perceptual experience, a phenomenon known as perceptual priming. However, there has been limited investigation on perceptual priming of shape perception of three-dimensional object structures defined by moving dots. Here we examined the perceptual priming of a 3D object shape defined purely by motion-in-depth cues (i.e., Shape-From-Motion, SFM) using a classic prime-target paradigm. The results from the first two experiments revealed a significant increase in accuracy when a “cloudy” SFM stimulus (whose object structure was difficult to recognize due to the presence of strong noise) was preceded by an unambiguous SFM that clearly defined the same transparent 3D shape. In contrast, results from Experiment 3 revealed no change in accuracy when a “cloudy” SFM stimulus was preceded by a static shape or a semantic word that defined the same object shape. Instead, there was a significant decrease in accuracy when preceded by a static shape or a semantic word that defined a different object shape. These results suggested that the perception of a noisy SFM stimulus can be facilitated by a preceding unambiguous SFM stimulus—but not a static image or a semantic stimulus—that defined the same shape. The potential neural and computational mechanisms underlying the difference in priming are discussed. PMID:26658496

  16. 3D motion analysis of keratin filaments in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf; Aach, Til

    2010-03-01

    We present a novel and efficient approach for 3D motion estimation of keratin intermediate filaments in vitro. Keratin filaments are elastic cables forming a complex scaffolding within epithelial cells. To understand the mechanisms of filament formation and network organisation under physiological and pathological conditions, quantitative measurements of dynamic network alterations are essential. Therefore we acquired time-lapse series of 3D images using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Based on these image series, we show that a dense vector field can be computed such that the displacements from one frame to the next can be determined. Our method is based on a two-step registration process: First, a rigid pre-registration is applied in order to compensate for possible global cell movement. This step enables the subsequent nonrigid registration to capture only the sought local deformations of the filaments. As the transformation model of the deformable registration algorithm is based on Free Form Deformations, it is well suited for modeling filament network dynamics. The optimization is performed using efficient linear programming techniques such that the huge amount of image data of a time series can be efficiently processed. The evaluation of our results illustrates the potential of our approach.

  17. Use of 3D vision for fine robot motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokshin, Anatole; Litwin, Todd

    1989-01-01

    An integration of 3-D vision systems with robot manipulators will allow robots to operate in a poorly structured environment by visually locating targets and obstacles. However, by using computer vision for objects acquisition makes the problem of overall system calibration even more difficult. Indeed, in a CAD based manipulation a control architecture has to find an accurate mapping between the 3-D Euclidean work space and a robot configuration space (joint angles). If a stereo vision is involved, then one needs to map a pair of 2-D video images directly into the robot configuration space. Neural Network approach aside, a common solution to this problem is to calibrate vision and manipulator independently, and then tie them via common mapping into the task space. In other words, both vision and robot refer to some common Absolute Euclidean Coordinate Frame via their individual mappings. This approach has two major difficulties. First a vision system has to be calibrated over the total work space. And second, the absolute frame, which is usually quite arbitrary, has to be the same with a high degree of precision for both robot and vision subsystem calibrations. The use of computer vision to allow robust fine motion manipulation in a poorly structured world which is currently in progress is described along with the preliminary results and encountered problems.

  18. Collective Motion of Mammalian Cell Cohorts in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yasha; Vargas, Diego A.; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Lepzelter, David; Weitz, David A.; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration is ubiquitous in biology, from development to cancer; it occurs in complex systems comprised of heterogeneous cell types, signals and matrices, and requires large scale regulation in space and time. Understanding how cells achieve organized collective motility is crucial to addressing cellular and tissue function and disease progression. While current two-dimensional model systems recapitulate the dynamic properties of collective cell migration, quantitative three-dimensional equivalent model systems have proved elusive. To establish such a model system, we study cell collectives by tracking individuals within cell cohorts embedded in three dimensional collagen scaffolding. We develop a custom algorithm to quantify the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of motion in cell cohorts during motility events. In the absence of external driving agents, we show that these cohorts rotate in short bursts, <2 hours, and translate for up to 6 hours. We observe, track, and analyze three dimensional motion of cell cohorts composed of 3–31 cells, and pave a path toward understanding cell collectives in 3D as a complex emergent system. PMID:26549557

  19. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  20. Effects of 3D random correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional, finite-difference simulations of a realistic finite-fault rupture on the southern Hayward fault are used to evaluate the effects of random, correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions. Velocity perturbations are added to a three-dimensional (3D) regional seismic velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area using a 3D von Karman random medium. Velocity correlation lengths of 5 and 10 km and standard deviations in the velocity of 5% and 10% are considered. The results show that significant deviations in predicted ground velocities are seen in the calculated frequency range (≤1 Hz) for standard deviations in velocity of 5% to 10%. These results have implications for the practical limits on the accuracy of scenario ground-motion calculations and on retrieval of source parameters using higher-frequency, strong-motion data.

  1. Determining the 3-D structure and motion of objects using a scanning laser range sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandhakumar, N.; Smith, Philip W.

    1993-12-01

    In order for the EVAHR robot to autonomously track and grasp objects, its vision system must be able to determine the 3-D structure and motion of an object from a sequence of sensory images. This task is accomplished by the use of a laser radar range sensor which provides dense range maps of the scene. Unfortunately, the currently available laser radar range cameras use a sequential scanning approach which complicates image analysis. Although many algorithms have been developed for recognizing objects from range images, none are suited for use with single beam, scanning, time-of-flight sensors because all previous algorithms assume instantaneous acquisition of the entire image. This assumption is invalid since the EVAHR robot is equipped with a sequential scanning laser range sensor. If an object is moving while being imaged by the device, the apparent structure of the object can be significantly distorted due to the significant non-zero delay time between sampling each image pixel. If an estimate of the motion of the object can be determined, this distortion can be eliminated; but, this leads to the motion-structure paradox - most existing algorithms for 3-D motion estimation use the structure of objects to parameterize their motions. The goal of this research is to design a rigid-body motion recovery technique which overcomes this limitation. The method being developed is an iterative, linear, feature-based approach which uses the non-zero image acquisition time constraint to accurately recover the motion parameters from the distorted structure of the 3-D range maps. Once the motion parameters are determined, the structural distortion in the range images is corrected.

  2. Spectrum analysis of motion parallax in a 3D cluttered scene and application to egomotion.

    PubMed

    Mann, Richard; Langer, Michael S

    2005-09-01

    Previous methods for estimating observer motion in a rigid 3D scene assume that image velocities can be measured at isolated points. When the observer is moving through a cluttered 3D scene such as a forest, however, pointwise measurements of image velocity are more challenging to obtain because multiple depths, and hence multiple velocities, are present in most local image regions. We introduce a method for estimating egomotion that avoids pointwise image velocity estimation as a first step. In its place, the direction of motion parallax in local image regions is estimated, using a spectrum-based method, and these directions are then combined to directly estimate 3D observer motion. There are two advantages to this approach. First, the method can be applied to a wide range of 3D cluttered scenes, including those for which pointwise image velocities cannot be measured because only normal velocity information is available. Second, the egomotion estimates can be used as a posterior constraint on estimating pointwise image velocities, since known egomotion parameters constrain the candidate image velocities at each point to a one-dimensional rather than a two-dimensional space.

  3. Reliability of 3D upper limb motion analysis in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Judy; Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; Meldrum, Dara

    2017-03-01

    Kinematics, measured by 3D upper limb motion analysis (3D-ULMA), can potentially increase understanding of movement patterns by quantifying individual joint contributions. Reliability in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) has not been established.

  4. Ground motion simulations in Marmara (Turkey) region from 3D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ulrich, Thomas; Douglas, John

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European project MARSite (2012-2016), one of the main contributions from our research team was to provide ground-motion simulations for the Marmara region from various earthquake source scenarios. We adopted a 3D finite difference code, taking into account the 3D structure around the Sea of Marmara (including the bathymetry) and the sea layer. We simulated two moderate earthquakes (about Mw4.5) and found that the 3D structure improves significantly the waveforms compared to the 1D layer model. Simulations were carried out for different earthquakes (moderate point sources and large finite sources) in order to provide shake maps (Aochi and Ulrich, BSSA, 2015), to study the variability of ground-motion parameters (Douglas & Aochi, BSSA, 2016) as well as to provide synthetic seismograms for the blind inversion tests (Diao et al., GJI, 2016). The results are also planned to be integrated in broadband ground-motion simulations, tsunamis generation and simulations of triggered landslides (in progress by different partners). The simulations are freely shared among the partners via the internet and the visualization of the results is diffused on the project's homepage. All these simulations should be seen as a reference for this region, as they are based on the latest knowledge that obtained during the MARSite project, although their refinement and validation of the model parameters and the simulations are a continuing research task relying on continuing observations. The numerical code used, the models and the simulations are available on demand.

  5. Faceless identification: a model for person identification using the 3D shape and 3D motion as cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, Lena M.; Li, Haibo

    1999-02-01

    Person identification by using biometric methods based on image sequences, or still images, often requires a controllable and cooperative environment during the image capturing stage. In the forensic case the situation is more likely to be the opposite. In this work we propose a method that makes use of the anthropometry of the human body and human actions as cues for identification. Image sequences from surveillance systems are used, which can be seen as monocular image sequences. A 3D deformable wireframe body model is used as a platform to handle the non-rigid information of the 3D shape and 3D motion of the human body from the image sequence. A recursive method for estimating global motion and local shape variations is presented, using two recursive feedback systems.

  6. 3D Geometry and Motion Estimations of Maneuvering Targets for Interferometric ISAR With Sparse Aperture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Xing, Mengdao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Bao, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the current scenario of high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the non-cooperative targets may have strong maneuverability, which tends to cause time-variant Doppler modulation and imaging plane in the echoed data. Furthermore, it is still a challenge to realize ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets from sparse aperture (SA) data. In this paper, we focus on the problem of 3D geometry and motion estimations of maneuvering targets for interferometric ISAR (InISAR) with SA. For a target of uniformly accelerated rotation, the rotational modulation in echo is formulated as chirp sensing code under a chirp-Fourier dictionary to represent the maneuverability. In particular, a joint multi-channel imaging approach is developed to incorporate the multi-channel data and treat the multi-channel ISAR image formation as a joint-sparsity constraint optimization. Then, a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problem to produce high-resolution range-Doppler (RD) images and chirp parameter estimation. The 3D target geometry and the motion estimations are followed by using the acquired RD images and chirp parameters. Herein, a joint estimation approach of 3D geometry and rotation motion is presented to realize outlier removing and error reduction. In comparison with independent single-channel processing, the proposed joint multi-channel imaging approach performs better in 2D imaging, 3D imaging, and motion estimation. Finally, experiments using both simulated and measured data are performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. Accurate 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.

    2005-08-01

    The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an accurate estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial locations interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for accurately segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.

  8. Tracking 3-D body motion for docking and robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donath, M.; Sorensen, B.; Yang, G. B.; Starr, R.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced method of tracking three-dimensional motion of bodies has been developed. This system has the potential to dynamically characterize machine and other structural motion, even in the presence of structural flexibility, thus facilitating closed loop structural motion control. The system's operation is based on the concept that the intersection of three planes defines a point. Three rotating planes of laser light, fixed and moving photovoltaic diode targets, and a pipe-lined architecture of analog and digital electronics are used to locate multiple targets whose number is only limited by available computer memory. Data collection rates are a function of the laser scan rotation speed and are currently selectable up to 480 Hz. The tested performance on a preliminary prototype designed for 0.1 in accuracy (for tracking human motion) at a 480 Hz data rate includes a worst case resolution of 0.8 mm (0.03 inches), a repeatability of plus or minus 0.635 mm (plus or minus 0.025 inches), and an absolute accuracy of plus or minus 2.0 mm (plus or minus 0.08 inches) within an eight cubic meter volume with all results applicable at the 95 percent level of confidence along each coordinate region. The full six degrees of freedom of a body can be computed by attaching three or more target detectors to the body of interest.

  9. Rigid Body Motion in Stereo 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the difficulties experienced by first-grade students studying rigid body motion at Sofia University. Most quantities describing the rigid body are in relations that the students find hard to visualize and understand. They also lose the notion of cause-result relations between vector quantities, such as the relation between…

  10. Markerless 3D motion capture for animal locomotion studies

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, William Irvin; Hirasaki, Eishi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obtaining quantitative data describing the movements of animals is an essential step in understanding their locomotor biology. Outside the laboratory, measuring animal locomotion often relies on video-based approaches and analysis is hampered because of difficulties in calibration and often the limited availability of possible camera positions. It is also usually restricted to two dimensions, which is often an undesirable over-simplification given the essentially three-dimensional nature of many locomotor performances. In this paper we demonstrate a fully three-dimensional approach based on 3D photogrammetric reconstruction using multiple, synchronised video cameras. This approach allows full calibration based on the separation of the individual cameras and will work fully automatically with completely unmarked and undisturbed animals. As such it has the potential to revolutionise work carried out on free-ranging animals in sanctuaries and zoological gardens where ad hoc approaches are essential and access within enclosures often severely restricted. The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of video-based 3D photogrammetry with examples from primates and birds, as well as discussing the current limitations of this technique and illustrating the accuracies that can be obtained. All the software required is open source so this can be a very cost effective approach and provides a methodology of obtaining data in situations where other approaches would be completely ineffective. PMID:24972869

  11. A Little Knowledge of Ground Motion: Explaining 3-D Physics-Based Modeling to Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Users of earthquake planning scenarios require the ground-motion map to be credible enough to justify costly planning efforts, but not all ground-motion maps are right for all uses. There are two common ways to create a map of ground motion for a hypothetical earthquake. One approach is to map the median shaking estimated by empirical attenuation relationships. The other uses 3-D physics-based modeling, in which one analyzes a mathematical model of the earth's crust near the fault rupture and calculates the generation and propagation of seismic waves from source to ground surface by first principles. The two approaches produce different-looking maps. The more-familiar median maps smooth out variability and correlation. Using them in a planning scenario can lead to a systematic underestimation of damage and loss, and could leave a community underprepared for realistic shaking. The 3-D maps show variability, including some very high values that can disconcert non-scientists. So when the USGS Science Application for Risk Reduction's (SAFRR) Haywired scenario project selected 3-D maps, it was necessary to explain to scenario users—especially engineers who often use median maps—the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of the two approaches. We used authority, empirical evidence, and theory to support our choice. We prefaced our explanation with SAFRR's policy of using the best available earth science, and cited the credentials of the maps' developers and the reputation of the journal in which they published the maps. We cited recorded examples from past earthquakes of extreme ground motions that are like those in the scenario map. We explained the maps on theoretical grounds as well, explaining well established causes of variability: directivity, basin effects, and source parameters. The largest mapped motions relate to potentially unfamiliar extreme-value theory, so we used analogies to human longevity and the average age of the oldest person in samples of

  12. Simple 3-D stimulus for motion parallax and its simulation.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroshi; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; D'Amour, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Simulation of a given stimulus situation should produce the same perception as the original. Rogers et al (2009 Perception 38 907-911) simulated Wheeler's (1982, PhD thesis, Rutgers University, NJ) motion parallax stimulus and obtained quite different perceptions. Wheeler's observers were unable to reliably report the correct direction of depth, whereas Rogers's were. With three experiments we explored the possible reasons for the discrepancy. Our results suggest that Rogers was able to see depth from the simulation partly due to his experience seeing depth with random dot surfaces.

  13. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M. L.; Marins, João C. B.; Silvatti, Amanda P.

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems. PMID:27513846

  14. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernardina, Gustavo R D; Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M L; Marins, João C B; Silvatti, Amanda P

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems.

  15. Motion field estimation for a dynamic scene using a 3D LiDAR.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-09-09

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  16. Motion Field Estimation for a Dynamic Scene Using a 3D LiDAR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively. PMID:25207868

  17. Vision-Based 3D Motion Estimation for On-Orbit Proximity Satellite Tracking and Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    printed using the Fortus 400mc 3D rapid- prototyping printer of the NPS Space Systems Academic Group, while the internal structure is made of aluminum...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited VISION-BASED 3D ...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE VISION-BASED 3D MOTION ESTIMATION FOR ON-ORBIT PROXIMITY SATELLITE TRACKING

  18. Motion-Corrected 3D Sonic Anemometer for Tethersondes and Other Moving Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John

    2012-01-01

    To date, it has not been possible to apply 3D sonic anemometers on tethersondes or similar atmospheric research platforms due to the motion of the supporting platform. A tethersonde module including both a 3D sonic anemometer and associated motion correction sensors has been developed, enabling motion-corrected 3D winds to be measured from a moving platform such as a tethersonde. Blimps and other similar lifting systems are used to support tethersondes meteorological devices that fly on the tether of a blimp or similar platform. To date, tethersondes have been limited to making basic meteorological measurements (pressure, temperature, humidity, and wind speed and direction). The motion of the tethersonde has precluded the addition of 3D sonic anemometers, which can be used for high-speed flux measurements, thereby limiting what has been achieved to date with tethersondes. The tethersonde modules fly on a tether that can be constantly moving and swaying. This would introduce enormous error into the output of an uncorrected 3D sonic anemometer. The motion correction that is required must be implemented in a low-weight, low-cost manner to be suitable for this application. Until now, flux measurements using 3D sonic anemometers could only be made if the 3D sonic anemometer was located on a rigid, fixed platform such as a tower. This limited the areas in which they could be set up and used. The purpose of the innovation was to enable precise 3D wind and flux measurements to be made using tether - sondes. In brief, a 3D accelerometer and a 3D gyroscope were added to a tethersonde module along with a 3D sonic anemometer. This combination allowed for the necessary package motions to be measured, which were then mathematically combined with the measured winds to yield motion-corrected 3D winds. At the time of this reporting, no tethersonde has been able to make any wind measurement other than a basic wind speed and direction measurement. The addition of a 3D sonic

  19. Computing 3-D structure of rigid objects using stereo and motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thinh V.

    1987-01-01

    Work performed as a step toward an intelligent automatic machine vision system for 3-D imaging is discussed. The problem considered is the quantitative 3-D reconstruction of rigid objects. Motion and stereo are the two clues considered in this system. The system basically consists of three processes: the low level process to extract image features, the middle level process to establish the correspondence in the stereo (spatial) and motion (temporal) modalities, and the high level process to compute the 3-D coordinates of the corner points by integrating the spatial and temporal correspondences.

  20. Model-based risk assessment for motion effects in 3D radiotherapy of lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, René; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Although 4D CT imaging becomes available in an increasing number of radiotherapy facilities, 3D imaging and planning is still standard in current clinical practice. In particular for lung tumors, respiratory motion is a known source of uncertainty and should be accounted for during radiotherapy planning - which is difficult by using only a 3D planning CT. In this contribution, we propose applying a statistical lung motion model to predict patients' motion patterns and to estimate dosimetric motion effects in lung tumor radiotherapy if only 3D images are available. Being generated based on 4D CT images of patients with unimpaired lung motion, the model tends to overestimate lung tumor motion. It therefore promises conservative risk assessment regarding tumor dose coverage. This is exemplarily evaluated using treatment plans of lung tumor patients with different tumor motion patterns and for two treatment modalities (conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy and step-&- shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy). For the test cases, 4D CT images are available. Thus, also a standard registration-based 4D dose calculation is performed, which serves as reference to judge plausibility of the modelbased 4D dose calculation. It will be shown that, if combined with an additional simple patient-specific breathing surrogate measurement (here: spirometry), the model-based dose calculation provides reasonable risk assessment of respiratory motion effects.

  1. On the integrability of the motion of 3D-Swinging Atwood machine and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmandouh, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    In the present article, we study the problem of the motion of 3D- Swinging Atwood machine. A new integrable case for this problem is announced. We point out a new integrable case describing the motion of a heavy particle on a titled cone.

  2. Local motion-compensated method for high-quality 3D coronary artery reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction of coronary artery from X-ray angiograms rotationally acquired on C-arm has great clinical value. While cardiac-gated reconstruction has shown promising results, it suffers from the problem of residual motion. This work proposed a new local motion-compensated reconstruction method to handle this issue. An initial image was firstly reconstructed using a regularized iterative reconstruction method. Then a 3D/2D registration method was proposed to estimate the residual vessel motion. Finally, the residual motion was compensated in the final reconstruction using the extended iterative reconstruction method. Through quantitative evaluation, it was found that high-quality 3D reconstruction could be obtained and the result was comparable to state-of-the-art method. PMID:28018741

  3. Local motion-compensated method for high-quality 3D coronary artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-12-01

    The 3D reconstruction of coronary artery from X-ray angiograms rotationally acquired on C-arm has great clinical value. While cardiac-gated reconstruction has shown promising results, it suffers from the problem of residual motion. This work proposed a new local motion-compensated reconstruction method to handle this issue. An initial image was firstly reconstructed using a regularized iterative reconstruction method. Then a 3D/2D registration method was proposed to estimate the residual vessel motion. Finally, the residual motion was compensated in the final reconstruction using the extended iterative reconstruction method. Through quantitative evaluation, it was found that high-quality 3D reconstruction could be obtained and the result was comparable to state-of-the-art method.

  4. Analyzing Non-circular Motions in Spiral Galaxies Through 3D Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Carrera, I.; Rosado, M.; Amram, P.

    3D spectroscopic techniques allow the assessment of different types of motions in extended objects. In the case of spiral galaxies, thes type of techniques allow us to trace not only the (almost) circular motion of the ionized gas, but also the motions arising from the presence of structure such as bars, spiral arms and tidal features. We present an analysis of non-circular motions in spiral galaxies in interacting pairs using scanning Fabry-Perot interferometry of emission lines. We show how this analysis can be helpful to differentiate circular from non-circular motions in the kinematical analysis of this type of galaxies.

  5. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhou, S.; Hurwitz, M.; Mishra, P.; Cai, W.; Rottmann, J.; Li, R.; Williams, C.; Wagar, M.; Berbeco, R.; Ionascu, D.; Lewis, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  6. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    PubMed Central

    Dhou, Salam; Hurwitz, Martina; Mishra, Pankaj; Cai, Weixing; Rottmann, Joerg; Li, Ruijiang; Williams, Christopher; Wagar, Matthew; Berbeco, Ross; Ionascu, Dan; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we develop and perform initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and use these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparing to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT- and 4DCT- based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms, and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery. PMID:25905722

  7. 3D tracking the Brownian motion of colloidal particles using digital holographic microscopy and joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Nicolas; Fournier, Corinne; Fournel, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    In-line digital holography is a valuable tool for sizing, locating, and tracking micro- or nano-objects in a volume. When a parametric imaging model is available, inverse problem approaches provide a straightforward estimate of the object parameters by fitting data with the model, thereby allowing accurate reconstruction. As recently proposed and demonstrated, combining pixel super-resolution techniques with inverse problem approaches improves the estimation of particle size and 3D position. Here, we demonstrate the accurate tracking of colloidal particles in Brownian motion. Particle size and 3D position are jointly optimized from video holograms acquired with a digital holographic microscopy setup based on a low-end microscope objective (×20, NA 0.5). Exploiting information redundancy makes it possible to characterize particles with a standard deviation of 15 nm in size and a theoretical resolution of 2×2×5  nm3 for position under additive white Gaussian noise assumption.

  8. The 3D Human Motion Control Through Refined Video Gesture Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yohan; Suk, Myunghoon; Prabhakaran, B.

    In the beginning of computer and video game industry, simple game controllers consisting of buttons and joysticks were employed, but recently game consoles are replacing joystick buttons with novel interfaces such as the remote controllers with motion sensing technology on the Nintendo Wii [1] Especially video-based human computer interaction (HCI) technique has been applied to games, and the representative game is 'Eyetoy' on the Sony PlayStation 2. Video-based HCI technique has great benefit to release players from the intractable game controller. Moreover, in order to communicate between humans and computers, video-based HCI is very crucial since it is intuitive, easy to get, and inexpensive. On the one hand, extracting semantic low-level features from video human motion data is still a major challenge. The level of accuracy is really dependent on each subject's characteristic and environmental noises. Of late, people have been using 3D motion-capture data for visualizing real human motions in 3D space (e.g, 'Tiger Woods' in EA Sports, 'Angelina Jolie' in Bear-Wolf movie) and analyzing motions for specific performance (e.g, 'golf swing' and 'walking'). 3D motion-capture system ('VICON') generates a matrix for each motion clip. Here, a column is corresponding to a human's sub-body part and row represents time frames of data capture. Thus, we can extract sub-body part's motion only by selecting specific columns. Different from low-level feature values of video human motion, 3D human motion-capture data matrix are not pixel values, but is closer to human level of semantics.

  9. 3D model-based catheter tracking for motion compensation in EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment by radio-frequency catheter ablation, performed using fluoroscopic image guidance, is gaining increasingly more importance. Two-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation can take advantage of overlay images derived from pre-operative 3-D data to add anatomical details otherwise not visible under X-ray. Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of these static overlay images for catheter navigation. We developed an approach for image-based 3-D motion compensation as a solution to this problem. A bi-plane C-arm system is used to take X-ray images of a special circumferential mapping catheter from two directions. In the first step of the method, a 3-D model of the device is reconstructed. Three-dimensional respiratory motion at the site of ablation is then estimated by tracking the reconstructed catheter model in 3-D. This step involves bi-plane fluoroscopy and 2-D/3-D registration. Phantom data and clinical data were used to assess our model-based catheter tracking method. Experiments involving a moving heart phantom yielded an average 2-D tracking error of 1.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 1.1 mm. Our evaluation of clinical data sets comprised 469 bi-plane fluoroscopy frames (938 monoplane fluoroscopy frames). We observed an average 2-D tracking error of 1.0 mm +/- 0.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 0.8 mm +/- 0.5 mm. These results demonstrate that model-based motion-compensation based on 2-D/3-D registration is both feasible and accurate.

  10. Handling Motion-Blur in 3D Tracking and Rendering for Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngmin; Lepetit, Vincent; Woo, Woontack

    2012-09-01

    The contribution of this paper is two-fold. First, we show how to extend the ESM algorithm to handle motion blur in 3D object tracking. ESM is a powerful algorithm for template matching-based tracking, but it can fail under motion blur. We introduce an image formation model that explicitly consider the possibility of blur, and shows its results in a generalization of the original ESM algorithm. This allows to converge faster, more accurately and more robustly even under large amount of blur. Our second contribution is an efficient method for rendering the virtual objects under the estimated motion blur. It renders two images of the object under 3D perspective, and warps them to create many intermediate images. By fusing these images we obtain a final image for the virtual objects blurred consistently with the captured image. Because warping is much faster than 3D rendering, we can create realistically blurred images at a very low computational cost.

  11. Motion-Capture-Enabled Software for Gestural Control of 3D Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Luo, Victor; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Valderrama, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art systems use general-purpose input devices such as a keyboard, mouse, or joystick that map to tasks in unintuitive ways. This software enables a person to control intuitively the position, size, and orientation of synthetic objects in a 3D virtual environment. It makes possible the simultaneous control of the 3D position, scale, and orientation of 3D objects using natural gestures. Enabling the control of 3D objects using a commercial motion-capture system allows for natural mapping of the many degrees of freedom of the human body to the manipulation of the 3D objects. It reduces training time for this kind of task, and eliminates the need to create an expensive, special-purpose controller.

  12. Depth representation of moving 3-D objects in apparent-motion path.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Kawachi, Yousuke; Gyoba, Jiro

    2008-01-01

    Apparent motion is perceived when two objects are presented alternately at different positions. The internal representations of apparently moving objects are formed in an apparent-motion path which lacks physical inputs. We investigated the depth information contained in the representation of 3-D moving objects in an apparent-motion path. We examined how probe objects-briefly placed in the motion path-affected the perceived smoothness of apparent motion. The probe objects comprised 3-D objects which were defined by being shaded or by disparity (convex/concave) or 2-D (flat) objects, while the moving objects were convex/concave objects. We found that flat probe objects induced a significantly smoother motion perception than concave probe objects only in the case of the convex moving objects. However, convex probe objects did not lead to smoother motion as the flat objects did, although the convex probe objects contained the same depth information for the moving objects. Moreover, the difference between probe objects was reduced when the moving objects were concave. These counterintuitive results were consistent in conditions when both depth cues were used. The results suggest that internal representations contain incomplete depth information that is intermediate between that of 2-D and 3-D objects.

  13. 3D pose estimation and motion analysis of the articulated human hand-forearm limb in an industrial production environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Markus; Barrois, Björn; Krüger, Lars; Wöhler, Christian; Sagerer, Gerhard; Kummert, Franz

    2010-09-01

    This study introduces an approach to model-based 3D pose estimation and instantaneous motion analysis of the human hand-forearm limb in the application context of safe human-robot interaction. 3D pose estimation is performed using two approaches: The Multiocular Contracting Curve Density (MOCCD) algorithm is a top-down technique based on pixel statistics around a contour model projected into the images from several cameras. The Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm is a bottom-up approach which uses a motion-attributed 3D point cloud to estimate the object pose. Due to their orthogonal properties, a fusion of these algorithms is shown to be favorable. The fusion is performed by a weighted combination of the extracted pose parameters in an iterative manner. The analysis of object motion is based on the pose estimation result and the motion-attributed 3D points belonging to the hand-forearm limb using an extended constraint-line approach which does not rely on any temporal filtering. A further refinement is obtained using the Shape Flow algorithm, a temporal extension of the MOCCD approach, which estimates the temporal pose derivative based on the current and the two preceding images, corresponding to temporal filtering with a short response time of two or at most three frames. Combining the results of the two motion estimation stages provides information about the instantaneous motion properties of the object. Experimental investigations are performed on real-world image sequences displaying several test persons performing different working actions typically occurring in an industrial production scenario. In all example scenes, the background is cluttered, and the test persons wear various kinds of clothes. For evaluation, independently obtained ground truth data are used. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Event-Based 3D Motion Flow Estimation Using 4D Spatio Temporal Subspaces Properties.

    PubMed

    Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Carneiro, João; Benosman, Ryad B

    2016-01-01

    State of the art scene flow estimation techniques are based on projections of the 3D motion on image using luminance-sampled at the frame rate of the cameras-as the principal source of information. We introduce in this paper a pure time based approach to estimate the flow from 3D point clouds primarily output by neuromorphic event-based stereo camera rigs, or by any existing 3D depth sensor even if it does not provide nor use luminance. This method formulates the scene flow problem by applying a local piecewise regularization of the scene flow. The formulation provides a unifying framework to estimate scene flow from synchronous and asynchronous 3D point clouds. It relies on the properties of 4D space time using a decomposition into its subspaces. This method naturally exploits the properties of the neuromorphic asynchronous event based vision sensors that allows continuous time 3D point clouds reconstruction. The approach can also handle the motion of deformable object. Experiments using different 3D sensors are presented.

  15. Event-Based 3D Motion Flow Estimation Using 4D Spatio Temporal Subspaces Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Carneiro, João; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art scene flow estimation techniques are based on projections of the 3D motion on image using luminance—sampled at the frame rate of the cameras—as the principal source of information. We introduce in this paper a pure time based approach to estimate the flow from 3D point clouds primarily output by neuromorphic event-based stereo camera rigs, or by any existing 3D depth sensor even if it does not provide nor use luminance. This method formulates the scene flow problem by applying a local piecewise regularization of the scene flow. The formulation provides a unifying framework to estimate scene flow from synchronous and asynchronous 3D point clouds. It relies on the properties of 4D space time using a decomposition into its subspaces. This method naturally exploits the properties of the neuromorphic asynchronous event based vision sensors that allows continuous time 3D point clouds reconstruction. The approach can also handle the motion of deformable object. Experiments using different 3D sensors are presented. PMID:28220057

  16. Separate Perceptual and Neural Processing of Velocity- and Disparity-Based 3D Motion Signals.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sung Jun; Czuba, Thaddeus B; Cormack, Lawrence K; Huk, Alexander C

    2016-10-19

    Although the visual system uses both velocity- and disparity-based binocular information for computing 3D motion, it is unknown whether (and how) these two signals interact. We found that these two binocular signals are processed distinctly at the levels of both cortical activity in human MT and perception. In human MT, adaptation to both velocity-based and disparity-based 3D motions demonstrated direction-selective neuroimaging responses. However, when adaptation to one cue was probed using the other cue, there was no evidence of interaction between them (i.e., there was no "cross-cue" adaptation). Analogous psychophysical measurements yielded correspondingly weak cross-cue motion aftereffects (MAEs) in the face of very strong within-cue adaptation. In a direct test of perceptual independence, adapting to opposite 3D directions generated by different binocular cues resulted in simultaneous, superimposed, opposite-direction MAEs. These findings suggest that velocity- and disparity-based 3D motion signals may both flow through area MT but constitute distinct signals and pathways.

  17. Introductory review on `Flying Triangulation': a motion-robust optical 3D measurement principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, Svenja

    2015-04-01

    'Flying Triangulation' (FlyTri) is a recently developed principle which allows for a motion-robust optical 3D measurement of rough surfaces. It combines a simple sensor with sophisticated algorithms: a single-shot sensor acquires 2D camera images. From each camera image, a 3D profile is generated. The series of 3D profiles generated are aligned to one another by algorithms, without relying on any external tracking device. It delivers real-time feedback of the measurement process which enables an all-around measurement of objects. The principle has great potential for small-space acquisition environments, such as the measurement of the interior of a car, and motion-sensitive measurement tasks, such as the intraoral measurement of teeth. This article gives an overview of the basic ideas and applications of FlyTri. The main challenges and their solutions are discussed. Measurement examples are also given to demonstrate the potential of the measurement principle.

  18. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  19. Subject-specific body segment parameter estimation using 3D photogrammetry with multiple cameras

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Mark; Sellers, William I.

    2015-01-01

    Inertial properties of body segments, such as mass, centre of mass or moments of inertia, are important parameters when studying movements of the human body. However, these quantities are not directly measurable. Current approaches include using regression models which have limited accuracy: geometric models with lengthy measuring procedures or acquiring and post-processing MRI scans of participants. We propose a geometric methodology based on 3D photogrammetry using multiple cameras to provide subject-specific body segment parameters while minimizing the interaction time with the participants. A low-cost body scanner was built using multiple cameras and 3D point cloud data generated using structure from motion photogrammetric reconstruction algorithms. The point cloud was manually separated into body segments, and convex hulling applied to each segment to produce the required geometric outlines. The accuracy of the method can be adjusted by choosing the number of subdivisions of the body segments. The body segment parameters of six participants (four male and two female) are presented using the proposed method. The multi-camera photogrammetric approach is expected to be particularly suited for studies including populations for which regression models are not available in literature and where other geometric techniques or MRI scanning are not applicable due to time or ethical constraints. PMID:25780778

  20. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Jørgensen, Morten R.; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Roed, Bjarne; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-02-01

    Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light with a DLP projector and a CCD camera is set up on a model of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT). Methods to reconstruct 3D point clouds of simple surfaces based on phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) are demonstrated. The projector and camera are calibrated using a simple stereo vision procedure where the projector is treated as a camera. Additionally, the surface reconstructions are corrected for the non-linear projector output prior to image capture. The results are convincing and a first step toward a fully automated tracking system for measuring head motions in PET imaging.

  1. Robust object tracking techniques for vision-based 3D motion analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, Vladimir A.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.

    2016-04-01

    Automated and accurate spatial motion capturing of an object is necessary for a wide variety of applications including industry and science, virtual reality and movie, medicine and sports. For the most part of applications a reliability and an accuracy of the data obtained as well as convenience for a user are the main characteristics defining the quality of the motion capture system. Among the existing systems for 3D data acquisition, based on different physical principles (accelerometry, magnetometry, time-of-flight, vision-based), optical motion capture systems have a set of advantages such as high speed of acquisition, potential for high accuracy and automation based on advanced image processing algorithms. For vision-based motion capture accurate and robust object features detecting and tracking through the video sequence are the key elements along with a level of automation of capturing process. So for providing high accuracy of obtained spatial data the developed vision-based motion capture system "Mosca" is based on photogrammetric principles of 3D measurements and supports high speed image acquisition in synchronized mode. It includes from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for capturing video sequences of object motion. The original camera calibration and external orientation procedures provide the basis for high accuracy of 3D measurements. A set of algorithms as for detecting, identifying and tracking of similar targets, so for marker-less object motion capture is developed and tested. The results of algorithms' evaluation show high robustness and high reliability for various motion analysis tasks in technical and biomechanics applications.

  2. Nonlinear Synchronization for Automatic Learning of 3D Pose Variability in Human Motion Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozerov, M.; Rius, I.; Roca, X.; González, J.

    2009-12-01

    A dense matching algorithm that solves the problem of synchronizing prerecorded human motion sequences, which show different speeds and accelerations, is proposed. The approach is based on minimization of MRF energy and solves the problem by using Dynamic Programming. Additionally, an optimal sequence is automatically selected from the input dataset to be a time-scale pattern for all other sequences. The paper utilizes an action specific model which automatically learns the variability of 3D human postures observed in a set of training sequences. The model is trained using the public CMU motion capture dataset for the walking action, and a mean walking performance is automatically learnt. Additionally, statistics about the observed variability of the postures and motion direction are also computed at each time step. The synchronized motion sequences are used to learn a model of human motion for action recognition and full-body tracking purposes.

  3. Markerless motion capture can provide reliable 3D gait kinematics in the sagittal and frontal plane.

    PubMed

    Sandau, Martin; Koblauch, Henrik; Moeslund, Thomas B; Aanæs, Henrik; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2014-09-01

    Estimating 3D joint rotations in the lower extremities accurately and reliably remains unresolved in markerless motion capture, despite extensive studies in the past decades. The main problems have been ascribed to the limited accuracy of the 3D reconstructions. Accordingly, the purpose of the present study was to develop a new approach based on highly detailed 3D reconstructions in combination with a translational and rotational unconstrained articulated model. The highly detailed 3D reconstructions were synthesized from an eight camera setup using a stereo vision approach. The subject specific articulated model was generated with three rotational and three translational degrees of freedom for each limb segment and without any constraints to the range of motion. This approach was tested on 3D gait analysis and compared to a marker based method. The experiment included ten healthy subjects in whom hip, knee and ankle joint were analysed. Flexion/extension angles as well as hip abduction/adduction closely resembled those obtained from the marker based system. However, the internal/external rotations, knee abduction/adduction and ankle inversion/eversion were less reliable.

  4. 3D motion adapted gating (3D MAG): a new navigator technique for accelerated acquisition of free breathing navigator gated 3D coronary MR-angiography.

    PubMed

    Hackenbroch, M; Nehrke, K; Gieseke, J; Meyer, C; Tiemann, K; Litt, H; Dewald, O; Naehle, C P; Schild, H; Sommer, T

    2005-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of a new navigator technique (3D MAG) on navigator efficiency, total acquisition time, image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Fifty-six patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent free breathing navigator gated coronary MRA (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, 1.5 T, spatial resolution 0.9x0.9x3 mm3) with and without 3D MAG. Evaluation of both sequences included: 1) navigator scan efficiency, 2) total acquisition time, 3) assessment of image quality and 4) detection of stenoses >50%. Average navigator efficiencies of the LCA and RCA were 43+/-12% and 42+/-12% with and 36+/-16% and 35+/-16% without 3D MAG (P<0.01). Scan time was reduced from 12 min 7 s without to 8 min 55 s with 3D MAG for the LCA and from 12 min 19 s to 9 min 7 s with 3D MAG for the RCA (P<0.01). The average scores of image quality of the coronary MRAs with and without 3D MAG were 3.5+/-0.79 and 3.46+/-0.84 (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the sensitivity and specificity in the detection of coronary artery stenoses between coronary MRAs with and without 3D MAG (P>0.05). 3D MAG provides accelerated acquisition of navigator gated coronary MRA by about 19% while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy.

  5. 3D Measurement of Forearm and Upper Arm during Throwing Motion using Body Mounted Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Hideharu; Sagawa, Koichi; Kuroshima, Kouta; Tsukamoto, Toshiaki; Urita, Kazutaka; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    The aim of this study is to propose the measurement method of three-dimensional (3D) movement of forearm and upper arm during pitching motion of baseball using inertial sensors without serious consideration of sensor installation. Although high accuracy measurement of sports motion is achieved by using optical motion capture system at present, it has some disadvantages such as the calibration of cameras and limitation of measurement place. Whereas the proposed method for 3D measurement of pitching motion using body mounted sensors provides trajectory and orientation of upper arm by the integration of acceleration and angular velocity measured on upper limb. The trajectory of forearm is derived so that the elbow joint axis of forearm corresponds to that of upper arm. Spatial relation between upper limb and sensor system is obtained by performing predetermined movements of upper limb and utilizing angular velocity and gravitational acceleration. The integration error is modified so that the estimated final position, velocity and posture of upper limb agree with the actual ones. The experimental results of the measurement of pitching motion show that trajectories of shoulder, elbow and wrist estimated by the proposed method are highly correlated to those from the motion capture system within the estimation error of about 10 [%].

  6. Brightness-compensated 3-D optical flow algorithm for monitoring cochlear motion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Tiedemann, Miriam; Fridberger, Anders; Ulfendahl, Mats; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet

    2010-09-01

    A method for three-dimensional motion analysis designed for live cell imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy is described. The approach is based on optical flow computation and takes into account brightness variations in the image scene that are not due to motion, such as photobleaching or fluorescence variations that may reflect changes in cellular physiology. The 3-D optical flow algorithm allowed almost perfect motion estimation on noise-free artificial sequences, and performed with a relative error of <10% on noisy images typical of real experiments. The method was applied to a series of 3-D confocal image stacks from an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. The complex motions caused by slow pressure changes in the cochlear compartments were quantified. At the surface of the hearing organ, the largest motion component was the transverse one (normal to the surface), but significant radial and longitudinal displacements were also present. The outer hair cell displayed larger radial motion at their basolateral membrane than at their apical surface. These movements reflect mechanical interactions between different cellular structures, which may be important for communicating sound-evoked vibrations to the sensory cells. A better understanding of these interactions is important for testing realistic models of cochlear mechanics.

  7. Teleoperation of a robot manipulator from 3D human hand-arm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, Jonathan; Verma, Siddharth; Wu, Xianghai; Luu, Timothy

    2003-10-01

    The control of a robot manipulator by a human operator is often necessary in unstructured dynamic environments with unfamiliar objects. Remote teleoperation is required when human presence at the robot site is undesirable or difficult, such as in handling hazardous materials and operating in dangerous or inaccessible environments. Previous approaches have employed mechanical or other contacting interfaces which require unnatural motions for object manipulation tasks or hinder dexterous human motion. This paper presents a non-contacting method of teleoperating a robot manipulator by having the human operator perform the 3D human hand-arm motion that would naturally be used to compete an object manipulation task and tracking the motion with a stereo-camera system at a local site. The 3D human hand-arm motion is reconstructed at the remote robot site and is used to control the position and orientation of the robot manipulator end-effector in real-time. Images captured of the robot interacting with objects at the remote site provide visual feedback to the human operator. Tests in teleoperation of the robot manipulator have demonstrated the ability of the human to carry out object manipulator tasks remotely and the teleoperated robot manipulator system to copy human-arm motions in real-time.

  8. Brightness-compensated 3-D optical flow algorithm for monitoring cochlear motion patterns.

    PubMed

    von Tiedemann, Miriam; Fridberger, Anders; Ulfendahl, Mats; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet

    2010-01-01

    A method for three-dimensional motion analysis designed for live cell imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy is described. The approach is based on optical flow computation and takes into account brightness variations in the image scene that are not due to motion, such as photobleaching or fluorescence variations that may reflect changes in cellular physiology. The 3-D optical flow algorithm allowed almost perfect motion estimation on noise-free artificial sequences, and performed with a relative error of <10% on noisy images typical of real experiments. The method was applied to a series of 3-D confocal image stacks from an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. The complex motions caused by slow pressure changes in the cochlear compartments were quantified. At the surface of the hearing organ, the largest motion component was the transverse one (normal to the surface), but significant radial and longitudinal displacements were also present. The outer hair cell displayed larger radial motion at their basolateral membrane than at their apical surface. These movements reflect mechanical interactions between different cellular structures, which may be important for communicating sound-evoked vibrations to the sensory cells. A better understanding of these interactions is important for testing realistic models of cochlear mechanics.

  9. Incorporating 3D body motions into large-sized freeform surface conceptual design.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengfeng; Wright, David K; Kang, Jingsheng; Prieto, P A

    2005-01-01

    Large-sized free-form surface design presents some challenges in practice. Especially at the conceptual design stage, sculpting physical models is still essential for surface development, because CAD models are less intuitive for designers to design and modify them. These sculpted physical models can be then scanned and converted into CAD models. However, if the physical models are too big, designers may have problems in finding a suitable position to conduct their operations or simply the models are difficult to be scanned in. We investigated a novel surface modelling approach by utilising a 3D motion capture system. For designing a large-sized surface, a network of splines is initially set up. Artists or designers wearing motion marks on their hands can then change shapes of the splines with their hands. Literarily they can move their body freely to any positions to perform their tasks. They can also move their hands in 3D free space to detail surface characteristics by their gestures. All their design motions are recorded in the motion capturing system and transferred into 3D curves and surfaces correspondingly. This paper reports this novel surface design method associated with some case studies.

  10. Bias Field Inconsistency Correction of Motion-Scattered Multislice MRI for Improved 3D Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A.; Corbett-Detig, James M.; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    A common solution to clinical MR imaging in the presence of large anatomical motion is to use fast multi-slice 2D studies to reduce slice acquisition time and provide clinically usable slice data. Recently, techniques have been developed which retrospectively correct large scale 3D motion between individual slices allowing the formation of a geometrically correct 3D volume from the multiple slice stacks. One challenge, however, in the final reconstruction process is the possibility of varying intensity bias in the slice data, typically due to the motion of the anatomy relative to imaging coils. As a result, slices which cover the same region of anatomy at different times may exhibit different sensitivity. This bias field inconsistency can induce artifacts in the final 3D reconstruction that can impact both clinical interpretation of key tissue boundaries and the automated analysis of the data. Here we describe a framework to estimate and correct the bias field inconsistency in each slice collectively across all motion corrupted image slices. Experiments using synthetic and clinical data show that the proposed method reduces intensity variability in tissues and improves the distinction between key tissue types. PMID:21511561

  11. Bias field inconsistency correction of motion-scattered multislice MRI for improved 3D image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A; Corbett-Detig, James M; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-09-01

    A common solution to clinical MR imaging in the presence of large anatomical motion is to use fast multislice 2D studies to reduce slice acquisition time and provide clinically usable slice data. Recently, techniques have been developed which retrospectively correct large scale 3D motion between individual slices allowing the formation of a geometrically correct 3D volume from the multiple slice stacks. One challenge, however, in the final reconstruction process is the possibility of varying intensity bias in the slice data, typically due to the motion of the anatomy relative to imaging coils. As a result, slices which cover the same region of anatomy at different times may exhibit different sensitivity. This bias field inconsistency can induce artifacts in the final 3D reconstruction that can impact both clinical interpretation of key tissue boundaries and the automated analysis of the data. Here we describe a framework to estimate and correct the bias field inconsistency in each slice collectively across all motion corrupted image slices. Experiments using synthetic and clinical data show that the proposed method reduces intensity variability in tissues and improves the distinction between key tissue types.

  12. 4DCBCT-based motion modeling and 3D fluoroscopic image generation for lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhou, Salam; Hurwitz, Martina; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross; Lewis, John

    2015-03-01

    A method is developed to build patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images taken at treatment time and use them to generate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Motion models are built by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on the displacement vector fields (DVFs) estimated by performing deformable image registration on each phase of 4DCBCT relative to a reference phase. The resulting PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively by comparing 2D projections captured at treatment time with projections estimated using the motion model. The optimized coefficients are used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images. The method is evaluated using anthropomorphic physical and digital phantoms reproducing real patient trajectories. For physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error (TLE) and (95th percentile) in two datasets were 0.95 (2.2) mm. For digital phantoms assuming superior image quality of 4DCT and no anatomic or positioning disparities between 4DCT and treatment time, the average TLE and the image intensity error (IIE) in six datasets were smaller using 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating positioning disparities and tumor baseline shifts at treatment time compared to planning 4DCT, the average TLE (95th percentile) and IIE were 4.2 (5.4) mm and 0.15 using 4DCT-based models, while they were 1.2 (2.2) mm and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based ones, respectively. 4DCBCT-based models were shown to perform better when there are positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties at treatment time. Thus, generating 3D fluoroscopic images based on 4DCBCT-based motion models can capture both inter- and intra- fraction anatomical changes during treatment.

  13. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Piro, Neltje E; Piro, Lennart K; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A

    2016-06-21

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team.

  14. On Integral Invariants for Effective 3-D Motion Trajectory Matching and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhanpeng; Li, Youfu

    2016-02-01

    Motion trajectories tracked from the motions of human, robots, and moving objects can provide an important clue for motion analysis, classification, and recognition. This paper defines some new integral invariants for a 3-D motion trajectory. Based on two typical kernel functions, we design two integral invariants, the distance and area integral invariants. The area integral invariants are estimated based on the blurred segment of noisy discrete curve to avoid the computation of high-order derivatives. Such integral invariants for a motion trajectory enjoy some desirable properties, such as computational locality, uniqueness of representation, and noise insensitivity. Moreover, our formulation allows the analysis of motion trajectories at a range of scales by varying the scale of kernel function. The features of motion trajectories can thus be perceived at multiscale levels in a coarse-to-fine manner. Finally, we define a distance function to measure the trajectory similarity to find similar trajectories. Through the experiments, we examine the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed integral invariants and find that they can capture the motion cues in trajectory matching and sign recognition satisfactorily.

  15. Structure-From-Motion in 3D Space Using 2D Lidars

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Geol; Bok, Yunsu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Shim, Inwook; Kweon, In So

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel structure-from-motion methodology using 2D lidars (Light Detection And Ranging). In 3D space, 2D lidars do not provide sufficient information for pose estimation. For this reason, additional sensors have been used along with the lidar measurement. In this paper, we use a sensor system that consists of only 2D lidars, without any additional sensors. We propose a new method of estimating both the 6D pose of the system and the surrounding 3D structures. We compute the pose of the system using line segments of scan data and their corresponding planes. After discarding the outliers, both the pose and the 3D structures are refined via nonlinear optimization. Experiments with both synthetic and real data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28165372

  16. A motion- and sound-activated, 3D-printed, chalcogenide-based triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Kanik, Mehmet; Say, Mehmet Girayhan; Daglar, Bihter; Yavuz, Ahmet Faruk; Dolas, Muhammet Halit; El-Ashry, Mostafa M; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2015-04-08

    A multilayered triboelectric nanogenerator (MULTENG) that can be actuated by acoustic waves, vibration of a moving car, and tapping motion is built using a 3D-printing technique. The MULTENG can generate an open-circuit voltage of up to 396 V and a short-circuit current of up to 1.62 mA, and can power 38 LEDs. The layers of the triboelectric generator are made of polyetherimide nanopillars and chalcogenide core-shell nanofibers.

  17. 3D dosimetric validation of motion compensation concepts in radiotherapy using an anthropomorphic dynamic lung phantom.

    PubMed

    Mann, P; Witte, M; Moser, T; Lang, C; Runz, A; Johnen, W; Berger, M; Biederer, J; Karger, C P

    2017-01-21

    In this study, we developed a new setup for the validation of clinical workflows in adaptive radiation therapy, which combines a dynamic ex vivo porcine lung phantom and three-dimensional (3D) polymer gel dosimetry. The phantom consists of an artificial PMMA-thorax and contains a post mortem explanted porcine lung to which arbitrary breathing patterns can be applied. A lung tumor was simulated using the PAGAT (polyacrylamide gelatin gel fabricated at atmospheric conditions) dosimetry gel, which was evaluated in three dimensions by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To avoid bias by reaction with oxygen and other materials, the gel was collocated inside a BAREX(™) container. For calibration purposes, the same containers with eight gel samples were irradiated with doses from 0 to 7 Gy. To test the technical feasibility of the system, a small spherical dose distribution located completely within the gel volume was planned. Dose delivery was performed under static and dynamic conditions of the phantom with and without motion compensation by beam gating. To verify clinical target definition and motion compensation concepts, the entire gel volume was homogeneously irradiated applying adequate margins in case of the static phantom and an additional internal target volume in case of dynamically operated phantom without and with gated beam delivery. MR-evaluation of the gel samples and comparison of the resulting 3D dose distribution with the planned dose distribution revealed a good agreement for the static phantom. In case of the dynamically operated phantom without motion compensation, agreement was very poor while additional application of motion compensation techniques restored the good agreement between measured and planned dose. From these experiments it was concluded that the set up with the dynamic and anthropomorphic lung phantom together with 3D-gel dosimetry provides a valuable and versatile tool for geometrical and dosimetrical validation of motion compensated

  18. 3D dosimetric validation of motion compensation concepts in radiotherapy using an anthropomorphic dynamic lung phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Witte, M.; Moser, T.; Lang, C.; Runz, A.; Johnen, W.; Berger, M.; Biederer, J.; Karger, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new setup for the validation of clinical workflows in adaptive radiation therapy, which combines a dynamic ex vivo porcine lung phantom and three-dimensional (3D) polymer gel dosimetry. The phantom consists of an artificial PMMA-thorax and contains a post mortem explanted porcine lung to which arbitrary breathing patterns can be applied. A lung tumor was simulated using the PAGAT (polyacrylamide gelatin gel fabricated at atmospheric conditions) dosimetry gel, which was evaluated in three dimensions by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To avoid bias by reaction with oxygen and other materials, the gel was collocated inside a BAREX™ container. For calibration purposes, the same containers with eight gel samples were irradiated with doses from 0 to 7 Gy. To test the technical feasibility of the system, a small spherical dose distribution located completely within the gel volume was planned. Dose delivery was performed under static and dynamic conditions of the phantom with and without motion compensation by beam gating. To verify clinical target definition and motion compensation concepts, the entire gel volume was homogeneously irradiated applying adequate margins in case of the static phantom and an additional internal target volume in case of dynamically operated phantom without and with gated beam delivery. MR-evaluation of the gel samples and comparison of the resulting 3D dose distribution with the planned dose distribution revealed a good agreement for the static phantom. In case of the dynamically operated phantom without motion compensation, agreement was very poor while additional application of motion compensation techniques restored the good agreement between measured and planned dose. From these experiments it was concluded that the set up with the dynamic and anthropomorphic lung phantom together with 3D-gel dosimetry provides a valuable and versatile tool for geometrical and dosimetrical validation of motion compensated

  19. Real-time 3D motion tracking for small animal brain PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyme, A. Z.; Zhou, V. W.; Meikle, S. R.; Fulton, R. R.

    2008-05-01

    High-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of conscious, unrestrained laboratory animals presents many challenges. Some form of motion correction will normally be necessary to avoid motion artefacts in the reconstruction. The aim of the current work was to develop and evaluate a motion tracking system potentially suitable for use in small animal PET. This system is based on the commercially available stereo-optical MicronTracker S60 which we have integrated with a Siemens Focus-220 microPET scanner. We present measured performance limits of the tracker and the technical details of our implementation, including calibration and synchronization of the system. A phantom study demonstrating motion tracking and correction was also performed. The system can be calibrated with sub-millimetre accuracy, and small lightweight markers can be constructed to provide accurate 3D motion data. A marked reduction in motion artefacts was demonstrated in the phantom study. The techniques and results described here represent a step towards a practical method for rigid-body motion correction in small animal PET. There is scope to achieve further improvements in the accuracy of synchronization and pose measurements in future work.

  20. Robust ego-motion estimation and 3-D model refinement using surface parallax.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amit; Chellappa, Rama

    2006-05-01

    We present an iterative algorithm for robustly estimating the ego-motion and refining and updating a coarse depth map using parametric surface parallax models and brightness derivatives extracted from an image pair. Given a coarse depth map acquired by a range-finder or extracted from a digital elevation map (DEM), ego-motion is estimated by combining a global ego-motion constraint and a local brightness constancy constraint. Using the estimated camera motion and the available depth estimate, motion of the three-dimensional (3-D) points is compensated. We utilize the fact that the resulting surface parallax field is an epipolar field, and knowing its direction from the previous motion estimates, estimate its magnitude and use it to refine the depth map estimate. The parallax magnitude is estimated using a constant parallax model (CPM) which assumes a smooth parallax field and a depth based parallax model (DBPM), which models the parallax magnitude using the given depth map. We obtain confidence measures for determining the accuracy of the estimated depth values which are used to remove regions with potentially incorrect depth estimates for robustly estimating ego-motion in subsequent iterations. Experimental results using both synthetic and real data (both indoor and outdoor sequences) illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Atmospheric Motion Vectors from INSAT-3D: Initial quality assessment and its impact on track forecast of cyclonic storm NANAUK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, S. K.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Kumar, Prashant; Kiran Kumar, A. S.; Pal, P. K.; Kaushik, Nitesh; Sangar, Ghansham

    2016-03-01

    The advanced Indian meteorological geostationary satellite INSAT-3D was launched on 26 July 2013 with an improved imager and an infrared sounder and is placed at 82°E over the Indian Ocean region. With the advancement in retrieval techniques of different atmospheric parameters and with improved imager data have enhanced the scope for better understanding of the different tropical atmospheric processes over this region. The retrieval techniques and accuracy of one such parameter, Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV) has improved significantly with the availability of improved spatial resolution data along with more options of spectral channels in the INSAT-3D imager. The present work is mainly focused on providing brief descriptions of INSAT-3D data and AMV derivation processes using these data. It also discussed the initial quality assessment of INSAT-3D AMVs for a period of six months starting from 01 February 2014 to 31 July 2014 with other independent observations: i) Meteosat-7 AMVs available over this region, ii) in-situ radiosonde wind measurements, iii) cloud tracked winds from Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and iv) numerical model analysis. It is observed from this study that the qualities of newly derived INSAT-3D AMVs are comparable with existing two versions of Meteosat-7 AMVs over this region. To demonstrate its initial application, INSAT-3D AMVs are assimilated in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and it is found that the assimilation of newly derived AMVs has helped in reduction of track forecast errors of the recent cyclonic storm NANAUK over the Arabian Sea. Though, the present study is limited to its application to one case study, however, it will provide some guidance to the operational agencies for implementation of this new AMV dataset for future applications in the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) over the south Asia region.

  2. Respiratory motion correction in 3-D PET data with advanced optical flow algorithms.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mohammad; Buther, Florian; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Schafers, Klaus P

    2008-08-01

    The problem of motion is well known in positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The PET images are formed over an elongated period of time. As the patients cannot hold breath during the PET acquisition, spatial blurring and motion artifacts are the natural result. These may lead to wrong quantification of the radioactive uptake. We present a solution to this problem by respiratory-gating the PET data and correcting the PET images for motion with optical flow algorithms. The algorithm is based on the combined local and global optical flow algorithm with modifications to allow for discontinuity preservation across organ boundaries and for application to 3-D volume sets. The superiority of the algorithm over previous work is demonstrated on software phantom and real patient data.

  3. Patient specific respiratory motion modeling using a limited number of 3D lung CT images.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xueli; Gao, Xin; Xia, Wei; Liu, Yangchuan; Liang, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    To build a patient specific respiratory motion model with a low dose, a novel method was proposed that uses a limited number of 3D lung CT volumes with an external respiratory signal. 4D lung CT volumes were acquired for patients with in vitro labeling on the upper abdominal surface. Meanwhile, 3D coordinates of in vitro labeling were measured as external respiratory signals. A sequential correspondence between the 4D lung CT and the external respiratory signal was built using the distance correlation method, and a 3D displacement for every registration control point in the CT volumes with respect to time can be obtained by the 4D lung CT deformable registration. A temporal fitting was performed for every registration control point displacements and an external respiratory signal in the anterior-posterior direction respectively to draw their fitting curves. Finally, a linear regression was used to fit the corresponding samples of the control point displacement fitting curves and the external respiratory signal fitting curve to finish the pulmonary respiration modeling. Compared to a B-spline-based method using the respiratory signal phase, the proposed method is highly advantageous as it offers comparable modeling accuracy and target modeling error (TME); while at the same time, the proposed method requires 70% less 3D lung CTs. When using a similar amount of 3D lung CT data, the mean of the proposed method's TME is smaller than the mean of the PCA (principle component analysis)-based methods' TMEs. The results indicate that the proposed method is successful in striking a balance between modeling accuracy and number of 3D lung CT volumes.

  4. Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeckx, D.; Ector, J.; Maes, F.; D'hooge, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Voigt, J.-U.; Heidbüchel, H.; Suetens, P.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate particular points and surfaces, representing e.g. the endo-cardial surface over the different frames. As such, the 4D path of these point is obtained, which can be used to calculate the velocity by which the wall moves and the evolution of the local surface area over time. The wall velocity is not angle-dependent as in classical Doppler imaging, since the 4D data allows calculating the true 3D motion. Similarly, all 3D myocardium strain components can be estimated. Combined they result in local surface area or volume changes which van be color-coded as a measure of local contractability. A diagnostic method that strongly benefits from this technique is cardiac motion and deformation analysis, which is an important aid to quantify the mechanical properties of the myocardium.

  5. 3D motion and strain estimation of the heart: initial clinical findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Daniel; Hristova, Krassimira; Loeckx, Dirk; Rademakers, Frank; Claus, Piet; D'hooge, Jan

    2010-03-01

    The quantitative assessment of regional myocardial function remains an important goal in clinical cardiology. As such, tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking based methods have been introduced to estimate local myocardial strain. Recently, volumetric ultrasound has become more readily available, allowing therefore the 3D estimation of motion and myocardial deformation. Our lab has previously presented a method based on spatio-temporal elastic registration of ultrasound volumes to estimate myocardial motion and deformation in 3D, overcoming the spatial limitations of the existing methods. This method was optimized on simulated data sets in previous work and is currently tested in a clinical setting. In this manuscript, 10 healthy volunteers, 10 patient with myocardial infarction and 10 patients with arterial hypertension were included. The cardiac strain values extracted with the proposed method were compared with the ones estimated with 1D tissue Doppler imaging and 2D speckle tracking in all patient groups. Although the absolute values of the 3D strain components assessed by this new methodology were not identical to the reference methods, the relationship between the different patient groups was similar.

  6. Integration of 3D structure from disparity into biological motion perception independent of depth awareness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Images projected onto the retinas of our two eyes come from slightly different directions in the real world, constituting binocular disparity that serves as an important source for depth perception - the ability to see the world in three dimensions. It remains unclear whether the integration of disparity cues into visual perception depends on the conscious representation of stereoscopic depth. Here we report evidence that, even without inducing discernible perceptual representations, the disparity-defined depth information could still modulate the visual processing of 3D objects in depth-irrelevant aspects. Specifically, observers who could not discriminate disparity-defined in-depth facing orientations of biological motions (i.e., approaching vs. receding) due to an excessive perceptual bias nevertheless exhibited a robust perceptual asymmetry in response to the indistinguishable facing orientations, similar to those who could consciously discriminate such 3D information. These results clearly demonstrate that the visual processing of biological motion engages the disparity cues independent of observers' depth awareness. The extraction and utilization of binocular depth signals thus can be dissociable from the conscious representation of 3D structure in high-level visual perception.

  7. Scientific rotoscoping: a morphology-based method of 3-D motion analysis and visualization.

    PubMed

    Gatesy, Stephen M; Baier, David B; Jenkins, Farish A; Dial, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional skeletal movement is often impossible to accurately quantify from external markers. X-ray imaging more directly visualizes moving bones, but extracting 3-D kinematic data is notoriously difficult from a single perspective. Stereophotogrammetry is extremely powerful if bi-planar fluoroscopy is available, yet implantation of three radio-opaque markers in each segment of interest may be impractical. Herein we introduce scientific rotoscoping (SR), a new method of motion analysis that uses articulated bone models to simultaneously animate and quantify moving skeletons without markers. The three-step process is described using examples from our work on pigeon flight and alligator walking. First, the experimental scene is reconstructed in 3-D using commercial animation software so that frames of undistorted fluoroscopic and standard video can be viewed in their correct spatial context through calibrated virtual cameras. Second, polygonal models of relevant bones are created from CT or laser scans and rearticulated into a hierarchical marionette controlled by virtual joints. Third, the marionette is registered to video images by adjusting each of its degrees of freedom over a sequence of frames. SR outputs high-resolution 3-D kinematic data for multiple, unmarked bones and anatomically accurate animations that can be rendered from any perspective. Rather than generating moving stick figures abstracted from the coordinates of independent surface points, SR is a morphology-based method of motion analysis deeply rooted in osteological and arthrological data.

  8. 3D Motion Planning Algorithms for Steerable Needles Using Inverse Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Duindam, Vincent; Xu, Jijie; Alterovitz, Ron; Sastry, Shankar; Goldberg, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Steerable needles can be used in medical applications to reach targets behind sensitive or impenetrable areas. The kinematics of a steerable needle are nonholonomic and, in 2D, equivalent to a Dubins car with constant radius of curvature. In 3D, the needle can be interpreted as an airplane with constant speed and pitch rate, zero yaw, and controllable roll angle. We present a constant-time motion planning algorithm for steerable needles based on explicit geometric inverse kinematics similar to the classic Paden-Kahan subproblems. Reachability and path competitivity are analyzed using analytic comparisons with shortest path solutions for the Dubins car (for 2D) and numerical simulations (for 3D). We also present an algorithm for local path adaptation using null-space results from redundant manipulator theory. Finally, we discuss several ways to use and extend the inverse kinematics solution to generate needle paths that avoid obstacles. PMID:21359051

  9. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Mishra, Pankaj E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Lewis, John H. E-mail: jhlewis@lroc.harvard.edu; Seco, Joao

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically feasible method of calculating actual delivered dose distributions for patients who have significant respiratory motion during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: A novel approach was proposed to calculate the actual delivered dose distribution for SBRT lung treatment. This approach can be specified in three steps. (1) At the treatment planning stage, a patient-specific motion model is created from planning 4DCT data. This model assumes that the displacement vector field (DVF) of any respiratory motion deformation can be described as a linear combination of some basis DVFs. (2) During the treatment procedure, 2D time-varying projection images (either kV or MV projections) are acquired, from which time-varying “fluoroscopic” 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. The DVF of each timepoint in the time-varying reconstruction is an optimized linear combination of basis DVFs such that the 2D projection of the 3D volume at this timepoint matches the projection image. (3) 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D reconstructed fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach was first validated using two modified digital extended cardio-torso (XCAT) phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions. The estimated doses were compared to the dose that would be calculated for routine 4DCT-based planning and to the actual delivered dose that was calculated using “ground truth” XCAT phantoms at all timepoints. The approach was also tested using one set of patient data, which demonstrated the application of our method in a clinical scenario. Results: For the first XCAT phantom that has a mostly regular breathing pattern, the errors in 95% volume dose (D95) are 0.11% and 0.83%, respectively for 3D fluoroscopic images

  10. 3D delivered dose assessment using a 4DCT-based motion model

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weixing; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Dhou, Salam; Berbeco, Ross I.; Seco, Joao; Mishra, Pankaj; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically feasible method of calculating actual delivered dose distributions for patients who have significant respiratory motion during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: A novel approach was proposed to calculate the actual delivered dose distribution for SBRT lung treatment. This approach can be specified in three steps. (1) At the treatment planning stage, a patient-specific motion model is created from planning 4DCT data. This model assumes that the displacement vector field (DVF) of any respiratory motion deformation can be described as a linear combination of some basis DVFs. (2) During the treatment procedure, 2D time-varying projection images (either kV or MV projections) are acquired, from which time-varying “fluoroscopic” 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. The DVF of each timepoint in the time-varying reconstruction is an optimized linear combination of basis DVFs such that the 2D projection of the 3D volume at this timepoint matches the projection image. (3) 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D reconstructed fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach was first validated using two modified digital extended cardio-torso (XCAT) phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions. The estimated doses were compared to the dose that would be calculated for routine 4DCT-based planning and to the actual delivered dose that was calculated using “ground truth” XCAT phantoms at all timepoints. The approach was also tested using one set of patient data, which demonstrated the application of our method in a clinical scenario. Results: For the first XCAT phantom that has a mostly regular breathing pattern, the errors in 95% volume dose (D95) are 0.11% and 0.83%, respectively for 3D fluoroscopic images

  11. Validation of INSAT-3D atmospheric motion vectors for monsoon 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priti; Rani, S. Indira; Das Gupta, M.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric Motion Vector (AMV) over Indian Ocean and surrounding region is one of the most important sources of tropospheric wind information assimilated in numerical weather prediction (NWP) system. Earlier studies showed that the quality of Indian geo-stationary satellite Kalpana-1 AMVs was not comparable to that of other geostationary satellites over this region and hence not used in NWP system. Indian satellite INSAT-3D was successfully launched on July 26, 2013 with upgraded imaging system as compared to that of previous Indian satellite Kalpana-1. INSAT-3D has middle infrared band (3.80 - 4.00 μm) which is capable of night time pictures of low clouds and fog. Three consecutive images of 30-minutes interval are used to derive the AMVs. New height assignment scheme (using NWP first guess and replacing old empirical GA method) along with modified quality control scheme were implemented for deriving INSAT-3D AMVs. In this paper an attempt has been made to validate these AMVs against in-situ observations as well as against NCMRWF's NWP first guess for monsoon 2015. AMVs are subdivided into three different pressure levels in the vertical viz. low (1000 - 700 hPa), middle (700 - 400 hPa) and high (400 - 100 hPa) for validation purpose. Several statistics viz. normalized root mean square vector difference; biases etc. have been computed over different latitudinal belt. Result shows that the general mean monsoon circulations along with all the transient monsoon systems are well captured by INSAT-3D AMVs, as well as the error statistics viz., RMSE etc of INSAT-3D AMVs is now comparable to other geostationary satellites.

  12. A Markerless 3D Computerized Motion Capture System Incorporating a Skeleton Model for Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Bretas, Rafael Vieira; Takamura, Yusaku; Hori, Etsuro; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a novel markerless motion capture system (MCS) for monkeys, in which 3D surface images of monkeys were reconstructed by integrating data from four depth cameras, and a skeleton model of the monkey was fitted onto 3D images of monkeys in each frame of the video. To validate the MCS, first, estimated 3D positions of body parts were compared between the 3D MCS-assisted estimation and manual estimation based on visual inspection when a monkey performed a shuttling behavior in which it had to avoid obstacles in various positions. The mean estimation error of the positions of body parts (3–14 cm) and of head rotation (35–43°) between the 3D MCS-assisted and manual estimation were comparable to the errors between two different experimenters performing manual estimation. Furthermore, the MCS could identify specific monkey actions, and there was no false positive nor false negative detection of actions compared with those in manual estimation. Second, to check the reproducibility of MCS-assisted estimation, the same analyses of the above experiments were repeated by a different user. The estimation errors of positions of most body parts between the two experimenters were significantly smaller in the MCS-assisted estimation than in the manual estimation. Third, effects of methamphetamine (MAP) administration on the spontaneous behaviors of four monkeys were analyzed using the MCS. MAP significantly increased head movements, tended to decrease locomotion speed, and had no significant effect on total path length. The results were comparable to previous human clinical data. Furthermore, estimated data following MAP injection (total path length, walking speed, and speed of head rotation) correlated significantly between the two experimenters in the MCS-assisted estimation (r = 0.863 to 0.999). The results suggest that the presented MCS in monkeys is useful in investigating neural mechanisms underlying various psychiatric disorders and developing

  13. A Soft Sensor-Based Three-Dimensional (3-D) Finger Motion Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wookeun; Ro, Kyongkwan; Kim, Suin; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a soft sensor-based three-dimensional (3-D) finger motion measurement system is proposed. The sensors, made of the soft material Ecoflex, comprise embedded microchannels filled with a conductive liquid metal (EGaln). The superior elasticity, light weight, and sensitivity of soft sensors allows them to be embedded in environments in which conventional sensors cannot. Complicated finger joints, such as the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint of the thumb are modeled to specify the location of the sensors. Algorithms to decouple the signals from soft sensors are proposed to extract the pure flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction joint angles. The performance of the proposed system and algorithms are verified by comparison with a camera-based motion capture system. PMID:28241414

  14. Fourier-based reconstruction for fully 3-D PET: optimization of interpolation parameters.

    PubMed

    Matej, Samuel; Kazantsev, Ivan G

    2006-07-01

    Fourier-based approaches for three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction are based on the relationship between the 3-D Fourier transform (FT) of the volume and the two-dimensional (2-D) FT of a parallel-ray projection of the volume. The critical step in the Fourier-based methods is the estimation of the samples of the 3-D transform of the image from the samples of the 2-D transforms of the projections on the planes through the origin of Fourier space, and vice versa for forward-projection (reprojection). The Fourier-based approaches have the potential for very fast reconstruction, but their straightforward implementation might lead to unsatisfactory results if careful attention is not paid to interpolation and weighting functions. In our previous work, we have investigated optimal interpolation parameters for the Fourier-based forward and back-projectors for iterative image reconstruction. The optimized interpolation kernels were shown to provide excellent quality comparable to the ideal sinc interpolator. This work presents an optimization of interpolation parameters of the 3-D direct Fourier method with Fourier reprojection (3D-FRP) for fully 3-D positron emission tomography (PET) data with incomplete oblique projections. The reprojection step is needed for the estimation (from an initial image) of the missing portions of the oblique data. In the 3D-FRP implementation, we use the gridding interpolation strategy, combined with proper weighting approaches in the transform and image domains. We have found that while the 3-D reprojection step requires similar optimal interpolation parameters as found in our previous studies on Fourier-based iterative approaches, the optimal interpolation parameters for the main 3D-FRP reconstruction stage are quite different. Our experimental results confirm that for the optimal interpolation parameters a very good image accuracy can be achieved even without any extra spectral oversampling, which is a common practice to decrease errors

  15. Evaluation of a Gait Assessment Module Using 3D Motion Capture Technology

    PubMed Central

    Baskwill, Amanda J.; Belli, Patricia; Kelleher, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Background Gait analysis is the study of human locomotion. In massage therapy, this observation is part of an assessment process that informs treatment planning. Massage therapy students must apply the theory of gait assessment to simulated patients. At Humber College, the gait assessment module traditionally consists of a textbook reading and a three-hour, in-class session in which students perform gait assessment on each other. In 2015, Humber College acquired a three-dimensional motion capture system. Purpose The purpose was to evaluate the use of 3D motion capture in a gait assessment module compared to the traditional gait assessment module. Participants Semester 2 massage therapy students who were enrolled in Massage Theory 2 (n = 38). Research Design Quasi-experimental, wait-list comparison study. Intervention The intervention group participated in an in-class session with a Qualisys motion capture system. Main Outcome Measure(s) The outcomes included knowledge and application of gait assessment theory as measured by quizzes, and students’ satisfaction as measured through a questionnaire. Results There were no statistically significant differences in baseline and post-module knowledge between both groups (pre-module: p = .46; post-module: p = .63). There was also no difference between groups on the final application question (p = .13). The intervention group enjoyed the in-class session because they could visualize the content, whereas the comparison group enjoyed the interactivity of the session. The intervention group recommended adding the assessment of gait on their classmates to their experience. Both groups noted more time was needed for the gait assessment module. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the gait assessment module combine both the traditional in-class session and the 3D motion capture system. PMID:28293329

  16. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with {{≤ft(2.5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. {{≤ft(5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} . In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  17. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  18. Characterisation of dynamic couplings at lower limb residuum/socket interface using 3D motion capture.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinghua; McGrath, Michael; Laszczak, Piotr; Jiang, Liudi; Bader, Dan L; Moser, David; Zahedi, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    Design and fitting of artificial limbs to lower limb amputees are largely based on the subjective judgement of the prosthetist. Understanding the science of three-dimensional (3D) dynamic coupling at the residuum/socket interface could potentially aid the design and fitting of the socket. A new method has been developed to characterise the 3D dynamic coupling at the residuum/socket interface using 3D motion capture based on a single case study of a trans-femoral amputee. The new model incorporated a Virtual Residuum Segment (VRS) and a Socket Segment (SS) which combined to form the residuum/socket interface. Angular and axial couplings between the two segments were subsequently determined. Results indicated a non-rigid angular coupling in excess of 10° in the quasi-sagittal plane and an axial coupling of between 21 and 35 mm. The corresponding angular couplings of less than 4° and 2° were estimated in the quasi-coronal and quasi-transverse plane, respectively. We propose that the combined experimental and analytical approach adopted in this case study could aid the iterative socket fitting process and could potentially lead to a new socket design.

  19. Biodynamic Doppler imaging of subcellular motion inside 3D living tissue culture and biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is an emerging 3D optical imaging technology that probes up to 1 mm deep inside three-dimensional living tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Biodynamic imaging is label-free and non-invasive. The information content of biodynamic imaging is captured through tissue dynamics spectroscopy that displays the changes in the Doppler signatures from intracellular constituents in response to applied compounds. The affected dynamic intracellular mechanisms include organelle transport, membrane undulations, cytoskeletal restructuring, strain at cellular adhesions, cytokinesis, mitosis, exo- and endo-cytosis among others. The development of 3D high-content assays such as biodynamic profiling can become a critical new tool for assessing efficacy of drugs and the suitability of specific types of tissue growth for drug discovery and development. The use of biodynamic profiling to predict clinical outcome of living biopsies to cancer therapeutics can be developed into a phenotypic companion diagnostic, as well as a new tool for therapy selection in personalized medicine. This invited talk will present an overview of the optical, physical and physiological processes involved in biodynamic imaging. Several different biodynamic imaging modalities include motility contrast imaging (MCI), tissue-dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) and tissue-dynamics imaging (TDI). A wide range of potential applications will be described that include process monitoring for 3D tissue culture, drug discovery and development, cancer therapy selection, embryo assessment for in-vitro fertilization and artificial reproductive technologies, among others.

  20. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  1. Interactive Motion Planning for Steerable Needles in 3D Environments with Obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Bevel-tip steerable needles for minimally invasive medical procedures can be used to reach clinical targets that are behind sensitive or impenetrable areas and are inaccessible to straight, rigid needles. We present a fast algorithm that can compute motion plans for steerable needles to reach targets in complex, 3D environments with obstacles at interactive rates. The fast computation makes this method suitable for online control of the steerable needle based on 3D imaging feedback and allows physicians to interactively edit the planning environment in real-time by adding obstacle definitions as they are discovered or become relevant. We achieve this fast performance by using a Rapidly Exploring Random Tree (RRT) combined with a reachability-guided sampling heuristic to alleviate the sensitivity of the RRT planner to the choice of the distance metric. We also relax the constraint of constant-curvature needle trajectories by relying on duty-cycling to realize bounded-curvature needle trajectories. These characteristics enable us to achieve orders of magnitude speed-up compared to previous approaches; we compute steerable needle motion plans in under 1 second for challenging environments containing complex, polyhedral obstacles and narrow passages. PMID:22294214

  2. Semi-automatic segmentation for 3D motion analysis of the tongue with dynamic MRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Woo, Jonghye; Xing, Fangxu; Murano, Emi Z; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic MRI has been widely used to track the motion of the tongue and measure its internal deformation during speech and swallowing. Accurate segmentation of the tongue is a prerequisite step to define the target boundary and constrain the tracking to tissue points within the tongue. Segmentation of 2D slices or 3D volumes is challenging because of the large number of slices and time frames involved in the segmentation, as well as the incorporation of numerous local deformations that occur throughout the tongue during motion. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic approach to segment 3D dynamic MRI of the tongue. The algorithm steps include seeding a few slices at one time frame, propagating seeds to the same slices at different time frames using deformable registration, and random walker segmentation based on these seed positions. This method was validated on the tongue of five normal subjects carrying out the same speech task with multi-slice 2D dynamic cine-MR images obtained at three orthogonal orientations and 26 time frames. The resulting semi-automatic segmentations of a total of 130 volumes showed an average dice similarity coefficient (DSC) score of 0.92 with less segmented volume variability between time frames than in manual segmentations.

  3. Feasibility Study for Ballet E-Learning: Automatic Composition System for Ballet "Enchainement" with Online 3D Motion Data Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umino, Bin; Longstaff, Jeffrey Scott; Soga, Asako

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on "Web3D dance composer" for ballet e-learning. Elementary "petit allegro" ballet steps were enumerated in collaboration with ballet teachers, digitally acquired through 3D motion capture systems, and categorised into families and sub-families. Digital data was manipulated into virtual reality modelling language (VRML) and fit…

  4. Dynamics of errors in 3D motion estimation and implications for strain-tensor imaging in acoustic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgen, Mehmet

    2000-06-01

    For the purpose of quantifying the noise in acoustic elastography, a displacement covariance matrix is derived analytically for the cross-correlation based 3D motion estimator. Static deformation induced in tissue from an external mechanical source is represented by a second-order strain tensor. A generalized 3D model is introduced for the ultrasonic echo signals. The components of the covariance matrix are related to the variances of the displacement errors and the errors made in estimating the elements of the strain tensor. The results are combined to investigate the dependences of these errors on the experimental and signal-processing parameters as well as to determine the effects of one strain component on the estimation of the other. The expressions are evaluated for special cases of axial strain estimation in the presence of axial, axial-shear and lateral-shear type deformations in 2D. The signals are shown to decorrelate with any of these deformations, with strengths depending on the reorganization and interaction of tissue scatterers with the ultrasonic point spread function following the deformation. Conditions that favour the improvements in motion estimation performance are discussed, and advantages gained by signal companding and pulse compression are illustrated.

  5. Quick and low cost measurement of soil parameters using a Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, R.; Van De Giesen, N.; Hagenaars, R.

    2013-12-01

    Retrieval of basic soil parameters such as bulk density and soil moisture from soil samples is a costly and time-consuming activity. Although indirect methods (heat or electromagnetic probes, radar backscatter, etc) are abundant, field truth measurement of soil parameters will remain important, if only to calibrate these other methods. We present a quick, field mountable setup to make 3D scans of surfaces up to 30 x 30 cm using a Kinect 3D scanner. By making scans before and after samples are taken, parameters such as bulk density and moisture content can easily be calculated.

  6. Multiview diffeomorphic registration: application to motion and strain estimation from 3D echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Piella, Gemma; De Craene, Mathieu; Butakoff, Constantine; Grau, Vicente; Yao, Cheng; Nedjati-Gilani, Shahrum; Penney, Graeme P; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new registration framework for quantifying myocardial motion and strain from the combination of multiple 3D ultrasound (US) sequences. The originality of our approach lies in the estimation of the transformation directly from the input multiple views rather than from a single view or a reconstructed compounded sequence. This allows us to exploit all spatiotemporal information available in the input views avoiding occlusions and image fusion errors that could lead to some inconsistencies in the motion quantification result. We propose a multiview diffeomorphic registration strategy that enforces smoothness and consistency in the spatiotemporal domain by modeling the 4D velocity field continuously in space and time. This 4D continuous representation considers 3D US sequences as a whole, therefore allowing to robustly cope with variations in heart rate resulting in different number of images acquired per cardiac cycle for different views. This contributes to the robustness gained by solving for a single transformation from all input sequences. The similarity metric takes into account the physics of US images and uses a weighting scheme to balance the contribution of the different views. It includes a comparison both between consecutive images and between a reference and each of the following images. The strain tensor is computed locally using the spatial derivatives of the reconstructed displacement fields. Registration and strain accuracy were evaluated on synthetic 3D US sequences with known ground truth. Experiments were also conducted on multiview 3D datasets of 8 volunteers and 1 patient treated by cardiac resynchronization therapy. Strain curves obtained from our multiview approach were compared to the single-view case, as well as with other multiview approaches. For healthy cases, the inclusion of several views improved the consistency of the strain curves and reduced the number of segments where a non-physiological strain pattern was

  7. 3D cardiac motion reconstruction from CT data and tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Mihalef, Viorel; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for left ventricle (LV) endocardium motion reconstruction using high resolution CT data and tagged MRI. High resolution CT data provide anatomic details on the LV endocardial surface, such as the papillary muscle and trabeculae carneae. Tagged MRI provides better time resolution. The combination of these two imaging techniques can give us better understanding on left ventricle motion. The high resolution CT images are segmented with mean shift method and generate the LV endocardium mesh. The meshless deformable model built with high resolution endocardium surface from CT data fit to the tagged MRI of the same phase. 3D deformation of the myocardium is computed with the Lagrangian dynamics and local Laplacian deformation. The segmented inner surface of left ventricle is compared with the heart inner surface picture and show high agreement. The papillary muscles are attached to the inner surface with roots. The free wall of the left ventricle inner surface is covered with trabeculae carneae. The deformation of the heart wall and the papillary muscle in the first half of the cardiac cycle is presented. The motion reconstruction results are very close to the live heart video.

  8. Comparative abilities of Microsoft Kinect and Vicon 3D motion capture for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Alexandra; West, Alexandre M; Bronner, Shaw; Noah, Jack Adam

    2014-07-01

    Biomechanical analysis is a powerful tool in the evaluation of movement dysfunction in orthopaedic and neurologic populations. Three-dimensional (3D) motion capture systems are widely used, accurate systems, but are costly and not available in many clinical settings. The Microsoft Kinect™ has the potential to be used as an alternative low-cost motion analysis tool. The purpose of this study was to assess concurrent validity of the Kinect™ with Brekel Kinect software in comparison to Vicon Nexus during sagittal plane gait kinematics. Twenty healthy adults (nine male, 11 female) were tracked while walking and jogging at three velocities on a treadmill. Concurrent hip and knee peak flexion and extension and stride timing measurements were compared between Vicon and Kinect™. Although Kinect measurements were representative of normal gait, the Kinect™ generally under-estimated joint flexion and over-estimated extension. Kinect™ and Vicon hip angular displacement correlation was very low and error was large. Kinect™ knee measurements were somewhat better than hip, but were not consistent enough for clinical assessment. Correlation between Kinect™ and Vicon stride timing was high and error was fairly small. Variability in Kinect™ measurements was smallest at the slowest velocity. The Kinect™ has basic motion capture capabilities and with some minor adjustments will be an acceptable tool to measure stride timing, but sophisticated advances in software and hardware are necessary to improve Kinect™ sensitivity before it can be implemented for clinical use.

  9. Automated 3D motion tracking using Gabor filter bank, robust point matching, and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the robust point matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of 1) through-plane motion and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the moving least square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  10. Kinematic ground motion simulations on rough faults including effects of 3D stochastic velocity perturbations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert; Pitarka, Arben

    2016-01-01

    We describe a methodology for generating kinematic earthquake ruptures for use in 3D ground‐motion simulations over the 0–5 Hz frequency band. Our approach begins by specifying a spatially random slip distribution that has a roughly wavenumber‐squared fall‐off. Given a hypocenter, the rupture speed is specified to average about 75%–80% of the local shear wavespeed and the prescribed slip‐rate function has a Kostrov‐like shape with a fault‐averaged rise time that scales self‐similarly with the seismic moment. Both the rupture time and rise time include significant local perturbations across the fault surface specified by spatially random fields that are partially correlated with the underlying slip distribution. We represent velocity‐strengthening fault zones in the shallow (<5  km) and deep (>15  km) crust by decreasing rupture speed and increasing rise time in these regions. Additional refinements to this approach include the incorporation of geometric perturbations to the fault surface, 3D stochastic correlated perturbations to the P‐ and S‐wave velocity structure, and a damage zone surrounding the shallow fault surface characterized by a 30% reduction in seismic velocity. We demonstrate the approach using a suite of simulations for a hypothetical Mw 6.45 strike‐slip earthquake embedded in a generalized hard‐rock velocity structure. The simulation results are compared with the median predictions from the 2014 Next Generation Attenuation‐West2 Project ground‐motion prediction equations and show very good agreement over the frequency band 0.1–5 Hz for distances out to 25 km from the fault. Additionally, the newly added features act to reduce the coherency of the radiated higher frequency (f>1  Hz) ground motions, and homogenize radiation‐pattern effects in this same bandwidth, which move the simulations closer to the statistical characteristics of observed motions as illustrated by comparison with recordings from

  11. DLP technology application: 3D head tracking and motion correction in medical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Wilm, Jakob; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light, such as plaster, light colored cloth. Whereas for human model scanning application, conventional methods suffer from low signal to noise ratio caused by low contrast of visible light over the human body. The proposed robust NIRSL, as implemented with the near infrared light, is capable of recovering those dark surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan. The proposed sensing system, by utilizing the new near-infrared capable high speed LightCrafter DLP projector, is robust to motion, provides accurate and high resolution three-dimensional point cloud, making our system more efficient and robust for human model reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our system is effective and efficient to scan real human models with various dark hair, jeans and shoes, robust to human body motion and produces accurate and high resolution 3D point cloud.

  12. Correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and 3D tumor motion in gated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu . E-mail: tsunashima@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Sakae, Takeji; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Kagei, Kenji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and three-dimensional (3D) tumor motion. Methods and materials: A laser displacement sensor (LDS: KEYENCE LB-300) that measures distance using infrared light was used as the respiratory sensor. This was placed such that the focus was in an area around the patient's navel. When the distance from the LDS to the body surface changes as the patient breathes, the displacement is detected as a respiratory waveform. To obtain the 3D tumor motion, a biplane digital radiography unit was used. For the tumor in the lung, liver, and esophagus of 26 patients, the waveform was compared with the 3D tumor motion. The relationship between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was analyzed by means of the Fourier transform and a cross-correlation function. Results: The respiratory waveform cycle agreed with that of the cranial-caudal and dorsal-ventral tumor motion. A phase shift observed between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was principally in the range 0.0 to 0.3 s, regardless of the organ being measured, which means that the respiratory waveform does not always express the 3D tumor motion with fidelity. For this reason, the standard deviation of the tumor position in the expiration phase, as indicated by the respiratory waveform, was derived, which should be helpful in suggesting the internal margin required in the case of respiratory gated radiotherapy. Conclusion: Although obtained from only a few breathing cycles for each patient, the correlation between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was evident in this study. If this relationship is analyzed carefully and an internal margin is applied, the accuracy and convenience of respiratory gated radiotherapy could be improved by use of the respiratory sensor.Thus, it is expected that this procedure will come into wider use.

  13. Skeletal camera network embedded structure-from-motion for 3D scene reconstruction from UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihua; Wu, Lixin; Gerke, Markus; Wang, Ran; Yang, Huachao

    2016-11-01

    Structure-from-Motion (SfM) techniques have been widely used for 3D scene reconstruction from multi-view images. However, due to the large computational costs of SfM methods there is a major challenge in processing highly overlapping images, e.g. images from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). This paper embeds a novel skeletal camera network (SCN) into SfM to enable efficient 3D scene reconstruction from a large set of UAV images. First, the flight control data are used within a weighted graph to construct a topologically connected camera network (TCN) to determine the spatial connections between UAV images. Second, the TCN is refined using a novel hierarchical degree bounded maximum spanning tree to generate a SCN, which contains a subset of edges from the TCN and ensures that each image is involved in at least a 3-view configuration. Third, the SCN is embedded into the SfM to produce a novel SCN-SfM method, which allows performing tie-point matching only for the actually connected image pairs. The proposed method was applied in three experiments with images from two fixed-wing UAVs and an octocopter UAV, respectively. In addition, the SCN-SfM method was compared to three other methods for image connectivity determination. The comparison shows a significant reduction in the number of matched images if our method is used, which leads to less computational costs. At the same time the achieved scene completeness and geometric accuracy are comparable.

  14. Velocity and Density Models Incorporating the Cascadia Subduction Zone for 3D Earthquake Ground Motion Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies in the Pacific Northwest, three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity (3D Vp and Vs) and density (3D rho) models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone have been developed for the region encompassed from about 40.2?N to 50?N latitude, and from about -122?W to -129?W longitude. The model volume includes elevations from 0 km to 60 km (elevation is opposite of depth in model coordinates). Stephenson and Frankel (2003) presented preliminary ground motion simulations valid up to 0.1 Hz using an earlier version of these models. The version of the model volume described here includes more structural and geophysical detail, particularly in the Puget Lowland as required for scenario earthquake simulations in the development of the Seattle Urban Hazards Maps (Frankel and others, 2007). Olsen and others (in press) used the model volume discussed here to perform a Cascadia simulation up to 0.5 Hz using a Sumatra-Andaman Islands rupture history. As research from the EarthScope Program (http://www.earthscope.org) is published, a wealth of important detail can be added to these model volumes, particularly to depths of the upper-mantle. However, at the time of development for this model version, no EarthScope-specific results were incorporated. This report is intended to be a reference for colleagues and associates who have used or are planning to use this preliminary model in their research. To this end, it is intended that these models will be considered a beginning template for a community velocity model of the Cascadia region as more data and results become available.

  15. Patient specific respiratory motion modeling using a 3D patient’s external surface

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Hadi; Pan, Tinsu; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion modeling of both tumor and surrounding tissues is a key element in minimizing errors and uncertainties in radiation therapy. Different continuous motion models have been previously developed. However, most of these models are based on the use of parameters such as amplitude and phase extracted from 1D external respiratory signal. A potentially reduced correlation between the internal structures (tumor and healthy organs) and the corresponding external surrogates obtained from such 1D respiratory signal is a limitation of these models. The objective of this work is to describe a continuous patient specific respiratory motion model, accounting for the irregular nature of respiratory signals, using patient external surface information as surrogate measures rather than a 1D respiratory signal. Methods: Ten patients were used in this study having each one 4D CT series, a synchronized RPM signal and patient surfaces extracted from the 4D CT volumes using a threshold based segmentation algorithm. A patient specific model based on the use of principal component analysis was subsequently constructed. This model relates the internal motion described by deformation matrices and the external motion characterized by the amplitude and the phase of the respiratory signal in the case of the RPM or using specific regions of interest (ROI) in the case of the patients’ external surface utilization. The capability of the different models considered to handle the irregular nature of respiration was assessed using two repeated 4D CT acquisitions (in two patients) and static CT images acquired at extreme respiration conditions (end of inspiration and expiration) for one patient. Results: Both quantitative and qualitative parameters covering local and global measures, including an expert observer study, were used to assess and compare the performance of the different motion estimation models considered. Results indicate that using surface information

  16. Nonrigid Registration of 2-D and 3-D Dynamic Cell Nuclei Images for Improved Classification of Subcellular Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun M.; Spector, David L.; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The observed motion of subcellular particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences of live cells is generally a superposition of the motion and deformation of the cell and the motion of the particles. Decoupling the two types of movements to enable accurate classification of the particle motion requires the application of registration algorithms. We have developed an intensity-based approach for nonrigid registration of multi-channel microscopy image sequences of cell nuclei. First, based on 3-D synthetic images we demonstrate that cell nucleus deformations change the observed motion types of particles and that our approach allows to recover the original motion. Second, we have successfully applied our approach to register 2-D and 3-D real microscopy image sequences. A quantitative experimental comparison with previous approaches for nonrigid registration of cell microscopy has also been performed. PMID:20840894

  17. Recording High Resolution 3D Lagrangian Motions In Marine Dinoflagellates using Digital Holographic Microscopic Cinematography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.; Place, A. R.; Belas, R.

    2006-11-01

    Detailed data on swimming behavior and locomotion for dense population of dinoflagellates constitutes a key component to understanding cell migration, cell-cell interactions and predator-prey dynamics, all of which affect algae bloom dynamics. Due to the multi-dimensional nature of flagellated cell motions, spatial-temporal Lagrangian measurements of multiple cells in high concentration are very limited. Here we present detailed data on 3D Lagrangian motions for three marine dinoflagellates: Oxyrrhis marina, Karlodinium veneficum, and Pfiesteria piscicida, using digital holographic microscopic cinematography. The measurements are performed in a 5x5x25mm cuvette with cell densities varying from 50,000 ˜ 90,000 cells/ml. Approximately 200-500 cells are tracked simultaneously for 12s at 60fps in a sample volume of 1x1x5 mm at a spatial resolution of 0.4x0.4x2 μm. We fully resolve the longitudinal flagella (˜200nm) along with the Lagrangian trajectory of each organism. Species dependent swimming behavior are identified and categorized quantitatively by velocities, radii of curvature, and rotations of pitch. Statistics on locomotion, temporal & spatial scales, and diffusion rate show substantial differences between species. The scaling between turning radius and cell dimension can be explained by a distributed stokeslet model for a self-propelled body.

  18. Global Existence and Asymptotic Behavior of Affine Motion of 3D Ideal Fluids Surrounded by Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sideris, Thomas C.

    2017-03-01

    The 3D compressible and incompressible Euler equations with a physical vacuum free boundary condition and affine initial conditions reduce to a globally solvable Hamiltonian system of ordinary differential equations for the deformation gradient in {GL^+(3, R)} . The evolution of the fluid domain is described by a family of ellipsoids whose diameter grows at a rate proportional to time. Upon rescaling to a fixed diameter, the asymptotic limit of the fluid ellipsoid is determined by a positive semi-definite quadratic form of rank r = 1, 2, or 3, corresponding to the asymptotic degeneration of the ellipsoid along 3-r of its principal axes. In the compressible case, the asymptotic limit has rank r = 3, and asymptotic completeness holds, when the adiabatic index {γ} satisfies {4/3 < γ < 2} . The number of possible degeneracies, 3-r, increases with the value of the adiabatic index {γ} . In the incompressible case, affine motion reduces to geodesic flow in {SL(3, R)} with the Euclidean metric. For incompressible affine swirling flow, there is a structural instability. Generically, when the vorticity is nonzero, the domains degenerate along only one axis, but the physical vacuum boundary condition fails over a finite time interval. The rescaled fluid domains of irrotational motion can collapse along two axes.

  19. The role of perspective information in the recovery of 3D structure-from-motion.

    PubMed

    Eagle, R A; Hogervorst, M A

    1999-05-01

    When investigating the recovery of three-dimensional structure-from-motion (SFM), vision scientists often assume that scaled-orthographic projection, which removes effects due to depth variations across the object, is an adequate approximation to full perspective projection. This is so even though SFM judgements can, in principle, be improved by exploiting perspective projection of scenes on to the retina. In an experiment, pairs of rotating hinged planes (open books) were simulated on a computer monitor, under either perspective or orthographic projection, and human observers were asked to indicate which they perceived had the larger dihedral angle. For small displays (4.6 x 6.0 degrees) discrimination thresholds were found to be similar under the two conditions, but diverged for all larger stimuli. In particular, as stimulus size was increased, performance under orthographic projection declined and by a stimulus size of 32 x 41 degrees performance was at chance for all subjects. In contrast, thresholds decreased under perspective projection as stimulus size was increased. These results show that human observers can use the information gained from perspective projection to recover SFM and that scaled-orthographic projection becomes an unacceptable approximation even at quite modest stimulus sizes. A model of SFM that incorporates measurement errors on the retinal motions accounts for performance under both projection systems, suggesting that this early noise forms the primary limitation on 3D discrimination performance.

  20. Study of human body: Kinematics and kinetics of a martial arts (Silat) performers using 3D-motion capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Ahmad Afiq Sabqi Awang; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Azraai, Nur Zaidi

    2015-04-01

    The Interest in this studies of human kinematics goes back very far in human history drove by curiosity or need for the understanding the complexity of human body motion. To find new and accurate information about the human movement as the advance computing technology became available for human movement that can perform. Martial arts (silat) were chose and multiple type of movement was studied. This project has done by using cutting-edge technology which is 3D motion capture to characterize and to measure the motion done by the performers of martial arts (silat). The camera will detect the markers (infrared reflection by the marker) around the performer body (total of 24 markers) and will show as dot in the computer software. The markers detected were analyzing using kinematic kinetic approach and time as reference. A graph of velocity, acceleration and position at time,t (seconds) of each marker was plot. Then from the information obtain, more parameters were determined such as work done, momentum, center of mass of a body using mathematical approach. This data can be used for development of the effectiveness movement in martial arts which is contributed to the people in arts. More future works can be implemented from this project such as analysis of a martial arts competition.

  1. Are 3-D coronal mass ejection parameters from single-view observations consistent with multiview ones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harim; Moon, Y.-J.; Na, Hyeonock; Jang, Soojeong; Lee, Jae-Ok

    2015-12-01

    To prepare for when only single-view observations are available, we have made a test whether the 3-D parameters (radial velocity, angular width, and source location) of halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) from single-view observations are consistent with those from multiview observations. For this test, we select 44 HCMEs from December 2010 to June 2011 with the following conditions: partial and full HCMEs by SOHO and limb CMEs by twin STEREO spacecraft when they were approximately in quadrature. In this study, we compare the 3-D parameters of the HCMEs from three different methods: (1) a geometrical triangulation method, the STEREO CAT tool developed by NASA/CCMC, for multiview observations using STEREO/SECCHI and SOHO/LASCO data, (2) the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) flux rope model for multiview observations using STEREO/SECCHI data, and (3) an ice cream cone model for single-view observations using SOHO/LASCO data. We find that the radial velocities and the source locations of the HCMEs from three methods are well consistent with one another with high correlation coefficients (≥0.9). However, the angular widths by the ice cream cone model are noticeably underestimated for broad CMEs larger than 100° and several partial HCMEs. A comparison between the 3-D CME parameters directly measured from twin STEREO spacecraft and the above 3-D parameters shows that the parameters from multiview are more consistent with the STEREO measurements than those from single view.

  2. SU-E-J-135: An Investigation of Ultrasound Imaging for 3D Intra-Fraction Prostate Motion Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, T; Harris, E; Bamber, J; Evans, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the use of a mechanically swept 3D ultrasound (US) probe to estimate intra-fraction motion of the prostate during radiation therapy using an US phantom and simulated transperineal imaging. Methods: A 3D motion platform was used to translate an US speckle phantom while simulating transperineal US imaging. Motion patterns for five representative types of prostate motion, generated from patient data previously acquired with a Calypso system, were using to move the phantom in 3D. The phantom was also implanted with fiducial markers and subsequently tracked using the CyberKnife kV x-ray system for comparison. A normalised cross correlation block matching algorithm was used to track speckle patterns in 3D and 2D US data. Motion estimation results were compared with known phantom translations. Results: Transperineal 3D US could track superior-inferior (axial) and anterior-posterior (lateral) motion to better than 0.8 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a volume rate of 1.7 Hz (comparable with kV x-ray tracking RMSE). Motion estimation accuracy was poorest along the US probe's swept axis (right-left; RL; RMSE < 4.2 mm) but simple regularisation methods could be used to improve RMSE (< 2 mm). 2D US was found to be feasible for slowly varying motion (RMSE < 0.5 mm). 3D US could also allow accurate radiation beam gating with displacement thresholds of 2 mm and 5 mm exhibiting a RMSE of less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: 2D and 3D US speckle tracking is feasible for prostate motion estimation during radiation delivery. Since RL prostate motion is small in magnitude and frequency, 2D or a hybrid (2D/3D) US imaging approach which also accounts for potential prostate rotations could be used. Regularisation methods could be used to ensure the accuracy of tracking data, making US a feasible approach for gating or tracking in standard or hypo-fractionated prostate treatments.

  3. 3D segmentation of lung CT data with graph-cuts: analysis of parameter sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jung won; Dunlap, Neal; Wang, Brian; Amini, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Lung boundary image segmentation is important for many tasks including for example in development of radiation treatment plans for subjects with thoracic malignancies. In this paper, we describe a method and parameter settings for accurate 3D lung boundary segmentation based on graph-cuts from X-ray CT data1. Even though previously several researchers have used graph-cuts for image segmentation, to date, no systematic studies have been performed regarding the range of parameter that give accurate results. The energy function in the graph-cuts algorithm requires 3 suitable parameter settings: K, a large constant for assigning seed points, c, the similarity coefficient for n-links, and λ, the terminal coefficient for t-links. We analyzed the parameter sensitivity with four lung data sets from subjects with lung cancer using error metrics. Large values of K created artifacts on segmented images, and relatively much larger value of c than the value of λ influenced the balance between the boundary term and the data term in the energy function, leading to unacceptable segmentation results. For a range of parameter settings, we performed 3D image segmentation, and in each case compared the results with the expert-delineated lung boundaries. We used simple 6-neighborhood systems for n-link in 3D. The 3D image segmentation took 10 minutes for a 512x512x118 ~ 512x512x190 lung CT image volume. Our results indicate that the graph-cuts algorithm was more sensitive to the K and λ parameter settings than to the C parameter and furthermore that amongst the range of parameters tested, K=5 and λ=0.5 yielded good results.

  4. Are There Side Effects to Watching 3D Movies? A Prospective Crossover Observational Study on Visually Induced Motion Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Solimini, Angelo G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing popularity of commercial movies showing three dimensional (3D) images has raised concern about possible adverse side effects on viewers. Methods and Findings A prospective carryover observational study was designed to assess the effect of exposure (3D vs. 2D movie views) on self reported symptoms of visually induced motion sickness. The standardized Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) was self administered on a convenience sample of 497 healthy adult volunteers before and after the vision of 2D and 3D movies. Viewers reporting some sickness (SSQ total score>15) were 54.8% of the total sample after the 3D movie compared to 14.1% of total sample after the 2D movie. Symptom intensity was 8.8 times higher than baseline after exposure to 3D movie (compared to the increase of 2 times the baseline after the 2D movie). Multivariate modeling of visually induced motion sickness as response variables pointed out the significant effects of exposure to 3D movie, history of car sickness and headache, after adjusting for gender, age, self reported anxiety level, attention to the movie and show time. Conclusions Seeing 3D movies can increase rating of symptoms of nausea, oculomotor and disorientation, especially in women with susceptible visual-vestibular system. Confirmatory studies which include examination of clinical signs on viewers are needed to pursue a conclusive evidence on the 3D vision effects on spectators. PMID:23418530

  5. 3D Modelling of Inaccessible Areas using UAV-based Aerial Photography and Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obanawa, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Yuichi; Gomez, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    In hardly accessible areas, the collection of 3D point-clouds using TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) can be very challenging, while airborne equivalent would not give a correct account of subvertical features and concave geometries like caves. To solve such problem, the authors have experimented an aerial photography based SfM (Structure from Motion) technique on a 'peninsular-rock' surrounded on three sides by the sea at a Pacific coast in eastern Japan. The research was carried out using UAS (Unmanned Aerial System) combined with a commercial small UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) carrying a compact camera. The UAV is a DJI PHANTOM: the UAV has four rotors (quadcopter), it has a weight of 1000 g, a payload of 400 g and a maximum flight time of 15 minutes. The camera is a GoPro 'HERO3 Black Edition': resolution 12 million pixels; weight 74 g; and 0.5 sec. interval-shot. The 3D model has been constructed by digital photogrammetry using a commercial SfM software, Agisoft PhotoScan Professional®, which can generate sparse and dense point-clouds, from which polygonal models and orthophotographs can be calculated. Using the 'flight-log' and/or GCPs (Ground Control Points), the software can generate digital surface model. As a result, high-resolution aerial orthophotographs and a 3D model were obtained. The results have shown that it was possible to survey the sea cliff and the wave cut-bench, which are unobservable from land side. In details, we could observe the complexity of the sea cliff that is nearly vertical as a whole while slightly overhanging over the thinner base. The wave cut bench is nearly flat and develops extensively at the base of the cliff. Although there are some evidences of small rockfalls at the upper part of the cliff, there is no evidence of very recent activity, because no fallen rock exists on the wave cut bench. This system has several merits: firstly lower cost than the existing measuring methods such as manned-flight survey and aerial laser

  6. How Plates Pull Transforms Apart: 3-D Numerical Models of Oceanic Transform Fault Response to Changes in Plate Motion Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, T. A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Olive, J. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Observations along oceanic fracture zones suggest that some mid-ocean ridge transform faults (TFs) previously split into multiple strike-slip segments separated by short (<~50 km) intra-transform spreading centers and then reunited to a single TF trace. This history of segmentation appears to correspond with changes in plate motion direction. Despite the clear evidence of TF segmentation, the processes governing its development and evolution are not well characterized. Here we use a 3-D, finite-difference / marker-in-cell technique to model the evolution of localized strain at a TF subjected to a sudden change in plate motion direction. We simulate the oceanic lithosphere and underlying asthenosphere at a ridge-transform-ridge setting using a visco-elastic-plastic rheology with a history-dependent plastic weakening law and a temperature- and stress-dependent mantle viscosity. To simulate the development of topography, a low density, low viscosity 'sticky air' layer is present above the oceanic lithosphere. The initial thermal gradient follows a half-space cooling solution with an offset across the TF. We impose an enhanced thermal diffusivity in the uppermost 6 km of lithosphere to simulate the effects of hydrothermal circulation. An initial weak seed in the lithosphere helps localize shear deformation between the two offset ridge axes to form a TF. For each model case, the simulation is run initially with TF-parallel plate motion until the thermal structure reaches a steady state. The direction of plate motion is then rotated either instantaneously or over a specified time period, placing the TF in a state of trans-tension. Model runs continue until the system reaches a new steady state. Parameters varied here include: initial TF length, spreading rate, and the rotation rate and magnitude of spreading obliquity. We compare our model predictions to structural observations at existing TFs and records of TF segmentation preserved in oceanic fracture zones.

  7. Mechanical performance and parameter sensitivity analysis of 3D braided composites joints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N.

  8. Mechanical Performance and Parameter Sensitivity Analysis of 3D Braided Composites Joints

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N. PMID:25121121

  9. Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking system applied to aquatic predator-prey interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2013-02-01

    Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking are combined to measure evolving volumetric velocity fields and organism trajectories during aquatic predator-prey interactions. The technique was used to study zebrafish foraging on both non-evasive and evasive prey species. Measurement volumes of 22.5 mm × 10.5 mm × 12 mm were reconstructed from images captured on a set of four high-speed cameras. To obtain accurate fluid velocity vectors within each volume, fish were first masked out using an automated visual hull method. Fish and prey locations were identified independently from the same image sets and tracked separately within the measurement volume. Experiments demonstrated that fish were not influenced by the infrared laser illumination or the tracer particles. Results showed that the zebrafish used different strategies, suction and ram feeding, for successful capture of non-evasive and evasive prey, respectively. The two strategies yielded different variations in fluid velocity between the fish mouth and the prey. In general, the results suggest that the local flow field, the direction of prey locomotion with respect to the predator and the relative accelerations and speeds of the predator and prey may all be significant in determining predation success.

  10. Combined aerial and terrestrial images for complete 3D documentation of Singosari Temple based on Structure from Motion algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Husnul; Cahyono, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    Singosaritemple is one of cultural heritage building in East Java, Indonesia which was built in 1300s and restorated in 1934-1937. Because of its history and importance, complete documentation of this temple is required. Nowadays with the advent of low cost UAVs combining aerial photography with terrestrial photogrammetry gives more complete data for 3D documentation. This research aims to make complete 3D model of this landmark from aerial and terrestrial photographs with Structure from Motion algorithm. To establish correct scale, position, and orientation, the final 3D model was georeferenced with Ground Control Points in UTM 49S coordinate system. The result shows that all facades, floor, and upper structures can be modeled completely in 3D. In terms of 3D coordinate accuracy, the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSEs) are RMSEx=0,041 m; RMSEy=0,031 m; RMSEz=0,049 m which represent 0.071 m displacement in 3D space. In addition the mean difference of lenght measurements of the object is 0,057 m. With this accuracy, this method can be used to map the site up to 1:237 scale. Although the accuracy level is still in centimeters, the combined aerial and terrestrial photographs with Structure from Motion algorithm can provide complete and visually interesting 3D model.

  11. Quantifying Key Climate Parameter Uncertainties Using an Earth System Model with a Dynamic 3D Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R.; Sriver, R. L.; Goes, M. P.; Urban, N.; Matthews, D.; Haran, M.; Keller, K.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections hinge critically on uncertain climate model parameters such as climate sensitivity, vertical ocean diffusivity and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcings. Climate sensitivity is defined as the equilibrium global mean temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Vertical ocean diffusivity parameterizes sub-grid scale ocean vertical mixing processes. These parameters are typically estimated using Intermediate Complexity Earth System Models (EMICs) that lack a full 3D representation of the oceans, thereby neglecting the effects of mixing on ocean dynamics and meridional overturning. We improve on these studies by employing an EMIC with a dynamic 3D ocean model to estimate these parameters. We carry out historical climate simulations with the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) varying parameters that affect climate sensitivity, vertical ocean mixing, and effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. We use a Bayesian approach whereby the likelihood of each parameter combination depends on how well the model simulates surface air temperature and upper ocean heat content. We use a Gaussian process emulator to interpolate the model output to an arbitrary parameter setting. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the posterior probability distribution function (pdf) of these parameters. We explore the sensitivity of the results to prior assumptions about the parameters. In addition, we estimate the relative skill of different observations to constrain the parameters. We quantify the uncertainty in parameter estimates stemming from climate variability, model and observational errors. We explore the sensitivity of key decision-relevant climate projections to these parameters. We find that climate sensitivity and vertical ocean diffusivity estimates are consistent with previously published results. The climate sensitivity pdf is strongly affected by the prior assumptions, and by the scaling

  12. Comparison of 2D and 3D modeled tumor motion estimation/prediction for dynamic tumor tracking during arc radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu; Ma, Xiangyu; Yan, Huagang; Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder; Li, Haiyun

    2017-03-06

    Many real-time imaging techniques have been developed to localize the target in 3D space or in 2D beam's eye view (BEV) plane for intrafraction motion tracking in radiation therapy. With tracking system latency, 3D-modeled method is expected to be more accurate even in terms of 2D BEV tracking error. No quantitative analysis, however, has been reported. In this study, we simulated co-planar arc deliveries using respiratory motion data acquired from 42 patients to quantitatively compare the accuracy between 2D BEV and 3D-modeled tracking in arc therapy and determine whether 3D information is needed for motion tracking. We used our previously developed low kV dose adaptive MV-kV imaging and motion compensation framework as a representative of 3D-modeled methods. It optimizes the balance between additional kV imaging dose and 3D tracking accuracy and solves the MLC blockage issue. With simulated Gaussian marker detection errors (zero mean and 0.39 mm standard deviation) and ~155/310/460 ms tracking system latencies, the mean percentage of time that the target moved >2 mm from the predicted 2D BEV position are 1.1%/4.0%/7.8% and 1.3%/5.8%/11.6% for 3D-modeled and 2D-only tracking, respectively. The corresponding average BEV RMS errors are 0.67/0.90/1.13 mm and 0.79/1.10/1.37 mm. Compared to the 2D method, the 3D method reduced the average RMS unresolved motion along the beam direction from ~3 mm to ~1 mm, resulting on average only <1% dosimetric advantage in the depth direction. Only for a small fraction of the patients, when tracking latency is long, the 3D-modeled method showed significant improvement of BEV tracking accuracy, indicating potential dosimetric advantage. However, if the tracking latency is short (~150 ms or less), those improvements are limited. Therefore, 2D BEV tracking has sufficient targeting accuracy for most clinical cases. The 3D technique is, however, still important in solving the MLC blockage problem during 2D BEV tracking.

  13. Intersection Based Motion Correction of Multi-Slice MRI for 3D in utero Fetal Brain Image Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, Anthony J.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years post-processing of fast multi-slice MR imaging to correct fetal motion has provided the first true 3D MR images of the developing human brain in utero. Early approaches have used reconstruction based algorithms, employing a two step iterative process, where slices from the acquired data are re-aligned to an approximate 3D reconstruction of the fetal brain, which is then refined further using the improved slice alignment. This two step slice-to-volume process, although powerful, is computationally expensive in needing a 3D reconstruction, and is limited in its ability to recover sub-voxel alignment. Here, we describe an alternative approach which we term slice intersection motion correction (SIMC), that seeks to directly co-align multiple slice stacks by considering the matching structure along all intersecting slice pairs in all orthogonally planned slices that are acquired in clinical imaging studies. A collective update scheme for all slices is then derived, to simultaneously drive slices into a consistent match along their lines of intersection. We then describe a 3D reconstruction algorithm that, using the final motion corrected slice locations, suppresses through-plane partial volume effects to provide a single high isotropic resolution 3D image. The method is tested on simulated data with known motions and is applied to retrospectively reconstruct 3D images from a range of clinically acquired imaging studies. The quantitative evaluation of the registration accuracy for the simulated data sets demonstrated a significant improvement over previous approaches. An initial application of the technique to studying clinical pathology is included, where the proposed method recovered up to 15 mm of translation and 30 degrees of rotation for individual slices, and produced full 3D reconstructions containing clinically useful additional information not visible in the original 2D slices. PMID:19744911

  14. Evaluating the utility of 3D TRUS image information in guiding intra-procedure registration for motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, Tharindu; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    In targeted 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy, patient and prostate movement during the procedure can cause target misalignments that hinder accurate sampling of pre-planned suspicious tissue locations. Multiple solutions have been proposed for motion compensation via registration of intra-procedural TRUS images to a baseline 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the biopsy procedure. While 2D TRUS images are widely used for intra-procedural guidance, some solutions utilize richer intra-procedural images such as bi- or multi-planar TRUS or 3D TRUS, acquired by specialized probes. In this work, we measured the impact of such richer intra-procedural imaging on motion compensation accuracy, to evaluate the tradeoff between cost and complexity of intra-procedural imaging versus improved motion compensation. We acquired baseline and intra-procedural 3D TRUS images from 29 patients at standard sextant-template biopsy locations. We used the planes extracted from the 3D intra-procedural scans to simulate 2D and 3D information available in different clinically relevant scenarios for registration. The registration accuracy was evaluated by calculating the target registration error (TRE) using manually identified homologous fiducial markers (micro-calcifications). Our results indicate that TRE improves gradually when the number of intra-procedural imaging planes used in registration is increased. Full 3D TRUS information helps the registration algorithm to robustly converge to more accurate solutions. These results can also inform the design of a fail-safe workflow during motion compensation in a system using a tracked 2D TRUS probe, by prescribing rotational acquisitions that can be performed quickly and easily by the physician immediately prior to needle targeting.

  15. Real-time 3D ultrasound fetal image enhancment techniques using motion-compensated frame rate up-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Ill; Park, Rae-Hong; Song, Young-Seuk; Kim, Cheol-An; Hwang, Jae-Sub

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we present a motion compensated frame rate up-conversion method for real-time three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound fetal image enhancement. The conventional mechanical scan method with one-dimensional (1-D) array converters used for 3-D volume data acquisition has a slow frame rate of multi-planar images. This drawback is not an issue for stationary objects, however in ultrasound images showing a fetus of more than about 25 weeks, we perceive abrupt changes due to fast motions. To compensate for this defect, we propose the frame rate up-conversion method by which new interpolated frames are inserted between two input frames, giving smooth renditions to human eyes. More natural motions can be obtained by frame rate up-conversion. In the proposed algorithm, we employ forward motion estimation (ME), in which motion vectors (MVs) ar estimated using a block matching algorithm (BMA). To smooth MVs over neighboring blocks, vector median filtering is performed. Using these smoothed MVs, interpolated frames are reconstructed by motion compensation (MC). The undesirable blocking artifacts due to blockwise processing are reduced by block boundary filtering using a Gaussian low pass filter (LPF). The proposed method can be used in computer aided diagnosis (CAD), where more natural 3-D ultrasound images are displayed in real-time. Simulation results with several real test sequences show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  16. How to select the most relevant 3D roughness parameters of a surface.

    PubMed

    Deltombe, R; Kubiak, K J; Bigerelle, M

    2014-01-01

    In order to conduct a comprehensive roughness analysis, around sixty 3D roughness parameters are created to describe most of the surface morphology with regard to specific functions, properties or applications. In this paper, a multiscale surface topography decomposition method is proposed with application to stainless steel (AISI 304), which is processed by rolling at different fabrication stages and by electrical discharge tool machining. Fifty-six 3D-roughness parameters defined in ISO, EUR, and ASME standards are calculated for the measured surfaces. Then, expert software "MesRug" is employed to perform statistical analysis on acquired data in order to find the most relevant parameters characterizing the effect of both processes (rolling and machining), and to determine the most appropriate scale of analysis. For the rolling process: The parameter Vmc (the Core Material Volume--defined as volume of material comprising the texture between heights corresponding to the material ratio values of p = 10% and q = 80%) computed at the scale of 3 µm is the most relevant parameter to characterize the cold rolling process. For the EDM Process, the best roughness parameter is SPD that represents the number of peaks per unit area after segmentation of a surface into motifs computed at the scale of 8 µm.

  17. Fully 3D modeling of tokamak vertical displacement events with realistic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferle, David; Ferraro, Nathaniel; Jardin, Stephen; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we model the complex multi-domain and highly non-linear physics of Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs), one of the most damaging off-normal events in tokamaks, with the implicit 3D extended MHD code M3D-C1. The code has recently acquired the capability to include finite thickness conducting structures within the computational domain. By exploiting the possibility of running a linear 3D calculation on top of a non-linear 2D simulation, we monitor the non-axisymmetric stability and assess the eigen-structure of kink modes as the simulation proceeds. Once a stability boundary is crossed, a fully 3D non-linear calculation is launched for the remainder of the simulation, starting from an earlier time of the 2D run. This procedure, along with adaptive zoning, greatly increases the efficiency of the calculation, and allows to perform VDE simulations with realistic parameters and high resolution. Simulations are being validated with NSTX data where both axisymmetric (toroidally averaged) and non-axisymmetric induced and conductive (halo) currents have been measured. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. SU-E-J-01: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Estimation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models

    SciTech Connect

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Lewis, J; Mishra, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: 3D motion modeling derived from 4DCT images, taken days or weeks before treatment, cannot reliably represent patient anatomy on the day of treatment. We develop a method to generate motion models based on 4DCBCT acquired at the time of treatment, and apply the model to estimate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Methods: Motion models are derived through deformable registration between each 4DCBCT phase, and principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated based on cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging. PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively through comparison of these cone-beam projections and projections estimated based on the motion model. Digital phantoms reproducing ten patient motion trajectories, and a physical phantom with regular and irregular motion derived from measured patient trajectories, are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization, and the global voxel intensity difference compared to ground truth. Results: Experiments included: 1) assuming no anatomic or positioning changes between 4DCT and treatment time; and 2) simulating positioning and tumor baseline shifts at the time of treatment compared to 4DCT acquisition. 4DCBCT were reconstructed from the anatomy as seen at treatment time. In case 1) the tumor localization error and the intensity differences in ten patient were smaller using 4DCT-based motion model, possible due to superior image quality. In case 2) the tumor localization error and intensity differences were 2.85 and 0.15 respectively, using 4DCT-based motion models, and 1.17 and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based models. 4DCBCT performed better due to its ability to reproduce daily anatomical changes. Conclusion: The study showed an advantage of 4DCBCT-based motion models in the context of 3D fluoroscopic images estimation. Positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties were mitigated by the 4DCBCT

  19. Surface classification and detection of latent fingerprints based on 3D surface texture parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruhn, Stefan; Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-06-01

    In the field of latent fingerprint detection in crime scene forensics the classification of surfaces has importance. A new method for the scientific analysis of image based information for forensic science was investigated in the last years. Our image acquisition based on a sensor using Chromatic White Light (CWL) with a lateral resolution up to 2 μm. The used FRT-MicroProf 200 CWL 600 measurement device is able to capture high-resolution intensity and topography images in an optical and contact-less way. In prior work, we have suggested to use 2D surface texture parameters to classify various materials, which was a novel approach in the field of criminalistic forensic using knowledge from surface appearance and a chromatic white light sensor. A meaningful and useful classification of different crime scene specific surfaces is not existent. In this work, we want to extend such considerations by the usage of fourteen 3D surface parameters, called 'Birmingham 14'. In our experiment we define these surface texture parameters and use them to classify ten different materials in this test set-up and create specific material classes. Further it is shown in first experiments, that some surface texture parameters are sensitive to separate fingerprints from carrier surfaces. So far, the use of surface roughness is mainly known within the framework of material quality control. The analysis and classification of the captured 3D-topography images from crime scenes is important for the adaptive preprocessing depending on the surface texture. The adaptive preprocessing in dependency of surface classification is necessary for precise detection because of the wide variety of surface textures. We perform a preliminary study in usage of these 3D surface texture parameters as feature for the fingerprint detection. In combination with a reference sample we show that surface texture parameters can be an indication for a fingerprint and can be a feature in latent fingerprint detection.

  20. Flying triangulation--an optical 3D sensor for the motion-robust acquisition of complex objects.

    PubMed

    Ettl, Svenja; Arold, Oliver; Yang, Zheng; Häusler, Gerd

    2012-01-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) shape acquisition is difficult if an all-around measurement of an object is desired or if a relative motion between object and sensor is unavoidable. An optical sensor principle is presented-we call it "flying triangulation"-that enables a motion-robust acquisition of 3D surface topography. It combines a simple handheld sensor with sophisticated registration algorithms. An easy acquisition of complex objects is possible-just by freely hand-guiding the sensor around the object. Real-time feedback of the sequential measurement results enables a comfortable handling for the user. No tracking is necessary. In contrast to most other eligible sensors, the presented sensor generates 3D data from each single camera image.

  1. A study of the effects of degraded imagery on tactical 3D model generation using structure-from-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolick, Leslie; Harguess, Josh

    2016-05-01

    An emerging technology in the realm of airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems is structure-from-motion (SfM), which enables the creation of three-dimensional (3D) point clouds and 3D models from two-dimensional (2D) imagery. There are several existing tools, such as VisualSFM and open source project OpenSfM, to assist in this process, however, it is well-known that pristine imagery is usually required to create meaningful 3D data from the imagery. In military applications, such as the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for surveillance operations, imagery is rarely pristine. Therefore, we present an analysis of structure-from-motion packages on imagery that has been degraded in a controlled manner.

  2. 3D graphics, virtual reality, and motion-onset visual evoked potentials in neurogaming.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, R; Wilson, S; Coyle, D

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) offers movement-free control of a computer application and is achieved by reading and translating the cortical activity of the brain into semantic control signals. Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) are neural potentials employed in BCIs and occur when motion-related stimuli are attended visually. mVEP dynamics are correlated with the position and timing of the moving stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing the mVEP paradigm with video games of various graphical complexities including those of commercial quality, we conducted three studies over four separate sessions comparing the performance of classifying five mVEP responses with variations in graphical complexity and style, in-game distractions, and display parameters surrounding mVEP stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing contemporary presentation modalities in neurogaming, one of the studies compared mVEP classification performance when stimuli were presented using the oculus rift virtual reality headset. Results from 31 independent subjects were analyzed offline. The results show classification performances ranging up to 90% with variations in conditions in graphical complexity having limited effect on mVEP performance; thus, demonstrating the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm within BCI-based neurogaming.

  3. A 3D MR-acquisition scheme for nonrigid bulk motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbitsch, Christoph Prieto, Claudia; Schaeffter, Tobias; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive medical imaging technique commonly used to detect and assess tumor lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution anatomical images with different contrasts and a range of additional information important for cancer diagnosis. Recently, simultaneous PET-MR systems have been released with the promise to provide complementary information from both modalities in a single examination. Due to long scan times, subject nonrigid bulk motion, i.e., changes of the patient's position on the scanner table leading to nonrigid changes of the patient's anatomy, during data acquisition can negatively impair image quality and tracer uptake quantification. A 3D MR-acquisition scheme is proposed to detect and correct for nonrigid bulk motion in simultaneously acquired PET-MR data. Methods: A respiratory navigated three dimensional (3D) MR-acquisition with Radial Phase Encoding (RPE) is used to obtain T1- and T2-weighted data with an isotropic resolution of 1.5 mm. Healthy volunteers are asked to move the abdomen two to three times during data acquisition resulting in overall 19 movements at arbitrary time points. The acquisition scheme is used to retrospectively reconstruct dynamic 3D MR images with different temporal resolutions. Nonrigid bulk motion is detected and corrected in this image data. A simultaneous PET acquisition is simulated and the effect of motion correction is assessed on image quality and standardized uptake values (SUV) for lesions with different diameters. Results: Six respiratory gated 3D data sets with T1- and T2-weighted contrast have been obtained in healthy volunteers. All bulk motion shifts have successfully been detected and motion fields describing the transformation between the different motion states could be obtained with an accuracy of 1.71 ± 0.29 mm. The PET simulation showed errors of up to 67% in measured SUV due to bulk motion which could be reduced to less than

  4. Time-resolved 3D contrast-enhanced MRA of an extended FOV using continuous table motion.

    PubMed

    Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Kruger, David G; Riederer, Stephen J; Glockner, James F; Hu, Houchun H

    2004-03-01

    A method is presented for acquiring 3D time-resolved MR images of an extended (>100 cm) longitudinal field of view (FOV), as used for peripheral MR angiographic runoff studies. Previous techniques for long-FOV peripheral MRA have generally provided a single image (i.e., with no time resolution). The technique presented here generates a time series of 3D images of the FOV that lies within the homogeneous volume of the magnet. This is achieved by differential sampling of 3D k-space during continuous motion of the patient table. Each point in the object is interrogated in five consecutive 3D image sets generated at 2.5-s intervals. The method was tested experimentally in eight human subjects, and the leading edge of the bolus was observed in real time and maintained within the imaging FOV. The data revealed differential bolus velocities along the vasculature of the legs.

  5. 3D HUMAN MOTION RETRIEVAL BASED ON HUMAN HIERARCHICAL INDEX STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Guo, X.

    2013-01-01

    With the development and wide application of motion capture technology, the captured motion data sets are becoming larger and larger. For this reason, an efficient retrieval method for the motion database is very important. The retrieval method needs an appropriate indexing scheme and an effective similarity measure that can organize the existing motion data well. In this paper, we represent a human motion hierarchical index structure and adopt a nonlinear method to segment motion sequences. Based on this, we extract motion patterns and then we employ a fast similarity measure algorithm for motion pattern similarity computation to efficiently retrieve motion sequences. The experiment results show that the approach proposed in our paper is effective and efficient. PMID:24744481

  6. Development of real-time motion capture system for 3D on-line games linked with virtual character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Hyeong; Ryu, Young Kee; Cho, Hyung Suck

    2004-10-01

    Motion tracking method is being issued as essential part of the entertainment, medical, sports, education and industry with the development of 3-D virtual reality. Virtual human character in the digital animation and game application has been controlled by interfacing devices; mouse, joysticks, midi-slider, and so on. Those devices could not enable virtual human character to move smoothly and naturally. Furthermore, high-end human motion capture systems in commercial market are expensive and complicated. In this paper, we proposed a practical and fast motion capturing system consisting of optic sensors, and linked the data with 3-D game character with real time. The prototype experiment setup is successfully applied to a boxing game which requires very fast movement of human character.

  7. Estimation of Pulmonary Motion in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Intrathoracic Tumors Using 3D-Dynamic MRI: Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Schoebinger, Max; Herth, Felix; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Meinzer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate a new technique for quantifying regional lung motion using 3D-MRI in healthy volunteers and to apply the technique in patients with intra- or extrapulmonary tumors. Materials and Methods Intraparenchymal lung motion during a whole breathing cycle was quantified in 30 healthy volunteers using 3D-dynamic MRI (FLASH [fast low angle shot] 3D, TRICKS [time-resolved interpolated contrast kinetics]). Qualitative and quantitative vector color maps and cumulative histograms were performed using an introduced semiautomatic algorithm. An analysis of lung motion was performed and correlated with an established 2D-MRI technique for verification. As a proof of concept, the technique was applied in five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 5 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Results The correlation between intraparenchymal lung motion of the basal lung parts and the 2D-MRI technique was significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Also, the vector color maps quantitatively illustrated regional lung motion in all healthy volunteers. No differences were observed between both hemithoraces, which was verified by cumulative histograms. The patients with NSCLC showed a local lack of lung motion in the area of the tumor. In the patients with MPM, there was global diminished motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax, which improved siginificantly after chemotherapy (CHT) (assessed by the 2D- and 3D-techniques) (p < 0.01). Using global spirometry, an improvement could also be shown (vital capacity 2.9 ± 0.5 versus 3.4 L ± 0.6, FEV1 0.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.4 ± 0.2 L) after CHT, but this improvement was not significant. Conclusion A 3D-dynamic MRI is able to quantify intraparenchymal lung motion. Local and global parenchymal pathologies can be precisely located and might be a new tool used to quantify even slight changes in lung motion (e.g. in therapy monitoring, follow-up studies or even benign lung diseases). PMID:19885311

  8. Piecewise-diffeomorphic image registration: application to the motion estimation between 3D CT lung images with sliding conditions.

    PubMed

    Risser, Laurent; Vialard, François-Xavier; Baluwala, Habib Y; Schnabel, Julia A

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for modelling sliding conditions when registering 3D images in a piecewise-diffeomorphic framework. More specifically, our main contribution is the development of a mathematical formalism to perform Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping registration with sliding conditions. We also show how to adapt this formalism to the LogDemons diffeomorphic registration framework. We finally show how to apply this strategy to estimate the respiratory motion between 3D CT pulmonary images. Quantitative tests are performed on 2D and 3D synthetic images, as well as on real 3D lung images from the MICCAI EMPIRE10 challenge. Results show that our strategy estimates accurate mappings of entire 3D thoracic image volumes that exhibit a sliding motion, as opposed to conventional registration methods which are not capable of capturing discontinuous deformations at the thoracic cage boundary. They also show that although the deformations are not smooth across the location of sliding conditions, they are almost always invertible in the whole image domain. This would be helpful for radiotherapy planning and delivery.

  9. Dynamics and cortical distribution of neural responses to 2D and 3D motion in human

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Suzanne P.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The perception of motion-in-depth is important for avoiding collisions and for the control of vergence eye-movements and other motor actions. Previous psychophysical studies have suggested that sensitivity to motion-in-depth has a lower temporal processing limit than the perception of lateral motion. The present study used functional MRI-informed EEG source-imaging to study the spatiotemporal properties of the responses to lateral motion and motion-in-depth in human visual cortex. Lateral motion and motion-in-depth displays comprised stimuli whose only difference was interocular phase: monocular oscillatory motion was either in-phase in the two eyes (lateral motion) or in antiphase (motion-in-depth). Spectral analysis was used to break the steady-state visually evoked potentials responses down into even and odd harmonic components within five functionally defined regions of interest: V1, V4, lateral occipital complex, V3A, and hMT+. We also characterized the responses within two anatomically defined regions: the inferior and superior parietal cortex. Even harmonic components dominated the evoked responses and were a factor of approximately two larger for lateral motion than motion-in-depth. These responses were slower for motion-in-depth and were largely independent of absolute disparity. In each of our regions of interest, responses at odd-harmonics were relatively small, but were larger for motion-in-depth than lateral motion, especially in parietal cortex, and depended on absolute disparity. Taken together, our results suggest a plausible neural basis for reduced psychophysical sensitivity to rapid motion-in-depth. PMID:24198326

  10. Investigation into the influence of build parameters on failure of 3D printed parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, Giacomo

    Additive manufacturing, including fused deposition modeling (FDM), is transforming the built world and engineering education. Deep understanding of parts created through FDM technology has lagged behind its adoption in home, work, and academic environments. Properties of parts created from bulk materials through traditional manufacturing are understood well enough to accurately predict their behavior through analytical models. Unfortunately, Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters create anisotropy on a scale that fundamentally affects the part properties. Understanding AM process parameters (implemented by program algorithms called slicers) is necessary to predict part behavior. Investigating algorithms controlling print parameters (slicers) revealed stark differences between the generation of part layers. In this work, tensile testing experiments, including a full factorial design, determined that three key factors, width, thickness, infill density, and their interactions, significantly affect the tensile properties of 3D printed test samples.

  11. GPS Measurements of Crustal Motion Indicate 3D GIA Models are Needed to Understand Antarctic Ice Mass Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konfal, S. A.; Wilson, T. J.; Bevis, M. G.; Kendrick, E. C.; Dalziel, I. W. D.; Smalley, R., Jr.; Willis, M. J.; Heeszel, D.; Wiens, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Continuous GPS measurements of bedrock crustal motions in response to GIA in Antarctica have been acquired by the Antarctic Network (ANET) component of the Polar Earth Observing Network (POLENET). Patterns of vertical crustal displacements are commonly considered the key fingerprints of GIA, with maximum uplift marking the position of former ice load centers. However, efforts to develop more realistic 3D earth models have shown that the horizontal motion pattern is a more important signature of GIA on a laterally varying earth. Here we provide the first measurements substantiating predictions of a reversal of horizontal motions across an extreme gradient in crustal thickness and mantle viscosity crossing Antarctica. GPS results document motion toward, rather than away from the sites of major ice mass loss in West Antarctica. When compared in a common reference frame, observed crustal motions are not in agreement with predictions from models of GIA. A gradient in crustal velocities, faster toward West Antarctica, is spatially coincident with the rheological boundary mapped from seismic tomographic results. This suggests that horizontal crustal motions are strongly influenced by laterally-varying earth properties, and demonstrates that only 3D earth models can produce reliable predictions of GIA for Antarctica.

  12. The 3D Tele Motion Tracking for the Orthodontic Facial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nota, Alessandro; Marchetti, Enrico; Padricelli, Giuseppe; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability of 3D-TMT, previously used only for dynamic testing, in a static cephalometric evaluation. Material and Method. A group of 40 patients (20 males and 20 females; mean age 14.2 ± 1.2 years; 12–18 years old) was included in the study. The measurements obtained by the 3D-TMT cephalometric analysis with a conventional frontal cephalometric analysis were compared for each subject. Nine passive markers reflectors were positioned on the face skin for the detection of the profile of the patient. Through the acquisition of these points, corresponding plans for three-dimensional posterior-anterior cephalometric analysis were found. Results. The cephalometric results carried out with 3D-TMT and with traditional posterior-anterior cephalometric analysis showed the 3D-TMT system values are slightly higher than the values measured on radiographs but statistically significant; nevertheless their correlation is very high. Conclusion. The recorded values obtained using the 3D-TMT analysis were correlated to cephalometric analysis, with small but statistically significant differences. The Dahlberg errors resulted to be always lower than the mean difference between the 2D and 3D measurements. A clinician should use, during the clinical monitoring of a patient, always the same method, to avoid comparing different millimeter magnitudes. PMID:28044130

  13. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Neltje E.; Piro, Lennart K.; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team. PMID:27338400

  14. Nonrigid motion correction in 3D using autofocusing with localized linear translations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Cunningham, Charles H; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael

    2012-12-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from nonrigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric--more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multichannel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called "Butterfly" navigators, which are modifications of the spin-warp sequence that provides intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, nonrigid motion was observed.

  15. Parameter Estimation of Fossil Oysters from High Resolution 3D Point Cloud and Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuricic, Ana; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Mandic, Oleg; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    is to investigate if the application of state-of-the-art 3D digitizing, data processing, and visualization technologies support the interpretation of this paleontological site. The obtained 3D data (approx. 1 billion points at the respective area) is analyzed with respect to their 3D structure in order to derive geometrical information. The aim of this contribution is to segment the 3D point cloud of laser scanning data into meaningful regions representing particular objects. Geometric parameters (curvature, tangent plane orientation, local minimum and maximum, etc.) are derived for every 3D point of the point cloud. A set of features is computed in each point using different kernel sizes to define neighborhoods of different size. This provides information on convexity (outer surface), concavity (inner surface) and locally flat areas, which shall be further utilized in fitting model of Crassostrea-shells. In addition, digitizing is performed manually in order to obtain a representative set of reference data for the evaluation of the obtained results. For evaluating these results the reference data (length and orientation of specimen) is then compared to the automatically derived segments of the point cloud. The study is supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF P 25883-N29).

  16. Determination of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Casagranda, Albert; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting; Pastore, Giovanni; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Hales, Jason Dean; Williamson, Richard L; Martineau, Richard Charles

    2016-05-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  17. Analysis of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Casagranda, Albert; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting; Pastore, Giovanni; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Hales, Jason Dean; Williamson, Richard L; Martineau, Richard Charles

    2016-06-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  18. Description of patellar movement by 3D parameters obtained from dynamic CT acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sá Rebelo, Marina; Moreno, Ramon Alfredo; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; de Ávila, Luiz Francisco Rodrigues; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Gutierrez, Marco Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The patellofemoral joint is critical in the biomechanics of the knee. The patellofemoral instability is one condition that generates pain, functional impairment and often requires surgery as part of orthopedic treatment. The analysis of the patellofemoral dynamics has been performed by several medical image modalities. The clinical parameters assessed are mainly based on 2D measurements, such as the patellar tilt angle and the lateral shift among others. Besides, the acquisition protocols are mostly performed with the leg laid static at fixed angles. The use of helical multi slice CT scanner can allow the capture and display of the joint's movement performed actively by the patient. However, the orthopedic applications of this scanner have not yet been standardized or widespread. In this work we present a method to evaluate the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint during active contraction using multi slice CT images. This approach can greatly improve the analysis of patellar instability by displaying the physiology during muscle contraction. The movement was evaluated by computing its 3D displacements and rotations from different knee angles. The first processing step registered the images in both angles based on the femuŕs position. The transformation matrix of the patella from the images was then calculated, which provided the rotations and translations performed by the patella from its position in the first image to its position in the second image. Analysis of these parameters for all frames provided real 3D information about the patellar displacement.

  19. Integrating structure-from-motion photogrammetry with geospatial software as a novel technique for quantifying 3D ecological characteristics of coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Delparte, D; Gates, RD; Takabayashi, M

    2015-01-01

    The structural complexity of coral reefs plays a major role in the biodiversity, productivity, and overall functionality of reef ecosystems. Conventional metrics with 2-dimensional properties are inadequate for characterization of reef structural complexity. A 3-dimensional (3D) approach can better quantify topography, rugosity and other structural characteristics that play an important role in the ecology of coral reef communities. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) is an emerging low-cost photogrammetric method for high-resolution 3D topographic reconstruction. This study utilized SfM 3D reconstruction software tools to create textured mesh models of a reef at French Frigate Shoals, an atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The reconstructed orthophoto and digital elevation model were then integrated with geospatial software in order to quantify metrics pertaining to 3D complexity. The resulting data provided high-resolution physical properties of coral colonies that were then combined with live cover to accurately characterize the reef as a living structure. The 3D reconstruction of reef structure and complexity can be integrated with other physiological and ecological parameters in future research to develop reliable ecosystem models and improve capacity to monitor changes in the health and function of coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26207190

  20. 3D GABA imaging with real-time motion correction, shim update and reacquisition of adiabatic spiral MRSI.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Wolfgang; Gagoski, Borjan; Hess, Aaron T; Bhat, Himanshu; Tisdall, M Dylan; van der Kouwe, Andre J W; Strasser, Bernhard; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Trattnig, Siegfried; Grant, Ellen; Rosen, Bruce; Andronesi, Ovidiu C

    2014-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) are the major neurotransmitters in the brain. They are crucial for the functioning of healthy brain and their alteration is a major mechanism in the pathophysiology of many neuro-psychiatric disorders. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the only way to measure GABA and Glu non-invasively in vivo. GABA detection is particularly challenging and requires special MRS techniques. The most popular is MEscher-GArwood (MEGA) difference editing with single-voxel Point RESolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) localization. This technique has three major limitations: a) MEGA editing is a subtraction technique, hence is very sensitive to scanner instabilities and motion artifacts. b) PRESS is prone to localization errors at high fields (≥3T) that compromise accurate quantification. c) Single-voxel spectroscopy can (similar to a biopsy) only probe steady GABA and Glu levels in a single location at a time. To mitigate these problems, we implemented a 3D MEGA-editing MRS imaging sequence with the following three features: a) Real-time motion correction, dynamic shim updates, and selective reacquisition to eliminate subtraction artifacts due to scanner instabilities and subject motion. b) Localization by Adiabatic SElective Refocusing (LASER) to improve the localization accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio. c) K-space encoding via a weighted stack of spirals provides 3D metabolic mapping with flexible scan times. Simulations, phantom and in vivo experiments prove that our MEGA-LASER sequence enables 3D mapping of GABA+ and Glx (Glutamate+Gluatmine), by providing 1.66 times larger signal for the 3.02ppm multiplet of GABA+ compared to MEGA-PRESS, leading to clinically feasible scan times for 3D brain imaging. Hence, our sequence allows accurate and robust 3D-mapping of brain GABA+ and Glx levels to be performed at clinical 3T MR scanners for use in neuroscience and clinical applications.

  1. A collaborative computing framework of cloud network and WBSN applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Feng; Chen, Min; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2014-03-01

    As cloud computing and wireless body sensor network technologies become gradually developed, ubiquitous healthcare services prevent accidents instantly and effectively, as well as provides relevant information to reduce related processing time and cost. This study proposes a co-processing intermediary framework integrated cloud and wireless body sensor networks, which is mainly applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction. In this study, the main focuses includes distributed computing and resource allocation of processing sensing data over the computing architecture, network conditions and performance evaluation. Through this framework, the transmissions and computing time of sensing data are reduced to enhance overall performance for the services of fall events detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

  2. A stroboscopic structured illumination system used in dynamic 3D visualization of high-speed motion object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Zhang, Qican; Li, Yong; Xiang, Liqun; Cao, Yiping; Chen, Wenjing

    2005-04-01

    A stroboscopic structured illumination system, which can be used in measurement for 3D shape and deformation of high-speed motion object, is proposed and verified by experiments. The system, present in this paper, can automatically detect the position of high-speed moving object and synchronously control the flash of LED to project a structured optical field onto surface of motion object and the shoot of imaging system to acquire an image of deformed fringe pattern, also can create a signal, set artificially through software, to synchronously control the LED and imaging system to do their job. We experiment on a civil electric fan, successful acquire a serial of instantaneous, sharp and clear images of rotation blade and reconstruct its 3D shapes in difference revolutions.

  3. A new method for automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D motion captured images (4D).

    PubMed

    Al-Anezi, T; Khambay, B; Peng, M J; O'Leary, E; Ju, X; Ayoub, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D image sequences. 32 subjects (16 males and 16 females) aged 18-35 years were recruited. 23 anthropometric landmarks were marked on the face of each subject with non-permanent ink using a 0.5mm pen. The subjects were asked to perform three facial animations (maximal smile, lip purse and cheek puff) from rest position. Each animation was captured by the 3D imaging system. A single operator manually digitised the landmarks on the 3D facial models and their locations were compared with those of the automatically tracked ones. To investigate the accuracy of manual digitisation, the operator re-digitised the same set of 3D images of 10 subjects (5 male and 5 female) at 1 month interval. The discrepancies in x, y and z coordinates between the 3D position of the manual digitised landmarks and that of the automatic tracked facial landmarks were within 0.17mm. The mean distance between the manually digitised and the automatically tracked landmarks using the tracking software was within 0.55 mm. The automatic tracking of facial landmarks demonstrated satisfactory accuracy which would facilitate the analysis of the dynamic motion during facial animations.

  4. Research on Joint Parameter Inversion for an Integrated Underground Displacement 3D Measuring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Qiu, Guohua; Li, Qing; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Wang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is a key means to monitor and evaluate geological disasters and geotechnical projects. There exist few practical instruments able to monitor subsurface horizontal and vertical displacements simultaneously due to monitoring invisibility and complexity. A novel underground displacement 3D measuring sensor had been proposed in our previous studies, and great efforts have been taken in the basic theoretical research of underground displacement sensing and measuring characteristics by virtue of modeling, simulation and experiments. This paper presents an innovative underground displacement joint inversion method by mixing a specific forward modeling approach with an approximate optimization inversion procedure. It can realize a joint inversion of underground horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for the proposed 3D sensor. Comparative studies have been conducted between the measured and inversed parameters of underground horizontal and vertical displacements under a variety of experimental and inverse conditions. The results showed that when experimentally measured horizontal displacements and vertical displacements are both varied within 0 ~ 30 mm, horizontal displacement and vertical displacement inversion discrepancies are generally less than 3 mm and 1 mm, respectively, under three kinds of simulated underground displacement monitoring circumstances. This implies that our proposed underground displacement joint inversion method is robust and efficient to predict the measuring values of underground horizontal and vertical displacements for the proposed sensor. PMID:25871714

  5. An eliminating method of motion-induced vertical parallax for time-division 3D display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyuan; Hou, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    A time difference between the left image and right image of the time-division 3D display makes a person perceive alternating vertical parallax when an object is moving vertically on a fixed depth plane, which causes the left image and right image perceived do not match and makes people more prone to visual fatigue. This mismatch cannot eliminate simply rely on the precise synchronous control of the left image and right image. Based on the principle of time-division 3D display technology and human visual system characteristics, this paper establishes a model of the true vertical motion velocity in reality and vertical motion velocity on the screen, and calculates the amount of the vertical parallax caused by vertical motion, and then puts forward a motion compensation method to eliminate the vertical parallax. Finally, subjective experiments are carried out to analyze how the time difference affects the stereo visual comfort by comparing the comfort values of the stereo image sequences before and after compensating using the eliminating method. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed method is reasonable and efficient.

  6. Stereo and motion parallax cues in human 3D vision: can they vanish without a trace?

    PubMed

    Rauschecker, Andreas M; Solomon, Samuel G; Glennerster, Andrew

    2006-12-19

    In an immersive virtual reality environment, subjects fail to notice when a scene expands or contracts around them, despite correct and consistent information from binocular stereopsis and motion parallax, resulting in gross failures of size constancy (A. Glennerster, L. Tcheang, S. J. Gilson, A. W. Fitzgibbon, & A. J. Parker, 2006). We determined whether the integration of stereopsis/motion parallax cues with texture-based cues could be modified through feedback. Subjects compared the size of two objects, each visible when the room was of a different size. As the subject walked, the room expanded or contracted, although subjects failed to notice any change. Subjects were given feedback about the accuracy of their size judgments, where the "correct" size setting was defined either by texture-based cues or (in a separate experiment) by stereo/motion parallax cues. Because of feedback, observers were able to adjust responses such that fewer errors were made. For texture-based feedback, the pattern of responses was consistent with observers weighting texture cues more heavily. However, for stereo/motion parallax feedback, performance in many conditions became worse such that, paradoxically, biases moved away from the point reinforced by the feedback. This can be explained by assuming that subjects remap the relationship between stereo/motion parallax cues and perceived size or that they develop strategies to change their criterion for a size match on different trials. In either case, subjects appear not to have direct access to stereo/motion parallax cues.

  7. Very Broad X(4260) and the Resonance Parameters of the ψ(3D) Vector Charmonium State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beveren, Eef; Rupp, George; Segovia, J.

    2010-09-01

    We argue that the X(4260) enhancement contains a wealth of information on 1-- cc¯ spectroscopy. We discuss the shape of the X(4260) observed in the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden process e+e-→π+π-J/ψ, in particular, at and near vector charmonium resonances as well as open-charm threshold enhancements. The resulting very broad X(4260) structure does not seem to classify itself as a 1-- cc¯ resonance, but its detailed shape allows us to identify new vector charmonium states with higher statistics than in open-charm decay. Here, we estimate the resonance parameters of the ψ(3D). Our approach also provides an explanation for the odd dip in the π+π-J/ψ data precisely at the ψ(4415) resonance.

  8. Very Broad X(4260) and the Resonance Parameters of the {psi}(3D) Vector Charmonium State

    SciTech Connect

    Beveren, Eef van; Rupp, George; Segovia, J.

    2010-09-03

    We argue that the X(4260) enhancement contains a wealth of information on 1{sup --} cc spectroscopy. We discuss the shape of the X(4260) observed in the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}, in particular, at and near vector charmonium resonances as well as open-charm threshold enhancements. The resulting very broad X(4260) structure does not seem to classify itself as a 1{sup --} cc resonance, but its detailed shape allows us to identify new vector charmonium states with higher statistics than in open-charm decay. Here, we estimate the resonance parameters of the {psi}(3D). Our approach also provides an explanation for the odd dip in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi} data precisely at the {psi}(4415) resonance.

  9. Investigating Cardiac Motion Patterns Using Synthetic High-Resolution 3D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Images and Statistical Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Benedetta; Bruse, Jan L.; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Ntsinjana, Hopewell N.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease is more and more based on medical imaging, which allows investigation of abnormal cardiac morphology and correlated abnormal function. Although analysis of 2D images represents the clinical standard, novel tools performing automatic processing of 3D images are becoming available, providing more detailed and comprehensive information than simple 2D morphometry. Among these, statistical shape analysis (SSA) allows a consistent and quantitative description of a population of complex shapes, as a way to detect novel biomarkers, ultimately improving diagnosis and pathology understanding. The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of a SSA method for the investigation of 3D left ventricular shape and motion patterns and to test it on a small sample of 4 congenital repaired aortic stenosis patients and 4 age-matched healthy volunteers to demonstrate its potential. The advantage of this method is the capability of analyzing subject-specific motion patterns separately from the individual morphology, visually and quantitatively, as a way to identify functional abnormalities related to both dynamics and shape. Specifically, we combined 3D, high-resolution whole heart data with 2D, temporal information provided by cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, and we used an SSA approach to analyze 3D motion per se. Preliminary results of this pilot study showed that using this method, some differences in end-diastolic and end-systolic ventricular shapes could be captured, but it was not possible to clearly separate the two cohorts based on shape information alone. However, further analyses on ventricular motion allowed to qualitatively identify differences between the two populations. Moreover, by describing shape and motion with a small number of principal components, this method offers a fully automated process to obtain visually intuitive and numerical information on cardiac shape and motion

  10. Effects of image noise, respiratory motion, and motion compensation on 3D activity quantification in count-limited PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman, W.; Mawlawi, O. R.; Mikell, J. K.; Mourtada, F.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of noise, motion blur, and motion compensation using quiescent-period gating (QPG) on the activity concentration (AC) distribution—quantified using the cumulative AC volume histogram (ACVH)—in count-limited studies such as 90Y-PET/CT. An International Electrotechnical Commission phantom filled with low 18F activity was used to simulate clinical 90Y-PET images. PET data were acquired using a GE-D690 when the phantom was static and subject to 1-4 cm periodic 1D motion. The static data were down-sampled into shorter durations to determine the effect of noise on ACVH. Motion-degraded PET data were sorted into multiple gates to assess the effect of motion and QPG on ACVH. Errors in ACVH at AC90 (minimum AC that covers 90% of the volume of interest (VOI)), AC80, and ACmean (average AC in the VOI) were characterized as a function of noise and amplitude before and after QPG. Scan-time reduction increased the apparent non-uniformity of sphere doses and the dispersion of ACVH. These effects were more pronounced in smaller spheres. Noise-related errors in ACVH at AC20 to AC70 were smaller (<15%) compared to the errors between AC80 to AC90 (>15%). The accuracy of ACmean was largely independent of the total count. Motion decreased the observed AC and skewed the ACVH toward lower values; the severity of this effect depended on motion amplitude and tumor diameter. The errors in AC20 to AC80 for the 17 mm sphere were  -25% and  -55% for motion amplitudes of 2 cm and 4 cm, respectively. With QPG, the errors in AC20 to AC80 of the 17 mm sphere were reduced to  -15% for motion amplitudes  <4 cm. For spheres with motion amplitude to diameter ratio  >0.5, QPG was effective at reducing errors in ACVH despite increases in image non-uniformity due to increased noise. ACVH is believed to be more relevant than mean or maximum AC to calculate tumor control and normal tissue complication probability

  11. Determination of HCME 3-D parameters using a full ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Harim

    2016-05-01

    It is very essential to determine three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) for space weather forecast. Several cone models (e.g., an elliptical cone model, an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model) have been examined to estimate these parameters. In this study, we investigate which cone type is close to a halo CME morphology using 26 CMEs: halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From cone shape parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone type CMEs are much closer to observations than shallow ice-cream cone type CMEs. Thus we develop a new cone model in which a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3-D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (a geometrical triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model) based on multi-spacecraft data. We are developing a general ice-cream cone model whose front shape is a free parameter determined by observations.

  12. Sedimentary basin effects in Seattle, Washington: Ground-motion observations and 3D simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur; Stephenson, William; Carver, David

    2009-01-01

    Seismograms of local earthquakes recorded in Seattle exhibit surface waves in the Seattle basin and basin-edge focusing of S waves. Spectral ratios of Swaves and later arrivals at 1 Hz for stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin show a dependence on the direction to the earthquake, with earthquakes to the south and southwest producing higher average amplification. Earthquakes to the southwest typically produce larger basin surface waves relative to S waves than earthquakes to the north and northwest, probably because of the velocity contrast across the Seattle fault along the southern margin of the Seattle basin. S to P conversions are observed for some events and are likely converted at the bottom of the Seattle basin. We model five earthquakes, including the M 6.8 Nisqually earthquake, using 3D finite-difference simulations accurate up to 1 Hz. The simulations reproduce the observed dependence of amplification on the direction to the earthquake. The simulations generally match the timing and character of basin surface waves observed for many events. The 3D simulation for the Nisqually earth-quake produces focusing of S waves along the southern margin of the Seattle basin near the area in west Seattle that experienced increased chimney damage from the earthquake, similar to the results of the higher-frequency 2D simulation reported by Stephenson et al. (2006). Waveforms from the 3D simulations show reasonable agreement with the data at low frequencies (0.2-0.4 Hz) for the Nisqually earthquake and an M 4.8 deep earthquake west of Seattle.

  13. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  14. Motion Controllers for Learners to Manipulate and Interact with 3D Objects for Mental Rotation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Wang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Lin, Po-Han; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Mental rotation is an important spatial processing ability and an important element in intelligence tests. However, the majority of past attempts at training mental rotation have used paper-and-pencil tests or digital images. This study proposes an innovative mental rotation training approach using magnetic motion controllers to allow learners to…

  15. Modelling of U-tube Tanks for ShipMo3D Ship Motion Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    official languages unless the text is bilingual .) Ship roll motions in waves can be significant due to small roll damping and the proximity of ship... first ...John Duncan Head of Simulation Based Acquisition Defence Equipment and Support Abbey Wood Mail Point 8014 BRISTOL BS34 8JH UK DRDC

  16. Upper Extremity Motion Assessment in Adult Ischemic Stroke Patients: A 3-D Kinematic Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Botox , motion analysis, hemiplegia, stroke I. INTRODUCTION Recovery from ischemic stroke has been explained by patients learning new skills, by...University and the Medical College of Wisconsin and to Allergan, Inc.(Irvine, CA), makers of BOTOX ®, for their sponsorship. REFERENCES [1] Gracies

  17. Well-posedness of linearized motion for 3-D water waves far from equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, T.Y.; Zhen-huan Teng; Pingwen Zhang

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we study the motion of a free surface separating two different layers of fluid in three dimensions. We assume the flow to be inviscid, irrotational, and incompressible. In this case, one can reduce the entire motion by variables on the surface alone. In general, without additional regularizing effects such as surface alone. In general, without additional regularizing effects such as surface tension or viscosity, the flow can be subject to Rayleigh-Taylor or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities which will lead to unbounded growth in high frequency wave numbers. In this case, the problem is not well-posed in the Hadamard sense. The problem of water wave with no fluid above is a special case. It is well-known that such motion is well-posed when the free surface is sufficiently close to equilibrium. Beale, Hous and Lowengrub derived a general condition which ensures well-posedness of the linearization about a presumed time-dependent motion in two dimensional case. The linearized equations, when formulated in a proper coordinate system are found to have a qualitative structure surprisingly like that for the simple case of linear waves near equilbrium. Such an analysis is essential in analyzing stability of boundary integral methods for computing free interface problems. 19 refs.

  18. Experimental air-broadened line parameters in the nu(2) band of CH3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Brawley-Tremblay, Shannon; Povey, Chad; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we report the first experimental measurements of air-broadening and air-induced pressure-shift coefficients for approximately 378 transitions in the nu(2) fundamental band of CH3D. These results were obtained from analysis of 17 room-temperature laboratory absorption spectra recorded at 0.0056 cm(-1) resolution using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer located on Kitt Peak, Ariz. Three absorption cells with path lengths of 10.2, 25, and 150 cm were used to record the spectra. The total sample pressures ranged from 0.129 x 10(-2) to 52.855 x 10(-2) atm with CH3D volume mixing ratios of approximately 0.0109 in air. The spectra were analyzed using a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique. We report measurements for air pressure-broadening coefficients for transitions with quantum numbers as high as J'' D 20 and K D 15, where K'' D K' equivalent to K (for a parallel band). The measured air-broadening coefficients range from 0.0205 to 0.0835 cm(-1)atm(-1) at 296 K. All the measured pressure-shift coefficients are negative and are found to vary from about -0.0005 to -0.0080 cm(-1) atm(-1) at the temperature of the spectra. We have examined the dependence of the measured broadening and shift parameters on the J'', and K quantum numbers and also developed empirical expressions to describe the broadening coefficients in terms of m (m D -J'', J'', and J'' + 1 in the P-Q-, (Q)Q-, and R-Q-branch, respectively) and K. On average, the empirical expressions reproduce the measured broadening coefficients to within 4.4%.

  19. Combining marker-less patient setup and respiratory motion monitoring using low cost 3D camera technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahavori, F.; Adams, E.; Dabbs, M.; Aldridge, L.; Liversidge, N.; Donovan, E.; Jordan, T.; Evans, PM.; Wells, K.

    2015-03-01

    Patient set-up misalignment/motion can be a significant source of error within external beam radiotherapy, leading to unwanted dose to healthy tissues and sub-optimal dose to the target tissue. Such inadvertent displacement or motion of the target volume may be caused by treatment set-up error, respiratory motion or an involuntary movement potentially decreasing therapeutic benefit. The conventional approach to managing abdominal-thoracic patient set-up is via skin markers (tattoos) and laser-based alignment. Alignment of the internal target volume with its position in the treatment plan can be achieved using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) in conjunction with marker-based respiratory motion monitoring. We propose a marker-less single system solution for patient set-up and respiratory motion management based on low cost 3D depth camera technology (such as the Microsoft Kinect). In this new work we assess this approach in a study group of six volunteer subjects. Separate simulated treatment mimic treatment "fractions" or set-ups are compared for each subject, undertaken using conventional laser-based alignment and with intrinsic depth images produced by Kinect. Microsoft Kinect is also compared with the well-known RPM system for respiratory motion management in terms of monitoring free-breathing and DIBH. Preliminary results suggest that Kinect is able to produce mm-level surface alignment and a comparable DIBH respiratory motion management when compared to the popular RPM system. Such an approach may also yield significant benefits in terms of patient throughput as marker alignment and respiratory motion can be automated in a single system.

  20. Key parameters in blood-surface interactions of 3D bioinspired ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, P; González, P; Serra, J; Landin, M

    2014-08-01

    Direct contact of materials with blood components may trigger numerous processes which ultimately lead to hemolysis, clot formation and recruitment of inflammatory cells. In this study, the blood-surface interactions for two inert bioinspired ceramic scaffolds obtained from natural resources; biomorphic carbon and silicon carbides (bioSiC) from different origins have been studied. The response of the blood in contact with carbon is well known, however little has been identified on the influence of their 3D porous structure. Moreover, to our knowledge, there is no reference in the literature about the hemocompatibility of biomorphic silicon carbide as a porous scaffold. The experimental results showed the surface energy to be crucial to evaluate the hemocompatibility of a material however the surface topography and material porosity are also parameters to be considered. Surface roughness modifies clot formation whereas for protein adsorption total sample porosity seems to be the key parameter to be considered for hydrophilic materials (biomorphic silicon carbides), while the size of the pores determines the hemolytic response.

  1. Sensor for In-Motion Continuous 3D Shape Measurement Based on Dual Line-Scan Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Guo, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of three-dimensional surface data plays an increasingly important role in the industrial sector. Numerous 3D shape measurement techniques have been developed. However, there are still limitations and challenges in fast measurement of large-scale objects or high-speed moving objects. The innovative line scan technology opens up new potentialities owing to the ultra-high resolution and line rate. To this end, a sensor for in-motion continuous 3D shape measurement based on dual line-scan cameras is presented. In this paper, the principle and structure of the sensor are investigated. The image matching strategy is addressed and the matching error is analyzed. The sensor has been verified by experiments and high-quality results are obtained. PMID:27869731

  2. Flying triangulation - A motion-robust optical 3D sensor for the real-time shape acquisition of complex objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willomitzer, Florian; Ettl, Svenja; Arold, Oliver; Häusler, Gerd

    2013-05-01

    The three-dimensional shape acquisition of objects has become more and more important in the last years. Up to now, there are several well-established methods which already yield impressive results. However, even under quite common conditions like object movement or a complex shaping, most methods become unsatisfying. Thus, the 3D shape acquisition is still a difficult and non-trivial task. We present our measurement principle "Flying Triangulation" which enables a motion-robust 3D acquisition of complex-shaped object surfaces by a freely movable handheld sensor. Since "Flying Triangulation" is scalable, a whole sensor-zoo for different object sizes is presented. Concluding, an overview of current and future fields of investigation is given.

  3. Sensor for In-Motion Continuous 3D Shape Measurement Based on Dual Line-Scan Cameras.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Guo, Yin

    2016-11-18

    The acquisition of three-dimensional surface data plays an increasingly important role in the industrial sector. Numerous 3D shape measurement techniques have been developed. However, there are still limitations and challenges in fast measurement of large-scale objects or high-speed moving objects. The innovative line scan technology opens up new potentialities owing to the ultra-high resolution and line rate. To this end, a sensor for in-motion continuous 3D shape measurement based on dual line-scan cameras is presented. In this paper, the principle and structure of the sensor are investigated. The image matching strategy is addressed and the matching error is analyzed. The sensor has been verified by experiments and high-quality results are obtained.

  4. Stereoscopic motion analysis in densely packed clusters: 3D analysis of the shimmering behaviour in Giant honey bees

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The detailed interpretation of mass phenomena such as human escape panic or swarm behaviour in birds, fish and insects requires detailed analysis of the 3D movements of individual participants. Here, we describe the adaptation of a 3D stereoscopic imaging method to measure the positional coordinates of individual agents in densely packed clusters. The method was applied to study behavioural aspects of shimmering in Giant honeybees, a collective defence behaviour that deters predatory wasps by visual cues, whereby individual bees flip their abdomen upwards in a split second, producing Mexican wave-like patterns. Results Stereoscopic imaging provided non-invasive, automated, simultaneous, in-situ 3D measurements of hundreds of bees on the nest surface regarding their thoracic position and orientation of the body length axis. Segmentation was the basis for the stereo matching, which defined correspondences of individual bees in pairs of stereo images. Stereo-matched "agent bees" were re-identified in subsequent frames by the tracking procedure and triangulated into real-world coordinates. These algorithms were required to calculate the three spatial motion components (dx: horizontal, dy: vertical and dz: towards and from the comb) of individual bees over time. Conclusions The method enables the assessment of the 3D positions of individual Giant honeybees, which is not possible with single-view cameras. The method can be applied to distinguish at the individual bee level active movements of the thoraces produced by abdominal flipping from passive motions generated by the moving bee curtain. The data provide evidence that the z-deflections of thoraces are potential cues for colony-intrinsic communication. The method helps to understand the phenomenon of collective decision-making through mechanoceptive synchronization and to associate shimmering with the principles of wave propagation. With further, minor modifications, the method could be used to study

  5. Kinetic Depth Effect and Optic Flow 1. 3D Shape from Fourier Motion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    rectification are unaffected by alternating-polarity but disrupted by interposed gray-frames. (2) To equate the accuracy of 2AFC planar direction-of...of the input stimulus. Direction. Discrimination between left and right motion direction (two-alternative forced choice, 2AFC Direction) minimally...and the standard stimulus would be recovered. 2AFC -Direction performance is impaired by polarity alternation, but still well above chance for a wide

  6. Image segmentation and registration for the analysis of joint motion from 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.; Fassbind, Michael; Rohr, Eric; Ledoux, William

    2006-03-01

    We report an image segmentation and registration method for studying joint morphology and kinematics from in vivo MRI scans and its application to the analysis of ankle joint motion. Using an MR-compatible loading device, a foot was scanned in a single neutral and seven dynamic positions including maximal flexion, rotation and inversion/eversion. A segmentation method combining graph cuts and level sets was developed which allows a user to interactively delineate 14 bones in the neutral position volume in less than 30 minutes total, including less than 10 minutes of user interaction. In the subsequent registration step, a separate rigid body transformation for each bone is obtained by registering the neutral position dataset to each of the dynamic ones, which produces an accurate description of the motion between them. We have processed six datasets, including 3 normal and 3 pathological feet. For validation our results were compared with those obtained from 3DViewnix, a semi-automatic segmentation program, and achieved good agreement in volume overlap ratios (mean: 91.57%, standard deviation: 3.58%) for all bones. Our tool requires only 1/50 and 1/150 of the user interaction time required by 3DViewnix and NIH Image Plus, respectively, an improvement that has the potential to make joint motion analysis from MRI practical in research and clinical applications.

  7. Long Period Ground Motion Prediction Of Linked Tonankai And Nankai Subduction Earthquakes Using 3D Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabe, H.; Kamae, K.

    2005-12-01

    There is high possibility of the occurrence of the Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes which are capable of causing immense damage. During these huge earthquakes, long period ground motions may strike mega-cities Osaka and Nagoya located inside the Osaka and Nobi basins in which there are many long period and low damping structures (such as tall buildings and oil tanks). It is very important for the earthquake disaster mitigation to predict long period strong ground motions of the future Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes that are capable of exciting long-period strong ground motions over a wide area. In this study, we tried to predict long-period ground motions of the future Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes using 3D finite difference method. We construct a three-dimensional underground structure model including not only the basins but also propagation field from the source to the basins. Resultantly, we can point out that the predominant periods of pseudo-velocity response spectra change basin by basin. Long period ground motions with periods of 5 to 8 second are predominant in the Osaka basin, 3 to 6 second in the Nobi basin and 2 to 5 second in the Kyoto basin. These characteristics of the long-period ground motions are related with the thicknesses of the sediments of the basins. The duration of long period ground motions inside the basin are more than 5 minutes. These results are very useful for the earthquake disaster mitigation of long period structures such as tall buildings and oil tanks.

  8. Instability of the perceived world while watching 3D stereoscopic imagery: A likely source of motion sickness symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Alex D.; Peli, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Watching 3D content using a stereoscopic display may cause various discomforting symptoms, including eye strain, blurred vision, double vision, and motion sickness. Numerous studies have reported motion-sickness-like symptoms during stereoscopic viewing, but no causal linkage between specific aspects of the presentation and the induced discomfort has been explicitly proposed. Here, we describe several causes, in which stereoscopic capture, display, and viewing differ from natural viewing resulting in static and, importantly, dynamic distortions that conflict with the expected stability and rigidity of the real world. This analysis provides a basis for suggested changes to display systems that may alleviate the symptoms, and suggestions for future studies to determine the relative contribution of the various effects to the unpleasant symptoms. PMID:26034562

  9. Instability of the perceived world while watching 3D stereoscopic imagery: A likely source of motion sickness symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Alex D; Peli, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Watching 3D content using a stereoscopic display may cause various discomforting symptoms, including eye strain, blurred vision, double vision, and motion sickness. Numerous studies have reported motion-sickness-like symptoms during stereoscopic viewing, but no causal linkage between specific aspects of the presentation and the induced discomfort has been explicitly proposed. Here, we describe several causes, in which stereoscopic capture, display, and viewing differ from natural viewing resulting in static and, importantly, dynamic distortions that conflict with the expected stability and rigidity of the real world. This analysis provides a basis for suggested changes to display systems that may alleviate the symptoms, and suggestions for future studies to determine the relative contribution of the various effects to the unpleasant symptoms.

  10. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from INSAT-3D: a feasibility study using radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinya, John; Bipasha, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    Clouds strongly modulate the Earths energy balance and its atmosphere through their interaction with the solar and terrestrial radiation. They interact with radiation in various ways like scattering, emission and absorption. By observing these changes in radiation at different wavelength, cloud properties can be estimated. Cloud properties are of utmost importance in studying different weather and climate phenomena. At present, no satellite provides cloud microphysical parameters over the Indian region with high temporal resolution. INSAT-3D imager observations in 6 spectral channels from geostationary platform offer opportunity to study continuous cloud properties over Indian region. Visible (0.65 μm) and shortwave-infrared (1.67 μm) channel radiances can be used to retrieve cloud microphysical parameters such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud effective radius (CER). In this paper, we have carried out a feasibility study with the objective of cloud microphysics retrieval. For this, an inter-comparison of 15 globally available radiative transfer models (RTM) were carried out with the aim of generating a Look-up- Table (LUT). SBDART model was chosen for the simulations. The sensitivity of each spectral channel to different cloud properties was investigated. The inputs to the RT model were configured over our study region (50°S - 50°N and 20°E - 130°E) and a large number of simulations were carried out using random input vectors to generate the LUT. The determination of cloud optical thickness and cloud effective radius from spectral reflectance measurements constitutes the inverse problem and is typically solved by comparing the measured reflectances with entries in LUT and searching for the combination of COT and CER that gives the best fit. The products are available on the website www.mosdac.gov.in

  11. Accelerated parameter identification in a 3D marine biogeochemical model using surrogate-based optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieß, M.; Piwonski, J.; Koziel, S.; Oschlies, A.; Slawig, T.

    2013-08-01

    We present the application of the Surrogate-based Optimization (SBO) method on a parameter identification problem for a 3-D biogeochemical model. SBO is a method for acceleration of optimization processes when the underlying model itself is of very high computational complexity. In these cases, coupled simulation runs require large amounts of computer time, where optimization runs may become unfeasible even with high-performance hardware. As a consequence, the key idea of SBO is to replace the original and computationally expensive (high-fidelity) model by a so-called surrogate, which is created from a less accurate but computationally cheaper (low-fidelity) model and a suitable correction approach to increase its accuracy. To date, the SBO approach has been widely and successfully used in engineering applications and also for parameter identification in a 1-D marine ecosystem model of NPZD type. In this paper, we apply the approach onto a two-component biogeochemical model. The model is spun-up into a steady seasonal cycle via the Transport Matrix Approach. The low-fidelity model we use consists of a reduced number of spin-up iterations (several decades instead of millennia used for the original model). A multiplicative correction operator is further exploited to extrapolate the rather inaccurate low-fidelity model onto the original one. This corrected model builds our surrogate. We validate this SBO method by twin-experiments that use synthetic observations generated by the original model. We motivate our choice of the low-fidelity model and the multiplicative correction and discuss the computational advantage of SBO in comparison to an expensive parameter optimization in the context of the high-fidelity model. The proposed SBO technique is shown to yield a solution close to the target at a significant gain of computational efficiency. Without further regularization techniques, the method is able to identify most model parameters. The method is simple to

  12. Spatial synchronization of an insole pressure distribution system with a 3D motion analysis system for center of pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Laetitia; Siegel, Johannes; Dahl, Marieke; Alimusaj, Merkur; Wolf, Sebastian I

    2009-01-01

    Insole pressure systems are often more appropriate than force platforms for analysing center of pressure (CoP) as they are more flexible in use and indicate the position of the CoP that characterizes the contact foot/shoe during gait with shoes. However, these systems are typically not synchronized with 3D motion analysis systems. The present paper proposes a direct method that does not require a force platform for synchronizing an insole pressure system with a 3D motion analysis system. The distance separating 24 different CoPs measured optically and their equivalents measured by the insoles and transformed in the global coordinate system did not exceed 2 mm, confirming the suitability of the method proposed. Additionally, during static single limb stance, distances smaller than 7 mm and correlations higher than 0.94 were found between CoP trajectories measured with insoles and force platforms. Similar measurements were performed during gait to illustrate the characteristics of the CoP measured with each system. The distance separating the two CoPs was below 19 mm and the coefficient of correlation above 0.86. The proposed method offers the possibility to conduct new experiments, such as the investigation of proprioception in climbing stairs or in the presence of obstacles.

  13. MetaTracker: integration and abstraction of 3D motion tracking data from multiple hardware systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopecky, Ken; Winer, Eliot

    2014-06-01

    Motion tracking has long been one of the primary challenges in mixed reality (MR), augmented reality (AR), and virtual reality (VR). Military and defense training can provide particularly difficult challenges for motion tracking, such as in the case of Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) and other dismounted, close quarters simulations. These simulations can take place across multiple rooms, with many fast-moving objects that need to be tracked with a high degree of accuracy and low latency. Many tracking technologies exist, such as optical, inertial, ultrasonic, and magnetic. Some tracking systems even combine these technologies to complement each other. However, there are no systems that provide a high-resolution, flexible, wide-area solution that is resistant to occlusion. While frameworks exist that simplify the use of tracking systems and other input devices, none allow data from multiple tracking systems to be combined, as if from a single system. In this paper, we introduce a method for compensating for the weaknesses of individual tracking systems by combining data from multiple sources and presenting it as a single tracking system. Individual tracked objects are identified by name, and their data is provided to simulation applications through a server program. This allows tracked objects to transition seamlessly from the area of one tracking system to another. Furthermore, it abstracts away the individual drivers, APIs, and data formats for each system, providing a simplified API that can be used to receive data from any of the available tracking systems. Finally, when single-piece tracking systems are used, those systems can themselves be tracked, allowing for real-time adjustment of the trackable area. This allows simulation operators to leverage limited resources in more effective ways, improving the quality of training.

  14. Uncertainty preserving patch-based online modeling for 3D model acquisition and integration from passive motion imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Chang, Peng; Molina, Edgardo; Zhu, Zhigang

    2012-06-01

    In both military and civilian applications, abundant data from diverse sources captured on airborne platforms are often available for a region attracting interest. Since the data often includes motion imagery streams collected from multiple platforms flying at different altitudes, with sensors of different field of views (FOVs), resolutions, frame rates and spectral bands, it is imperative that a cohesive site model encompassing all the information can be quickly built and presented to the analysts. In this paper, we propose to develop an Uncertainty Preserving Patch-based Online Modeling System (UPPOMS) leading towards the automatic creation and updating of a cohesive, geo-registered, uncertaintypreserving, efficient 3D site terrain model from passive imagery with varying field-of-views and phenomenologies. The proposed UPPOMS has the following technical thrusts that differentiate our approach from others: (1) An uncertaintypreserved, patch-based 3D model is generated, which enables the integration of images captured with a mixture of NFOV and WFOV and/or visible and infrared motion imagery sensors. (2) Patch-based stereo matching and multi-view 3D integration are utilized, which are suitable for scenes with many low texture regions, particularly in mid-wave infrared images. (3) In contrast to the conventional volumetric algorithms, whose computational and storage costs grow exponentially with the amount of input data and the scale of the scene, the proposed UPPOMS system employs an online algorithmic pipeline, and scales well to large amount of input data. Experimental results and discussions of future work will be provided.

  15. Quantification of Ground Motion Reductions by Fault Zone Plasticity with 3D Spontaneous Rupture Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roten, D.; Olsen, K. B.; Cui, Y.; Day, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the effects of fault zone nonlinearity on peak ground velocities (PGVs) by simulating a suite of surface rupturing earthquakes in a visco-plastic medium. Our simulations, performed with the AWP-ODC 3D finite difference code, cover magnitudes from 6.5 to 8.0, with several realizations of the stochastic stress drop for a given magnitude. We test three different models of rock strength, with friction angles and cohesions based on criteria which are frequently applied to fractured rock masses in civil engineering and mining. We use a minimum shear-wave velocity of 500 m/s and a maximum frequency of 1 Hz. In rupture scenarios with average stress drop (~3.5 MPa), plastic yielding reduces near-fault PGVs by 15 to 30% in pre-fractured, low-strength rock, but less than 1% in massive, high quality rock. These reductions are almost insensitive to the scenario earthquake magnitude. In the case of high stress drop (~7 MPa), however, plasticity reduces near-fault PGVs by 38 to 45% in rocks of low strength and by 5 to 15% in rocks of high strength. Because plasticity reduces slip rates and static slip near the surface, these effects can partially be captured by defining a shallow velocity-strengthening layer. We also perform a dynamic nonlinear simulation of a high stress drop M 7.8 earthquake rupturing the southern San Andreas fault along 250 km from Indio to Lake Hughes. With respect to the viscoelastic solution (a), nonlinearity in the fault damage zone and in near-surface deposits would reduce long-period (> 1 s) peak ground velocities in the Los Angeles basin by 15-50% (b), depending on the strength of crustal rocks and shallow sediments. These simulation results suggest that nonlinear effects may be relevant even at long periods, especially for earthquakes with high stress drop.

  16. Mobile Biplane X-Ray Imaging System for Measuring 3D Dynamic Joint Motion During Overground Gait.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Keynejad, Farzad; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-01-01

    Most X-ray fluoroscopy systems are stationary and impose restrictions on the measurement of dynamic joint motion; for example, knee-joint kinematics during gait is usually measured with the subject ambulating on a treadmill. We developed a computer-controlled, mobile, biplane, X-ray fluoroscopy system to track human body movement for high-speed imaging of 3D joint motion during overground gait. A robotic gantry mechanism translates the two X-ray units alongside the subject, tracking and imaging the joint of interest as the subject moves. The main aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy with which the mobile imaging system measures 3D knee-joint kinematics during walking. In vitro experiments were performed to measure the relative positions of the tibia and femur in an intact human cadaver knee and of the tibial and femoral components of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implant during simulated overground gait. Accuracy was determined by calculating mean, standard deviation and root-mean-squared errors from differences between kinematic measurements obtained using volumetric models of the bones and TKA components and reference measurements obtained from metal beads embedded in the bones. Measurement accuracy was enhanced by the ability to track and image the joint concurrently. Maximum root-mean-squared errors were 0.33 mm and 0.65° for translations and rotations of the TKA knee and 0.78 mm and 0.77° for translations and rotations of the intact knee, which are comparable to results reported for treadmill walking using stationary biplane systems. System capability for in vivo joint motion measurement was also demonstrated for overground gait.

  17. 3-D microvessel-mimicking ultrasound phantoms produced with a scanning motion system.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Ryan C; Kothadia, Roshni; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A

    2011-05-01

    Ultrasound techniques are currently being developed that can assess the vascularization of tissue as a marker for therapeutic response. Some of these ultrasound imaging techniques seek to extract quantitative features about vessel networks, whereas high-frequency imaging also allows individual vessels to be resolved. The development of these new techniques, and subsequent imaging analysis strategies, necessitates an understanding of their sensitivities to vessel and vessel network structural abnormalities. Constructing in-vitro flow phantoms for this purpose can be prohibitively challenging, because simulating precise flow environments with nontrivial structures is often impossible using conventional methods of construction for flow phantoms. Presented in this manuscript is a method to create predefined structures with <10 μm precision using a three-axis motion system. The application of this technique is demonstrated for the creation of individual vessel and vessel networks, which can easily be made to simulate the development of structural abnormalities typical of diseased vasculature in vivo. In addition, beyond facilitating the creation of phantoms that would otherwise be very challenging to construct, the method presented herein enables one to precisely simulate very slow blood flow and respiration artifacts, and to measure imaging resolution.

  18. Capturing the 3D Motion of an Infalling Galaxy via Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Roediger, Elke; Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; Machacek, Marie E.

    2017-01-01

    The Fornax Cluster is the nearest (≤slant 20 Mpc) galaxy cluster in the southern sky. NGC 1404 is a bright elliptical galaxy falling through the intracluster medium (ICM) of the Fornax Cluster. The sharp leading edge of NGC 1404 forms a classical “cold front” that separates 0.6 keV dense interstellar medium and 1.5 keV diffuse ICM. We measure the angular pressure variation along the cold front using a very deep (670 ks) Chandra X-ray observation. We are taking the classical approach—using stagnation pressure to determine a substructure’s speed—to the next level by not only deriving a general speed but also directionality, which yields the complete velocity field as well as the distance of the substructure directly from the pressure distribution. We find a hydrodynamic model consistent with the pressure jump along NGC 1404's atmosphere measured in multiple directions. The best-fit model gives an inclination of 33° and a Mach number of 1.3 for the infall of NGC 1404, in agreement with complementary measurements of the motion of NGC 1404. Our study demonstrates the successful treatment of a highly ionized ICM as ideal fluid flow, in support of the hypothesis that magnetic pressure is not dynamically important over most of the virial region of galaxy clusters.

  19. Nonlinear, nonlaminar-3D computation of electron motion through the output cavity of a klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, L. U.; Kosmahl, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    The equations of motion used in the computation are discussed along with the space charge fields and the integration process. The following assumptions were used as a basis for the computation: (1) The beam is divided into N axisymmetric discs of equal charge and each disc into R rings of equal charge. (2) The velocity of each disc, its phase with respect to the gap voltage, and its radius at a specified position in the drift tunnel prior to the interaction gap is known from available large signal one dimensional programs. (3) The fringing rf fields are computed from exact analytical expressions derived from the wave equation assuming a known field shape between the tunnel tips at a radius a. (4) The beam is focused by an axisymmetric magnetic field. Both components of B, that is B sub z and B sub r, are taken into account. (5) Since this integration does not start at the cathode but rather further down the stream prior to entering the output cavity it is assumed that each electron moved along a laminar path from the cathode to the start of integration.

  20. 3D optical imagery for motion compensation in a limb ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan J.; Feigin, Micha; Zhang, Xiang; Mireault, Al; Raskar, Ramesh; Herr, Hugh M.; Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional processes for prosthetic socket fabrication are heavily subjective, often resulting in an interface to the human body that is neither comfortable nor completely functional. With nearly 100% of amputees reporting that they experience discomfort with the wearing of their prosthetic limb, designing an effective interface to the body can significantly affect quality of life and future health outcomes. Active research in medical imaging and biomechanical tissue modeling of residual limbs has led to significant advances in computer aided prosthetic socket design, demonstrating an interest in moving toward more quantifiable processes that are still patient-specific. In our work, medical ultrasonography is being pursued to acquire data that may quantify and improve the design process and fabrication of prosthetic sockets while greatly reducing cost compared to an MRI-based framework. This paper presents a prototype limb imaging system that uses a medical ultrasound probe, mounted to a mechanical positioning system and submerged in a water bath. The limb imaging is combined with three-dimensional optical imaging for motion compensation. Images are collected circumferentially around the limb and combined into cross-sectional axial image slices, resulting in a compound image that shows tissue distributions and anatomical boundaries similar to magnetic resonance imaging. In this paper we provide a progress update on our system development, along with preliminary results as we move toward full volumetric imaging of residual limbs for prosthetic socket design. This demonstrates a novel multi-modal approach to residual limb imaging.

  1. Simultaneous elastic parameter inversion in 2-D/3-D TTI medium combined later arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Wang, Tao; Yang, Shang-bei; Li, Xing-wang; Huang, Guo-jiao

    2016-04-01

    Traditional traveltime inversion for anisotropic medium is, in general, based on a "weak" assumption in the anisotropic property, which simplifies both the forward part (ray tracing is performed once only) and the inversion part (a linear inversion solver is possible). But for some real applications, a general (both "weak" and "strong") anisotropic medium should be considered. In such cases, one has to develop a ray tracing algorithm to handle with the general (including "strong") anisotropic medium and also to design a non-linear inversion solver for later tomography. Meanwhile, it is constructive to investigate how much the tomographic resolution can be improved by introducing the later arrivals. For this motivation, we incorporated our newly developed ray tracing algorithm (multistage irregular shortest-path method) for general anisotropic media with a non-linear inversion solver (a damped minimum norm, constrained least squares problem with a conjugate gradient approach) to formulate a non-linear inversion solver for anisotropic medium. This anisotropic traveltime inversion procedure is able to combine the later (reflected) arrival times. Both 2-D/3-D synthetic inversion experiments and comparison tests show that (1) the proposed anisotropic traveltime inversion scheme is able to recover the high contrast anomalies and (2) it is possible to improve the tomographic resolution by introducing the later (reflected) arrivals, but not as expected in the isotropic medium, because the different velocity (qP, qSV and qSH) sensitivities (or derivatives) respective to the different elastic parameters are not the same but are also dependent on the inclination angle.

  2. Quantifying bone weathering stages using the average roughness parameter Ra measured from 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietti, Laura A.

    2016-09-01

    Bone surface texture is known to degrade in a predictable fashion due to subaerial exposure, and can thus act as a relative proxy for estimating temporal information from modern and ancient bone assemblages. To date, the majority of bone weathering data is collected on a categorical scale based on descriptive terms. While this qualitative classification of weathering data is well established, textural analyses of bone surfaces may provide means to quantify weathering stages but have yet to be tested. Here, I examined the suitability of textural analyses for bone weathering studies by first establishing bone surface regions most appropriate for weathering analyses. I then measured and compared the roughness texture of weathered bones at different stages. To establish regions of bone most suitable for textural analyses, Ra was measured from 3D scans of dorsal ribs of four adult ungulate taxa. Results indicate that the rib-shafts from unweathered ungulate skeletons were similar and are likely good candidates because differences in surface texture will not be due to differences in initial bone texture. To test if textural measurements could reliably characterize weathering stages, the average roughness values (Ra) were measured from weathered ungulate rib-shafts assigned to four descriptive weathering stages. Results from analyses indicate that the Ra was statistically distinct for each weathering stage and that roughness positively correlates with the degree of weathering. As such, results suggest that textural analyses may provide the means for quantifying bone-weathering stages. Using Ra and other quantifiable texture parameters may enable more reliable and comparative taphonomic analyses by reducing inter-observer variations and by providing numerical data more compatible for multivariate statistics.

  3. Site-Specific Internal Motions in GB1 Protein Microcrystals Revealed by 3D 2H–13C–13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    2H quadrupolar line shapes deliver rich information about protein dynamics. A newly designed 3D 2H–13C–13C solid-state NMR magic angle spinning (MAS) experiment is presented and demonstrated on the microcrystalline β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1). The implementation of 2H–13C adiabatic rotor-echo-short-pulse-irradiation cross-polarization (RESPIRATION CP) ensures the accuracy of the extracted line shapes and provides enhanced sensitivity relative to conventional CP methods. The 3D 2H–13C–13C spectrum reveals 2H line shapes for 140 resolved aliphatic deuterium sites. Motional-averaged 2H quadrupolar parameters obtained from the line-shape fitting identify side-chain motions. Restricted side-chain dynamics are observed for a number of polar residues including K13, D22, E27, K31, D36, N37, D46, D47, K50, and E56, which we attribute to the effects of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. In contrast, we observe significantly enhanced side-chain flexibility for Q2, K4, K10, E15, E19, N35, N40, and E42, due to solvent exposure and low packing density. T11, T16, and T17 side chains exhibit motions with larger amplitudes than other Thr residues due to solvent interactions. The side chains of L5, V54, and V29 are highly rigid because they are packed in the core of the protein. High correlations were demonstrated between GB1 side-chain dynamics and its biological function. Large-amplitude side-chain motions are observed for regions contacting and interacting with immunoglobulin G (IgG). In contrast, rigid side chains are primarily found for residues in the structural core of the protein that are absent from protein binding and interactions. PMID:26849428

  4. Highest performance in 3D metal cutting at smallest footprint: benchmark of a robot based system vs. parameters of gantry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Torsten; Bastick, André; Michel-Triller, Robert; Manzella, Christon

    2014-02-01

    In the automotive industry as well as in other industries ecological aspects regarding energy savings are driving new technologies and materials, e.g. lightweight materials as aluminium or press hardened steels. Processing such parts especially complex 3D shaped parts laser manufacturing has become the key process offering highest efficiency. The most established systems for 3D cutting applications are based on gantry systems. The disadvantage of those systems is their huge footprint to realize the required stability and work envelope. Alternatively a robot based system might be of advantage if accuracy, speed and overall performance would be capable processing automotive parts. With the BIM "beam in motion" system, JENOPTIK Automatisierungstechnik GmbH has developed a modular robot based laser processing machine, which meets all OEM specs processing press hardened steel parts. A benchmark of the BIM versus a gantry system was done regarding all required parameters to fulfil OEM specifications for press hardened steel parts. As a result a highly productive, accurate and efficient system can be described based on one or multiple robot modules working simultaneously together. The paper presents the improvements on the robot machine concept BIM addressed in 2012 [1] leading to an industrial proven system approach for the automotive industry. It further compares the performance and the parameters for 3D cutting applications of the BIM system versus a gantry system by samples of applied parts. Finally an overview of suitable applications for processing complex 3D parts with high productivity at small footprint is given.

  5. Effect of 3D physiological loading and motion on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gao, Leiming; Wang, Fengcai; Yang, Peiran; Jin, Zhongmin

    2009-07-01

    An elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) simulation of a metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip implant was presented, considering both steady state and transient physiological loading and motion gait cycle in all three directions. The governing equations were solved numerically by the multi-grid method and fast Fourier transform in spherical coordinates, and full numerical solutions were presented included the pressure and film thickness distribution. Despite small variations in the magnitude of 3D resultant load, the horizontal anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) load components were found to translate the contact area substantially in the corresponding direction and consequently to result in significant squeeze-film actions. For a cup positioned anatomically at 45 degrees , the variation of the resultant load was shown unlikely to cause the edge contact. The contact area was found within the cup dimensions of 70-130 degrees and 90-150 degrees in the AP and ML direction respectively even under the largest translations. Under walking conditions, the horizontal load components had a significant impact on the lubrication film due to the squeeze-film effect. The time-dependent film thickness was increased by the horizontal translation and decreased during the reverse of this translation caused by the multi-direction of the AP load during walking. The minimum film thickness of 12-20 nm was found at 0.4s and around the location at (95, 125) degrees. During the whole walking cycle both the average and centre film thickness were found obviously increased to a range of 40-65 nm, compared with the range of 25-55 nm under one load (vertical) and one motion (flexion-extension) condition, which suggested the lubrication in the current MOM hip implant was improved under 3D physiological loading and motion. This study suggested the lubrication performance especially the film thickness distribution should vary greatly under different operating conditions and the time and

  6. 3D measurements of alpine skiing with an inertial sensor motion capture suit and GNSS RTK system.

    PubMed

    Supej, Matej

    2010-05-01

    To date, camcorders have been the device of choice for 3D kinematic measurement in human locomotion, in spite of their limitations. This study examines a novel system involving a GNSS RTK that returns a reference trajectory through the use of a suit, imbedded with inertial sensors, to reveal subject segment motion. The aims were: (1) to validate the system's precision and (2) to measure an entire alpine ski race and retrieve the results shortly after measuring. For that purpose, four separate experiments were performed: (1) forced pendulum, (2) walking, (3) gate positions, and (4) skiing experiments. Segment movement validity was found to be dependent on the frequency of motion, with high accuracy (0.8 degrees , s = 0.6 degrees ) for 10 s, which equals approximately 10 slalom turns, while accuracy decreased slightly (2.1 degrees , 3.3 degrees , and 4.2 degrees for 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz oscillations, respectively) during 35 s of data collection. The motion capture suit's orientation inaccuracy was mostly due to geomagnetic secular variation. The system exhibited high validity regarding the reference trajectory (0.008 m, s = 0.0044) throughout an entire ski race. The system is capable of measuring an entire ski course with less manpower and therefore lower cost compared with camcorder-based techniques.

  7. 3D Dynamic Rupture process ans Near Source Ground Motion Simulation Using the Discrete Element Method: Application to the 1999 Chi-chi and 2000 Tottori Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalguer Gudiel, L. A.; Irikura, K.

    2001-12-01

    We performed a 3D model to simulate the dynamic rupture of a pre-existing fault and near-source ground motion of actual earthquakes solving the elastodynamic equation of motion using the 3D Discrete Element Method (DEM). The DEM is widely employed in engineering to designate lumped mass models in a truss arrangement, as opposed to FEM (Finite Element) models that may also consist of lumped masses, but normally require to mount a full stiffness matrix for response determination. The term has also been used for models of solids consisting of assemblies of discrete elements, such as spheres in elastic contact, employed in the analysis of perforation or penetration of concrete or rock. It should be noted that the designation Lattice Models, common in Physics, may be more adequate, although it omits reference to a fundamental property of the approach, which is the lumped-mass representation. In the present DEM formulation, the method models any orthotropic elastic solid. It is constructed by a three dimensional periodic truss-like structures using cubic elements that consists of lumping masses in nodal points, which are interconnected by unidimensional elements. The method was previously used in 2D to simulate in a simplified way the 1999 Chi-chi (Taiwan) earthquake (Dalguer et. al., 2000). Now the method was extended to resolve 3D problems. We apply the model to simulate the dynamic rupture process and near source ground motion of the 1999 Chi-chi (Taiwan) and the 2000 Tottori (Japan) earthquakes. The attractive feature in the problem under consideration is the possibility of introducing internal cracks or fractures with little computational effort and without increasing the number of degrees of freedom. For the 3D dynamic spontaneous rupture simulation of these eartquakes we need to know: the geometry of the fault, the initial stress distribution along the fault, the stress drop distribution, the strength of the fault to break and the critical slip (because slip

  8. The influence of printing parameters on cell survival rate and printability in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Yang; Mao, Shuangshuang; Sun, Wei; Yao, Rui

    2015-11-02

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing technology has provided a versatile methodology to fabricate cell-laden tissue-like constructs and in vitro tissue/pathological models for tissue engineering, drug testing and screening applications. However, it still remains a challenge to print bioinks with high viscoelasticity to achieve long-term stable structure and maintain high cell survival rate after printing at the same time. In this study, we systematically investigated the influence of 3D cell printing parameters, i.e. composition and concentration of bioink, holding temperature and holding time, on the printability and cell survival rate in microextrusion-based 3D cell printing technology. Rheological measurements were utilized to characterize the viscoelasticity of gelatin-based bioinks. Results demonstrated that the bioink viscoelasticity was increased when increasing the bioink concentration, increasing holding time and decreasing holding temperature below gelation temperature. The decline of cell survival rate after 3D cell printing process was observed when increasing the viscoelasticity of the gelatin-based bioinks. However, different process parameter combinations would result in the similar rheological characteristics and thus showed similar cell survival rate after 3D bioprinting process. On the other hand, bioink viscoelasticity should also reach a certain point to ensure good printability and shape fidelity. At last, we proposed a protocol for 3D bioprinting of temperature-sensitive gelatin-based hydrogel bioinks with both high cell survival rate and good printability. This research would be useful for biofabrication researchers to adjust the 3D bioprinting process parameters quickly and as a referable template for designing new bioinks.

  9. Shape and motion reconstruction from 3D-to-1D orthographically projected data via object-image relations.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Matthew; Arnold, Gregory; Stuff, Mark

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes an invariant-based shape- and motion reconstruction algorithm for 3D-to-1D orthographically projected range data taken from unknown viewpoints. The algorithm exploits the object-image relation that arises in echo-based range data and represents a simplification and unification of previous work in the literature. Unlike one proposed approach, this method does not require uniqueness constraints, which makes its algorithmic form independent of the translation removal process (centroid removal, range alignment, etc.). The new algorithm, which simultaneously incorporates every projection and does not use an initialization in the optimization process, requires fewer calculations and is more straightforward than the previous approach. Additionally, the new algorithm is shown to be the natural extension of the approach developed by Tomasi and Kanade for 3D-to-2D orthographically projected data and is applied to a realistic inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging scenario, as well as experiments with varying amounts of aperture diversity and noise.

  10. An improved 3-D Look--Locker imaging method for T(1) parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Nkongchu, Ken; Santyr, Giles

    2005-09-01

    The 3-D Look-Locker (LL) imaging method has been shown to be a highly efficient and accurate method for the volumetric mapping of the spin lattice relaxation time T(1). However, conventional 3-D LL imaging schemes are typically limited to small tip angle RF pulses (3-D LL imaging method that incorporates an additional and variable delay time between recovery samples is described, which permits the use of larger tip angles (>5 degrees ), thereby improving the SNR and the accuracy of the method. In phantom studies, a mean T(1) measurement accuracy of less than 2% (0.2-3.1%) using a tip angle of 10 degrees was obtained for a range of T(1) from approximately 300 to 1,700 ms with a measurement time increase of only 15%. This accuracy compares favorably with the conventional 3-D LL method that provided an accuracy between 2.2% and 7.3% using a 5 degrees flip angle.

  11. 3-D or median map? Earthquake scenario ground-motion maps from physics-based models versus maps from ground-motion prediction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, K.

    2015-12-01

    There are two common ways to create a ground-motion map for a hypothetical earthquake: using ground motion prediction equations (by far the more common of the two) and using 3-D physics-based modeling. The former is very familiar to engineers, the latter much less so, and the difference can present a problem because engineers tend to trust the familiar and distrust novelty. Maps for essentially the same hypothetical earthquake using the two different methods can look very different, while appearing to present the same information. Using one or the other can lead an engineer or disaster planner to very different estimates of damage and risk. The reasons have to do with depiction of variability, spatial correlation of shaking, the skewed distribution of real-world shaking, and the upward-curving relationship between shaking and damage. The scientists who develop the two kinds of map tend to specialize in one or the other and seem to defend their turf, which can aggravate the problem of clearly communicating with engineers.The USGS Science Application for Risk Reduction's (SAFRR) HayWired scenario has addressed the challenge of explaining to engineers the differences between the two maps, and why, in a disaster planning scenario, one might want to use the less-familiar 3-D map.

  12. Robust patella motion tracking using intensity-based 2D-3D registration on dynamic bi-plane fluoroscopy: towards quantitative assessment in MPFL reconstruction surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Yoshito; Esnault, Matthieu; Grupp, Robert; Kosugi, Shinichi; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2016-03-01

    The determination of in vivo motion of multiple-bones using dynamic fluoroscopic images and computed tomography (CT) is useful for post-operative assessment of orthopaedic surgeries such as medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction. We propose a robust method to measure the 3D motion of multiple rigid objects with high accuracy using a series of bi-plane fluoroscopic images and a multi-resolution, intensity-based, 2D-3D registration. A Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES) optimizer was used with a gradient correlation similarity metric. Four approaches to register three rigid objects (femur, tibia-fibula and patella) were implemented: 1) an individual bone approach registering one bone at a time, each with optimization of a six degrees of freedom (6DOF) parameter, 2) a sequential approach registering one bone at a time but using the previous bone results as the background in DRR generation, 3) a simultaneous approach registering all the bones together (18DOF) and 4) a combination of the sequential and the simultaneous approaches. These approaches were compared in experiments using simulated images generated from the CT of a healthy volunteer and measured fluoroscopic images. Over the 120 simulated frames of motion, the simultaneous approach showed improved registration accuracy compared to the individual approach: with less than 0.68mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) for translation and less than 1.12° RMSE for rotation. A robustness evaluation was conducted with 45 trials of a randomly perturbed initialization showed that the sequential approach improved robustness significantly (74% success rate) compared to the individual bone approach (34% success) for patella registration (femur and tibia-fibula registration had a 100% success rate with each approach).

  13. ShipMo3D Version 1.0 User Manual for Simulating Time Domain Motions of a Freely Maneuvering Ship in a Seaway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    from) in earth -fixed axes ν mean wave direction (from) in earth -fixed axes νi mean wave direction (from) for spectral component i ρ water density {σ...Kennedy Abstract This report serves as a user manual for simulating ship motions in waves and in calm water using ShipMo3D Version 1.0. ShipMo3D is...with associated user applica- tions for predicting ship motions in calm water and in waves. Motion predictions are available in both the frequency

  14. 3D FEM Simulations of Drop Test Reliability on 3D-WLP: Effects of Solder Reflow Residual Stress and Molding Resin Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhenini, Soufyane; Tougui, Abdellah; Bouchou, Abdelhake; Mohan, Ranganathan; Dosseul, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Numerous three-dimensional (3D) packaging technologies are currently used for 3D integration. 3D-wafer level package (3D-WLP) appears to be a way to keep increasing the density of the microelectronic components. The reliability of 3D components has to be evaluated on mechanical demonstrators with daisy chains before real production. Numerical modeling is acknowledged as a very efficient tool for design optimization. In this paper, 3D finite-elements calculations are carried out to analyze the effects of molding resin's mechanical properties and thickness on the 3D component's dynamic response under drop loading conditions. Residual stress generated by solder reflow is also discussed. The influences of residual stresses on the numerical estimation of the component behavior during drop loading are studied. Solder reflow residual stresses have an impact on solder plastic strain and die equivalent stress calculations. We have compared the result of two numerical drop test models. Stress-free initial conduction is introduced for the first model. Solder reflow residual stresses are considered as the initial condition for the second drop test model. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons are carried out to show the effect of residual stress in drop test calculations. For the effect of molding resin thickness on the component behavior under drop loading, the stress-free initial condition is considered. The effect of the molding resin's thickness on critical area location is discussed. The solder bump maximum plastic shear strain and the silicon die maximum equivalent stress are used as reliability criteria. Numerical submodeling techniques are used to increase calculation accuracy. Numerical results have contributed to the design optimization of the 3D-WLP component.

  15. The Relationship of 3D Human Skull Motion to Brain Tissue Deformation in Magnetic Resonance Elastography Studies.

    PubMed

    Badachhape, Andrew A; Okamoto, Ruth J; Durham, Ramona S; Efron, Brent D; Nadell, Sam J; Johnson, Curtis L; Bayly, Philip V

    2017-03-07

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI), membranes such as the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater play a vital role in transmitting motion from the skull to brain tissue. Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is an imaging technique developed for non-invasive estimation of soft tissue material parameters. In MRE, dynamic deformation of brain tissue is induced by skull vibrations; however skull motion and its mode of transmission to the brain remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, displacements of points in the skull, reconstructed using data from an array of MRI-safe accelerometers, were compared to displacements of neighboring material points in brain tissue, estimated from MRE measurements. Comparison of the relative amplitudes, directions, and temporal phases of harmonic motion in the skulls and brains of six human subjects shows that the skull-brain interface significantly attenuates and delays transmission of motion from skull to brain. In contrast, in a cylindrical gelatin "phantom", displacements of the rigid case (reconstructed from accelerometer data) were transmitted to the gelatin inside (estimated from MRE data) with little attenuation or phase lag. This quantitative characterization of the skull-brain interface will be valuable in the parameterization and validation of computer models of TBI.

  16. Determination of key parameters of SEU occurrence using 3-D full cell SRAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Tavernier, C.; Ecoffet, R.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-12-01

    A 3-D entire SRAM cell, based on a 0.35-{micro}m current CMOS technology, is simulated in this work with a DEVICE simulator. The transient current, resulting from a heavy ion strike in the most sensitive region of the cell, is studied as a function of the LET value, the cell layout and the ion penetration depth. A definition of the critical charge is proposed and two new methods are presented to compute this basic amount of charge only using SPICE simulations. Numerical applications are performed with two different generations of submicron CMOS technologies, including the determination of the sensitive thicknesses.

  17. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-21

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required

  18. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  19. Does fluid infiltration affect the motion of sediment grains? - A 3-D numerical modelling approach using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Rogers, Benedict D.; Fourtakas, Georgios; Mokos, Athanasios; Huhn, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    The processes that cause the creation of a variety of sediment morphological features, e.g. laminated beds, ripples, or dunes, are based on the initial motion of individual sediment grains. However, with experimental techniques it is difficult to measure the flow characteristics, i.e., the velocity of the pore water flow in sediments, at a sufficient resolution and in a non-intrusive way. As a result, the role of fluid infiltration at the surface and in the interior affecting the initiation of motion of a sediment bed is not yet fully understood. Consequently, there is a strong need for numerical models, since these are capable of quantifying fluid driven sediment transport processes of complex sediment beds composed of irregular shapes. The numerical method Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) satisfies this need. As a meshless and Lagrangian technique, SPH is ideally suited to simulating flows in sediment beds composed of various grain shapes, but also flow around single grains at a high temporal and spatial resolution. The solver chosen is DualSPHysics (www.dual.sphysics.org) since this is validated for a range of flow conditions. For the present investigation a 3-D numerical flume model was generated using SPH with a length of 4.0 cm, a width of 0.05 cm and a height of 0.2 cm where mobile sediment particles were deposited in a recess. An experimental setup was designed to test sediment configurations composed of irregular grain shapes (grain diameter, D50=1000 μm). Each bed consisted of 3500 mobile objects. After the bed generation process, the entire domain was flooded with 18 million fluid particles. To drive the flow, an oscillating motion perpendicular to the bed was applied to the fluid, reaching a peak value of 0.3 cm/s, simulating 4 seconds of real time. The model results showed that flow speeds decreased logarithmically from the top of the domain towards the surface of the beds, indicating a fully developed boundary layer. Analysis of the fluid

  20. Shoulder 3D range of motion and humerus rotation in two volleyball spike techniques: injury prevention and performance.

    PubMed

    Seminati, Elena; Marzari, Alessandra; Vacondio, Oreste; Minetti, Alberto E

    2015-06-01

    Repetitive stresses and movements on the shoulder in the volleyball spike expose this joint to overuse injuries, bringing athletes to a career threatening injury. Assuming that specific spike techniques play an important role in injury risk, we compared the kinematic of the traditional (TT) and the alternative (AT) techniques in 21 elite athletes, evaluating their safety with respect to performance. Glenohumeral joint was set as the centre of an imaginary sphere, intersected by the distal end of the humerus at different angles. Shoulder range of motion and angular velocities were calculated and compared to the joint limits. Ball speed and jump height were also assessed. Results indicated the trajectory of the humerus to be different for the TT, with maximal flexion of the shoulder reduced by 10 degrees, and horizontal abduction 15 degrees higher. No difference was found for external rotation angles, while axial rotation velocities were significantly higher in AT, with a 5% higher ball speed. Results suggest AT as a potential preventive solution to shoulder chronic pathologies, reducing shoulder flexion during spiking. The proposed method allows visualisation of risks associated with different overhead manoeuvres, by depicting humerus angles and velocities with respect to joint limits in the same 3D space.

  1. Mechanical performance of endodontic restorations with prefabricated posts: sensitivity analysis of parameters with a 3D finite element model.

    PubMed

    González-Lluch, Carmen; Pérez-González, Antonio; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo-Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of different parameters of the endodontically restored tooth on its final strength, using in vitro tests and model simulations. However, the differences in the experimental set-up or modelling conditions and the limited number of parameters studied in each case prevent us from obtaining clear conclusions about the relative importance of each parameter. In this study, a validated 3D biomechanical model of the restored tooth was used for an exhaustive sensitivity analysis. The individual influence of 20 different parameters on the mechanical performance of an endodontic restoration with prefabricated posts was studied. The results bring up the remarkable importance of the loading angle on the final restoration strength. Flexural loads are more critical than compressive or tensile loads. Young's modulus of the post and its length and diameter are the most influential parameters for strength, whereas other parameters such as ferrule geometry or core and crown characteristics are less significant.

  2. Calculating the Probability of Strong Ground Motions Using 3D Seismic Waveform Modeling - SCEC CyberShake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, N.; Callaghan, S.; Graves, R.; Mehta, G.; Zhao, L.; Deelman, E.; Jordan, T. H.; Kesselman, C.; Okaya, D.; Cui, Y.; Field, E.; Gupta, V.; Vahi, K.; Maechling, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    Researchers from the SCEC Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME) project are utilizing the CyberShake computational platform and a distributed high performance computing environment that includes USC High Performance Computer Center and the NSF TeraGrid facilities to calculate physics-based probabilistic seismic hazard curves for several sites in the Southern California area. Traditionally, probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is conducted using intensity measure relationships based on empirical attenuation relationships. However, a more physics-based approach using waveform modeling could lead to significant improvements in seismic hazard analysis. Members of the SCEC/CME Project have integrated leading-edge PSHA software tools, SCEC-developed geophysical models, validated anelastic wave modeling software, and state-of-the-art computational technologies on the TeraGrid to calculate probabilistic seismic hazard curves using 3D waveform-based modeling. The CyberShake calculations for a single probablistic seismic hazard curve require tens of thousands of CPU hours and multiple terabytes of disk storage. The CyberShake workflows are run on high performance computing systems including multiple TeraGrid sites (currently SDSC and NCSA), and the USC Center for High Performance Computing and Communications. To manage the extensive job scheduling and data requirements, CyberShake utilizes a grid-based scientific workflow system based on the Virtual Data System (VDS), the Pegasus meta-scheduler system, and the Globus toolkit. Probabilistic seismic hazard curves for spectral acceleration at 3.0 seconds have been produced for eleven sites in the Southern California region, including rock and basin sites. At low ground motion levels, there is little difference between the CyberShake and attenuation relationship curves. At higher ground motion (lower probability) levels, the curves are similar for some sites (downtown LA, I-5/SR-14 interchange) but different for

  3. SU-E-J-80: Interplay Effect Between VMAT Intensity Modulation and Tumor Motion in Hypofractioned Lung Treatment, Investigated with 3D Pressage Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Touch, M; Wu, Q; Oldham, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate an embedded tissue equivalent presage dosimeter for measuring 3D doses in moving tumors and to study the interplay effect between the tumor motion and intensity modulation in hypofractioned Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy(VMAT) lung treatment. Methods: Motion experiments were performed using cylindrical Presage dosimeters (5cm diameter by 7cm length) mounted inside the lung insert of a CIRS thorax phantom. Two different VMAT treatment plans were created and delivered in three different scenarios with the same prescribed dose of 18 Gy. Plan1, containing a 2 centimeter spherical CTV with an additional 2mm setup margin, was delivered on a stationary phantom. Plan2 used the same CTV except expanded by 1 cm in the Sup-Inf direction to generate ITV and PTV respectively. The dosimeters were irradiated in static and variable motion scenarios on a Truebeam system. After irradiation, high resolution 3D dosimetry was performed using the Duke Large Field-of-view Optical-CT Scanner, and compared to the calculated dose from Eclipse. Results: In the control case (no motion), good agreement was observed between the planned and delivered dose distributions as indicated by 100% 3D Gamma (3% of maximum planned dose and 3mm DTA) passing rates in the CTV. In motion cases gamma passing rates was 99% in CTV. DVH comparisons also showed good agreement between the planned and delivered dose in CTV for both control and motion cases. However, differences of 15% and 5% in dose to PTV were observed in the motion and control cases respectively. Conclusion: With very high dose nature of a hypofraction treatment, significant effect was observed only motion is introduced to the target. This can be resulted from the motion of the moving target and the modulation of the MLC. 3D optical dosimetry can be of great advantage in hypofraction treatment dose validation studies.

  4. 3D printing PLGA: a quantitative examination of the effects of polymer composition and printing parameters on print resolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Holzberg, Timothy R; Lim, Casey G; Gao, Feng; Gargava, Ankit; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2017-04-12

    In the past few decades, 3D printing has played a significant role in fabricating scaffolds with consistent, complex structure that meet patient-specific needs in future clinical applications. Although many studies have contributed to this emerging field of additive manufacturing, which includes material development and computer-aided scaffold design, current quantitative analyses do not correlate material properties, printing parameters, and printing outcomes to a great extent. A model that correlates these properties has tremendous potential to standardize 3D printing for tissue engineering and biomaterial science. In this study, we printed poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) utilizing a direct melt extrusion technique without additional ingredients. We investigated PLGA with various lactic acid:glycolic acid (LA:GA) molecular weight ratios and end caps to demonstrate the dependence of the extrusion process on the polymer composition. Micro-computed tomography was then used to evaluate printed scaffolds containing different LA:GA ratios, composed of different fiber patterns, and processed under different printing conditions. We built a statistical model to reveal the correlation and predominant factors that determine printing precision. Our model showed a strong linear relationship between the actual and predicted precision under different combinations of printing conditions and material compositions. This quantitative examination establishes a significant foreground to 3D print biomaterials following a systematic fabrication procedure. Additionally, our proposed statistical models can be applied to couple specific biomaterials and 3D printing applications for patient implants with particular requirements.

  5. A study on the influence of process parameters on the Mechanical Properties of 3D printed ABS composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya Christiyan, K. G.; Chandrasekhar, U.; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies have been emerged as a fabrication method to obtain engineering components within a short span of time. Desktop 3D printing, also referred as additive layer manufacturing technology is one of the powerful method of rapid prototyping (RP) technique that fabricates three dimensional engineering components. In this method, 3D digital CAD data is converted directly to a product. In the present investigation, ABS + hydrous magnesium silicate composite was considered as the starting material. Mechanical properties of ABS + hydrous magnesium silicate composite material were evaluated. ASTM D638 and ASTM D760 standards were followed for carrying out tensile and flexural tests, respectively. Samples with different layer thickness and printing speed were prepared. Based on the experimental results, it is suggested that low printing speed, and low layer thickness has resulted maximum tensile and flexural strength, as compared to all the other process parameters samples.

  6. Respiratory motion compensation for simultaneous PET/MR based on a 3D-2D registration of strongly undersampled radial MR data: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rank, Christopher M.; Heußer, Thorsten; Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new method for PET/MR respiratory motion compensation, which is based on a 3D-2D registration of strongly undersampled MR data and a) runs in parallel with the PET acquisition, b) can be interlaced with clinical MR sequences, and c) requires less than one minute of the total MR acquisition time per bed position. In our simulation study, we applied a 3D encoded radial stack-of-stars sampling scheme with 160 radial spokes per slice and an acquisition time of 38 s. Gated 4D MR images were reconstructed using a 4D iterative reconstruction algorithm. Based on these images, motion vector fields were estimated using our newly-developed 3D-2D registration framework. A 4D PET volume of a patient with eight hot lesions in the lungs and upper abdomen was simulated and MoCo 4D PET images were reconstructed based on the motion vector fields derived from MR. For evaluation, average SUVmean values of the artificial lesions were determined for a 3D, a gated 4D, a MoCo 4D and a reference (with ten-fold measurement time) gated 4D reconstruction. Compared to the reference, 3D reconstructions yielded an underestimation of SUVmean values due to motion blurring. In contrast, gated 4D reconstructions showed the highest variation of SUVmean due to low statistics. MoCo 4D reconstructions were only slightly affected by these two sources of uncertainty resulting in a significant visual and quantitative improvement in terms of SUVmean values. Whereas temporal resolution was comparable to the gated 4D images, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were close to the 3D reconstructions.

  7. Real-time motion- and B0-correction for LASER-localized spiral-accelerated 3D-MRSI of the brain at 3T.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Wolfgang; Hess, Aaron T; Gagoski, Borjan; Tisdall, M Dylan; van der Kouwe, Andre J W; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rosen, Bruce; Andronesi, Ovidiu C

    2014-03-01

    The full potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often limited by localization artifacts, motion-related artifacts, scanner instabilities, and long measurement times. Localized adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) provides accurate B1-insensitive spatial excitation even at high magnetic fields. Spiral encoding accelerates MRSI acquisition, and thus, enables 3D-coverage without compromising spatial resolution. Real-time position- and shim/frequency-tracking using MR navigators correct motion- and scanner instability-related artifacts. Each of these three advanced MRI techniques provides superior MRSI data compared to commonly used methods. In this work, we integrated in a single pulse sequence these three promising approaches. Real-time correction of motion, shim, and frequency-drifts using volumetric dual-contrast echo planar imaging-based navigators were implemented in an MRSI sequence that uses low-power gradient modulated short-echo time LASER localization and time efficient spiral readouts, in order to provide fast and robust 3D-MRSI in the human brain at 3T. The proposed sequence was demonstrated to be insensitive to motion- and scanner drift-related degradations of MRSI data in both phantoms and volunteers. Motion and scanner drift artifacts were eliminated and excellent spectral quality was recovered in the presence of strong movement. Our results confirm the expected benefits of combining a spiral 3D-LASER-MRSI sequence with real-time correction. The new sequence provides accurate, fast, and robust 3D metabolic imaging of the human brain at 3T. This will further facilitate the use of 3D-MRSI for neuroscience and clinical applications.

  8. Identification of groundwater parameters at Columbus, Mississippi, using a 3D inverse flow and transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlebo, H.C.; Rosbjerg, D.; Hill, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive amount of data including hydraulic heads, hydraulic conductivities and concentrations of several solutes from controlled injections have been collected during the MADE 1 and MADE 2 experiments at a heterogeneous site near Columbus, Mississippi. In this paper the use of three-dimensional inverse groundwater models including simultaneous estimation of flow and transport parameters is proposed to help identify the dominant characteristics at the site. Simulations show that using a hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from 2187 borehole flowmeter tests directly in the model produces poor matches to the measured hydraulic heads and tritium concentrations. Alternatively, time averaged hydraulic head maps are used to define zones of constant hydraulic conductivity to be estimated. Preliminary simulations suggest that in the case of conservative transport many, but not all, of the major plume characteristics can be explained by large-scale heterogeneity in recharge and hydraulic conductivity.

  9. Recursive least squares approach to calculate motion parameters for a moving camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Samuel H.; Fuller, Joseph; Farsaie, Ali; Elkins, Les

    2003-10-01

    The increase in quality and the decrease in price of digital camera equipment have led to growing interest in reconstructing 3-dimensional objects from sequences of 2-dimensional images. The accuracy of the models obtained depends on two sets of parameter estimates. The first is the set of lens parameters - focal length, principal point, and distortion parameters. The second is the set of motion parameters that allows the comparison of a moving camera"s desired location to a theoretical location. In this paper, we address the latter problem, i.e. the estimation of the set of 3-D motion parameters from data obtained with a moving camera. We propose a method that uses Recursive Least Squares for camera motion parameter estimation with observation noise. We accomplish this by calculation of hidden information through camera projection and minimization of the estimation error. We then show how a filter based on the motion parameters estimates may be designed to correct for the errors in the camera motion. The validity of the approach is illustrated by the presentation of experimental results obtained using the methods described in the paper.

  10. Parameter investigation with line-implicit lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel on 3D stretched grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Evelyn; Eliasson, Peter

    2015-03-01

    An implicit lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) solver has been implemented as a multigrid smoother combined with a line-implicit method as an acceleration technique for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation on stretched meshes. The computational fluid dynamics code concerned is Edge, an edge-based finite volume Navier-Stokes flow solver for structured and unstructured grids. The paper focuses on the investigation of the parameters related to our novel line-implicit LU-SGS solver for convergence acceleration on 3D RANS meshes. The LU-SGS parameters are defined as the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy number, the left-hand side dissipation, and the convergence of iterative solution of the linear problem arising from the linearisation of the implicit scheme. The influence of these parameters on the overall convergence is presented and default values are defined for maximum convergence acceleration. The optimised settings are applied to 3D RANS computations for comparison with explicit and line-implicit Runge-Kutta smoothing. For most of the cases, a computing time acceleration of the order of 2 is found depending on the mesh type, namely the boundary layer and the magnitude of residual reduction.

  11. Large Area Projection Microstereolithography: Characterization and Optimization of 3D Printing Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Melissa R.; Moran, Bryan; Bekker, Logan; Dudukovic, Nikola

    2016-08-12

    Large Area Projection Microstereolithography (LAPμSL) is a new technology that allows the additive manufacture of parts that have feature sizes spanning from centimeters to tens of microns. Knowing the accuracy of builds from a system like this is a crucial step in development. This project explored the capabilities of the second and newest LAPμSL system that was built by comparing the features of actual builds to the desired structures. The system was then characterized in order to achieve the best results. The photo polymeric resins that were used were Autodesk PR48 and HDDA. Build parameters for Autodesk PR48 were found that allowed the prints to progress while using the full capacity of the system to print quality parts in a relatively short amount of time. One of the larger prints in particular had a print time that was nearly eighteen times faster than it would have been had printed in the first LAPμSL system. The characterization of HDDA resin helped the understanding that the flux of the light projected into the resin also affected the quality of the builds, rather than just the dose of light given. Future work for this project includes exploring the use of other resins in the LAPμSL systems, exploring the use of Raman Spectroscopy to analyze builds, and completing the characterization of the LAPμSL system.

  12. Maximum likelihood estimates of polar motion parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Clark R.; Vicente, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    Two estimators developed by Jeffreys (1940, 1968) are described and used in conjunction with polar-motion data to determine the frequency (Fc) and quality factor (Qc) of the Chandler wobble. Data are taken from a monthly polar-motion series, satellite laser-ranging results, and optical astrometry and intercompared for use via interpolation techniques. Maximum likelihood arguments were employed to develop the estimators, and the assumption that polar motion relates to a Gaussian random process is assessed in terms of the accuracies of the estimators. The present results agree with those from Jeffreys' earlier study but are inconsistent with the later estimator; a Monte Carlo evaluation of the estimators confirms that the 1968 method is more accurate. The later estimator method shows good performance because the Fourier coefficients derived from the data have signal/noise levels that are superior to those for an individual datum. The method is shown to be valuable for general spectral-analysis problems in which isolated peaks must be analyzed from noisy data.

  13. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  14. A hybrid approach for fusing 4D-MRI temporal information with 3D-CT for the study of lung and lung tumor motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. X.; Van Reeth, E.; Poh, C. L.; Teo, S.-K.; Tan, C. H.; Tham, I. W. K.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Accurate visualization of lung motion is important in many clinical applications, such as radiotherapy of lung cancer. Advancement in imaging modalities [e.g., computed tomography (CT) and MRI] has allowed dynamic imaging of lung and lung tumor motion. However, each imaging modality has its advantages and disadvantages. The study presented in this paper aims at generating synthetic 4D-CT dataset for lung cancer patients by combining both continuous three-dimensional (3D) motion captured by 4D-MRI and the high spatial resolution captured by CT using the authors’ proposed approach. Methods: A novel hybrid approach based on deformable image registration (DIR) and finite element method simulation was developed to fuse a static 3D-CT volume (acquired under breath-hold) and the 3D motion information extracted from 4D-MRI dataset, creating a synthetic 4D-CT dataset. Results: The study focuses on imaging of lung and lung tumor. Comparing the synthetic 4D-CT dataset with the acquired 4D-CT dataset of six lung cancer patients based on 420 landmarks, accurate results (average error <2 mm) were achieved using the authors’ proposed approach. Their hybrid approach achieved a 40% error reduction (based on landmarks assessment) over using only DIR techniques. Conclusions: The synthetic 4D-CT dataset generated has high spatial resolution, has excellent lung details, and is able to show movement of lung and lung tumor over multiple breathing cycles.

  15. Evaluation of the combined effects of target size, respiratory motion and background activity on 3D and 4D PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-June; Ionascu, Dan; Killoran, Joseph; Mamede, Marcelo; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Chin, Lee; Berbeco, Ross

    2008-07-01

    Gated (4D) PET/CT has the potential to greatly improve the accuracy of radiotherapy at treatment sites where internal organ motion is significant. However, the best methodology for applying 4D-PET/CT to target definition is not currently well established. With the goal of better understanding how to best apply 4D information to radiotherapy, initial studies were performed to investigate the effect of target size, respiratory motion and target-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) on 3D (ungated) and 4D PET images. Using a PET/CT scanner with 4D or gating capability, a full 3D-PET scan corrected with a 3D attenuation map from 3D-CT scan and a respiratory gated (4D) PET scan corrected with corresponding attenuation maps from 4D-CT were performed by imaging spherical targets (0.5-26.5 mL) filled with 18F-FDG in a dynamic thorax phantom and NEMA IEC body phantom at different TBRs (infinite, 8 and 4). To simulate respiratory motion, the phantoms were driven sinusoidally in the superior-inferior direction with amplitudes of 0, 1 and 2 cm and a period of 4.5 s. Recovery coefficients were determined on PET images. In addition, gating methods using different numbers of gating bins (1-20 bins) were evaluated with image noise and temporal resolution. For evaluation, volume recovery coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated as a function of the number of gating bins. Moreover, the optimum thresholds which give accurate moving target volumes were obtained for 3D and 4D images. The partial volume effect and signal loss in the 3D-PET images due to the limited PET resolution and the respiratory motion, respectively were measured. The results show that signal loss depends on both the amplitude and pattern of respiratory motion. However, the 4D-PET successfully recovers most of the loss induced by the respiratory motion. The 5-bin gating method gives the best temporal resolution with acceptable image noise. The results based on the 4D

  16. 2-D-3-D frequency registration using a low-dose radiographic system for knee motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, Taha; Burdin, Valerie; Leboucher, Julien; Stindel, Eric; Roux, Christian

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a new method is presented to study the feasibility of the pose and the position estimation of bone structures using a low-dose radiographic system, the entrepreneurial operating system (designed by EOS-Imaging Company). This method is based on a 2-D-3-D registration of EOS bi-planar X-ray images with an EOS 3-D reconstruction. This technique is relevant to such an application thanks to the EOS ability to simultaneously make acquisitions of frontal and sagittal radiographs, and also to produce a 3-D surface reconstruction with its attached software. In this paper, the pose and position of a bone in radiographs is estimated through the link between 3-D and 2-D data. This relationship is established in the frequency domain using the Fourier central slice theorem. To estimate the pose and position of the bone, we define a distance between the 3-D data and the radiographs, and use an iterative optimization approach to converge toward the best estimation. In this paper, we give the mathematical details of the method. We also show the experimental protocol and the results, which validate our approach.

  17. Effects of computing parameters and measurement locations on the estimation of 3D NPS in non-stationary MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Miéville, Frédéric A; Bolard, Gregory; Bulling, Shelley; Gudinchet, François; Bochud, François O; Verdun, François R

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of computing parameters and the location of volumes of interest (VOI) on the calculation of 3D noise power spectrum (NPS) in order to determine an optimal set of computing parameters and propose a robust method for evaluating the noise properties of imaging systems. Noise stationarity in noise volumes acquired with a water phantom on a 128-MDCT and a 320-MDCT scanner were analyzed in the spatial domain in order to define locally stationary VOIs. The influence of the computing parameters in the 3D NPS measurement: the sampling distances bx,y,z and the VOI lengths Lx,y,z, the number of VOIs NVOI and the structured noise were investigated to minimize measurement errors. The effect of the VOI locations on the NPS was also investigated. Results showed that the noise (standard deviation) varies more in the r-direction (phantom radius) than z-direction plane. A 25 × 25 × 40 mm(3) VOI associated with DFOV = 200 mm (Lx,y,z = 64, bx,y = 0.391 mm with 512 × 512 matrix) and a first-order detrending method to reduce structured noise led to an accurate NPS estimation. NPS estimated from off centered small VOIs had a directional dependency contrary to NPS obtained from large VOIs located in the center of the volume or from small VOIs located on a concentric circle. This showed that the VOI size and location play a major role in the determination of NPS when images are not stationary. This study emphasizes the need for consistent measurement methods to assess and compare image quality in CT.

  18. Extension of the Optimized Virtual Fields Method to estimate viscoelastic material parameters from 3D dynamic displacement fields

    PubMed Central

    Connesson, N.; Clayton, E.H.; Bayly, P.V.; Pierron, F.

    2015-01-01

    In-vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of soft tissues is essential to provide necessary data in biomechanics and medicine (early cancer diagnosis, study of traumatic brain injuries, etc.). Imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) can provide 3D displacement maps in the bulk and in vivo, from which, using inverse methods, it is then possible to identify some mechanical parameters of the tissues (stiffness, damping etc.). The main difficulties in these inverse identification procedures consist in dealing with the pressure waves contained in the data and with the experimental noise perturbing the spatial derivatives required during the processing. The Optimized Virtual Fields Method (OVFM) [1], designed to be robust to noise, present natural and rigorous solution to deal with these problems. The OVFM has been adapted to identify material parameter maps from Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) data consisting of 3-dimensional displacement fields in harmonically loaded soft materials. In this work, the method has been developed to identify elastic and viscoelastic models. The OVFM sensitivity to spatial resolution and to noise has been studied by analyzing 3D analytically simulated displacement data. This study evaluates and describes the OVFM identification performances: different biases on the identified parameters are induced by the spatial resolution and experimental noise. The well-known identification problems in the case of quasi-incompressible materials also find a natural solution in the OVFM. Moreover, an a posteriori criterion to estimate the local identification quality is proposed. The identification results obtained on actual experiments are briefly presented. PMID:26146416

  19. Influence of Head Motion on the Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT: Landmark Identification Errors in Maxillofacial Surface Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Jin-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of head motion on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. Materials and Methods Fifteen dry skulls were incorporated into a motion controller which simulated four types of head motion during CBCT scan: 2 horizontal rotations (to the right/to the left) and 2 vertical rotations (upward/downward). Each movement was triggered to occur at the start of the scan for 1 second by remote control. Four maxillofacial surface models with head motion and one control surface model without motion were obtained for each skull. Nine landmarks were identified on the five maxillofacial surface models for each skull, and landmark identification errors were compared between the control model and each of the models with head motion. Results Rendered surface models with head motion were similar to the control model in appearance; however, the landmark identification errors showed larger values in models with head motion than in the control. In particular, the Porion in the horizontal rotation models presented statistically significant differences (P < .05). Statistically significant difference in the errors between the right and left side landmark was present in the left side rotation which was opposite direction to the scanner rotation (P < .05). Conclusions Patient movement during CBCT scan might cause landmark identification errors on the 3D surface model in relation to the direction of the scanner rotation. Clinicians should take this into consideration to prevent patient movement during CBCT scan, particularly horizontal movement. PMID:27065238

  20. Imaging bacterial 3D motion using digital in-line holographic microscopy and correlation-based de-noising algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Better understanding of bacteria environment interactions in the context of biofilm formation requires accurate 3-dimentional measurements of bacteria motility. Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) has demonstrated its capability in resolving 3D distribution and mobility of particulates in a dense suspension. Due to their low scattering efficiency, bacteria are substantially difficult to be imaged by DHM. In this paper, we introduce a novel correlation-based de-noising algorithm to remove the background noise and enhance the quality of the hologram. Implemented in conjunction with DHM, we demonstrate that the method allows DHM to resolve 3-D E. coli bacteria locations of a dense suspension (>107 cells/ml) with submicron resolutions (<0.5 µm) over substantial depth and to obtain thousands of 3D cell trajectories. PMID:25607177

  1. Dynamic particle accumulation structure (PAS) in half-zone liquid bridge Reconstruction of particle motion by 3-D PTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, I.; Abe, Y.; Noguchi, K.; Kawamura, H.

    Three-dimensional (3-D) velocity field reconstruction of oscillatory thermocapillary convections in a half-zone liquid bridge with a radius of O (1 mm) was carried out by applying 3-D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Simultaneous observation of the particles suspended in the bridge by two CCD cameras was carried out by placing a small cubic beam splitter above a transparent top rod. The reconstruction of the 3-D trajectories and the velocity fields of the particles in the several types of oscillatory-flow regimes were conducted successfully for sufficiently long period without losing particle tracking. With this application the present authors conducted a series of experiments focusing upon the collapse and re-formation process of the PAS by mechanically disturbing fully developed PAS.

  2. A Comparison between 3D Model Predictions for Martian Exospheric Hot Oxygen and MAVEN IUVS observations: Sensitivity to Model Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yuni; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Bougher, Stephen W.; Deighan, Justin; Schneider, Nicholas M.; McClintock, William; Jakosky, Bruce; Johnson, Robert E.; Tully, Catherine T.

    2016-10-01

    Earlier observations have suggested that the current deficiency of water and CO2 is due to various mechanisms driven from the surface, atmosphere and surroundings over geologic time. Understanding the nature of the loss processes at the current epoch is critical for evaluating both the global atmospheric loss rate and the time-dependent volatile inventory, and in turn for unraveling the evolution of the Martian atmosphere. At the current epoch, the main photochemical mechanism that induces the escape of atomic O is suggested to be dissociative recombination of O2+, which also produces the extended hot O corona in the upper thermosphere and exosphere. To understand the loss via this process quantitatively, it is important to constrain the model by characterizing the structure and variability of the hot O corona in accordance with the observed features of the atmosphere. Here, we present our 3D model predictions for the Martian hot O corona compared with the OI 130.4 nm emission observed by Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) onboard Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN). The hot O corona has been simulated by the coupled framework between our Mars application of the 3D Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS) and the Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM), based completely on our best pre-MAVEN understanding of the 3D structure of the thermosphere and ionosphere. Among important model parameters, we have chosen appropriate seasonal and solar activity parameters, which are approximately equivalent to the conditions during each observation. We have also examined the sensitivity of the resulting hot O density to the elastic collision cross sections for the hot O collisions with the background atmospheric species. We present the importance of these key parameters by comparing measurements with the model predictions for the altitude variation of the hot O density and the spatial variation of the dayside-dominated corona. Any discrepancies

  3. Bedside assistance in freehand ultrasonic diagnosis by real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, M.; Kawata, K.; Nakamori, N.; Kitsunezuka, Y.

    2011-03-01

    By real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion, freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of neonatal ischemic diseases has been assisted at the bedside. The 2D ultrasonic movie was taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus (ATL HDI5000) and ultrasonic probes of 5-7 MHz with the compact tilt-sensor to measure the probe orientation. The real-time 3D visualization was realized by developing an extended version of the PC-based visualization system. The software was originally developed on the DirectX platform and optimized with the streaming SIMD extensions. The 3D scatter diagram of the latest pulsatile tissues has been continuously generated and visualized as projection image with the ultrasonic movie in the current section more than 15 fps. It revealed the 3D structure of pulsatile tissues such as middle and posterior cerebral arteries, Willis ring and cerebellar arteries, in which pediatricians have great interests in the blood flow because asphyxiated and/or low-birth-weight neonates have a high risk of ischemic diseases such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and periventricular leukomalacia. Since the pulsatile tissue-motion is due to local blood flow, it can be concluded that the system developed in this work is very useful to assist freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of ischemic diseases in the neonatal cranium.

  4. A hybrid 3D-Var data assimilation scheme for joint state and parameter estimation: application to morphodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P.; Nichols, N. K.; Dance, S.

    2011-12-01

    Data assimilation is typically used to provide initial conditions for state estimation; combining model predictions with observational data to produce an updated model state that most accurately characterises the true system state whilst keeping the model parameters fixed. This updated model state is then used to initiate the next model forecast. However, even with perfect initial data, inaccurate representation of model parameters will lead to the growth of model error and therefore affect the ability of our model to accurately predict the true system state. A key question in model development is how to estimate parameters a priori. In most cases, parameter estimation is addressed as a separate issue to state estimation and model calibration is performed offline in a separate calculation. Here we demonstrate how, by employing the technique of state augmentation, it is possible to use data assimilation to estimate uncertain model parameters concurrently with the model state as part of the assimilation process. We present a novel hybrid data assimilation algorithm developed for application to parameter estimation in morphodynamic models. The new approach is based on a computationally inexpensive 3D-Var scheme, where the specification of the covariance matrices is crucial for success. For combined state-parameter estimation, it is particularly important that the cross-covariances between the parameters and the state are given a good a priori specification. Early experiments indicated that in order to yield reliable estimates of the true parameters, a flow dependent representation of the state-parameter cross covariances is required. By combining ideas from 3D-Var and the extended Kalman filter we have developed a novel hybrid assimilation scheme that captures the flow dependent nature of the state-parameter cross covariances without the computational expense of explicitly propagating the full system covariance matrix. We will give details of the formulation of this

  5. Motion capture based identification of the human body inertial parameters.

    PubMed

    Venture, Gentiane; Ayusawa, Ko; Nakamura, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Identification of body inertia, masses and center of mass is an important data to simulate, monitor and understand dynamics of motion, to personalize rehabilitation programs. This paper proposes an original method to identify the inertial parameters of the human body, making use of motion capture data and contact forces measurements. It allows in-vivo painless estimation and monitoring of the inertial parameters. The method is described and then obtained experimental results are presented and discussed.

  6. Using Parameters of Dynamic Pulse Function for 3d Modeling in LOD3 Based on Random Textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadehashrafi, B.

    2015-12-01

    The pulse function (PF) is a technique based on procedural preprocessing system to generate a computerized virtual photo of the façade with in a fixed size square(Alizadehashrafi et al., 2009, Musliman et al., 2010). Dynamic Pulse Function (DPF) is an enhanced version of PF which can create the final photo, proportional to real geometry. This can avoid distortion while projecting the computerized photo on the generated 3D model(Alizadehashrafi and Rahman, 2013). The challenging issue that might be handled for having 3D model in LoD3 rather than LOD2, is the final aim that have been achieved in this paper. In the technique based DPF the geometries of the windows and doors are saved in an XML file schema which does not have any connections with the 3D model in LoD2 and CityGML format. In this research the parameters of Dynamic Pulse Functions are utilized via Ruby programming language in SketchUp Trimble to generate (exact position and deepness) the windows and doors automatically in LoD3 based on the same concept of DPF. The advantage of this technique is automatic generation of huge number of similar geometries e.g. windows by utilizing parameters of DPF along with defining entities and window layers. In case of converting the SKP file to CityGML via FME software or CityGML plugins the 3D model contains the semantic database about the entities and window layers which can connect the CityGML to MySQL(Alizadehashrafi and Baig, 2014). The concept behind DPF, is to use logical operations to project the texture on the background image which is dynamically proportional to real geometry. The process of projection is based on two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses starting from upper-left corner of the background wall in down and right directions respectively based on image coordinate system. The logical one/zero on the intersections of two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses projects/does not project the texture on the background image. It is possible to define

  7. Kinetic approach to the formation of 3D electromagnetic structures in flows of expanding plasma coronas. II. flow anisotropy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of magnetic structures in moving hot solar coronal plasma and hot collisionless laser-produced plasma, as determined by nonlinear criteria for weak and strong magnetization on the basis of the friction parameter Γ B and Alfven number M A, is considered within the Vlasov and Maxwell equations in the second part of the work. The flow velocities are lower then the thermal electron velocity. The energy and pulse anisotropy parameters of a flow, which determine its electromagnetic properties in the Cherenkov resonance line, are calculated by shape of particle distribution function (PDF). The ratio of these parameters is the Q-factor G V ; it characterizes the electromagnetic properties of a plasma flow and is expressed via the ratio of diamagnetic and resistive current densities or via the ratio of irregular and diamagnetic plasma scales. A particle flow is similar to a conductive medium at G V ≪ 1 and a diamagnetic medium at G V ≫ 1. The following cases are considered. (1) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF and interacts with distributed magnetization. Expressions for anisotropy parameters are derived, 3D field structures in the tail wake are found, and a possibility of topological reconstruction into a compact state under variation in the parameter G V is shown. (2) A plasma flow is specified by an isotropic PDF; a steady-state diamagnetic current layer, characterized by an anisotropic PDF, is immersed inside it. The system is in the diamagnetic state G ≫ 1. The generalized anisotropy parameter is calculated and a possibility of the excitation of three types of diamagnetic structures with low resistive currents is shown. (3) The nonlinear dynamics of anisotropic quasi-current-free plasma ( G =-1), in which the diamagnetic and resistive current densities locally compensate each other in the phase space of particle velocities, is studied. This dynamics is implemented in the long wavelength limit in plasma with an anisotropic PDF.

  8. Combining 3D tracking and surgical instrumentation to determine the stiffness of spinal motion segments: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Reutlinger, C; Gédet, P; Büchler, P; Kowal, J; Rudolph, T; Burger, J; Scheffler, K; Hasler, C

    2011-04-01

    The spine is a complex structure that provides motion in three directions: flexion and extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. So far, the investigation of the mechanical and kinematic behavior of the basic unit of the spine, a motion segment, is predominantly a domain of in vitro experiments on spinal loading simulators. Most existing approaches to measure spinal stiffness intraoperatively in an in vivo environment use a distractor. However, these concepts usually assume a planar loading and motion. The objective of our study was to develop and validate an apparatus, that allows to perform intraoperative in vivo measurements to determine both the applied force and the resulting motion in three dimensional space. The proposed setup combines force measurement with an instrumented distractor and motion tracking with an optoelectronic system. As the orientation of the applied force and the three dimensional motion is known, not only force-displacement, but also moment-angle relations could be determined. The validation was performed using three cadaveric lumbar ovine spines. The lateral bending stiffness of two motion segments per specimen was determined with the proposed concept and compared with the stiffness acquired on a spinal loading simulator which was considered to be gold standard. The mean values of the stiffness computed with the proposed concept were within a range of ±15% compared to data obtained with the spinal loading simulator under applied loads of less than 5 Nm.

  9. Sports video categorizing method using camera motion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shinichi; Hattori, Shinobu; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kodate, Akihisa; Tominaga, Hideyoshi

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a content based video categorizing method for broadcasted sports videos using camera motion parameters. We define and introduce two new features in the proposed method; "Camera motion extraction ratio" and "Camera motion transition". Camera motion parameters in the video sequence contain very significant information for categorization of broadcasted sports video, because in most of sports video, camera motions are closely related to the actions taken in the sports, which are mostly based on a certain rule depending on types of sports. Based on the charactersitics, we design a sports video categorization algorithm for identifying 6 major different sports types. In our algorithm, the features automatically extracted from videos are analysed statistically. The experimental results show a clear tendency and the applicability of the proposed method for sports genre identification.

  10. Dynamic simulation and modeling of the motion modes produced during the 3D controlled manipulation of biological micro/nanoparticles based on the AFM.

    PubMed

    Saraee, Mahdieh B; Korayem, Moharam H

    2015-08-07

    Determining the motion modes and the exact position of a particle displaced during the manipulation process is of special importance. This issue becomes even more important when the studied particles are biological micro/nanoparticles and the goals of manipulation are the transfer of these particles within body cells, repair of cancerous cells and the delivery of medication to damaged cells. However, due to the delicate nature of biological nanoparticles and their higher vulnerability, by obtaining the necessary force of manipulation for the considered motion mode, we can prevent the sample from interlocking with or sticking to the substrate because of applying a weak force or avoid damaging the sample due to the exertion of excessive force. In this paper, the dynamic behaviors and the motion modes of biological micro/nanoparticles such as DNA, yeast, platelet and bacteria due to the 3D manipulation effect have been investigated. Since the above nanoparticles generally have a cylindrical shape, the cylindrical contact models have been employed in an attempt to more precisely model the forces exerted on the nanoparticle during the manipulation process. Also, this investigation has performed a comprehensive modeling and simulation of all the possible motion modes in 3D manipulation by taking into account the eccentricity of the applied load on the biological nanoparticle. The obtained results indicate that unlike the macroscopic scale, the sliding of nanoparticle on substrate in nano-scale takes place sooner than the other motion modes and that the spinning about the vertical and transverse axes and the rolling of nanoparticle occur later than the other motion modes. The simulation results also indicate that the applied force necessary for the onset of nanoparticle movement and the resulting motion mode depend on the size and aspect ratio of the nanoparticle.

  11. Validation and Comparison of 2D and 3D Codes for Nearshore Motion of Long Waves Using Benchmark Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioǧlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are huge waves with long wave periods and wave lengths that can cause great devastation and loss of life when they strike a coast. The interest in experimental and numerical modeling of tsunami propagation and inundation increased considerably after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. In this study, two numerical codes, FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE, that analyze tsunami propagation and inundation patterns are considered. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as long waves by solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (3D-NS) equations. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve 2D depth-averaged linear and nonlinear forms of shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. In order to validate these two codes and analyze the differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations, two benchmark problems are applied. One benchmark problem investigates the runup of long waves over a complex 3D beach. The experimental setup is a 1:400 scale model of Monai Valley located on the west coast of Okushiri Island, Japan. Other benchmark problem is discussed in 2015 National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Annual meeting in Portland, USA. It is a field dataset, recording the Japan 2011 tsunami in Hilo Harbor, Hawaii. The computed water surface elevation and velocity data are compared with the measured data. The comparisons showed that both codes are in fairly good agreement with each other and benchmark data. The differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations are highlighted. All results are presented with discussions and comparisons. Acknowledgements: Partial support by Japan-Turkey Joint Research Project by JICA on earthquakes and tsunamis in Marmara Region (JICA SATREPS - MarDiM Project), 603839 ASTARTE Project of EU, UDAP-C-12-14 project of AFAD Turkey, 108Y227, 113M556 and 213M534 projects of TUBITAK Turkey, RAPSODI (CONCERT_Dis-021) of CONCERT

  12. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Neelakkantan, Harini; Ruddy, Bari H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  13. Motion-sensitive 3-D optical coherence microscope operating at 1300 nm for the visualization of early frog development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeling, Barbara M.; Feldman, Stephanie S.; Strenge, Daniel T.; Bernard, Aaron; Hogan, Emily R.; Petersen, Daniel C.; Fraser, Scott E.; Kee, Yun; Tyszka, J. Michael; Haskell, Richard C.

    2007-02-01

    We present 3-dimensional volume-rendered in vivo images of developing embryos of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis taken with our new en-face-scanning, focus-tracking OCM system at 1300 nm wavelength. Compared to our older instrument which operates at 850 nm, we measure a decrease in the attenuation coefficient by 33%, leading to a substantial improvement in depth penetration. Both instruments have motion-sensitivity capability. By evaluating the fast Fourier transform of the fringe signal, we can produce simultaneously images displaying the fringe amplitude of the backscattered light and images showing the random Brownian motion of the scatterers. We present time-lapse movies of frog gastrulation, an early event during vertebrate embryonic development in which cell movements result in the formation of three distinct layers that later give rise to the major organ systems. We show that the motion-sensitive images reveal features of the different tissue types that are not discernible in the fringe amplitude images. In particular, we observe strong diffusive motion in the vegetal (bottom) part of the frog embryo which we attribute to the Brownian motion of the yolk platelets in the endoderm.

  14. Parameter analysis for a high-gain harmonic generation FEL using a recently developed 3D polychromatic code.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.; Freund, H. P.; Yu, L.-H.

    1999-09-10

    One possible design for a fourth-generation light source is the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL). Here, a coherent seed with a wavelength at a subharmonic of the desired output radiation interacts with the electron beam in an energy-modulating section. This energy modulation is then converted into spatial bunching while traversing a dispersive section (a three-dipole chicane). The final step is passage through a radiative section, an undulator tuned to the desired higher harmonic output wavelength. The coherent seed serves to remove noise and can be at a much lower subharmonic of the output radiation, thus eliminating the concerns found in self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) and seeded FELs, respectively. Recently, a 3D code that includes multiple frequencies, multiple undulatory (both in quantity and/or type), quadruple magnets, and dipole magnets was developed to easily simulate HGHG. Here, a brief review of the HGHG theory, the code development, the Accelerator Test Facility's (ATF) HGHG FEL experimental parameters, and the parameter analysis from simulations of this specific experiment will be discussed.

  15. Refining seismic parameters in low seismicity areas by 3D trenching: The Alhama de Murcia fault, SE Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater, Marta; Ortuño, Maria; Masana, Eulàlia; Pallàs, Raimon; Perea, Hector; Baize, Stephane; García-Meléndez, Eduardo; Martínez-Díaz, José J.; Echeverria, Anna; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Sharp, Warren D.; Medialdea, Alicia; Rhodes, Edward J.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional paleoseismology in strike-slip faults with slip rates less than 1 mm per year involves a great methodological challenge. We adapted 3D trenching to track buried channels offset by the Alhama de Murcia seismogenic left-lateral strike-slip fault (SE Iberia). A fault net slip of 0.9 ± 0.1 mm/yr was determined using statistical analysis of piercing lines for one buried channel, whose age is constrained between 15.2 ± 1.1 ka and 21.9-22.3 cal BP. This value is larger and more accurate than the previously published slip rates for this fault. The minimum number of five paleo-earthquakes identified since the deposition of dated layers suggests a maximum average recurrence interval of approximately 5 ka. The combination of both seismic parameters yields a maximum slip per event between 5.3 and 6.3 m. We show that accurately planned trenching strategies and data processing may be key to obtaining robust paleoseismic parameters in low seismicity areas.

  16. Recovery of motion parameters from distortions in scanned images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1997-01-01

    Scanned images, such as those produced by the scanning-laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), show distortions when there is target motion. This is because pixels corresponding to different image regions are acquired sequentially, and so, in essence, are slices of different snapshots. While these distortions create problems for image registration algorithms, they are potentially useful for recovering target motion parameters at temporal frequencies above the frame rate. Stetter, Sendtner and Timberlake measured large distortions in SLO images to recover the time course of rapid horizontal saccadic eye movements. Here, this work is extended with the goal of automatically recovering small eye movements in two dimensions. Eye position during the frame interval is modeled using a low dimensional parametric description, which in turn is used to generate predicted distortions of a reference template. The input image is then registered to the distorted template using normalized cross correlation. The motion parameters are then varied, and the correlation recomputed, to find the motion which maximizes the peak value of the correlation. The location and value of the correlation maximum are determined with sub-pixel precision using biquadratic interpolation, yielding eye position resolution better than 1 arc minute. This method of motion parameter estimation is tested using actual SLO images as well as simulated images. Motion parameter estimation might also be applied to individual video lines in order to reduce pipeline delays for a near real-time system.

  17. Automated 3D architecture reconstruction from photogrammetric structure-and-motion: A case study of the One Pilla pagoda, Hanoi, Vienam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, T.; Nguyen, D.; Tran, G.

    2015-04-01

    Heritage system of Vietnam has decline because of poor-conventional condition. For sustainable development, it is required a firmly control, space planning organization, and reasonable investment. Moreover, in the field of Cultural Heritage, the use of automated photogrammetric systems, based on Structure from Motion techniques (SfM), is widely used. With the potential of high-resolution, low-cost, large field of view, easiness, rapidity and completeness, the derivation of 3D metric information from Structure-and- Motion images is receiving great attention. In addition, heritage objects in form of 3D physical models are recorded not only for documentation issues, but also for historical interpretation, restoration, cultural and educational purposes. The study suggests the archaeological documentation of the "One Pilla" pagoda placed in Hanoi capital, Vietnam. The data acquired through digital camera Cannon EOS 550D, CMOS APS-C sensor 22.3 x 14.9 mm. Camera calibration and orientation were carried out by VisualSFM, CMPMVS (Multi-View Reconstruction) and SURE (Photogrammetric Surface Reconstruction from Imagery) software. The final result represents a scaled 3D model of the One Pilla Pagoda and displayed different views in MeshLab software.

  18. Assessment of laparoscopic skills based on force and motion parameters.

    PubMed

    Horeman, Tim; Dankelman, Jenny; Jansen, Frank Willem; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2014-03-01

    Box trainers equipped with sensors may help in acquiring objective information about a trainee's performance while performing training tasks with real instruments. The main aim of this study is to investigate the added value of force parameters with respect to commonly used motion and time parameters such as path length, motion volume, and task time. Two new dynamic bimanual positioning tasks were developed that not only requiring adequate motion control but also appropriate force control successful completion. Force and motion data for these tasks were studied for three groups of participants with different experience levels in laparoscopy (i.e., 11 novices, 19 intermediates, and 12 experts). In total, 10 of the 13 parameters showed a significant difference between groups. When the data from the significant motion, time, and force parameters are used for classification, it is possible to identify the skills level of the participants with 100% accuracy. Furthermore, the force parameters of many individuals in the intermediate group exceeded the maximum values in the novice and expert group. The relatively high forces used by the intermediates argue for the inclusion of training and assessment of force application during tissue handling in future laparoscopic skills training programs.

  19. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-21

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  20. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L.; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G.; Mak, Raymond H.; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  1. Towards patient-specific modeling of mitral valve repair: 3D transesophageal echocardiography-derived parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Kanik, Jingjing; Mansi, Tommaso; Voigt, Ingmar; Sharma, Puneet; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Lin, Ben A; Sugeng, Lissa; Yuh, David; Comaniciu, Dorin; Duncan, James

    2017-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is routinely used to provide important qualitative and quantitative information regarding mitral regurgitation. Contemporary planning of surgical mitral valve repair, however, still relies heavily upon subjective predictions based on experience and intuition. While patient-specific mitral valve modeling holds promise, its effectiveness is limited by assumptions that must be made about constitutive material properties. In this paper, we propose and develop a semi-automated framework that combines machine learning image analysis with geometrical and biomechanical models to build a patient-specific mitral valve representation that incorporates image-derived material properties. We use our computational framework, along with 3D TEE images of the open and closed mitral valve, to estimate values for chordae rest lengths and leaflet material properties. These parameters are initialized using generic values and optimized to match the visualized deformation of mitral valve geometry between the open and closed states. Optimization is achieved by minimizing the summed Euclidean distances between the estimated and image-derived closed mitral valve geometry. The spatially varying material parameters of the mitral leaflets are estimated using an extended Kalman filter to take advantage of the temporal information available from TEE. This semi-automated and patient-specific modeling framework was tested on 15 TEE image acquisitions from 14 patients. Simulated mitral valve closures yielded average errors (measured by point-to-point Euclidean distances) of 1.86 ± 1.24 mm. The estimated material parameters suggest that the anterior leaflet is stiffer than the posterior leaflet and that these properties vary between individuals, consistent with experimental observations described in the literature.

  2. Development of the dynamic motion simulator of 3D micro-gravity with a combined passive/active suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Hirose, Shigeo; Ogawa, Tadashi

    1994-01-01

    The establishment of those in-orbit operations like 'Rendez-Vous/Docking' and 'Manipulator Berthing' with the assistance of robotics or autonomous control technology, is essential for the near future space programs. In order to study the control methods, develop the flight models, and verify how the system works, we need a tool or a testbed which enables us to simulate mechanically the micro-gravity environment. There have been many attempts to develop the micro-gravity testbeds, but once the simulation goes into the docking and berthing operation that involves mechanical contacts among multi bodies, the requirement becomes critical. A group at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has proposed a method that can simulate the 3D micro-gravity producing a smooth response to the impact phenomena with relatively simple apparatus. Recently the group carried out basic experiments successfully using a prototype hardware model of the testbed. This paper will present our idea of the 3D micro-gravity simulator and report the results of our initial experiments.

  3. Hybrid 3-D rocket trajectory program. Part 1: Formulation and analysis. Part 2: Computer programming and user's instruction. [computerized simulation using three dimensional motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, L. C. P.; Cook, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Models utilizing various sub-sets of the six degrees of freedom are used in trajectory simulation. A 3-D model with only linear degrees of freedom is especially attractive, since the coefficients for the angular degrees of freedom are the most difficult to determine and the angular equations are the most time consuming for the computer to evaluate. A computer program is developed that uses three separate subsections to predict trajectories. A launch rail subsection is used until the rocket has left its launcher. The program then switches to a special 3-D section which computes motions in two linear and one angular degrees of freedom. When the rocket trims out, the program switches to the standard, three linear degrees of freedom model.

  4. 3D Dynamic Rupture with Slip Reactivation and Ground Motion Simulations of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalguer, Luis; Galvez, Percy

    2013-04-01

    Seismological, geodetic and tsunami observations, including kinematic source inversion and back-projection models of the giant megathrust 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake indicate that the earthquake featured complex rupture patterns, with multiple rupture fronts and rupture styles. The compilation of these studies reveals fundamentally three main feature: 1) spectacular large slip over 50m, 2) the existence of slip reactivation and 3) distinct regions of low and high frequency radiation. In this paper we investigate the possible mechanisms causing the slip reactivation. For this purpose we perform earthquakes dynamic rupture and strong ground motion simulations. We investigate two mechanisms as potential sources of slip reactivation: 1) The additional push to the earthquake rupture (slip reactivation) comes from the rupture front back propagating from the free-surface after rupturing the trench of the fault, a phenomena usually observed in dynamic rupture simulations of dipping faults (e.g. Dalguer et al. 2001). This mechanism produces smooth slip velocity reactivation with low frequency content. 2) Slip reactivation governed by the friction constitutive low (in the form given by Kanamori and Heaton, 2000) in which frictional strength drops initially to certain value, but then at large slips there is a second drop in frictional strength. The slip velocity caused by this mechanism is a sharp pulse capable to radiate stronger ground motion. Our simulations show that the second mechanism produces synthetic ground motion pattern along the Japanese cost of the Tohoku event consistent with the observed ground motion. In addition, the rupture pattern with slip reactivation is also consistent with kinematic source inversion models in which slip reactivation is observed. Therefore we propose that the slip reactivation observed in this earthquake is results of strong frictional strength drop, maybe caused by fault melting, pressurization, lubrication or other thermal weakening

  5. Double calibration: an accurate, reliable and easy-to-use method for 3D scapular motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Brochard, Sylvain; Lempereur, Mathieu; Rémy-Néris, Olivier

    2011-02-24

    The most recent non-invasive methods for the recording of scapular motion are based on an acromion marker (AM) set and a single calibration (SC) of the scapula in a resting position. However, this method fails to accurately measure scapular kinematics above 90° of arm elevation, due to soft tissue artifacts of the skin and muscles covering the acromion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, and inter-trial and inter-session repeatability of a double calibration method (DC) in comparison with SC. The SC and DC data were measured with an optoelectronic system during arm flexion and abduction at different angles of elevation (0-180°). They were compared with palpation of the scapula using a scapula locator. DC data was not significantly different from palpation for 5/6 axes of rotation tested (Y, X, and Z in abduction and flexion), where as SC showed significant differences for 5/6 axes. The root mean square errors ranged from 2.96° to 4.48° for DC and from 6° to 9.19° for SC. The inter-trial repeatability was good to excellent for SC and DC. The inter-session repeatability was moderate to excellent for SC and moderate to good for DC. Coupling AM and DC is an easy-to-use method, which yields accurate and reliable measurements of scapular kinematics for the complete range of arm motion. It can be applied to the measurement of shoulder motion in many fields (sports, orthopaedics, and rehabilitation), especially when large ranges of arm motion are required.

  6. Integration Method of Emphatic Motions and Adverbial Expressions with Scalar Parameters for Robotic Motion Coaching System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Keisuke; Inamura, Tetsunari

    A robotic coaching system can improve humans' learning performance of motions by intelligent usage of emphatic motions and adverbial expressions according to user reactions. In robotics, however, method to control both the motions and the expressions and how to bind them had not been adequately discussed from an engineering point of view. In this paper, we propose a method for controlling and binding emphatic motions and adverbial expressions by using two scalar parameters in a phase space. In the phase space, variety of motion patterns and verbal expressions are connected and can be expressed as static points. We show the feasibility of the proposing method through experiments of actual sport coaching tasks for beginners. From the results of participants' improvements in motion learning, we confirmed the feasibility of the methods to control and bind emphatic motions and adverbial expressions, as well as confirmed contribution of the emphatic motions and positive correlation of adverbial expressions for participants' improvements in motion learning. Based on the results, we introduce a hypothesis that individually optimized method for binding adverbial expression is required.

  7. Retrieval of Vegetation Structural Parameters and 3-D Reconstruction of Forest Canopies Using Ground-Based Echidna® Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Yao, T.; Zhao, F.; Yang, X.; Schaaf, C.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D. L.; Culvenor, D.; Newnham, G.; Lovell, J.

    2010-12-01

    A ground-based, scanning, near-infrared lidar, the Echidna® validation instrument (EVI), built by CSIRO Australia, retrieves structural parameters of forest stands rapidly and accurately, and by merging multiple scans into a single point cloud, the lidar also provides 3-D stand reconstructions. Echidna lidar technology scans with pulses of light at 1064 nm wavelength and digitizes the full return waveform sufficiently finely to recover and distinguish the differing shapes of return pulses as they are scattered by leaves, trunks, and branches. Deployments in New England in 2007 and the southern Sierra Nevada of California in 2008 tested the ability of the instrument to retrieve mean tree diameter, stem count density (stems/ha), basal area, and above-ground woody biomass from single scans at points beneath the forest canopy. Parameters retrieved from five scans located within six 1-ha stand sites matched manually-measured parameters with values of R2 = 0.94-0.99 in New England and 0.92-0.95 in the Sierra Nevada. Retrieved leaf area index (LAI) values were similar to those of LAI-2000 and hemispherical photography. In New England, an analysis of variance showed that EVI-retrieved values were not significantly different from other methods (power = 0.84 or higher). In the Sierra, R2 = 0.96 and 0.81 for hemispherical photos and LAI-2000, respectively. Foliage profiles, which measure leaf area with canopy height, showed distinctly different shapes for the stands, depending on species composition and age structure. New England stand heights, obtained from foliage profiles, were not significantly different (power = 0.91) from RH100 values observed by LVIS in 2003. Three-dimensional stand reconstruction identifies one or more “hits” along the pulse path coupled with the peak return of each hit expressed as apparent reflectance. Returns are classified as trunk, leaf, or ground returns based on the shape of the return pulse and its location. These data provide a point

  8. Global and regional kinematics of the cervical spine during upper cervical spine manipulation: a reliability analysis of 3D motion data.

    PubMed

    Dugailly, Pierre-Michel; Beyer, Benoît; Sobczak, Stéphane; Salvia, Patrick; Feipel, Véronique

    2014-10-01

    Studies reporting spine kinematics during cervical manipulation are usually related to continuous global head-trunk motion or discrete angular displacements for pre-positioning. To date, segmental data analyzing continuous kinematics of cervical manipulation is lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate upper cervical spine (UCS) manipulation in vitro. This paper reports an inter- and intra-rater reliability analysis of kinematics during high velocity low amplitude manipulation of the UCS. Integration of kinematics into specific-subject 3D models has been processed as well for providing anatomical motion representation during thrust manipulation. Three unembalmed specimens were included in the study. Restricted dissection was realized to attach technical clusters to each bone of interest (skull, C1-C4 and sternum). During manipulation, bone motion data was computed using an optoelectronic system. The reliability of manipulation kinematics was assessed for three experimented practitioners performing two trials of 3 repetitions on two separate days. During UCS manipulation, average global head-trunk motion ROM (±SD) were 14 ± 5°, 35 ± 7° and 14 ± 8° for lateral bending, axial rotation and flexion-extension, respectively. For regional ROM (C0-C2), amplitudes were 10 ± 5°, 30 ± 5° and 16 ± 4° for the same respective motions. Concerning the reliability, mean RMS ranged from 1° to 4° and from 3° to 6° for intra- and inter-rater comparisons, respectively. The present results confirm the limited angular displacement during manipulation either for global head-trunk or for UCS motion components, especially for axial rotation. Additionally, kinematics variability was low confirming intra- and inter-practitioners consistency of UCS manipulation achievement.

  9. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2D and 3D motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories, and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and sub-millimeter accuracy. Method We examined the accuracy and precision of 2D and 3D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially-available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. Results Overall mean error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3 vs. 6 mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2D and 3D data. Conclusion Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve sub-millimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes. PMID:24686484

  10. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2-d and 3-d motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and submillimeter accuracy. METHOD The authors examined the accuracy and precision of 2-D and 3-D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. RESULTS Overall root-mean-square error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3- vs. 6-mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2-D and 3-D data. CONCLUSION Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve submillimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes.

  11. In-situ 3D high-spatial resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic parameter distribution at decameter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Brauchler, R.; Hu, L.; Qiu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, a major challenge in aquifer characterization is the determination of hydraulic parameters with high-spatial resolution. Since the mid-90's, various working groups have developed numerical evaluation approaches for hydraulic tomography: the inversion of hydraulic tests that have been recorded using tomographic arrangements. The practical application is often associated with long test times, complex evaluations, and prolonged computation times. In our study, a hydraulic tomographical data set consisted of 450 drawdown curves produced by a series of short term pumping tests conducted over 4 working days. Data was collected by two scientists without a technical staff. The tests were performed at the test site "Stegemühle", Göttingen, Germany in a confined sand and gravel aquifer with a thickness of 2-3 m. For the inversion, an approach has been used, which is based on the transformation of the groundwater flow equation into a form of Eikonal equation (Vasco et al., 2000). Utilizing this approach, the hydraulic data can be inverted using an Eikonal solver e.g. SIRT. This Eikonal solver is considerably computationally efficient and allows hundreds of draw down curves to be inverted on a standard laptop within minutes. Following the methodology described in Brauchler et al. 2013, 3D distribution of diffusivity and specific storage were directly reconstructed, and subsequently their product: the hydraulic conductivity. This study exemplifies that the required data can be recorded and analyzed efficiently in the field, which is a vital precondition for the in-situ field aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. Literature Vasco, D.W., Keers, H., Karasaki, K. (2000) Estimation of reservoir properties using transient pressure data: An asymptotic approach. Water Resour. Res. 36(12), 3447-3465 Brauchler, R., Hu, R., Hu, L., Jimenéz, S., Bayer, P., Ptak, T. (2013) Rapid field application of hydraulic tomography for resolving aquifer heterogeneity in

  12. 3D computation of an incipient motion of a sessile drop on a rigid surface with contact angle hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Nicklas; Criscione, Antonio; Roisman, Ilia V.; Marschall, Holger; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-12-01

    Contact line phenomena govern a large number of multiphase flows. A reliable description of the contact line dynamics is therefore essential for prediction of such flows. Well-known difficulties of computation of the wetting phenomena include the mesh dependence of the results caused by flow singularity near the contact line and accurate estimation of its propagating velocity. The present study deals with the computational problem arising from the discontinuity in the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the propagation velocity, associated with the contact angle hysteresis. The numerical simulations are performed using the volume of fluid method. The boundary conditions in the neighborhood of the contact line are switched depending on the value of the computed current local contact angle between a propagating contact line and a pinning condition. The method is applied to the simulation of the deformation and incipient motion of a shedding drop. The model is validated by comparison of the numerical predictions with experimental data.

  13. 3D Motions of Iron in Six-Coordinate {FeNO}(7) Hemes by Nuclear Resonance Vibration Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Pavlik, Jeffrey W; Silvernail, Nathan J; Alp, E Ercan; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Sage, J Timothy; Scheidt, W Robert

    2016-04-25

    The vibrational spectrum of a six-coordinate nitrosyl iron porphyrinate, monoclinic [Fe(TpFPP)(1-MeIm)(NO)] (TpFPP=tetra-para-fluorophenylporphyrin; 1-MeIm=1-methylimidazole), has been studied by oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). The crystal was oriented to give spectra perpendicular to the porphyrin plane and two in-plane spectra perpendicular or parallel to the projection of the FeNO plane. These enable assignment of the FeNO bending and stretching modes. The measurements reveal that the two in-plane spectra have substantial differences that result from the strongly bonded axial NO ligand. The direction of the in-plane iron motion is found to be largely parallel and perpendicular to the projection of the bent FeNO on the porphyrin plane. The out-of-plane Fe-N-O stretching and bending modes are strongly mixed with each other, as well as with porphyrin ligand modes. The stretch is mixed with v50 as was also observed for dioxygen complexes. The frequency of the assigned stretching mode of eight Fe-X-O (X=N, C, and O) complexes is correlated with the Fe-XO bond lengths. The nature of highest frequency band at ≈560 cm(-1) has also been examined in two additional new derivatives. Previously assigned as the Fe-NO stretch (by resonance Raman), it is better described as the bend, as the motion of the central nitrogen atom of the FeNO group is very large. There is significant mixing of this mode. The results emphasize the importance of mode mixing; the extent of mixing must be related to the peripheral phenyl substituents.

  14. Determining inter-fractional motion of the uterus using 3D ultrasound imaging during radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Mariwan; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Behrens, Claus F.

    2014-03-01

    Uterine positional changes can reduce the accuracy of radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to; 1) Quantify the inter-fractional uterine displacement using a novel 3D ultrasound (US) imaging system, and 2) Compare the result with the bone match shift determined by Cone- Beam CT (CBCT) imaging.Five cervical cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Three of them underwent weekly CBCT imaging prior to treatment and bone match shift was applied. After treatment delivery they underwent a weekly US scan. The transabdominal scans were conducted using a Clarity US system (Clarity® Model 310C00). Uterine positional shifts based on soft-tissue match using US was performed and compared to bone match shifts for the three directions. Mean value (+/-1 SD) of the US shifts were (mm); anterior-posterior (A/P): (3.8+/-5.5), superior-inferior (S/I) (-3.5+/-5.2), and left-right (L/R): (0.4+/-4.9). The variations were larger than the CBCT shifts. The largest inter-fractional displacement was from -2 mm to +14 mm in the AP-direction for patient 3. Thus, CBCT bone matching underestimates the uterine positional displacement due to neglecting internal uterine positional change to the bone structures. Since the US images were significantly better than the CBCT images in terms of soft-tissue visualization, the US system can provide an optional image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. US imaging might be a better IGRT system than CBCT, despite difficulty in capturing the entire uterus. Uterine shifts based on US imaging contains relative uterus-bone displacement, which is not taken into consideration using CBCT bone match.

  15. The birth of a dinosaur footprint: Subsurface 3D motion reconstruction and discrete element simulation reveal track ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion over deformable substrates is a common occurrence in nature. Footprints represent sedimentary distortions that provide anatomical, functional, and behavioral insights into trackmaker biology. The interpretation of such evidence can be challenging, however, particularly for fossil tracks recovered at bedding planes below the originally exposed surface. Even in living animals, the complex dynamics that give rise to footprint morphology are obscured by both foot and sediment opacity, which conceals animal–substrate and substrate–substrate interactions. We used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to image and animate the hind limb skeleton of a chicken-like bird traversing a dry, granular material. Foot movement differed significantly from walking on solid ground; the longest toe penetrated to a depth of ∼5 cm, reaching an angle of 30° below horizontal before slipping backward on withdrawal. The 3D kinematic data were integrated into a validated substrate simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) to create a quantitative model of limb-induced substrate deformation. Simulation revealed that despite sediment collapse yielding poor quality tracks at the air–substrate interface, subsurface displacements maintain a high level of organization owing to grain–grain support. Splitting the substrate volume along “virtual bedding planes” exposed prints that more closely resembled the foot and could easily be mistaken for shallow tracks. DEM data elucidate how highly localized deformations associated with foot entry and exit generate specific features in the final tracks, a temporal sequence that we term “track ontogeny.” This combination of methodologies fosters a synthesis between the surface/layer-based perspective prevalent in paleontology and the particle/volume-based perspective essential for a mechanistic understanding of sediment redistribution during track formation. PMID:25489092

  16. Radiographic Trabecular 2D and 3D Parameters of Proximal Femoral Bone Cores Correlate with Each Other and with Yield Stress

    PubMed Central

    Steines, Daniel; Liew, Siau-Way; Arnaud, Claude; Voracek, Rene Vargas; Nazarian, Ara; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian; Hess, Patrick; Lang, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We compared morphometric measurements of trabecular patterns in two-dimensional (2D) projection radiographic images of cores from cadaver proximal femoral bones with conceptually equivalent measurements from three-dimensional (3D) μCT images. Methods Seven cadaver proximal femora provided 47 excised cores from seven regions. Digitized radiographs of those cores were processed with software that extracts trabecular patterns. Measurements of their distribution, geometry, and connectivity were compared with 3D parameters of similar definition derived from μCT of those cores. The relationship between 2D and 3D measurements and yield stress was also examined. Results 2D measurements strongly correlated with conceptually equivalent measurements obtained using 3D μCT. In all cases, the correlation coefficients were high, ranging from r=0.84 (p<0.001) to r=0.93 (p<0.001). The correlation coefficients between 2D and 3D measurements and yield stress of the cores were also high (r=0.60 and 0.82, p<0.001 respectively). Conclusions These findings provide correlative and biomechanical evidence supporting the qualitative similarity of 2D microstructural parameters extracted from plain proximal femoral core X-ray images to conceptually equivalent 3D microstuctural measurements of those same cores. PMID:19319618

  17. Estimates of Running Ground Reaction Force Parameters from Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pavei, Gaspare; Seminati, Elena; Storniolo, Jorge L L; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo A

    2017-02-01

    We compared running mechanics parameters determined from ground reaction force (GRF) measurements with estimated forces obtained from double differentiation of kinematic (K) data from motion analysis in a broad spectrum of running speeds (1.94-5.56 m⋅s(-1)). Data were collected through a force-instrumented treadmill and compared at different sampling frequencies (900 and 300 Hz for GRF, 300 and 100 Hz for K). Vertical force peak, shape, and impulse were similar between K methods and GRF. Contact time, flight time, and vertical stiffness (kvert) obtained from K showed the same trend as GRF with differences < 5%, whereas leg stiffness (kleg) was not correctly computed by kinematics. The results revealed that the main vertical GRF parameters can be computed by the double differentiation of the body center of mass properly calculated by motion analysis. The present model provides an alternative accessible method for determining temporal and kinetic parameters of running without an instrumented treadmill.

  18. Alignment of sparse freehand 3-D ultrasound with preoperative images of the liver using models of respiratory motion and deformation.

    PubMed

    Blackall, Jane M; Penney, Graeme P; King, Andrew P; Hawkes, David J

    2005-11-01

    We present a method for alignment of an interventional plan to optically tracked two-dimensional intraoperative ultrasound (US) images of the liver. Our clinical motivation is to enable the accurate transfer of information from three-dimensional preoperative imaging modalities [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] to intraoperative US to aid needle placement for thermal ablation of liver metastases. An initial rigid registration to intraoperative coordinates is obtained using a set of US images acquired at maximum exhalation. A preprocessing step is applied to both the preoperative images and the US images to produce evidence of corresponding structures. This yields two sets of images representing classification of regions as vessels. The registration then proceeds using these images. The preoperative images and plan are then warped to correspond to a single US slice acquired at an unknown point in the breathing cycle where the liver is likely to have moved and deformed relative to the preoperative image. Alignment is constrained using a patient-specific model of breathing motion and deformation. Target registration error is estimated by carrying out simulation experiments using resliced MR volumes to simulate real US and comparing the registration results to a "bronze-standard" registration performed on the full MR volume. Finally, the system is tested using real US and verified using visual inspection.

  19. Rigid model-based 3D segmentation of the bones of joints in MR and CT images for motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K; Saha, Punam K; Odhner, Dewey; Hirsch, Bruce E; Siegler, Sorin; Simon, Scott; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2008-08-01

    There are several medical application areas that require the segmentation and separation of the component bones of joints in a sequence of images of the joint acquired under various loading conditions, our own target area being joint motion analysis. This is a challenging problem due to the proximity of bones at the joint, partial volume effects, and other imaging modality-specific factors that confound boundary contrast. In this article, a two-step model-based segmentation strategy is proposed that utilizes the unique context of the current application wherein the shape of each individual bone is preserved in all scans of a particular joint while the spatial arrangement of the bones alters significantly among bones and scans. In the first step, a rigid deterministic model of the bone is generated from a segmentation of the bone in the image corresponding to one position of the joint by using the live wire method. Subsequently, in other images of the same joint, this model is used to search for the same bone by minimizing an energy function that utilizes both boundary- and region-based information. An evaluation of the method by utilizing a total of 60 data sets on MR and CT images of the ankle complex and cervical spine indicates that the segmentations agree very closely with the live wire segmentations, yielding true positive and false positive volume fractions in the range 89%-97% and 0.2%-0.7%. The method requires 1-2 minutes of operator time and 6-7 min of computer time per data set, which makes it significantly more efficient than live wire-the method currently available for the task that can be used routinely.

  20. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, W; Hong, S-M

    2016-03-07

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN(+) , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN(+) prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN(+) implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN(+) . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating

  1. Analysis of local molecular motions of aromatic sidechains in proteins by 2D and 3D fast MAS NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Jeziorna, Agata; Trébosc, Julien; Hou, Guangjin; Vega, Alexander J; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Dracinsky, Martin; Polenova, Tatyana; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-11-21

    We report a new multidimensional magic angle spinning NMR methodology, which provides an accurate and detailed probe of molecular motions occurring on timescales of nano- to microseconds, in sidechains of proteins. The approach is based on a 3D CPVC-RFDR correlation experiment recorded under fast MAS conditions (ν(R) = 62 kHz), where (13)C-(1)H CPVC dipolar lineshapes are recorded in a chemical shift resolved manner. The power of the technique is demonstrated in model tripeptide Tyr-(d)Ala-Phe and two nanocrystalline proteins, GB1 and LC8. We demonstrate that, through numerical simulations of dipolar lineshapes of aromatic sidechains, their detailed dynamic profile, i.e., the motional modes, is obtained. In GB1 and LC8 the results unequivocally indicate that a number of aromatic residues are dynamic, and using quantum mechanical calculations, we correlate the molecular motions of aromatic groups to their local environment in the crystal lattice. The approach presented here is general and can be readily extended to other biological systems.

  2. Predicting Strong Ground-Motion Seismograms for Magnitude 9 Cascadia Earthquakes Using 3D Simulations with High Stress Drop Sub-Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, A. D.; Wirth, E. A.; Stephenson, W. J.; Moschetti, M. P.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.

    2015-12-01

    We have produced broadband (0-10 Hz) synthetic seismograms for magnitude 9.0 earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone by combining synthetics from simulations with a 3D velocity model at low frequencies (≤ 1 Hz) with stochastic synthetics at high frequencies (≥ 1 Hz). We use a compound rupture model consisting of a set of M8 high stress drop sub-events superimposed on a background slip distribution of up to 20m that builds relatively slowly. The 3D simulations were conducted using a finite difference program and the finite element program Hercules. The high-frequency (≥ 1 Hz) energy in this rupture model is primarily generated in the portion of the rupture with the M8 sub-events. In our initial runs, we included four M7.9-8.2 sub-events similar to those that we used to successfully model the strong ground motions recorded from the 2010 M8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake. At periods of 2-10 s, the 3D synthetics exhibit substantial amplification (about a factor of 2) for sites in the Puget Lowland and even more amplification (up to a factor of 5) for sites in the Seattle and Tacoma sedimentary basins, compared to rock sites outside of the Puget Lowland. This regional and more localized basin amplification found from the simulations is supported by observations from local earthquakes. There are substantial variations in the simulated M9 time histories and response spectra caused by differences in the hypocenter location, slip distribution, down-dip extent of rupture, coherence of the rupture front, and location of sub-events. We examined the sensitivity of the 3D synthetics to the velocity model of the Seattle basin. We found significant differences in S-wave focusing and surface wave conversions between a 3D model of the basin from a spatially-smoothed tomographic inversion of Rayleigh-wave phase velocities and a model that has an abrupt southern edge of the Seattle basin, as observed in seismic reflection profiles.

  3. From Monotonous Hop-and-Sink Swimming to Constant Gliding via Chaotic Motions in 3D: Is There Adaptive Behavior in Planktonic Micro-Crustaceans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    Planktonic micro-crustaceans, such as Daphnia, Copepod, and Cyclops, swim in the 3D environment of water and feed on suspended material, mostly algae and bacteria. Their mechanisms for swimming differ; some use their swimming legs to produce one hop per second resulting in a speed of one body-length per second, while others scan water volumes with their mouthparts and glide through the water column at 1 to 10 body-lengths per second. However, our observations show that these speeds are modulated. The question to be discussed will be whether or not these modulations show adaptive behavior taking food quality and food abundance as criteria for the swimming performances. Additionally, we investigated the degree these temporal motion patterns are dependant on the sizes, and therefore, on the Reynolds number of the animals.

  4. 3D crustal structure and long-period ground motions from a M9.0 megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, K.B.; Stephenson, W.J.; Geisselmeyer, A.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a community velocity model for the Pacific Northwest region from northern California to southern Canada and carried out the first 3D simulation of a Mw 9.0 megathrust earthquake rupturing along the Cascadia subduction zone using a parallel supercomputer. A long-period (<0.5 Hz) source model was designed by mapping the inversion results for the December 26, 2004 Sumatra–Andaman earthquake (Han et al., Science 313(5787):658–662, 2006) onto the Cascadia subduction zone. Representative peak ground velocities for the metropolitan centers of the region include 42 cm/s in the Seattle area and 8–20 cm/s in the Tacoma, Olympia, Vancouver, and Portland areas. Combined with an extended duration of the shaking up to 5 min, these long-period ground motions may inflict significant damage on the built environment, in particular on the highrises in downtown Seattle.

  5. Intrafraction motion of the prostate during an IMRT session: a fiducial-based 3D measurement with Cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Köhler, Frederick Marc; Wertz, Hansjörg; Ehmann, Michael; Hermann, Brigitte; Riesenacker, Nadja; Küpper, Beate; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-01-01

    Background Image-guidance systems allow accurate interfractional repositioning of IMRT treatments, however, these may require up to 15 minutes. Therefore intrafraction motion might have an impact on treatment precision. 3D geometric data regarding intrafraction prostate motion are rare; we therefore assessed its magnitude with pre- and post-treatment fiducial-based imaging with cone-beam-CT (CBCT). Methods 39 IMRT fractions in 5 prostate cancer patients after 125I-seed implantation were evaluated. Patient position was corrected based on the 125I-seeds after pre-treatment CBCT. Immediately after treatment delivery, a second CBCT was performed. Differences in bone- and fiducial position were measured by seed-based grey-value matching. Results Fraction time was 13.6 ± 1.6 minutes. Median overall displacement vector length of 125I-seeds was 3 mm (M = 3 mm, Σ = 0.9 mm, σ = 1.7 mm; M: group systematic error, Σ: SD of systematic error, σ: SD of random error). Median displacement vector of bony structures was 1.84 mm (M = 2.9 mm, Σ = 1 mm, σ = 3.2 mm). Median displacement vector length of the prostate relative to bony structures was 1.9 mm (M = 3 mm, Σ = 1.3 mm, σ = 2.6 mm). Conclusion a) Overall displacement vector length during an IMRT session is < 3 mm. b) Positioning devices reducing intrafraction bony displacements can further reduce overall intrafraction motion. c) Intrafraction prostate motion relative to bony structures is < 2 mm and may be further reduced by institutional protocols and reduction of IMRT duration. PMID:18986517

  6. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  7. Real-Time Motion Capture Toolbox (RTMocap): an open-source code for recording 3-D motion kinematics to study action-effect anticipations during motor and social interactions.

    PubMed

    Lewkowicz, Daniel; Delevoye-Turrell, Yvonne

    2016-03-01

    We present here a toolbox for the real-time motion capture of biological movements that runs in the cross-platform MATLAB environment (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). It provides instantaneous processing of the 3-D movement coordinates of up to 20 markers at a single instant. Available functions include (1) the setting of reference positions, areas, and trajectories of interest; (2) recording of the 3-D coordinates for each marker over the trial duration; and (3) the detection of events to use as triggers for external reinforcers (e.g., lights, sounds, or odors). Through fast online communication between the hardware controller and RTMocap, automatic trial selection is possible by means of either a preset or an adaptive criterion. Rapid preprocessing of signals is also provided, which includes artifact rejection, filtering, spline interpolation, and averaging. A key example is detailed, and three typical variations are developed (1) to provide a clear understanding of the importance of real-time control for 3-D motion in cognitive sciences and (2) to present users with simple lines of code that can be used as starting points for customizing experiments using the simple MATLAB syntax. RTMocap is freely available (http://sites.google.com/site/RTMocap/) under the GNU public license for noncommercial use and open-source development, together with sample data and extensive documentation.

  8. Estimating 3D L5/S1 moments and ground reaction forces during trunk bending using a full-body ambulatory inertial motion capture system.

    PubMed

    Faber, G S; Chang, C C; Kingma, I; Dennerlein, J T; van Dieën, J H

    2016-04-11

    Inertial motion capture (IMC) systems have become increasingly popular for ambulatory movement analysis. However, few studies have attempted to use these measurement techniques to estimate kinetic variables, such as joint moments and ground reaction forces (GRFs). Therefore, we investigated the performance of a full-body ambulatory IMC system in estimating 3D L5/S1 moments and GRFs during symmetric, asymmetric and fast trunk bending, performed by nine male participants. Using an ambulatory IMC system (Xsens/MVN), L5/S1 moments were estimated based on the upper-body segment kinematics using a top-down inverse dynamics analysis, and GRFs were estimated based on full-body segment accelerations. As a reference, a laboratory measurement system was utilized: GRFs were measured with Kistler force plates (FPs), and L5/S1 moments were calculated using a bottom-up inverse dynamics model based on FP data and lower-body kinematics measured with an optical motion capture system (OMC). Correspondence between the OMC+FP and IMC systems was quantified by calculating root-mean-square errors (RMSerrors) of moment/force time series and the interclass correlation (ICC) of the absolute peak moments/forces. Averaged over subjects, L5/S1 moment RMSerrors remained below 10Nm (about 5% of the peak extension moment) and 3D GRF RMSerrors remained below 20N (about 2% of the peak vertical force). ICCs were high for the peak L5/S1 extension moment (0.971) and vertical GRF (0.998). Due to lower amplitudes, smaller ICCs were found for the peak asymmetric L5/S1 moments (0.690-0.781) and horizontal GRFs (0.559-0.948). In conclusion, close correspondence was found between the ambulatory IMC-based and laboratory-based estimates of back load.

  9. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Tony; Knopf, Antje

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4D-CT(MRI)s has been validated by 4D proton dose calculations. Our 4D dose algorithm takes into account displacements as well as deformations on the originating 4D-CT/4D-CT(MRI) by calculating the dose of each pencil beam based on an individual time stamp of when that pencil beam is applied. According to corresponding displacement and density-variation-maps the position and the water equivalent range of the dose grid points is adjusted at each time instance. Results: 4D dose distributions, using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets as input were compared to results based on a reference conventional 4D-CT data set capturing similar motion characteristics. Almost identical 4D dose distributions could be achieved, even though scanned proton beams are very sensitive to small differences in the patient geometry. In addition, 4D dose calculations have been performed on the same patient, but using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets based on

  10. Estimation of spatial-temporal gait parameters using a low-cost ultrasonic motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, a low-cost motion analysis system using a wireless ultrasonic sensor network is proposed and investigated. A methodology has been developed to extract spatial-temporal gait parameters including stride length, stride duration, stride velocity, stride cadence, and stride symmetry from 3D foot displacements estimated by the combination of spherical positioning technique and unscented Kalman filter. The performance of this system is validated against a camera-based system in the laboratory with 10 healthy volunteers. Numerical results show the feasibility of the proposed system with average error of 2.7% for all the estimated gait parameters. The influence of walking speed on the measurement accuracy of proposed system is also evaluated. Statistical analysis demonstrates its capability of being used as a gait assessment tool for some medical applications.

  11. Estimation of Spatial-Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Low-Cost Ultrasonic Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a low-cost motion analysis system using a wireless ultrasonic sensor network is proposed and investigated. A methodology has been developed to extract spatial-temporal gait parameters including stride length, stride duration, stride velocity, stride cadence, and stride symmetry from 3D foot displacements estimated by the combination of spherical positioning technique and unscented Kalman filter. The performance of this system is validated against a camera-based system in the laboratory with 10 healthy volunteers. Numerical results show the feasibility of the proposed system with average error of 2.7% for all the estimated gait parameters. The influence of walking speed on the measurement accuracy of proposed system is also evaluated. Statistical analysis demonstrates its capability of being used as a gait assessment tool for some medical applications. PMID:25140636

  12. The effect of parameters of equilibrium-based 3-D biomechanical models on extracted muscle synergies during isometric lumbar exertion.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, A H; Sedaghat-Nejad, E; Rashedi, E; Sedighi, A; Arjmand, N; Parnianpour, M

    2016-04-11

    A hallmark of more advanced models is their higher details of trunk muscles represented by a larger number of muscles. The question is if in reality we control these muscles individually as independent agents or we control groups of them called "synergy". To address this, we employed a 3-D biomechanical model of the spine with 18 trunk muscles that satisfied equilibrium conditions at L4/5, with different cost functions. The solutions of several 2-D and 3-D tasks were arranged in a data matrix and the synergies were computed by using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithms. Variance accounted for (VAF) was used to evaluate the number of synergies that emerged by the analysis, which were used to reconstruct the original muscle activations. It was showed that four and six muscle synergies were adequate to reconstruct the input data of 2-D and 3-D torque space analysis. The synergies were different by choosing alternative cost functions as expected. The constraints affected the extracted muscle synergies, particularly muscles that participated in more than one functional tasks were influenced substantially. The compositions of extracted muscle synergies were in agreement with experimental studies on healthy participants. The following computational methods show that the synergies can reduce the complexity of load distributions and allow reduced dimensional space to be used in clinical settings.

  13. Histograms of Oriented 3D Gradients for Fully Automated Fetal Brain Localization and Robust Motion Correction in 3 T Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Macnaught, Gillian; Denison, Fiona C.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly emerging diagnostic imaging tool. However, automated fetal brain localization is one of the biggest obstacles in expediting and fully automating large-scale fetal MRI processing. We propose a method for automatic localization of fetal brain in 3 T MRI when the images are acquired as a stack of 2D slices that are misaligned due to fetal motion. First, the Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) feature descriptor is extended from 2D to 3D images. Then, a sliding window is used to assign a score to all possible windows in an image, depending on the likelihood of it containing a brain, and the window with the highest score is selected. In our evaluation experiments using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy, we achieved 96% of complete brain localization using a database of 104 MRI scans at gestational ages between 34 and 38 weeks. We carried out comparisons against template matching and random forest based regression methods and the proposed method showed superior performance. We also showed the application of the proposed method in the optimization of fetal motion correction and how it is essential for the reconstruction process. The method is robust and does not rely on any prior knowledge of fetal brain development. PMID:28251155

  14. Identifying the origin of differences between 3D numerical simulations of ground motion in sedimentary basins: lessons from stringent canonical test models in the E2VP framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, Emmanuel; Maufroy, Emeline; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Priolo, Enrico; Klin, Peter; De Martin, Florent; Zhang, Zenghuo; Hollender, Fabrice; Bard, Pierre-Yves

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulation is playing a role of increasing importance in the field of seismic hazard by providing quantitative estimates of earthquake ground motion, its variability, and its sensitivity to geometrical and mechanical properties of the medium. Continuous efforts to develop accurate and computationally efficient numerical methods, combined with increasing computational power have made it technically feasible to calculate seismograms in 3D realistic configurations and for frequencies of interest in seismic design applications. Now, in order to foster the use of numerical simulations in practical prediction of earthquake ground motion, it is important to evaluate the accuracy of current numerical methods when applied to realistic 3D sites. This process of verification is a necessary prerequisite to confrontation of numerical predictions and observations. Through the ongoing Euroseistest Verification and Validation Project (E2VP), which focuses on the Mygdonian basin (northern Greece), we investigated the capability of numerical methods to predict earthquake ground motion for frequencies up to 4 Hz. Numerical predictions obtained by several teams using a wide variety of methods were compared using quantitative goodness-of-fit criteria. In order to better understand the cause of misfits between different simulations, initially performed for the realistic geometry of the Mygdonian basin, we defined five stringent canonical configurations. The canonical models allow for identifying sources of misfits and quantify their importance. Detailed quantitative comparison of simulations in relation to dominant features of the models shows that even relatively simple heterogeneous models must be treated with maximum care in order to achieve sufficient level of accuracy. One important conclusion is that the numerical representation of models with strong variations (e.g. discontinuities) may considerably vary from one method to the other, and may become a dominant source of

  15. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Modelling of the Inner Gas Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: A Parameter Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Su, C. C.; Marschall, R.; Wu, J. S.; Rubin, M.; Lai, I. L.; Ip, W. H.; Keller, H. U.; Knollenberg, J.; Kührt, E.; Skorov, Y. V.; Thomas, N.

    2016-03-01

    Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is a powerful numerical method to study rarefied gas flows such as cometary comae and has been used by several authors over the past decade to study cometary outflow. However, the investigation of the parameter space in simulations can be time consuming since 3D DSMC is computationally highly intensive. For the target of ESA's Rosetta mission, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, we have identified to what extent modification of several parameters influence the 3D flow and gas temperature fields and have attempted to establish the reliability of inferences about the initial conditions from in situ and remote sensing measurements. A large number of DSMC runs have been completed with varying input parameters. In this work, we present the simulation results and conclude on the sensitivity of solutions to certain inputs. It is found that among cases of water outgassing, the surface production rate distribution is the most influential variable to the flow field.

  16. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Pötter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Van Limbergen, Erik; Barillot, Isabelle; De Brabandere, Marisol; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm3; optional 5 and 10 cm3. Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm3. Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD2)-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Pötter R, Van Limbergen E et al. Recommendations from

  17. TransCAIP: A Live 3D TV system using a camera array and an integral photography display with interactive control of viewing parameters.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuichi; Koike, Takafumi; Takahashi, Keita; Naemura, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    The system described in this paper provides a real-time 3D visual experience by using an array of 64 video cameras and an integral photography display with 60 viewing directions. The live 3D scene in front of the camera array is reproduced by the full-color, full-parallax autostereoscopic display with interactive control of viewing parameters. The main technical challenge is fast and flexible conversion of the data from the 64 multicamera images to the integral photography format. Based on image-based rendering techniques, our conversion method first renders 60 novel images corresponding to the viewing directions of the display, and then arranges the rendered pixels to produce an integral photography image. For real-time processing on a single PC, all the conversion processes are implemented on a GPU with GPGPU techniques. The conversion method also allows a user to interactively control viewing parameters of the displayed image for reproducing the dynamic 3D scene with desirable parameters. This control is performed as a software process, without reconfiguring the hardware system, by changing the rendering parameters such as the convergence point of the rendering cameras and the interval between the viewpoints of the rendering cameras.

  18. The accuracy of a 2D and 3D dendritic tip scaling parameter in predicting the columnar to equiaxed transition (CET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredyński, M.; Rebow, M.; Banaszek, J.

    2016-09-01

    The dendrite tip kinetics model accuracy relies on the reliability of the stability constant used, which is usually experimentally determined for 3D situations and applied to 2D models. The paper reports authors' attempts to cure the situation by deriving 2D dendritic tip scaling parameter for aluminium-based alloy: Al-4wt%Cu. The obtained parameter is then incorporated into the KGT dendritic growth model in order to compare it with the original 3D KGT counterpart and to derive two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the modified Hunt's analytical model for the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The conclusions drawn from the above analysis are further confirmed through numerical calculations of the two cases of Al-4wt%Cu metallic alloy solidification using the front tracking technique. Results, including the porous zone-under-cooled liquid front position, the calculated solutal under-cooling and a new predictor of the relative tendency to form an equiaxed zone, are shown, compared and discussed two numerical cases. The necessity to calculate sufficiently precise values of the tip scaling parameter in 2D and 3D is stressed.

  19. Quantitative anatomical analysis of facial expression using a 3D motion capture system: Application to cosmetic surgery and facial recognition technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Gi; Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Hyung-Jin; Seo, Jung-Hyuk; Choi, You-Jin; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-09-01

    The topography of the facial muscles differs between males and females and among individuals of the same gender. To explain the unique expressions that people can make, it is important to define the shapes of the muscle, their associations with the skin, and their relative functions. Three-dimensional (3D) motion-capture analysis, often used to study facial expression, was used in this study to identify characteristic skin movements in males and females when they made six representative basic expressions. The movements of 44 reflective markers (RMs) positioned on anatomical landmarks were measured. Their mean displacement was large in males [ranging from 14.31 mm (fear) to 41.15 mm (anger)], and 3.35-4.76 mm smaller in females [ranging from 9.55 mm (fear) to 37.80 mm (anger)]. The percentages of RMs involved in the ten highest mean maximum displacement values in making at least one expression were 47.6% in males and 61.9% in females. The movements of the RMs were larger in males than females but were more limited. Expanding our understanding of facial expression requires morphological studies of facial muscles and studies of related complex functionality. Conducting these together with quantitative analyses, as in the present study, will yield data valuable for medicine, dentistry, and engineering, for example, for surgical operations on facial regions, software for predicting changes in facial features and expressions after corrective surgery, and the development of face-mimicking robots.

  20. Lifetime of inner-shell hole states of Ar (2p) and Kr (3d) using equation-of-motion coupled cluster method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-14

    Auger decay is an efficient ultrafast relaxation process of core-shell or inner-shell excited atom or molecule. Generally, it occurs in femto-second or even atto-second time domain. Direct measurement of lifetimes of Auger process of single ionized and double ionized inner-shell state of an atom or molecule is an extremely difficult task. In this paper, we have applied the highly correlated complex absorbing potential-equation-of-motion coupled cluster (CAP-EOMCC) approach which is a combination of CAP and EOMCC approach to calculate the lifetime of the states arising from 2p inner-shell ionization of an Ar atom and 3d inner-shell ionization of Kr atom. We have also calculated the lifetime of Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}D, Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}S, and Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3s{sup −1}) {sup 1}P double ionized states. The predicted results are compared with the other theoretical results as well as experimental results available in the literature.

  1. A New Accurate 3D Measurement Tool to Assess the Range of Motion of the Tongue in Oral Cancer Patients: A Standardized Model.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Simone; van Alphen, Maarten J A; Jacobi, Irene; Smeele, Ludwig E; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Balm, Alfons J M

    2016-02-01

    In oral cancer treatment, function loss such as speech and swallowing deterioration can be severe, mostly due to reduced lingual mobility. Until now, there is no standardized measurement tool for tongue mobility and pre-operative prediction of function loss is based on expert opinion instead of evidence based insight. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a triple-camera setup for the measurement of tongue range of motion (ROM) in healthy adults and its feasibility in patients with partial glossectomy. A triple-camera setup was used, and 3D coordinates of the tongue in five standardized tongue positions were achieved in 15 healthy volunteers. Maximum distances between the tip of the tongue and the maxillary midline were calculated. Each participant was recorded twice, and each movie was analysed three times by two separate raters. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability were the main outcome measures. Secondly, feasibility of the method was tested in ten patients treated for oral tongue carcinoma. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability all showed high correlation coefficients of >0.9 in both study groups. All healthy subjects showed perfect symmetrical tongue ROM. In patients, significant differences in lateral tongue movements were found, due to restricted tongue mobility after surgery. This triple-camera setup is a reliable measurement tool to assess three-dimensional information of tongue ROM. It constitutes an accurate tool for objective grading of reduced tongue mobility after partial glossectomy.

  2. WE-G-BRB-02: The Role of Program Project Grants in Study of 3D Conformal Therapy, Dose Escalation and Motion Management

    SciTech Connect

    Fraass, B.

    2015-06-15

    Over the past 20 years the NIH has funded individual grants, program projects grants, and clinical trials which have been instrumental in advancing patient care. The ways that each grant mechanism lends itself to the different phases of translating research into clinical practice will be described. Major technological innovations, such as IMRT and proton therapy, have been advanced with R01-type and P01-type funding and will be discussed. Similarly, the role of program project grants in identifying and addressing key hypotheses on the potential of 3D conformal therapy, normal tissue-guided dose escalation and motion management will be described. An overview will be provided regarding how these technological innovations have been applied to multi-institutional NIH-sponsored trials. Finally, the panel will discuss regarding which research questions should be funded by the NIH to inspire the next advances in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the different funding mechanisms of the NIH Learn about research advances that have led to innovation in delivery Review achievements due to NIH-funded program project grants in radiotherapy over the past 20 years Understand example advances achieved with multi-institutional clinical trials NIH.

  3. Order parameter re-mapping algorithm for 3D phase field model of grain growth using FEM

    SciTech Connect

    Permann, Cody J.; Tonks, Michael R.; Fromm, Bradley; Gaston, Derek R.

    2016-01-14

    Phase field modeling (PFM) is a well-known technique for simulating microstructural evolution. To model grain growth using PFM, typically each grain is assigned a unique non-conserved order parameter and each order parameter field is evolved in time. Traditional approaches using a one-to-one mapping of grains to order parameters present a challenge when modeling large numbers of grains due to the computational expense of using many order parameters. This problem is exacerbated when using an implicit finite element method (FEM), as the global matrix size is proportional to the number of order parameters. While previous work has developed methods to reduce the number of required variables and thus computational complexity and run time, none of the existing approaches can be applied for an implicit FEM implementation of PFM. Here, we present a modular, dynamic, scalable reassignment algorithm suitable for use in such a system. Polycrystal modeling with grain growth and stress require careful tracking of each grain’s position and orientation which is lost when using a reduced order parameter set. In conclusion, the method presented in this paper maintains a unique ID for each grain even after reassignment, to allow the PFM to be tightly coupled to calculations of the stress throughout the polycrystal. Implementation details and comparative results of our approach are presented.

  4. Order parameter re-mapping algorithm for 3D phase field model of grain growth using FEM

    DOE PAGES

    Permann, Cody J.; Tonks, Michael R.; Fromm, Bradley; ...

    2016-01-14

    Phase field modeling (PFM) is a well-known technique for simulating microstructural evolution. To model grain growth using PFM, typically each grain is assigned a unique non-conserved order parameter and each order parameter field is evolved in time. Traditional approaches using a one-to-one mapping of grains to order parameters present a challenge when modeling large numbers of grains due to the computational expense of using many order parameters. This problem is exacerbated when using an implicit finite element method (FEM), as the global matrix size is proportional to the number of order parameters. While previous work has developed methods to reducemore » the number of required variables and thus computational complexity and run time, none of the existing approaches can be applied for an implicit FEM implementation of PFM. Here, we present a modular, dynamic, scalable reassignment algorithm suitable for use in such a system. Polycrystal modeling with grain growth and stress require careful tracking of each grain’s position and orientation which is lost when using a reduced order parameter set. In conclusion, the method presented in this paper maintains a unique ID for each grain even after reassignment, to allow the PFM to be tightly coupled to calculations of the stress throughout the polycrystal. Implementation details and comparative results of our approach are presented.« less

  5. Volumetry and biomechanical parameters detected by 3D and 2D ultrasound in patients with and without an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Batagini, Nayara Cioffi; Ventura, Carlos Augusto Pinto; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Tachibana, Adriano; da Silva, Erasmo Simão

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the ability of ultrasound (US) with 3D properties to evaluate volumetry and biomechanical parameters of the aorta in patients with and without abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Thirty-one patients with normal aortas (group 1), 46 patients with AAA measuring 3.0-5.5 cm (group 2) and 31 patients with AAA ⩾ 5.5 cm (group 3) underwent a 2D/3D-US examination of the infra-renal aorta, and the images were post-processed prior to being analyzed. In the maximum diameter, the global circumferential strain and the global maximum rotation assessed by 2D speckle-tracking algorithms were compared among the three groups. The volumetry data obtained using 3D-US from 40 AAA patients were compared with the volumetry data obtained by a contemporary computed tomography (CT) scan. The median global circumferential strain was 2.0% (interquartile range (IR): 1.0-3.0), 1.0% (IR: 1.0-2.0) and 1.0% (IR: 1.0-1.75) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (p < 0.001). The median global maximum rotation decreased progressively from group 1 to group 3 (1.38º (IR: 0.77-2.13), 0.80º (IR: 0.57-1.0) and 0.50º (IR: 0.31-0.75), p < 0.001). AAA volume estimations by 3D-US correlated well with CT (R(2) = 0.76). In conclusion, US with 3D properties is non-invasive and has the potential to evaluate volumetry and biomechanical characteristics of AAA.

  6. A Bayesian and Physics-Based Ground Motion Parameters Map Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Quiroz, A.; Sandoval, H.; Perez-Yanez, C.; Ruiz, A. L.; Delgado, R.; Macias, M. A.; Alcántara, L.

    2014-12-01

    We present the Ground Motion Parameters Map Generation (GMPMG) system developed by the Institute of Engineering at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The system delivers estimates of information associated with the social impact of earthquakes, engineering ground motion parameters (gmp), and macroseismic intensity maps. The gmp calculated are peak ground acceleration and velocity (pga and pgv) and response spectral acceleration (SA). The GMPMG relies on real-time data received from strong ground motion stations belonging to UNAM's networks throughout Mexico. Data are gathered via satellite and internet service providers, and managed with the data acquisition software Earthworm. The system is self-contained and can perform all calculations required for estimating gmp and intensity maps due to earthquakes, automatically or manually. An initial data processing, by baseline correcting and removing records containing glitches or low signal-to-noise ratio, is performed. The system then assigns a hypocentral location using first arrivals and a simplified 3D model, followed by a moment tensor inversion, which is performed using a pre-calculated Receiver Green's Tensors (RGT) database for a realistic 3D model of Mexico. A backup system to compute epicentral location and magnitude is in place. A Bayesian Kriging is employed to combine recorded values with grids of computed gmp. The latter are obtained by using appropriate ground motion prediction equations (for pgv, pga and SA with T=0.3, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 s ) and numerical simulations performed in real time, using the aforementioned RGT database (for SA with T=2, 2.5 and 3 s). Estimated intensity maps are then computed using SA(T=2S) to Modified Mercalli Intensity correlations derived for central Mexico. The maps are made available to the institutions in charge of the disaster prevention systems. In order to analyze the accuracy of the maps, we compare them against observations not considered in the

  7. On the derivation of passive 3D material parameters from 1D stress-strain data of hydrostats.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Benjamin; Schleichardt, Axel

    2011-07-28

    The present paper offers a novel equivalent-pressure approach to the derivation of isotropic passive muscle parameters from 1D stress-strain data sets. The approach aims specifically at the identification of material parameters in hydrostats, in which case the equivalent-force approach that is common for skeletal muscle generates suboptimal results. Instead, an equivalent-pressure hypothesis is formulated which provides more adequate boundary conditions for the concluding curve-fitting procedure. The choice of an appropriate constitutive description is decisive for the quality of the deduced parameter sets. Here, a Yeoh material law is chosen for the model of a squid tentacle. Parameters derived by both, equivalent-force and equivalent-pressure algorithms, are compared, illustrating the applicability limits of either. They are implemented in a finite element model of the tentacle. A prey-capture strike is simulated and compared to data from literature. The hydrostat-specific interpretation of the equivalent-pressure hypothesis is shown to match the reference very well.

  8. CH3D photomixing spectroscopy up to 2.5 THz: New set of rotational and dipole parameters, first THz self-broadening measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Cédric; Cuisset, Arnaud; Hindle, Francis; Bocquet, Robin; Mouret, Gaël; Drouin, Brian J.

    2017-03-01

    Several previously unmeasured transitions of 12CH3D have been recorded by a terahertz photomixing continuous-wave spectrometer up to QR(10) branch at 2.5 THz. An improved set of rotational constants has been obtained utilizing a THz frequency metrology based on a frequency comb that achieved an averaged frequency position better than 150 kHz on more than fifty ground-state transitions. A detailed analysis of the measured line intensities was undertaken using the multispectrum fitting program and has resulted in a determination of new dipole moment parameters. Measurements at different pressures of the QR(7) transitions provide the first determination of self-broadening coefficients from pure rotational CH3D lines. The THz rotational measurements are consistent with IR rovibrational data but no significant vibrational dependence of self-broadening coefficient may be observed by comparison.

  9. WE-G-207-06: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Physical Phantom and Clinical Patient Images

    SciTech Connect

    Dhou, S; Cai, W; Hurwitz, M; Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Cifter, F; Berbeco, R; Lewis, J; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Ionascu, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images acquired immediately prior to treatment have the potential to represent patient motion patterns and anatomy during treatment, including both intra- and inter-fractional changes. We develop a method to generate patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images acquired with existing clinical equipment and used to generate time varying volumetric images (3D fluoroscopic images) representing motion during treatment delivery. Methods: Motion models are derived by deformably registering each 4DCBCT phase to a reference phase, and performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated by optimizing the resulting PCA coefficients iteratively through comparison of the cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging and digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the motion model. Patient and physical phantom datasets are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization error compared to manually defined ground truth positions. Results: 4DCBCT-based motion models were derived and used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time. For the patient datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.57 and 3.13 respectively in subsets of four patient datasets. For the physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.14 and 2.78 respectively in two datasets. 4DCBCT motion models are shown to perform well in the context of generating 3D fluoroscopic images due to their ability to reproduce anatomical changes at treatment time. Conclusion: This study showed the feasibility of deriving 4DCBCT-based motion models and using them to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time in real clinical settings. 4DCBCT-based motion models were found to account for the 3D non-rigid motion of the patient anatomy during treatment and have the potential

  10. Predictive parameters in hypofractionated whole-breast 3D conformal radiotherapy according to the Ontario Canadian trial

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Grazia; Terlizzi, Angela; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Perri, Francesco; De Chiara, Vincenzo; Turi, Barbara; Silvano, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the possible role of dosimetric parameters according Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) model as predictive of late toxicity and cosmesis in hypofractionated whole-breast three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis on 215 consecutive early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (according the Ontario Canadian trial), with a 6 years median follow-up was conducted. To assess the impact of 10%–20% dose hotspots on different percent values of planning target volume (PTV) of the breast, we retrospectively employed the NTCP model of Lyman. PTV breast (PTVbr), V110 were identified. For statistical analysis the χ2 and paired t-test were used to find a correlation between late skin and subcutaneous toxicity and cosmetic outcome with dosimetrical parameters Multivariate analysis was performed with the aim to assess independently the impact of dosimetric and clinical parameters on late toxicity and cosmesis using Pearson’s covariance. Results Late skin toxicity was recorded in 47/215 (22%); and G3 toxicity occurred in 11 patients (5%). Cosmesis with excellent–good score was found in 172 patients (80%) while fair–poor score was found in 43 patients (20%). In univariate χ2 analysis the V110 >10% of the PTV breast significantly correlated with higher toxicity (P<0.005, OR 9.60 [CI 3.89–23.72]). Cosmesis related to V110 >10% and PTV breast volume over 1,300 cc was significant at multivariate analysis (P<0.005, OR 6.07 [CI 2.36–15.59]). Conclusion To safely use one of the most important whole-breast hypofractionated radiotherapy schedules, we found some predictive paramaters on the basis of NTCP model by Lyman. These parameters may be useful in selection of elegible patients. PMID:28392704

  11. Computer-controlled multi-parameter mapping of 3D compressible flowfields using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.; Victor, Kenneth G.; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-controlled technique, using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence, for measuring complex compressible flowfields is presented. A new laser permits the use of a planar two-line temperature technique so that all parameters can be measured with the laser operated narrowband. Pressure and temperature measurements in a step flowfield show agreement within 10 percent of a CFD model except in regions close to walls. Deviation of near wall temperature measurements from the model was decreased from 21 percent to 12 percent compared to broadband planar temperature measurements. Computer-control of the experiment has been implemented, except for the frequency tuning of the laser. Image data storage and processing has been improved by integrating a workstation into the experimental setup reducing the data reduction time by a factor of 50.

  12. Probabilistic point source inversion of strong-motion data in 3-D media using pattern recognition: A case study for the 2008 Mw 5.4 Chino Hills earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käufl, Paul; Valentine, Andrew P.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-08-01

    Despite the ever increasing availability of computational power, real-time source inversions based on physical modeling of wave propagation in realistic media remain challenging. We investigate how a nonlinear Bayesian approach based on pattern recognition and synthetic 3-D Green's functions can be used to rapidly invert strong-motion data for point source parameters by means of a case study for a fault system in the Los Angeles Basin. The probabilistic inverse mapping is represented in compact form by a neural network which yields probability distributions over source parameters. It can therefore be evaluated rapidly and with very moderate CPU and memory requirements. We present a simulated real-time inversion of data for the 2008 Mw 5.4 Chino Hills event. Initial estimates of epicentral location and magnitude are available ˜14 s after origin time. The estimate can be refined as more data arrive: by ˜40 s, fault strike and source depth can also be determined with relatively high certainty.

  13. Accuracy of 3-D reconstruction with occlusions.

    PubMed

    Begon, Mickaël; Lacouture, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    A marker has to be seen by at least two cameras for its three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction, and the accuracy can be improved with more cameras. However, a change in the set of cameras used in the reconstruction can alter the kinematics. The purpose of this study was to quantify the harmful effect of occlusions on two-dimensional (2-D) images and to make recommendations about the signal processing. A reference kinematics data set was collected for a three degree-of-freedom linkage with three cameras of a commercial motion analysis system without any occlusion on the 2-D images. In the 2-D images, some occlusions were artificially created based on trials of real cyclic motions. An interpolation of 2-D trajectories before the 3-D reconstruction and two filters (Savitsky-Golay and Butterworth filters) after reconstruction were successively applied to minimize the effect of the 2-D occlusions. The filter parameters were optimized by minimizing the root mean square error between the reference and the filtered data. The optimal parameters of the filters were marker dependent, whereas no filter was necessary after a 2-D interpolation. As the occlusions cause systematic error in the 3-D reconstruction, the interpolation of the 2-D trajectories is more appropriate than filtering the 3-D trajectories.

  14. Thermo-mechanical Characterization of Metal/Polymer Composite Filaments and Printing Parameter Study for Fused Deposition Modeling in the 3D Printing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seyeon; Reyes, Edgar I.; Moon, Kyoung-sik; Rumpf, Raymond C.; Kim, Nam Soo

    2015-03-01

    New metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) processes were developed in order to observe the thermo-mechanical properties of the new filaments. The acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic was mixed with copper and iron particles. The percent loading of the metal powder was varied to confirm the effects of metal particles on the thermo-mechanical properties of the filament, such as tensile strength and thermal conductivity. The printing parameters such as temperature and fill density were also varied to see the effects of the parameters on the tensile strength of the final product which was made with the FDM process. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the tensile strength of the composites is decreased by increasing the loading of metal particles. Additionally, the thermal conductivity of the metal/polymer composite filament was improved by increasing the metal content. It is believed that the metal/polymer filament could be used to print metal and large-scale 3-dimensional (3D) structures without any distortion by the thermal expansion of thermoplastics. The material could also be used in 3D printed circuits and electromagnetic structures for shielding and other applications.

  15. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  16. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  17. Utility of real-time prospective motion correction (PROMO) on 3D T1-weighted imaging in automated brain structure measurements

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Keita; Kakeda, Shingo; Igata, Natsuki; Watanabe, Rieko; Narimatsu, Hidekuni; Nozaki, Atsushi; Dan Rettmann; Abe, Osamu; Korogi, Yukunori

    2016-01-01

    PROspective MOtion correction (PROMO) can prevent motion artefacts. The aim of this study was to determine whether brain structure measurements of motion-corrected images with PROMO were reliable and equivalent to conventional images without motion artefacts. The following T1-weighted images were obtained in healthy subjects: (A) resting scans with and without PROMO and (B) two types of motion scans (“side-to-side” and “nodding” motions) with and without PROMO. The total gray matter volumes and cortical thicknesses were significantly decreased in motion scans without PROMO as compared to the resting scans without PROMO (p < 0.05). Conversely, Bland–Altman analysis indicated no bias between motion scans with PROMO, which have good image quality, and resting scans without PROMO. In addition, there was no bias between resting scans with and without PROMO. The use of PROMO facilitated more reliable brain structure measurements in subjects moving during data acquisition. PMID:27917950

  18. Utility of real-time prospective motion correction (PROMO) on 3D T1-weighted imaging in automated brain structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Keita; Kakeda, Shingo; Igata, Natsuki; Watanabe, Rieko; Narimatsu, Hidekuni; Nozaki, Atsushi; Dan Rettmann; Abe, Osamu; Korogi, Yukunori

    2016-12-01

    PROspective MOtion correction (PROMO) can prevent motion artefacts. The aim of this study was to determine whether brain structure measurements of motion-corrected images with PROMO were reliable and equivalent to conventional images without motion artefacts. The following T1-weighted images were obtained in healthy subjects: (A) resting scans with and without PROMO and (B) two types of motion scans (“side-to-side” and “nodding” motions) with and without PROMO. The total gray matter volumes and cortical thicknesses were significantly decreased in motion scans without PROMO as compared to the resting scans without PROMO (p < 0.05). Conversely, Bland–Altman analysis indicated no bias between motion scans with PROMO, which have good image quality, and resting scans without PROMO. In addition, there was no bias between resting scans with and without PROMO. The use of PROMO facilitated more reliable brain structure measurements in subjects moving during data acquisition.

  19. Quantitative Evaluation of 3D Mouse Behaviors and Motor Function in the Open-Field after Spinal Cord Injury Using Markerless Motion Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Alison L.; Lai, Po-Lun; Fisher, Lesley C.; Basso, D. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study’s goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz). Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal’s silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal’s front Center of Volume (CoV) height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005) and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01) were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative measurement

  20. Using Averaging-Based Factorization to Compare Seismic Hazard Models Derived from 3D Earthquake Simulations with NGA Ground Motion Prediction Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Jordan, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic hazard models based on empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) employ a model-based factorization to account for source, propagation, and path effects. An alternative is to simulate these effects directly using earthquake source models combined with three-dimensional (3D) models of Earth structure. We have developed an averaging-based factorization (ABF) scheme that facilitates the geographically explicit comparison of these two types of seismic hazard models. For any fault source k with epicentral position x, slip spatial and temporal distribution f, and moment magnitude m, we calculate the excitation functions G(s, k, x, m, f) for sites s in a geographical region R, such as 5% damped spectral acceleration at a particular period. Through a sequence of weighted-averaging and normalization operations following a certain hierarchy over f, m, x, k, and s, we uniquely factorize G(s, k, x, m, f) into six components: A, B(s), C(s, k), D(s, k, x), E(s, k, x, m), and F(s, k, x, m, f). Factors for a target model can be divided by those of a reference model to obtain six corresponding factor ratios, or residual factors: a, b(s), c(s, k), d(s, k, x), e(s, k, x, m), and f(s, k, x, m, f). We show that these residual factors characterize differences in basin effects primarily through b(s), distance scaling primarily through c(s, k), and source directivity primarily through d(s, k, x). We illustrate the ABF scheme by comparing CyberShake Hazard Model (CSHM) for the Los Angeles region (Graves et. al. 2010) with the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) GMPEs modified according to the directivity relations of Spudich and Chiou (2008). Relative to CSHM, all NGA models underestimate the directivity and basin effects. In particular, the NGA models do not account for the coupling between source directivity and basin excitation that substantially enhance the low-frequency seismic hazards in the sedimentary basins of the Los Angeles region. Assuming Cyber

  1. Volumetric (3D) bladder dose parameters are more reproducible than point (2D) dose parameters in vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Lucas Gomes; Flosi, Adriana; Aiza, Antonio; de Assis Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio; Chojniak, Rubens; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of computed tomography in vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) planning. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine the reproducibility of point bladder dose parameters (DICRU and maximum dose), compared with volumetric-based parameters. Twenty-two patients who were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) VCB underwent simulation by computed tomography (CT-scan) with a Foley catheter at standard tension (position A) and extra tension (position B). CT-scan determined the bladder ICRU dose point in both positions and compared the displacement and recorded dose. Volumetric parameters (D0.1cc, D1.0cc, D2.0cc, D4.0cc and D50%) and point dose parameters were compared. The average spatial shift in ICRU dose point in the vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions was 2.91 mm (range: 0.10–9.00), 12.04 mm (range: 4.50–24.50) and 2.65 mm (range: 0.60–8.80), respectively. The DICRU ratio for positions A and B was 1.64 (p < 0.001). Moreover, a decrease in Dmax was observed (p = 0.016). Tension level of the urinary catheter did not affect the volumetric parameters. Our data suggest that point parameters (DICRU and Dmax) are not reproducible and are not the ideal choice for dose reporting. PMID:27296459

  2. The studies of the spin Hamiltonian parameters and local structures for various 3d3 hexacyanometallates of paramagnetic salts with diluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui-Ning; Liu, Xu-Sheng; Zhou, Hong-Fei

    2016-09-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters (SHPs) (g factors, hyperfine structure constants and zero-field splittings (ZFSs)) and local structures for various 3d3 hexacyanometallates of paramagnetic salts K3Cr(CN)6 and K4V(CN)6ṡ3H2O with the diluents K3Co(CN)6, K3Mn(CN)6 and K4Fe(CN)6ṡ3H2O are theoretically investigated from the perturbation calculations of these parameters for a rhombically distorted octahedral 3d3 cluster. The paramagnetic systems are found to undergo the local axial distortions ΔZ (≈-0.19, -0.18 and 0.09 Å) and the planar bond angle variations Δφ (≈ 3.5∘, 5.3∘ and 1.4∘) for K3Cr(CN)6 with K3Co(CN)6, K3Cr(CN)6 with K3Mn(CN)6 and K4V(CN)6ṡ3H2O with K4Fe(CN)6ṡ 3H2O, respectively. The signs for ZFSs D and E are analyzed in the light of those for ΔZ and the rhombic distortion angle δφ (= φ‧- π/4) related to an ideal octahedron. Microscopically, the magnitudes of ΔZ and Δφ can be conveniently illustrated by the axial (ADD) and perpendicular distortion degrees (PDD), respectively, for the paramagnetic systems with the corresponding diluents. The local structural properties are analyzed from the relative ionic radius deviation Δr of the equivalent diluent cation from the host paramagnetic cation, the axial and perpendicular ZFS variations ΔF and ΔG for ZFSs with the diluent related to the host, the relative deviation ΔDq of the cubic crystal-field parameter for the diluent related to the host. The above studies would be helpful to the investigations on synthesis, structures and properties of 3d3 hexacyanometallates in paramagnetic salts.

  3. Sphere-Enhanced Microwave Ablation (sMWA) Versus Bland Microwave Ablation (bMWA): Technical Parameters, Specific CT 3D Rendering and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Gockner, T. L.; Zelzer, S.; Mokry, T. Gnutzmann, D. Bellemann, N.; Mogler, C.; Beierfuß, A. Köllensperger, E. Germann, G.; Radeleff, B. A. Stampfl, U. Kauczor, H. U.; Pereira, P. L.; Sommer, C. M.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare technical parameters during ablation as well as CT 3D rendering and histopathology of the ablation zone between sphere-enhanced microwave ablation (sMWA) and bland microwave ablation (bMWA).MethodsIn six sheep-livers, 18 microwave ablations were performed with identical system presets (power output: 80 W, ablation time: 120 s). In three sheep, transarterial embolisation (TAE) was performed immediately before microwave ablation using spheres (diameter: 40 ± 10 μm) (sMWA). In the other three sheep, microwave ablation was performed without spheres embolisation (bMWA). Contrast-enhanced CT, sacrifice, and liver harvest followed immediately after microwave ablation. Study goals included technical parameters during ablation (resulting power output, ablation time), geometry of the ablation zone applying specific CT 3D rendering with a software prototype (short axis of the ablation zone, volume of the largest aligned ablation sphere within the ablation zone), and histopathology (hematoxylin-eosin, Masson Goldner and TUNEL).ResultsResulting power output/ablation times were 78.7 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for bMWA and 78.4 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for sMWA (n.s., respectively). Short axis/volume were 23.7 ± 3.7 mm/7.0 ± 2.4 cm{sup 3} for bMWA and 29.1 ± 3.4 mm/11.5 ± 3.9 cm{sup 3} for sMWA (P < 0.01, respectively). Histopathology confirmed the signs of coagulation necrosis as well as early and irreversible cell death for bMWA and sMWA. For sMWA, spheres were detected within, at the rim, and outside of the ablation zone without conspicuous features.ConclusionsSpecific CT 3D rendering identifies a larger ablation zone for sMWA compared with bMWA. The histopathological signs and the detectable amount of cell death are comparable for both groups. When comparing sMWA with bMWA, TAE has no effect on the technical parameters during ablation.

  4. Temperature dependences of self- and N2-broadened line-shape parameters in the ν3 and ν5 bands of 12CH3D: Measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Malathy Devi, V.; Sutradhar, P.; Sinyakova, T.; Buldyreva, J.; Sung, K.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a spectroscopic line shape study of self- and nitrogen-broadened 12CH3D transitions in the ν3 and ν5 bands in the Triad region. We combined five pure gas spectra with eighteen spectra of lean mixtures of 12CH3D and nitrogen, all recorded with a Bruker IFS-125 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectra have been analyzed simultaneously using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique. N2-broadened line parameters for 184 transitions in the ν3 band and 205 transitions in the ν5 band were measured. In addition, line positions and line intensities were measured for 168 transitions in the ν3 band and 214 transitions in the ν5 band. We have observed 10 instances of weak line mixing corresponding to K″=3 A1 or A2 transitions. Comparisons were made for the N2-broadening coefficients and associated temperature exponents with corresponding values calculated using a semi-classical Robert Bonamy type formalism that involved an inter-molecular potential with terms corresponding to short- and long-range interactions, and exact classical molecular trajectories. The theoretical N2-broadened coefficients are overestimated for high J values, but are in good agreement with the experimental values for small and middle range J values.

  5. Different scenarios for inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters from double-ring infiltrometer data using HYDRUS-2D/3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Parisa; Ghorbani-Dashtaki, Shoja; Mosaddeghi, Mohammad Reza; Shirani, Hossein; Nodoushan, Ali Reza Mohammadi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, HYDRUS-2D/3D was used to simulate ponded infiltration through double-ring infiltrometers into a hypothetical loamy soil profile. Twelve scenarios of inverse modelling (divided into three groups) were considered for estimation of Mualem-van Genuchten hydraulic parameters. In the first group, simulation was carried out solely using cumulative infiltration data. In the second group, cumulative infiltration data plus water content at h = -330 cm (field capacity) were used as inputs. In the third group, cumulative infiltration data plus water contents at h = -330 cm (field capacity) and h = -15 000 cm (permanent wilting point) were used simultaneously as predictors. The results showed that numerical inverse modelling of the double-ring infiltrometer data provided a reliable alternative method for determining soil hydraulic parameters. The results also indicated that by reducing the number of hydraulic parameters involved in the optimization process, the simulation error is reduced. The best one in infiltration simulation which parameters α, n, and Ks were optimized using the infiltration data and field capacity as inputs. Including field capacity as additional data was important for better optimization/definition of soil hydraulic functions, but using field capacity and permanent wilting point simultaneously as additional data increased the simulation error.

  6. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  7. Demonstration of a 3D vision algorithm for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, Rui J. P. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports an extension of the MIAG algorithm for recognition and motion parameter determination of general 3-D polyhedral objects based on model matching techniques and using movement invariants as features of object representation. Results of tests conducted on the algorithm under conditions simulating space conditions are presented.

  8. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  9. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-03-11

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility.

  10. The application of 3D Zernike moments for the description of "model-free" molecular structure, functional motion, and structural reliability.

    PubMed

    Grandison, Scott; Roberts, Carl; Morris, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    Protein structures are not static entities consisting of equally well-determined atomic coordinates. Proteins undergo continuous motion, and as catalytic machines, these movements can be of high relevance for understanding function. In addition to this strong biological motivation for considering shape changes is the necessity to correctly capture different levels of detail and error in protein structures. Some parts of a structural model are often poorly defined, and the atomic displacement parameters provide an excellent means to characterize the confidence in an atom's spatial coordinates. A mathematical framework for studying these shape changes, and handling positional variance is therefore of high importance. We present an approach for capturing various protein structure properties in a concise mathematical framework that allows us to compare features in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate how three-dimensional Zernike moments can be employed to describe functions, not only on the surface of a protein but throughout the entire molecule. A number of proof-of-principle examples are given which demonstrate how this approach may be used in practice for the representation of movement and uncertainty.

  11. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility. PMID:26978366

  12. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND MOTION SIMULATIONS FOR SCENARIO EARTHQUAKES ON THE HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK FAULT SYSTEM USING THE USGS 3D VELOCITY MODEL AND REALISTIC PSEUDODYNAMIC RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Xie, X

    2008-01-09

    This project seeks to compute ground motions for large (M>6.5) scenario earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using realistic pseudodynamic ruptures, the USGS three-dimensional (3D) velocity model and anelastic finite difference simulations on parallel computers. We will attempt to bound ground motions by performing simulations with suites of stochastic rupture models for a given scenario on a given fault segment. The outcome of this effort will provide the average, spread and range of ground motions that can be expected from likely large earthquake scenarios. The resulting ground motions will be based on first-principles calculations and include the effects of slip heterogeneity, fault geometry and directivity, however, they will be band-limited to relatively low-frequency (< 1 Hz).

  13. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate.

    PubMed

    Trache, Tudor; Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values.

  14. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): A 3D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on Amplitude-modulated (AM) - Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module, and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework in order to 1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and 2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6, and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69, 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19, 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28, and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s, and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was also found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm2) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm2). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo. PMID:22036637

  15. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a 3-D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-12-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on amplitude-modulated (AM) - harmonic motion imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework to (1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and (2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6 and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69 and 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19 and 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28 and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm(2)) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm(2)). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  16. Comparison of flux motion in type-II superconductors including pinning centers with the shapes of nano-rods and nano-particles by using 3D-TDGL simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shintaro; Ichino, Yusuke; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations are very useful method for simulation of the motion of flux quanta in type-II superconductors. We constructed the 3D-TDGL simulator and succeeded to simulate the motion of flux quanta in 3-dimension. We carried out the 3D-TDGL simulation to compare two superconductors which included only pinning centers with the shape of nano-rods and only nano-particle-like pinning centers in the viewpoint of the flux motion. As a result, a motion of "single-kink" caused the whole motion of a flux quantum in the superconductor including only the nano-rods. On the other hand, in the superconductor including the nano-particles, the flux quanta were pinned by the nano-particles in the various magnetic field applied angles. As the result, no "single-kink" occurred in the superconductor including the nano-particles. Therefore, the nano-particle-like pinning centers are effective shape to trap flux quanta for various magnetic field applied angles.

  17. Synthesis of image sequences for Korean sign language using 3D shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mun-Ho; Choi, Chang-Seok; Kim, Chang-Seok; Jeon, Joon-Hyeon

    1995-05-01

    This paper proposes a method for offering information and realizing communication to the deaf-mute. The deaf-mute communicates with another person by means of sign language, but most people are unfamiliar with it. This method enables to convert text data into the corresponding image sequences for Korean sign language (KSL). Using a general 3D shape model of the upper body leads to generating the 3D motions of KSL. It is necessary to construct the general 3D shape model considering the anatomical structure of the human body. To obtain a personal 3D shape model, this general model is to adjust to the personal base images. Image synthesis for KSL consists of deforming a personal 3D shape model and texture-mapping the personal images onto the deformed model. The 3D motions for KSL have the facial expressions and the 3D movements of the head, trunk, arms and hands and are parameterized for easily deforming the model. These motion parameters of the upper body are extracted from a skilled signer's motion for each KSL and are stored to the database. Editing the parameters according to the inputs of text data yields to generate the image sequences of 3D motions.

  18. Critical modeling parameters identified for 3D CFD modeling of rectangular final settling tanks for New York City wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, K; Xanthos, S; Gong, M; Fillos, J; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; McCorquodale, J A

    2012-01-01

    New York City Environmental Protection is in the process of incorporating biological nitrogen removal (BNR) in its wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) which entails operating the aeration tanks with higher levels of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) than a conventional activated sludge process. The objective of this paper is to discuss two of the important parameters introduced in the 3D CFD model that has been developed by the City College of New York (CCNY) group: (a) the development of the 'discrete particle' measurement technique to carry out the fractionation of the solids in the final settling tank (FST) which has critical implications in the prediction of the effluent quality; and (b) the modification of the floc aggregation (K(A)) and floc break-up (K(B)) coefficients that are found in Parker's flocculation equation (Parker et al. 1970, 1971) used in the CFD model. The dependence of these parameters on the predictions of the CFD model will be illustrated with simulation results on one of the FSTs at the 26th Ward WWTP in Brooklyn, NY.

  19. Computation of the 3D kinematics in a global frame over a 40m-long pathway using a rolling motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Begon, Mickaël; Colloud, Floren; Fohanno, Vincent; Bahuaud, Pascal; Monnet, Tony

    2009-12-11

    A rolling motion analysis system has been purpose-built to acquire an accurate three-dimensional kinematics of human motion with large displacement. Using this device, the kinematics is collected in a local frame associated with the rolling motion analysis system. The purpose of this paper is to express the local kinematics of a subject walking on a 40 m-long pathway in a global system of co-ordinates. One participant performed five trials of walking while he was followed by a rolling eight camera optoelectronic motion analysis system. The kinematics of the trials were reconstructed in the global frame using two different algorithms and 82 markers placed on the floor organized in two parallel and horizontal lines. The maximal error ranged from 0.033 to 0.187 m (<0.5% of the volume diagonal). As a result, this device is accurate enough for acquiring the kinematics of cyclic activities with large displacements in ecological environment.

  20. Using subject-specific three-dimensional (3D) anthropometry data in digital human modelling: case study in hand motion simulation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Liuxing; Ma, Liang

    2016-11-01

    Digital human modelling enables ergonomists and designers to consider ergonomic concerns and design alternatives in a timely and cost-efficient manner in the early stages of design. However, the reliability of the simulation could be limited due to the percentile-based approach used in constructing the digital human model. To enhance the accuracy of the size and shape of the models, we proposed a framework to generate digital human models using three-dimensional (3D) anthropometric data. The 3D scan data from specific subjects' hands were segmented based on the estimated centres of rotation. The segments were then driven in forward kinematics to perform several functional postures. The constructed hand models were then verified, thereby validating the feasibility of the framework. The proposed framework helps generate accurate subject-specific digital human models, which can be utilised to guide product design and workspace arrangement. Practitioner Summary: Subject-specific digital human models can be constructed under the proposed framework based on three-dimensional (3D) anthropometry. This approach enables more reliable digital human simulation to guide product design and workspace arrangement.

  1. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  2. The Feasibility of 3d Point Cloud Generation from Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for increasing the accuracy of direct geo-referenced image-based 3D point cloud generated from low-cost sensors in smartphones. The smartphone's motion sensors are used to directly acquire the Exterior Orientation Parameters (EOPs) of the captured images. These EOPs, along with the Interior Orientation Parameters (IOPs) of the camera/ phone, are used to reconstruct the image-based 3D point cloud. However, because smartphone motion sensors suffer from poor GPS accuracy, accumulated drift and high signal noise, inaccurate 3D mapping solutions often result. Therefore, horizontal and vertical linear features, visible in each image, are extracted and used as constraints in the bundle adjustment procedure. These constraints correct the relative position and orientation of the 3D mapping solution. Once the enhanced EOPs are estimated, the semi-global matching algorithm (SGM) is used to generate the image-based dense 3D point cloud. Statistical analysis and assessment are implemented herein, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D point cloud generation from the consumer-grade sensors in smartphones.

  3. 3-D model-based vehicle tracking.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianguang; Tan, Tieniu; Hu, Weiming; Yang, Hao; Maybank, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    This paper aims at tracking vehicles from monocular intensity image sequences and presents an efficient and robust approach to three-dimensional (3-D) model-based vehicle tracking. Under the weak perspective assumption and the ground-plane constraint, the movements of model projection in the two-dimensional image plane can be decomposed into two motions: translation and rotation. They are the results of the corresponding movements of 3-D translation on the ground plane (GP) and rotation around the normal of the GP, which can be determined separately. A new metric based on point-to-line segment distance is proposed to evaluate the similarity between an image region and an instantiation of a 3-D vehicle model under a given pose. Based on this, we provide an efficient pose refinement method to refine the vehicle's pose parameters. An improved EKF is also proposed to track and to predict vehicle motion with a precise kinematics model. Experimental results with both indoor and outdoor data show that the algorithm obtains desirable performance even under severe occlusion and clutter.

  4. Prediction of broadband ground-motion time histories: Hybrid low/high-frequency method with correlated random source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, P.; Archuleta, R.J.; Hartzell, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method for calculating broadband time histories of ground motion based on a hybrid low-frequency/high-frequency approach with correlated source parameters. Using a finite-difference method we calculate low- frequency synthetics (< ∼1 Hz) in a 3D velocity structure. We also compute broadband synthetics in a 1D velocity model using a frequency-wavenumber method. The low frequencies from the 3D calculation are combined with the high frequencies from the 1D calculation by using matched filtering at a crossover frequency of 1 Hz. The source description, common to both the 1D and 3D synthetics, is based on correlated random distributions for the slip amplitude, rupture velocity, and rise time on the fault. This source description allows for the specification of source parameters independent of any a priori inversion results. In our broadband modeling we include correlation between slip amplitude, rupture velocity, and rise time, as suggested by dynamic fault modeling. The method of using correlated random source parameters is flexible and can be easily modified to adjust to our changing understanding of earthquake ruptures. A realistic attenuation model is common to both the 3D and 1D calculations that form the low- and high-frequency components of the broadband synthetics. The value of Q is a function of the local shear-wave velocity. To produce more accurate high-frequency amplitudes and durations, the 1D synthetics are corrected with a randomized, frequency-dependent radiation pattern. The 1D synthetics are further corrected for local site and nonlinear soil effects by using a 1D nonlinear propagation code and generic velocity structure appropriate for the site’s National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classification. The entire procedure is validated by comparison with the 1994 Northridge, California, strong ground motion data set. The bias and error found here for response spectral acceleration are similar to the best results

  5. Accuracy and Precision of a Custom Camera-Based System for 2-D and 3-D Motion Tracking during Speech and Nonspeech Motor Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable…

  6. Space motion sickness medications - Interference with biomedical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.; Leach, C. S.; Rosenblatt, L. S.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that drugs administered to Skylab 3 and 4 crewmen for space motion sickness may have interfered with their biomedical evaluation in space is investigated. The mixture of scopolamine and dextroamphetamine produced changes which allow a more valid interpretation of the early biomedical changes ocurring in weightlessness. There is no doubt that the dramatic increase in aldosterone excretion is not attributable to the drug, while the drug could have contributed to the in-flight changes observed in cortisol, epinephrine, heart rate and possibly urine volume.

  7. Predation by the Dwarf Seahorse on Copepods: Quantifying Motion and Flows Using 3D High Speed Digital Holographic Cinematography - When Seahorses Attack!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmell, Brad; Sheng, Jian; Buskey, Ed

    2008-11-01

    Copepods are an important planktonic food source for most of the world's fish species. This high predation pressure has led copepods to evolve an extremely effective escape response, with reaction times to hydrodynamic disturbances of less than 4 ms and escape speeds of over 500 body lengths per second. Using 3D high speed digital holographic cinematography (up to 2000 frames per second) we elucidate the role of entrainment flow fields generated by a natural visual predator, the dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) during attacks on its prey, Acartia tonsa. Using phytoplankton as a tracer, we recorded and reconstructed 3D flow fields around the head of the seahorse and its prey during both successful and unsuccessful attacks to better understand how some attacks lead to capture with little or no detection from the copepod while others result in failed attacks. Attacks start with a slow approach to minimize the hydro-mechanical disturbance which is used by copepods to detect the approach of a potential predator. Successful attacks result in the seahorse using its pipette-like mouth to create suction faster than the copepod's response latency. As these characteristic scales of entrainment increase, a successful escape becomes more likely.

  8. Comparison of 3D Joint Angles Measured With the Kinect 2.0 Skeletal Tracker Versus a Marker-Based Motion Capture System.

    PubMed

    Guess, Trent M; Razu, Swithin; Jahandar, Amirhossein; Skubic, Marjorie; Huo, Zhiyu

    2017-04-01

    The Microsoft Kinect is becoming a widely used tool for inexpensive, portable measurement of human motion, with the potential to support clinical assessments of performance and function. In this study, the relative osteokinematic Cardan joint angles of the hip and knee were calculated using the Kinect 2.0 skeletal tracker. The pelvis segments of the default skeletal model were reoriented and 3-dimensional joint angles were compared with a marker-based system during a drop vertical jump and a hip abduction motion. Good agreement between the Kinect and marker-based system were found for knee (correlation coefficient = 0.96, cycle RMS error = 11°, peak flexion difference = 3°) and hip (correlation coefficient = 0.97, cycle RMS = 12°, peak flexion difference = 12°) flexion during the landing phase of the drop vertical jump and for hip abduction/adduction (correlation coefficient = 0.99, cycle RMS error = 7°, peak flexion difference = 8°) during isolated hip motion. Nonsagittal hip and knee angles did not correlate well for the drop vertical jump. When limited to activities in the optimal capture volume and with simple modifications to the skeletal model, the Kinect 2.0 skeletal tracker can provide limited 3-dimensional kinematic information of the lower limbs that may be useful for functional movement assessment.

  9. 3D for the people: multi-camera motion capture in the field with consumer-grade cameras and open source software

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Dennis J.; Ray, Dylan D.; Hedrick, Tyson L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ecological, behavioral and biomechanical studies often need to quantify animal movement and behavior in three dimensions. In laboratory studies, a common tool to accomplish these measurements is the use of multiple, calibrated high-speed cameras. Until very recently, the complexity, weight and cost of such cameras have made their deployment in field situations risky; furthermore, such cameras are not affordable to many researchers. Here, we show how inexpensive, consumer-grade cameras can adequately accomplish these measurements both within the laboratory and in the field. Combined with our methods and open source software, the availability of inexpensive, portable and rugged cameras will open up new areas of biological study by providing precise 3D tracking and quantification of animal and human movement to researchers in a wide variety of field and laboratory contexts. PMID:27444791

  10. 3D for the people: multi-camera motion capture in the field with consumer-grade cameras and open source software.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brandon E; Evangelista, Dennis J; Ray, Dylan D; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2016-09-15

    Ecological, behavioral and biomechanical studies often need to quantify animal movement and behavior in three dimensions. In laboratory studies, a common tool to accomplish these measurements is the use of multiple, calibrated high-speed cameras. Until very recently, the complexity, weight and cost of such cameras have made their deployment in field situations risky; furthermore, such cameras are not affordable to many researchers. Here, we show how inexpensive, consumer-grade cameras can adequately accomplish these measurements both within the laboratory and in the field. Combined with our methods and open source software, the availability of inexpensive, portable and rugged cameras will open up new areas of biological study by providing precise 3D tracking and quantification of animal and human movement to researchers in a wide variety of field and laboratory contexts.

  11. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  12. A multiple-shape memory polymer-metal composite actuator capable of programmable control, creating complex 3D motion of bending, twisting, and oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qi; Trabia, Sarah; Stalbaum, Tyler; Palmre, Viljar; Kim, Kwang; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Development of biomimetic actuators has been an essential motivation in the study of smart materials. However, few materials are capable of controlling complex twisting and bending deformations simultaneously or separately using a dynamic control system. Here, we report an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator having multiple-shape memory effect, and is able to perform complex motion by two external inputs, electrical and thermal. Prior to the development of this type of actuator, this capability only could be realized with existing actuator technologies by using multiple actuators or another robotic system. This paper introduces a soft multiple-shape-memory polymer-metal composite (MSMPMC) actuator having multiple degrees-of-freedom that demonstrates high maneuverability when controlled by two external inputs, electrical and thermal. These multiple inputs allow for complex motions that are routine in nature, but that would be otherwise difficult to obtain with a single actuator. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this MSMPMC actuator is the first solitary actuator capable of multiple-input control and the resulting deformability and maneuverability. PMID:27080134

  13. Application of recursive Gibbs-Appell formulation in deriving the equations of motion of N-viscoelastic robotic manipulators in 3D space using Timoshenko Beam Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Shafei, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the application of Gibbs-Appell (G-A) formulation and the assumed modes method to the mathematical modeling of N-viscoelastic link manipulators. The paper's focus is on obtaining accurate and complete equations of motion which encompass the most related structural properties of lightweight elastic manipulators. In this study, two important damping mechanisms, namely, the structural viscoelasticity (Kelvin-Voigt) effect (as internal damping) and the viscous air effect (as external damping) have been considered. To include the effects of shear and rotational inertia, the assumption of Timoshenko beam (TB) theory (TBT) has been applied. Gravity, torsion, and longitudinal elongation effects have also been included in the formulations. To systematically derive the equations of motion and improve the computational efficiency, a recursive algorithm has been used in the modeling of the system. In this algorithm, all the mathematical operations are carried out by only 3×3 and 3×1 matrices. Finally, a computational simulation for a manipulator with two elastic links is performed in order to verify the proposed method.

  14. A multiple-shape memory polymer-metal composite actuator capable of programmable control, creating complex 3D motion of bending, twisting, and oscillation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Trabia, Sarah; Stalbaum, Tyler; Palmre, Viljar; Kim, Kwang; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-04-15

    Development of biomimetic actuators has been an essential motivation in the study of smart materials. However, few materials are capable of controlling complex twisting and bending deformations simultaneously or separately using a dynamic control system. Here, we report an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator having multiple-shape memory effect, and is able to perform complex motion by two external inputs, electrical and thermal. Prior to the development of this type of actuator, this capability only could be realized with existing actuator technologies by using multiple actuators or another robotic system. This paper introduces a soft multiple-shape-memory polymer-metal composite (MSMPMC) actuator having multiple degrees-of-freedom that demonstrates high maneuverability when controlled by two external inputs, electrical and thermal. These multiple inputs allow for complex motions that are routine in nature, but that would be otherwise difficult to obtain with a single actuator. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this MSMPMC actuator is the first solitary actuator capable of multiple-input control and the resulting deformability and maneuverability.

  15. 2D/3D Image Registration using Regression Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Frederick, Brandon; Mageras, Gig; Chang, Sha; Pizer, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In computer vision and image analysis, image registration between 2D projections and a 3D image that achieves high accuracy and near real-time computation is challenging. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can rapidly detect an object’s 3D rigid motion or deformation from a 2D projection image or a small set thereof. The method is called CLARET (Correction via Limited-Angle Residues in External Beam Therapy) and consists of two stages: registration preceded by shape space and regression learning. In the registration stage, linear operators are used to iteratively estimate the motion/deformation parameters based on the current intensity residue between the target projec-tion(s) and the digitally reconstructed radiograph(s) (DRRs) of the estimated 3D image. The method determines the linear operators via a two-step learning process. First, it builds a low-order parametric model of the image region’s motion/deformation shape space from its prior 3D images. Second, using learning-time samples produced from the 3D images, it formulates the relationships between the model parameters and the co-varying 2D projection intensity residues by multi-scale linear regressions. The calculated multi-scale regression matrices yield the coarse-to-fine linear operators used in estimating the model parameters from the 2D projection intensity residues in the registration. The method’s application to Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) requires only a few seconds and yields good results in localizing a tumor under rigid motion in the head and neck and under respiratory deformation in the lung, using one treatment-time imaging 2D projection or a small set thereof. PMID:24058278

  16. An automated image-based method of 3D subject-specific body segment parameter estimation for kinetic analyses of rapid movements.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Alison L; Corazza, Stefano; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    important for studies focused on overweight populations. The new image-based BSP estimation method described in this paper addressed the limitations of currently used geometric and regression methods by using exact limb geometry to determine subject-specific parameters. BSP differences have the largest effect on kinetic analyses of motions with large limb accelerations, for joints farther along the kinematic chain from the known forces and moments, and for subjects with larger limb masses or BMIs.

  17. Quantitative viscoelastic parameters measured by harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Vappou, Jonathan; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-06-07

    Quantifying the mechanical properties of soft tissues remains a challenging objective in the field of elasticity imaging. In this work, we propose an ultrasound-based method for quantitatively estimating viscoelastic properties, using the amplitude-modulated harmonic motion imaging (HMI) technique. In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is generated inside the medium by using focused ultrasound and the resulting displacements are measured using an imaging transducer. The proposed approach is a two-step method that uses both the properties of the propagating shear wave and the phase shift between the applied stress and the measured strain in order to infer to the shear storage (G') and shear loss modulus (G''), which refer to the underlying tissue elasticity and viscosity, respectively. The proposed method was first evaluated on numerical phantoms generated by finite-element simulations, where a very good agreement was found between the input and the measured values of G' and G''. Experiments were then performed on three soft tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. HMI measurements were compared to rotational rheometry (dynamic mechanical analysis), and very good agreement was found at the only overlapping frequency (10 Hz) in the estimate of the shear storage modulus G' (14% relative error, averaged p-value of 0.34), whereas poorer agreement was found in G'' (55% relative error, averaged p-value of 0.0007), most likely due to the significantly lower values of G'' of the gel phantoms, posing thus a greater challenge in the sensitivity of the method. Nevertheless, this work proposes an original model-independent ultrasound-based elasticity imaging method that allows for direct, quantitative estimation of tissue viscoelastic properties, together with a validation against mechanical testing.

  18. Advantages of fibre lasers in 3D metal cutting and welding applications supported by a 'beam in motion (BIM)' beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Torsten; Bastick, André; Griebel, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Modern laser technology is continuously opening up new fields of applications. Driven by the development of increasingly efficient laser sources, the new technology is successfully entering classical applications such as 3D cutting and welding of metals. Especially in light weight applications in the automotive industry laser manufacturing is key. Only by this technology the reduction of welding widths could be realised as well as the efficient machining of aluminium and the abrasion free machining of hardened steel. The paper compares the operation of different laser types in metal machining regarding wavelength, laser power, laser brilliance, process speed and welding depth to give an estimation for best use of single mode or multi mode lasers in this field of application. The experimental results will be presented by samples of applied parts. In addition a correlation between the process and the achieved mechanical properties will be made. For this application JENOPTIK Automatisierungstechnik GmbH is using the BIM beam control system in its machines, which is the first one to realize a fully integrated combination of beam control and robot. The wide performance and wavelength range of the laser radiation which can be transmitted opens up diverse possibilities of application and makes BIM a universal tool.

  19. Identification of motion parameters of a rigid body from its orthogonal and perspective projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, B.; Tarn, T. J.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    An estimate is made of the motion parameters, namely, linear and angular velocities, of a rigid body rotating and translating in three-space. The authors assume that the velocities are constant and that the motion is not completely observable. They consider two separate cases of partial observations corresponding to the orthogonal and the perspective projections, respectively. If (x, y, z) is the Cartesian coordinate of the three-space, the authors assume in the first case that the projection of the motion on the x-y plane is observed. If (r, theta, phi) is the polar coordinates of the three-space, they assume in the second case that the parameter vector (theta, phi) is observed. The use of both of these cases to estimate the motion parameters is discussed.

  20. Space motion sickness medications: interference with biomedical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Winget, C. M.; Leach, C. S.; Rosenblatt, L. S.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility that drugs administered to Skylab 3 (SL-3) and 4 (SL-4) crewmen for space motion sickness may have interfered with their biomedical evaluation in space was investigated. Healthy volunteers received combinations of Scopolamine/Dexedrine for four days in regimens similar to those used in these missions. Urine samples, heart rate, body temperature, mood and performance were analyzed for drug-related changes. Twenty-four hour urine samples were analyzed by the same procedures as those used to analyze the flight samples. Hormone concentrations determined included cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone and antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In addition, volume, specific gravity, osmolarity, sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), chloride (Cl), inorganic phosphate, uric acid and creatinine were measured. Performance was not affected by the Scopolamine/Dexedrine. The drug combination increased daily mean heart rate (HR) significantly in all the subjects and daily mean rectal temperature (RT) in some of the subjects. A 2-4 hr phase shift in the HR circadian rhythm was also observed which indicates that internal circadian synchrony was disturbed by the drugs. Psychological and subjective evaluation indicated that the subjects could usually identify which days they were given the drugs by an increase in tension and anxiety, decreased patience, restlessness, decreased appetite, difficulty in sleeping and feelings of increased heart rate and body temperature. Urinary electrolytes were not changed significantly by the drug, but marked and significant changes occurred in urine volume and hormone excretion patterns. Scopolamine/Dexedrine caused consistent elevations in urinary cortisol and epinephrine and a transient elevation in ADH. Norepinephrine excretion was decreased, but there was no significant change in aldosterone excretion or in 24 hr urine volume. A comparison of these findings with the first four days of inflight data from the

  1. Computation of load performance and other parameters of extra high speed modified Lundell alternators from 3D-FE magnetic field solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined magnetic vector potential - magnetic scalar potential method of computation of 3D magnetic fields by finite elements, introduced in a companion paper, in combination with state modeling in the abc-frame of reference, are used for global 3D magnetic field analysis and machine performance computation under rated load and overload condition in an example 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator. The results vividly demonstrate the 3D nature of the magnetic field in such machines, and show how this model can be used as an excellent tool for computation of flux density distributions, armature current and voltage waveform profiles and harmonic contents, as well as computation of torque profiles and ripples. Use of the model in gaining insight into locations of regions in the magnetic circuit with heavy degrees of saturation is demonstrated. Experimental results which correlate well with the simulations of the load case are given.

  2. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  3. A Parameter-Free Dynamic Alternative to Hyper-Viscosity for Coupled Transport Equations: Application to the Simulation of 3D Squall Lines Using Spectral Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-04

    that involve physics coupling with phase change in the simulation of 3D deep convection . We show that the VMS+DC approach is a robust technique that can...of 3D deep convection . We show that the VMS+DC approach is a robust technique that can damp the high order modes characterizing the spectral element...of Spectral Elements, Deep Convection , Kessler Microphysics Preprint J. Comput. Phys. 283 (2015) 360-373 June 4, 2015 1. Introduction In the field of

  4. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  8. Structure from Motion Photogrammetry and Micro X-Ray Computed Tomography 3-D Reconstruction Data Fusion for Non-Destructive Conservation Documentation of Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaulieu, K. R.; Blumenfeld, E. H.; Liddle, D. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Our team is developing a modern, cross-disciplinary approach to documentation and preservation of astromaterials, specifically lunar and meteorite samples stored at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility. Apollo Lunar Sample 60639, collected as part of rake sample 60610 during the 3rd Extra-Vehicular Activity of the Apollo 16 mission in 1972, served as the first NASA-preserved lunar sample to be examined by our team in the development of a novel approach to internal and external sample visualization. Apollo Sample 60639 is classified as a breccia with a glass-coated side and pristine mare basalt and anorthosite clasts. The aim was to accurately register a 3-dimensional Micro X-Ray Computed Tomography (XCT)-derived internal composition data set and a Structure-From-Motion (SFM) Photogrammetry-derived high-fidelity, textured external polygonal model of Apollo Sample 60639. The developed process provided the means for accurate, comprehensive, non-destructive visualization of NASA's heritage lunar samples. The data products, to be ultimately served via an end-user web interface, will allow researchers and the public to interact with the unique heritage samples, providing a platform to "slice through" a photo-realistic rendering of a sample to analyze both its external visual and internal composition simultaneously.

  9. Revisions to some parameters used in stochastic-method simulations of ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David; Thompson, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    The stochastic method of ground‐motion simulation specifies the amplitude spectrum as a function of magnitude (M) and distance (R). The manner in which the amplitude spectrum varies with M and R depends on physical‐based parameters that are often constrained by recorded motions for a particular region (e.g., stress parameter, geometrical spreading, quality factor, and crustal amplifications), which we refer to as the seismological model. The remaining ingredient for the stochastic method is the ground‐motion duration. Although the duration obviously affects the character of the ground motion in the time domain, it also significantly affects the response of a single‐degree‐of‐freedom oscillator. Recently published updates to the stochastic method include a new generalized double‐corner‐frequency source model, a new finite‐fault correction, a new parameterization of duration, and a new duration model for active crustal regions. In this article, we augment these updates with a new crustal amplification model and a new duration model for stable continental regions. Random‐vibration theory (RVT) provides a computationally efficient method to compute the peak oscillator response directly from the ground‐motion amplitude spectrum and duration. Because the correction factor used to account for the nonstationarity of the ground motion depends on the ground‐motion amplitude spectrum and duration, we also present new RVT correction factors for both active and stable regions.

  10. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  11. Statistical analysis of censored motion sickness latency data using the two-parameter Weibull distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Won J.; Crampton, George H.

    1988-01-01

    The suitability of the two-parameter Weibull distribution for describing highly censored cat motion sickness latency data was evaluated by estimating the parameters with the maximum likelihood method and testing for goodness of fit with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic. A procedure for determining confidence levels and testing for significance of the difference between Weibull parameters is described. Computer programs for these procedures may be obtained from an archival source.

  12. Measuring the Stellar Halo Velocity Anisotropy With 3D Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Emily C.; Deason, Alis J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, S. Tony

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the anisotropy parameter β using 3D kinematic information outside of the solar neighborhood. Our sample consists of 13 Milky Way halo stars with measured proper motions and radial velocities in the line of sight of M31. Proper motions were measured using deep, multi-epoch HST imaging, and radial velocities were measured from Keck II/DEIMOS spectra. We measure β = -0.3-0.9 +0.4, which is consistent with isotropy, and inconsistent with measurements in the solar neighborhood. We suggest that this may be the kinematic signature of a relatively early, massive accretion event, or perhaps several such events.

  13. Space-to-Space Based Relative Motion Estimation Using Direct Relative Orbit Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, T.; Schaub, H.

    There has been an increasing interest in space-based space situational awareness around satellite assets and the tracking of orbital debris. Of particular interest is the space-based tracking of objects near critical circular orbit regimes, for example near the Geostationary belt or the International Space Station. Relative orbit descriptions such as the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations describe the motion using time-varying Cartesian or curvilinear coordinates. Orbit element differences describe the unperturbed motion using constant variations of inertial orbit elements. With perturbations these only vary slowly, but can be challenging to estimate. Linearized Relative Orbit Elements (LROEs) employ invariants of the linearized relative motion, are thus constant for the unperturbed linear case, and share the benefit of the CW equations in that they directly related to space-based relative motion measurements. The variational LROE equations enable the relative orbit to be directly propagated including perturbation forces. Utilization of the invariant-inspired relative motion parameters exhibits exciting applications in relative motion sensing and control. Many methods of relative motion estimation involve the direct estimation of time-evolving position and velocity variables. Developed is an angles-only relative orbit Extended Kalman filter (EKF) navigation approach that directly estimates these nominally constant LROEs. The proposed variational equations and filtering scheme enables direct estimation of geometric parameters with clear geometric insight. Preliminary numerical simulation results demonstrate the relative orbit insight gained and speed of convergence. EKF implementations often exhibit significant sensitivity to initial conditions, however, initial results show that the LROE filter converges within fractions of an orbit with initialization errors that exceed 100 percent. The manuscript presents the invariants of motion, develops the variational equations for

  14. Ground Motion Simulations for Bursa Region (Turkey) Using Input Parameters derived from the Regional Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, B.; Askan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural disasters in Turkey and it is important to assess seismicity in different regions with the use of seismic networks. Bursa is located in Marmara Region, Northwestern Turkey and to the south of the very active North Anatolian Fault Zone. With around three million inhabitants and key industrial facilities of the country, Bursa is the fourth largest city in Turkey. Since most of the focus is on North Anatolian Fault zone, despite its significant seismicity, Bursa area has not been investigated extensively until recently. For reliable seismic hazard estimations and seismic design of structures, assessment of potential ground motions in this region is essential using both recorded and simulated data. In this study, we employ stochastic finite-fault simulation with dynamic corner frequency approach to model previous events as well to assess potential earthquakes in Bursa. To ensure simulations with reliable synthetic ground motion outputs, the input parameters must be carefully derived from regional data. In this study, using strong motion data collected at 33 stations in the region, site-specific parameters such as near-surface high frequency attenuation parameter and amplifications are obtained. Similarly, source and path parameters are adopted from previous studies that as well employ regional data. Initially, major previous events in the region are verified by comparing the records with the corresponding synthetics. Then simulations of scenario events in the region are performed. We present the results in terms of spatial distribution of peak ground motion parameters and time histories at selected locations.

  15. Sensitivity of Tumor Motion Simulation Accuracy to Lung Biomechanical Modeling Approaches and Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the Neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. PMID:26531324

  16. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  17. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  18. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  19. Comparison of Changes in Immunological Parameters in Human Lymphocytes in 2D Versus 3D Clinostats-Goal Towards Microgravity Analog Calibration for Future Space Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Russomano, Thais; Pellis, Neal R.

    2008-06-01

    Exposure to microgravity may produce changes in the performance of the immunological system at the cellular level as well as in the major physiological systems of the body. Studies in true spaceflight and similar studies in 2D clinostats (Rotating wall vessels) related to decreased immune function in astronaut blood and normal human lymphocytes indicate a decrease in cell proliferation, T cell activation, locomotion and altered lymphocyte signal transduction (Sundaresan and Pellis, 2008, Sundaresan et al., 2004). The present study was designed to investigate whether the proliferation and viability of lymphocytes are reduced by exposure to rotation in a 3D-Clinostat, which is used to simulate microgravity for cells.

  20. SENSITIVITY OF STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO GROUND MOTION SOURCE AND SITE PARAMETERS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Brebbia, C.A.; Cakmak, A.S.; Abdel Ghaffar, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Designing structures to withstand earthquakes requires an accurate estimation of the expected ground motion. While engineers use the peak ground acceleration (PGA) to model the strong ground motion, seismologists use physical characteristics of the source and the rupture mechanism, such as fault length, stress drop, shear wave velocity, seismic moment, distance, and attenuation. This study presents a method for calculating response spectra from seismological models using random vibration theory. It then investigates the effect of various source and site parameters on peak response. Calculations are based on a nonstationary stochastic ground motion model, which can incorporate all the parameters both in frequency and time domains. The estimation of the peak response accounts for the effects of the non-stationarity, bandwidth and peak correlations of the response.

  1. Revisiting the TORT Solutions to the NEA Suite of Benchmarks for 3D Transport Methods and Codes Over a Range in Parameter Space

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B; Azmy, Yousry

    2009-01-01

    Improved TORT solutions to the 3D transport codes' suite of benchmarks exercise are presented in this study. Preliminary TORT solutions to this benchmark indicate that the majority of benchmark quantities for most benchmark cases are computed with good accuracy, and that accuracy improves with model refinement. However, TORT fails to compute accurate results for some benchmark cases with aspect ratios drastically different from 1, possibly due to ray effects. In this work, we employ the standard approach of splitting the solution to the transport equation into an uncollided flux and a fully collided flux via the code sequence GRTUNCL3D and TORT to mitigate ray effects. The results of this code sequence presented in this paper show that the accuracy of most benchmark cases improved substantially. Furthermore, the iterative convergence problems reported for the preliminary TORT solutions have been resolved by bringing the computational cells' aspect ratio closer to unity and, more importantly, by using 64-bit arithmetic precision in the calculation sequence. Results of this study are also reported.

  2. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  3. Implementation of nodal equivalence parameters in DIF3D-VARIANT for core analysis of prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR).

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C. H.; Joo, H. K.; Yang, W. S.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-15

    The VARIANT module of the DIF3D code has been upgraded to utilize surface-dependent discontinuity factors. The performance of the new capability is verified using two-dimensional core cases with control rods in reflector and fuel blocks. Cross sections for VHTR components were generated using the DRAGON and HELIOS codes. For rodded block cross sections, the DRAGON calculations used a single-block model or the multi-block models combined with MCNP4C flux solutions, whereas the HELIOS calculations utilized multi-block models. Results from core calculations indicate that multiplication factor, block power, and control rod worth are significantly improved by using surface-dependent discontinuity factors.

  4. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  5. Estimating unknown input parameters when implementing the NGA ground-motion prediction equations in engineering practice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaklamanos, James; Baise, Laurie G.; Boore, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) developed as part of the Next Generation Attenuation of Ground Motions (NGA-West) project in 2008 are becoming widely used in seismic hazard analyses. However, these new models are considerably more complicated than previous GMPEs, and they require several more input parameters. When employing the NGA models, users routinely face situations in which some of the required input parameters are unknown. In this paper, we present a framework for estimating the unknown source, path, and site parameters when implementing the NGA models in engineering practice, and we derive geometrically-based equations relating the three distance measures found in the NGA models. Our intent is for the content of this paper not only to make the NGA models more accessible, but also to help with the implementation of other present or future GMPEs.

  6. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  7. Physics-based real time ground motion parameter maps: the Central Mexico example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Guzman, L.; Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G.; Quiroz Ramirez, A.; Carrillo Lucia, M. A.; Perez Yanez, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the use of near real time ground motion simulations in the generation of ground motion parameter maps for Central Mexico. Simple algorithm approaches to predict ground motion parameters of civil protection and risk engineering interest are based on the use of observed instrumental values, reported macroseismic intensities and their correlations, and ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). A remarkable example of the use of this approach is the worldwide Shakemap generation program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Nevertheless, simple approaches rely strongly on the availability of instrumental and macroseismic intensity reports, as well as the accuracy of the GMPEs and the site effect amplification calculation. In regions where information is scarce, the GMPEs, a reference value in a mean sense, provide most of the ground motion information together with site effects amplification using a simple parametric approaches (e.g. the use of Vs30), and have proven to be elusive. Here we propose an approach that includes physics-based ground motion predictions (PBGMP) corrected by instrumental information using a Bayesian Kriging approach (Kitanidis, 1983) and apply it to the central region of Mexico. The method assumes: 1) the availability of a large database of low and high frequency Green's functions developed for the region of interest, using fully three-dimensional and representative one-dimension models, 2) enough real time data to obtain the centroid moment tensor and a slip rate function, and 3) a computational infrastructure that can be used to compute the source parameters and generate broadband synthetics in near real time, which will be combined with recorded instrumental data. By using a recently developed velocity model of Central Mexico and an efficient finite element octree-based implementation we generate a database of source-receiver Green's functions, valid to 0.5 Hz, that covers 160 km x 300 km x 700 km of Mexico, including a

  8. Extraction of bowing parameters from violin performance combining motion capture and sensors.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, E; Demoucron, M

    2009-11-01

    A method is described for measurement of a complete set of bowing parameters in violin performance. Optical motion capture was combined with sensors for accurate measurement of the main bowing parameters (bow position, bow velocity, bow acceleration, bow-bridge distance, and bow force) as well as secondary control parameters (skewness, inclination, and tilt of the bow). In addition, other performance features (moments of on/off in bow-string contact, string played, and bowing direction) were extracted. Detailed descriptions of the calculations of the bowing parameters, features, and calibrations are given. The described system is capable of measuring all bowing parameters without disturbing the player, allowing for detailed studies of musically relevant aspects of bow control and coordination of bowing parameters in bowed-string instrument performance.

  9. Topology dictionary for 3D video understanding.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tony; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that achieves 3D video understanding. 3D video consists of a stream of 3D models of subjects in motion. The acquisition of long sequences requires large storage space (2 GB for 1 min). Moreover, it is tedious to browse data sets and extract meaningful information. We propose the topology dictionary to encode and describe 3D video content. The model consists of a topology-based shape descriptor dictionary which can be generated from either extracted patterns or training sequences. The model relies on 1) topology description and classification using Reeb graphs, and 2) a Markov motion graph to represent topology change states. We show that the use of Reeb graphs as the high-level topology descriptor is relevant. It allows the dictionary to automatically model complex sequences, whereas other strategies would require prior knowledge on the shape and topology of the captured subjects. Our approach serves to encode 3D video sequences, and can be applied for content-based description and summarization of 3D video sequences. Furthermore, topology class labeling during a learning process enables the system to perform content-based event recognition. Experiments were carried out on various 3D videos. We showcase an application for 3D video progressive summarization using the topology dictionary.

  10. [Evaluation of the usefulness of the EOS 2D/3D system for the measurement of lower limbs anatomical and biomechanical parameters in children].

    PubMed

    Schlégl, Adám Tibor; Szuper, Kinga; Somoskeöy, Szabolcs; Than, Péter

    2014-10-26

    Bevezetés: Az alsó végtag anatómiai és biomechanikai paraméterei számos gyermekortopédiai betegség kulcstényezői, így pontos mérésük elengedhetetlen. Célkitűzés: A szerzők célja a rendelkezésükre álló 3D rekonstrukcióra képes képalkotó eszköz, az EOS 2D/3D System gyermekkori alkalmazhatóságának vizsgálata volt. Módszer: A 2–16 éves korcsoportba tartozó 523 egyén 3D modellezését végezték el, akiknél az alsó végtag biomechanikáját befolyásoló eltérés nem igazolódott. Az adatok statisztikai feldolgozásához intraclass korrelációs vizsgálatot, páros t-próbát, Spearman-korrelációt, illetve Welch-tesztet alkalmaztak. Eredmények: A megbízhatósági vizsgálat során az operátor minden paraméter esetében kiváló eredményt ért el. A képalkotás során alkalmazott előrelépett pozíció egyedül a sagittalis tibifemoralis szögnél okozott eltérést. A szerzők által vizsgált összes paraméter összefüggést mutatott a korral és a nemmel. Ezzel szemben a magassággal nem mutatott összefüggést a collodiaphysealis szög, a csípő-térd eltolódás és a femoralis és tibialis torzió. Következtetések: Az EOS-technológia alkalmas módszernek bizonyult az alsó végtag anatómiai paramétereinek mérésére gyermekkorban. Ezek változása összefügg a nemmel és a korral egyaránt. Orv., Hetil., 2014, 155(43), 1701–1711.

  11. Stochastic estimation of biogeochemical parameters from Globcolour ocean colour satellite data in a North Atlantic 3D ocean coupled physical-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, Maéva; Brasseur, Pierre; Brankart, Jean-Michel; Losa, Svetlana N.; Melet, Angélique

    2013-05-01

    Biogeochemical parameters remain a major source of uncertainty in coupled physical-biogeochemical models of the ocean. In a previous study (Doron et al., 2011), a stochastic estimation method was developed to estimate a subset of biogeochemical model parameters from surface phytoplankton observations. The concept was tested in the context of idealised twin experiments performed with a 1/4° resolution model of the North Atlantic ocean. The method was based on ensemble simulations describing the model response to parameter uncertainty. The statistical estimation process relies on nonlinear transformations of the estimated space to cope with the non-Gaussian behaviour of the resulting joint probability distribution of the model state variables and parameters. In the present study, the same method is applied to real ocean colour observations, as delivered by the sensors SeaWiFS, MERIS and MODIS embarked on the satellites OrbView-2, Envisat and Aqua respectively. The main outcome of the present experiments is a set of regionalised biogeochemical parameters. The benefit is quantitatively assessed with an objective norm of the misfits, which automatically adapts to the different ecological regions. The chlorophyll concentration simulated by the model with this set of optimally derived parameters is closer to the observations than the reference simulation using uniform values of the parameters. In addition, the interannual and seasonal robustness of the estimated parameters is tested by repeating the same analysis using ocean colour observations from several months and several years. The results show the overall consistency of the ensemble of estimated parameters, which are also compared to the results of an independent study.

  12. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-07

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  13. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  14. Interference effect in the dipole and nondipole anisotropy parameters of the Kr 4p photoelectrons in the vicinity of the Kr (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Ricz, S.; Ricsoka, T.; Holste, K.; Borovik, A. Jr.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.; Mueller, A.; Koever, A.; Varga, D.

    2010-04-15

    The angular distribution of the Kr 4p photoelectrons was investigated in the photon energy range of the (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations. The experimental dipole ({beta}) and nondipole ({gamma} and {delta}) anisotropy parameters were determined for the spin-orbit components of the Kr 4p shell. A simple theoretical model was developed for the description of the photoionization and excitation processes. An interference effect was observed between the direct photoionization and the resonant excitation participator Auger decay processes in the photon energy dependence of the experimental anisotropy parameters.

  15. Action and gait recognition from recovered 3-D human joints.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junxia; Ding, Xiaoqing; Wang, Shengjin; Wu, Youshou

    2010-08-01

    A common viewpoint-free framework that fuses pose recovery and classification for action and gait recognition is presented in this paper. First, a markerless pose recovery method is adopted to automatically capture the 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences from volume data. Second, multiple configuration features (combination of joints) and movement features (position, orientation, and height of the body) are extracted from the recovered 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences. A hidden Markov model (HMM) and an exemplar-based HMM are then used to model the movement features and configuration features, respectively. Finally, actions are classified by a hierarchical classifier that fuses the movement features and the configuration features, and persons are recognized from their gait sequences with the configuration features. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated with experiments on the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique Xmas Motion Acquisition Sequences data set.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  17. Real-time physics-based 3D biped character animation using an inverted pendulum model.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yao-Yang; Lin, Wen-Chieh; Cheng, Kuangyou B; Lee, Jehee; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2010-01-01

    We present a physics-based approach to generate 3D biped character animation that can react to dynamical environments in real time. Our approach utilizes an inverted pendulum model to online adjust the desired motion trajectory from the input motion capture data. This online adjustment produces a physically plausible motion trajectory adapted to dynamic environments, which is then used as the desired motion for the motion controllers to track in dynamics simulation. Rather than using Proportional-Derivative controllers whose parameters usually cannot be easily set, our motion tracking adopts a velocity-driven method which computes joint torques based on the desired joint angular velocities. Physically correct full-body motion of the 3D character is computed in dynamics simulation using the computed torques and dynamical model of the character. Our experiments demonstrate that tracking motion capture data with real-time response animation can be achieved easily. In addition, physically plausible motion style editing, automatic motion transition, and motion adaptation to different limb sizes can also be generated without difficulty.

  18. Time- and computation-efficient calibration of MEMS 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2014-08-13

    We propose calibration methods for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes that are efficient in terms of time and computational complexity. The calibration process for both sensors is simple, does not require additional expensive equipment, and can be performed in the field before or between motion measurements. The methods rely on a small number of defined calibration measurements that are used to obtain the values of 12 calibration parameters. This process enables the static compensation of sensor inaccuracies. The values detected by the 3D sensor are interpreted using a generalized 3D sensor model. The model assumes that the values detected by the sensor are equal to the projections of the measured value on the sensor sensitivity axes. Although this finding is trivial for 3D accelerometers, its validity for 3D gyroscopes is not immediately apparent; thus, this paper elaborates on this latter topic. For an example sensor device, calibration parameters were established using calibration measurements of approximately 1.5 min in duration for the 3D accelerometer and 2.5 min in duration for the 3D gyroscope. Correction of each detected 3D value using the established calibration parameters in further measurements requires only nine addition and nine multiplication operations.

  19. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  20. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  1. Estimating Shape and Micro-Motion Parameter of Rotationally Symmetric Space Objects from the Infrared Signature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yabei; Lu, Huanzhang; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Shape serves as an important additional feature for space target classification, which is complementary to those made available. Since different shapes lead to different projection functions, the projection property can be regarded as one kind of shape feature. In this work, the problem of estimating the projection function from the infrared signature of the object is addressed. We show that the projection function of any rotationally symmetric object can be approximately represented as a linear combination of some base functions. Based on this fact, the signal model of the emissivity-area product sequence is constructed, which is a particular mathematical function of the linear coefficients and micro-motion parameters. Then, the least square estimator is proposed to estimate the projection function and micro-motion parameters jointly. Experiments validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27763500

  2. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  3. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  4. Comprehensive evaluation of latest 2D/3D monitors and comparison to a custom-built 3D mirror-based display in laparoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Reiser, Silvano; Kohn, Nils; Witte, Michael; Leiner, Ulrich; Mühlbach, Lothar; Ruschin, Detlef; Reiner, Wolfgang; Feussner, Hubertus

    2014-03-01

    Though theoretically superior, 3D video systems did not yet achieve a breakthrough in laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, visual alterations, such as eye strain, diplopia and blur have been associated with the use of stereoscopic systems. Advancements in display and endoscope technology motivated a re-evaluation of such findings. A randomized study on 48 test subjects was conducted to investigate whether surgeons can benefit from using most current 3D visualization systems. Three different 3D systems, a glasses-based 3D monitor, an autostereoscopic display and a mirror-based theoretically ideal 3D display were compared to a state-of-the-art 2D HD system. The test subjects split into a novice and an expert surgeon group, which high experience in laparoscopic procedures. Each of them had to conduct a well comparable laparoscopic suturing task. Multiple performance parameters like task completion time and the precision of stitching were measured and compared. Electromagnetic tracking provided information on the instruments path length, movement velocity and economy. The NASA task load index was used to assess the mental work load. Subjective ratings were added to assess usability, comfort and image quality of each display. Almost all performance parameters were superior for the 3D glasses-based display as compared to the 2D and the autostereoscopic one, but were often significantly exceeded by the mirror-based 3D display. Subjects performed the task at average 20% faster and with a higher precision. Work-load parameters did not show significant differences. Experienced and non-experienced laparoscopists profited equally from 3D. The 3D mirror system gave clear evidence for additional potential of 3D visualization systems with higher resolution and motion parallax presentation.

  5. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  6. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  7. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  8. [EVALUATION OF CHANGES OF GEOMETRICAL PARAMETERS OF ALGINATE DENTAL IMPRESSIONS DUE TO THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL AND MICROWAVE DISINFECTION METHOD USING 3D TECHNOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Nespraydko, V P; Shevchuk, V A; Michaylov, A A; Lyseyko, N V

    2015-01-01

    This clinical and laboratory study evaluated the effect of two methods of disinfection in different modes at the volume changes of alginate dental impressions and plaster models poured from them, as compared to the same parameters of plastic master models (PMM), using three-dimensional non-contact laser scanner and software. Immersion chemical disinfection for 15 min, microwave disinfection at 354 W for 10 minutes and combined disinfection with the power of 319 W for 4 minutes did not significantly affect the volumetric dimensional accuracy of the alginate impressions (P > 0.05).

  9. Probabilistic Relationships between Ground‐Motion Parameters and Modified Mercalli Intensity in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worden, C.B.; Wald, David J.; Rhoades, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    We use a database of approximately 200,000 modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) observations of California earthquakes collected from USGS "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) reports, along with a comparable number of peak ground-motion amplitudes from California seismic networks, to develop probabilistic relationships between MMI and peak ground velocity (PGV), peak ground acceleration (PGA), and 0.3-s, 1-s, and 3-s 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (PSA). After associating each ground-motion observation with an MMI computed from all the DYFI responses within 2 km of the observation, we derived a joint probability distribution between MMI and ground motion. We then derived reversible relationships between MMI and each ground-motion parameter by using a total least squares regression to fit a bilinear function to the median of the stacked probability distributions. Among the relationships, the fit to peak ground velocity has the smallest errors, though linear combinations of PGA and PGV give nominally better results. We also find that magnitude and distance terms reduce the overall residuals and are justifiable on an information theoretic basis. For intensities MMI≥5, our results are in close agreement with the relations of Wald, Quitoriano, Heaton, and Kanamori (1999); for lower intensities, our results fall midway between Wald, Quitoriano, Heaton, and Kanamori (1999) and those of Atkinson and Kaka (2007). The earthquakes in the study ranged in magnitude from 3.0 to 7.3, and the distances ranged from less than a kilometer to about 400 km from the source.

  10. A 3D interactive method for estimating body segmental parameters in animals: application to the turning and running performance of Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, John R; Ng-Thow-Hing, Victor; Anderson, Frank C

    2007-06-21

    We developed a method based on interactive B-spline solids for estimating and visualizing biomechanically important parameters for animal body segments. Although the method is most useful for assessing the importance of unknowns in extinct animals, such as body contours, muscle bulk, or inertial parameters, it is also useful for non-invasive measurement of segmental dimensions in extant animals. Points measured directly from bodies or skeletons are digitized and visualized on a computer, and then a B-spline solid is fitted to enclose these points, allowing quantification of segment dimensions. The method is computationally fast enough so that software implementations can interactively deform the shape of body segments (by warping the solid) or adjust the shape quantitatively (e.g., expanding the solid boundary by some percentage or a specific distance beyond measured skeletal coordinates). As the shape changes, the resulting changes in segment mass, center of mass (CM), and moments of inertia can be recomputed immediately. Volumes of reduced or increased density can be embedded to represent lungs, bones, or other structures within the body. The method was validated by reconstructing an ostrich body from a fleshed and defleshed carcass and comparing the estimated dimensions to empirically measured values from the original carcass. We then used the method to calculate the segmental masses, centers of mass, and moments of inertia for an adult Tyrannosaurus rex, with measurements taken directly from a complete skeleton. We compare these results to other estimates, using the model to compute the sensitivities of unknown parameter values based upon 30 different combinations of trunk, lung and air sac, and hindlimb dimensions. The conclusion that T. rex was not an exceptionally fast runner remains strongly supported by our models-the main area of ambiguity for estimating running ability seems to be estimating fascicle lengths, not body dimensions. Additionally, the

  11. A review of 3D first-pass, whole-heart, myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Fair, Merlin J; Gatehouse, Peter D; DiBella, Edward V R; Firmin, David N

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review is undertaken of the methods available for 3D whole-heart first-pass perfusion (FPP) and their application to date, with particular focus on possible acceleration techniques. Following a summary of the parameters typically desired of 3D FPP methods, the review explains the mechanisms of key acceleration techniques and their potential use in FPP for attaining 3D acquisitions. The mechanisms include rapid sequences, non-Cartesian k-space trajectories, reduced k-space acquisitions, parallel imaging reconstructions and compressed sensing. An attempt is made to explain, rather than simply state, the varying methods with the hope that it will give an appreciation of the different components making up a 3D FPP protocol. Basic estimates demonstrating the required total acceleration factors in typical 3D FPP cases are included, providing context for the extent that each acceleration method can contribute to the required imaging speed, as well as potential limitations in present 3D FPP literature. Although many 3D FPP methods are too early in development for the type of clinical trials required to show any clear benefit over current 2D FPP methods, the review includes the small but growing quantity of clinical research work already using 3D FPP, alongside the more technical work. Broader challenges concerning FPP such as quantitative analysis are not covered, but challenges with particular impact on 3D FPP methods, particularly with regards to motion effects, are discussed along with anticipated future work in the field.

  12. 3D stress simulation and parameter design during twin-roll casting of 304 stainless steel based on the Anand model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Li-gang; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Qing-xiang

    2014-07-01

    This study first investigated cracks on the surface of an actual steel strip. Formulating the Anand model in ANSYS software, we then simulated the stress field in the molten pool of type 304 stainless steel during the twin-roll casting process. Parameters affecting the stress distribution in the molten pool were analyzed in detail and optimized. After twin-roll casting, a large number of transgranular and intergranular cracks resided on the surface of the thin steel strip, and followed a tortuous path. In the molten pool, stress was enhanced at the exit and at the roller contact positions. The stress at the exit decreased with increasing casting speed and pouring temperature. To ensure high quality of the fabricated strips, the casting speed and pouring temperature should be controlled above 0.7 m/s and 1520°C, respectively.

  13. Estimation of hurdle clearance parameters using a monocular human motion tracking method.

    PubMed

    Krzeszowski, Tomasz; Przednowek, Krzysztof; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof; Iskra, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a method of monocular human motion tracking for estimation of hurdle clearance kinematic parameters. The analysis involved 10 image sequences of five hurdlers at various training levels. Recording of the sequences was carried out under simulated starting conditions of a 110 m hurdle race. The parameters were estimated using the particle swarm optimization algorithm and they are based on analysis of the images recorded with a 100 Hz camera. The proposed method does not involve using any special clothes, markers, inertial sensors, etc. As the quality criteria, the mean absolute error and mean relative error were used. The level of computed errors justifies the use of this method to estimate hurdle clearance parameters.

  14. Dependence of Brain Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Perfusion Parameters on the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Federau, Christian; Hagmann, Patric; Maeder, Philippe; Müller, Markus; Meuli, Reto; Stuber, Matthias; O’Brien, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of microvascular perfusion with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MRI is gaining interest. Yet, the physiological influences on the IVIM perfusion parameters (“pseudo-diffusion” coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and flow related parameter fD*) remain insufficiently characterized. In this article, we hypothesize that D* and fD*, which depend on blood speed, should vary during the cardiac cycle. We extended the IVIM model to include time dependence of D* = D*(t), and demonstrate in the healthy human brain that both parameters D* and fD* are significantly larger during systole than diastole, while the diffusion coefficient D and f do not vary significantly. The results non-invasively demonstrate the pulsatility of the brain’s microvasculature. PMID:24023649

  15. MRI-Guided 3D Optimization Significantly Improves DVH Parameters of Pulsed-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lindegaard, Jacob C. Tanderup, Kari; Nielsen, Soren Kynde; Haack, Soren; Gelineck, John

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dose-volume histogram parameters of standard Point A and magnetic resonance imaging-based three-dimensional optimized dose plans in 21 consecutive patients who underwent pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients received external beam radiotherapy (elective target dose, 45 Gy in 25-30 fractions; tumor target dose, 50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions). PDR-BT was applied with a tandem-ring applicator. Additional ring-guided titanium needles were used in 4 patients and a multichannel vaginal cylinder in 2 patients. Dose planning was done using 1.5 Tesla T{sub 1}-weighted and T{sub 2}-weighted paratransversal magnetic resonance imaging scans. T{sub 1}-weighted visible oil-containing tubes were used for applicator reconstruction. The prescribed standard dose for PDR-BT was 10 Gy (1 Gy/pulse, 1 pulse/h) for two to three fractions to reach a physical dose of 80 Gy to Point A. The total dose (external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy) was normalized to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions using {alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor, {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy for normal tissue, and a repair half-time of 1.5 h. The goal of optimization was dose received by 90% of the target volume (D{sub 90}) of {>=}85 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 10} in the high-risk clinical target volume (cervix and remaining tumor at brachytherapy), but keeping the minimal dose to 2 cm{sup 3} of the bladder and rectum/sigmoid at <90 and <75 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3}, respectively. Results: Using three-dimensional optimization, all dose-volume histogram constraints were met in 16 of 21 patients compared with 3 of 21 patients with two-dimensional library plans (p < 0.001). Optimization increased the minimal target dose (D{sub 100}) of the high-risk clinical target volume (p < 0.007) and decreased the minimal dose to 2 cm{sup 3} for the sigmoid significantly (p = 0.03). For the high-risk clinical target volume, D

  16. Optimal asymmetry and other motion parameters that characterise high-quality female dance.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Kristofor; Darwin, Hannah; Cornelissen, Piers L; Saxton, Tamsin K; Tovée, Martin J; Caplan, Nick; Neave, Nick

    2017-02-09

    Dance is a universal human behaviour that is observed particularly in courtship contexts, and that provides information that could be useful to potential partners. Here, we use a data-driven approach to pinpoint the movements that discriminate female dance quality. Using 3D motion-capture we recorded women whilst they danced to a basic rhythm. Video clips of 39 resultant avatars were rated for dance quality, and those ratings were compared to quantitative measurements of the movement patterns using multi-level models. Three types of movement contributed independently to high-quality female dance: greater hip swing, more asymmetric movements of the thighs, and intermediate levels of asymmetric movements of the arms. Hip swing is a trait that identifies female movement, and the ability to move limbs asymmetrically (i.e. independently of the other) may attest to well-developed motor control, so long as this limb independence does not verge into uncontrolled pathological movement. We also found that the same level of dance quality could be predicted by different combinations of dance features. Our work opens avenues to exploring the functional significance, informational content, and temporal sequencing of the different types of movement in dance.

  17. Optimal asymmetry and other motion parameters that characterise high-quality female dance

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Kristofor; Darwin, Hannah; Cornelissen, Piers L.; Saxton, Tamsin K.; Tovée, Martin J.; Caplan, Nick; Neave, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Dance is a universal human behaviour that is observed particularly in courtship contexts, and that provides information that could be useful to potential partners. Here, we use a data-driven approach to pinpoint the movements that discriminate female dance quality. Using 3D motion-capture we recorded women whilst they danced to a basic rhythm. Video clips of 39 resultant avatars were rated for dance quality, and those ratings were compared to quantitative measurements of the movement patterns using multi-level models. Three types of movement contributed independently to high-quality female dance: greater hip swing, more asymmetric movements of the thighs, and intermediate levels of asymmetric movements of the arms. Hip swing is a trait that identifies female movement, and the ability to move limbs asymmetrically (i.e. independently of the other) may attest to well-developed motor control, so long as this limb independence does not verge into uncontrolled pathological movement. We also found that the same level of dance quality could be predicted by different combinations of dance features. Our work opens avenues to exploring the functional significance, informational content, and temporal sequencing of the different types of movement in dance. PMID:28181991

  18. Motion Parameters Determination of the SC and Phobos in the Project Phobos-Grunt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akim, E. L.; Stepanyants, V. A.; Tuchin, A. G.; Shishov, V. A.

    2007-01-01

    The SC "Phobos-Grunt" flight is planned to 2009 in Russia with the purpose to deliver to the Earth the soil samples of the Mars satellite Phobos. The mission will pass under the following scheme [1-4]: the SC flight from the Earth to the Mars, the SC transit on the Mars satellite orbit, the motion round the Mars on the observation orbit and on the quasi-synchronous one [5], landing on Phobos, taking of a ground and start in the direction to the Earth. The implementation of complicated dynamical operations in the Phobos vicinity is foreseen by the project. The SC will be in a disturbance sphere of gravitational fields from the Sun, the Mars and the Phobos. The SC orbit determination is carried out on a totality of trajectory measurements executed from ground tracking stations and measurements of autonomous systems onboard space vehicle relatively the Phobos. As ground measurements the radio engineering measurements of range and range rate are used. There are possible as onboard optical observations of the Phobos by a television system and ranges from the SC up to the Phobos surface by laser locator. As soon as the Phobos orbit accuracy is insufficient for a solution of a problem of landing its orbit determination will be carried out together with determination of the SC orbit. Therefore the algorithms for joint improving of initial conditions of the SC and the Phobos are necessary to determine parameters of the SC relative the Phobos motion within a single dynamical motion model. After putting on the martial satellite orbit, on the Phobos observation orbit, on the quasi-synchronous orbit in the Phobos vicinity the equipment guidance and the following process of the SC orbit determination relatively Phobos requires a priori knowledge of the Phobos orbit parameters with sufficiently high precision. These parameters should be obtained beforehand using both all modern observations and historical ones.

  19. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  20. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. Numerical study on 3D composite morphing actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Kazuma; Saito, Makoto; Anandan, Nishita; Kadooka, Kevin; Taya, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    There are a number of actuators using the deformation of electroactive polymer (EAP), where fewer papers seem to have focused on the performance of 3D morphing actuators based on the analytical approach, due mainly to their complexity. The present paper introduces a numerical analysis approach on the large scale deformation and motion of a 3D half dome shaped actuator composed of thin soft membrane (passive material) and EAP strip actuators (EAP active coupon with electrodes on both surfaces), where the locations of the active EAP strips is a key parameter. Simulia/Abaqus Static and Implicit analysis code, whose main feature is the high precision contact analysis capability among structures, are used focusing on the whole process of the membrane to touch and wrap around the object. The unidirectional properties of the EAP coupon actuator are used as input data set for the material properties for the simulation and the verification of our numerical model, where the verification is made as compared to the existing 2D solution. The numerical results can demonstrate the whole deformation process of the membrane to wrap around not only smooth shaped objects like a sphere or an egg, but also irregularly shaped objects. A parametric study reveals the proper placement of the EAP coupon actuators, with the modification of the dome shape to induce the relevant large scale deformation. The numerical simulation for the 3D soft actuators shown in this paper could be applied to a wider range of soft 3D morphing actuators.

  2. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  3. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. Study of design parameters affecting the motion of DNA for nanoinjection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Regis A.; Jensen, Brian D.; Black, Justin L.; Burnett, Sandra H.; Howell, Larry L.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports the effects of various parameters on the attraction and repulsion of DNA to and from a silicon lance. An understanding of DNA motion is crucial for a new approach to insert DNA, or other foreign microscopic matter, into a living cell. The approach, called nanoinjection, uses electrical forces to attract and repel the desired substance to a micromachined lance designed to pierce the cell membranes. We have developed mathematical models to predict the trajectory of DNA. The mathematical model allows investigation of the attraction/repulsion process by varying specific parameters. We find that the ground electrode placement, lance orientation and lance penetration significantly affect attraction or repulsion efficiency, while the gap, lance direction, lance tip width, lance tip half-angle and lance tip height do not.

  5. CT-guided Irreversible Electroporation in an Acute Porcine Liver Model: Effect of Previous Transarterial Iodized Oil Tissue Marking on Technical Parameters, 3D Computed Tomographic Rendering of the Electroporation Zone, and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Fritz, S.; Vollherbst, D.; Zelzer, S.; Wachter, M. F. Bellemann, N. Gockner, T. Mokry, T. Schmitz, A.; Aulmann, S.; Stampfl, U.; Pereira, P.; Kauczor, H. U.; Werner, J.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance.MethodsAfter Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann–Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed.ResultsMean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone.ConclusionThere is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver.

  6. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  7. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  8. Motion capture for human motion measuring by using single camera with triangle markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shun'ichi

    2005-12-01

    This study aims to realize a motion capture for measuring 3D human motions by using single camera. Although motion capture by using multiple cameras is widely used in sports field, medical field, engineering field and so on, optical motion capture method with one camera is not established. In this paper, the authors achieved a 3D motion capture by using one camera, named as Mono-MoCap (MMC), on the basis of two calibration methods and triangle markers which each length of side is given. The camera calibration methods made 3D coordinates transformation parameter and a lens distortion parameter with Modified DLT method. The triangle markers enabled to calculate a coordinate value of a depth direction on a camera coordinate. Experiments of 3D position measurement by using the MMC on a measurement space of cubic 2 m on each side show an average error of measurement of a center of gravity of a triangle marker was less than 2 mm. As compared with conventional motion capture method by using multiple cameras, the MMC has enough accuracy for 3D measurement. Also, by putting a triangle marker on each human joint, the MMC was able to capture a walking motion, a standing-up motion and a bending and stretching motion. In addition, a method using a triangle marker together with conventional spherical markers was proposed. Finally, a method to estimate a position of a marker by measuring the velocity of the marker was proposed in order to improve the accuracy of MMC.

  9. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  10. A monolithic 3D-0D coupled closed-loop model of the heart and the vascular system: Experiment-based parameter estimation for patient-specific cardiac mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hirschvogel, Marc; Bassilious, Marina; Jagschies, Lasse; Wildhirt, Stephen M; Gee, Michael W

    2016-10-15

    A model for patient-specific cardiac mechanics simulation is introduced, incorporating a 3-dimensional finite element model of the ventricular part of the heart, which is coupled to a reduced-order 0-dimensional closed-loop vascular system, heart valve, and atrial chamber model. The ventricles are modeled by a nonlinear orthotropic passive material law. The electrical activation is mimicked by a prescribed parameterized active stress acting along a generic muscle fiber orientation. Our activation function is constructed such that the start of ventricular contraction and relaxation as well as the active stress curve's slope are parameterized. The imaging-based patient-specific ventricular model is prestressed to low end-diastolic pressure to account for the imaged, stressed configuration. Visco-elastic Robin boundary conditions are applied to the heart base and the epicardium to account for the embedding surrounding. We treat the 3D solid-0D fluid interaction as a strongly coupled monolithic problem, which is consistently linearized with respect to 3D solid and 0D fluid model variables to allow for a Newton-type solution procedure. The resulting coupled linear system of equations is solved iteratively in every Newton step using 2  ×  2 physics-based block preconditioning. Furthermore, we present novel efficient strategies for calibrating active contractile and vascular resistance parameters to experimental left ventricular pressure and stroke volume data gained in porcine experiments. Two exemplary states of cardiovascular condition are considered, namely, after application of vasodilatory beta blockers (BETA) and after injection of vasoconstrictive phenylephrine (PHEN). The parameter calibration to the specific individual and cardiovascular state at hand is performed using a 2-stage nonlinear multilevel method that uses a low-fidelity heart model to compute a parameter correction for the high-fidelity model optimization problem. We discuss 2 different low

  11. Performance Analysis of a Low-Cost Triangulation-Based 3d Camera: Microsoft Kinect System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . K. Chow, J. C.; Ang, K. D.; Lichti, D. D.; Teskey, W. F.

    2012-07-01

    Recent technological advancements have made active imaging sensors popular for 3D modelling and motion tracking. The 3D coordinates of signalised targets are traditionally estimated by matching conjugate points in overlapping images. Current 3D cameras can acquire point clouds at video frame rates from a single exposure station. In the area of 3D cameras, Microsoft and PrimeSense have collaborated and developed an active 3D camera based on the triangulation principle, known as the Kinect system. This off-the-shelf system costs less than 150 USD and has drawn a lot of attention from the robotics, computer vision, and photogrammetry disciplines. In this paper, the prospect of using the Kinect system for precise engineering applications was evaluated. The geometric quality of the Kinect system as a function of the scene (i.e. variation of depth, ambient light conditions, incidence angle, and object reflectivity) and the sensor (i.e. warm-up time and distance averaging) were analysed quantitatively. This system's potential in human body measurements was tested against a laser scanner and 3D range camera. A new calibration model for simultaneously determining the exterior orientation parameters, interior orientation parameters, boresight angles, leverarm, and object space features parameters was developed and the effectiveness of this calibration approach was explored.

  12. Optimizing Design Parameters for Sets of Concentric Tube Robots using Sampling-based Motion Planning.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Cenk; Torres, Luis G; Alterovitz, Ron

    2015-09-28

    Concentric tube robots are tentacle-like medical robots that can bend around anatomical obstacles to access hard-to-reach clinical targets. The component tubes of these robots can be swapped prior to performing a task in order to customize the robot's behavior and reachable workspace. Optimizing a robot's design by appropriately selecting tube parameters can improve the robot's effectiveness on a procedure-and patient-specific basis. In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates sets of concentric tube robot designs that can collectively maximize the reachable percentage of a given goal region in the human body. Our algorithm combines a search in the design space of a concentric tube robot using a global optimization method with a sampling-based motion planner in the robot's configuration space in order to find sets of designs that enable motions to goal regions while avoiding contact with anatomical obstacles. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in a simulated scenario based on lung anatomy.

  13. Optimizing Design Parameters for Sets of Concentric Tube Robots using Sampling-based Motion Planning

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Cenk; Torres, Luis G.; Alterovitz, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Concentric tube robots are tentacle-like medical robots that can bend around anatomical obstacles to access hard-to-reach clinical targets. The component tubes of these robots can be swapped prior to performing a task in order to customize the robot’s behavior and reachable workspace. Optimizing a robot’s design by appropriately selecting tube parameters can improve the robot’s effectiveness on a procedure-and patient-specific basis. In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates sets of concentric tube robot designs that can collectively maximize the reachable percentage of a given goal region in the human body. Our algorithm combines a search in the design space of a concentric tube robot using a global optimization method with a sampling-based motion planner in the robot’s configuration space in order to find sets of designs that enable motions to goal regions while avoiding contact with anatomical obstacles. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in a simulated scenario based on lung anatomy. PMID:26951790

  14. Multi-camera sensor system for 3D segmentation and localization of multiple mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Losada, Cristina; Mazo, Manuel; Palazuelos, Sira; Pizarro, Daniel; Marrón, Marta

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for obtaining the motion segmentation and 3D localization of multiple mobile robots in an intelligent space using a multi-camera sensor system. The set of calibrated and synchronized cameras are placed in fixed positions within the environment (intelligent space). The proposed algorithm for motion segmentation and 3D localization is based on the minimization of an objective function. This function includes information from all the cameras, and it does not rely on previous knowledge or invasive landmarks on board the robots. The proposed objective function depends on three groups of variables: the segmentation boundaries, the motion parameters and the depth. For the objective function minimization, we use a greedy iterative algorithm with three steps that, after initialization of segmentation boundaries and depth, are repeated until convergence.

  15. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  16. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  17. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. Motion coordination affects movement parameters in a joint pick-and-place task.

    PubMed

    Vesper, Cordula; Soutschek, Alexander; Schubo, Anna

    2009-12-01

    This study examined influences of social context on movement parameters in a pick-and-place task. Participants' motion trajectories were recorded while they performed sequences of natural movements either working side-by-side with a partner or alone. It was expected that movement parameters would be specifically adapted to the joint condition to overcome the difficulties arising from the requirement to coordinate with another person. To disentangle effects based on participants' effort to coordinate their movements from effects merely due to the other's presence, a condition was included where only one person performed the task while being observed by the partner. Results indicate that participants adapted their movements temporally and spatially to the joint action situation: Overall movement duration was shorter, and mean and maximum velocity was higher when actually working together than when working alone. Pick-to-place trajectories were also shifted away from the partner in spatial coordinates. The partner's presence as such did not have an impact on movement parameters. These findings are interpreted as evidence for the use of implicit strategies to facilitate movement coordination in joint action tasks.

  19. Fault parameter constraints using relocated earthquakes: A validation of first-motion focal-mechanism data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilb, Debi; Hardebeck, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    We estimate the strike and dip of three California fault segments (Calaveras, Sargent, and a portion of the San Andreas near San Jaun Bautistia) based on principle component analysis of accurately located microearthquakes. We compare these fault orientations with two different first-motion focal mechanism catalogs: the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) catalog, calculated using the FPFIT algorithm (Reasenberg and Oppenheimer, 1985), and a catalog created using the HASH algorithm that tests mechanism stability relative to seismic velocity model variations and earthquake location (Hardebeck and Shearer, 2002). We assume any disagreement (misfit >30° in strike, dip, or rake) indicates inaccurate focal mechanisms in the catalogs. With this assumption, we can quantify the parameters that identify the most optimally constrained focal mechanisms. For the NCEDC/FPFIT catalogs, we find that the best quantitative discriminator of quality focal mechanisms is the station distribution ratio (STDR) parameter, an indicator of how the stations are distributed about the focal sphere. Requiring STDR > 0.65 increases the acceptable mechanisms from 34%–37% to 63%–68%. This suggests stations should be uniformly distributed surrounding, rather than aligning, known fault traces. For the HASH catalogs, the fault plane uncertainty (FPU) parameter is the best discriminator, increasing the percent of acceptable mechanisms from 63%–78% to 81%–83% when FPU ≤ 35°. The overall higher percentage of acceptable mechanisms and the usefulness of the formal uncertainty in identifying quality mechanisms validate the HASH approach of testing for mechanism stability.

  20. Relationship between strong-motion array parameters and the accuracy of source inversion and physical waves