Science.gov

Sample records for 3-d natural convection

  1. 3D Convection-pulsation Simulations with the HERACLES Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, S.; Audit, E.; Dintrans, B.

    2015-10-01

    We present 3D simulations of the coupling between surface convection and pulsations due to the κ-mechanism in classical Cepheids of the red edge of Hertzsprung-Russell diagram's instability strip. We show that 3D convection is less powerful than 2D convection and does not quench the radiative pulsations, leading to an efficient 3D κ-mechanism. Thus, the 3D instability strip is closer to the observed one than the 1D or 2D were.

  2. Venusian Applications of 3D Convection Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonaccorso, Timary Annie

    2011-01-01

    This study models mantle convection on Venus using the 'cubed sphere' code OEDIPUS, which models one-sixth of the planet in spherical geometry. We are attempting to balance internal heating, bottom mantle viscosity, and temperature difference across Venus' mantle, in order to create a realistic model that matches with current planetary observations. We also have begun to run both lower and upper mantle simulations to determine whether layered (as opposed to whole-mantle) convection might produce more efficient heat transfer, as well as to model coronae formation in the upper mantle. Upper mantle simulations are completed using OEDIPUS' Cartesian counterpart, JOCASTA. This summer's central question has been how to define a mantle plume. Traditionally, we have defined a hot plume the region with temperature at or above 40% of the difference between the maximum and horizontally averaged temperature, and a cold plume as the region with 40% of the difference between the minimum and average temperature. For less viscous cases (1020 Pa?s), the plumes generated by that definition lacked vigor, displaying buoyancies 1/100th of those found in previous, higher viscosity simulations (1021 Pa?s). As the mantle plumes with large buoyancy flux are most likely to produce topographic uplift and volcanism, the low viscosity cases' plumes may not produce observable deformation. In an effort to eliminate the smallest plumes, we experimented with different lower bound parameters and temperature percentages.

  3. Convective instability in sedimentation: 3-D numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Hsu, Tian-Jian; Balachandar, S.

    2014-11-01

    To provide a probable explanation on the field observed rapid sedimentation process near river mouths, we investigate the convective sedimentation in stably stratified saltwater using 3-D numerical simulations. Guided by the linear stability analysis, this study focuses on the nonlinear interactions of several mechanisms, which lead to various sediment finger patterns, and the effective settling velocity for sediment ranging from clay (single-particle settling velocity V0 = 0.0036 and 0.0144 mm/s, or particle diameter d = 2 and 4 μm) to silt (V0 = 0.36 mm/s, or d = 20 μm). For very fine sediment with V0 = 0.0036 mm/s, the convective instability is dominated by double diffusion, characterized by millimeter-scale fingers. Gravitational settling slightly increases the growth rate; however, it has notable effect on the downward development of vertical mixing shortly after the sediment interface migrates below the salt interface. For sediment with V0 = 0.0144 mm/s, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities become dominant before double-diffusive modes grow sufficiently large. Centimeter-scale and highly asymmetric sediment fingers are obtained due to nonlinear interactions between different modes. For sediment with V0 = 0.36 mm/s, Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism dominates and the resulting centimeter-scale sediment fingers show a plume-like structure. The flow pattern is similar to that without ambient salt stratification. Rapid sedimentation with effective settling velocity on the order of 1 cm/s is likely driven by convective sedimentation for sediment with V0 greater than 0.1 mm/s at concentration greater than 10-20 g/L.

  4. 3D Simulations of methane convective storms on Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    The arrival of the Cassini/Huygens mission to Titan has opened an unprecedented opportunity to study the atmosphere of this satellite. Under the pressure-temperature conditions on Titan, methane, a large atmospheric component amounting perhaps to a 3-5% of the atmosphere, is close to its triple point, potentially playing a similar role as water on Earth. The Huygens probe has shown a terrain shaped by erosion of probably liquid origin, suggestive of past rain. On the other hand, Voyager IRIS spectroscopic observations of Titan imply a saturated atmosphere of methane (amounting perhaps to 150 covered by methane clouds, if we think on Earth meteorology. However, observations from Earth and Cassini have shown that clouds are localized, transient and fast evolving, in particular in the South Pole (currently in its summer season). This might imply a lack of widespread presence on Titan of nuclei where methane could initiate condensation and particle growth with subsequent precipitation. We investigate different scenarios of moist convective storms on Titan using a complete 3D atmospheric model that incorporates a full microphysics treatment required to study cloud formation processes under a saturated atmosphere with low concentration of condensation nuclei. We study local convective development under a variety of atmospheric conditions: sub-saturation, super-saturation, abundances of condensation nuclei fall, condensation nuclei lifted from the ground or gently falling from the stratosphere. We show that under the appropriate circumstances, precipitation rates comparable to typical tropical storms on Earth can be found. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  5. 3D Spherical Convection Modeling of Venusian Resurfacing Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prunty, A. C.; King, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    The surface of Venus is thought to have undergone a global resurfacing event approximately 750 Ma. While several variations and modifications within the proposed resurfacing models exist, two end-member mechanisms can be broadly identified: (1) catastrophic overturns of the lithosphere, and (2) global volcanic resurfacing. We perform high-resolution, 3D spherical convection calculations using CitcomS to determine the conditions in Venus' deep interior necessary for each mechanism to occur. To date, we have focused on modeling episodic overturns of the lithosphere in the stagnant lid regime following the method of van Heck and Tackley (2008), and implementing a temperature-dependent rheology and yield stress. We find in general that lithospheric yielding can occur with a Rayleigh number of the order of 105 and a yield stress of the order of 20 ­- 400 MPa, consistent with the results of van Heck and Tackley. Additionally, we find that the behavior of lithospheric overturn depends strongly on the yield stress. To see this, we systematically increase the Rayleigh number and the yield stress via a priori scaling relationships. We find that models with Rayleigh number between 105 and 108 exhibit some variation of stagnant-lid convection; however, we observe that by varying the yield stress we are able to control the degree to which the overturns consist of the subduction of large, coherent segments of lithosphere as opposed to the formation of a large number of smaller, regional delaminations. We analyze these two modes of overturn by looking at the resultant geoid and topography fields to see if they yield distinguishable signatures. Furthermore, we analyze the spherical harmonic power spectrum of the geoid and topography to determine the extent to which their signatures are contributed from lower mantle anomalies and surface features. We also test the effects of mineral phase transformations and depth­-increasing viscosity on lithospheric overturn behavior by varying

  6. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  7. Computational study of 3-D Benard convection with gravitational modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Peltier, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    In this numerical study the effects of a modulated gravitational field on three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection with heating from above or from below is investigated. The full, nonlinear, time-dependent, Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation are solved by a semiimplicit, pseudo-spectral procedure. This study has been motivated by the need to better understand the effects of vibration (G-Jitter) on fluids systems especially in the low gravity environment.

  8. A 3D Convective Model for the Jovian Wind Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Chan, K. L.

    2004-11-01

    In an earlier paper (Mayr et al. 1984, Earth, Moon, & Planets, 30, 245), we proposed that Jupiter's alternating wind bands are a manifestation of the global interaction between rotation and convection in a shallow layer. The model, however, was obtained from linearization of the 2D equations of motions. At HKUST/Hong Kong, we are now trying to study this problem by rigorous numerical simulation. Using a three-dimensional spectral numerical code, we compute models for the outermost layer of Jupiter's convective envelope. Two cases have been studied. In one the atmospheric pressure varies from 1 to 23 bar, and in the other from 1 to 115 bar. The physical parameters (internal energy flux, rotation rate) are chosen to be close to those expected, but solar heating, chemistry, as well as dynamical influences from deeper layers are ignored. The models generate wind field patterns that contain alternating jet streams with resemblance to the Jovian bands. Instantaneous values of the mean zonal flow at the equator reach 80 m/sec. Yet the mean meridional flows are less than 1% of such value. The meridional temperature profile at the cloud top level also shows a double hump structure of a few degrees (as observed) in the subtropics. Though there is not complete quantitative agreement (caused perhaps by neglected effects like solar radiation), these models demonstrate, in principle, the feasibility of generating a Jovian type wind pattern through the interaction of fast rotation and convection in a thin shell. KLC thanks RGC/Hong Kong for support.

  9. Numerical simulation of 3-D Benard convection with gravitational modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Peltier, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    In this numerical study, randomly and sinusoidally modulated gravitational fields imposed on three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection are investigated in an effort to understand the effects of vibration (G-Jitter) on fluid systems. The time-dependent, Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation with Boussinesq approximations are solved by a semi-implicit, pseudospectral procedure. An analysis of energy balances indicates that with increasing modulation amplitude, transition from synchronous to relaxation oscillation goes through the subharmonic response. Random modulations are found to be less stabilizing than sinusoidal and are shown to impose three-dimensionality on the flow for some parameter ranges both at terrestrial and zero base gravity conditions.

  10. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  11. Influence of Chemical Piles on Convective Structure and the Geoid from 3D Spherical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2013-12-01

    Classic mantle dynamic models for the Earth's geoid are mostly based on whole mantle convection and constrain that the upper mantle is significantly weaker than the lower mantle. Whole mantle convection models with such mantle viscosity structure have successfully explained the long-wavelength structure in the mantle. However, with increasing consensus on the existence of chemically distinct piles above the core mantle boundary (CMB) (also known as large low shear velocity provinces or LLSVPs), questions arise as to what extent the chemical piles influence the Earth's geoid and long-wavelength mantle convection. Some recent studies suggested that the chemical piles have a controlling effect on the Earth's degree two mantle structure, geoid, and true polar wander, although the chemical piles are estimated to be of small volume (~2% of the whole mantle) by seismic studies. We have formulated dynamically consistent 3D mantle convection models using CitcomS and studied how the chemical piles above CMB influence the long-wavelength convective structure and geoid. The models have free slip boundary conditions and temperature dependent viscosity. By comparing with purely thermal convection models, we found that the long wavelength convective structure is not sensitive to the presence of the chemical piles. By determining the geoid from the buoyance of a certain layer of the mantle, we found that for both purely thermal and thermochemical convection, the geoid is mostly contributed by the upper part of the mantle, with ~80% geoid explained by the buoyancy in the upper half of the mantle. In purely thermal convection, the contribution to the geoid from the bottom layer of the mantle always has the same sign with the total geoid (a bottom ~ 600 km thick layer gives ~3.5% of the total geoid). However, in the thermochemical convection, the bottom layer with overall negatively buoyant chemical piles gives rise to the geoid that has opposite sign with the total geoid and has a

  12. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems: the Transition from 2D to 3D Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Eric; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies have reproduced the patterns of zonal flow and thermal emission on the Giant Planets using deep convection models. For example, it has been shown that the fundamental differences between the winds of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, and the Gas Giants, Jupiter and Saturn, may be explained by the breakdown of the influence of rotation on convection. Here, we present results from a coupled suite of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of rotating convection which span a broad range of parameter space. We observe distinct transitions from rotationally controlled, quasi-2D dynamics to strongly 3D, non-rotating style convection. We quantify the boundary between these two regimes as a function of the Rayleigh and Ekman numbers. The transition is not determined, as long assumed, by the convective Rossby number, but instead is controlled by boundary layer dynamics. It may then be easier than previously thought for convection systems to break free from the constraints of rotation. We are presently investigating how this transition correlates with zonal flows and magnetic field generation on the Giant Planets. Funding provided by NSF Geophysics Program (EAR/IF) and NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  13. New Era in 3-D Modeling of Convection and Magnetic Dynamos in Stellar Envelopes and Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomre, J.; Augustson, K. C.; Brown, B. P.; Browning, M. K.; Brun, A. S.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    The recent advances in asteroseismology and spectropolarimetry are beginning to provide estimates of differential rotation and magnetic structures for a range of F and G-type stars possessing convective envelopes, and in A-type stars with convective cores. It is essential to complement such observational work with theoretical studies based on 3-D simulations of highly turbulent convection coupled to rotation, shear and magnetic fields in full spherical geometries. We have so employed the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code, which deals with compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in spherical shells, to examine the manner in which the global-scale convection can establish differential rotation and meridional circulations under current solar rotation rates, and these make good contact with helioseismic findings. For younger G stars rotating 3 to 5 times faster than the current Sun, the convection establishes ever stronger angular velocity contrasts between their fast equators and slow poles, and these are accompanied by prominent latitudinal temperature contrasts as well. Turning to MHD simulation of magnetic dynamo action within these younger G stars, the resulting magnetism involves wreaths of strong toroidal magnetic fields (up to 50 to 100 kG strengths) in the bulk of the convection zone, typically of opposite polarity in the northern and southern hemispheres. These fields can persist for long intervals despite being pummeled by the fast convective downflows, but they can also exhibit field reversals and cycles. Turning to shallower convective envelopes in the more luminous F-type stars that range in mass from 1.2 to 1.4 solar masses and for various rotation rates, we find that the convection can again establish solar-like differential rotation profiles with a fast equator and slow poles, but the opposite is achieved at the slower rotation rates. The F stars are also capable of building strong magnetic fields, often as wreaths, through dynamo action. We also

  14. An efficient compact fourth order FD method for simulating 3-D mantle convection at high Rayleigh number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    , 533, 1984. Isosurfaces of the temperature field from a 3-D mantle convection simulation at Rayleigh number 10**7 during the transition from a purely conductive state to a double-layer convection state. Simulation was performed using the compact fourth order finite difference scheme at a resolution of 200-by-200-by-100 (length-by-width-by-height).

  15. 3D coexisting modes of thermal convection in the faulted Lower Yarmouk Gorge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Fabien; Inbar, Nimrod; Möller, Peter; Raggad, Marwan; Rödiger, Tino; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Siebert, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Numerical investigations of 3D modes of large-scale convection in faulted aquifers are presented with the aim to infer possible transport mechanisms supporting the formation of thermal springs in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG), at the border between Israel and Jordan. The transient finite elements models are based on a geological model of the LYG that introduces more realistic structural features of the basin, compared to previous existing models of the area (Magri et al., submitted). The sensitivity analysis of the fault permeability showed that faults cross-cutting the main regional flow direction allow groundwater to be driven laterally by convective forces within the fault planes. Therein thermal waters can either discharge along the fault traces or exit the fault through adjacent permeable aquifers. The location of springs can migrate with time, is not strictly constrained to the damage zones and reflects the interplay between the wavelength of the multicellular regime in the fault zone and the regional flow toward discharge areas in the lowlands. The results presented here suggest that in the LYG case, crossing flow paths result from the coexistence of fault convection, that can develop for example along NE-SW oriented faults within the Gorge, and additional flow fields that can be induced either by topography N-S gradients, e.g. perpendicular to the major axe of the Gorge, or by local thermal convection in permeable aquifers below Eocene aquiclude. The sensitivity analysis is consistent with the analytical solutions based on viscous-dependent Rayleigh theory. It indicates that in the LYG coexisting transport processes likely occur at fault hydraulic conductivity ranging between 2.3e-7 m/s and 9.3e- 7 m/s (i.e. 7 m/yr and 30 m/yr). The LYG numerical example and the associated Rayleigh analysis can be applied to study the onset of thermal convection and resulting flow patterns of any fractured hydrothermal basin. References Magri F, Möller S, Inbar N, M

  16. Is the 3-D magnetic null point with a convective electric field an efficient particle accelerator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.-N.; Büchner, J.; Otto, A.; Santos, J.; Marsch, E.; Gan, W.-Q.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: We study the particle acceleration at a magnetic null point in the solar corona, considering self-consistent magnetic fields, plasma flows and the corresponding convective electric fields. Methods: We calculate the electromagnetic fields by 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and expose charged particles to these fields within a full-orbit relativistic test-particle approach. In the 3-D MHD simulation part, the initial magnetic field configuration is set to be a potential field obtained by extrapolation from an analytic quadrupolar photospheric magnetic field with a typically observed magnitude. The configuration is chosen so that the resulting coronal magnetic field contains a null. Driven by photospheric plasma motion, the MHD simulation reveals the coronal plasma motion and the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. In a subsequent test particle experiment the particle energies and orbits (determined by the forces exerted by the convective electric field and the magnetic field around the null) are calculated in time. Results: Test particle calculations show that protons can be accelerated up to 30 keV near the null if the local plasma flow velocity is of the order of 1000 km s-1 (in solar active regions). The final parallel velocity is much higher than the perpendicular velocity so that accelerated particles escape from the null along the magnetic field lines. Stronger convection electric field during big flare explosions can accelerate protons up to 2 MeV and electrons to 3 keV. Higher initial velocities can help most protons to be strongly accelerated, but a few protons also run the risk to be decelerated. Conclusions: Through its convective electric field and due to magnetic nonuniform drifts and de-magnetization process, the 3-D null can act as an effective accelerator for protons but not for electrons. Protons are more easily de-magnetized and accelerated than electrons because of their larger Larmor radii. Notice that macroscopic MHD

  17. Mechanism for generating stagnant slabs in 3-D spherical mantle convection models at Earth-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Yamagishi, Yasuko; Hamano, Yozo; Stegman, Dave R.; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas; Jellinek, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Seismic tomography reveals the natural mode of convection in the Earth is whole mantle with subducted slabs clearly seen as continuous features into the lower mantle. However, simultaneously existing alongside these deep slabs are stagnant slabs which are, if only temporarily, trapped in the upper mantle. Previous numerical models of mantle convection have observed a range of behavior for slabs in the transition zone depending on viscosity stratification and mineral phase transitions, but typically only exhibit flat-lying slabs when mantle convection is layered or trench migration is imposed. We use 3-D spherical models of mantle convection which range up to Earth-like conditions in Rayleigh number to systematically investigate three effects on mantle dynamics: (1) the mineral phase transitions, (2) a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity with plastic yielding at shallow depth, and (3) a viscosity increase in the lower mantle. First a regime diagram is constructed for isoviscous models over a wide range of Rayleigh number and Clapeyron slope for which the convective mode is determined. It agrees very well with previous results from 2-D simulations by Christensen and Yuen (1985), suggesting present-day Earth is in the intermittent convection mode rather than layered or strictly whole mantle. Two calculations at Earth-like conditions (Ra and RaH = 2 í 107 and 5 í 108, respectively) which include effects (2) and (3) are produced with and without the effect of the mineral phase transitions. The first calculation (without the phase transition) successfully produces plate-like behavior with a long wavelength structure and surface heat flow similar to Earth's value. While the observed convective flow pattern in the lower mantle is broader compared to isoviscous models, it basically shows the behavior of whole mantle convection, and does not exhibit any slab flattening at the viscosity increase at 660 km depth. The second calculation which includes the phase

  18. Characterizing 3D Structure of Convective Momentum Transport Associated with the MJO Based on Contemporary Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Jiang, X.; Waliser, D. E.; Moncrieff, M. W.; Johnson, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    As one of the most prominent tropical atmospheric variability modes, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) exerts profound influences on global weather and climate, and serves as a critical predictability source for extend-range forecast. While credible representation of the MJO still represents a great challenge for current general circulation models (GCMs), previous studies on the vertical structure of the MJO have largely focused on collective impacts from multi-scale convective systems on thermodynamic properties of the MJO. Most recently, limited observational studies and idealized modeling work suggested that convective momentum transport (CMT) could also play an important role in interpreting the observed MJO features. In this study, the 3D CMT structure associated with the MJO is examined by analyzing model output from three recent high-quality reanalysis systems, including NOAA's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and ECMWF-the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) reanalysis. Consistent with previous cloud-resolving model study, a well-organized three-layer vertical structure in the CMT associated with the MJO is also discerned based on reanalyses. The result suggests that CMT tends to intensify the MJO circulation, particularly in the lower troposphere. Relative roles of meso-scale systems (MCS) and synoptic waves in contributing the total CMT profiles of the MJO will also be explored. Differences in CMT profiles in these several reanalysis models will be discussed.

  19. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online.

  20. 3D spherical models of Martian mantle convection constrained by melting history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, Pavithra; King, Scott D.

    2014-02-01

    While most of Tharsis rise was in place by end of the Noachian period, at least one volcano on Tharsis swell (Arsia Mons) has been active within the last 2 Ma. This places an important constraint on mantle convection and on the thermal evolution of Mars. The existence of recent volcanism on Mars implies that adiabatic decompression melting and, hence, upwelling convective flow in the mantle remains important on Mars at present. The thermal history on Mars can be constrained by the history of melt production, specifically generating sufficient melt in the first billion years of the planets history to produce Tharsis rise as well as present day melt to explain recent volcanism. In this work, mantle convection simulations were performed using finite element code CitcomS in a 3D sphere starting from a uniformly hot mantle and integrating forward in time for the age of the solar system. We implement constant and decaying radioactive heat sources; and vary the partitioning of heat sources between the crust and mantle, and consider decreasing core-mantle boundary temperature and latent heat of melting. The constant heat source calculations produce sufficient melt to create Tharsis early in Martian history and continue to produce significant melt to the present. Calculations with decaying radioactive heat sources generate excessive melt in the past, except when all the radiogenic elements are in the crust, and none produce melt after 2 Gyr. Producing a degree-1 or degree-2 structure may not be pivotal to explain the Tharsis rise: we present multi-plume models where not every plume produces melt. The Rayleigh number controls the timing of the first peak of volcanism while late-stage volcanism is controlled more by internal mantle heating. Decreasing the Rayleigh number increases the lithosphere thickness (i.e., depth), and increasing lithosphere thickness increases the mean mantle temperature. Increasing pressure reduces melt production while increasing temperature

  1. Interactive Visualization of 3-D Mantle Convection Extended Through AJAX Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, J. C.; Czech, W.; Yuen, D.; Greensky, J.; Knox, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a new software system for real-time interactive visualization of results taken directly from large-scale simulations of 3-D mantle convection and other large-scale simulations. This approach allows for intense visualization sessions for a couple of hours as opposed to storing massive amounts of data in a storage system. Our data sets consist of 3-D data for volume rendering with over 10 million unknowns at each timestep. Large scale visualization on a display wall holding around 13 million pixels has already been accomplished with extension to hand-held devices, such as the OQO and Nokia N800 and recently the iPHONE. We are developing web-based software in Java to extend the use of this system across long distances. The software is aimed at creating an interactive and functional application capable of running on multiple browsers by taking advantage of two AJAX-enabled web frameworks: Echo2 and Google Web Toolkit. The software runs in two modes allowing for a user to control an interactive session or observe a session controlled by another user. Modular build of the system allows for components to be swapped out for new components so that other forms of visualization could be accommodated such as Molecular Dynamics in mineral physics or 2-D data sets from lithospheric regional models.

  2. Natural convection in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.; Hussain, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on free convection in porous materials. Topics considered at the conference included heat transfer, nonlinear temperature profiles and magnetic fields, boundary conditions, concentrated heat sources in stratified porous media, free convective flow in a cavity, heat flux, laminar mixed convection flow, and the onset of convection in a porous medium with internal heat generation and downward flow.

  3. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R

    1986-04-01

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  4. Natural convection between concentric spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference solution for steady natural convective flow in a concentric spherical annulus with isothermal walls has been obtained. The stream function-vorticity formulation of the equations of motion for the unsteady axisymmetric flow is used; interest lying in the final steady solution. Forward differences are used for the time derivatives and second-order central differences for the space derivatives. The alternating direction implicit method is used for solution of the discretization equations. Local one-dimensional grid adaptation is used to resolve the steep gradients in some regions of the flow at large Rayleigh numbers. The break-up into multi-cellular flow is found at high Rayleigh numbers for air and water, and at significantly low Rayleigh numbers for liquid metals. Excellent agreement with previous experimental and numerical data is obtained.

  5. Accessing the Full Potential of Asteroseismology with Kepler using Realistic 3D Simulations of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampedach, Regner

    Asteroseismic analysis of stars is frequently hampered by the unknown surface effect: a systematic frequency shift of acoustic modes between observed and theoretical frequencies from 1D stellar structure models. If ignored, the surface effect will lead to the wrong set of physical parameters for the target star. This bias will also depend on the available modeset, as the surface effect increases with frequency. Well constrained low- frequency modes are needed for an unaffected reference, but are often not available. For F stars the surface effect seems to be of similar magnitude as the large frequency separation (the difference between modes of consecutive radial order and same spherical degree), severely limiting the possibility of unambiguous mode identification. Two rather different F-star models can be found to match the frequencies similarly well, and conflicting schemes have been proposed for discriminating between them. This situation worsens for evolved stars displaying avoided crossings between p-modes, and g-modes from the interior radiative zone. In such cases mode identification is even more challenging ― correct identification is however, also rewarded with frequencies that are highly sensitive to the structure of the core (and hence the age), which can therefore be exceedingly well constrained. The central objective of the proposed project is to evaluate the surface effect and implement appropriate corrections in an asteroseismic data-reduction pipeline. The surface effect is composed of a number of inherently 3D convective effects, which will be evaluated from a grid of realistic 3D hydrodynamical simulations of deep convective atmospheres. New formalisms need to be developed for this, and the results will be made available to the community. The theoretical findings will be validated against, in particular, Kepler observations. This project is of fundamental importance to all asteroseismic research and will advance the science goals of NASA

  6. Assessing the performance of a parallel MATLAB-based 3D convection code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, G. J.; Hasenclever, J.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Shi, C.

    2008-12-01

    We are currently building 2D and 3D MATLAB-based parallel finite element codes for mantle convection and melting. The codes use the MATLAB implementation of core MPI commands (eg. Send, Receive, Broadcast) for message passing between computational subdomains. We have found that code development and algorithm testing are much faster in MATLAB than in our previous work coding in C or FORTRAN, this code was built from scratch with only 12 man-months of effort. The one extra cost w.r.t. C coding on a Beowulf cluster is the cost of the parallel MATLAB license for a >4core cluster. Here we present some preliminary results on the efficiency of MPI messaging in MATLAB on a small 4 machine, 16core, 32Gb RAM Intel Q6600 processor-based cluster. Our code implements fully parallelized preconditioned conjugate gradients with a multigrid preconditioner. Our parallel viscous flow solver is currently 20% slower for a 1,000,000 DOF problem on a single core in 2D as the direct solve MILAMIN MATLAB viscous flow solver. We have tested both continuous and discontinuous pressure formulations. We test with various configurations of network hardware, CPU speeds, and memory using our own and MATLAB's built in cluster profiler. So far we have only explored relatively small (up to 1.6GB RAM) test problems. We find that with our current code and Intel memory controller bandwidth limitations we can only get ~2.3 times performance out of 4 cores than 1 core per machine. Even for these small problems the code runs faster with message passing between 4 machines with one core each than 1 machine with 4 cores and internal messaging (1.29x slower), or 1 core (2.15x slower). It surprised us that for 2D ~1GB-sized problems with only 3 multigrid levels, the direct- solve on the coarsest mesh consumes comparable time to the iterative solve on the finest mesh - a penalty that is greatly reduced either by using a 4th multigrid level or by using an iterative solve at the coarsest grid level. We plan to

  7. Convection and chemistry effects in CVD: A 3-D analysis for silicon deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.; Tsui, P.; Chait, A.

    1989-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT has been adopted to simulate the entire rectangular-channel-like (3-D) geometry of an experimental CVD reactor designed for Si deposition. The code incorporated the effects of both homogeneous (gas phase) and heterogeneous (surface) chemistry with finite reaction rates of important species existing in silane dissociation. The experiments were designed to elucidate the effects of gravitationally-induced buoyancy-driven convection flows on the quality of the grown Si films. This goal is accomplished by contrasting the results obtained from a carrier gas mixture of H2/Ar with the ones obtained from the same molar mixture ratio of H2/He, without any accompanying change in the chemistry. Computationally, these cases are simulated in the terrestrial gravitational field and in the absence of gravity. The numerical results compare favorably with experiments. Powerful computational tools provide invaluable insights into the complex physicochemical phenomena taking place in CVD reactors. Such information is essential for the improved design and optimization of future CVD reactors.

  8. Natural convection in low-g environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Bannister, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The present state of knowledge in the area of low-g natural convection is reviewed, taking into account a number of experiments conducted during the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 space flights. Convections due to steady low-g accelerations are considered. Steady g-levels result from spacecraft rotation, gravity gradients, solar wind, and solar pressure. Varying g-levels are produced by engine burns, attitude control maneuvers, and onboard vibrations from machinery or astronaut movement. Thermoacoustic convection in a low-g environment is discussed together with g-jitter convection, surface tension-driven convection, electrohydrodynamics under low-g conditions, phase change convection, and approaches for the control and the utilization of convection in space.

  9. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  10. 3D printing of natural organic materials by photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva Gonçalves, Joyce Laura; Valandro, Silvano Rodrigo; Wu, Hsiu-Fen; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Mettra, Bastien; Monnereau, Cyrille; Schmitt Cavalheiro, Carla Cristina; Pawlicka, Agnieszka; Focsan, Monica; Lin, Chih-Lang; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2016-03-01

    In previous works, we have used two-photon induced photochemistry to fabricate 3D microstructures based on proteins, anti-bodies, and enzymes for different types of bio-applications. Among them, we can cite collagen lines to guide the movement of living cells, peptide modified GFP biosensing pads to detect Gram positive bacteria, anti-body pads to determine the type of red blood cells, and trypsin columns in a microfluidic channel to obtain a real time biochemical micro-reactor. In this paper, we report for the first time on two-photon 3D microfabrication of DNA material. We also present our preliminary results on using a commercial 3D printer based on a video projector to polymerize slicing layers of gelatine-objects.

  11. Locally modified QUICK scheme for highly convective 2-D and 3-D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    The positive and negative aspects of the QUICK scheme are discussed. QUICK is used in the bulk of the flow domain; however, when the local curvature of the convected variable exceeds a preset value, the algorithm switches to exponential upwinding or other compatible interpolation. Results are presented for the purely convective oblique-step test. A comparison is made between the sharp monotonic EULER-QUICK results and first-, second-, and third-order upwinding.

  12. Thermal convection in a 3D spherical shell with strongly temperature and pressure dependent viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, K.; Harder, H.; Hansen, U.

    2004-12-01

    The style of convection in planetary mantles is presumably dominated by the strong dependence of the viscosity of the mantle material on temperature and pressure. While several efforts have been undertaken in cartesian geometry to investigate convection in media with strong temperature dependent viscosity, spherical models are still in their infancy and still limited to modest parameters. Spectral approaches are usually employed for spherical convection models which do not allow to take into account lateral variations, like temperature dependent viscosity. We have developed a scheme, based on a finite volume discretization, to treat convection in a spherical shell with strong temperature dependent viscosity. Our approach has been particularly tailored to run efficiently on parallel computers. The spherical shell is topologically divided into six cubes. The equations are formulated in primitive variables, and are treated in the cartesian cubes. In order to ensure mass conservation a SIMPLER pressure correction procedure is applied and to handle strong viscosity variations up to Δ η =106 and high Rayleigh-numbers up to Ra=108 the pressure correction algorithm is combined with a pressure weighted interpolation method to satisfy the incompressibility condition and to avoid oscillations. We study thermal convection in a basal and mixed-mode heated shell with stress free and isothermal boundary conditions, as a function of the Rayleigh-number and viscosity contrast. Besides the temperature dependence we have further explored the effects of pressure on the viscosity. As a general result we observe the existence of three regimes (mobile, sluggish and stagnant lid), characterized by the type of surface motion. Laterally averaged depth-profiles of velocity, temperature and viscosity exhibit significant deviations from the isoviscous case. As compared to cartesian geometries, convection in a spherical shell possesses strong memory for the initial state. At strong

  13. Automatic differentiation as a tool for sensitivity analysis of a convective storm in a 3-D cloud model

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.K.; Droegemeier, K.K.; Bischof, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    The ADIFOR automatic differentiation tool is applied to a 3-D storm-scale meteorological model to generate a sensitivity-enhanced code capable of providing derivatives of all model output variables and related diagnostic (derived) parameters as a function of specified control parameters. The tangent linear approximation, applied to a deep convective storm by the first of its kind using a full-physics compressible model, is valid up to 50 min for a 1% water vapor perturbations. The result is very encouraging considering the highly nonlinear and discontinuous properties of solutions. The ADIFOR-generated code has provided valuable sensitivity information on storm dynamics. Especially, it is very efficient and useful for investigating how a perturbation inserted at earlier time propagates through the model variables at later times. However, it is computationally very expensive to be applied to the variational data assimilation, especially for 3-D meteorological models, which potentially have a large number of input variables.

  14. Stellar models with mixing length and T(τ) relations calibrated on 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaris, Maurizio; Cassisi, Santi

    2015-05-01

    The calculation of the thermal stratification in the superadiabatic layers of stellar models with convective envelopes is a long-standing problem of stellar astrophysics, and has a major impact on predicted observational properties such as radius and effective temperature. The mixing length theory, almost universally used to model the superadiabatic convective layers, contains one free parameter to be calibrated (αml) whose value controls the resulting effective temperature. Here we present the first self-consistent stellar evolution models calculated by employing the atmospheric temperature stratification, Rosseland opacities, and calibrated variable αml (dependent on effective temperature and surface gravity) from a recently published large suite of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of stellar convective envelopes and atmospheres for solar stellar composition. From our calculations (with the same composition of the radiation hydrodynamics simulations), we find that the effective temperatures of models with the hydro-calibrated variable αml (that ranges between ~1.6 and ~2.0 in the parameter space covered by the simulations) present only minor differences, by at most ~30-50 K, compared to models calculated at constant solar αml (equal to 1.76, as obtained from the same simulations). The depth of the convective regions is essentially the same in both cases. We also analyzed the role played by the hydro-calibrated T(τ) relationships in determining the evolution of the model effective temperatures, when compared to alternative T(τ) relationships often used in stellar model computations. The choice of the T(τ) can have a larger impact than the use of a variable αml compared to a constant solar value. We found that the solar semi-empirical T(τ) by Vernazza et al. (1981, ApJS, 45, 635) provides stellar model effective temperatures that agree quite well with the results with the hydro-calibrated relationships.

  15. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  16. A Simple Classroom Demonstration of Natural Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Dean R.

    2005-01-01

    This article explains a simple way to demonstrate natural convection, such as from a lit candle, in the classroom using an overhead projector. The demonstration is based on the principle of schlieren imaging, commonly used to visualize variations in density for gas flows.

  17. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. Methods: The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, were matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derived the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[vz,vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. Results: The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is α๏MLT (Sbot) = 1.98. . For different stellar parameters, αMLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, αMLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for α๏MLT (ΔS). In addition, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean-field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and find that it qualitatively shows a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with the solar value of α๏m = 1.83.. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields 1.71 for the Sun, but only displays a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increases with Teff. Conclusions: We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, αm and related quantities vary strongly. Our results will help to replace a constant αMLT. Appendices are available in electronic form at http

  18. MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION DYNAMICS FROM 3D MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dário; Charbonneau, Paul; Miesch, Mark

    2015-02-10

    The form of solar meridional circulation is a very important ingredient for mean field flux transport dynamo models. However, a shroud of mystery still surrounds this large-scale flow, given that its measurement using current helioseismic techniques is challenging. In this work, we use results from three-dimensional global simulations of solar convection to infer the dynamical behavior of the established meridional circulation. We make a direct comparison between the meridional circulation that arises in these simulations and the latest observations. Based on our results, we argue that there should be an equatorward flow at the base of the convection zone at mid-latitudes, below the current maximum depth helioseismic measures can probe (0.75 R{sub ⊙}). We also provide physical arguments to justify this behavior. The simulations indicate that the meridional circulation undergoes substantial changes in morphology as the magnetic cycle unfolds. We close by discussing the importance of these dynamical changes for current methods of observation which involve long averaging periods of helioseismic data. Also noteworthy is the fact that these topological changes indicate a rich interaction between magnetic fields and plasma flows, which challenges the ubiquitous kinematic approach used in the vast majority of mean field dynamo simulations.

  19. Fingering convection induced by atomic diffusion in stars: 3D numerical computations and applications to stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskova, Varvara; Garaud, Pascale; Deal, Morgan; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2014-11-10

    Iron-rich layers are known to form in the stellar subsurface through a combination of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Their presence, nature, and detailed structure can affect the excitation process of various stellar pulsation modes and must therefore be modeled carefully in order to better interpret Kepler asteroseismic data. In this paper, we study the interplay between atomic diffusion and fingering convection in A-type stars, as well as its role in the establishment and evolution of iron accumulation layers. To do so, we use a combination of three-dimensional idealized numerical simulations of fingering convection (which neglect radiative transfer and complex opacity effects) and one-dimensional realistic stellar models. Using the three-dimensional simulations, we first validate the mixing prescription for fingering convection recently proposed by Brown et al. (within the scope of the aforementioned approximation) and identify what system parameters (total mass of iron, iron diffusivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.) play a role in the overall evolution of the layer. We then implement the Brown et al. prescription in the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code to study the evolution of the iron abundance profile beneath the stellar surface. We find, as first discussed by Théado et al., that when the concurrent settling of helium is ignored, this accumulation rapidly causes an inversion in the mean molecular weight profile, which then drives fingering convection. The latter mixes iron with the surrounding material very efficiently, and the resulting iron layer is very weak. However, taking helium settling into account partially stabilizes the iron profile against fingering convection, and a large iron overabundance can accumulate. The opacity also increases significantly as a result, and in some cases it ultimately triggers dynamical convection. The direct effects of radiative acceleration on the dynamics of fingering convection (especially in the

  20. Fingering Convection Induced by Atomic Diffusion in Stars: 3D Numerical Computations and Applications to Stellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskova, Varvara; Garaud, Pascale; Deal, Morgan; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2014-11-01

    Iron-rich layers are known to form in the stellar subsurface through a combination of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Their presence, nature, and detailed structure can affect the excitation process of various stellar pulsation modes and must therefore be modeled carefully in order to better interpret Kepler asteroseismic data. In this paper, we study the interplay between atomic diffusion and fingering convection in A-type stars, as well as its role in the establishment and evolution of iron accumulation layers. To do so, we use a combination of three-dimensional idealized numerical simulations of fingering convection (which neglect radiative transfer and complex opacity effects) and one-dimensional realistic stellar models. Using the three-dimensional simulations, we first validate the mixing prescription for fingering convection recently proposed by Brown et al. (within the scope of the aforementioned approximation) and identify what system parameters (total mass of iron, iron diffusivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.) play a role in the overall evolution of the layer. We then implement the Brown et al. prescription in the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code to study the evolution of the iron abundance profile beneath the stellar surface. We find, as first discussed by Théado et al., that when the concurrent settling of helium is ignored, this accumulation rapidly causes an inversion in the mean molecular weight profile, which then drives fingering convection. The latter mixes iron with the surrounding material very efficiently, and the resulting iron layer is very weak. However, taking helium settling into account partially stabilizes the iron profile against fingering convection, and a large iron overabundance can accumulate. The opacity also increases significantly as a result, and in some cases it ultimately triggers dynamical convection. The direct effects of radiative acceleration on the dynamics of fingering convection (especially in the

  1. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  2. The Phenix ultimate natural convection test

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthe, P.; Pialla, D.; Tenchine, D.; Vasile, A.; Rochwerger, D.

    2012-07-01

    The French sodium cooled fast reactor Phenix was shut down in 2009 after 35 years of operation. Before decommissioning, a final set of tests were performed by the CEA during 9 months. Several topics were involved such as thermal hydraulics, core physics and fuel behaviour. Among these ultimate experiments, two thermal hydraulic tests were performed: an asymmetrical test consisting in a trip of one secondary pump and a natural convection test in the primary circuit. Recognizing the unique opportunity offered by these Phenix ultimate tests, IAEA decided in 2007 to launch a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) devoted to benchmarking analyses with system codes on the Phenix natural convection test. One objective of the natural convection test in Phenix reactor is the assessment of the CATHARE system code for safety studies on future and advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The aim of this paper is to describe this test, which was performed on June 22-23, 2009, and the associated benchmark specifications for the CRP work. The paper reminds briefly the Phenix reactor with the main physical parameters and the instrumentation used during the natural convection test. After that, the test scenario is described: - initial state at a power of 120 MWth, - test beginning resulting from a manual dry out of the two steam generators, - manual scram, - manual trip on the three primary pumps without back-up by pony motors, - setting and development of natural convection in the primary circuit, in a first phase without significant heat sink in the secondary circuits and in a second phase with significant heat sink in the secondary circuits, by opening the casing of steam generators to create an efficient heat sink, by air natural circulation in the steam generators casing. The benchmark case ends after this second phase, which corresponds to the experimental test duration of nearly 7 hours. The paper presents also the benchmark specifications data supplied by the CEA to all

  3. Bifurcations and unfoldings in natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, W.J.; Dorning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Extensive numerical studies of bifurcations and unfoldings have been carried out for two important problems in natural convection. These are (a) the Rayleigh-Benard convection (RBC) problem-a rectangular cavity, with insulated sidewalls, heated at constant uniform temperature along the bottom and cooled at constant uniform temperature along the top; and (b) the volumetric heating convection (VHC) problem - a rectangular cavity, with insulated sidewalls and bottom, heated by a constant uniform volumetric heat source and cooled at constant uniform temperature along the top. The information available in the literature on RBC was used to evaluate and justify the approximations made in the current research, which has shed additional light on nonlinear phenomena in RBC and led to new basic information on the bifurcations and unfoldings that occur in VHC for which there were essentially no previous results available. Both problems arise in many important technological and scientific contexts, including reactor safety analysis and meteorological phenomena. In particular, VHC is relevant to the development of an understanding of the natural convective motion driven by the radioactive decay heat in the molten core mixture (corium) in the core catcher following a hypothetical reactor core meltdown accident and of that which occurs in the atmosphere due to the deposition of radiant solar energy. The calculations were done using newly developed versions of the nodal integral method (NIM) for steady-state flows in conjunction with extended system methods for numerical bifurcation analysis for the saddle-node and pitchfork bifurcation computations.

  4. Self-propulsion via natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo; Mercier, Matthieu; Allshouse, Michael; Peacock, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Natural convection of a fluid due to a heated or cooled boundary has been studied within a myriad of different contexts due to the prevalence of the phenomenon in environmental systems such as glaciers, katabatic winds, or magmatic chambers; and in engineered problems like natural ventilation of buildings, or cooling of electronic components. It has, however, hitherto gone unrecognized that boundary-induced natural convection can propel immersed objects. We experimentally investigate the motion of a wedge-shaped object, immersed within a two-layer fluid system, due to a heated surface. The wedge resides at the interface between the two fluid layers of different density, and its concomitant motion provides the first demonstration of the phenomenon of propulsion via boundary-induced natural convection. Established theoretical and numerical models are used to rationalize the propulsion speed by virtue of balancing the propulsion force against the appropriate drag force. We successfully verified the influence of various fluid and heat parameters on the predicted speed. now at IMFT (Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse).

  5. Turbulent Convection: Is 2D a good proxy of 3D?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    Several authors have recently carried out 2D simulations of turbulent convection for both solar and massive stars. Fitting the 2D results with the MLT, they obtain that alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 specifically, 1.4 less than alpha(sub MLT) less than 1.8. The authors further suggest that this methodology could be used to calibrate the MLT used in stellar evolutionary codes. We suggest the opposite viewpoint: the 2D results show that MLT is internally inconsistent because the resulting alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 violates the MLT basic assumption that alpha(sub MLT) less than 1. When the 2D results are fitted with the CM model, alpha(sub CMT) less than 1, in accord with the basic tenet of the model. On the other hand, since both MLT and CM are local models, they should be replaced by the next generation of non-local, time dependent turbulence models which we discuss in some detail.

  6. Laminar natural convection in right triangular enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuad Kent, E.; Asmaz, E.; Ozerbay, S.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, natural convection in non-rectangular enclosures is analyzed numerically. Streamlines and isotherms are presented for different triangular enclosures with different boundary conditions and Rayleigh numbers. Mean Nusselt numbers on hot walls are also calculated in order to make comparisons between different cases. The solutions are obtained for different aspect ratios where boundary conditions represent the wintertime heating of an attic space. This made possible to investigate the effect of aspect ratio on natural convection. In this study, quarter circular enclosure, which is very similar to right triangles, is also examined. Consequently, we had the opportunity to analyze how shape changes affect the flow pattern. The results of the calculations are compared with the similar enclosures and boundary conditions.

  7. Unsteady natural convection in micropolar nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rup, Kazimierz; Nering, Konrad

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the analysis of momentum, angular momentum and heat transfer during unsteady natural convection in micropolar nanofluids. Selected nanofluids treated as single phase fluids contain small particles with diameter size 10-38.4 nm. In particular three water-based nanofluids were analyzed. Volume fraction of these solutions was 6%. The first of the analyzed nanofluids contained TiO2 nanoparticles, the second one contained Al2O3 nanoparticles, and the third one the Cu nanoparticles.

  8. Natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novomestský, Marcel; Smatanová, Helena; Kapjor, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    This article is concerned with natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder mounted on a plane adiabatic base, the cylinders having an exposed cylinder surface according to different horizontal angle. The cylinder receives heat from a radiating heater which results in a buoyant flow. There are many industrial applications, including refrigeration, ventilation and the cooling of electrical components, for which the present study may be applicable

  9. Examining In-Cloud Convective Turbulence in Relation to Total Lightning and the 3D Wind Field of Severe Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momar, S. A.; Deierling, W.; Williams, J. K.; Hoffman, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Convectively induced turbulence (CIT) is commonly listed as a cause or factor in weather-related commercial aviation accidents. In-cloud CIT is generated in part by shears between convective updrafts and downdrafts. Total lightning is also dependent on a robust updraft and the resulting storm electrification. The relationship between total lightning and turbulence could prove useful in operational aviation settings with the use of future measurements from the geostationary lightning mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-R satellite. Providing nearly hemispheric coverage of total lightning, the GLM could help identify CIT in otherwise data-sparse locations. For a severe thunderstorm case on 7 June 2012 in northeast Colorado, in-cloud eddy dissipation rate estimates from the NCAR/NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm were compared with cloud electrification data from the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array and radar products from the Denver, Colorado WSR-88D. These comparisons showed that high concentrations of very high frequency (VHF) source densities emitted by lightning occurred near and downstream of the storm's convective core. Severe turbulence was also shown to occur near this area, extending near the melting level of the storm and spreading upward and outward. Additionally, increases/decreases in VHF sources and turbulence volumes occurred within a few minutes of each other; although, light turbulence was shown to increase near one storm's dissipation. This may be due to increased shear from the now downdraft dominate storm. The 3D wind field from this case, obtained by either a dual-Doppler or a Variational Doppler Radar Assimilation System (VDRAS) analysis, will also be examined to further study the relationships between total lightning and thunderstorm kinematics. If these results prove to be robust, lightning may serve as a strong indicator of the location of moderate or greater turbulence.

  10. Natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1996-05-01

    In the event of a core meltdown accident, to prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head, the establishment of a coolable configuration has been proposed by flooding with water the reactor cavity. In Reference 3, it was shown that for the heavy-water new production reactor (NPW-HWR) design, this strategy, e.g., the rejection of decay heat to a containment decay heat removal system by boiling of water in the reactor cavity, could keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. The analysis of Ref. 3 was performed with the computer code COMMIX-1AR/P, and showed that natural convection in the molten-corium pool was the dominant mechanism of heat transfer from the pool to the wall of the reactor vessel lower head. To determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source, in Ref. 4, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reineke were analyzed with COMMIX. It was found that the Nusselt (Nu) number predicted by COMMIX was within the spread of the experimental measurements. In the COMMIX analysis of Ref. 4, the semicircular cavity was treated as symmetric. The objective of the work presented in this paper was to extend the COMMIX validation analysis of Ref. 4 by removing the assumption of symmetry and expanding the analysis up to the highest Rayleigh (Ra) number that leads to a steady state. In conclusion, this work shows that the numerical predictions of natural convection in an internally heated pool bounded by a curved bottom are in reasonably good agreement with experimental measurements.

  11. Modeling PCR in Natural Convection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Kevin; Yariv, Ehud; Ben Dov, Guy

    2007-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a biochemical protocol for making many copies of a DNA template by thermal cycling between a hot temperature (where the strands are separated) and a cool temperature (where primers are annealed). In natural convection PCR, the requisite thermal cycling is provided by a buoyancy-driven circulating flow of the carrying buffer between a lower hot plate (at the denaturing temperature) and an upper cold plate (at the annealing temperature). We present a multi-component convection-diffusion-reaction model for natural convection-driven PCR when both primers and PCR enzyme are in excess. The evolution of the DNA population achieves a stationary state, wherein the problem is recast as an eigenvalue problem for computing the exponential amplification rate. With a realistic choice of parameters, the model predicts a doubling time on the order of two minutes, in agreement with experiments and much slower than the fluid cycling time. In contrast to what might be expected, the doubling time increases monotonically with the diffusion coefficient.

  12. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  13. Laminar natural convection under nonuniform gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J.; Eichhorn, R.; Dhir, V.

    1972-01-01

    Laminar natural convection is analyzed for cases in which gravity varies with the distance from the leading edge of an isothermal plate. The study includes situations in which gravity varies by virtue of the varying slope of a surface. A general integral solution method which includes certain known integral solutions as special cases is developed to account for arbitrary position-dependence of gravity. A series method of solution is also developed for the full equations. Although it is more cumbersome it provides verification of the integral method.

  14. Natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    To prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head in the event of a core meltdown accident, the establishment of a coolable configuration has been proposed by flooding the reactor cavity with water. In Ref. 3, it was shown that for the heavy-water new production reactor (NPW-HWR) design, this strategy (e.g., the rejection of decay heat to a containment decay heat removal system by boiling of water in the reactor cavity) could keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. The analysis of Ref. 3 was performed with the COMMIX-IAR/P computer code and showed that natural convection in the molten-corium pool was the dominant mechanism of heat transfer from the pool to the wall of the reactor vessel lower head. COMMIX is a general-purpose thermal-hydraulics code based on finite differencing by the first-order upwind scheme. To determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source, in Ref. 4, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reineke were analyzed with COMMIX in Ref. 5. It was found that the Nusselt number predicted by COMMIX was within the spread of the experimental measurements. In the COMMIX analysis of Ref. 5, the semicircular cavity was treated as symmetric. The objective of this paper was to extend the COMMIX validation analysis of Ref. 5 by removing the assumption of symmetry and expanding the analysis from the highest Rayleigh number of the experiments of Ref. 4 to the highest Rayleigh number that leads to a steady state.

  15. Natural convection in C-shaped thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamad, A.A.; Sezai, I.

    1997-08-29

    The present work is concerned with the numerical analysis of natural convection from a C-shaped thermosyphon. The system can be considered as a model for a Trombe wall in passive solar collectors as well as electronic cooling arrangements and it has geophysical applications. The effect of Rayleigh number (1 {times} 10{sup 3} to 1 {times} 10{sup 7}) and aspect ratios of 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, and 10.0 is investigated for a fixed Prandtl number (0.7). Local and average Nusselt numbers for heated and cold walls are discussed. Mass advected by the buoyancy force is calculated and presented for the range of investigated parameters. The flow pattern and isotherm distribution in the gap between the wall and cover plate are presented and discussed.

  16. Conjugate natural convection between horizontal eccentric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Davood; Dehghan, Ali Akbar; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    This study involved the numerical investigation of conjugate natural convection between two horizontal eccentric cylinders. Both cylinders were considered to be isothermal with only the inner cylinder having a finite wall thickness. The momentum and energy equations were discretized using finite volume method and solved by employing SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results were presented for various solid-fluid conductivity ratios (KR) and various values of eccentricities in different thickness of inner cylinder wall and also for different angular positions of inner cylinder. From the results, it was observed that in an eccentric case, and for KR < 10, an increase in thickness of inner cylinder wall resulted in a decrease in the average equivalent conductivity coefficient (overline{{K_{eq} }} ); however, a KR > 10 value caused an increase in overline{{K_{eq} }} . It was also concluded that in any angular position of inner cylinder, the value of overline{{K_{eq} }} increased with increase in the eccentricity.

  17. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents Using RT3D

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian D.; Truex, Michael J.; Clement, T P.

    2006-07-25

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a reactive transport code that can be applied to model solute fate and transport for many different purposes. This document specifically addresses application of RT3D for modeling related to evaluation and implementation of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). Selection of MNA as a remedy requires an evaluation process to demonstrate that MNA will meet the remediation goals. The U.S. EPA, through the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directive 9200.4?17P, provides the regulatory context for the evaluation and implementation of MNA. In a complementary fashion, the context for using fate and transport modeling as part of MNA evaluation is described in the EPA?s technical protocol for chlorinated solvent MNA, the Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA, and in this document. The intent of this document is to describe (1) the context for applying RT3D for chlorinated solvent MNA and (2) the attenuation processes represented in RT3D, (3) dechlorination reactions that may occur, and (4) the general approach for using RT3D reaction modules (including a summary of the RT3D reaction modules that are available) to model fate and transport of chlorinated solvents as part of MNA or for combinations of MNA and selected types of active remediation.

  18. Natural convection in a fluid layer periodically heated from above.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Floryan, J M

    2014-08-01

    Natural convection in a horizontal layer subject to periodic heating from above has been studied. It is shown that the primary convection leads to the cooling of the bulk of the fluid below the mean temperature of the upper wall. The secondary convection may lead either to longitudinal rolls, transverse rolls, or oblique rolls. The global flow properties (e.g., the average Nusselt number for the primary convection and the critical conditions for the secondary convection) are identical to those of the layer heated from below. However, the flow and temperature patterns exhibit phase shifts in the horizontal directions.

  19. fVisiOn: glasses-free tabletop 3D display to provide virtual 3D media naturally alongside real media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shunsuke

    2012-06-01

    A novel glasses-free tabletop 3D display, named fVisiOn, floats virtual 3D objects on an empty, flat, tabletop surface and enables multiple viewers to observe raised 3D images from any angle at 360° Our glasses-free 3D image reproduction method employs a combination of an optical device and an array of projectors and produces continuous horizontal parallax in the direction of a circular path located above the table. The optical device shapes a hollow cone and works as an anisotropic diffuser. The circularly arranged projectors cast numerous rays into the optical device. Each ray represents a particular ray that passes a corresponding point on a virtual object's surface and orients toward a viewing area around the table. At any viewpoint on the ring-shaped viewing area, both eyes collect fractional images from different projectors, and all the viewers around the table can perceive the scene as 3D from their perspectives because the images include binocular disparity. The entire principle is installed beneath the table, so the tabletop area remains clear. No ordinary tabletop activities are disturbed. Many people can naturally share the 3D images displayed together with real objects on the table. In our latest prototype, we employed a handmade optical device and an array of over 100 tiny projectors. This configuration reproduces static and animated 3D scenes for a 130° viewing area and allows 5-cm-tall virtual characters to play soccer and dance on the table.

  20. New technologies of 2-D and 3-D modeling for analysis and management of natural resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisina, E. N.; Lyubimova, A. V.; Kirpicheva, E. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    For ensuring technological support of research and administrative activity in the sphere of environmental management a specialized modular program complex was developed. The special attention in developing a program complex is focused to creation of convenient and effective tools for creation and visualization 2d and 3D models providing the solution of tasks of the analysis and management of natural resources.

  1. Natural Convection in Enclosed Porous or Fluid Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saatdjian, Esteban; Lesage, François; Mota, José Paulo B.

    2014-01-01

    In Saatdjian, E., Lesage, F., and Mota, J.P.B, "Transport Phenomena Projects: A Method to Learn and to Innovate, Natural Convection Between Porous, Horizontal Cylinders," "Chemical Engineering Education," 47(1), 59-64, (2013), the numerical solution of natural convection between two porous, concentric, impermeable cylinders was…

  2. Combining volumetric edge display and multiview display for expression of natural 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Ryota; Matsuda, Isamu; Kakeya, Hideki

    2006-02-01

    In the present paper the authors present a novel stereoscopic display method combining volumetric edge display technology and multiview display technology to realize presentation of natural 3D images where the viewers do not suffer from contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation of the eyes, which causes eyestrain and sickness. We adopt volumetric display method only for edge drawing, while we adopt stereoscopic approach for flat areas of the image. Since focal accommodation of our eyes is affected only by the edge part of the image, natural focal accommodation can be induced if the edges of the 3D image are drawn on the proper depth. The conventional stereo-matching technique can give us robust depth values of the pixels which constitute noticeable edges. Also occlusion and gloss of the objects can be roughly expressed with the proposed method since we use stereoscopic approach for the flat area. We can attain a system where many users can view natural 3D objects at the consistent position and posture at the same time in this system. A simple optometric experiment using a refractometer suggests that the proposed method can give us 3-D images without contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation.

  3. Modeling Images of Natural 3D Surfaces: Overview and Potential Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalobeanu, Andre; Kuehnel, Frank; Stutz, John

    2004-01-01

    Generative models of natural images have long been used in computer vision. However, since they only describe the of 2D scenes, they fail to capture all the properties of the underlying 3D world. Even though such models are sufficient for many vision tasks a 3D scene model is when it comes to inferring a 3D object or its characteristics. In this paper, we present such a generative model, incorporating both a multiscale surface prior model for surface geometry and reflectance, and an image formation process model based on realistic rendering, the computation of the posterior model parameter densities, and on the critical aspects of the rendering. We also how to efficiently invert the model within a Bayesian framework. We present a few potential applications, such as asteroid modeling and Planetary topography recovery, illustrated by promising results on real images.

  4. Spontaneous development of arcuate single-sided subduction in global 3-D mantle convection models with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Fabio; Tackley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The work presented aims at a better understanding of plate tectonics, a crucial dynamical feature within the global framework of mantle convection. Special focus is given to the interaction of subduction-related mantle flow and surface topography. Thereby, the application of a numerical model with two key functional requirements is essential: an evolution over a long time period to naturally model mantle flow and a physically correct topography calculation. The global mantle convection model presented in Crameri et al. (2012a) satisfies both of these requirements. First, it is efficiently calculated by the finite-volume code Stag-YY (e.g., Tackley 2008) using a multi-grid method on a fully staggered grid. Second, it applies the sticky-air method (Matsumoto and Tomoda 1983; Schmeling et al, 2008) and thus approximates a free surface when the sticky-air parameters are chosen carefully (Crameri et al., 2012b). This leads to dynamically self-consistent mantle convection with realistic, single-sided subduction. New insights are thus gained into the interplay of obliquely sinking plates, toroidal mantle flow and the arcuate shape of slabs and trenches. Numerous two-dimensional experiments provide optimal parameter setups that are applied to three-dimensional models in Cartesian and fully spherical geometries. Features observed and characterised in the latter experiments give important insight into the strongly variable behaviour of subduction zones along their strike. This includes (i) the spontaneous development of arcuate trench geometry, (ii) regional subduction polarity reversals and slab tearing, and the newly discovered features (iii) 'slab tunnelling' and (iv) 'back-slab spiral flow'. Overall, this study demonstrates the strong interaction between surface topography and mantle currents and highlights the variability of subduction zones and their individual segments. REFERENCES Crameri, F., P. J. Tackley, I. Meilick, T. V. Gerya, and B. J. P. Kaus (2012a), A free

  5. Suppression of Natural Convection in a Thermoacoustic Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun-Qing; Liu, Qiu-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    The effects of gravity on the efficiency of thermoacoustic engines are investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially for thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigerators. The significant effects of gravity are found to be due to the presence of natural convection in the thermoacoustic pulse tube when the hot side of the tube is lower than the cold side. This kind of natural convection influences and reduces the efficiency of the thermoacoustic working system. Thus, how to suppress this natural convection becomes important for increasing the efficiency of thermoacoustic engines. Unlike the method of inserting a silk screen in a pulse tube, the present study uses a numerical simulation method to research the natural convection in pulse tubes, and we try to change the shape of the pulse tube to suppress this convection.

  6. 3-D Modeling of Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Temperature and Concentration Fields Coupling via Materials Properties Dependence and via Double Diffusive Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the HgCdTe growth by the vertical Bridgman method was performed using FIDAP finite element code. Double-diffusive melt convection is analyzed, as the primary factor at controls inhomogeneity of the solidified material. Temperature and concentration fields in the model are also coupled via material properties, such as thermal and solutal expansion coefficients with the dependence on both temperature and concentration, and melting temperature evaluation from pseudobinary CdTe-HgTe phase diagram. Experimental measurements were used to obtain temperature boundary conditions. Parametric study of the melt convection dependence on the gravity conditions was undertaken. It was found, that the maximum convection velocity in the melt can be reduced under certain conditions. Optimal conditions to obtain a near flat solidified interface are discussed. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D calculations are compared with previous 2- D findings. A video film featuring 3-D melt convection will be presented.

  7. Transient natural convection in heated inclined tubes

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. . Oceanic Div.); Denbow, D.A. ); Murphy, H.D. )

    1990-05-01

    To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0{degree}, 20{degree}, and 35{degree} from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Results were primarily qualitative but were useful in providing insight into the phenomena occurring. Steady-state temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. transient measurements of the temperature distribution were obtained during cooling from a higher temperature without a heat source to calibrate the heat losses. With the electrical heat source, temporal data were taken during heating to examine the approach to steady state. Quasi-steady flow conditions were approached rapidly, but the overall time constant of the apparatus was of the order of one-third of a day. Predictions with the three-dimensional TEMPEST code were first tested by comparison with simple conduction analyses. Comparison with actual data showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination, 35{degree}, and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. Trends of temperature level and Nusselt number with heating rate or Rayleigh number were reasonable, but the predicted variation of the end Nusselt number versus inclination was in the opposite direction from the experiment. 75 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. A numerical study of natural convection in a narrow annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, V.

    1991-12-01

    Various numerical models were used to predict the natural convection of a solidifying liquid metal in a narrow annulus. Previous work in this area does not consider the temperature variation that exists in the fluid and the resulting heat conduction in the solid mold material. The finite element fluid dynamics code FIDAP was used to solve these models. The results indicate that the natural convective effects are small.

  9. Analysis of natural convection in a low gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattor, Ethan E.; Durgin, William W.; Bloznalis, Peter; Schoenberg, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Natural convection inside a spherical container was studied experimentally with two apparatuses at low buoyancy levels. The data generated by these experiments, plotted nondimensionally as the Nusselt versus Rayleigh numbers, give correlations for Rayleigh numbers between 1000 and 10 exp 8, a range previously untested. These results show that natural convection has significant effects at a Rayleigh number of 1000 and higher, although the behavior of the Nusselt number as the conduction limit is approached is still unknown for a spherical geometry.

  10. Estimating 3D tilt from local image cues in natural scenes

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Johannes; McCann, Brian C.; Geisler, Wilson S.

    2016-01-01

    Estimating three-dimensional (3D) surface orientation (slant and tilt) is an important first step toward estimating 3D shape. Here, we examine how three local image cues from the same location (disparity gradient, luminance gradient, and dominant texture orientation) should be combined to estimate 3D tilt in natural scenes. We collected a database of natural stereoscopic images with precisely co-registered range images that provide the ground-truth distance at each pixel location. We then analyzed the relationship between ground-truth tilt and image cue values. Our analysis is free of assumptions about the joint probability distributions and yields the Bayes optimal estimates of tilt, given the cue values. Rich results emerge: (a) typical tilt estimates are only moderately accurate and strongly influenced by the cardinal bias in the prior probability distribution; (b) when cue values are similar, or when slant is greater than 40°, estimates are substantially more accurate; (c) when luminance and texture cues agree, they often veto the disparity cue, and when they disagree, they have little effect; and (d) simplifying assumptions common in the cue combination literature is often justified for estimating tilt in natural scenes. The fact that tilt estimates are typically not very accurate is consistent with subjective impressions from viewing small patches of natural scene. The fact that estimates are substantially more accurate for a subset of image locations is also consistent with subjective impressions and with the hypothesis that perceived surface orientation, at more global scales, is achieved by interpolation or extrapolation from estimates at key locations. PMID:27738702

  11. Combination of photogrammetric and geoelectric methods to assess 3d structures associated to natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargier, Yannick; Dore, Ludovic; Antoine, Raphael; Palma Lopes, Sérgio; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2016-04-01

    The extraction of subsurface materials is a key element for the economy of a nation. However, natural degradation of underground quarries is a major issue from an economic and public safety point of view. Consequently, the quarries stakeholders require relevant tools to define hazards associated to these structures. Safety assessment methods of underground quarries are recent and mainly based on rock physical properties. This kind of method leads to a certain homogeneity assumption of pillar internal properties that can cause an underestimation of the risk. Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) is a widely used method that possesses two advantages to overcome this limitation. The first is to provide a qualitative understanding for the detection and monitoring of anomalies in the pillar body (e.g. faults). The second is to provide a quantitative description of the electrical resistivity distribution inside the pillar. This quantitative description can be interpreted with constitutive laws to help decision support (water content decreases the mechanical resistance of a chalk). However, conventional 2D and 3D Imaging techniques are usually applied to flat surface surveys or to surfaces with moderate topography. A 3D inversion of more complex media (case of the pillar) requires a full consideration of the geometry that was never taken into account before. The Photogrammetric technique presents a cost effective solution to obtain an accurate description of the external geometry of a complex media. However, this method has never been fully coupled with a geophysical method to enhance/improve the inversion process. Consequently we developed a complete procedure showing that photogrammetric and ERI tools can be efficiently combined to assess a complex 3D structure. This procedure includes in a first part a photogrammetric survey, a processing stage with an open source software and a post-processing stage finalizing a 3D surface model. The second part necessitates the

  12. Functional neurology of a brain system: a 3D olfactory bulb model to process natural odorants.

    PubMed

    Migliore, Michele; Cavarretta, Francesco; Hines, Michael L; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2013-01-01

    The network of interactions between mitral and granule cells in the olfactory bulb is a critical step in the processing of odor information underlying the neural basis of smell perception. We are building the first computational model in 3 dimensions of this network in order to analyze the rules for connectivity and function within it. The initial results indicate that this network can be modeled to simulate experimental results on the activation of the olfactory bulb by natural odorants, providing a much more powerful approach for 3D simulation of brain neurons and microcircuits.

  13. A new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling: Implications for the Cenozoic evolution of 3-D structure and dynamics of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2016-06-01

    The 3-D distribution of buoyancy in the convecting mantle drives a suite of convection-related manifestations. Although seismic tomography is providing increasingly resolved images of the present-day mantle heterogeneity, the distribution of mantle density variations in the geological past is unknown, and, by implication, this is true for the convection-related observables. The one major exception is tectonic plate motions, since geologic data are available to estimate their history and they currently provide the only available constraints on the evolution of 3-D mantle buoyancy in the past. We developed a new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling with a procedure for matching plate velocity data at different instants in the past. The crucial aspect of this reconstruction methodology is to ensure that at all times plates are driven by buoyancy forces in the mantle and not vice versa. Employing tomography-based retrodictions over the Cenozoic, we estimate the global amplitude of the following observables: dynamic surface topography, the core-mantle boundary ellipticity, the free-air gravity anomalies, and the global divergence rates of tectonic plates. One of the major benefits of the new data assimilation method is the stable recovery of much shorter wavelength changes in heterogeneity than was possible in our previous work. We now resolve what appears to be two-stage subduction of the Farallon plate under the western U.S. and a deeply rooted East African Plume that is active under the Ethiopian volcanic fields during the Early Eocene.

  14. Nature versus nurture in shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romps, D. M.; Kuang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    We use tracers in a large-eddy simulation of shallow convection to show that stochastic entrainment, not cloud-base properties, determine the fate of convecting parcels. The tracers are used to diagnose the correlations between a parcel's state above the cloud base and both the parcel's state at the cloud base and its entrainment history. We find that the correlation with the cloud-base state goes to zero a few hundred meters above the cloud base. On the other hand, correlations between a parcel's state and its net entrainment are large. Evidence is found that the entrainment events may be described as a stochastic Poisson process. We construct a parcel model with stochastic entrainment that is able to replicate flux profiles and, more importantly, the observed variability. Turning off cloud-base variability has little effect on the results, which suggests that stochastic mass-flux models may be initialized with a single set of properties. The success of the stochastic parcel model suggests that it holds promise as the framework for a convective parameterization.

  15. Localization of toroidal motion and shear heating in 3-D high Rayleigh number convection with temperature-dependent viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandar, S.; Yuen, D. A.; Reuteler, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have applied spectral-transform methods to study three-dimensional thermal convection with temperature-dependent viscosity. The viscosity varies exponentially with the form exp(-BT), where B controls the viscosity contrast and T is temperature. Solutions for high Rayleigh numbers, up to an effective Ra of 6.25 x 10(exp 6), have been obtained for an aspect-ratio of 5x5x1 and a viscosity contrast of 25. Solutions show the localization of toroidal velocity fields with increasing vigor of convection to a coherent network of shear-zones. Viscous dissipation increases with Rayleigh number and is particularly strong in regions of convergent flows and shear deformation. A time-varying depth-dependent mean-flow is generated because of the correlation between laterally varying viscosity and velocity gradients.

  16. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y; Nitao, J; Buscheck, T A; Sun, Y

    2006-02-03

    In this study, we conduct a two-dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have strong impacts on the in-drift convective flow and transport.

  17. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y; Nitao, J J; Buscheck, T A; Sun, Y

    2006-07-24

    In this study, we conduct a two dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have a strong impact on in-drift convective flow and transport.

  18. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Hao; J. Nitao; T.A. Buscheck; Y. Sun

    2006-03-28

    In this study, we conduct a two-dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have strong impacts on the in-drift convective flow and transport.

  19. A decoupled monolithic projection method for natural convection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaomin; Kim, Kyoungyoun; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient monolithic numerical procedure based on a projection method for solving natural convection problems. In the present monolithic method, the buoyancy, linear diffusion, and nonlinear convection terms are implicitly advanced by applying the Crank-Nicolson scheme in time. To avoid an otherwise inevitable iterative procedure in solving the monolithic discretized system, we use a linearization of the nonlinear convection terms and approximate block lower-upper (LU) decompositions along with approximate factorization. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed method is more stable and computationally efficient than other semi-implicit methods, preserving temporal second-order accuracy.

  20. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  1. A Two Colorable Fourth Order Compact Difference Scheme and Parallel Iterative Solution of the 3D Convection Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ge, Lixin; Kouatchou, Jules

    2000-01-01

    A new fourth order compact difference scheme for the three dimensional convection diffusion equation with variable coefficients is presented. The novelty of this new difference scheme is that it Only requires 15 grid points and that it can be decoupled with two colors. The entire computational grid can be updated in two parallel subsweeps with the Gauss-Seidel type iterative method. This is compared with the known 19 point fourth order compact differenCe scheme which requires four colors to decouple the computational grid. Numerical results, with multigrid methods implemented on a shared memory parallel computer, are presented to compare the 15 point and the 19 point fourth order compact schemes.

  2. What causes the large extensions of red supergiant atmospheres?. Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1D hydrostatic, 3D convection, and 1D pulsating model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Scholz, M.; Freytag, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Wood, P. R.; Abellan, F. J.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: This research has two main goals. First, we present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants (RSGs), increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. Methods: We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of the RSGs V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 in the near-infrared K-band (1.92-2.47 μm) with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution (R ~ 1500). To categorize and comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3D convection, and new 1D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Results: Our near-infrared flux spectra of V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict the large observed extensions of molecular layers, most remarkably in the CO bands. Likewise, the 3D convection models and the 1D pulsation models with typical parameters of RSGs lead to compact atmospheric structures as well, which are similar to the structure of the hydrostatic PHOENIX models. They can also not explain the observed decreases in the visibilities and thus the large atmospheric molecular extensions. The full sample of our RSGs indicates increasing observed atmospheric extensions with increasing luminosity and decreasing surface gravity, and no correlation with effective temperature or variability amplitude. Conclusions: The location of our RSG sources in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is confirmed to be consistent with the red limits of recent evolutionary tracks

  3. Interaction of a vortex ring with a natural convective layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Morales, C.; Gelderblom, G.; Solorio, F.; Salinas-Vázquez, M.; Zenit, R.

    2014-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the interaction of a vortex ring with a shear flow, generated by a natural convective layer. Laminar vortex rings were generated in water with a piston-cylinder arrangement. To generate the shear flow, a vertical wall was heated by a thermal bath held at constant temperature to produce a laminar and stable thermal boundary layer with a Grashof number of O(108). Measurements of the two-dimensional velocity field were obtained with a time resolved particle image velocimetry technique. Additionally, a 3D numerical model was used to simulate the experimental conditions. We mainly conducted experiments for the piston stroke L/D0 = 1 and Re of O(1000). The velocity ratio r = Uvi/Ush (where Uvi is the initial vortex velocity and Ush is the maximum velocity of the shear layer) was in the range 2.2 ⩽ r ⩽ 3.6. The results show that as the vortex approaches the shear layer, the ring expands and stretches mainly in the vertical direction and tilts slightly forming an angle between the wall and the ring plane which increases to about 3°. The rate of reduction of circulation is slower at the lower section of the vortex ring indicating that the momentum transport is more significant in this region. Moreover, the vortex circulation at the lower section increases to about 20% compared to the isothermal case. An analysis of the different mechanisms leading to this ring-shear layer interaction is presented and comparisons with reported data are discussed.

  4. Capturing natural-colour 3D models of insects for species discovery and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chuong V; Lovell, David R; Adcock, Matt; La Salle, John

    2014-01-01

    Collections of biological specimens are fundamental to scientific understanding and characterization of natural diversity-past, present and future. This paper presents a system for liberating useful information from physical collections by bringing specimens into the digital domain so they can be more readily shared, analyzed, annotated and compared. It focuses on insects and is strongly motivated by the desire to accelerate and augment current practices in insect taxonomy which predominantly use text, 2D diagrams and images to describe and characterize species. While these traditional kinds of descriptions are informative and useful, they cannot cover insect specimens "from all angles" and precious specimens are still exchanged between researchers and collections for this reason. Furthermore, insects can be complex in structure and pose many challenges to computer vision systems. We present a new prototype for a practical, cost-effective system of off-the-shelf components to acquire natural-colour 3D models of insects from around 3 mm to 30 mm in length. ("Natural-colour" is used to contrast with "false-colour", i.e., colour generated from, or applied to, gray-scale data post-acquisition.) Colour images are captured from different angles and focal depths using a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera rig and two-axis turntable. These 2D images are processed into 3D reconstructions using software based on a visual hull algorithm. The resulting models are compact (around 10 megabytes), afford excellent optical resolution, and can be readily embedded into documents and web pages, as well as viewed on mobile devices. The system is portable, safe, relatively affordable, and complements the sort of volumetric data that can be acquired by computed tomography. This system provides a new way to augment the description and documentation of insect species holotypes, reducing the need to handle or ship specimens. It opens up new opportunities to collect data for research

  5. Capturing natural-colour 3D models of insects for species discovery and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chuong V; Lovell, David R; Adcock, Matt; La Salle, John

    2014-01-01

    Collections of biological specimens are fundamental to scientific understanding and characterization of natural diversity-past, present and future. This paper presents a system for liberating useful information from physical collections by bringing specimens into the digital domain so they can be more readily shared, analyzed, annotated and compared. It focuses on insects and is strongly motivated by the desire to accelerate and augment current practices in insect taxonomy which predominantly use text, 2D diagrams and images to describe and characterize species. While these traditional kinds of descriptions are informative and useful, they cannot cover insect specimens "from all angles" and precious specimens are still exchanged between researchers and collections for this reason. Furthermore, insects can be complex in structure and pose many challenges to computer vision systems. We present a new prototype for a practical, cost-effective system of off-the-shelf components to acquire natural-colour 3D models of insects from around 3 mm to 30 mm in length. ("Natural-colour" is used to contrast with "false-colour", i.e., colour generated from, or applied to, gray-scale data post-acquisition.) Colour images are captured from different angles and focal depths using a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera rig and two-axis turntable. These 2D images are processed into 3D reconstructions using software based on a visual hull algorithm. The resulting models are compact (around 10 megabytes), afford excellent optical resolution, and can be readily embedded into documents and web pages, as well as viewed on mobile devices. The system is portable, safe, relatively affordable, and complements the sort of volumetric data that can be acquired by computed tomography. This system provides a new way to augment the description and documentation of insect species holotypes, reducing the need to handle or ship specimens. It opens up new opportunities to collect data for research

  6. Capturing Natural-Colour 3D Models of Insects for Species Discovery and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Lovell, David R.; Adcock, Matt; La Salle, John

    2014-01-01

    Collections of biological specimens are fundamental to scientific understanding and characterization of natural diversity—past, present and future. This paper presents a system for liberating useful information from physical collections by bringing specimens into the digital domain so they can be more readily shared, analyzed, annotated and compared. It focuses on insects and is strongly motivated by the desire to accelerate and augment current practices in insect taxonomy which predominantly use text, 2D diagrams and images to describe and characterize species. While these traditional kinds of descriptions are informative and useful, they cannot cover insect specimens “from all angles” and precious specimens are still exchanged between researchers and collections for this reason. Furthermore, insects can be complex in structure and pose many challenges to computer vision systems. We present a new prototype for a practical, cost-effective system of off-the-shelf components to acquire natural-colour 3D models of insects from around 3 mm to 30 mm in length. (“Natural-colour” is used to contrast with “false-colour”, i.e., colour generated from, or applied to, gray-scale data post-acquisition.) Colour images are captured from different angles and focal depths using a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera rig and two-axis turntable. These 2D images are processed into 3D reconstructions using software based on a visual hull algorithm. The resulting models are compact (around 10 megabytes), afford excellent optical resolution, and can be readily embedded into documents and web pages, as well as viewed on mobile devices. The system is portable, safe, relatively affordable, and complements the sort of volumetric data that can be acquired by computed tomography. This system provides a new way to augment the description and documentation of insect species holotypes, reducing the need to handle or ship specimens. It opens up new opportunities to collect data

  7. Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Karen; Hazzard, James F.

    2007-07-01

    Active faults often contain distinct accumulations of granular wear material. During shear, this granular material accommodates stress and strain in a heterogeneous manner that may influence fault stability. We present new work to visualize the nature of contact force distributions during 3D granular shear. Our 3D discrete numerical models consist of granular layers subjected to normal loading and direct shear, where gouge particles are simulated by individual spheres interacting at points of contact according to simple laws. During shear, we observe the transient microscopic processes and resulting macroscopic mechanical behavior that emerge from interactions of thousands of particles. We track particle translations and contact forces to determine the nature of internal stress accommodation with accumulated slip for different initial configurations. We view model outputs using novel 3D visualization techniques. Our results highlight the prevalence of transient directed contact force networks that preferentially transmit enhanced stresses across our granular layers. We demonstrate that particle size distribution (psd) controls the nature of the force networks. Models having a narrow (i.e. relatively uniform) psd exhibit discrete pipe-like force clusters with a dominant and focussed orientation oblique to but in the plane of shear. Wider psd models (e.g. power law size distributions D = 2.6) also show a directed contact force network oblique to shear but enjoy a wider range of orientations and show more out-of-plane linkages perpendicular to shear. Macroscopic friction level, is insensitive to these distinct force network morphologies, however, force network evolution appears to be linked to fluctuations in macroscopic friction. Our results are consistent with predictions, based on recent laboratory observations, that force network morphologies are sensitive to grain characteristics such as particle size distribution of a sheared granular layer. Our numerical

  8. An optimal sensing strategy for recognition and localization of 3-D natural quadric objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Hahn, Hernsoo

    1991-01-01

    An optimal sensing strategy for an optical proximity sensor system engaged in the recognition and localization of 3-D natural quadric objects is presented. The optimal sensing strategy consists of the selection of an optimal beam orientation and the determination of an optimal probing plane that compose an optimal data collection operation known as an optimal probing. The decision of an optimal probing is based on the measure of discrimination power of a cluster of surfaces on a multiple interpretation image (MII), where the measure of discrimination power is defined in terms of a utility function computing the expected number of interpretations that can be pruned out by a probing. An object representation suitable for active sensing based on a surface description vector (SDV) distribution graph and hierarchical tables is presented. Experimental results are shown.

  9. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Valenta, Vaclav

    2014-03-01

    This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR).The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  10. Numerical modeling of crystal growth on a centrifuge for unstable natural convection configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Downey, J. P.; Curreri, P. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The fluid mechanics associated with crystal growth processes on centrifuges is modeled using 2D and 3D models. Two-dimensional calculations show that flow bifurcations exist in such crystal growth configurations where the ampoule is oriented in the same direction as the resultant gravity vector and a temperature gradient is imposed on the melt. A scaling analysis is formulated to predict the flow transition point from the natural convection dominated regime to the Coriolis force dominated regime. Results of 3D calculations are presented for two thermal configurations of the crystal growth cell: top heated and bottom heated with respect to the centrifugal acceleration. In the top heated configuration, a substantial reduction in the convection intensity within the melt can be attained by centrifuge operations, and close to steady diffusion-limited thermal conditions can be achieved over a narrow range of the imposed microgravity level. In the bottom heated configuration the Coriolis force has a stabilizing effect on fluid motion by delaying the onset of unsteady convection.

  11. Combined natural convection and radiation in a triangular enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasani, Syed Muhammad Fakhir

    The problem of combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer of a gray absorbing-emitting and isotropically scattering medium in a triangular enclosure is solved numerically in this dissertation. Interactions of natural convection and radiation occur in many engineering applications such as electronic cooling, solar heating, crystal growth, fire propagation etc. The radiation effect was neglected from many of the previous studies due to the complexities associated with radiation modeling. The triangular enclosure considered in the present study has been used by researchers in the past to model flows inside attic spaces, solar stills and near shore water circulation in lakes and rivers. Previous pure natural convection studies in this geometry had produced conflicting results and the effect of radiation was not considered prior to this study. The objectives of this study are: (i) to obtain a numerical solution for the combined natural convection and radiation problem in a triangular enclosure, (ii) to study the influence of radiation on thermal instabilities present in pure natural convection flow in this geometry, (iii) to perform parametric study and (iv) to verify the results of pure natural convection flow using more accurate QUICK scheme. The problem is mathematically formulated and a Fortran computer program is developed to meet the desired objectives. The two dimensional stream function equation, the time-dependent vorticity transport and energy equations, and the radiative transport equation are solved simultaneously for uniform temperature boundary conditions. Two different sets of boundary conditions are employed with inclined surfaces considered hot for one and cold for the other. The stream function equation is solved using successive overrelaxation whereas the vorticity transport and energy equations are solved using third-order upwinding QUICK scheme while the radiative transport solution is sought by means of Discrete Ordinates Method. Two

  12. Visual navigation of the UAVs on the basis of 3D natural landmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    This work considers the tracking of the UAV (unmanned aviation vehicle) on the basis of onboard observations of natural landmarks including azimuth and elevation angles. It is assumed that UAV's cameras are able to capture the angular position of reference points and to measure the angles of the sight line. Such measurements involve the real position of UAV in implicit form, and therefore some of nonlinear filters such as Extended Kalman filter (EKF) or others must be used in order to implement these measurements for UAV control. Recently it was shown that modified pseudomeasurement method may be used to control UAV on the basis of the observation of reference points assigned along the UAV path in advance. However, the use of such set of points needs the cumbersome recognition procedure with the huge volume of on-board memory. The natural landmarks serving as such reference points which may be determined on-line can significantly reduce the on-board memory and the computational difficulties. The principal difference of this work is the usage of the 3D reference points coordinates which permits to determine the position of the UAV more precisely and thereby to guide along the path with higher accuracy which is extremely important for successful performance of the autonomous missions. The article suggests the new RANSAC for ISOMETRY algorithm and the use of recently developed estimation and control algorithms for tracking of given reference path under external perturbation and noised angular measurements.

  13. Numerical Solution of Natural Convection in Eccentric Annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.W.

    2001-09-18

    The governing equations for transient natural convection in eccentric annular space are solved with two high-order accurate numerical algorithms. The equation set is transformed into bipolar coordinates and split into two one-dimensional equations: finite elements are used in the direction normal to the cylinder surfaces; the pseudospectral technique is used in the azimuthal direction. This report discusses those equations.

  14. On the convective-absolute nature of river bedform instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesipa, Riccardo; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca; Chomaz, Jean Marc

    2014-12-01

    River dunes and antidunes are induced by the morphological instability of stream-sediment boundary. Such bedforms raise a number of subtle theoretical questions and are crucial for many engineering and environmental problems. Despite their importance, the absolute/convective nature of the instability has never been addressed. The present work fills this gap as we demonstrate, by the cusp map method, that dune instability is convective for all values of the physical control parameters, while the antidune instability exhibits both behaviors. These theoretical predictions explain some previous experimental and numerical observations and are important to correctly plan flume experiments, numerical simulations, paleo-hydraulic reconstructions, and river works.

  15. Mimicking Natural Laminar to Turbulent Flow Transition: A Systematic CFD Study Using PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2005-01-01

    For applied aerodynamic computations using a general purpose Navier-Stokes code, the common practice of treating laminar to turbulent flow transition over a non-slip surface is somewhat arbitrary by either treating the entire flow as turbulent or forcing the flow to undergo transition at given trip locations in the computational domain. In this study, the possibility of using the PAB3D code, standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and the Girimaji explicit algebraic stresses model to mimic natural laminar to turbulent flow transition was explored. The sensitivity of flow transition with respect to two limiters in the standard k-epsilon turbulence model was examined using a flat plate and a 6:1 aspect ratio prolate spheroid for our computations. For the flat plate, a systematic dependence of transition Reynolds number on background turbulence intensity was found. For the prolate spheroid, the transition patterns in the three-dimensional boundary layer at different flow conditions were sensitive to the free stream turbulence viscosity limit, the reference Reynolds number and the angle of attack, but not to background turbulence intensity below a certain threshold value. The computed results showed encouraging agreements with the experimental measurements at the corresponding geometry and flow conditions.

  16. Microscopic magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, J.; Nozaki, H.; Umegaki, I.; Higemoto, W.; Ansaldo, E. J.; Brewer, J. H.; Sakurai, H.; Kao, T.-H.; Yang, H.-D.; Månsson, M.

    2014-12-01

    In order to elucidate the magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides, we have measured μ+SR spectra for Sr2VO4, LaSrVO4, and Sr2CrO4 using powder samples. ZF- and wTF-μ+SR measurements propose that Sr2VO4 enters into the static antiferromagnetic (AF) order phase below 8 K. In addition, TF-μ+SR measurements evidence that the transition at 105 K is not magnetic but structural and/or electronic in origin. For LaSrVO4, static long-range order has not been observed down to 20 K, while, as T decreases from 145 K, wTF asymmetry starts to decrease below 60 K, suggesting the appearance and evolution of localized magnetic moments below 60 K. For Sr2CrO4, by contrast, both ZF- and wTF-μ+SR have confirmed the presence of antiferromagnetic order below 117 K, as predicted in the χ(T) curve.

  17. Transport in vertical mixed convection flows and natural convection flows in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, V. P.

    Computed similarity solutions are presented for thermally-driven natural convection flow adjacent to a vertical isothermal surface in cold pure or saline water. These calculations specifically explore the flow behavior at temperature conditions for which the buoyancy force reverses across the thermal transport region due to the presence of a density extremum within the region. Computed similarity solutions are given for the laminar natural convection flow adjacent to a vertical ice surface melting in saline water. The most recent transport property data and a very accurate equation of state for saline water are used to analyze the transport of momentum, salt and thermal energy in such flows. Interface motion effects are included and the interface conditions are determined from the transport. Time exposure photographs of the flow adjacent to a vertical ice surface melting in 10% saline water are presented for ambient water temperatures between 1 C and 15 C. A perturbation analysis is presented of mixed convection flow over a vertical semi infinite surface with uniform heat flux.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction in natural convection systems: A convection-diffusion-reaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, E.; Ben-Dov, G.; Dorfman, K. D.

    2005-09-01

    We present a rational scheme for modeling natural convection-driven polymerase chain reaction (PCR), where many copies of a DNA template are made by cycling between hot and cold regions via a circulatory, buoyancy-driven flow. This process is described here in the framework of multiple-species formulation, using evolution equations which govern the concentrations of the various DNA species in the carrying solution. In the intermediate asymptotic limit, where a stationary amplification rate is achieved, these equations provide an eigenvalue problem for computing the exponential amplification rate of double-stranded DNA. The scheme is demonstrated using a simplified model of a Rayleigh-Bénard cell. In contrast to what may have been anticipated, diffusion tends to enhance the growth rate. The present model, intended to be used as a template for more device-specific analyses, provides a starting point for understanding the effects of the competing mechanisms (reaction, convection and diffusion) upon the amplification efficiency.

  19. Influence of geometry on natural convection in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Winn, C.B.; Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Strong free convection airflows occur within passive solar buildings resulting from elevated temperatures of surfaces irradiated by solar energy compared with the cooler surfaces not receiving radiation. The geometry of a building has a large influence on the directions and magnitudes of natural airflows, and thus heat transfer between zones. This investigation has utilized a variety of reduced-scale building configurations to study the effects of geometry on natural convection heat transfer. Similarity between the reduced-scale model and a full-scale passive solar building is achieved by having similar geometries and by replacing air with Freon-12 gas as the model's working fluid. Filling the model with Freon-12 gas results in similarity in Prandtl numbers and Rayleigh numbers based on temperature differences in the range from 10/sup 9/ to 10/sup 11/. Results from four geometries are described with an emphasis placed on the effects of heat loss on zone temperature stratification shifts.

  20. Verification of a numerical simulation technique for natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Altmayer, E.; Kammerud, R.C.

    1983-03-01

    The present paper describes a verification of CONVEC2 for single-zone geometries by comparison with the results of two natural convection experiments performed in small-scale rectangular enclosures. These experiments were selected because of the high Rayleigh numbers obtained and the small heat loss through the insulated surfaces. Comparisons are presented for (1) heat transfer rates, (2) fluid temperature profiles, and (3) surface heat flux distributions.

  1. Prandtl Number Dependent Natural Convection with Internal Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Hee Lee; Seung Dong Lee; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-06-01

    Natural convection plays an important role in determining the thermal load from debris accumulated in the reactor vessel lower head during a severe accident. Recently, attention is being paid to the feasibility of external vessel flooding as a severe accident management strategy and to the phenomena affecting the success path for retaining the molten core material inside the vessel. The heat transfer inside the molten core material can be characterized by the strong buoyancy-induced flows resulting from internal heating due to decay of fission products. The thermo-fluid dynamic characteristics of such flow depend strongly on the thermal boundary conditions. The spatial and temporal variation of heat flux on the pool wall boundaries and the pool superheat are mainly characterized by the natural convection flow inside the molten pool. In general, the natural convection heat transfer phenomena involving the internal heat generation are represented by the modified Rayleigh number (Ra’), which quantifies the internal heat source and hence the strength of the buoyancy force. In this study, tests were conducted in a rectangular section 250 mm high, 500 mm long and 160 mm wide. Twenty-four T-type thermocouples were installed in the test section to measure temperatures. Four T-type thermocouples were used to measure the boundary temperatures. The thermocouples were placed in designated locations after calibration. A direct heating method was adopted in this test to simulate the uniform heat generation. The experiments covered a range of Ra' between 1.5x106 and 7.42x1015 and the Prandtl number (Pr) between 0.7 and 6.5. Tests were conducted with water and air as simulant. The upper and lower boundary conditions were maintained uniform. The results demonstrated feasibility of the direct heating method to simulate uniform volumetric heat generation. Particular attentions were paid to the effect of Pr on natural convection heat transfer within the rectangular pool.

  2. Uncovering the true nature of deformation microstructures using 3D analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Quadir, M. Z.; Afrin, N.; Xu, W.; Loeb, A.; Soe, B.; McMahon, C.; George, C.; Bassman, L.

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction (3D EBSD) has emerged as a powerful technique for generating 3D crystallographic information in reasonably large volumes of a microstructure. The technique uses a focused ion beam (FIB) as a high precision serial sectioning device for generating consecutive ion milled surfaces of a material, with each milled surface subsequently mapped by EBSD. The successive EBSD maps are combined using a suitable post-processing method to generate a crystallographic volume of the microstructure. The first part of this paper shows the usefulness of 3D EBSD for understanding the origin of various structural features associated with the plastic deformation of metals. The second part describes a new method for automatically identifying the various types of low and high angle boundaries found in deformed and annealed metals, particularly those associated with grains exhibiting subtle and gradual variations in orientation. We have adapted a 2D image segmentation technique, fast multiscale clustering, to 3D EBSD data using a novel variance function to accommodate quaternion data. This adaptation is capable of segmenting based on subtle and gradual variation as well as on sharp boundaries within the data. We demonstrate the excellent capabilities of this technique with application to 3D EBSD data sets generated from a range of cold rolled and annealed metals described in the paper.

  3. Innovative radar products for the 3D, high-resolution and real-time monitoring of the convective activity in the airspace around airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabary, P.; Bousquet, O.; Sénési, S.; Josse, P.

    2009-09-01

    Airports are recognized to become critical areas in the future given the expected doubling in air traffic by 2020. The increased density of aircrafts in the airport airspaces calls for improved systems and products to monitor in real-time potential hazards and thus meet the airport objectives in terms of safety and throughput. Among all meteorological hazards, convection is certainly the most impacting one. We describe here some innovative radar products that have recently been developed and tested at Météo France around the Paris airports. Those products rely on the French Doppler radar network consisting today of 24 elements with some of them being polarimetric. Reflectivity and Doppler volumetric data are concentrated from all 24 radar sites in real-time at the central level (Toulouse) where 3D Cartesian mosaics covering the entire French territory (i.e. a typical 1,000 by 1,000 km² area) are elaborated. The innovation with respect to what has been done previously is that the three components of the wind are retrieved by operational combination of the radial velocities. The final product, available in real-time every 15 minutes with a spatial resolution of 2.5 km horizontally and 500 m vertically, is a 3D grid giving the interpolated reflectivity and wind field (u, v and w) values. The 2.5 km resolution, arising from the fact that the retrieval is carried out every 15 minutes from radars typically spaced apart by 150 km, is not sufficient for airport airspace monitoring but is valuable for en-route monitoring. Its extension to the entire European space is foreseen. To address the specific needs in the airport areas, a downscaling technique has been proposed to merge the above-mentioned low-resolution 3D wind and reflectivity fields with the high resolution (5 minutes and 1 km²) 2D imagery of the Trappes radar that is the one that covers the Paris airports. The merging approach is based on the assumption that the Vertical Profile of Reflectivity (i.e. the

  4. The Effects of Chemically Distinct LLSVPs on the Geoid: the Results from Both 3-D Thermochemical Convection and Seismically Constrained Instantaneous Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Zhong, Shijie

    2015-04-01

    The long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and mantle viscosity structure. Hager and Ricard and their colleagues successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically imaged mantle structure as buoyancy force in an isochemical, whole mantle convection model. However, it has been generally agreed that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath the Pacific and the Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and likely more dense than the ambient mantle. In this study, we investigate how chemically distinct LLSVPs or chemical piles affect the geoid using both time-dependent thermochemical convection model and instantaneous flow model driven by buoyancy derived from seismic models. First, by conducting a series of 3D spherical thermochemical convection calculations, we found that the chemically dense piles above the CMB have a compensation effect on the geoid, and as a result, the total geoid is only controlled by the upper ~1600 km of the mantle. Second, we use buoyancy structure derived from seismic models (e.g., Smean and other models) to study whether the observed geoid can be reproduced by considering the compensation effects of the LLSVPs. The geoid modeling requires a viscosity profile and a seismic velocity to density scaling f. We define a four-layer viscosity model with viscosities for lithosphere, the upper mantle, the transition zone, and the lower mantle . With a fixed non-dimensional lithospheric viscosity at 20, we compute the geoid and search for other three viscosity parameters and scaling parameter f that lead to the maximum variance reduction for the geoid. For the whole mantle, isochemical model, the best model with variance reduction of ~71% for degrees 2-9 has viscosities of 0.5, 0.5, and 35, for the upper mantle, transition zone, and lower mantle, respectively, and the scaling f is 0.24. For the thermochemical model with the bottom 1000 km of structure

  5. The Effects of Chemically Distinct LLSVPs on the Geoid: the Results from Both 3-D Thermochemical Convection and Seismically Constrained Instantaneous Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2014-12-01

    The long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and mantle viscosity structure. Hager and Ricard and their colleagues successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically imaged mantle structure as buoyancy force in an isochemical, whole mantle convection model. However, it has been generally agreed that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath the Pacific and the Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and likely more dense than the ambient mantle. In this study, we investigate how chemically distinct LLSVPs or chemical piles affect the geoid using both time-dependent thermochemical convection model and instantaneous flow model driven by buoyancy derived from seismic models. First, by conducting a series of 3D spherical thermochemical convection calculations, we found that the chemically dense piles above the CMB have a compensation effect on the geoid, and as a result, the total geoid is only controlled by the upper ~1600 km of the mantle. Second, we use buoyancy structure derived from seismic model Smean to study whether the observed geoid can be reproduced by considering the compensation effects of the LLSVPs. The geoid modeling requires a viscosity profile η and a seismic velocity to density scaling f. We define a four-layer viscosity model with viscosities for lithosphere η_lt, the upper mantle η_um, the transition zone η_tz, and the lower mantle η_lm. With a fixed η_lt of 20, we compute the geoid and search for η_um, η_tz, η_lm, and f that lead to the maximum variance reduction for the geoid. For the whole mantle, isochemical model, the best model with variance reduction of ~71% for degrees 2-9 has viscosities of 20, 0.5, 0.5, 35, for η_lt, η_um, η_tz, and η_lm, respectively, and the scaling f is 0.24. For the thermochemical model with the bottom 1000 km of structure removed, the best model has a viscosity profile of 20, 0.5, 0.5, 30 for the four

  6. Local heat transfer estimation in microchannels during convective boiling under microgravity conditions: 3D inverse heat conduction problem using BEM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, S.; LeNiliot, C.

    2008-11-01

    Two-phase and boiling flow instabilities are complex, due to phase change and the existence of several interfaces. To fully understand the high heat transfer potential of boiling flows in microscale's geometry, it is vital to quantify these transfers. To perform this task, an experimental device has been designed to observe flow patterns. Analysis is made up by using an inverse method which allows us to estimate the local heat transfers while boiling occurs inside a microchannel. In our configuration, the direct measurement would impair the accuracy of the searched heat transfer coefficient because thermocouples implanted on the surface minichannels would disturb the established flow. In this communication, we are solving a 3D IHCP which consists in estimating using experimental data measurements the surface temperature and the surface heat flux in a minichannel during convective boiling under several gravity levels (g, 1g, 1.8g). The considered IHCP is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem and solved using the boundary element method (BEM).

  7. Topological analysis of a mixing flow generated by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Pablo Sebastián; de la Cruz, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We use topological tools to describe the natural convective motion and the Lagrangian trajectories of a flow generated by stepwise, alternating heating and cooling protocol of opposite vertical walls of a cubic container. The working fluid considered is Newtonian and the system is in presence of the acceleration of gravity but the nonlinear terms are neglected, i.e., we study the piece-wise steady and linear problem. For this convective mixing flow, we identify invariant surfaces formed by the Lagrangian orbits of massless tracers that are topologically equivalent to spherical shells and period-1 lines with elliptic and hyperbolic segments that are located on symmetry planes. We describe the previous features as functions of the Rayleigh number in the range 3 × 104 ≤ Ra ≤ 5 × 105. We show that this system shares properties with other systems with non-toroidal invariant surfaces.

  8. Upwind finite-volume method for natural and forced convection

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, D.; Chang, C.H. . Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics)

    1994-03-01

    A third-order upwind finite-volume method was applied to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations via the use of artificial compressibility. The energy equation and the source terms representing thermal buoyancy are included in the system. The inviscid fluxes are evaluated by a MUSCL-type flux difference upwind scheme based on the inviscid eigensystem. An implicit approximate factorization (AF) scheme was used for time integration, and subiterations at each time step can be applied to obtain time accuracy. Various steady and unsteady tests are performed to validate the present method, including problems in natural convection and forced convection, and in particular the complex flow field over two circular cylinders displaced normally to free stream.

  9. Natural assembly of platelet lysate-loaded nanocarriers into enriched 3D hydrogels for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Santo, Vítor E; Popa, Elena G; Mano, João F; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L

    2015-06-01

    The role of Platelet Lysates (PLs) as a source of growth factors (GFs) and as main element of three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels has been previously described. However, the resulting hydrogels usually suffer from high degree of contraction, limiting their usefulness. This work describes the development of a stable biomimetic 3D hydrogel structure based on PLs, through the spontaneous assembling of a high concentration of chitosan-chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles (CH/CS NPs) with PLs loaded by adsorption. The interactions between the NPs and the lysates resemble the ones observed in the extracellular matrix (ECM) native environment between glycosaminoglycans and ECM proteins. In vitro release studies were carried out focusing on the quantification of PDGF-BB and TGF-β1 GFs. Human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) were entrapped in these 3D hydrogels and cultured in vitro under chondrogenic stimulus, in order to assess their potential use for cartilage regeneration. Histological, immunohistological and gene expression analysis demonstrated that the PL-assembled constructs entrapping hASCs exhibited results similar to the positive control (hASCS cultured in pellets), concerning the levels of collagen II expression and immunolocalization of collagen type I and II and aggrecan. Moreover, the deposition of new cartilage ECM was detected by alcian blue and safranin-O positive stainings. This work demonstrates the potential of PLs to act simultaneously as a source/carrier of GFs and as a 3D structure of support, through the application of a "bottom-up" approach involving the assembly of NPs, resulting in an enriched construct for cartilage regeneration applications. PMID:25795623

  10. An experimental investigation of a natural convection solar air loop

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrullo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Vanoli, R.

    1983-12-01

    The interest that has been shown in the use of solar energy to heat dwellings following the ''passive'' design criteria does not correspond to the development of accurate theoretical and experimental analysis. This is particularly true for natural circulation solar air heaters. A significant application of these components is wall panel to complement south-facing windows in supplying solar heat directly to buildings. This idea, formerly suggested by Trombe et al., leads to various realizations, one of which was theoretically investigated by present authors. A convective loop panel consists of a glass layer and a black absorber that is backed by insulation. In the configuration shown the air flows in the channel in front of the absorber and the deflecting panel allows cool air to settle to the bottom of the U channel, preventing reverse thermocirculation during night or very low insolation periods. Since thermocirculation is the primary mode of heat transfer for the solar air heaters, the definition of an accurate convection model for the channel is essential for performance predictions. Studies on this subject - free convection between asymmetrically heated vertical planes - deal mainly with theoretical solutions for laminar flow, with the two usual boundary conditions. As the heat transfer process in the solar air loop cannot be expected to follow this model, there is the need of extensive experimental investigation.

  11. Instabilities of Natural Convection in a Periodically Heated Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. Z.; Floryan, Jerzy M.

    2013-11-01

    Natural convection in a horizontal layer subject to a spatially periodic heating along the lower wall has been investigated. The heating produces sinusoidal temperature variations characterized by the wave number α and the Rayleigh number Rap. The primary response has the form of stationary rolls with axis orthogonal to the heating wave vector. For large α convection is limited to a thin layer adjacent to the lower wall with a uniform conduction above it. Linear stability was used to determine conditions leading to a secondary convection. Two mechanisms of instability have been identified. For α = 0(1), the parametric resonance dominates and leads to the pattern of instability that is locked-in with the pattern of the heating according to the relation δcr = α /2, where δcr denotes the component of the critical disturbance wave vector parallel to the heating wave vector. The second mechanism, Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) mechanism, dominates for large α. Competition between these mechanisms gives rise to non-commensurable states and appearance of soliton lattices, to the formation of distorted transverse rolls, and to the appearance of the wave vector component in the direction perpendicular to the forcing direction.

  12. Modelling and control of natural convection in canned foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Vazquez, L. J.; Martinez, A.

    1999-12-01

    In this paper we study mathematically an industrial problem related to sterilization processes involving heat transfer by natural convection. We give results of existence and regularity for the solution of this problem. We recast the whole problem as an optimal control problem with pointwise constraints on the state and the control in order to ensure the reduction of microorganism concentration and the retention of nutrients, and to save energy. Finally, we give results on existence of the optimal solution and optimality conditions for its characterization.

  13. Quaternary Hot-spot Activity within the Australian Continent Fueled by Edge-driven Convection: Combined Evidence from Seismic Tomography and 3D Geodynamic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, N.; Davies, R.

    2013-12-01

    Although the Australian continent is often regarded as tectonically quiescent owing to its intra-plate setting, it is not entirely free from large-scale processes, which result in lithospheric-scale changes in composition and structure. A clear example of this is the Newer Volcanics Province (NVP), located in the state of Victoria, southeast Australia, which exhibits the youngest evidence (~5ka) of basaltic intra-plate volcanism within Australia. Over the last few decades there has been much conjecture as to whether the source of volcanism originates deep in the mantle - for example, a rising plume - or is somehow localized in the uppermost mantle. In order to directly address this question, we use teleseismic arrival time residuals recorded by the WOMBAT transportable array in eastern Australia - the largest of its type in the southern hemisphere - to image 3-D variations in P-wavespeed in the upper mantle beneath the NVP. Our results unequivocally show the presence of a low velocity anomaly beneath the NVP which terminates at around 250 km depth. Assuming that this distinct anomaly is associated with increased temperatures and melting, then it appears likely that the NVP is a shallow, rather than deeply rooted feature. It is not possible to completely rule out the presence of a plume, because a narrow plume that spreads out on contact with the base of the lithosphere may yield a similar signature; however, our seismic results, combined with complementary evidence, including: (i) the lack of a hotspot chain; (ii) modest topographic response; and (iii) elongation of the eruption centers in a direction perpendicular to contemporary plate motion, all support the same conclusion. An idea that has been invoked to explain the NVP is so-called edge driven convection, where a change in lithospheric thickness drives a localized convection cell, which can transport deeper and hotter material to the surface. It has been inferred, from regional surface wave models, that the

  14. Numerical predictions of natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P. Cho, D.H.

    1993-05-01

    In the event of a core meltdown accident, one of the accident progression paths is fuel relocation to the lower reactor plenum. In the heavy water new production reactor (NPR-HWR) design the reactor cavity is flooded with water. In such a design, decay heat removal to the water in the reactor cavity and thence to the containment may be adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. If this is the case, the accident progression can be arrested by retaining a coolable corium configuration in the lower reactor plenum. The strategy of reactor cavity flooding to prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head has also been considered for commercial pressurized water reactors. Previously, the computer code COMMIX-LAR/P was used to determine if the heat removal rate from the molten cerium in the lower plenum to the water in the cavity was adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature in the NPR-HWR design below failure limits. It was found that natural convection in the molten pool resulted in heat removal rates that kept the peak reactor vessel temperature about 400{degrees}C below the steel melting point. The objective of the work presented in this paper was to determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source. For this purpose, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reeneke were analyzed with COMMIX and code predictions were compared with experimental measurements. COMMIX is a general purpose thermalhydraulics code based on finite differencing by the first order upwind scheme.

  15. Numerical predictions of natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P. Cho, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    In the event of a core meltdown accident, one of the accident progression paths is fuel relocation to the lower reactor plenum. In the heavy water new production reactor (NPR-HWR) design the reactor cavity is flooded with water. In such a design, decay heat removal to the water in the reactor cavity and thence to the containment may be adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. If this is the case, the accident progression can be arrested by retaining a coolable corium configuration in the lower reactor plenum. The strategy of reactor cavity flooding to prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head has also been considered for commercial pressurized water reactors. Previously, the computer code COMMIX-LAR/P was used to determine if the heat removal rate from the molten cerium in the lower plenum to the water in the cavity was adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature in the NPR-HWR design below failure limits. It was found that natural convection in the molten pool resulted in heat removal rates that kept the peak reactor vessel temperature about 400[degrees]C below the steel melting point. The objective of the work presented in this paper was to determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source. For this purpose, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reeneke were analyzed with COMMIX and code predictions were compared with experimental measurements. COMMIX is a general purpose thermalhydraulics code based on finite differencing by the first order upwind scheme.

  16. Effect of enclosure shape on natural convection velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical analysis was performed to compare natural convection velocities in two dimensional enclosures of various shape. The following shapes were investigated: circle, square, horizontal and upright 2 x 1 aspect ratio rectangles, horizontal and upright half circles, diamond. In all cases, the length scale in the various dimensionless parameters, such as Rayleigh number, is defined as the diameter of the equal area circle. Natural convection velocities were calculated for Rayleigh numbers of 1000 and 5000 with the temperature difference taken to be across (1) the maximum horizontal dimension, (2) the median horizontal line (line through centroid) and (3) the horizontal distance such that the temperature gradient is the same for shapes of equal area. For the class of shapes including the square, upright half circle and upright rectangle, the computed velocities were found to agree very closely with that of the equal area circle when the temperature difference is taken to be across the maximum horizontal dimension (condition (a)). The velocities for the horizontal rectangle and half circle were found to be approximately one half that of the equal area circle for the same condition. Better overall agreement among all shapes was obtained by setting the temperature difference across a distance such that the temperature gradients were equal for shapes of equal area.

  17. 3D stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of a liquid metal layer in the presence of a magnetic field—effect of wall electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopoulos, Dimitrios; Pelekasis, Nikos A.

    2014-10-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard stability of a liquid metal layer of rectangular cross section is examined in the presence of a strong magnetic field that is aligned with the horizontal direction of the cross section. The latter is much longer than the vertical direction and the cross section assumes a large aspect ratio. The side walls are treated as highly conducting. Linear stability analysis is performed allowing for three-dimensional instabilities that develop along the longitudinal direction. The finite element methodology is employed for the discretization of the stability analysis formulation while accounting for the electrical conductivity of the cavity walls. The Arnoldi method provides the dominant eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the problem. In order to facilitate parallel implementation of the numerical solution at large Hartmann numbers, Ha, domain decomposition is employed along the horizontal direction of the cross section. As the Hartmann number increases a real eigenvalue emerges as the dominant unstable eigenmode, signifying the onset of thermal convection, whose major vorticity component in the core of the layer is aligned with the direction of the magnetic field. Its wavelength along the longitudinal direction of the layer is on the order of twice its height and increases as Ha increases. The critical Grashof was obtained for large Ha and it was seen to scale like Ha 2 signifying the balance between buoyancy and Lorentz forces. For well conducting side walls, the nature of the emerging flow pattern is determined by the combined conductivity of Hartmann walls and Hartmann layers, cH + Ha -1. When poor conducting Hartmann walls are considered, cH ≪ 1, the critical eigensolution is characterized by well defined Hartmann and side layers. The side layers are characterized by fast fluid motion in the magnetic field direction as a result of the electromagnetic pumping in the vicinity of the Hartmann walls. Increasing the electrical conductivity of the Hartmann

  18. Morphogenesis and mechanostabilization of complex natural and 3D printed shapes

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Kishore, Sharan; Sarkar, Suman; Mahapatra, Debiprosad Roy; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio

    2015-01-01

    The natural selection and the evolutionary optimization of complex shapes in nature are closely related to their functions. Mechanostabilization of shape of biological structure via morphogenesis has several beautiful examples. With the help of simple mechanics-based modeling and experiments, we show an important causality between natural shape selection as evolutionary outcome and the mechanostabilization of seashells. The effect of biological growth on the mechanostabilization process is identified with examples of two natural shapes of seashells, one having a diametrically converging localization of stresses and the other having a helicoidally concentric localization of stresses. We demonstrate how the evolved shape enables predictable protection of soft body parts of the species. The effect of bioavailability of natural material is found to be a secondary factor compared to shape selectivity, where material microstructure only acts as a constraint to evolutionary optimization. This is confirmed by comparing the mechanostabilization behavior of three-dimensionally printed synthetic polymer structural shapes with that of natural seashells consisting of ceramic and protein. This study also highlights interesting possibilities in achieving a new design of structures made of ordinary materials which have bio-inspired optimization objectives. PMID:26601170

  19. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  20. Characterization of immiscible fluid displacement processes with various capillary numbers and viscosity ratios in 3D natural sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Jiang, Fei; Christensen, Kenneth T.

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the influence of reservoir conditions upon multiphase flow, we calculated fluid displacements (drainage processes) in 3D pore spaces of Berea sandstone using two-phase lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The results of simulations under various conditions were used to classify the resulting two-phase flow behavior into three typical fluid displacement patterns on the diagram of capillary number (Ca) and viscosity ratio of the two fluids (M). In addition, the saturation of the nonwetting phase was calculated and mapped on the Ca-M diagram. We then characterized dynamic pore-filling events (i.e., Haines jumps) from the pressure variation of the nonwetting phase, and linked this behavior to the occurrence of capillary fingering. The results revealed the onset of capillary fingering in 3D natural rock at a higher Ca than in 2D homogeneous granular models, with the crossover region between typical displacement patterns broader than in the homogeneous granular model. Furthermore, saturation of the nonwetting phase mapped on the Ca-M diagram significantly depends on the rock models. These important differences between two-phase flow in 3D natural rock and in 2D homogeneous models could be due to the heterogeneity of pore geometry in the natural rock and differences in pore connectivity. By quantifying two-phase fluid behavior in the target reservoir rock under various conditions (e.g., saturation mapping on the Ca-M diagram), our approach could provide useful information for investigating suitable reservoir conditions for geo-fluid management (e.g., high CO2 saturation in CO2 storage).

  1. The Emergence of Solar Supergranulation as a Natural Consequence of Rotationally Constrained Interior Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate how rotationally constrained, deep convection might give rise to supergranulation, the largest distinct spatial scale of convection observed in the solar photosphere. While supergranulation is only weakly influenced by rotation, larger spatial scales of convection sample the deep convection zone and are presumably rotationally influenced. We present numerical results from a series of nonlinear, 3D simulations of rotating convection and examine the velocity power distribution realized under a range of Rossby numbers. When rotation is present, the convective power distribution possesses a pronounced peak, at characteristic wavenumber {{\\ell }}{peak}, whose value increases as the Rossby number is decreased. This distribution of power contrasts with that realized in non-rotating convection, where power increases monotonically from high to low wavenumbers. We find that spatial scales smaller than {{\\ell }}{peak} behave in analogy to non-rotating convection. Spatial scales larger than {{\\ell }}{peak} are rotationally constrained and possess substantially reduced power relative to the non-rotating system. We argue that the supergranular scale emerges due to a suppression of power on spatial scales larger than {\\ell }≈ 100 owing to the presence of deep, rotationally constrained convection. Supergranulation thus represents the largest non-rotationally constrained mode of solar convection. We conclude that the characteristic spatial scale of supergranulation bounds that of the deep convective motions from above, making supergranulation an indirect measure of the deep-seated dynamics at work in the solar dynamo. Using the spatial scale of supergranulation in conjunction with our numerical results, we estimate an upper bound of 10 m s‑1 for the Sun’s bulk rms convective velocity.

  2. Natural Convection and Boiling for Cooling SRP Reactors During Loss of Circulation Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-06-26

    This study investigated natural convection and boiling as a means of cooling SRP reactors in the event of a loss of circulation accident. These studies show that single phase natural convection cooling of SRP reactors in shutdown conditions with the present piping geometry is probably not feasible.

  3. 3-D Modeling of Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe Growth Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical calculation for a non-dilute alloy solidification was performed using the FIDAP finite element code. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. Estimates of convection contributions for various gravity conditions was performed parametrically. For gravity levels higher then 1 0 -7 of earth's gravity it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by factor of 50% for precise orientation of the ampoule in the microgravity environment. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D modeling are compared with previous 2-D finding. A video film featuring melt convection will be presented.

  4. Combined 3D-QSAR and Molecular Docking Study for Identification of Diverse Natural Products as Potent Pf ENR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Preeti; Saha, Debasmita; Sharma, Anuj

    2015-01-01

    An in-house library of 200 molecules from natural plant products was designed in order to evaluate their binding to Plasmodium ACP enoyl reductase (ENR), a promising biological target for antimalarial chemotherapeutics. The binding site of PfENR was explored computationally and the molecules were docked using AutoDock. Furthermore, the top-ranked scaffolds from docking studies were also compared with known PfENR inhibitors using 3D-QSAR. To this effect, a 3D-QSAR model was derived from a set of experimentally established PfENR inhibitors, using Comparative Molecular Force Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA). The best optimum CoMFA model exhibited a leave-one-out correlation coefficient (q2) and a noncross- validated correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.630 and 0.911, respectively. The result of this cumulative approach proposed five structurally distinct natural products as potent PfENR inhibitors. This study may lay a stepping stone towards Functional oriented synthesis (FOS) of novel PfENR inhibitors in future. PMID:26517356

  5. Three-dimensional, transient natural convection in inclined wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. . Oceanic Div.); Denbow, D.A. ); Murphy, H.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence of natural conduction in a wellbore can affect geothermal gradient measurements and heat flow estimates. In the Hot Dry Rock geothermal concept, the wellbores are purposely inclined in the deep regions to enhance heat production. To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length to diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0{degrees}, 20{degrees}, and 35{degrees} from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. Comparison with measurements showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. 50 refs., 9 figs.

  6. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  7. Natural convection in enclosures. Proceedings of the nineteenth national heat transfer conference, Orlando, FL, July 27-30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Torrance, K.E.; Catton, I.

    1980-01-01

    Natural convection in low aspect ratio rectangular enclosures is considered along with three-dimensional convection within rectangular boxes, natural convection flow visualization in irradiated water cooled by air flow over the surface, free convection in vertical slots, the stratification in natural convection in vertical enclosures, the flow structure with natural convection in inclined air-filled enclosures, and natural convection across tilted, rectangular enclosures of small aspect ratio. Attention is given to the effect of wall conduction and radiation on natural convection in a vertical slot with uniform heat generation of the heated wall, a numerical study of thermal insulation enclosure, free convection in a piston-cylinder enclosure with sinusoidal piston motion, natural convection heat transfer between bodies and their spherical enclosure, an experimental study of the steady natural convection in a horizontal annulus with irregular boundaries, three-dimensional natural convection in a porous medium between concentric inclined cylinders, a numerical solution for natural convection in concentric spherical annuli, and heat transfer by natural convection in porous media between two concentric spheres.

  8. Osteogenic cell response to 3-D hydroxyapatite scaffolds developed via replication of natural marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S A; Choi, S Y; McKechnie, Melanie; Burke, G; Dunne, N; Walker, G; Cunningham, E; Buchanan, F

    2016-02-01

    Bone tissue engineering may provide an alternative to autograft, however scaffold optimisation is required to maximize bone ingrowth. In designing scaffolds, pore architecture is important and there is evidence that cells prefer a degree of non-uniformity. The aim of this study was to compare scaffolds derived from a natural porous marine sponge (Spongia agaricina) with unique architecture to those derived from a synthetic polyurethane foam. Hydroxyapatite scaffolds of 1 cm(3) were prepared via ceramic infiltration of a marine sponge and a polyurethane (PU) foam. Human foetal osteoblasts (hFOB) were seeded at 1 × 10(5) cells/scaffold for up to 14 days. Cytotoxicity, cell number, morphology and differentiation were investigated. PU-derived scaffolds had 84-91% porosity and 99.99% pore interconnectivity. In comparison marine sponge-derived scaffolds had 56-61% porosity and 99.9% pore interconnectivity. hFOB studies showed that a greater number of cells were found on marine sponge-derived scaffolds at than on the PU scaffold but there was no significant difference in cell differentiation. X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry showed that Si ions were released from the marine-derived scaffold. In summary, three dimensional porous constructs have been manufactured that support cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation but significantly more cells were seen on marine-derived scaffolds. This could be due both to the chemistry and pore architecture of the scaffolds with an additional biological stimulus from presence of Si ions. Further in vivo tests in orthotopic models are required but this marine-derived scaffold shows promise for applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26704539

  9. Depth camera-based 3D hand gesture controls with immersive tactile feedback for natural mid-air gesture interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangtaek; Kim, Joongrock; Choi, Jaesung; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Sangyoun

    2015-01-08

    Vision-based hand gesture interactions are natural and intuitive when interacting with computers, since we naturally exploit gestures to communicate with other people. However, it is agreed that users suffer from discomfort and fatigue when using gesture-controlled interfaces, due to the lack of physical feedback. To solve the problem, we propose a novel complete solution of a hand gesture control system employing immersive tactile feedback to the user's hand. For this goal, we first developed a fast and accurate hand-tracking algorithm with a Kinect sensor using the proposed MLBP (modified local binary pattern) that can efficiently analyze 3D shapes in depth images. The superiority of our tracking method was verified in terms of tracking accuracy and speed by comparing with existing methods, Natural Interaction Technology for End-user (NITE), 3D Hand Tracker and CamShift. As the second step, a new tactile feedback technology with a piezoelectric actuator has been developed and integrated into the developed hand tracking algorithm, including the DTW (dynamic time warping) gesture recognition algorithm for a complete solution of an immersive gesture control system. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the integrated system were conducted with human subjects, and the results demonstrate that our gesture control with tactile feedback is a promising technology compared to a vision-based gesture control system that has typically no feedback for the user's gesture inputs. Our study provides researchers and designers with informative guidelines to develop more natural gesture control systems or immersive user interfaces with haptic feedback.

  10. Depth Camera-Based 3D Hand Gesture Controls with Immersive Tactile Feedback for Natural Mid-Air Gesture Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangtaek; Kim, Joongrock; Choi, Jaesung; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Sangyoun

    2015-01-01

    Vision-based hand gesture interactions are natural and intuitive when interacting with computers, since we naturally exploit gestures to communicate with other people. However, it is agreed that users suffer from discomfort and fatigue when using gesture-controlled interfaces, due to the lack of physical feedback. To solve the problem, we propose a novel complete solution of a hand gesture control system employing immersive tactile feedback to the user's hand. For this goal, we first developed a fast and accurate hand-tracking algorithm with a Kinect sensor using the proposed MLBP (modified local binary pattern) that can efficiently analyze 3D shapes in depth images. The superiority of our tracking method was verified in terms of tracking accuracy and speed by comparing with existing methods, Natural Interaction Technology for End-user (NITE), 3D Hand Tracker and CamShift. As the second step, a new tactile feedback technology with a piezoelectric actuator has been developed and integrated into the developed hand tracking algorithm, including the DTW (dynamic time warping) gesture recognition algorithm for a complete solution of an immersive gesture control system. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the integrated system were conducted with human subjects, and the results demonstrate that our gesture control with tactile feedback is a promising technology compared to a vision-based gesture control system that has typically no feedback for the user's gesture inputs. Our study provides researchers and designers with informative guidelines to develop more natural gesture control systems or immersive user interfaces with haptic feedback. PMID:25580901

  11. Natural convection in asymmetric triangular enclosures heated from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyo, O. M.; Angeli, D.; Barozzi, G. S.; Collins, M. W.

    2014-11-01

    Triangular enclosures are typical configurations of attic spaces found in residential as well as industrial pitched-roof buildings. Natural convection in triangular rooftops has received considerable attention over the years, mainly on right-angled and isosceles enclosures. In this paper, a finite volume CFD package is employed to study the laminar air flow and temperature distribution in asymmetric rooftop-shaped triangular enclosures when heated isothermally from the base wall, for aspect ratios (AR) 0.2 <= AR <= 1.0, and Rayleigh number (Ra) values 8 × 105 <= Ra <= 5 × 107. The effects of Rayleigh number and pitch angle on the flow structure and temperature distributions within the enclosure are analysed. Results indicate that, at low pitch angle, the heat transfer between the cold inclined and the hot base walls is very high, resulting in a multi-cellular flow structure. As the pitch angle increases, however, the number of cells reduces, and the total heat transfer rate progressively reduces, even if the Rayleigh number, being based on the enclosure height, rapidly increases. Physical reasons for the above effect are inspected.

  12. Experimental analysis of natural convection within a thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.

    1993-09-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a thermosyphon designed to passively cool cylindrical heat sources are experimentally studied. The analysis is based on recognizing the physics of the flow within different regions of the thermosyphon to develop empirical heat transfer correlations. The basic system consists of three concentric cylinders, with an outer channel between the outer two cylinders, and an inner channel between the inner two cylinders. Tests were conducted. with two different process material container diameters, representing the inner cylinder, and several different power levels. The experimentally determined local and average Nu numbers for the inner channel are in good agreement with previous work for natural convection between vertical parallel plates, one uniformly heated and the other thermally insulated. The implication is that the heat transfer off of each surface is independent of the adjacent surface for sufficiently high Ra numbers. The heat transfer is independent because of limited interaction between the boundary layers at sufficiently high Ra numbers. As a result of the limited interaction, the maximum temperature within the system remained constant, or decreased slightly when the radii of the inner cylinders increased for the same amount of heat removal.

  13. Analysis of Phenix natural convection test with the TRACE code

    SciTech Connect

    Chenu, A.; Mikityuk, K.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    Experimental data from the Natural Convection (NC) test performed in the Phenix reactor prior to its final shutdown have been used to further validate the single-phase sodium flow modeling in TRACE. The experimental data for the benchmark have been shared by the CEA in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP), initiated by the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). This paper presents a complete TRACE model of the Phenix primary circuit developed for the analysis. Steady-state calculations at nominal (350 MWth) and reduced (120 MWth) power are compared to the experimental data for the validation of the model. We presents results from the 'blind' comparison, i.e. the comparison of the test results with those computed prior to the communication of the experimental data, so-called 'pre-test' results. 'Post-test' results, calculated from a model improved on the basis of the discrepancies identified from the blind comparison, are also presented. The analysis highlights the need to accurately simulate the reactor structures, since these define the thermal inertia of the system during the first phase of the transient. Furthermore, it shows the limitations of computed 1D-results when applied to the simulation of highly-stratified temperature fields. Nevertheless, the simulated reactor behavior and temperatures are found to match very well with the experimental data after the first two hours and, in general, the TRACE blind predictions may be considered as having been quite satisfactory. (authors)

  14. Natural convection heat transfer analysis of ATR fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Langerman, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    Natural convection air cooling of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel assemblies is analyzed to determine the level of decay heat that can be removed without exceeding the melting temperature of the fuel. The study was conducted to assist in the level 2 PRA analysis of a hypothetical ATR water canal draining accident. The heat transfer process is characterized by a very low Rayleigh number (Ra {approx} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a high temperature ratio. Since neither data nor analytical models were available for Ra < 0.1, an analytical approach is presented based upon the integral boundary layer equations. All assumptions and simplifications are presented and assessed and two models are developed from similar foundations. In one model, the well-known Boussinesq approximations are employed, the results from which are used to assess the modeling philosophy through comparison to existing data and published analytical results. In the other model, the Boussinesq approximations are not used, thus making the model more general and applicable to the ATR analysis.

  15. Natural convection of ferrofluids in partially heated square enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selimefendigil, Fatih; Öztop, Hakan F.; Al-Salem, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    In this study, natural convection of ferrofluid in a partially heated square cavity is numerically investigated. The heater is located to the left vertical wall and the right vertical wall is kept at constant temperature lower than that of the heater. Other walls of the square enclosure are assumed to be adiabatic. Finite element method is utilized to solve the governing equations. The influence of the Rayleigh number (104≤Ra≤5×105), heater location (0.25H≤yh≤0.75H), strength of the magnetic dipole (0≤γ≤2), horizontal and vertical location of the magnetic dipole (-2H≤a≤-0.5H, 0.2H≤b≤0.8H) on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are investigated. It is observed that different velocity components within the square cavity are sensitive to the magnetic dipole source strength and its position. The length and size of the recirculation zones adjacent to the heater can be controlled with magnetic dipole strength. Averaged heat transfer increases with decreasing values of horizontal position of the magnetic dipole source. Averaged heat transfer value increases from middle towards both ends of the vertical wall when the vertical location of the dipole source is varied. When the heater location is changed, a symmetrical behavior in the averaged heat transfer plot is observed and the minimum value of the averaged heat transfer is attained when the heater is located at the mid of vertical wall.

  16. Conjugate natural convection flow over a vertical surface with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqa, Sadia; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical study of conjugate natural convection flow over a finite vertical surface with radiation is reported in this article. Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to express the radiative heat flux term. The governing boundary-layer equations are made dimensionless by means of a suitable form of non-similarity transformation. These equations are obtained in three regimes: (1) upstream (when ξ → 0), (2) downstream (when ξ → ∞ ) and (3) entire regime and are solved numerically. The solutions in the upstream and downstream regimes are obtained via shooting method whereas two-point implicit finite difference method is used to get the solutions for the entire regime. It is seen that asymptotic solutions give accurate results when compared with the numerical solution of the entire regime. The results indicate that the flow field and the temperature distributions are greatly influenced by thermal radiation parameter , R_d, surface temperature parameter, θ _w and Prandtl number Pr. It is established from the analysis that recirculation occurs in the flow specifically for R_d=1.5.

  17. Effects of finiteness on the thermo-fluid-dynamics of natural convection above horizontal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2016-06-01

    A rigorous and systematic computational and theoretical study, the first of its kind, for the laminar natural convective flow above rectangular horizontal surfaces of various aspect ratios ϕ (from 1 to ∞) is presented. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations (for ϕ → ∞) and three-dimensional CFD simulations (for 1 ≤ ϕ < ∞) are performed to establish and elucidate the role of finiteness of the horizontal planform on the thermo-fluid-dynamics of natural convection. Great care is taken here to ensure grid independence and domain independence of the presented solutions. The results of the CFD simulations are compared with experimental data and similarity theory to understand how the existing simplified results fit, in the appropriate limiting cases, with the complex three-dimensional solutions revealed here. The present computational study establishes the region of a high-aspect-ratio planform over which the results of the similarity theory are approximately valid, the extent of this region depending on the Grashof number. There is, however, a region near the edge of the plate and another region near the centre of the plate (where a plume forms) in which the similarity theory results do not apply. The sizes of these non-compliance zones decrease as the Grashof number is increased. The present study also shows that the similarity velocity profile is not strictly obtained at any location over the plate because of the entrainment effect of the central plume. The 3-D CFD simulations of the present paper are coordinated to clearly reveal the separate and combined effects of three important aspects of finiteness: the presence of leading edges, the presence of planform centre, and the presence of physical corners in the planform. It is realised that the finiteness due to the presence of physical corners in the planform arises only for a finite value of ϕ in the case of 3-D CFD simulations (and not in 2-D CFD simulations or similarity theory

  18. A 3-d modeling approach for studying the formation, maintenance, and decay of Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) cirrus associated with deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henz, D.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Smith, E. A.

    2009-04-01

    This study is being conducted to examine the distribution, variability, and formation-decay processes of TTL cirrus associated with tropical deep convection using the University of Wisconsin Non-Hydrostatic modeling system (NMS). The experimental design is based on Tripoli, Hack and Kiehl (1992) which explicitly simulates the radiative-convective equilibrium of the tropical atmosphere over extended periods of weeks or months using a 2D periodic cloud resolving model. The experiment design includes a radiation parameterization to explicitly simulate radiative transfer through simulated crystals. Advanced Microphysics Prediction System (AMP) will be used to simulate microphysics by employing SHIPS (Spectral Habit Ice Prediction System) for ice, SLiPS (Spectral Liquid Prediction System) for droplets, and SAPS (Spectral Aerosol Prediction System) for aerosols. The period of integration is 1 month enough to achieve a radiative equilibrium. The purpose of this study is to determine the relative contributions of Deep convection outflow versus local radiation-aerosol interactions to the formation of the cirrus observed in the TTL. On going studies also consider the role of gravity waves shed by convective towers and their role in TTL cirrus formation and maintenance.

  19. The role of natural convection on cool flames and autoignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Wu, Ming-Shin; Hehemann, David; Sheredy, William; Pearlman, Howard

    2000-01-01

    Slow reaction, cool flames and autoignition are discussed in the context of unstirred, static reactors at terrestrial (1g) and microgravity (μg) environments. At 1g, conductive heat transport is important when the Rayleigh number (Ra) is less than 600, conduction and convection are important when the Ra ranges from 600 to approximately 104 and convection governs when Ra exceeds 104. Except for highly-diluted, weakly exothermic reactions, the Ra for all laboratory-scale, lg experiments ranges from 103-105. Hence, convection and conduction are important at 1g. Existing models, however, neglect convection, in lieu of conduction, to simplify mathematical formulation. While this assumption is not valid for most 1g cool flames and autoignitions, it is valid at μg where Ra numbers on the order of 10-100 are easily attained in drop towers and aircraft. Aboard the Space Shuttle and Station, typical Ra's are order 1/10-1. .

  20. Multicellular natural convection of a low Prandlt number fluid between horizontal concentric cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Joosik Yoo; Jun Young Choi; Moonuhn Kim . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional natural convection of a fluid of low Prandtl number (Pr = 0.02) in an annulus between two concentric horizontal cylinders is numerically investigated in a wide range of gap widths. For low Grashof numbers, a steady unicellular convection is obtained. Above a transition Grashof number that depends on the gap width, a steady bicellular flow occurs. With further increase of the Grashof number, steady or time-periodic multicellular convection occurs, and finally, complex unsteady convective flow appears. A plot is presented that predicts the type of flow patterns for various combination of gap widths and Grashof numbers.

  1. Experimental study of natural convective heat transfer in a vertical hexagonal sub channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandian, Nathanael P.; Umar, Efrizon; Hardianto, Toto; Febriyanto, Catur

    2012-06-01

    The development of new practices in nuclear reactor safety aspects and optimization of recent nuclear reactors, including the APWR and the PHWR reactors, needs a knowledge on natural convective heat transfer within sub-channels formed among several nuclear fuel rods or heat exchanger tubes. Unfortunately, the currently available empirical correlation equations for such heat transfer modes are limited and researches on convective heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders (especially within the natural convection modes) are scarcely done. Although boundary layers around the heat exchanger cylinders or fuel rods may be dominated by their entry regions, most of available convection correlation equations are for fully developed boundary layers. Recently, an experimental study on natural convective heat transfer in a subchannel formed by several heated parallel cylinders that arranged in a hexagonal configuration has been being done. The study seeks for a new convection correlation for the natural convective heat transfer in the sub-channel formed among the hexagonal vertical cylinders. A new convective heat transfer correlation equation has been obtained from the study and compared to several similar equations in literatures.

  2. Analysis of the heat transfer from horizontal pipes at natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapjor, Andrej; Huzvar, Jozef; Ftorek, Branislav; Smatanova, Helena

    2014-08-01

    These article deals with heat transfer from "n" horizontal pipes one above another at natural convection. On the bases of theoretical models have been developed for calculating the thermal performance of natural convection by Churilla and Morgan, for various pipe diameters and temperatures. These models were compared with models created in CFD-Fluent Ansys the same boundary conditions. The aim of the analyze of heat and fluxional pipe fields "n" pipes one about another at natural convection is the creation of criterion equation on the basis of which the heat output of heat transfer from pipe oriented areas one above another with given spacing could be quantified.

  3. Natural free convection in porous media: First field documentation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Remke L.; Simmons, Craig T.; Hyndman, David W.; Wood, Warren W.

    2009-06-01

    Natural free convection is a process of great importance in disciplines from hydrology to meteorology, oceanography, planetary sciences, and economic geology, and for applications in carbon sequestration and nuclear waste disposal. It has been studied for over a century - but almost exclusively in theoretical and laboratory settings. Despite its importance, conclusive primary evidence of free convection in porous media does not currently exist in a natural field setting. Here, we present recent electrical resistivity measurements from a sabkha aquifer near Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, where large density inversions exist. The geophysical images from this site provide, for the first time, compelling field evidence of fingering associated with natural free convection in groundwater.

  4. Theoretical analysis of solar-driven natural convection energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.W.; Lasier, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a theoretical study of solar-powered natural convection tower (chimney) performance. Both heated and cooled towers are analyzed; the latter uses evaporating water as the cooling mechanism. The results, which are applicable to any open-cycle configuration, show that the ideal conversion efficiencies of both heated and cooled natural convection towers are linear functions of height. The performance of a heated tower in an adiabatic atmosphere ideally approaches the Carnot efficiency limit of approx. = 3.4%/km (1.0%/1000 ft). Including water pumping requirements, the ideal limit to cooled tower performance is approx. = 2.75%/km (0.85%/1000 ft). Ambient atmospheric conditions such as vertical temperature gradient (lapse rate) and relative humidity can have significantly adverse effects on natural convection tower performance. The combined effects of lapse rate and ambient relative humidity are especially important to cooled natural convection towers.

  5. Four Decades of Utilizing Shadowgraph Techniques to study Natural Convection in Cavities: Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminuddin Aftab, Syed Mohammed; Younis, Obai; Al-Atabi, Musthak

    2012-09-01

    Natural convection in cavities has been a field of interest to researchers over the past 50 years. One of the basic techniques used to investigate the natural convection in cavities is shadowgraph flow visualisation, used to experimentally observe the boundary layer growth, formation of double layer structures, intrusions and plume generation. This paper accounts for Various other observations also made when fins are placed along the side wall of the cavity, the effect due to change in shape and orientation of the cavity, how these changes effect the natural convection have also been discussed. The applications of various types of shadowgraph methods to understand the flow variation with density have also been included. The paper summarizes the literature of shadowgraph techniques in natural convection.

  6. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  7. Natural convection heat transfer simulation using energy conservative dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Nada, Eiyad

    2010-05-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation (eDPD) was used to study natural convection via Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) problem and a differentially heated enclosure problem (DHE). The current eDPD model implemented the Boussinesq approximation to model the buoyancy forces. The eDPD results were compared to the finite volume solutions and it was found that the eDPD method predict the temperature and flow fields throughout the natural convection domains properly. The eDPD model recovered the basic features of natural convection, such as development of plumes, development of thermal boundary layers, and development of natural convection circulation cells (rolls). The eDPD results were presented via temperature isotherms, streamlines, velocity contours, velocity vector plots, and temperature and velocity profiles. Further useful quantities, such as Nusselt number was calculated from the eDPD results and found to be in good agreement with the finite volume calculations.

  8. Tracking Down the Causes of Recent Induced and Natural Intraplate Earthquakes with 3D Seismological Analyses in Northwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uta, P.; Brandes, C.; Boennemann, C.; Plenefisch, T.; Winsemann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Northwest Germany is a typical low strain intraplate region with a low seismic activity. Nevertheless, 58 well documented earthquakes with magnitudes of 0.5 - 4.3 affected the area in the last 40 years. Most of the epicenters were located in the vicinity of active natural gas fields and some inside. Accordingly, the earthquakes were interpreted as a consequence of hydrocarbon recovery (e.g. Dahm et al. 2007, Bischoff et al. 2013) and classified as induced events in the bulletins of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). The two major ones have magnitudes of 4.3 and 4.0. They are the strongest earthquakes ever recorded in Northern Germany. Consequently, these events raise the question whether the ongoing extraction itself can cause them or if other natural tectonic processes like glacial isostatic adjustment may considerably contribute to their initiation. Recent studies of Brandes et al. (2012) imply that lithospheric stress changes due to post glacial isostatic adjustment might be also a potential natural cause for earthquakes in Central Europe. In order to better analyse the earthquakes and to test this latter hypothesis we performed a relocalization of the events with the NonLinLoc (Lomax et al. 2000) program package and two differently scaled 3D P-wave velocity models. Depending on the station coverage for a distinct event, either a fine gridded local model (88 x 73 x 15 km, WEG-model, made available by the industry) or a coarse regional model (1600 x 1600 x 45 km, data from CRUST1.0, Laske et al. 2013) and for some cases a combination of both models was used for the relocalization. The results confirm the trend of the older routine analysis: The majority of the events are located at the margins of the natural gas fields, some of them are now located closer to them. Focal depths mostly vary between 3.5 km and 10 km. However, for some of the events, especially for the older events with relatively bad station coverage, the error bars

  9. Inherent safety advantages of carbide fuel systems and technical issues regarding natural convection in LMRs

    SciTech Connect

    Barthold, W.P.

    1984-08-01

    The scope of work is to summarize inherent safety advantages that are unique to the use of a carbide based fuel system and to summarize the technical issues regarding natural convection flow in LMFBR cores. As discussed in this report, carbide fuel provides the designer with far greater flexibility than oxide fuel. Carbide fuel systems can be designed to eliminate major accident initiators. They turn quantitative advantages into a qualitative advantage. The author proposed to LANL a series of core design and component concepts that would greatly enhance the safety of carbide over oxide systems. This report cites a series of safety advantages which potentially exist for a carbide fuel system. Natural convection issues have not been given much attention in the past. Only during the last few years has this issue been addressed in some detail. Despite claims to the contrary by some of the LMR contractors, the author does not think that the natural convection phenomena is fully understood. Some of the approximations made in natural convection transient analyses have probably a greater impact on calculated transient temperatures than the effects under investigation. Only integral in-pile experimental data and single assembly out-of-pile detailed data are available for comparisons with analytical models and correlations. Especially for derated cores, the natural convection capability of a LMR should be far superior to that of a LWR. The author ranks the natural convection capability of the LMR as the most important inherent safety feature.

  10. Observations of 3-D transverse dispersion and dilution in natural consolidated rock by X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Maartje; Bijeljic, Branko; Niu, Ben; Krevor, Sam

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of transverse dispersion for dilution and mixing of solutes but most observations have remained limited to two-dimensional sand-box models. We present a new core-flood test to characterize solute transport in 3-D natural-rock media. A device consisting of three annular regions was used for fluid injection into a cylindrical rock core. Pure water was injected into the center and outer region and a NaI solution into the middle region. Steady state transverse dispersion of NaI was visualized with an X-ray medical CT-scanner for a range of Peclét numbers. Three methods were used to calculate Dt: (1) fitting an analytical solution, (2) analyzing the second-central moment, and (3) analyzing the dilution index and reactor ratio. Transverse dispersion decreased with distance due to flow focusing. Furthermore, Dt in the power-law regime showed sub-linear behavior. Overall, the reactor ratios were high confirming the homogeneity of Berea sandstone.

  11. Study of plasma natural convection induced by electron beam in atmosphere [

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yongfeng Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2014-06-15

    Using high-energy electron beams to ionize air is an effective way to produce a large-size plasma in the atmosphere. In particular, with a steady-state high power generator, some unique phenomena can be achieved, including natural convection of the plasma. The characteristics of this convection are studied both experimentally and numerically. The results show that an asymmetrical temperature field develops with magnitudes that vary from 295 K to 389 K at a pressure of 100 Torr. Natural convection is greatly enhanced under 760 Torr. Nevertheless, plasma transport is negligible in this convection flow field and only the plasma core tends to move upward. Parameter analysis is performed to discern influencing factors on this phenomenon. The beam current, reflecting the Rayleigh number Ra effect, correlates with convection intensity, which indicates that energy deposition is the underlying key factor in determining such convections. Finally, natural convection is concluded to be an intrinsic property of the electron beam when focused into dense air, and can be achieved by carefully adjusting equipment operations parameters.

  12. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  13. The impact of non-local buoyancy flux on the convective boundary layer development as simulated by a 3-D TKE-based subgrid mixing scheme in a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Bao, Jian-Wen; Chen, Baode

    2016-04-01

    This presentation highlights a study in which a series of dry convective boundary layer (CBL) simulations are carried out using a generalized 3-dimensional (3-D) TKE-based parameterization scheme of sub-grid turbulent mixing in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulated characteristics of dry CBL are analyzed for the purpose of evaluating this scheme in comparison with a commonly-used scheme for sub-grid turbulent mixing in NWP models (i.e., the Mellor-Yamada 1.5-order TKE scheme). The same surface layer scheme is used in all the simulations so that only the sensitivity of the WRF model to different parameterizations of the sub-grid turbulent mixing above the surface layer is examined. The effect of horizontal grid resolution on the simulated CBL is also examined by running the model with grid sizes of 200, 400 m, 600 m, 1 km and 3 km. We will first compare the characteristics of the simulated CBL using the two schemes with the WRF LES dataset. We will then illustrate the importance of including the non-local component in the vertical buoyancy specification in the 3-D TKE-based scheme. Finally, comparing the results from the simulations against coarse-grained WRF LES dataset, we will show the feasibility and advantage of replacing conventional planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes with a scale-aware 3-D TKE-based scheme in the WRF model.

  14. The effect of convective life cycle stage on microwave brightness temperature/rainrate relations as determined from 3-D cloud model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Prasad, N.; Yeh, H.-Y. M.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rain rate and the brightness temperature (Tb) was investigated using a cloud model/microwave radiative transfer model combination to obtain the rain-rate/Tb relations for four different frequencies: 10, 19, 37, and 86 GHz. The results at 19, 37, and 86 GHz were found to be significantly affected by ice in the modeled convective system, while the results at 10 GHz showed very little effect. Nonprecipitating cloud water was found to affect Tb in two ways. First, at low rain rates, the presence of significant cloud water produced higher Tb values than in cases with little cloud water. The second effects occurs at 19, 37, and 86 GHz at higher rainrates associated with significant ice formation; the scattering by ice lowered the Tb.

  15. Numerical simulation of natural convection in a sessile liquid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartashevich, M. V.; Marchuk, I. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2012-06-01

    Heat transfer in a sessile liquid droplet was studied with numerical methods. A computer code was developed for solving the problem of convection in an axisymmetric hemispherical droplet and in a spherical layer as well. The problem of establishing an equilibrium state in a droplet was solved using several variables: temperature, stream function, and vorticity. Simulation was performed for droplets of water, ethyl alcohol, and model liquids. Variable parameters: intensity of heat transfer from droplet surface, Rayleigh and Marangoni dimensionless criteria, and the characteristic temperature difference. It was revealed that the curve of convective flow intensity versus heat transfer intensity at droplet surface has a maximum. A dual-vortex structure was obtained in a stationary hemispherical profile of liquid droplet for the case of close values for thermocapillary and thermogravitational forces. Either thermocapillary or thermogravitational vortex might be dominating phenomena in the flow structure.

  16. 3-D patterns and volumes of decompression melting fueled by asthenospheric flow: comparison and interaction of shear-driven upwelling with small-scale convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Conrad, C. P.; Harmon, N.; Bianco, T. A.; Smith, E. I.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanism far from plate boundaries is typically ascribed to mantle plumes. Related hotspot melting can indeed explain a wide range of observations at a fair number of age-progressive volcano lineaments. Various other sites of intraplate volcanism, however, such as in the western US and the south Pacific, require alternative explanations, for which candidates are asthenospheric flow and lithospheric cracking. While cracking mechanisms presume abundant metastable melt in the asthenosphere, upward flow in the asthenosphere can generate significant amounts of decompression melting to support intraplate volcanism. Shear-driven upwellings (SDU) arise from rheological heterogeneity in the asthenosphere, a configuration that can redirect vigorous horizontal shearing into localized upwellings. Thermally-driven instabilities (small-scale convection, or SSC) develop at the base of cool and relatively thick lithosphere. It has been shown that areas with abundant non-hotspot volcanism indeed statistically correlate with regions of large asthenospheric shear [Conrad et al., 2011, see URL below]. In three-dimensional thermochemical numerical simulations, we investigate the relevance of SDU and SSC for mantle melting and intraplate volcanism. Depending on ambient mantle viscosity, plate thickness, asthenospheric shear, as well as the geometry and viscosity contrast of rheological heterogeneity (i.e., low-viscosity pockets), either SDU or SSC dominates asthenospheric flow and decompression melting. SDU is promoted over SSC by high viscosities, young plates, high shear, as well as wide, shallow, and strongly contrasting heterogeneity. Once melting initiates, it is amplified through the positive feedback effects of melt buoyancy (buoyant melting instability, or BMI), and lubrication. However, degrees of melting are effectively capped by stiffening of the residue upon melt and water extraction. In some cases, the dominance of SDU over SSC or vice-versa is transient, since

  17. Suppression/Reversal of Natural Convection by Exploiting the Temperature/Composition Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, F.; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Natural convection, driven by temperature-or concentration gradients or both, is an inherent phenomenon during solidification of materials on Earth. This convection has practical consequences (e.g effecting macrosegregation) but also renders difficult the scientific examination of diffusive/conductive phenomena during solidification. It is possible to halt, or even reverse, natural convection by exploiting the variation (with temperature, for example) of the susceptibility of a material. If the material is placed in a vertical magnetic field gradient, a buoyancy force of magnetic origin arises and, at a critical field gradient, can balance the normal buoyancy forces to halt convection. At higher field gradients the convection can be reversed. The effect has been demonstrated in experiments at Marshall Space Flight Center where flow was measured by PIV in MnCl2 solution in a superconducting magnet. In auxiliary experiments the field in the magnet and the properties of the solution were measured. Computations of the natural convection, its halting and reversal, using the commercial software FLUENT were in good agreement with the measurements.

  18. A 3D similarity method for scaffold hopping from known drugs or natural ligands to new chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jeremy L; Glick, Meir; Davies, John W

    2004-12-01

    A primary goal of 3D similarity searching is to find compounds with similar bioactivity to a reference ligand but with different chemotypes, i.e., "scaffold hopping". However, an adequate description of chemical structures in 3D conformational space is difficult due to the high-dimensionality of the problem. We present an automated method that simplifies flexible 3D chemical descriptions in which clustering techniques traditionally used in data mining are exploited to create "fuzzy" molecular representations called FEPOPS (feature point pharmacophores). The representations can be used for flexible 3D similarity searching given one or more active compounds without a priori knowledge of bioactive conformations or pharmacophores. We demonstrate that similarity searching with FEPOPS significantly enriches for actives taken from in-house high-throughput screening datasets and from MDDR activity classes COX-2, 5-HT3A, and HIV-RT, while also scaffold or ring-system hopping to new chemical frameworks. Further, inhibitors of target proteins (dopamine 2 and retinoic acid receptor) are recalled by FEPOPS by scaffold hopping from their associated endogenous ligands (dopamine and retinoic acid). Importantly, the method excels in comparison to commonly used 2D similarity methods (DAYLIGHT, MACCS, Pipeline Pilot fingerprints) and a commercial 3D method (Pharmacophore Distance Triplets) at finding novel scaffold classes given a single query molecule.

  19. The simulation of a convective cloud in a 3D model with explicit microphysics. Part II: Dynamical and microphysical aspects of cloud merger

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Y.L.; Shapiro, A.

    1996-09-01

    The development and merger of pairs of convective clouds in a shear-free environment were simulated in an explicit microphysical cloud model. The occurrence or nonoccurrence of updraft merger and the timing of merger depended critically on the initial spacing of the thermal perturbations imposed in the model`s initialization. In the unmerged cases the presence of a neighbor cloud was detrimental to cloud development at all times. In the merged cases this negative interaction was still operating but only until the onset of updraft merger. Based on the visual form of the updraft merger, it was hypothesized that low-level merger was a consequence of mutual advection, that is, that each cloud caught its neighbor in its radial inflow and advected it inward. This low-level advection hypothesis was quantified by considering a potential flow induced by two line sinks whose strengths were set equal to the low-level mass flux into the numerically simulated clouds. The merger times obtained from the advection hypothesis were in good agreement with the merger times observed in the simulations. Moreover, if merger did not occur, the advection hypothesis suggested that merger should not have occurred. The merger process was accompanied by the presence of trimodal drop spectra at the upper levels of the cloud. It was shown that the drop size distribution depends not only on the autoconversion and accretion rates, but also on the nonlinear interaction between various source and sink terms affecting rain formation, particularly on the rates of condensation-evaporation, sedimentation, and breakup processes. The analysis of raindrop trajectories showed the details of rain formation in different cloud regions and the effect of dynamical conditions on the growth of rain particles. 41 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Natural convection heat transfer in vertical triangular subchannel in Zirconia-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandian, N. P.; Alkharboushi, A. A. K.; Kamajaya, K.

    2015-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer in vertical triangular sub-channel has important role in cooling mechanism of the APWR and the PHWR nuclear reactors. Unfortunately, natural convection correlation equations for such geometry are scarcely available. Recent studies showed that ZrO2-water nanofluid has a good prospect to be used in the nuclear reactor technology due to its low neutron absorption cross section. Although several papers have reported transport properties of ZrO2-water nanofluids, practically there is no correlation equation for predicting natural convection heat transfer in a vertical triangular sub-channel in ZrO2-water nanofluid. Therefore, a study for finding such heat transfer correlation equation has been done by utilizing Computational Fluid Dynamics software and reported in this paper. In the study, natural convection heat transfer in a vertical triangular sub-channel has been simulated at several values of heat transfer flux within 9.1 to 30.9 kW/m2 range and ZrO2 concentrations of 0 (pure water), 0.27, and 3 volume-% of ZrO2. The study shows that the ZrO2 concentration has no significant influence to the natural convection heat transfer at those concentration levels. The obtained theoretical heat transfer correlation equations were verified through experiment, and they showed very similar results. The correlation equations are reported in this paper.

  1. Effect of Prandtl number and computational schemes on the oscillatory natural convection in an enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Toshio; Ozoe, Hiroyuki

    1996-08-23

    Numerical calculations were carried out for natural convection of low-Prandtl-number fluid. These calculations include the inertial terms that were approximated by six kinds of schemes, i.e., upwind scheme, hybrid scheme, second-order central difference method, Kawamura-Kuwahara scheme, Utopia scheme, and fourth-order central difference method. The average Nusselt number depended significantly on the schemes. The occurrence of oscillatory flow also depended on the schemes for inertial terms. Higher order up-winding approximations for inertial terms appear to be required to calculate natural convection of low-Prandtl-number fluids like liquid metal, even if the Rayleigh number is not large enough.

  2. Natural Convection Cooling of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Hill, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    After fueling and prior to launch, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) will be stored for a period of time then moved to the launch pad for integration with the space probe and mounting on the launch vehicle. During this time, which could be as long as 3 years, the ASRG will operate continuously with heat rejected from the housing and fins. Typically, the generator will be cooled by forced convection using fans. During some of the ground operations, maintaining forced convection may add significant complexity, so allowing natural convection may simplify operations. A test was conducted on the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) to quantify temperatures and operating parameters with natural convection only and determine if the EU could be safely operated in such an environment. The results show that with natural convection cooling the ASRG EU Stirling convertor pressure vessel temperatures and other parameters had significant margins while the EU was operated for several days in this configuration. Additionally, an update is provided on ASRG EU testing at NASA Glenn Research Center, where the ASRG EU has operated for over 16,000 hr and underwent extensive testing.

  3. RT3D Reaction Modules for Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Chloroethanes, Chloroethenes, Chloromethanes, and Daughter Products

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian D.; Truex, Michael J.

    2006-07-25

    This document describes a suite of MNA/EA reaction modules that were developed for addressing complex chlorinated solvent reactions using RT3D. As an introduction, an overview of these MNA/EA reaction modules is presented, including discussions of similarities between reaction modules, the purpose of key reaction parameters, and important considerations for using the reaction modules. Subsequent sections provide the details of the reaction kinetics (conceptual model and equations), data input requirements, and example (batch reactor) results for each reaction module. This document does not discuss reaction module implementation or validation; such information will accompany the software in the form of release notes or a supplement to the RT3D manual.

  4. A volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method for measuring kinematics of natural knees with single-plane fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chen, Chung-Ming; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurement of the three-dimensional (3D) rigid body and surface kinematics of the natural human knee is essential for many clinical applications. Existing techniques are limited either in their accuracy or lack more realistic experimental evaluation of the measurement errors. The purposes of the study were to develop a volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method, called the weighted edge-matching score (WEMS) method, for measuring natural knee kinematics with single-plane fluoroscopy to determine experimentally the measurement errors and to compare its performance with that of pattern intensity (PI) and gradient difference (GD) methods. Methods: The WEMS method gives higher priority to matching of longer edges of the digitally reconstructed radiograph and fluoroscopic images. The measurement errors of the methods were evaluated based on a human cadaveric knee at 11 flexion positions. Results: The accuracy of the WEMS method was determined experimentally to be less than 0.77 mm for the in-plane translations, 3.06 mm for out-of-plane translation, and 1.13 deg. for all rotations, which is better than that of the PI and GD methods. Conclusions: A new volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method has been developed for measuring 3D in vivo kinematics of natural knee joints with single-plane fluoroscopy. With the equipment used in the current study, the accuracy of the WEMS method is considered acceptable for the measurement of the 3D kinematics of the natural knee in clinical applications.

  5. Natural convection in a horizontal cylinder with axial rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Odalys; Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol; Alonso, Arantxa

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of thermal convection in a laterally heated horizontal cylinder rotating about its axis. A cylinder of aspect ratio Γ =H /2 R =2 containing a small Prandtl number fluid (σ =0.01 ) representative of molten metals and molten semiconductors at high temperature is considered. We focus on a slow rotation regime (Ω <8 ), where the effects of rotation and buoyancy forces are comparable. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations with the Boussinesq approximation are solved numerically to calculate the basic states, analyze their linear stability, and compute several secondary flows originated from the instabilities. Due to the confined cylindrical geometry—the presence of lateral walls and lids—all the flows are completely three dimensional, even the basic steady states. Results characterizing the basic states as the rotation rate increases are presented. As it occurred in the nonrotating case for higher values of the Prandtl number, two curves of steady states with the same symmetric character coexist for moderate values of the Rayleigh number. In the range of Ω considered, rotation has a stabilizing effect only for very small values. As the value of the rotation rate approaches Ω =3.5 and Ω =4.5 , the scenario of bifurcations becomes more complex due to the existence in both cases of very close bifurcations of codimension 2, which in the latter case involve both curves of symmetric solutions.

  6. Natural convection in a horizontal cylinder with axial rotation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Odalys; Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol; Alonso, Arantxa

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of thermal convection in a laterally heated horizontal cylinder rotating about its axis. A cylinder of aspect ratio Γ=H/2R=2 containing a small Prandtl number fluid (σ=0.01) representative of molten metals and molten semiconductors at high temperature is considered. We focus on a slow rotation regime (Ω<8), where the effects of rotation and buoyancy forces are comparable. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations with the Boussinesq approximation are solved numerically to calculate the basic states, analyze their linear stability, and compute several secondary flows originated from the instabilities. Due to the confined cylindrical geometry-the presence of lateral walls and lids-all the flows are completely three dimensional, even the basic steady states. Results characterizing the basic states as the rotation rate increases are presented. As it occurred in the nonrotating case for higher values of the Prandtl number, two curves of steady states with the same symmetric character coexist for moderate values of the Rayleigh number. In the range of Ω considered, rotation has a stabilizing effect only for very small values. As the value of the rotation rate approaches Ω=3.5 and Ω=4.5, the scenario of bifurcations becomes more complex due to the existence in both cases of very close bifurcations of codimension 2, which in the latter case involve both curves of symmetric solutions. PMID:27415364

  7. Mass transport at infinite regular arrays of microband electrodes submitted to natural convection: theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Pebay, Cécile; Sella, Catherine; Thouin, Laurent; Amatore, Christian

    2013-12-17

    Mass transport at infinite regular arrays of microband electrodes was investigated theoretically and experimentally in unstirred solutions. Even in the absence of forced hydrodynamics, natural convection limits the convection-free domain up to which diffusion layers may expand. Hence, several regimes of mass transport may take place according to the electrode size, gap between electrodes, time scale of the experiment, and amplitude of natural convection. They were identified through simulation by establishing zone diagrams that allowed all relative contributions to mass transport to be delineated. Dynamic and steady-state regimes were compared to those achieved at single microband electrodes. These results were validated experimentally by monitoring the chronoamperometric responses of arrays with different ratios of electrode width to gap distance and by mapping steady-state concentration profiles above their surface through scanning electrochemical microscopy. PMID:24283775

  8. The Fractional Step Method Applied to Simulations of Natural Convective Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes research done to apply the Fractional Step Method to finite-element simulations of natural convective flows in pure liquids, permeable media, and in a directionally solidified metal alloy casting. The Fractional Step Method has been applied commonly to high Reynold's number flow simulations, but is less common for low Reynold's number flows, such as natural convection in liquids and in permeable media. The Fractional Step Method offers increased speed and reduced memory requirements by allowing non-coupled solution of the pressure and the velocity components. The Fractional Step Method has particular benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, since other methods presently employed are not very efficient. Previously, the most suitable method for predicting flows in a directionally solidified binary alloy was the penalty method. The penalty method requires direct matrix solvers, due to the penalty term. The Fractional Step Method allows iterative solution of the finite element stiffness matrices, thereby allowing more efficient solution of the matrices. The Fractional Step Method also lends itself to parallel processing, since the velocity component stiffness matrices can be built and solved independently of each other. The finite-element simulations of a directionally solidified casting are used to predict macrosegregation in directionally solidified castings. In particular, the finite-element simulations predict the existence of 'channels' within the processing mushy zone and subsequently 'freckles' within the fully processed solid, which are known to result from macrosegregation, or what is often referred to as thermo-solutal convection. These freckles cause material property non-uniformities in directionally solidified castings; therefore many of these castings are scrapped. The phenomenon of natural convection in an alloy under-going directional solidification, or thermo-solutal convection, will be explained. The

  9. Experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in volumetrically heated spherical segments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Asfia, F.; Dhir, V.

    1998-03-01

    One strategy for preventing the failure of lower head of a nuclear reactor vessel is to flood the concrete cavity with subcooled water in accidents in which relocation of core material into the vessel lower head occurs. After the core material relocates into the vessel, a crust of solid material forms on the inner wall of the vessel, however, most of the pool remains molten and natural convection exists in the pool. At present, uncertainty exists with respect to natural convection heat transfer coefficients between the pool of molten core material and the reactor vessel wall. In the present work, experiments were conducted to examine natural convection heat transfer in internally heated partially filled spherical pools with external cooling. In the experiments, Freon-113 contained in a Pyrex bell jar was used as a test liquid. The pool was bounded with a spherical segment at the bottom, and was heated with magnetrons taken from a conventional microwave oven. The vessel was cooled from the outside with natural convection of water or with nucleate boiling of liquid nitrogen.

  10. A numerical study of natural convection during an in-package pasteurisation process

    SciTech Connect

    Engelman, M.E.; Sani, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    Results of a numerical study of transient axisymmetric natural convection during an in-package pasteurisation process are reported. The numerical technique employed was a penalty Galerkin finite element procedure using a variable step implicit time integration technique coupled with a quasi-Newton nonlinear equation solver. The numerical results display excellent agreement with experimental results.

  11. Tracking naturally occurring indoor features in 2-D and 3-D with lidar range/amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.D.; Kerstens, A.

    1998-09-01

    Sensor-data processing for the interpretation of a mobile robot`s indoor environment, and the manipulation of this data for reliable localization, are still some of the most important issues in robotics. This article presents algorithms that determine the true position of a mobile robot, based on real 2-D and 3-D optical range and intensity data. The authors start with the physics of the particular type of sensor used, so that the extraction of reliable and repeatable information (namely, edge coordinates) can be determined, taking into account the noise associated with each range sample and the possibility of optical multiple-path effects. Again, applying the physical model of the sensor, the estimated positions of the mobile robot and the uncertainty in these positions are determined. They demonstrate real experiments using 2-D and 3-D scan data taken in indoor environments. To update the robot`s position reliably, the authors address the problem of matching the information recorded in a scan to, first, an a priori map, and second, to information recorded in previous scans, eliminating the need for an a priori map.

  12. Variations in timing of lithospheric failure on terrestrial planets due to chaotic nature of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Teresa; Solomatov, Viatcheslav S.

    2016-05-01

    We perform numerical simulations of lithospheric failure in the stagnant lid regime of temperature-dependent viscosity convection, using the yield stress approach. We find that the time of failure can vary significantly for the same values of the controlling parameters due to the chaotic nature of the convective system. The general trend of the dependence of the time of lithospheric failure on the yield stress can be explained by treating lithospheric failure as a type of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This study suggests that it is important to address not only the question of whether plate tectonics can occur on a planet but also when it would occur if conditions are favorable.

  13. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  14. The effect of external heat transfer on thermal explosion in a spherical vessel with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A N

    2015-07-14

    When any exothermic reaction proceeds in an unstirred vessel, natural convection may develop. This flow can significantly alter the heat transfer from the reacting fluid to the environment and hence alter the balance between heat generation and heat loss, which determines whether or not the system will explode. Previous studies of the effects of natural convection on thermal explosion have considered reactors where the temperature of the wall of the reactor is held constant. This implies that there is infinitely fast heat transfer between the wall of the vessel and the surrounding environment. In reality, there will be heat transfer resistances associated with conduction through the wall of the reactor and from the wall to the environment. The existence of these additional heat transfer resistances may alter the rate of heat transfer from the hot region of the reactor to the environment and hence the stability of the reaction. This work presents an initial numerical study of thermal explosion in a spherical reactor under the influence of natural convection and external heat transfer, which neglects the effects of consumption of reactant. Simulations were performed to examine the changing behaviour of the system as the intensity of convection and the importance of external heat transfer were varied. It was shown that the temporal development of the maximum temperature in the reactor was qualitatively similar as the Rayleigh and Biot numbers were varied. Importantly, the maximum temperature in a stable system was shown to vary with Biot number. This has important consequences for the definitions used for thermal explosion in systems with significant reactant consumption. Additionally, regions of parameter space where explosions occurred were identified. It was shown that reducing the Biot number increases the likelihood of explosion and reduces the stabilising effect of natural convection. Finally, the results of the simulations were shown to compare favourably with

  15. Human keratinocyte caspase-14 expression is altered in human epidermal 3D models by dexamethasone and by natural products used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Saori; Hattori, Kenji; Date, Akira; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2013-10-01

    Caspase-14 is a cysteinyl-aspartate-specific proteinase that is specifically expressed in epidermal keratinocytes. Dysregulation of caspase-14 expression is implicated in impaired skin barrier formation. To elucidate the regulation of caspase-14 in differentiated keratinocytes, we characterized the expression of caspase-14 in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and two types of three-dimensional (3D) human epidermis culture models, EPI-200 and EPI-201, via RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses. Caspase-14 expression was absent in subconfluent NHEKs, but was present in confluent NHEKs as well as those induced to differentiate by calcium. Caspase-14 expression levels in the 3D epidermis models were almost equal to that in the Ca(2+)-treated differentiated NHEKs. Despite the presence of caspase-14 expression in these models, caspase-14 activity was found only in the mature 3D skin model, EPI-200. This was confirmed by detection of a 17 kDa cleaved fragment of caspase-14 present only in the EPI-200 model. Since glucocorticoid (GC) receptor is required for skin barrier competence, we investigated whether the GC dexamethasone (Dex) and various natural components of common skin moisturizers affect caspase-14 expression in keratinocytes. Dex decreased caspase-14 expression in undifferentiated, but not differentiated, NHEKs. Conversely, Dex increased caspase-14 expression in both 3D skin models, although it did not alter caspase protease activity. Similar to treatment with Dex, treatment of the premature 3D skin mode, EPI-201 with a Galactomyces ferment filtrate markedly increased expression of caspase-14. Further, these results suggest that the effect of Dex, or lack thereof, on caspase-14 expression is dependent on the stage of keratinocyte differentiation.

  16. Controlling natural convection in a closed thermosyphon using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarata, L.; Fichera, A.; Pagano, A.

    . The aim of this paper is to present a neural network-based approach to identification and control of a rectangular natural circulation loop. The first part of the paper defines a NARMAX model for the prediction of the experimental oscillating behavior characterizing the fluid temperature. The model has been generalized and implemented by means of a Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network that has been trained to simulate the system experimental dynamics. In the second part of the paper, the NARMAX model has been used to simulate the plant during the training of another neural network aiming to suppress the undesired oscillating behavior of the system. In order to define the neural controller, a cascade of several couples of neural networks representing both the system and the controller has been used, the number of couples coinciding with the number of steps in which the control action is exerted.

  17. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    SciTech Connect

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  18. Radiation effects on bifurcation and dual solutions in transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kang; Yi, Hong-Liang Tan, He-Ping

    2014-05-15

    Transitions and bifurcations of transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus with radiatively participating medium are numerically investigated using the coupled lattice Boltzmann and direct collocation meshless (LB-DCM) method. As a hybrid approach based on a common multi-scale Boltzmann-type model, the LB-DCM scheme is easy to implement and has an excellent flexibility in dealing with the irregular geometries. Separate particle distribution functions in the LBM are used to calculate the density field, the velocity field and the thermal field. In the radiatively participating medium, the contribution of thermal radiation to natural convection must be taken into account, and it is considered as a radiative term in the energy equation that is solved by the meshless method with moving least-squares (MLS) approximation. The occurrence of various instabilities and bifurcative phenomena is analyzed for different Rayleigh number Ra and Prandtl number Pr with and without radiation. Then, bifurcation diagrams and dual solutions are presented for relevant radiative parameters, such as convection-radiation parameter Rc and optical thickness τ. Numerical results show that the presence of volumetric radiation changes the static temperature gradient of the fluid, and generally results in an increase in the flow critical value. Besides, the existence and development of dual solutions of transient convection in the presence of radiation are greatly affected by radiative parameters. Finally, the advantage of LB-DCM combination is discussed, and the potential benefits of applying the LB-DCM method to multi-field coupling problems are demonstrated.

  19. Critical heat flux in natural convection cooled TRIGA reactors with hexagonal bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Avery, M.; De Angelis, M.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.; Feldman, E. E.; Dunn, F. E.; Matos, J. E.

    2012-07-01

    A three-rod bundle Critical Heat Flux (CHF) study at low flow, low pressure, and natural convection condition has been conducted, simulating TRIGA reactors with the hexagonally configured core. The test section is a custom-made trefoil shape tube with three identical fuel pin heater rods located symmetrically inside. The full scale fuel rod is electrically heated with a chopped-cosine axial power profile. CHF experiments were carried out with the following conditions: inlet water subcooling from 30 K to 95 K; pressure from 110 kPa to 230 kPa; mass flux up to 150 kg/m{sup 2}s. About 50 CHF data points were collected and compared with a few existing CHF correlations whose application ranges are close to the testing conditions. Some tests were performed with the forced convection to identify the potential difference between the CHF under the natural convection and forced convection. The relevance of the CHF to test parameters is investigated. (authors)

  20. Exploring natural silk protein sericin for regenerative medicine: an injectable, photoluminescent, cell-adhesive 3D hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yeshun; Zhang, Jinxiang; Huang, Lei; Liu, Jia; Li, Yongkui; Zhang, Guozheng; Kundu, Subhas C.; Wang, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Sericin, a major component of silk, has a long history of being discarded as a waste during silk processing. The value of sericin for tissue engineering is underestimated and its potential application in regenerative medicine has just begun to be explored. Here we report the successful fabrication and characterization of a covalently-crosslinked 3D pure sericin hydrogel for delivery of cells and drugs. This hydrogel is injectable, permitting its implantation through minimally invasive approaches. Notably, this hydrogel is found to exhibit photoluminescence, enabling bioimaging and in vivo tracking. Moreover, this hydrogel system possesses excellent cell-adhesive capability, effectively promoting cell attachment, proliferation and long-term survival of various types of cells. Further, the sericin hydrogel releases bioactive reagents in a sustained manner. Additionally, this hydrogel demonstrates good elasticity, high porosity, and pH-dependent degradation dynamics, which are advantageous for this sericin hydrogel to serve as a delivery vehicle for cells and therapeutic drugs. With all these unique features, it is expected that this sericin hydrogel will have wide utility in the areas of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  1. Exploring natural silk protein sericin for regenerative medicine: an injectable, photoluminescent, cell-adhesive 3D hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yeshun; Zhang, Jinxiang; Huang, Lei; Liu, Jia; Li, Yongkui; Zhang, Guozheng; Kundu, Subhas C.; Wang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Sericin, a major component of silk, has a long history of being discarded as a waste during silk processing. The value of sericin for tissue engineering is underestimated and its potential application in regenerative medicine has just begun to be explored. Here we report the successful fabrication and characterization of a covalently-crosslinked 3D pure sericin hydrogel for delivery of cells and drugs. This hydrogel is injectable, permitting its implantation through minimally invasive approaches. Notably, this hydrogel is found to exhibit photoluminescence, enabling bioimaging and in vivo tracking. Moreover, this hydrogel system possesses excellent cell-adhesive capability, effectively promoting cell attachment, proliferation and long-term survival of various types of cells. Further, the sericin hydrogel releases bioactive reagents in a sustained manner. Additionally, this hydrogel demonstrates good elasticity, high porosity, and pH-dependent degradation dynamics, which are advantageous for this sericin hydrogel to serve as a delivery vehicle for cells and therapeutic drugs. With all these unique features, it is expected that this sericin hydrogel will have wide utility in the areas of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25412301

  2. Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

  3. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  4. Potential of enhancing a natural convection loop with a thermomagnetically pumped ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aursand, Eskil; Gjennestad, Magnus Aa.; Lervåg, Karl Yngve; Lund, Halvor

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of using a thermomagnetically pumped ferrofluid to enhance the performance of a natural convection cooling loop is investigated. First, a simplified analytical estimate for the thermomagnetic pumping action is derived, and then design rules for optimal solenoid and ferrofluid are presented. The design rules are used to set up a medium-scale (1 m, 10-1000 W) case study, which is modeled using a previously published and validated model (Aursand et al. [1]). The results show that the thermomagnetic driving force is significant compared to the natural convection driving force, and may in some cases greatly surpass it. The results also indicate that cooling performance can be increased by factors up to 4 and 2 in the single-phase and two-phase regimes, respectively, even when taking into the account the added heat from the solenoid. The performance increases can alternatively be used to obtain a reduction in heat-sink size by up to 75%.

  5. Scaling of the turbulent natural convection flow in a heated square cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, R. A. W. M.; Hoogendoorn, C. J.

    1994-05-01

    By numerically solving the Reynolds equations for air and water in a square cavity, with differentially heated vertical walls, at Rayleigh numbers up to 10(exp 20) the scalings of the turbulent natural convection flow are derived. Turbulence is modeled by the standard k-epsilon model and by the low-Reynolds-number k-epsilon models of Chien and of Jones and Launder. Both the scalings with respect to the Rayleigh number (based on the cavity size H) and with respect to the local height (y/H) are considered. The scalings are derived for the inner layer, outer layer, and core region. The Rayleigh number scalings are almost the same as the scalings for the natural convection boundary layer along a hot vertical plate. The scalings found are almost independent of the k-epsilon model used.

  6. Natural convection within a vertical finite-length channel in free space

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.C.; Chang, K.P.; Hung, Y.H. )

    1994-04-01

    Natural convection within a vertical finite length channel in free space is studied in this article to remove assumptions that need to be made on velocity and temperature profiles at the channel entrance. For small channel aspect ratios and low Rayleigh numbers, significant deviations of the Nusselt number and temperature distributions exist due to the effects of vertical thermal diffusion and free space stratification in the channel. A new correlation was proposed on induced Reynolds number for vertical finite length channel. 8 refs.

  7. Simulation of natural convection in a rectangular loop using finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D W; Hamm, L L; Kehoe, A B

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite-element analysis of natural convection in a rectangular loop is presented. A psi-omega formulation of the Boussinesque approximation to the Navier-Stokes equation is solved by the false transient technique. Streamlines and isotherms at Ra = 10/sup 4/ are shown for three different modes of heating. The results indicate that corner effects should be considered when modeling flow patterns in thermosyphons.

  8. Natural convection flow of a generalized second grade fluid between two vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.C.; Vaidya, Ashwin; Wulandana, Rachmadian

    2008-02-01

    We study the flow due to natural convection of a non-Newtonian fluid, modeled as a generalized second grade fluid, between two vertical parallel walls. The flow results from the two walls being held at different temperatures. The viscosity of the fluid is taken to be a function of temperature according to Reynolds’ exponential law. We solve for the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles and study their dependence upon certain material parameters.

  9. Effects of slotted structures on the nonlinear characteristics of natural convection in a cylinder with an internal concentric slotted annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chunyun; Yang, Mo; Zhang, Yuwen; Li, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Natural convection in a cylinder with an internally slotted annulus was solved by SIMPLE algorithm, and the effects of different slotted structures on nonlinear characteristics of natural convection were investigated. The results show that the equivalent thermal conductivity Keq increases with Rayleigh number, and reaches the maximum in the vertical orientation. Nonlinear results were obtained by simulating the fluid flow at different conditions. With increasing Rayleigh number, heat transfer is intensified and the state of heat transfer changes from the steady to unsteady. We investigated different slotted structures effects on natural convection, and analyze the corresponding nonlinear characteristics.

  10. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well. PMID:25144442

  11. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well.

  12. Emergency cooling down of fast-neutron reactors by natural convection (a review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, A. V.; Sorokin, A. P.; Kuzina, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    Various methods for emergency cooling down of fast-neutron reactors by natural convection are discussed. The effectiveness of using natural convection for these purposes is demonstrated. The operating principles of different passive decay heat removal systems intended for cooling down a reactor are explained. Experimental investigations carried out in Russia for substantiating the removal of heat in cooling down fast-neutron reactors are described. These investigations include experimental works on studying thermal hydraulics in small-scale simulation facilities containing the characteristic components of a reactor (reactor core elements, above-core structure, immersed and intermediate heat exchangers, pumps, etc.). It is pointed out that a system that uses leaks of coolant between fuel assemblies holds promise for fast-neutron reactor cooldown purposes. Foreign investigations on this problem area are considered with making special emphasis on the RAMONA and NEPTUN water models. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of using natural convection as the main method for passively removing heat in cooling down fast-neutron reactors, which is confirmed experimentally both in Russia and abroad.

  13. Parametric numerical investigaion of natural convection in a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, A.E.; Chudanov, V.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vabishchevich, P.N.

    1995-09-01

    Unsteady natural convection of a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions in the enclosures of a square section with isothermal rigid walls is investigated numerically for a wide range of dimensionless parameters. The quasisteady state solutions of conjugate heat and mass transfer problem are compared with available experimental results. Correlation relations for heat flux distributions at the domain boundaries depending on Rayleigh and Ostrogradskii numbers are obtained. It is shown that generally heat transfer is governed both by natural circulation and crust formation phenomena. Results of this paper may be used for analysis of experiments with prototypic core materials.

  14. Natural convection in a square cavity with thin porous layers on its vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Le Breton, P.; Caltagirone, J.P.; Arquis, E. )

    1991-11-01

    Natural convection in a square cavity in which differentially heated vertical walls are covered with thin porous layers is studied by using a control volume formulation and a SIMPLER algorithm for pressure-velocity coupling. Comparisons with benchmark solutions for natural convection in fluid-filled cavities are first presented for Rayleigh numbers up to 10{sup 8}. The problem of the square cavity with thin porous layers on its vertical walls is then studied by using a modified form of the Navier-Stokes equations by addition of a Darcy term. It is shown that the main effect of the introduction of porous layers is to produce a large decrease of the overall Nusselt number when the permeability is reduced. The higher the Rayleigh number is, the stronger is the decrease, and obviously the decrease also increases with the layer thickness. Moreover, porous layers having a thickness of the order of the boundary layer thickness are sufficient, and taking thicker ones only induces a small decrease of the heat transfer. The main effect of porous layers is to reduce the upwind flow and then to decrease the convective heat transfer.

  15. Numerical study of natural convection characteristics of nanofluids in an enclosure using multiphase model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Jun; Wang, Ping-Yang; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2016-11-01

    The natural convective heat transfer and flow characteristics of nanofluids in an enclosure are numerically simulated using the multiphase-flow model and single phase model respectively. The simulated results are compared with the experimental results from the published papers to investigate the applicability of these models for nanofluids from a macro standpoint. The effects of Rayleigh number, Grashof number and volume concentration of nanoparticles on the heat transfer and flow characteristics are investigated and discussed. Comparisons of the horizontal and vertical central dimensionless velocity profiles between nanofluid and water for various Grashof numbers are studied. In addition, both streamline contours and isotherms lines for different volume concentrations of nanofluids are analyzed as well. The study results show that a great deviation exists between the simulated result of the single phase model and the experimental data on the relation of Nusselt number and Rayleigh number, which indicates that the single phase model cannot reflect the heat transfer characteristic of nanofluid. While the simulated results using the multiphase-flow model show a good agreement with the experimental data of nanofluid, which means that the multiphase-flow model is more suitable for the numerical study of nanofluid. For the natural convection, the present study holds the point that using Grashof numbers as the benchmark would be more appropriate to describe the heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid. Moreover, the simulated results demonstrate that adding nanoparticles into the base fluid can enhance both the motion of fluid and convection in the enclosure significantly.

  16. Finite element, stream function-vorticity solution of steady laminar natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, W. N. R.

    1982-12-01

    Stream function-vorticity finite element solution of two-dimensional incompressible viscous flow and natural convection is considered. Steady state solutions of the natural convection problem have been obtained for a wide range of the two independent parameters. Use of boundary vorticity formulae or iterative satisfaction of the no-slip boundary condition is avoided by application of the finite element discretization and a displacement of the appropriate discrete equations. Solution is obtained by Newton-Raphson iteration of all equations simultaneously. The method then appears to give a steady solution whenever the flow is physically steady, but it does not give a steady solution when the flow is physically unsteady. In particular, no form of asymmetric differencing is required. The method offers a degree of economy over primitive variable formulations. Physical results are given for the square cavity convection problem. The paper also reports on earlier work in which the most commonly used boundary vorticity formula was found not to satisfy the no-slip condition, and in which segregated solution procedures were attempted with very minimal success.

  17. Solar drying of whole mint plant under natural and forced convection.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Y I; Aly, M H; Nassar, A F; Mohamed, E A

    2015-03-01

    Two identical prototype solar dryers (direct and indirect) having the same dimensions were used to dry whole mint. Both prototypes were operated under natural and forced convection modes. In the case of the later one the ambient air was entered the dryer with the velocity of 4.2 m s(-1). The effect of flow mode and the type of solar dryers on the drying kinetics of whole mint were investigated. Ten empirical models were used to fit the drying curves; nine of them represented well the solar drying behavior of mint. The results indicated that drying of mint under different operating conditions occurred in the falling rate period, where no constant rate period of drying was observed. Also, the obtained data revealed that the drying rate of mint under forced convection was higher than that of mint under natural convection, especially during first hours of drying (first day). The values of the effective diffusivity coefficient for the mint drying ranged between 1.2 × 10(-11) and 1.33 × 10(-11) m(2) s(-1). PMID:25750751

  18. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  19. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  20. Augmented saliency model using automatic 3D head pose detection and learned gaze following in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Parks, Daniel; Borji, Ali; Itti, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that gaze direction of actors in a scene influences eye movements of passive observers during free-viewing (Castelhano, Wieth, & Henderson, 2007; Borji, Parks, & Itti, 2014). However, no computational model has been proposed to combine bottom-up saliency with actor's head pose and gaze direction for predicting where observers look. Here, we first learn probability maps that predict fixations leaving head regions (gaze following fixations), as well as fixations on head regions (head fixations), both dependent on the actor's head size and pose angle. We then learn a combination of gaze following, head region, and bottom-up saliency maps with a Markov chain composed of head region and non-head region states. This simple structure allows us to inspect the model and make comments about the nature of eye movements originating from heads as opposed to other regions. Here, we assume perfect knowledge of actor head pose direction (from an oracle). The combined model, which we call the Dynamic Weighting of Cues model (DWOC), explains observers' fixations significantly better than each of the constituent components. Finally, in a fully automatic combined model, we replace the oracle head pose direction data with detections from a computer vision model of head pose. Using these (imperfect) automated detections, we again find that the combined model significantly outperforms its individual components. Our work extends the engineering and scientific applications of saliency models and helps better understand mechanisms of visual attention.

  1. The effect of natural and forced melt convection on dendritic solidification in Ga-In alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, N.; Roshchupkina, O.; Sokolova, O.; Eckert, S.

    2015-05-01

    The directional solidification of Ga-25 wt%In alloys within a Hele-Shaw cell was visualized by means of X-ray radioscopy. The experimental investigations are especially focused on the impact of melt convection on the dendritic growth. Natural convection occurs during a bottom up solidification because lighter solute is rejected at the solid-liquid interface leading to an unstable density stratification. Forced convection was produced by a rotating wheel with two parallel disks containing at their inner sides a set of permanent NdFeB magnets with alternating polarization. The direction of forced melt flow is almost horizontal at the solidification front whereas local flow velocities in the range between 0.1 and 1.0 mm/s were achieved by controlling the rotation speed of the magnetic wheel. Melt flow induces various effects on the grain morphology primarily caused by the convective transport of solute. Our observations show a facilitation of the growth of primary trunks or lateral branches, suppression of side branching, dendrite remelting and fragmentation. The manifestation of all phenomena depends on the dendrite orientation, local direction and intensity of the flow. The forced flow eliminates the solutal plumes and damps the local fluctuations of solute concentration. It provokes a preferential growth of the secondary arms at the upstream side of the primary dendrite arms, whereas the high solute concentration at the downstream side of the dendrites can inhibit the formation of secondary branches completely. Moreover, the flow changes the inclination angle of the dendrites and the angle between primary trunks and secondary arms.

  2. Biotemplate synthesis of polyaniline@cellulose nanowhiskers/natural rubber nanocomposites with 3D hierarchical multiscale structure and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Lu, Canhui; Xu, Haoyu; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhou, Zehang

    2014-12-10

    Development of novel and versatile strategies to construct conductive polymer composites with low percolation thresholds and high mechanical properties is of great importance. In this work, we report a facile and effective strategy to prepare polyaniline@cellulose nanowhiskers (PANI@CNs)/natural rubber (NR) nanocomposites with 3D hierarchical multiscale structure. Specifically, PANI was synthesized in situ on the surface of CNs biotemplate to form PANI@CNs nanohybrids with high aspect ratio and good dispersity. Then NR latex was introduced into PANI@CNs nanohybrids suspension to enable the self-assembly of PANI@CNs nanohybrids onto NR latex microspheres. During cocoagulation process, PANI@CNs nanohybrids selectively located in the interstitial space between NR microspheres and organized into a 3D hierarchical multiscale conductive network structure in NR matrix. The combination of the biotemplate synthesis of PANI and latex cocoagulation method significantly enhanced the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of the NR-based nanocomposites simultaneously. The electrical conductivity of PANI@CNs/NR nanocomposites containing 5 phr PANI showed 11 orders of magnitude higher than that of the PANI/NR composites at the same loading fraction,; meanwhile, the percolation threshold was drastically decreased from 8.0 to 3.6 vol %.

  3. Biotemplate synthesis of polyaniline@cellulose nanowhiskers/natural rubber nanocomposites with 3D hierarchical multiscale structure and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Lu, Canhui; Xu, Haoyu; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhou, Zehang

    2014-12-10

    Development of novel and versatile strategies to construct conductive polymer composites with low percolation thresholds and high mechanical properties is of great importance. In this work, we report a facile and effective strategy to prepare polyaniline@cellulose nanowhiskers (PANI@CNs)/natural rubber (NR) nanocomposites with 3D hierarchical multiscale structure. Specifically, PANI was synthesized in situ on the surface of CNs biotemplate to form PANI@CNs nanohybrids with high aspect ratio and good dispersity. Then NR latex was introduced into PANI@CNs nanohybrids suspension to enable the self-assembly of PANI@CNs nanohybrids onto NR latex microspheres. During cocoagulation process, PANI@CNs nanohybrids selectively located in the interstitial space between NR microspheres and organized into a 3D hierarchical multiscale conductive network structure in NR matrix. The combination of the biotemplate synthesis of PANI and latex cocoagulation method significantly enhanced the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of the NR-based nanocomposites simultaneously. The electrical conductivity of PANI@CNs/NR nanocomposites containing 5 phr PANI showed 11 orders of magnitude higher than that of the PANI/NR composites at the same loading fraction,; meanwhile, the percolation threshold was drastically decreased from 8.0 to 3.6 vol %. PMID:25384188

  4. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  5. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  6. Natural convection of silica-water nanofluids based on experimental measured thermophysical properties: critical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Zoubida; Abid, Chérifa; Mohamad, A. A.; Rahli, O.; Bawazer, S.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental and numerical study was performed to investigate the effect of different formulas for nanofluid thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity on natural convective heat transfer. It was found that the heat transfer across the enclosure using different models can be enhanced or deteriorated with respect to the base fluid. Also, it was found that the inconsistencies in the reported thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity from different research groups are mainly due to the characterization of the nanofluid, including determination of colloidal stability and particle size, (i.e., aggregates size) within nanofluid.

  7. Passive decay heat removal by natural air convection after severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J.; Cheng, X.

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed by the Research Center Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe is to cope with severe accidents. It pursues the goal to restrict the consequences of core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new containment concept is its potential to remove the decay heat by natural air convection and thermal radiation in a passive way. To investigate the coolability of such a passive cooling system and the physical phenomena involved, experimental investigations are carried out at the PASCO test facility. Additionally, numerical calculations are performed by using different codes. A satisfying agreement between experimental data and numerical results is obtained.

  8. Drying characteristic of barley under natural convection in a mixed-mode type solar grain dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Basunia, M.A.; Abe, T.

    1999-07-01

    Thin-layer solar drying characteristics of barley were determined at average natural air flow temperature ranging from 43.4 to 51.7 C and for relative humidities ranging from 16.5% to 37.5%. A mixed-mode type natural convection solar dryer was used for this experiment. The data of sample weight, and dry and wet bulb temperatures of the drying air were recorded continuously throughout the drying period for each test. The drying data were then fitted to the Page model. The model gave a good fit for the moisture content with an average standard error of 0.305% dry basis. The parameter N in Page's equation was assumed as a product-dependent constant which made it easy to compare the effects of independent variables on the natural convection solar drying rate without causing considerable error in predicting the drying rate for barley. A linear relationship was found between the parameter K, temperature T, and relative humidity R{sub H}.

  9. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  10. The program FANS-3D (finite analytic numerical simulation 3-dimensional) and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravo, Ramiro H.; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the program named FANS-3D (Finite Analytic Numerical Simulation-3 Dimensional) is presented. FANS-3D was designed to solve problems of incompressible fluid flow and combined modes of heat transfer. It solves problems with conduction and convection modes of heat transfer in laminar flow, with provisions for radiation and turbulent flows. It can solve singular or conjugate modes of heat transfer. It also solves problems in natural convection, using the Boussinesq approximation. FANS-3D was designed to solve heat transfer problems inside one, two and three dimensional geometries that can be represented by orthogonal planes in a Cartesian coordinate system. It can solve internal and external flows using appropriate boundary conditions such as symmetric, periodic and user specified.

  11. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, T. S.; Couto, S.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s-1) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 102-3 × 105). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow patterns and

  12. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  13. Comparison of results between the DEMO 1-D and the COMMIX 3-D analysis of the CRBRP-IHX under a natural-circulation event

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, A.C.; Kao, T.T.; Cho, S.M.; Lowrie, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    In order to assess the multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic effects in an intermediate heat thermal-hydraulic effects in an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and to ascertain the adequacy of the DEMO one-dimensional (1-D) IHX model in natural circulation analysis, a comparison of the predictions by the DEMO and the COMMIX three-dimensional (3-D) computer code has been conducted. The CRBRP IHX configuration was used in this benchmark comparison. The COMMIX results clearly demonstrated that there is no significant flow channeling or stratification on either the shell or tube side of the CRBRP IHX during the postulated natural circulation event. Comparisons of the integrated thermal heads predicted by the two codes for the CRBRP IHX show differences of .013 and .024 psi (90 and 164 W/m/sup 2/ for both the primary and the secondary side respectively. These results demonstrate that, while a 1-D IHX model can not predict the velocity and temperature distribution inside the IHX in complete detail, it is adequate for the analysis of a heat transport system under design base natural circulation events (i.e. accidents initiated by the simultaneous loss of all AC power during power operation).

  14. Experimental study of natural convection enhancement using a Fe3O4-water based magnetic nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Stoian, Floriana D; Holotescu, Sorin

    2012-10-01

    The effect of nanoparticles dispersed in a carrier fluid on the natural convection heat transfer is still raising controversies. While the reported experimental results show no improvement or even worsening of the heat transfer performance of nanofluids, the numerical simulations show an increase of the heat transfer coefficient, at least for certain ranges of Ra number. We report an experimental investigation regarding the natural convection heat transfer performance of a Fe3O4-water based nanofluid, in a cylindrical enclosure. The fluid was heated linearly from the bottom wall using an electric heater and cooled from the upper wall by a constant flow of water, such that a constant temperature difference between the upper and bottom walls was obtained at steady-state. The experiment was also carried out using water, in order to observe the effect of the addition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the heat transfer coefficient. Several regimes were tested, both for water and nanofluid. The experimental results showed that values obtained for the heat transfer coefficient for Fe3O4-water nanofluid were higher than those for water, at the same temperature difference. The present experimental results are also compared with our previous work and the reference literature. PMID:23421199

  15. A new look at natural convection from isothermal vertical parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.H.; Chung, B.T.F.

    1996-12-31

    Natural convection between isothermal plates is solved numerically by applying the full Navier-Stokes equations. The elliptic formulation allows separating the effect of the Rayleigh number, Ra, and the aspect ratio, L/B. Calculations are made on a wide range of the Rayleigh number and the aspect ratio, and the Nusselt number is provided as a function of both Ra and B/L. The conventional correlations in the literature presenting the Nusselt number in terms of a single parameter, RaB/L, have been found inaccurate. At a small value of RaB/L, multiple values of Nusselt number are obtained for different combinations of Ra and B/L. Previous results are found to be the special cases of the present study. A minimum Rayleigh number is also obtained above which a fully-developed flow is possible. To simulate the natural convective flow, the ambient pressure is given at the exit while the pressure at the entrance is related to the ambient pressure by the Bernoulli equation. Velocities at the entrance and exit are also solved from the Navier-Stokes equations.

  16. Natural convection of a high Prandlt number fluid in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Poujol, F.T.; Rojas, J.; Ramos, E.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic and thermal properties of transient natural convection in cavities have been studied in the context of limnology, geophysics, solar energy and mixing applications as an effort to build realistic models of various physical phenomena. It is of interest to understand the heat transfer process to be able to enhance or reduce it, depending on the requirements. Here, transient natural convection in a square cavity heated with a time-dependent heat flux on one vertical wall and cooled by maintaining the opposite wall at a constant temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. The working fluid was silicon oil (Dow Corning fluid 20--200) with a prandtl number of 230. All experiments were carried out in a cubic cavity of 0.13 m in each side. The heating rate used was 460 W/m{sup 2}, which corresponds to a Rayleigh number of 2 x 10{sup 9}. Experimental data included temperature records at particular points and velocity measurements obtained from video images of tracers. The dynamics of the transition to the steady state is characterized by a vortex structure that forms near the heated wall. This structure is generated by shear at the heated wall boundary layer. The results were compared with a numerical simulation and qualitative agreement was obtained.

  17. Study on natural convection capability of liquid gallium for passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    The safety issues of the SFRs are important due to the fact that it uses sodium as a nuclear coolant, reacting vigorously with water and air. For that reason, there are efforts to seek for alternative candidates of liquid metal coolants having excellent heat transfer property and to adopt improved safety features to the SFR concepts. This study considers gallium as alternative liquid metal coolant applicable to safety features in terms of chemical activity issue of the sodium and aims to experimentally investigate the natural convection capability of gallium as a feasibility study for the development of gallium-based passive safety features in SFRs. In this paper, the design and construction of the liquid gallium natural convection loop were carried out. The experimental results of heat transfer coefficient of liquid gallium resulting in heat removal {approx}2.53 kW were compared with existing correlations and they were much lower than the correlations. To comparison of the experimental data with computer code analysis, gallium property code was developed for employing MARS-LMR (Korea version of RELAP) based on liquid gallium as working fluid. (authors)

  18. Natural and mixed convection in the cylindrical pool of TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Tiselj, I.; Matkovič, M.

    2016-05-01

    Temperature fields within the pool of the JSI TRIGA MARK II nuclear research reactor were measured to collect data for validation of the thermal hydraulics computational model of the reactor tank. In this context temperature of the coolant was measured simultaneously at sixty different positions within the pool during steady state operation and two transients. The obtained data revealed local peculiarities of the cooling water dynamics inside the pool and were used to estimate the coolant bulk velocity above the reactor core. Mixed natural and forced convection in the pool were simulated with a Computational Fluid Dynamics code. A relatively simple CFD model based on Unsteady RANS turbulence model was found to be sufficient for accurate prediction of the temperature fields in the pool during the reactor operation. Our results show that the simple geometry of the TRIGA pool reactor makes it a suitable candidate for a simple natural circulation benchmark in cylindrical geometry.

  19. Natural microseismicity investigated using double-difference tomography: a 3D look at the 2008 swarm in the Novy Kostel area, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Calo, M.; Bouchaala, F.; Vavrycuk, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Novy Kostel region in West Bohemia is an area prone to periodic bursts of natural microseismic activity. In this study, we use 476 events from the October 2008 earthquake swarm recorded on the WEBNET seismic network. The foci occurred on the northern extension of the Marianske-Lazne Fault near the town of Novy Kostel in the Czech Republic. Initial source locations indicated a rupture zone approximately 3 km along the fault with the sources spread over 4 km depth, centered at 9 km. We use the double-difference tomography method to study the fault structure by relocating the sources and inverting for the P and S velocities in the rupture region. Events are first relocated using the HypoDD program (Waldhauser and Ellsworth, 2000) using both catalog and cross-correlated datasets. These datasets, along with the absolute time picks are then used by the TomoDD program (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) to iteratively relocate the sources and invert for the 3D seismic structure. This dataset is ideal for this procedure as the cluster is very condensed and the WEBNET network offers ray coverage in all directions. The relocated events flatten onto a fault plane striking at 169 degrees NE. This fault plane has three sections with distinct dip angles. At the shallowest (up to 8 km) and deepest (10 - 11 km) parts of the fault, the dip is shallow, whereas the middle section has a steep dip angle. Most events occur at the deeper part of the middle section. The inverted velocities correspond well to results from regional seismic refraction surveys (e.g., CELEBRATION 2000). Here, more details of the 3D velocity structure are revealed. As expected, velocities to the east of the fault are overall higher, corresponding to the uplifted northern margin of the Eger Rift. Finer structures surrounding the source region are also resolved.

  20. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  1. Natural convection in a cylindrical porous enclosure with internal heat generation

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.; Chui, A. )

    1989-11-01

    A numerical study is performed on natural convection inside a cylindrical enclosure filled with a volumetrically heated, saturated porous medium for the case when the vertical wall is isothermal and the horizontal walls are either adiabatic or isothermally cooled. When the horizontal walls are insulated, the flow in the cavity is unicellular and the temperature field in upper layers is highly stratified. However, if the top wall is cooled, there may exist a multicellular flow and an unstable thermal stratification in the upper region of the cylinder. Under the influence of weak convection, the maximum temperature in the cavity can be considerably higher than that predicted for pure conduction. The local heat flux on the bounding walls is generally a strong function of the Rayleigh number, the aspect ratio, and the wall boundary conditions. The heat removal on the cold upper surface decreases with the aspect ratio, thereby increasing the Nusselt number on the vertical wall. The effect of Rayleigh number is, however, not straightforward. Several correlations are presented for the maximum cavity temperature and the overall Nusselt number.

  2. Developing natural convection in a fluid layer with localized heating and large viscosity variation

    SciTech Connect

    Hickox, C.E.; Chu, Tze Yao.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments are used to elucidate aspects of transient natural convection in a magma chamber. The magma chamber is modeled as a horizontal fluid layer confined within an enclosure of square planform and heated from below by a strip heater centered on the lower boundary of the enclosure. The width of the strip heater and the depth of the fluid layer are one-fourth of the layer width. Corn syrup is used as the working fluid in order to approximate the large viscosity variation with temperature and the large Prandtl number typical of magma. The quiescent, uniform, fluid layer is subjected to instantaneous heating from the strip heater producing a transient flow which is dominated by two counter-rotating convective cells. Experimentally determined characteristics of the developing flow are compared with numerical simulations carried out with a finite element computer program. The results of numerical simulations are in essential agreement with experimental data. Differences between the numerical simulations and experimental measurements are conjectured to result from non-ideal effects present in the experiment which are difficult to represent accurately in a numerical simulation.

  3. 3D Micro-topography of Transferred Laboratory and Natural Ice Crystal Surfaces Imaged by Cryo and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Bandamede, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted micro-scale roughness on the surfaces of ice crystals grown and imaged in-situ within the chambers of environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEM). These observations appear to align with theoretical and satellite observations that suggest a prevalence of rough ice in cirrus clouds. However, the atmospheric application of the lab observations are indeterminate because the observations have been based only on crystals grown on substrates and in pure-water vapor environments. In this work, we present details and results from the development of a transfer technique which allows natural and lab-grown ice and snow crystals to be captured, preserved, and transferred into the ESEM for 3D imaging. Ice crystals were gathered from 1) natural snow, 2) a balloon-borne cirrus particle capture device, and 3) lab-grown ice crystals from a diffusion chamber. Ice crystals were captured in a pre-conditioned small-volume (~1 cm3) cryo-containment cell. The cell was then sealed closed and transferred to a specially-designed cryogenic dewer (filled with liquid nitrogen or crushed dry ice) for transport to a new Hitachi Field Emission, Variable Pressure SEM (SU-5000). The cryo-cell was then removed from the dewer and quickly placed onto the pre-conditioned cryo transfer stage attached to the ESEM (Quorum 3010T). Quantitative 3D topographical digital elevation models of ice surfaces are reported from SEM for the first time, including a variety of objective measures of statistical surface roughness. The surfaces of the transported crystals clearly exhibit signatures of mesoscopic roughening that are similar to examples of roughness seen in ESEM-grown crystals. For most transported crystals, the habits and crystal edges are more intricate that those observed for ice grown directly on substrates within the ESEM chamber. Portions of some crystals do appear smooth even at magnification greater than 1000x, a rare observation in our ESEM-grown crystals. The

  4. Computational analysis of non-isothermal temperature distribution on natural convection in nanofluid filled enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztop, Hakan F.; Abu-Nada, Eiyad; Varol, Yasin; Al-Salem, Khaled

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the problem of steady state natural convection in an enclosure filled with a nanofluid has been analyzed numerically by using heating and cooling by sinusoidal temperature profiles on one side. The governing partial differential equations, in terms of the dimensionless stream function-vorticity and temperature, are solved numerically using the finite volume method for various inclination angles 0∘≤ϕ≤90∘, different types of nanoparticles (TiO 2 and Al 2O 3) and fractions of nanoparticles 0≤φ≤0.1, whereas the range of the Rayleigh number Ra is 10 3-10 5. It is found that the addition of nanoparticles into water affects the fluid flow and temperature distribution especially for higher Rayleigh numbers. An enhancement in heat transfer rate was registered for the whole range of Rayleigh numbers. However, low Rayleigh numbers show more enhancement compared to high Rayleigh numbers.

  5. MHD natural convection flow along a vertical wavy surface with heat generation and pressure work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, M. A.; Kabir, K. H.; Andallah, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of pressure work on MHD natural convection flow of viscous incompressible fluid along a uniformly heated vertical wavy surface with heat generation has been investigated. The governing boundary layer equations are first transformed into a non-dimensional form using suitable set of dimensionless variables. The resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations are mapped into the domain of a vertical flat plate and then solved numerically employing the implicit finite difference method, known as Keller-box scheme. The numerical results for the velocity profiles, temperature profiles, skin friction coefficient, the rate of heat transfers, the streamlines and the isotherms are shown graphically and skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer have been shown in tabular form for different values of the selective set of parameters consisting of pressure work parameter Ge, the magnetic parameter M, Prandtl number Pr, heat generation parameter Q and the amplitude of the wavy surface.

  6. Enhancement of natural-convection heat transfer from a horizontal heated plate using grid fins

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Kenzo; Nagae, Naoyuki; Kimura, Fumiyoshi

    1996-01-01

    An enhancement technique was developed for natural-convection heat transfer from a horizontal heated plate. In order to enhance the heat transfer, grid fins made of copper plates were soldered to the copper base plate. These grid fins function not only as an extended surface but also as a heat-transfer promoter. The apparent heat-transfer coefficient of the above enhanced plate were measured and compared with those of a nontreated, smooth plate and a conventional plate with vertical straight fins. It was found that the highest performance is achieved by the present plate. By adopting grid fins with appropriate size and height, the heat-transfer coefficient at the central portion of the present plate is increased by 35% compared to that of the conventional finned plate with the same fin area of fin height.

  7. Design and Scaling of the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, Darius D.; Gerardi, Craig D.; Bremer, Nathan C.; Farmer, Mitchell T.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) reflects a 1/2 scale model of one conceptual design for passive safety in advanced reactors. The project was initiated in 2010 primarily to conduct ex-vessel, passive decay heat removal experiments in support of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Small Modular Reactor (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) programs while also generating data for code validation purposes. The facility successfully demonstrated scoping objectives in late 2013, and is expected to begin testing by early 2014. The following paper summarizes some of the key design and scaling considerations used in construction of the experimental facility, along with an overview of the current instrumentation and data acquisition methods. Details of the distributed fiber optic temperature system will be presented, which introduces a level of data density suitable for CFD validation and is a first-of-its-kind for largescale thermal hydraulics facilities.

  8. Natural convection in binary gases driven by combined horizontal thermal and vertical solutal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of natural convection is presented to examine the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient and a concentration gradient occurring from the bottom to the cold wall in a cavity. As the solutal buoyancy force changes from augmenting to opposing the thermal buoyancy force, the fluid motion switches from unicellular to multicellular flow (fluid motion is up the cold wall and down the hot wall for the bottom counterrotating flow cell). Qualitatively, the agreement between predicted streamlines and smoke flow patterns is generally good. In contrast, agreement between measured and predicted temperature and concentration distributions ranges from fair to poor. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to experimental error. However, there remains considerable discrepancy between data and predictions due to the idealizations of the mathematical model, which examines only first-order physical effects. An unsteady flow, variable thermophysical properties, conjugate effects, species interdiffusion, and radiation were not accounted for in the model.

  9. Natural convection in binary gases driven by combined horizontal thermal and vertical solutal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.A.; Viskanta, R. )

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of natural convection is presented to examine the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient and a concentration gradient occurring from the bottom to the cold wall in a cavity. As the solutal buoyancy force changes from augmenting to opposing the thermal buoyancy force, the fluid motion switches from unicellular to multicellular flow (fluid motion is up the cold wall and down the hot wall for the bottom counterrotating flow cell). Qualitatively, the agreement between predicted streamlines and smoke flow patterns is generally good. In contrast, agreement between measured and predicted temperature and concentration distributions ranges from fair to poor. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to experimental error. However, there remains considerable discrepancy between data and predictions due to the idealizations of the mathematical model, which examines only first-order physical effects. An unsteady flow, variable thermophysical properties, conjugate effects, species interdiffusion, and radiation were not accounted for in the model. 31 refs.

  10. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  11. Natural convection flow in porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiki, Md. Noor-A.-Alam; Molla, Md. Mamun; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady natural convection flow in a two dimensional fluid saturated porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux, symmetrical cooling from the sides and the insulated top wall has been investigated numerically. The governing equations are the Darcy's law for the porous media and the energy equation for the temperature field has been considered. The non-dimensional Darcy's law in terms of the stream function is solved by finite difference method using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) scheme and the energy equation is solved by Alternative Direction Alternative (ADI) scheme. The uniform heat flux source is located centrally at the bottom wall. The numerical results are presented in terms of the streamlines and isotherms, as well as the local and average rate of heat transfer for the wide range of the Darcy's Rayleigh number and the length of the heat flux source at the bottom wall.

  12. Experimental investigation of turbulent natural convection flow in a converging channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ayinde, T.F.

    2008-05-15

    This paper reports the results of fluid flow measurements for natural convection in a converging plates channel using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The channel walls were symmetrically subjected to uniform temperature conditions. Velocity characteristics were obtained for two inclination angles, {theta} = 15 and 45 , and two heating conditions corresponding to Ra{sub L} = 2.7 x 10{sup 8} and 4.4 x 10{sup 8}, where Ra{sub L} is the Raleigh number based on the length of the channel wall. Results are presented as vector plots as well as profiles of mean velocities and turbulence quantities. They show that the main flow is aligned with the orientation of the channel walls, due to the effect of buoyancy force, which is no longer exclusively in the vertical direction. They also reveal the presence of reverse flow, which leads to the formation of two symmetric vortices in the core. (author)

  13. Parallel Computations of Natural Convection Flow in a Tall Cavity Using an Explicit Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.A.; McCallen, R.C.

    2000-10-17

    The Galerkin Finite Element Method was used to predict a natural convection flow in an enclosed cavity. The problem considered was a differentially heated, tall (8:1), rectangular cavity with a Rayleigh number of 3.4 x 10{sup 5} and Prandtl number of 0.71. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a Boussinesq approximation for the buoyancy force. The algorithm was developed for efficient use on massively parallel computer systems. Emphasis was on time-accurate simulations. It was found that the average temperature and velocity values can be captured with a relatively coarse grid, while the oscillation amplitude and period appear to be grid sensitive and require a refined computation.

  14. 3D structure of macropore networks within natural and de-embarked estuary saltmarsh sediments: towards an improved understanding of network structural control over hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate; James, Tempest; Lucy, Diggens

    2015-04-01

    Saltmarshes are globally important environments which, though occupying < 4% of the Earth's surface, provide a range of ecosystem services. Yet, they are threatened by sea level rise, human population growth, urbanization and pollution resulting in degradation. To compensate for this habitat loss many coastal restoration projects have been implemented over the last few decades, largely driven by legislative requirements for improved biodiversity e.g. the EU Habitats Directive and Birds Directive. However, there is growing evidence that restored saltmarshes, recreated through the return to tidal inundation of previously drained and defended low-lying coastal land, do not have the same species composition even after 100 years and while environmental enhancement has been achieved, there may be consequences for ecosystem functioning This study presents the findings of a comparative analysis of detailed sediment structure and hydrological functioning of equivalent natural and de-embanked saltmarsh sediments at Orplands Farm, Essex, UK. 3D x-ray CT scanning of triplicate undisturbed sediment cores recovered in 2013 have been used to derive detailed volumetric reconstructions of macropore structure and networks, and to infer differences in bulk microporosity between natural and de-embanked saltmarshes. These volumes have been further visualised for qualitative analysis of the main sediment components, and extraction of key macropore space parameters for quantified analysis including total porosity and connectivity, as well as structure, organisation and efficiency (tortuosity) of macropore networks. Although total porosity was significantly greater within the de-embanked saltmarsh sediments, pore networks in these samples were less organised and more tortuous, and were also inferred to have significantly lower micro-porosity than those of the natural saltmarsh. These datasets are applied to explain significant differences in the hydraulic behaviour and functioning

  15. NASA's 3-D Animation of Tropical Storm Ulika from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ulika using GPM's Radar data showed some strong convective storms inside the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 187 mm (7.4 inches)...

  16. Experimental natural convection on vertical surfaces for building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fossa, M.; Menezo, C.; Leonardi, E.

    2008-02-15

    An experimental study on natural convection in an open channel is carried out in order to investigate the effect of the geometrical configuration of heat sources on the heat transfer behaviour. To this aim, a series of vertical heaters are cooled by natural convection of air flowing between two parallel walls. The objective of the work is to investigate the physical mechanisms which influence the thermal behaviour of a double-skin photovoltaic (PV) facade. This results in a better understanding of the related phenomena and infers useful engineering information for controlling the energy transfers from the environment to the PV surfaces and from the PV surfaces to the building. Furthermore increasing the heat transfer rate from the PV surfaces increases the conversion efficiency of the PV modules since they operate better as their temperature is lower. The test section consists in a double vertical wall, 2 m high, and each wall is constituted by 10 different heating modules 0.2 m high. The heater arrangement simulates, at a reduced scale, the presence of a series of vertical PV modules. The heat flux at the wall ranges from 75 to 200 W/m{sup 2}. In this study, the heated section is 1.6 m in height, preceded by an adiabatic of 0.4 m in height. Different heating configurations are analyzed, including the uniform heating mode and two different configurations of non uniform, alternate heating. The experimental procedure allows the wall surface temperature, local heat transfer coefficient and local and average Nusselt numbers to be inferred. The experimental evidences show that the proper selection of the separating distance and heating configuration can noticeably decrease the surface temperatures and hence enhance the conversion efficiency of PV modules. (author)

  17. Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal cylinders in liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Takeuchi, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal 7.6 mm diameter test cylinders assembled with the ratio of the distance between each cylinder axis to the cylinder diameter, S/D, of 2 in liquid sodium was studied experimentally and theoretically. The heat transfer coefficients on the cylinder surface due to the same heat inputs ranging from 1.0 X 10{sup 7} to 1.0 x 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 3} were obtained experimentally for various setting angeles, {gamma}, between vertical direction and the plane including both of these cylinder axis over the range of zero to 90{degrees}. Theoretical equations for laminar natural convection heat transfer from the two horizontal cylinders were numerically solved for the same conditions as the experimental ones considering the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties concerned. The average Nusselt numbers, Nu, values on the Nu versus modified Rayleigh number, R{sub f}, graph. The experimental values of Nu for the upper cylinder are about 20% lower than those for the lower cylinder at {gamma} = 0{degrees} for the range of R{sub f} tested here. The value of Nu for the upper cylinder becomes higher and approaches that for the lower cylinder with the increase in {gamma} over range of 0 to 90{degrees}. The values of Nu for the lower cylinder at each {gamma} are almost in agreement with those for a single cylinder. The theoretical values of Nu on two cylinders except those for R{sub f}<4 at {gamma} = 0{degrees} are in agreement with the experimental data at each {gamma} with the deviations less than 15%. Correlations for Nu on the upper and lower cylinders were obtained as functions of S/D and {gamma} based n the theoretical solutions for the S/D ranged over 1.5 to 4.0.

  18. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  19. Transport Phenomena Projects: Natural Convection between Porous, Concentric Cylinders--A Method to Learn and to Innovate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saatadjian, Esteban; Lesage, Francois; Mota, Jose Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    A project that involves the numerical simulation of transport phenomena is an excellent method to teach this subject to senior/graduate chemical engineering students. The subject presented here has been used in our senior/graduate course, it concerns the study of natural convection heat transfer between two concentric, horizontal, saturated porous…

  20. Comparison of CFD Natural Convection and Conduction-only Models for Heat Transfer in the Yucca Mountain Project Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hadgu; S. Webb; M. Itamura

    2004-02-12

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been designated as the nation's high-level radioactive waste repository and the U.S. Department of Energy has been approved to apply to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a repository. Heat transfer in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) drift enclosures is an important aspect of repository waste emplacement. Canisters containing radioactive waste are to be emplaced in tunnels drilled 500 m below the ground surface. After repository closure, decaying heat is transferred from waste packages to the host rock by a combination of thermal radiation, natural convection and conduction heat transfer mechanism?. Current YMP mountain-scale and drift-scale numerical models often use a simplified porous medium code to model fluid and heat flow in the drift openings. To account for natural convection heat transfer, the thermal conductivity of the air was increased in the porous medium model. The equivalent thermal conductivity, defined as the ratio of total heat flow to conductive heat flow, used in the porous media models was based on horizontal concentric cylinders. Such modeling does not effectively capture turbulent natural convection in the open spaces as discussed by Webb et al. (2003) yet the approach is still widely used on the YMP project. In order to mechanistically model natural convection conditions in YMP drifts, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT (Fluent, Incorporated, 2001) has been used to model natural convection heat transfer in the YMP emplacement drifts. A two-dimensional (2D) model representative of YMP geometry (e.g., includes waste package, drip shield, invert and drift wall) has been developed and numerical simulations made (Francis et al., 2003). Using CFD simulation results for both natural convection and conduction-only heat transfer in a single phase, single component fluid, equivalent thermal conductivities have been calculated for different Rayleigh numbers. Correlation

  1. Natural convection in a wavy open porous cavity filled with a nanofluid: Tiwari and Das' nanofluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, M. A.; Pop, I.; Shenoy, A.

    2016-03-01

    Natural convective heat transfer and fluid flow in an open porous cavity filled with a nanofluid is studied numerically using the Tiwari and Das nanofluid model. The transport equations for mass, momentum and energy formulated in dimensionless stream function and temperature are solved numerically using a second-order accurate finite difference method. Particular efforts are focused on the effects of the governing parameters on the heat and fluid flow. It is found that an increase in undulation number of the wavy vertical wall leads to an attenuation of convective flow and a decrease in the heat transfer rate.

  2. Laminar Natural Convection in Vertical Tubes with One End Open to a Large Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yissu

    1995-01-01

    The problem of laminar natural convection in vertical tubes with one end open to a large reservoir, designated open thermosyphons, is numerically and experimentally examined to predict flow behavior and the heat transfer rates. In the numerical study, a semi-implicit, time-marching, finite -volume solution procedure was adopted to solve the three governing equations--mass, momentum, and energy--sequentially. Experimental work involved the use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to examine the temperature field for a modified rectangular open thermosyphon through the interpretation of fringe patterns. These experimental fringe patterns were used for the qualitative comparison with those obtained from the numerical analyses. Nusselt numbers were determined from the interferometer results and compared with numerical results. Heat transfer rates through the tube wall were found to be strong functions of the tube radius, and approached an asymptotic limit as the tube radius was increased. Both experimental and numerical results exhibited an oscillatory nature for large height-to-width (aspect ratio) open cavities. comparisons between experimental and numerically-generated fringe patterns indicated good agreement. Based on experimental results, a correlation between Nusselt number, Nu, and Rayleigh number, Ra_{rm w}, for different aspect ratios, L/W, was determined to be Nu = 0.036cdotrm Ra_sp{w }{2/5}cdot(L/W)^{-1/5} .

  3. Effects of electrode location on EHD-enhanced natural convection in an enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.S.; Lai, F.C.

    1997-07-01

    Numerical results are presented for natural convection in an enclosure under the influence of electric field. The geometry considered is a two-dimensional cavity with an aspect ratio of 5. The electrical field is generated by positive corona from an electrode wire charged with a high dc voltage. Three wire locations have been considered, which result in symmetric and non-symmetric electric fields. Numerical calculations have covered a wide range of parameters (i.e., V{sub o} = 12, 15 and 18 kV, 10{sup 3} {le} Ra {le} 10{sup 6}). In the presence of electric field, the flow and temperature fields may reach a steady, steady-periodic or non-periodic state. For low Rayleigh numbers, it is observed that the flow and temperature fields are basically oscillatory in nature. When the Rayleigh number is sufficiently increased, a steady state may be reached. Due to the oscillatory flows, there is a significant increase in heat transfer. It is found that heat transfer enhancement increases with the applied voltage but decreases with the Rayleigh number. In addition, it is found that heat transfer enhancement can be maximized by placing the electrode toward the leading edge of the heat transfer surface, that is, to perturb the thermal boundary layer as early as it begins to develop.

  4. A three-dimensional analysis of natural convection in a toroidal loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, A. G.

    1984-06-01

    Flow through a toroidal loop oriented in a vertical plane is studied. This system is a simple example of a class of devices known as thermosyphons or natural circulation loops, which have many applications. When the toroidal loop is heated from below and cooled from above, an unstable density gradient is created in the fluid. Under the influence of gravity, the lighter fluid rises and the heavier fluid fails. Thus, the fluid flows due only to natural convection. Experiments on the toroidal thermosyphon have shown that under steady state flow conditions, the axial velocity and the temperature are nonaxisymmetric, the cross stream velocities are nonzero and regions of streamwise flow reversal exist. The simplified one and two dimensional analyses performed to date have not been able to predict these phenomena. The development of a finite difference computer program for performing a three dimensional analysis of the steady state fluid flow and heat transfer in the toroidal thermosyphon is described. Regions of streamwise flow reversal are predicted in some cases. Simplified analyses which do not take the flow reversals into account are shown to be substantially in error. Hence, the current analysis yields insight into the three dimensional aspects of the flow, which could not be predicted by earlier more simplified analyses.

  5. Numerical study of natural convection in a horizontal cylinder filled with water-based alumina nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangyin; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Natural heat convection of water-based alumina (Al2O3/water) nanofluids (with volume fraction 1% and 4%) in a horizontal cylinder is numerically investigated. The whole three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedure is performed in a completely open-source way. Blender, enGrid, OpenFOAM and ParaView are employed for geometry creation, mesh generation, case simulation and post process, respectively. Original solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleFoam' is selected for the present study, and a temperature-dependent solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleTDFoam' is developed to ensure the simulation is more realistic. The two solvers are used for same cases and compared to corresponding experimental results. The flow regime in these cases is laminar (Reynolds number is 150) and the Rayleigh number range is 0.7 × 10(7) ~ 5 × 10(7). By comparison, the average natural Nusselt numbers of water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are found to increase with the Rayleigh number. At the same Rayleigh number, the Nusselt number is found to decrease with nanofluid volume fraction. The temperature-dependent solver is found better for water and 1% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases, while the original solver is better for 4% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases. Furthermore, due to strong three-dimensional flow features in the horizontal cylinder, three-dimensional CFD simulation is recommended instead of two-dimensional simplifications.

  6. Numerical study of natural convection in a horizontal cylinder filled with water-based alumina nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangyin; Li, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Natural heat convection of water-based alumina (Al2O3/water) nanofluids (with volume fraction 1% and 4%) in a horizontal cylinder is numerically investigated. The whole three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedure is performed in a completely open-source way. Blender, enGrid, OpenFOAM and ParaView are employed for geometry creation, mesh generation, case simulation and post process, respectively. Original solver `buoyantBoussinesqSimpleFoam' is selected for the present study, and a temperature-dependent solver `buoyantBoussinesqSimpleTDFoam' is developed to ensure the simulation is more realistic. The two solvers are used for same cases and compared to corresponding experimental results. The flow regime in these cases is laminar (Reynolds number is 150) and the Rayleigh number range is 0.7 × 107 ~ 5 × 107. By comparison, the average natural Nusselt numbers of water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are found to increase with the Rayleigh number. At the same Rayleigh number, the Nusselt number is found to decrease with nanofluid volume fraction. The temperature-dependent solver is found better for water and 1% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases, while the original solver is better for 4% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases. Furthermore, due to strong three-dimensional flow features in the horizontal cylinder, three-dimensional CFD simulation is recommended instead of two-dimensional simplifications.

  7. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  8. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  9. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  10. Design, synthesis, and optimization of nanostructured calcium phosphates (NanoCaPs) and natural polymer based 3-D non-viral gene delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hsu-Feng

    Sustained delivery of therapeutic genes from a three-dimensional (3-D) scaffold and subsequent gene expression capable of triggering the regeneration of damaged tissues is a tissue engineering strategy that has been gaining increased attention. Nanostructured calcium phosphates (NanoCaPs) are biocompatible and non-toxic biomaterials. Furthermore, their efficient transfection in vitro have rendered them attractive gene delivery carriers compared to other viral- or lipid-based agents that tend to be immunogenic or cytotoxic, leading to undesirable responses when utilized above a critical threshold. However, NanoCaPs are typically characterized by variable transfection and short shelf life due to particle aggregation. A viable solution to this problem is the incorporation of NanoCaPs into 3-D scaffolds. The main objectives of this research are therefore two-fold: (1) Examination of the potential of achieving optimized transfection of NanoCaPs via anionic substitution and (2) high throughput synthesis and screening of non-viral gene delivery systems (GDS) comprised of naturally-derived polymers as scaffolds containing NanoCaPs gene carriers. Results indicated that in addition to the excellent transfection levels exhibited by NanoCaPs in vitro, an additional 20-30% increase was observed for NanoCaPs with 10-25 mol% anion substitution. In contrast, high anion substitution (>60%) yielded a drastic decline in transfection. Structural characterizations verified successful anion substitution with a noticeable increase in lattice parameters indicative of an expanded unit cell due to ionic substitution. All of the anion substituted calcium phosphates exhibited the primary phase of hydroxyapatite. For the first time, GDS composed of various concentrations of alginate (AA), fibronectin (FN), and NanoCaPs-DNA complexes were demonstrated. The presence of AA and FN was effective in immobilizing NanoCaPs and reducing the aggregation. High throughput synthesis and screening

  11. Experimental Study for the Determination of the Turbulence Onset in Natural Convection on Inclined Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Grande, Isabel; Rodriguez Sevillano, Angel; Meseguer, Jos

    In June, 8th, 2009 the balloon-borne solar telescope SUNRISE was launched from the Swedish Space Corporation balloon facility Esrange. A telescope with a mirror of 1 m in diameter ob-served the Sun during six days until the mission was terminated in Canada. The design process of SUNRISE and of any optical telescope requires the analysis of the effect of surrounding air on the quality of images. The turbulence encountered in the local telescope environment de-grades its optical performance. This phenomenon called `seeing' consists of optical aberrations produced by density non-homogeneities in the air along the optical path. The refraction index of air changes due to thermal non-uniformities so that the wavefront incident on the mirror is randomly distorted, and therefore, images are altered. When telescope mirrors are heated, as it happens in solar telescopes, and therefore they are at a temperature different from the environment's, natural convection occurs. It is then crucial to know whether the flow in front of the mirror is laminar or turbulent. After reviewing the literature, it was found that the scattering of results about the onset of the transition gives only rough orders of magnitude of the values of the critical Grashof numbers. Aiming to obtain more information about it, the problem of determination of the turbulence onset in natural convection on heated inclined plates in air environment was experimentally revisited. The transition has been determined from hot wire velocity measurements. The onset of turbulence has been considered to take place where velocity perturbations start to grow. Experiments have shown that the onset depends not only on the Grashof number, but also on other parameters as the temperature difference between the heated plate and the surrounding air. A correlation between dimensionless Grashof and Reynolds numbers has been obtained, fitting extraordinarily well the experimental data. The results are obtained in terms of non

  12. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  13. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  14. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Ziya; Harmand, Souad

    2013-02-07

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size.

  15. Numerical modeling of a lead melting front under the influence of natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Ryan

    This work presents a study of the Effective Heat Capacity (EHC) method applied to the numerical simulation of the interface between a solid and a naturally convecting pool of liquid lead under pseudo-steady-state and transient conditions using COMSOL Multiphysics. The EHC method is implemented as a temperature dependent pseudo-material with discontinuities in the heat capacity, dynamic viscosity, and thermal conductivity to simulate the melting front. The approach is validated with experimental data for a vertical melting front between two walls. The hot wall heat flux and the cold wall temperature are adjusted until the numerical model that best matches the experimental data is found. The best case boundary conditions then serve as the control in subsequent studies of key modeling parameters, including the mesh refinement, the discontinuity width and location, the maximum allowable time step, and the jump in dynamic viscosity. An extra fine mesh with a maximum element size of 1.24 * 10--3 m2 results in the most accurate model. For pseudo-steady-state models the width and location of the discontinuity does not affect the results substantially but it does affect the settling times and transient behavior of the models. The maximum allowable time step is dependent on the mesh resolution. The behavior of the pseudo-solid transitions from solid to liquid when the dynamic viscosity is less then 1.0 * 104 Pa · s.

  16. Pulsating and traveling wave modes of natural convection in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scurtu, N.; Futterer, B.; Egbers, C.

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is made of the natural convective fluid motion in the spherical shell geometry, i.e., the gap between two concentric spheres. The case of homogeneously heated inner sphere and cooled outer sphere is considered for the radius ratio η =0.714 and Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Patterns of fluid flow are established by the variation of the Rayleigh number Ra and its heat transfer is characterized by the Nusselt number Nu. For small values of the Rayleigh number, a crescent shaped axisymmetric vortex is formed and is regarded as the basic flow. By increasing the Rayleigh number, two transitions occur to a fully developed three-dimensional irregular flow. On the first bifurcation branch, a pulsating wave flow was found with petal-like formations pulsating in meridional direction. On the second branch, a traveling wave flow exists with an azimuthal rotation of the spirally distributed petal patterns. Various characteristics of the flow patterns are investigated as well as their transition to chaos. Both branches conjoin in the very supercritical domain, where the traveling wave dominates.

  17. Characterization of Fuego for laminar and turbulent natural convection heat transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Nicholas Donald, Jr.

    2005-08-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is conducted for internal natural convection heat transfer using the low Mach number code Fuego. The flow conditions under investigation are primarily laminar, transitional, or low-intensity level turbulent flows. In the case of turbulent boundary layers at low-level turbulence or transitional Reynolds numbers, the use of standard wall functions no longer applies, in general, for wall-bounded flows. One must integrate all the way to the wall in order to account for gradients in the dependent variables in the viscous sublayer. Fuego provides two turbulence models in which resolution of the near-wall region is appropriate. These models are the v2-f turbulence model and a Launder-Sharma, low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Two standard geometries are considered: the annulus formed between horizontal concentric cylinders and a square enclosure. Each geometry emphasizes wall shear flow and complexities associated with turbulent or near turbulent boundary layers in contact with a motionless core fluid. Overall, the Fuego simulations for both laminar and turbulent flows compared well to measured data, for both geometries under investigation, and to a widely accepted commercial CFD code (FLUENT).

  18. Natural convection in a differentially heated square enclosure with a solid polygon.

    PubMed

    Roslan, R; Saleh, H; Hashim, I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present numerical study is to analyze the conjugate natural convection heat transfer in a differentially heated square enclosure containing a conductive polygon object. The left wall is heated and the right wall is cooled, while the horizontal walls are kept adiabatic. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is applied to solve the dimensionless governing equations. The governing parameters considered are the polygon type, 3 ≤ N ≤ ∞, the horizontal position, 0.25 ≤ X 0 ≤ 0.75, the polygon size, 0 ≤ A ≤ π/16, the thermal conductivity ratio, 0.1 ≤ K r ≤ 10.0, and the Rayleigh number, 10(3) ≤ Ra ≤ 10(6). The critical size of the solid polygon was found exists at low conductivities. The heat transfer rate increases with the increase of the size of the solid polygon, until it reaches its maximum value. Here, the size of the solid polygon is reaches its critical value. Further, beyond this critical size of the solid polygon, will decrease the heat transfer rate.

  19. Radial segregation induced by natural convection and melt/solid interface shape in vertical Bridgman growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The roles of natural convection in the melt and the shape of the melt/solid interface on radial dopant segregation are analyzed for a prototype of vertical Bridgman crystal growth system by finite element methods that solve simultaneously for the velocity field in the melt, the shape of the solidification isotherm, and the temperature distribution in both phases. Results are presented for crystal and melt with thermophysical properties similar to those of gallium-doped germanium in Bridgman configurations with melt below (thermally destabilizing) and above (stabilizing) the crystal. Steady axisymmetric flow are classified according to Rayleigh number as either being nearly the growth velocity, having a weak cellular structure or having large amplitude cellular convention. The flows in the two Bridgman configurations are driven by different temperature gradients and are in opposite directions. Finite element calculations for the transport of a dilute dopant by these flow fields reveal radial segregation levels as large as sixty percent of the mean concentration. Segregation is found most severe at an intermediate value of Rayleigh number above which the dopant distribution along the interface levels as the intensity of the flow increases.

  20. Study of natural convection cooling of a nanofluid subjected to a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Ahmed; Mejri, Imen; Omri, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of natural convection cooling of water-Al2O3 nanofluid by two heat sinks vertically attached to the horizontal walls of a cavity subjected to a magnetic field. The left wall is hot, the right wall is cold, while the horizontal walls are insulated. Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied to solve the coupled equations of flow and temperature fields. This study has been carried out for the pertinent parameters in the following ranges: Rayleigh number of the base fluid, Ra =103 to 105, Hartmann number varied from Ha = 0 to 60 and the solid volume fraction of nanoparticles between ϕ = 0 and 6%. In order to investigate the effect of heat sinks location, three different configurations of heat sinks are considered. The effects of Rayleigh numbers, Hartmann number and heat sinks location on the streamlines, isotherms, Nusselt number are investigated. Results show that the heat transfer rate decreases with the increase of Hartmann number and increases with the rise of Rayleigh number. In addition it is observed that the average Nusselt number increases linearly with the increase of the nanoparticles solid volume fraction. Also, results show that the heat sinks positions greatly influence the heat transfer rate depending on the Hartmann number, Rayleigh number and nanoparticle solid volume fraction.

  1. Natural convection inside a porous trapezoidal enclosure with wavy top surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshon, Sehrina Muzahid; Mustafa, Rakib; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present work is analysis of heat flow during natural convection inside a trapezoidal porous cavity having wavy top surface. The bottom wall of the cavity is sinusoidally heated whereas the top wall is kept at constant low temperature and the side walls are maintained adiabatic. The physical problem has been represented mathematically by various governing equations along with the corresponding boundary conditions and hence solved by using Galerkin Finite Element scheme. Numerical simulations were carried out and the flow and thermal fields inside the cavity were analyzed in terms of distribution of isothermal lines (θ), streamlines (ψ) and heatlines (Π). To compare heat transfer characteristics local Nusselt number (Nu), and average Nusselt number (Nuavg) along the hot bottom wall are studied for various system parameters, such as, Rayleigh number (Ra) and Darcy number (Da). The range of Ra, Da considered in the present study are as follows; 104 ≤ Ra ≤ 106, 10-5 ≤ Da ≤ 10-3. The present study has been conducted for the trapezoidal cavity being filled with two different types of fluids; water (Pr = 7.2), and molten gallium (Pr = 0.026). It has been found that an increase in flow intensity and heat transfer occurs at higher Rayleigh number (Ra) and Darcy number (Da) whereas the effect of Prandtl number (Pr) is somewhat negligible.

  2. Natural convection heat transfer from a horizontal wavy surface in a porous enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.; Kumar, B.V.R.; Singh, P.

    1997-02-07

    The effect of surface undulations on the natural convection heat transfer from an isothermal surface in a Darcian fluid-saturated porous enclosure has been numerically analyzed using the finite element method on a graded nonuniform mesh system. The flow-driving Rayleigh number Ra together with the geometrical parameters of wave amplitude a, wave phase {phi}, and the number of waves N considered in the horizontal dimension of the cavity are found to influence the flow and heat transfer process in the enclosure. For Ra around 50 and above, the phenomenon of flow separation and reattachment is noticed on the walls of the enclosure. A periodic shift in the reattachment point from the bottom wall to the adjacent walls in the clockwise direction, leading to the manifestation of cycles of unicellular and bicellular clockwise and counterclockwise flows, is observed, with the phase varying between 0{degree} and 350{degree}. The counterflow in the secondary circulation zone is intensified with the increase in the value of Ra. The counterflow on the wavy wall hinders the heat transfer into the system. An increase in either wave amplitude or the number of waves considered per unit length decreases the global heat flux into the system. Only marginal changes in global heat flux are noticed with increasing Ra. On the whole, the comparison of global heat flux results in the wavy wall case with those of the horizontal flat wall case shows that, in a porous enclosure, the wavy wall reduces the heat transfer into the system.

  3. Experimental study of the steady natural convection in a horizontal annulus with irregular boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The natural convective heat transfer across an annulus with irregular boundaries was studied using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The annulus was formed by an inner hexagonal cylinder and an outer concentric circular cylinder. This configuration models, in two dimensions, a liquid metal fast breeder reactor spent fuel subassembly inside a shipping container. During the test, the annulus was filled with a single gas, either neon, air, argon, krypton, or xenon, at a pressure of about 0.5 MPa. From temperature measurements, both local and mean Nusselt numbers (Nu/sub ..delta../) at the surface of the inner cylinder were evaluated, with the mean Rayleigh number (anti Ra/sub ..delta../) varying from 4.54 x 10/sup 4/ to 0.915 x 10/sup 6/ (..delta.. is the local gas width). The data correlation for the mean Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers is given by anti Nu/sub ..delta../ = 0.183 anti Ra/sub ..delta..//sup 0/ /sup 310/.

  4. Natural Convection in a Differentially Heated Square Enclosure with a Solid Polygon

    PubMed Central

    Roslan, R.; Saleh, H.; Hashim, I.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present numerical study is to analyze the conjugate natural convection heat transfer in a differentially heated square enclosure containing a conductive polygon object. The left wall is heated and the right wall is cooled, while the horizontal walls are kept adiabatic. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is applied to solve the dimensionless governing equations. The governing parameters considered are the polygon type, 3 ≤ N ≤ ∞, the horizontal position, 0.25 ≤ X 0 ≤ 0.75, the polygon size, 0 ≤ A ≤ π/16, the thermal conductivity ratio, 0.1 ≤ K r ≤ 10.0, and the Rayleigh number, 103 ≤ Ra ≤ 106. The critical size of the solid polygon was found exists at low conductivities. The heat transfer rate increases with the increase of the size of the solid polygon, until it reaches its maximum value. Here, the size of the solid polygon is reaches its critical value. Further, beyond this critical size of the solid polygon, will decrease the heat transfer rate. PMID:24991643

  5. Natural convection in an enclosure with discrete roughness elements on a vertical heated wall

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S; Bohn, M S; Loehrke, R I

    1986-02-01

    Natural convection flow next to a heated wall with single and repeated, two-dimensional, rectangular roughness elements is studied numerically and experimentally. The objective is to determine how these roughness elements influence heat transfer rates from the wall. Each roughness element consists of a thermally conducting, horizontal cylinder of rectangular cross section attached to the heated, isothermal wall of an enclosure. The height of roughness is on the order of the boundary layer thickness. Dye flow visualization in water confirms the numerical prediction that the steady flow over these elements does not separate. Only at high Rayleigh numbers, when the boundary layer below the roughness is unsteady, is local instantaneous flow reversal observed. Although steady flow reversals near the wall are not predicted or observed, nearly stagnant regions are formed, particularly between closely spaced cylinders. The surface heat flux in these stagnant regions is relatively low, so the total heat transfer rate may be nearly the same as for a smooth wall in spite of the increased surface area.

  6. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  7. Numerical study of natural convection in a horizontal cylinder filled with water-based alumina nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangyin; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Natural heat convection of water-based alumina (Al2O3/water) nanofluids (with volume fraction 1% and 4%) in a horizontal cylinder is numerically investigated. The whole three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedure is performed in a completely open-source way. Blender, enGrid, OpenFOAM and ParaView are employed for geometry creation, mesh generation, case simulation and post process, respectively. Original solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleFoam' is selected for the present study, and a temperature-dependent solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleTDFoam' is developed to ensure the simulation is more realistic. The two solvers are used for same cases and compared to corresponding experimental results. The flow regime in these cases is laminar (Reynolds number is 150) and the Rayleigh number range is 0.7 × 10(7) ~ 5 × 10(7). By comparison, the average natural Nusselt numbers of water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are found to increase with the Rayleigh number. At the same Rayleigh number, the Nusselt number is found to decrease with nanofluid volume fraction. The temperature-dependent solver is found better for water and 1% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases, while the original solver is better for 4% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases. Furthermore, due to strong three-dimensional flow features in the horizontal cylinder, three-dimensional CFD simulation is recommended instead of two-dimensional simplifications. PMID:25852431

  8. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  9. Natural solutal convection in magnetic fluids: First-order phase transition aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Aleksey S.

    2016-10-01

    Concentration stratification of magnetic fluids under the action of external magnetic field can disturb mechanical equilibrium in the system and cause intensive solutal convection. The current paper is devoted to the study of free solutal convection in magnetic fluids undergoing first-order phase transition. Simulation of solutal convection in OpenFOAM package makes it possible to compare numeric results with physical experiment observations. The numeric simulation of convective hydrodynamic flows was carried out in the framework of several theories of first-order phase transition in ferrocolloids. The numerical results are compared with experimental observations in order to choose the theory which predicts most accurately the concentration stratification in magnetic fluids undergoing magneto-controllable first-order phase transition.

  10. The halt of deep convection in the Greenland Sea: A natural experiment for the study of their causes and effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somavilla Cabrillo, Raquel; Schauer, Ursula; Budeus, Gedeon; Latarius, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    There are only a few sites where the deep ocean is ventilated from the surface. The responsible process known as deep convection is recognized to be a key process on the Earth's climate system, but still it is scarcely observed, and its good representation by global oceanographic and climate models remains unclear. In the Arctic Ocean, the halt of deep convection in the Greenland Sea during the last three decades serves as a natural experiment to study: (1) the conditions that drive the occurrence or not of deep convection and (2) the effects of the halt of deep convection on the thermohaline properties of the deep water masses and circulation both locally and in adjacent ocean basins. Combining oceanic and atmospheric in-situ data together with reanalysis data, we observe that not only on average the winter net heat losses from the ocean to the atmosphere (Qo) have decreased during the last three decades in the Greenland Sea (ΔQo (before the 1980s- after the 1980s) = 25 Wm-2) but the intensity and number of strong cooling events (Qo ≥ 800Wm-2). This last value for convection reaching 2000 m in the Greenland Sea seems critical to make the mixed layer deepening from being a non-penetrative process to one arrested by baroclinic instabilities. Besides, changes in the wind stress curl and preconditioning for deep convection have occurred, hindering also the occurrence of deep convection. Concerning the effects of the halt of deep convection, hydrographic data reveal that the temperature between 2000 meters depth and the sea floor has risen by 0.3 °C in the last 30 years, which is ten times higher than the temperature increase in the global ocean on average, and salinity rose by 0.02 because import of relatively warm and salty Arctic Ocean deep waters continued. The necessary transports to explain the observed changes suggest an increase of Arctic Ocean deep water transport that would have compensated the decrease in deep water formation rate after the 1980s. The

  11. Geometric aspect and buoyancy effects on nature convection flow in the complex annuli filled with micropolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen Ruey

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the steady laminar natural convection of micropolar fluids in the complex annuli between the inner sphere and outer vertical cylinder to present a numerical analysis of the flow and heat transfer characteristics with buoyancy effects. Computations were carried out systematically by the several different parameters of geometric ratio, micropolar material parameter and Rayleigh number to determine the average Nusselt number and the skin friction coefficient on the flow and the thermal fields.

  12. A generalized quasi-geostrophic model of thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, M.; Laycock, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that, under the influence of planetary rotation, the primary force balance for large scale convective planetary flows is between pressure gradients and the Coriolis force; these flows are termed geostrophic. Convective flows are never purely geostrophic because buoyancy (which powers convection) is necessarily present and so is viscous dissipation. Nevertheless, provided rotation is dominant, the first order geostrophic balance is preserved and these flows are often referred to as quasi-geostrophic (QG). When buoyancy is perpendicular to rotation, the non-axial QG flows are rigid, that is, they have small variations along the direction of rotation. QG numerical models of thermal convection, in which only the non-axial flows are evolved, have been developed to take advantage of this 2D structure of QG flows. These models can reproduce faithfully some of the features of fully three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The chief advantage of such QG models is that, because of their 2D nature, a much higher numerical resolution is achievable than for 3D models for the same computing cost and can thus be used to study aspects of convection under a regime not accessible in 3D models. In existing QG models, buoyancy is restricted to its non-axial component and the modelled region of convection is limited to that outside the tangent cylinder. Here, we present an extension on these models by incorporating the axial component of buoyancy and by modelling convection inside the tangent cylinder. When buoyancy is parallel to rotation, the non-axial QG flows are no longer rigid and include an axial gradient. To capture the first order dynamics inside the tangent cylinder, we must also track the evolution of non-rigid flows. We show that our model can reproduce the salient features of 3D numerical models near onset. Further, our model also captures features of well developed, fully turbulent convection, such as production of zonal jets.

  13. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  14. An evaluation of gas transfer velocity parameterizations during natural convection using DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, Sam T.; Arneborg, Lars; Nilsson, Hâkan; Zhang, Qi; Handler, Robert A.

    2016-02-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of free surface flows driven by natural convection are used to evaluate different methods of estimating air-water gas exchange at no-wind conditions. These methods estimate the transfer velocity as a function of either the horizontal flow divergence at the surface, the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation beneath the surface, the heat flux through the surface, or the wind speed above the surface. The gas transfer is modeled via a passive scalar. The Schmidt number dependence is studied for Schmidt numbers of 7, 150 and 600. The methods using divergence, dissipation and heat flux estimate the transfer velocity well for a range of varying surface heat flux values, and domain depths. The two evaluated empirical methods using wind (in the limit of no wind) give reasonable estimates of the transfer velocity, depending however on the surface heat flux and surfactant saturation. The transfer velocity is shown to be well represented by the expression, ks=A |Bν|1/4 Sc-n, where A is a constant, B is the buoyancy flux, ν is the kinematic viscosity, Sc is the Schmidt number, and the exponent n depends on the water surface characteristics. The results suggest that A=0.39 and n≈1/2 and n≈2/3 for slip and no-slip boundary conditions at the surface, respectively. It is further shown that slip and no-slip boundary conditions predict the heat transfer velocity corresponding to the limits of clean and highly surfactant contaminated surfaces, respectively. This article was corrected on 22 MAR 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  15. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  16. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  17. Stochastic Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2005-11-01

    Stochastic bifurcations and stability of natural convective flows in 2d and 3d enclosures are investigated by the multi-element generalized polynomial chaos (ME-gPC) method (Xiu and Karniadakis, SISC, vol. 24, 2002). The Boussinesq approximation for the variation of physical properties is assumed. The stability analysis is first carried out in a deterministic sense, to determine steady state solutions and primary and secondary bifurcations. Stochastic simulations are then conducted around discontinuities and transitional regimes. It is found that these highly non-linear phenomena can be efficiently captured by the ME-gPC method. Finally, the main findings of the stochastic analysis and their implications for heat transfer will be discussed.

  18. Dual nature of 3 d electrons in YbT 2 Zn 20 (T = Co; Fe) evidenced by electron spin resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Ivanshin, V. A.; Litvinova, T. O.; Gimranova, K.; Sukhanov, A. A.; Jia, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-03-18

    The electron spin resonance experiments were carried out in the single crystals YbFe2Zn20. The observed spin dynamics is compared with that in YbCo2Zn20 and Yb2Co12P7 as well as with the data of inelastic neutron scattering and electronic band structure calculations. Our results provide direct evidence that 3d electrons are itinerant in YbFe2Zn20 and localized in YbCo2Zn20. Possible connection between spin paramagnetism of dense heavy fermion systems, quantum criticality effects, and ESR spectra is discussed.

  19. A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in HeatedSubsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-04-14

    In heated tunnels such as those designated for emplacementof radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, axial temperature gradients maycause natural convection processes that can significantly influence themoisture conditions in the tunnels and in the surrounding fractured rock.Large-scale convection cells would provide an effective mechanism foraxial vapor transport, driving moisture out of the formation away fromthe heated tunnel section into cool end sections (where no waste isemplaced). To study such processes, we have developed and applied anenhanced version of TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999) adding a new module thatsolves for natural convection in open cavities. The new TOUGH2 simulatorsimultaneously handles (1) the flow and energy transport processes in thefractured rock; (2) the flow and energy transport processes in thecavity; and (3) the heat and mass exchange at the rock-cavity interface.The new module is applied to simulate the future thermal-hydrological(TH) conditions within and near a representative waste emplacement tunnelat Yucca Mountain. Particular focus is on the potential for condensationalong the emplacement section, a possible result of heat outputdifferences between individual waste packages.

  20. The nature and geochemical role of density convection in the East European evaporite basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. G.; Abdrakhmanov, R. F.; Puchkov, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    The role of the gravitation factor in the formation of the hydrostratisphere in the East European evaporate basin is considered. The features of Paleozoic sedimentation are characterized, as are the mechanism and litho-hydrogeochemical effects of the density concentration convection of mother brines of the Low-Permian salt-bearing basin to the underlying terrigenous-carbonate Paleozoic and Proterozoic layers. It is shown that the convection processes resulted in the formation of multicomponent calcium chloride brines prevailing in the sedimentary layer of the basis; they also caused the metasomatic dolomitization of limestones with growth of their filtration capacity.

  1. Flow and transport due to natural convection in a galvanic cell. 1: Development of a mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, S.; Evans, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    In many electrochemical cells, the flow of electrolyte has an influence on cell behavior and this investigation concerns a cell (a zinc-air cell) where that flow occurred through natural convection. The zinc was present in the form of a bed of particles, connected at its top and bottom with channels forming reservoirs of electrolyte. Dissolution of the zinc caused density differences between electrolyte in the bed interstices and that in the reservoir. In Part 1 of this two-part paper, a mathematical model for this cell is developed. The model employs the well-known Newman/Tobias description of a porous electrode and treats flow through the bed using the Blake-Kozeny equation. A fourth-order Lax-Wendroff algorithm, thought to be original, is used to solve the convective diffusion equation within the model. Sample computed results are presented.

  2. Porous media flow problems: natural convection and one-dimensional flow of a non-Newtonian fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, K.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two fluid problems in porous media are studied: natural convection of a Newtonian fluid and one-dimensional flow of a non-Newtonian fluid. Convection in a rectangular porous cavity driven by heating in the horizontal is analyzed by a number of different techniques which yield a fairly complete description of the 2-dimensional solutions. The solutions are governed by 2 dimensionless parameters: the Darcy-Rayleigh number R and cavity aspect ratio A. The flow behavior of a dilute solution of polyacrylamide in corn syrup flowing through porous media also is studied. Measurements of the pressure drop and flow rate are made for the solution flowing through a packed bed of glass beads. At low velocities the pressure drop as a function of velocity is the same as that for a Newtonian fluid of equal viscosity. At higher flow rates the non-Newtonian fluid exhibited significantly higher pressure drops than a Newtonian fluid.

  3. Thermal Performance Mapping of Direct Liquid Cooled 3d Chip Stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Karl J. L.; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    Chip stacks are a crucial building block in advanced 3D microsystem architectures and can accommodate shorter interconnect distances between devices, leading to reduced power dissipation and improved electrical performance. Although enhanced conduction can serve to transfer the dissipated heat to the top and sides of the package and/or down to the underlying PCB, effective thermal management of stacked chips remains a most difficult challenge. Immersion cooling techniques, which provide convective and/or ebullient heat transfer, along with buoyant fluid flow, in the narrow gaps separating adjacent chips, are a most promising alternative to conduction cooling of threedimensional chip stacks. Application of the available theories, correlations, and experimental data are shown to reveal that passive immersion cooling--relying on natural convection and/or pool boiling--could provide the requisite thermal management capability for 3D chip stacks anticipated for use in much of the portable equipment category. Alternatively, pumped flow of dielectric liquids through the microgaps in 3D stacks, providing single phase and/or flow boiling heat absorption, could meet many of the most extreme thermal management requirements for high-performance 3D microsystems.

  4. Nature of Convective Instabilities in Explosive Volcanic Clouds Inferred by Analog Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazzo, G.; Jellinek, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the dynamics of a volcanic cloud generated by the rise and spread of an explosive eruption is a central issue in volcanology for the assessment of associated hazards. The last decades have seen the development of sophisticated numerical simulations and particle-tracking models with the aim of better understanding and forecasting the transport and sedimentation of the solid fraction in the cloud. In these models, the lateral spreading of an umbrella cloud is strongly influenced by stratospheric winds and its loss of mass with time is assumed be controlled by the opposing effects of particles settling and turbulent diffusion. However, recent observations suggest that additional spatially complex and time-dependent phenomena may govern the dynamics in a volcanic cloud. Here we investigate the mechanisms governing the lateral transport and residence time of ash in the atmosphere using analog experiments. In these experiments, a mixture of small particles and fresh water is injected upwards at a fixed rate into a chamber containing a salt water layer beneath a fresh water layer. Our results show that the formation of a thin particle-rich layer at the base of the cloud (a particle boundary layer) can dramatically modify its dynamics and lead to a variety of behaviors not detected previously. Depending on the conditions imposed at the source and on the magnitude of the density gradient in the environment, the cloud may either break up into discrete layers or release material as dense batches of particle-laden fluid. In natural eruptions the formation of this dense layer is found to be mainly controlled by the grain size distribution and to a lesser extent the altitude reached by the plume. An exhaustive review of field data available in the literature suggests that several past eruptions meet the required conditions to form a particle boundary layer. This study shows that large convective instabilities induced by the presence of a

  5. Non-Darcy double-diffusive natural convection in axisymmetric fluid saturated porous cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithiarasu, P.; Seetharamu, K. N.; Sundararajan, T.

    Double-diffusive natural convection in a fluid saturated porous medium has been investigated using the finite element method. A generalised porous medium model is used to study both Darcy and non-Darcy flow regimes in an axisymmetric cavity. Results indicate that the Darcy number should be a separate parameter to understand flow characteristics in non-Darcy regime. The influence of porosity on heat and mass transfer is significant and the transport rates may differ by 25% or more, at higher Darcy and Rayleigh numbers. When compared with the Darcy and other specialised models of Brinkman and Forchheimer, the present generalised model predicts the least heat and mass transfer rates. It is also observed that an increase in radius ratio leads to higher Nusselt and Sherwood numbers along the inner wall. Zusammenfassung Mit Hilfe der Finitelement-Methode wurde die Doppeldiffusion bei natürlicher Konvektion in einem fluidgetränktem porösen Medium untersucht, wobei ein verallgemeinertes Modell für poröse Medien Verwendung fand, das sich sowohl für Darcysches, wie für nicht-Darcysches Fluidverhalten in einem achsialsymmetrischen Ringraum eignet. Aus den Ergebnissen geht hervor, daß die Darcy-Zahl als zusätzlicher Parameter eingeführt werden muß, um das Strömungsverhalten im nicht-Darcyschen Regime verstehen zu können. Die Porosität hat großen Einfluß auf den Wärme- und Stoffaustausch, so daß bei höheren Darcy- und Rayleigh-Zahlen diesbezüglich Unterschiede bis über 25% auftreten können. Im Vergleich mit den speziellen Modellen nach Darcy, Brinkman und Forchheimer liefert das hier untersuchte verallgemeinerte Modell die geringsten Wärme- und Stoffflüsse. Es zeigt sich ferner, daß die Vergrößerung des Radienverhältnisses höhere Nusselt- und Sherwood- Zahlen entlang der Innenwand zur Folge hat.

  6. Eulerian-Lagrangian solution of the convection-dispersion equation in natural co-ordinates.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.; Milford, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The vast majority of numerical investigations of transport phenomena use an Eulerian formulation for the convenience that the computational grids are fixed in space. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) of solution for the convection-dispersion equation is discussed and analyzed. The ELM uses the Lagrangian concept in an Eulerian computational grid system.-from Authors

  7. Forced and natural convective drying of trehalose/water thin films: implication in the desiccation preservation of Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingyan; Fowler, Alex; Bhowmick, Sankha

    2006-06-01

    Trehalose is believed to offer desiccation protection to mammalian cells by forming stable glassy matrices. The goal of the current study was to explore the desiccation kinetics of thin films of trehalose-water solution under forced and natural convective conditions and to investigate the thermophysical state of mammalian cells at the bottom of the thin film. We developed a finite difference model based on the mass and energy conservation equations coupled to the water transport model from the cells. The boundary conditions were obtained from correlations or experimental measurements and the Gordon-Taylor equation was used to predict the glass transition temperature at every location. Results indicated that there are three distinct regimes for drying for both forced and natural convection, characterized by the slope of the moisture content plot as a function of time. Our results also indicate that the surface of the solution reached the glassy state in less than 10 min for the Reynolds (forced) numbers explored and approximately 30 min for some Rayleigh (natural convective) numbers; however, significant water was trapped at this instant. Larger drying force hastened quicker glass formation but trapped more water. The numerical model was capable of predicting the drying kinetics for the dilute region accurately, but deviated while predicting the other regimes. Based on these experimental validations of the model, the osmotic response of different cells located at the bottom of the solution with orders of magnitude difference in their membrane permeability (Lp) was predicted. The results suggested that extracellular glass formed around cells at the bottom of a trehalose-water solution by the propagation of glass into the solution; however it takes more than an order of magnitude time (approximately 7 min to >100 min for forced convective drying) to remove sufficient water to form glass around cells from the time when the first surface glass is formed. This is

  8. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  9. Effect of natural convection on the current-voltage characteristic of a DC discharge in neon at intermediate pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Uvarov, A. V.; Sakharova, N. A.; Vinnichenko, N. A.

    2011-12-15

    The parameters of the positive column of a glow discharge in neon are calculated with allowance for the induced hydrodynamic motion. It is shown that natural convection in the pressure range of {approx}0.1 atm significantly affects the profiles of the parameters of the positive column and its current-voltage characteristic. The convection arising at large deposited energies improves heat removal, due to which the temperature in the central region of the discharge becomes lower than that calculated from the heat conduction equation. As a result, the current-voltage characteristic is shifted. With allowance for convection, the current-voltage characteristic changes at currents much lower than the critical current at which a transition into the constricted state is observed. This change is uniquely related to the Rayleigh number in the discharge. Thus, a simplified analysis of thermal conduction and diffusion, even with detailed account of kinetic processes occurring in the positive column, does not allow one to accurately calculate the current-voltage characteristic and other discharge parameters at intermediate gas pressures.

  10. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  12. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  13. The variable nature of convection in the tropics and subtropics: A legacy of 16 years of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kristen L.; Zuluaga, Manuel D.; Brodzik, Stella R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For over 16 years, the Precipitation Radar of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite detected the three‐dimensional structure of significantly precipitating clouds in the tropics and subtropics. This paper reviews and synthesizes studies using the TRMM radar data to present a global picture of the variation of convection throughout low latitudes. The multiyear data set shows convection varying not only in amount but also in its very nature across the oceans, continents, islands, and mountain ranges of the tropics and subtropics. Shallow isolated raining clouds are overwhelmingly an oceanic phenomenon. Extremely deep and intense convective elements occur almost exclusively over land. Upscale growth of convection into mesoscale systems takes a variety of forms. Oceanic cloud systems generally have less intense embedded convection but can form very wide stratiform regions. Continental mesoscale systems often have more intense embedded convection. Some of the most intense convective cells and mesoscale systems occur near the great mountain ranges of low latitudes. The Maritime Continent and Amazonia exhibit convective clouds with maritime characteristics although they are partially or wholly land. Convective systems containing broad stratiform areas manifest most strongly over oceans. The stratiform precipitation occurs in various forms. Often it occurs as quasi‐uniform precipitation with strong melting layers connected with intense convection. In monsoons and the Intertropical Convergence Zone, it takes the form of closely packed weak convective elements. Where fronts extend into the subtropics, broad stratiform regions are larger and have lower and sloping melting layers related to the baroclinic origin of the precipitation. PMID:27668295

  14. Experimental study of laminar natural convection in cells with various convex and concave bottoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, W.M.; Khubeiz, M.J. )

    1992-02-01

    The subject of this work is connected with experimental explanation of influence of bottom shape on free convective heat transfer in cylindrical closed space. Heat transfer and free convective motion in limited space from the bottoms of different hemispherical convex or concave shapes have been studied experimentally. The ratio of the diameter of the hemisphere (d) to the diameter of the bottom (D) (0 < d/D < 1) has been tested for a range of Rayleigh numbers (10{sup 5} < Ra < 10{sup 7}). In comparison with a flat bottom (d/D = O), about 40 percent inhibition or about 50 percent intensification depending on the bottom configuration (d/D) have been observed. The mechanism of the phenomenon based on dead space, local overheating, and shape influence effects has been proposed.

  15. Studies of heat-source driven natural convection: A numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emara, A. A.; Kulacki, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal convection driven by uniform volumetric energy sources was studied in a horizontal fluid layer bounded from above by a rigid, isothermal surface and from below by a rigid, zero heat-flux surface. The side walls of the fluid domain were assumed to be rigid and perfectly insulating. The computations were formally restricted to two-dimensional laminar convection but were carried out for a range of Rayleigh numbers which spans the regimes of laminar and turbulent flow. The results of the computations consists of streamline and isotherm patterns, horizontally averaged temperature distributions, and horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers at the upper surface. Flow and temperature fields do not exhibit a steady state, but horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers reach limiting, quasi-steady values for all Rayleigh numbers considered. Correlations of the Nusselt number in terms of the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers were determined.

  16. On the episodic nature of derecho-producing convective systems in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Walker S.; Mote, Thomas L.; Bentley, Mace L.

    2005-11-01

    Convectively generated windstorms occur over broad temporal and spatial scales; however, one of the larger-scale and most intense of these windstorms has been given the name derecho. This study illustrates the tendency for derecho-producing mesoscale convective systems to group together across the United States - forming a derecho series. The derecho series is recognized as any succession of derechos that develop within a similar synoptic environment with no more than 72 h separating individual events. A derecho dataset for the period 1994-2003 was assembled to investigate the groupings of these extremely damaging convective wind events. Results indicate that over 62% of the derechos in the dataset were members of a derecho series. On average, nearly six series affected the United States annually. Most derecho series consisted of two or three events; though, 14 series during the period of record contained four or more events. Two separate series involved nine derechos within a period of nine days. Analyses reveal that derecho series largely frequent regions of the Midwest, Ohio Valley, and the south-central Great Plains during May, June, and July. Results suggest that once a derecho occurred during May, June, or July, there was a 58% chance that this event was the first of a series of two or more, and about a 46% chance that this was the first of a derecho series consisting of three or more events. The derecho series climatology reveals that forecasters in regions frequented by derechos should be prepared for the probable regeneration of a derecho-producing convective system after an initial event occurs. Copyright

  17. The nature of symmetric instability and its similarity to convective and inertial instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Q.; Clark, J. H. E.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there exists a local similarity among SI (Symmetric Instability), BI (Buoyancy or Convective Instability), and II (Inertial Instability) even for fully nonlinear viscous motion. The most unstable slope angles for SI and Moist SI motions are analyzed based on parcel energetics. These considerations also suggest qualitatively that CSI (Conditional SI) circulations will be slantwise and lie between the moist most unstable slope and dry least stable slope of the basic state.

  18. Three-dimensional natural convection of a fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity in an enclosure with localized heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torczynski, J. R.; Henderson, J. A.; Ohern, T. J.; Chu, T. Y.; Blanchat, T. K.

    Three-dimensional natural convection of a fluid in an enclosure is examined. The geometry is motivated by a possible magmaenergy extraction system, and the fluid is a magma simulant and has a highly temperature-dependent viscosity. Flow simulations are performed for enclosures with and without a cylinder, which represents the extractor, using the finite-element code FIDAP (Fluid Dynamics International). The presence of the cylinder completely alters the flow pattern. Flow-visualization and PIV experiments are in qualitative agreement with the simulations.

  19. Transitions and chaos in natural convection of a fluid with Pr = 0.1 in a horizontal annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Joo-Sik; Han, Seung-Moo

    2000-10-01

    Bifurcation sequence to chaos in natural convection in a horizontal annulus is numerically investigated for the fluid of Pr=0.1. As Ra is increased, a transition from a steady unicellular flow to an oscillatory multicellular flow with a counter-rotating eddy on the top of the annulus occurs. After the first Hopf bifurcation from steady to monoperiodic flow, a period-3 solution first appears. Quasi-periodic flow and two period-doubling bifurcations are recorded before chaos, and a window of period 4 is observed between chaotic states.

  20. Three-dimensional natural convection of a fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity in an enclosure with localized heating

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, J.R.; Henderson, J.A.; O`Hern, T.J.; Chu, T.Y.; Blanchat, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional natural convection of a fluid in an enclosure is examined. The geometry is motivated by a possible magmaenergy extraction system, and the fluid is a magma simulant and has a highly temperature-dependent viscosity. Flow simulations are performed for enclosures with and without a cylinder, which represents the extractor, using the finite-element code FIDAP (Fluid Dynamics International). The presence of the cylinder completely alters the flow pattern. Flow-visualization and PIV experiments are in qualitative agreement wit the simulations.

  1. Film boiling heat transfer from a sphere in natural and forced convection of freon-113

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, D.; Orozco, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer fluxes were measured on a 3.84-cm hollow copper sphere, in both forced convection and pool boiling, as a function of angular position in Freon 113. This paper reports on forced-convection tests run at speeds of 0.5 to 1.9 m/s. These tests were conducted in the stable film boiling region of the boiling curve. Significant heat transfer rates were measured in the vapor wake region of the sphere for flow film boiling. Video observations of the boiling process revealed that the flow film boiling vapor removal mechanism consisted of periodic formation and detachment of a vapor wake in the rear of the sphere. For pool boiling it was found that the heated surface had a uniform rate of energy dissipation in the stable film boiling regime, whereas in forced convection the film boiling rate was dependent on angular position. Pool film boiling tests also showed multiple humps (more than one maximum heat flux) in the boiling curve when the liquid was subcooled.

  2. Transition from multiplicity to singularity of steady natural convection in a tilted cubical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan F.; Henry, Daniel; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2015-08-01

    The transition from the complex Rayleigh-Bénard convection to the simple heated-from-the-sides configuration in a cubical cavity filled with a Newtonian fluid is numerically studied. The cavity is tilted by an angle θ around its lower horizontal edge and is heated and cooled from two opposite tilted sides. We first analyze the effect of a marginal inclination angle on quasi-Rayleigh-Bénard convection (θ ≈0∘ ), which is a realistic physical approximation to the ideal Rayleigh-Bénard convection. We then yield the critical angles where multiple solutions that were initially found for θ ≈0∘ disappear, eventually resulting in the single steady roll solution found in the heated-from-the-sides configuration (θ =90∘ ). We confirm the existence of critical angles during the transition θ :0∘→90∘ , and we demonstrate that such angles are a consequence of either singularities or collisions of bifurcation points in the Rayleigh-number-θ parameter space. We finally derive the most important critical angles corresponding to any Newtonian fluid of Prandtl number greater than that of air.

  3. Solution breakdown due to natural convection of the boundary-layer radial flow on a constant temperature horizontal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Feria, Ramon; Del Pino, Carlos; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The boundary-layer flow of a cold horizontal current exiting radially from a cylindrical vertical surface with a constant velocity over a hotter horizontal wall with constant temperature is analyzed. The temperature and velocity fields are coupled by buoyancy through the pressure gradients, so that the boundary-layer equations are made dimensionless with a radial characteristic length in which natural and forced convection become of the same order of magnitude, being the Prandtl number the only nondimensional parameter governing the problem. A similarity solution valid for the leading edge boundary-layer flow is obtained, yielding as a first order correction the effect of natural convection on Blasius' thermal boundary layer. This solution is also used to start the numerical integration of the equations to find out the location where the boundary-layer flow blows up due to the termination of the solution in a singularity. The physical nature of this singularity is analyzed and its position is characterized numerically. The heat flux from the horizontal wall up to this singularity is also characterized and qualitatively compared with previous experimental results from a related experimental setup.

  4. NUBEAM developments and 3d halo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Medley, S. S.; Kaye, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments related to the 3D halo model in NUBEAM code are described. To have a reliable halo neutral source for diagnostic simulation, the TRANSP/NUBEAM code has been enhanced with full implementation of ADAS atomic physic ground state and excited state data for hydrogenic beams and mixed species plasma targets. The ADAS codes and database provide the density and temperature dependence of the atomic data, and the collective nature of the state excitation process. To be able to populate 3D halo output with sufficient statistical resolution, the capability to control the statistics of fast ion CX modeling and for thermal halo launch has been added to NUBEAM. The 3D halo neutral model is based on modification and extension of the ``beam in box'' aligned 3d Cartesian grid that includes the neutral beam itself, 3D fast neutral densities due to CX of partially slowed down fast ions in the beam halo region, 3D thermal neutral densities due to CX deposition and fast neutral recapture source. More details on the 3D halo simulation design will be presented.

  5. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  6. Modeling Cellular Processes in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Odde, David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in photonic imaging and fluorescent protein technology offer unprecedented views of molecular space-time dynamics in living cells. At the same time, advances in computing hardware and software enable modeling of ever more complex systems, from global climate to cell division. As modeling and experiment become more closely integrated, we must address the issue of modeling cellular processes in 3-D. Here, we highlight recent advances related to 3-D modeling in cell biology. While some processes require full 3-D analysis, we suggest that others are more naturally described in 2-D or 1-D. Keeping the dimensionality as low as possible reduces computational time and makes models more intuitively comprehensible; however, the ability to test full 3-D models will build greater confidence in models generally and remains an important emerging area of cell biological modeling. PMID:22036197

  7. THE IMPACT OF NATURAL CONVECTION ON NEAR-FIELD TH PROCESSES IN THE FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Yvonne Tsang

    2006-04-16

    The heat output of the radioactive waste proposed to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain will strongly affect the thermal-hydrological (TH) conditions in and near the geologic repository for thousands of years. Recent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has demonstrated that the emplacement tunnels (drifts) will act as important conduits for gas flows driven by natural convection. As a result, vapor generated from boiling/evaporation of formation water near elevated-temperature sections of the drifts may effectively be transported to cooler end sections (where no waste is emplaced), would condense there, and subsequently drain into underlying rock units. To study these processes, we have developed a new simulation method that couples existing tools for simulating TH conditions in the fractured formation with modules that approximate natural convection in heated emplacement drifts. The new method is applied to evaluate the future TH conditions at Yucca Mountain in a three-dimensional model domain comprising a representative emplacement drift and the surrounding fractured rock.

  8. A computational analysis of natural convection in a vertical channel with a modified power law non-Newtonian fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.; Greene, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    An implicit finite difference method was applied to analyze laminar natural convection in a vertical channel with a modified power law fluid. This fluid model was chosen because it describes the viscous properties of a pseudoplastic fluid over the entire shear rate range likely to be found in natural convection flows since it covers the shear rate range from Newtonian through transition to simple power law behavior. In addition, a dimensionless similarity parameter is identified which specifies in which of the three regions a particular system is operating. The results for the average channel velocity and average Nusselt number in the asymptotic Newtonian and power law regions are compared with numerical data in the literature. Also, graphical results are presented for the velocity and temperature fields and entrance lengths. The results of average channel velocity and Nusselt number are given in the three regions including developing and fully developed flows. As an example, a pseudoplastic fluid (carboxymethyl cellulose) was chosen to compare the different results of average channel velocity and Nusselt number between a modified power law fluid and the conventional power law model. The results show, depending upon the operating conditions, that if the correct model is not used, gross errors can result.

  9. Emissivity measurements in support of experiments on natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.E.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental measurements of surface emissivities of three metallic samples have been obtained in support of an experiment aimed at determining natural convection and total heat transfer for a heated vertical cylinder surrounded by an array of cooled vertical tubes. In some cases, the heated stainless steel cylinder was shrouded by a perforated aluminum outer cylinder. The surrounding cooled tubes were also aluminum. In this experiment, heat transfer from the heated tube and the surrounding outer cylinder will occur by a combination of natural convection and radiation. At temperatures near the melting point of aluminum, the radiant contribution is particularly important, accounting for 50% or more of the total heat transfer. Consequently, accurate knowledge of surface emissivities of the heated rods, outer cylinders and surrounding structures is needed in order to predict the system thermal response during the transient. Direct measurements of surface emissivities have been obtained for one stainless steel and two aluminum samples. The measurements were obtained using an infrared pyrometer sensitive to the 8--14 {mu}m wavelength range. A procedure for estimating total hemispherical emissivities based on the measured spectral, normal results is also provided.

  10. Characterisation of natural organic matter (NOM) in depth profile of Mediterranean Sea by 3D-Fluorescence following with PARAFAC treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiyu, Z.; Durrieu, G.; Redon, R.; Heimbuerger, L.; Mounier, S.

    2009-12-01

    A periodic series of samplings have made during one year(2008) organized by Ifremer into the central Ligurian Sea(DYFAMED site, 43°25’N, 07°52’E, Mediterranean Sea). Spectra were mesured by spectrofluorimetry(HITACHI 4500) at excitation wavelengths from 250nm to 500nm and emission wavelengths from 200nm to 550nm, both wavelength slits for 5nm, scan speed is 2400nm/min. Parallel factors analysis(PARAFAC) software is a powerful statistical technique to treat the 3D-fluorescence spectra leading to the decomposition by a number of independent fluorescent compounds 1 and 2. Found 4 fluorescent components representing the fluorescence maxima of previously identified moieties: [Tyr] maximal excitation wavelength and emission wavelength 265nm/305nm (tyrosine-like); [Trp] maximal λEX/λEM=280nm/340nm(Peak T, tryptophan-like group); [M] maximal λEX/λEM=295nm/410nm(Peak M, marine humic-like substance) and a double maximum component [CA] with maximal λEX/λEM=335nm/445nm(Peak C, visible humic-like group) and λEX/λEM=250nm/445nm(Peak A, UV humic-like substance). Fluorescence contribution of each component at different logarithmic depths(Fig.2) shows that the most concentrated fluorophores zone is deeper than 100m, which is different from the results of dissolved organic carbon(DOC) concentration which the most concentrated zone is on the seasurface(B.Avril,2002).The humic-like substances are generally less fluorescent, particularly the M compound. An important peak contribution of marine humic-like substance has appeared in May at the profound 100m and 2200m, although the other fluorophores kept their values reasonable. The intensity maxima was closed to 100m, while an augmentation of protein substances in the deep sea(about 400 m) following by a shut immediate at 600 m in the months July, August and September. It is probably due to the sufficient heat from the sea surface; micro-organism could modify their position in the depth profile in the seawater. Thanks to

  11. Hydromagnetic natural convection flow between vertical parallel plates with time-periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesanya, S. O.; Oluwadare, E. O.; Falade, J. A.; Makinde, O. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the free convective flow of magnetohydrodynamic fluid through a channel with time periodic boundary condition is investigated by taking the effects of Joule dissipation into consideration. Based on simplifying assumptions, the coupled governing equations are reduced to a set of nonlinear boundary valued problem. Approximate solutions are obtained by using semi-analytical Adomian decomposition method. The effect of pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, Nusselt number and skin friction are presented graphically and discussed. The result of the computation shows that an increase in the magnetic field intensity has significant influence on the fluid flow.

  12. Influence of Natural Convection and Thermal Radiation Multi-Component Transport in MOCVD Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S.; Krishnan, A.; Clark, I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of Grashof and Reynolds number in Metal Organic Chemical Vapor (MOCVD) reactors is being investigated under a combined empirical/numerical study. As part of that research, the deposition of Indium Phosphide in an MOCVD reactor is modeled using the computational code CFD-ACE. The model includes the effects of convection, conduction, and radiation as well as multi-component diffusion and multi-step surface/gas phase chemistry. The results of the prediction are compared with experimental data for a commercial reactor and analyzed with respect to the model accuracy.

  13. Laminar natural convection in vertical tubes with one end open to a large reservoir: A numerical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Welty, J.R. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    A two-dimensional finite difference computer program in cylindrical coordinates has been developed to solve the case of laminar natural convection in a vertical tube open to large reservoir. Such a device, the open thermosyphon, is used in a number of applications, including the cooling of gas turbines, geothermal energy extraction, and thermosyphon solar water heaters. The objective of this work were to study the nature of fluid flow and the heat transfer rate along the tube wall. A semi-implicit, time marching, finite difference solution procedure was used, satisfying continuity, momentum, and energy equations for incompressible flow. Results show three well-defined flow regimes appearing as functions of the tube length-to-radius (aspect) ratio. Fluid motion in the tube and heat transfer rates became oscillatory at long time intervals. Plots of streamlines and isotherms at selected times for different aspect ratio tubes are also presented to show the transition behavior of fluid motion.

  14. Natural convection in horizontal porous layers with localized heating from below

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V. ); Kulacki, F.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Convective flow of fluid through saturated porous media heated from below is of considerable interest, and has been extensively studied. Most of these studies are concerned with either infinite horizontal porous layers or rectangular (or cylindrical) porous cavities with adiabatic vertical walls. A related problem of practical importance occurs when only a portion of the bottom surface is heated and the rest of it is either adiabatic or isothermally cooled. This situation is encountered in several geothermal areas which consists of troughs of volcanic debris contained by walls of nonfragmented ignimbrite. Thus, the model region considered is a locally heated long trough of isotropic porous medium confined by impermeable and insulating surroundings. Also, the recent motivation to study this problem has come from the efforts to identify a geologic repository for nuclear waste disposal. The purpose of the present work is to consider the effects of aspect ratio and Rayleigh number on free convection heat transfer from an isothermal heat source centrally located on the bottom surface of a horizontal porous cavity.

  15. Buoyancy-Driven Natural Convection of Liquid Helium in an Electron Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y. L.; Dodd, J. R.; Willis, W. J.

    2006-04-27

    A small liquid helium test chamber with 1.5 L active volume has been designed and constructed, to make the fundamental measurements of physical properties of electron bubble transports in liquid helium, aimed at developing a new cryogenic neutrino detector, using liquid helium as the detecting medium, for the detection of solar neutrinos. The test chamber is a double-walled cylindrical container equipped with five optical windows and ten high voltage cables. A LN2/LHe cryostat and a needle valve for vapor helium cooling are used to provide a 1.7{approx}4.5 K low temperature environments for the test chamber. One of key issues for the cryogenic design and experimental sensitivity of electron bubble tracking is that of keeping a thermally uniform liquid helium bath. The external heat loads to the chamber will generate a buoyancy-induced convection of liquid helium, which will carry the electron bubbles and accelerate or decelerate their transportation and therefore must be reduced to the minimum, so that the slow motion of the electron bubbles will not be confused by this effect. This paper will present the computational simulation and analysis on thermal convection and uniformity of the test chamber.

  16. Natural convection of a two-dimensional Boussinesq fluid does not maximize entropy production.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stuart; Bullock, Seth

    2014-08-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection is a canonical example of spontaneous pattern formation in a nonequilibrium system. It has been the subject of considerable theoretical and experimental study, primarily for systems with constant (temperature or heat flux) boundary conditions. In this investigation, we have explored the behavior of a convecting fluid system with negative feedback boundary conditions. At the upper and lower system boundaries, the inward heat flux is defined such that it is a decreasing function of the boundary temperature. Thus the system's heat transport is not constrained in the same manner that it is in the constant temperature or constant flux cases. It has been suggested that the entropy production rate (which has a characteristic peak at intermediate heat flux values) might apply as a selection rule for such a system. In this work, we demonstrate with Lattice Boltzmann simulations that entropy production maximization does not dictate the steady state of this system, despite its success in other, somewhat similar scenarios. Instead, we will show that the same scaling law of dimensionless variables found for constant boundary conditions also applies to this system.

  17. Natural convection of a two-dimensional Boussinesq fluid does not maximize entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Stuart; Bullock, Seth

    2014-08-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection is a canonical example of spontaneous pattern formation in a nonequilibrium system. It has been the subject of considerable theoretical and experimental study, primarily for systems with constant (temperature or heat flux) boundary conditions. In this investigation, we have explored the behavior of a convecting fluid system with negative feedback boundary conditions. At the upper and lower system boundaries, the inward heat flux is defined such that it is a decreasing function of the boundary temperature. Thus the system's heat transport is not constrained in the same manner that it is in the constant temperature or constant flux cases. It has been suggested that the entropy production rate (which has a characteristic peak at intermediate heat flux values) might apply as a selection rule for such a system. In this work, we demonstrate with Lattice Boltzmann simulations that entropy production maximization does not dictate the steady state of this system, despite its success in other, somewhat similar scenarios. Instead, we will show that the same scaling law of dimensionless variables found for constant boundary conditions also applies to this system.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER OF IONIC LIQUID IN A RECTANGULAR ENCLOSURE HEATED FROM BELOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-07-18

    This paper presents an experimental study of natural convection heat transfer for an Ionic Liquid. The experiments were performed for 1-butyl-2, 3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}]) at a Raleigh number range of 1.26 x 10{sup 7} to 8.3 x 10{sup 7}. In addition to determining the convective heat transfer coefficients, this study also included experimental determination of thermophysical properties of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] such as, density, viscosity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. The results show that the density of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] varies from 1.437-1.396 g/cm{sup 3} within the temperature range of 10-50 C, the thermal conductivity varies from 0.105-0.116 W/m.K between a temperature of 10 to 60 C, the heat capacity varies from 1.015 J/g.K - 1.760 J/g.K within temperature range of 25-340 C and the viscosity varies from 18cp-243cp within temperature range 10-75 C. The results for density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and viscosity were in close agreement with the values in the literature. Measured dimensionless Nusselt number was observed to be higher for the ionic liquid than that of DI water. This is expected as Nusselt number is the ratio of heat transfer by convection to conduction and the ionic liquid has lower thermal conductivity (approximately 18%) than DI water.

  19. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  20. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  1. Inverse design and control of microstructural development in solidification processes with natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.Z.; Zabaras, N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a finite element solution of an inverse solidification design problem. It is based on the previous work on an adjoint method with a functional optimization scheme for the solution of inverse thermal convection problems with overspecified thermal boundary conditions. An inverse calculation is performed here for directional solidification processes to find the optimal heat flux at the mold wall boundary on both the solid and liquid mold sides. The objective is to achieve desired velocity and heat flux histories at the solid-liquid interface. The specification of the growth velocity and freezing interface heat fluxes considers the microstructural implications on the casting product and the morphological stability requirements of the freezing interface. An example of solidification in a rectangular mold with a planar interface growth is shown.

  2. Experimental Technique and Assessment for Measuring the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient from Natural Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, K. Cyril; Vanfossen, G. James, Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Dukhan, Nihad

    1995-01-01

    A technique was developed to cast frozen ice shapes that had been grown on a metal surface. This technique was applied to a series of ice shapes that were grown in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel on flat plates. Nine flat plates, 18 inches square, were obtained from which aluminum castings were made that gave good ice shape characterizations. Test strips taken from these plates were outfitted with heat flux gages, such that when placed in a dry wind tunnel, can be used to experimentally map out the convective heat transfer coefficient in the direction of flow from the roughened surfaces. The effects on the heat transfer coefficient for both parallel and accelerating flow will be studied. The smooth plate model verification baseline data as well as one ice roughened test case are presented.

  3. Natural convection on a vertical plate in a saturated porous medium with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedda, M.; Sriti, M.; Achemlal, D.

    2014-08-01

    The main goal of this paper is to re-exam a class of exact solutions for the two-dimensional free convection boundary layers induced by a heated vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium with an exponential decaying heat generation. The temperature distribution of the plate has been assumed to vary as a power of the axial coordinate measured from the leading edge of the plate and subjected to an applied lateral mass flux. The boundary layer equations are solved analytically and numerically using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme coupled with the shooting iteration method. As for the classical problem without internal heat generation, it is proved that multiple (unbounded) solutions arise for any and for any suction/injection parameter. For such solutions, the asymptotic behavior as the similarity variable approaches infinity is determined.

  4. Natural convection between two concentric spheres - Transition toward a multicellular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caltagirone, J.-P.; Mojtabi, A.; Combarnous, M.

    1980-03-01

    A moderate temperature difference maintained between two concentric spherical surfaces induces, in steady state, unicellular toroidal movements in the enclosed fluid. Beyond a critical temperature difference, the flow becomes unstable and the convective phenomena rearrange into counter-rotating toroidal cells. A two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical model confirms the existence of a unicellular regime and shows that, beyond the critical conditions and for the same set of parameters, two convergent solutions can be obtained. One is unicellular and the other is bicellular; in the latter, the additional cell appears at the top of the layer. The initial conditions determine which one of these two will be established. This transition is investigated as a function of several parameters and the results are compared with the experimental results in the literature.

  5. Schlieren visualization of water natural convection in a vertical ribbed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossa, M.; Misale, M.; Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Schlieren techniques are valuable tools for the qualitative and quantitative visualizations of flows in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines. A large number of schlieren systems have been developed and documented in the literature; majority of applications involve flows of gases, typically air. In this work, a schlieren technique is applied to visualize the buoyancy-induced flow inside vertical ribbed channels using water as convective fluid. The test section consists of a vertical plate made of two thin sheets of chrome-plated copper with a foil heater sandwiched between them; the external sides of the plate are roughened with transverse, square-cross-sectioned ribs. Two parallel vertical walls, smooth and unheated, form with the heated ribbed plate two adjacent, identical and asymmetrically heated, vertical channels. Results include flow schlieren visualizations with colour-band filters, reconstructions of the local heat transfer coefficient distributions along the ribbed surfaces and comparisons with past experiments performed using air as working fluid.

  6. Modification of postfrontal convective clouds and precipitation by natural and anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Daniel; Bangert, Max; Vogel, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Shallow postfrontal convective clouds are thought to be sensitive to the aerosol burden. In our case study we present results of model runs, simulating April 25, 2008. On this day a cold front passes Germany from north to south. During this situation the sea salt aerosol transported by the northerly flow into the model domain replaces the preexisting anthropogenic aerosol. We quantify the effect of the aerosol on the microphysical properties of the convective clouds that develop after the passage of the cold front. The model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009, Bangert et al., 2010) is a comprehensive online coupled model system to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of reactive gaseous and particulate matter. It is used to quantify the feedback processes between aerosols and the. state of the atmosphere on the continental to the regional scale with two-way interactions between different atmospheric processes. The model system enables further investigations of the aerosol-cloud-interactions and associated feedback processes. The model framework contains a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme (Seifert and Beheng, 2006) in combination with sophisticated activation parameterizations (Bangert et al., 2012). We carried out sensitivity runs. One applies a bulk microphysics scheme as used in the operational forecasts of the German weather service. In two of them the aerosol was. prescribed (continental, maritime) and kept constant in space and time. In the fourth one we used the full capabilities of COSMO-ART to simulate the dynamic behavior of aerosol and its feedback with radiation and cloud microphysics. We compare our model results with radar data, satellite IR images, and rain gauges.

  7. Effects of walls temperature variation on double diffusive natural convection of Al2O3-water nanofluid in an enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, G. A.; Dastmalchi, M.; Khorasanizadeh, H.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of wall temperature variations on double diffusive natural convection of Al2O3-water nanofluid in a differentially heated square enclosure with constant temperature hot and cold vertical walls is studied numerically. Transport mechanisms of nanoparticles including Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis that cause heterogeneity are considered in non-homogeneous model. The hot and cold wall temperatures are varied, but the temperature difference between them is always maintained 5 °C. The thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, viscosity and density and thermophoresis diffusion and Brownian motion coefficients are considered variable with temperature and volume fraction of nanoparticles. The governing equations are discretized using the control volume method. The results show that nanoparticle transport mechanisms affect buoyancy force and cause formation of small vortexes near the top and bottom walls of the cavity and reduce the heat transfer. By increasing the temperature of the walls the effect of transport mechanisms decreases and due to enhanced convection the heat transfer rate increases.

  8. Natural convection in a flexible sided triangular cavity with internal heat generation under the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selimefendigil, Fatih; Öztop, Hakan F.

    2016-11-01

    In this numerical study, magnetohydrodynamics natural convection in a flexible sided triangular cavity with internal heat generation is investigated. The inclined wall of the cavity is cooled and flexible while the left vertical wall is partially heated. Galerkin weighted residual finite element method is used to solve the governing equations. The effects of pertinent parameters such as external Rayleigh number (between 104 and 106), internal Rayleigh number (between 104 and 107), elastic modulus of flexible wall (between 500 and 105), Hartmann number (between 0 and 40) and inclination angle of the magnetic field (between 0° and 90°) on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics were numerically investigated. It was observed local and averaged Nusselt number enhance with external Rayleigh number but in the vicinity of the upper location of the heater local heat transfer deteriorates due to the inclined wall deformation with increasing external Rayleigh number. Heat transfer reduces with internal Rayleigh number and Hartmann number. Averaged heat transfer decreases 13.25% when internal Rayleigh number is increased from 104 to 107 and decreases 40.56% when Hartmann number is increased from 0 to 10. The reduction in the convection with magnetic field is effective for higher values of external Rayleigh numbers and averaged heat transfer increases with magnetic field inclination angle.

  9. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  10. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  11. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  12. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  13. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  14. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  15. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  16. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  17. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  18. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  19. Analysis of the Phenix end-of-life natural convection test with SAS4A/SASSYS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Dunn, F. E.; Sofu, T.

    2012-07-01

    From a reduced power and flow condition, the 2009 Phenix Natural Convection Test mimics a protected loss-of-heat sink event. The measured transient response of the Phenix reactor to such an event provides an important data set for validating safety analysis codes. A model of the Phenix reactor and primary coolant system was developed using the reactor safety analysis code system SAS4A/SASSYS-1. While the overall global response of the reactor was predicted reasonably well, there were some non-negligible discrepancies in the temperature predictions during the transient and work continues to improve the model. Some modeling issues have been identified, and will be addressed as improvements to the model continue. (authors)

  20. Numerical analysis of natural convection for non-Newtonian fluid conveying nanoparticles between two vertical parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahebi, S. A. R.; Pourziaei, H.; Feizi, A. R.; Taheri, M. H.; Rostamiyan, Y.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, natural convection of non-Newtonian bio-nanofluids flow between two vertical flat plates is investigated numerically. Sodium Alginate (SA) and Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose (SCMC) are considered as the base non-Newtonian fluid, and nanoparticles such as Titania ( TiO2 and Alumina ( Al2O3 were added to them. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are calculated through Maxwell-Garnetts (MG) and Brinkman models, respectively. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method (NUM) and three Weighted Residual Methods (WRMs), Collocation (CM), Galerkin (GM) and Least-Square Method (LSM) and Finite-Element Method (FEM), are used to solve the present problem. The influence of some physical parameters such as nanofluid volume friction on non-dimensional velocity and temperature profiles are discussed. The results show that SCMC- TiO2 has higher velocity and temperature values than other nanofluid structures.

  1. Role of Induced Magnetic Field on Transient Natural Convection Flow in a Vertical Channel: The Riemann Sum Approximation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Sani, I.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the role of induced magnetic field on a transient natural convection flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible and viscous fluid in a vertical channel formed by two infinite vertical parallel plates. The transient flow formation inside the channel is due to sudden asymmetric heating of channel walls. The time dependent momentum, energy and magnetic induction equations are solved semi-analytically using the Laplace transform technique along with the Riemann-sum approximation method. The solutions obtained are validated by comparisons with the closed form solutions obtained for the steady states which have been derived separately and also by the implicit finite difference method. Graphical results for the temperature, velocity, induced magnetic field, current density, and skin-friction based on the semi-analytical solutions are presented and discussed.

  2. Application of a Differential Transform Method to the Transient Natural Convection Problem in a Vertical Tube with Variable Fluid Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2016-02-01

    The transient natural convection of a viscous fluid in a heated vertical tube is studied using the two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM). A time-dependent Dirichlet boundary condition is imposed for tube wall temperature. The partial differential equations for the velocity and temperature fields within the tube are solved by the DTM while considering temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of the fluid. As a result, tractable solutions in double-series form are derived for the temperature and flow velocity. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical results illustrate the effects of temperature-dependent properties on transient temperature and flow behaviour, including the Nusselt number and volumetric flow rate. The DTM gives accurate series solutions without any special functions for nonlinear transient heat transfer problems which are advantageous in finding the derivative or integral.

  3. Studies of heat source driven natural convection. Ph.D. Thesis. Technical Report, Jul. 1974 - Aug. 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Emara, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid was measured for Rayleigh numbers from 1890 to 2.17 x 10 to the 12th power. The fluid layer is bounded below by a rigid zero-heat-flux surface and above by a rigid constant-temperature surface. Joule heating by an alternating current passing horizontally through the layer provides the uniform volumetric energy source. The overall steady-state heat transfer coefficient at the upper surface was determined by measuring the temperature difference across the layer and power input to the fluid. The correlation between the Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for the data of the present study and the data of the Kulacki study is given.

  4. Experimental and numerical study on laminar natural convection in a cavity heated from bottom due to an inclined fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varol, Yasin; Öztop, Hakan F.; Özgen, Filiz; Koca, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Natural convection heat transfer in an inclined fin attached square enclosure is studied both experimentally and numerically. Bottom wall of enclosure has higher temperature than that of top wall while vertical walls are adiabatic. Inclined fin has also adiabatic boundary conditions. Numerical solutions have been done by writing a computer code in Fortran platform and results are compared with Fluent commercial code and experimental method. Governing parameters are Rayleigh numbers (8.105 ≤ Ra ≤ 4 × 106) and inclination angle (30° ≤ and ≤ 120°). The temperature measurements are done by using thermocouples distributed uniformly at the wall of the enclosure. Remarkably good agreement is obtained between the predicted results and experimental data. A correlation is also developed including all effective parameters on heat transfer and fluid flow. It was observed that heat transfer can be controlled by attaching an inclined fin onto wall.

  5. Natural convection flow of Cu-H2O nanofluid along a vertical wavy surface with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiba, Farjana; Molla, Md. Mamun; Khan, M. A. Hakim

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study on natural convection flow of Cu-Water nanofluid along a vertical wavy surface with uniform heat flux has been carried out. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into parabolic partial differential equations by applying a suitable set of variables. The resulting nonlinear system of equations are then mapped into a regular rectangular computational domain and solved numerically by using an implicit finite difference method. Numerical results are thoroughly discussed in terms of velocity and temperature distributions, surface temperature distribution, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number coefficient for selected key parameters such as solid volume fraction of nanofluid (ϕ) and amplitude (α) of surface waviness. In addition, velocity vectors, streamlines and isotherms are plotted to visualize momentum and thermal flow pattern within the boundary layer region.

  6. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  7. Implicit temperature-correction-based immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seta, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper, we apply the implicit-correction method to the immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method (IB-TLBM) for the natural convection between two concentric horizontal cylinders and in a square enclosure containing a circular cylinder. The Chapman-Enskog multiscale expansion proves the existence of an extra term in the temperature equation from the source term of the kinetic equation. In order to eliminate the extra term, we redefine the temperature and the source term in the lattice Boltzmann equation. When the relaxation time is less than unity, the new definition of the temperature and source term enhances the accuracy of the thermal lattice Boltzmann method. The implicit-correction method is required in order to calculate the thermal interaction between a fluid and a rigid solid using the redefined temperature. Simulation of the heat conduction between two concentric cylinders indicates that the error at each boundary point of the proposed IB-TLBM is reduced by the increment of the number of Lagrangian points constituting the boundaries. We derive the theoretical relation between a temperature slip at the boundary and the relaxation time and demonstrate that the IB-TLBM requires a small relaxation time in order to avoid temperature distortion around the immersed boundary. The streamline, isotherms, and average Nusselt number calculated by the proposed method agree well with those of previous numerical studies involving natural convection. The proposed IB-TLBM improves the accuracy of the boundary conditions for the temperature and velocity using an adequate discrete area for each of the Lagrangian nodes and reduces the penetration of the streamline on the surface of the body.

  8. Implicit temperature-correction-based immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of natural convection.

    PubMed

    Seta, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper, we apply the implicit-correction method to the immersed-boundary thermal lattice Boltzmann method (IB-TLBM) for the natural convection between two concentric horizontal cylinders and in a square enclosure containing a circular cylinder. The Chapman-Enskog multiscale expansion proves the existence of an extra term in the temperature equation from the source term of the kinetic equation. In order to eliminate the extra term, we redefine the temperature and the source term in the lattice Boltzmann equation. When the relaxation time is less than unity, the new definition of the temperature and source term enhances the accuracy of the thermal lattice Boltzmann method. The implicit-correction method is required in order to calculate the thermal interaction between a fluid and a rigid solid using the redefined temperature. Simulation of the heat conduction between two concentric cylinders indicates that the error at each boundary point of the proposed IB-TLBM is reduced by the increment of the number of Lagrangian points constituting the boundaries. We derive the theoretical relation between a temperature slip at the boundary and the relaxation time and demonstrate that the IB-TLBM requires a small relaxation time in order to avoid temperature distortion around the immersed boundary. The streamline, isotherms, and average Nusselt number calculated by the proposed method agree well with those of previous numerical studies involving natural convection. The proposed IB-TLBM improves the accuracy of the boundary conditions for the temperature and velocity using an adequate discrete area for each of the Lagrangian nodes and reduces the penetration of the streamline on the surface of the body.

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. MHD natural convection in an inclined wavy cavity with corner heater filled with a nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, M. A.; Oztop, H. F.; Pop, I.

    2016-10-01

    A mathematical modelling of MHD free convection in an inclined wavy enclosure filled with a Cu-water nanofluid in the presence of an isothermal corner heater has been carried out. The cavity is heated from the left bottom corner and cooled from the top wavy wall while the rest walls are adiabatic. Uniform magnetic field affects the heat transfer and fluid flow with an inclination angle to the axis xbar. Wavy cavity is inclined to the horizontal direction. Mathematical model formulated using the single-phase nanofluid approach in dimensionless variables stream function, vorticity and temperature has been solved by finite difference method of the second order accuracy in a wide range of governing parameters: Hartmann number (Ha=0-100), inclination angle of the magnetic field (χ = 0 - π) , undulation number (κ=0-4), inclination angle of the cavity (ζ = 0 - π) , solid volume fraction parameter of nanoparticles (φ=0.0-0.05), and dimensionless time (τ=0-0.27). Main efforts have been focused on the effects of these parameters on the fluid flow and heat transfer inside the cavity. Numerical results have been presented in the form of streamlines, isotherms and average Nusselt numbers.

  12. Influences of surface hydrophilicity on frost formation on a vertical cold plate under natural convection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2007-07-15

    Surface hydrophilicity has a strong influence on frost nucleation according to phase transition theory. To study this effect, a close observation of frost formation and deposition processes on a vertical plate was made under free convection conditions. The formation and shape variation of frost crystals during the initial period are described and the frost thickness variation with time on both hydrophobic and plain copper cold surfaces are presented. The various influencing factors are discussed in depth. The mechanism of surface hydrophilicity influence on frost formation was analyzed theoretically. This revealed that increasing the contact angle can increase the potential barrier and restrain crystal nucleation and growth and thus frost deposition. The experimental results show that the initial water drops formed on a hydrophobic surface are smaller and remain in the liquid state for a longer time compared with ones formed on a plain copper surface. It is also observed that the frost layer deposited on a hydrophobic surface is loose and weak. Though the hydrophobic surface can retard frost formation to a certain extent and causes a looser frost layer, our experimental results show that it does not depress the growth of the frost layer. (author)

  13. Application of a new time scale based low {kappa}-{var_epsilon} model to natural convection from a semi-infinite vertical isothermal plate

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, A.L.; Senthooran, S.; Parameswaran, S.

    1999-01-01

    The low {kappa}-{var_epsilon} model proposed by Yang and Shih (1992) is applied to the calculation of the turbulent natural convective boundary layer over a semi-infinite, vertical, isothermal surface. Using {kappa}/{var_epsilon} as the turbulent time scale will introduce a singularity in the {var_epsilon} equation, near the wall. This model uses a modified turbulent time scale near the wall to eliminate this singularity. The constants in the equation for damping function are modified to produce better results for both, natural convection and force convection. The results are compared with available experimental data and the results obtained from Chien`s model and are found to be in reasonable agreement. Here {kappa} represents the turbulent kinetic energy and {var_epsilon} represents the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy.

  14. A numerical simulation of combined radiation and natural convection heat transfer in a square enclosure heated by a centric circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wencan; Chen, Jiqing; Lan, Fengchong

    2013-02-01

    A numerical simulation of combined natural convection and radiation in a square enclosure heated by a centric circular cylinder and filled with absorbing-emitting medium is presented. The ideal gas law and the discrete ordinates method are used to model the density changes due to temperature differences and the radiation heat transfer correspondingly. The influence of Rayleigh number, optical thickness and temperature difference on flow and temperature fields along with the natural convection, radiation and total Nusselt number at the source surfaces is studied. The results reveal that the radiation heat transfer as well as the optical thickness of the fluid has a distinct effect on the fluid flow phenomena, especially at high Rayleigh number. The heat transfer and so the Nusselt number decreases with increase in optical thickness, while increases greatly with increase in temperature difference. The variation in radiation heat transfer with optical thickness and temperature difference is much more obvious as comparison with convection heat transfer.

  15. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  16. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  17. Non linear Quasi-Geostrophic thermal convection and dynamo in a rapidly rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, P.; Guervilly, C.

    2009-12-01

    Using a combination of a quasi-geostrophic (QG) model for the velocity field and a classical spectral 3D code for the temperature field, we compute thermal convective motions in a rapidly rotating full sphere. The QG flow is computed in the equatorial plane, whereas the temperature field is calculated within the full sphere. The coupling terms are evaluated by interpolating onto the 2D (equatorial) and 3D coarse grids. Our hybrid approach allows us to compute simulations at low Ekman numbers, low Prandtl numbers and explore the strongly non-linear regime currently inaccessible with purely 3D codes. We pay particular attention to the zonal winds generated by non-linear interactions between the convection columns. Understanding these zonal winds is especially relevant for the study of atmospheric layers of planets such as Jupiter and Saturn [1] and dynamo generation in convective dynamos. Moreover the 2D/3D approach has already been used successfully to obtain dynamos driven by a QG flow with a mechanical boundary forcing [2]. Following these ideas, we solve the magnetic induction equation in 3D to obtain dynamos for low Ekman, Prandtl and magnetic Prandtl numbers. [1] Heimpel, M.H., Aurnou, J.M., Wicht, J., 2005. Simulation of equatorial and high-latitude jets on Jupiter in a deep convection model. Nature 438, 193-196. [2] Schaeffer, N. and Cardin, P., 2006. Quasi-geostrophic kinematic dynamos at low magnetic Prandtl number. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 245, 595-604.

  18. The importance of 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been getting progressively more complex for the past 20 years. Early radiation therapy techniques needed only basic dosimetry equipment; motorized water phantoms, ionization chambers, and basic radiographic film techniques. As intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided therapy came into widespread practice, medical physicists were challenged with developing effective and efficient dose measurement techniques. The complex 3-dimensional (3D) nature of the dose distributions that were being delivered demanded the development of more quantitative and more thorough methods for dose measurement. The quality assurance vendors developed a wide array of multidetector arrays that have been enormously useful for measuring and characterizing dose distributions, and these have been made especially useful with the advent of 3D dose calculation systems based on the array measurements, as well as measurements made using film and portal imagers. Other vendors have been providing 3D calculations based on data from the linear accelerator or the record and verify system, providing thorough evaluation of the dose but lacking quality assurance (QA) of the dose delivery process, including machine calibration. The current state of 3D dosimetry is one of a state of flux. The vendors and professional associations are trying to determine the optimal balance between thorough QA, labor efficiency, and quantitation. This balance will take some time to reach, but a necessary component will be the 3D measurement and independent calculation of delivered radiation therapy dose distributions.

  19. Naturally Derived Iron Oxide Nanowires from Bacteria for Magnetically Triggered Drug Release and Cancer Hyperthermia in 2D and 3D Culture Environments: Bacteria Biofilm to Potent Cancer Therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Kumeria, Tushar; Maher, Shaheer; Wang, Ye; Kaur, Gagandeep; Wang, Luoshan; Erkelens, Mason; Forward, Peter; Lambert, Martin F; Evdokiou, Andreas; Losic, Dusan

    2016-08-01

    Iron oxide nanowires produced by bacteria (Mariprofundus ferrooxydans) are demonstrated as new multifunctional drug carriers for triggered therapeutics release and cancer hyperthmia applications. Iron oxide nanowires are obtained from biofilm waste in the bore system used to pump saline groundwater into the River Murray, South Australia (Australia) and processed into individual nanowires with extensive magnetic properties. The drug carrier capabilities of these iron oxide nanowires (Bac-FeOxNWs) are assessed by loading anticancer drug (doxorubicin, Dox) followed by measuring its elution under sustained and triggered release conditions using alternating magnetic field (AMF). The cytotoxicity of Bac-FeOxNWs assessed in 2D (96 well plate) and 3D (Matrigel) cell cultures using MDA-MB231-TXSA human breast cancer cells and mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells shows that these Bac-FeOxNWs are biocompatible even at concentrations as high as 250 μg/mL after 24 h of incubation. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of Bac-FeOxNWs as potential hyperthermia agent in 3D culture setup. Application of AMF increased the local temperature by 14 °C resulting in approximately 34% decrease in cell viability. Our results demonstrate that these naturally produced nanowires in the form of biofilm can efficiently act as drug carriers with triggered payload release and magnetothermal heating features for potential anticancer therapeutics applications. PMID:27428076

  20. Shaping Meridional Circulation in Solar and Stellar Convection Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Meridional circulations play a crucial role in mediating the angular momentum transport within stellar convection zones and, likely, in determining the nature and timing of their dynamos. The length of the solar cycle, for instance, is thought to depend intimately on the transport of magnetic fields by the meridional circulations in the convection zone. We present a series of 3-D nonlinear simulations of solar-like convection, carried out using the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code that are designed to provide insight into those processes responsible for driving and shaping the meridional circulations established within stellar convection zones. These 3-D models have been constructed in such a way as to span the transition between regimes of solar-like differential rotation (fast equator, slow poles) and regimes of so-called ``anti-solar'' differential rotation (slow equator, fast poles). Solar-like states of differential rotation are characterized by multiple cells of meridional circulation in depth at low latitudes, whereas anti-solar states of differential rotation are characterized by a single cell of circulation within each hemisphere. We demonstrate that the transition from single-celled to multi-celled meridional circulation profiles in these two different regimes is directly linked to a change in the nature of the convective Reynolds stress. These results suggest that if convection in the Sun is strongly rotationally-constrained, a multi-cellular meridional circulation profile may well be expected. Transitional regimes do exist, however, and we conclude by examining a simulation wherein convection that is only marginally rotationally constrained can drive both mono-cellular meridional circulation and solar-like differential rotation.

  1. NGT-3D: a simple nematode cultivation system to study Caenorhabditis elegans biology in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Young; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Lee, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the premier experimental model organisms today. In the laboratory, they display characteristic development, fertility, and behaviors in a two dimensional habitat. In nature, however, C. elegans is found in three dimensional environments such as rotting fruit. To investigate the biology of C. elegans in a 3D controlled environment we designed a nematode cultivation habitat which we term the nematode growth tube or NGT-3D. NGT-3D allows for the growth of both nematodes and the bacteria they consume. Worms show comparable rates of growth, reproduction and lifespan when bacterial colonies in the 3D matrix are abundant. However, when bacteria are sparse, growth and brood size fail to reach levels observed in standard 2D plates. Using NGT-3D we observe drastic deficits in fertility in a sensory mutant in 3D compared to 2D, and this defect was likely due to an inability to locate bacteria. Overall, NGT-3D will sharpen our understanding of nematode biology and allow scientists to investigate questions of nematode ecology and evolutionary fitness in the laboratory. PMID:26962047

  2. NGT-3D: a simple nematode cultivation system to study Caenorhabditis elegans biology in 3D.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tong Young; Yoon, Kyoung-Hye; Lee, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    The nematodeCaenorhabditiselegansis one of the premier experimental model organisms today. In the laboratory, they display characteristic development, fertility, and behaviors in a two dimensional habitat. In nature, however,C. elegansis found in three dimensional environments such as rotting fruit. To investigate the biology ofC. elegansin a 3D controlled environment we designed a nematode cultivation habitat which we term the nematode growth tube or NGT-3D. NGT-3D allows for the growth of both nematodes and the bacteria they consume. Worms show comparable rates of growth, reproduction and lifespan when bacterial colonies in the 3D matrix are abundant. However, when bacteria are sparse, growth and brood size fail to reach levels observed in standard 2D plates. Using NGT-3D we observe drastic deficits in fertility in a sensory mutant in 3D compared to 2D, and this defect was likely due to an inability to locate bacteria. Overall, NGT-3D will sharpen our understanding of nematode biology and allow scientists to investigate questions of nematode ecology and evolutionary fitness in the laboratory. PMID:26962047

  3. Feasibility study for use of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for VHTR water-cooled RCCS shutdown.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.; Farmer, M.T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-31

    In summary, a scaling analysis of a water-cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) system was performed based on generic information on the RCCS design of PBMR. The analysis demonstrates that the water-cooled RCCS can be simulated at the ANL NSTF facility at a prototypic scale in the lateral direction and about half scale in the vertical direction. Because, by necessity, the scaling is based on a number of approximations, and because no analytical information is available on the performance of a reference water-cooled RCCS, the scaling analysis presented here needs to be 'validated' by analysis of the steady state and transient performance of a reference water-cooled RCCS design. The analysis of the RCCS performance by CFD and system codes presents a number of challenges including: strong 3-D effects in the cavity and the RCCS tubes; simulation of turbulence in flows characterized by natural circulation, high Rayleigh numbers and low Reynolds numbers; validity of heat transfer correlations for system codes for heat transfer in the cavity and the annulus of the RCCS tubes; the potential of nucleate boiling in the tubes; water flashing in the upper section of the RCCS return line (during limiting transient); and two-phase flow phenomena in the water tanks. The limited simulation of heat transfer in cavities presented in Section 4.0, strongly underscores the need of experimental work to validate CFD codes, and heat transfer correlations for system codes, and to support the analysis and design of the RCCS. Based on the conclusions of the scaling analysis, a schematic that illustrates key attributes of the experiment system is shown in Fig. 4. This system contains the same physical elements as the PBMR RCCS, plus additional equipment to facilitate data gathering to support code validation. In particular, the prototype consists of a series of oval standpipes surrounding the reactor vessel to provide cooling of the reactor cavity during both normal and off

  4. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  5. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  6. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  7. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  8. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  9. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  10. Forward ramp in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. When this image was taken, Sojourner was still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal.

    The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. The metallic object at the lower left of the image is the lander's low-gain antenna. The square at the end of the ramp is one of the spacecraft's magnetic targets. Dust that accumulates on the magnetic targets will later be examined by Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer instrument for chemical analysis. At right, a lander petal is visible.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  12. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  13. The empirical correlations for natural convection heat transfer Al2O3 and ZrO2 nanofluid in vertical sub-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, K.; Umar, E.; Sudjatmi

    2015-09-01

    Study on convection heat transfer using water-Al2O3 nanofluid as the working fluid in the vertical sub-channel has been conducted. The results of the study have been compared with the water-ZrO2 nanofluid and pure-water as the working fluid. The equipment used in this experiment is a vertical triangular sub-channel, equipped by primary cooling system, heat exchanger and a secondary cooling system. As a heating source used three vertical cylinders that have a uniform heat flux with a pitch to diameter ratio (P/D) 01:16. Cooling is used is water-Al2O3 colloid at 0.05 wt. %. Heat transfer from heating to cooling would occur in natural or forced convection. However, in this study will be discussed only natural convection heat transfer. The results showed that the natural convection heat transfer of water-Al2O3 nanofluid in a triangular sub-channels depending on the position. The results of the correlation as follows,

  14. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated (β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined (β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated (β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated (β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined (β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated (β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number. PMID:26183389

  16. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  17. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  18. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  19. Examining the Impact of Prandtl Number and Surface Convection Models on Deep Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, B. D.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent motions within the solar convection zone play a central role in the generation and maintenance of the Sun's magnetic field. This magnetic field reverses its polarity every 11 years and serves as the source of powerful space weather events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can affect artificial satellites and power grids. The structure and inductive properties are linked to the amplitude (i.e. speed) of convective motion. Using the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, a 3D fluids code simulates these processes by evolving the Navier-Stokes equations in time and under an anelastic constraint. This code simulates the fluxes describing heat transport in the sun in a global spherical-shell geometry. Such global models can explicitly capture the large-scale motions in the deep convection zone but heat transport from unresolved small-scale convection in the surface layers must be parameterized. Here we consider two models for heat transport by surface convection, including a conventional turbulent thermal diffusion as well as an imposed flux that carries heat through the surface in a manner that is independent of the deep convection and the entropy stratification it establishes. For both models, we investigate the scaling of convective amplitude with decreasing diffusion (increasing Rayleigh number). If the Prandtl number is fixed, we find that the amplitude of convective motions increases with decreasing diffusion, possibly reaching an asymptotic value in the low diffusion limit. However, if only the thermal diffusion is decreased (keeping the viscosity fixed), we find that the amplitude of convection decreases with decreasing diffusion. Such a high-Prandtl-number, high-Peclet-number limit may be relevant for the Sun if magnetic fields mix momentum, effectively acting as an enhanced viscosity. In this case, our results suggest that the amplitude of large-scale convection in the Sun may be substantially less than in current models that employ an

  20. Dissection of C. elegans behavioral genetics in 3-D environments.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Namseop; Hwang, Ara B; You, Young-Jai; V Lee, Seung-Jae; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a widely used model for genetic dissection of animal behaviors. Despite extensive technical advances in imaging methods, it remains challenging to visualize and quantify C. elegans behaviors in three-dimensional (3-D) natural environments. Here we developed an innovative 3-D imaging method that enables quantification of C. elegans behavior in 3-D environments. Furthermore, for the first time, we characterized 3-D-specific behavioral phenotypes of mutant worms that have defects in head movement or mechanosensation. This approach allowed us to reveal previously unknown functions of genes in behavioral regulation. We expect that our 3-D imaging method will facilitate new investigations into genetic basis of animal behaviors in natural 3-D environments.

  1. Dissection of C. elegans behavioral genetics in 3-D environments

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Namseop; Hwang, Ara B.; You, Young-Jai; V. Lee, Seung-Jae; Ho Je, Jung

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a widely used model for genetic dissection of animal behaviors. Despite extensive technical advances in imaging methods, it remains challenging to visualize and quantify C. elegans behaviors in three-dimensional (3-D) natural environments. Here we developed an innovative 3-D imaging method that enables quantification of C. elegans behavior in 3-D environments. Furthermore, for the first time, we characterized 3-D-specific behavioral phenotypes of mutant worms that have defects in head movement or mechanosensation. This approach allowed us to reveal previously unknown functions of genes in behavioral regulation. We expect that our 3-D imaging method will facilitate new investigations into genetic basis of animal behaviors in natural 3-D environments. PMID:25955271

  2. Global tectonics from mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of the surface of the Earth are described using the theory of Plate Tectonics. Despite the fact that this theory has shaped modern geosciences it has some limitations, and among them the impossibility to evaluate the forces at the origin of the surface displacements and deformations. Hence important questions remain difficult to solve like the origin of the sizes of plates, forces driving mountain building or supercontinent dispersal... Tremendous progresses have been made in the past 15 years in mantle convection modelling. Especially, modern convection codes can solve for motion equations with complex material properties. Since the early 2000's, the development of pseudo-plastic rheologies contributed to produce convection models with plate-like behaviour: plates naturally emerge and interact with the flow in a self-organized manner. Using such models in 3D spherical geometry (computed with StagYY - Tackley, 2008), I will show that important questions on the global tectonics of the planet can be addressed now: the distribution of seafloor ages, the distribution of plate area, the lifetime of small and large plates or modes of plate reorganizations. Tackley, P.J., Modellng compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter, 171, 7-18 (2008).

  3. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  4. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  5. Invertible authentication for 3D meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jana; Benedens, Oliver

    2003-06-01

    Digital watermarking has become an accepted technology for enabling multimedia protection schemes. Based on the introduced media independent protocol schemes for invertible data authentication in references 2, 4 and 5 we discuss the design of a new 3D invertible labeling technique to ensure and require high data integrity. We combine digital signature schemes and digital watermarking to provide a public verifiable integrity. Furthermore the protocol steps in the other papers to ensure that the original data can only be reproduced with a secret key is adopted for 3D meshes. The goal is to show how the existing protocol can be used for 3D meshes to provide solutions for authentication watermarking. In our design concept and evaluation we see that due to the nature of 3D meshes the invertible function are different from the image and audio concepts to achieve invertibility to guaranty reversibility of the original. Therefore we introduce a concept for distortion free invertibility and a concept for adjustable minimum distortion invertibility.

  6. 3D Virtual Reality for Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Laffey, J.; Ding, N.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing 3D virtual learning environments (VLEs) as learning materials for an undergraduate astronomy course, in which will utilize advances both in technologies available and in our understanding of the social nature of learning. These learning materials will be used to test whether such VLEs can indeed augment science learning so that it is more engaging, active, visual and effective. Our project focuses on the challenges and requirements of introductory college astronomy classes. Here we present our virtual world of the Jupiter system and how we plan to implement it to allow students to learn course material - physical laws and concepts in astronomy - while engaging them into exploration of the Jupiter's system, encouraging their imagination, curiosity, and motivation. The VLE can allow students to work individually or collaboratively. The 3D world also provides an opportunity for research in astronomy education to investigate impact of social interaction, gaming features, and use of manipulatives offered by a learning tool on students’ motivation and learning outcomes. Use of this VLE is also a valuable source for exploration of how the learners’ spatial awareness can be enhanced by working in 3D environment. We will present the Jupiter-system environment along with a preliminary study of the efficacy and usability of our Jupiter 3D VLE.

  7. 3D hollow nanostructures as building blocks for multifunctional plasmonics.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Francesco; Malerba, Mario; Patrini, Maddalena; Miele, Ermanno; Das, Gobind; Toma, Andrea; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2013-08-14

    We present an advanced and robust technology to realize 3D hollow plasmonic nanostructures which are tunable in size, shape, and layout. The presented architectures offer new and unconventional properties such as the realization of 3D plasmonic hollow nanocavities with high electric field confinement and enhancement, finely structured extinction profiles, and broad band optical absorption. The 3D nature of the devices can overcome intrinsic difficulties related to conventional architectures in a wide range of multidisciplinary applications.

  8. A numerical study of thermal stratification due to transient natural convection in densified liquid propellant tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manalo, Lawrence B.

    A comprehensive, non-equilibrium, two-domain (liquid and vapor), physics based, mathematical model is developed to investigate the onset and growth of the natural circulation and thermal stratification inside cryogenic propellant storage tanks due to heat transfer from the surroundings. A two-dimensional (planar) model is incorporated for the liquid domain while a lumped, thermodynamic model is utilized for the vapor domain. The mathematical model in the liquid domain consists of the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations and incorporates the Boussinesq approximation (constant fluid density except in the buoyancy term of the momentum equation). In addition, the vapor is assumed to behave like an ideal gas with uniform thermodynamic properties. Furthermore, the time-dependent nature of the heat leaks from the surroundings to the propellant (due to imperfect tank insulation) is considered. Also, heterogeneous nucleation, although not significant in the temperature range of study, has been included. The transport of mass and energy between the liquid and vapor domains leads to transient ullage vapor temperatures and pressures. (The latter of which affects the saturation temperature of the liquid at the liquid-vapor interface.) This coupling between the two domains is accomplished through an energy balance (based on a micro-layer concept) at the interface. The resulting governing, non-linear, partial differential equations (which include a Poisson's equation for determining the pressure distribution) in the liquid domain are solved by an implicit, finite-differencing technique utilizing a non-uniform (stretched) mesh (in both directions) for predicting the velocity and temperature fields. (The accuracy of the numerical scheme is validated by comparing the model's results to a benchmark numerical case as well as to available experimental data.) The mass, temperature, and pressure of the vapor is determined by using a simple explicit finite

  9. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  10. Mixed convective boundary layer flow over a vertical wedge embedded in a porous medium saturated with a nanofluid: Natural Convection Dominated Regime

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A boundary layer analysis is presented for the mixed convection past a vertical wedge in a porous medium saturated with a nano fluid. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of non-similar equations and solved numerically by an efficient, implicit, iterative, finite-difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of various physical parameters is performed. Numerical results for the velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as the friction factor, surface heat and mass transfer rates have been presented for parametric variations of the buoyancy ratio parameter Nr, Brownian motion parameter Nb, thermophoresis parameter Nt, and Lewis number Le. The dependency of the friction factor, surface heat transfer rate (Nusselt number), and mass transfer rate (Sherwood number) on these parameters has been discussed. PMID:21711715

  11. Mixed convective boundary layer flow over a vertical wedge embedded in a porous medium saturated with a nanofluid: Natural Convection Dominated Regime.

    PubMed

    Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy; Chamkha, Ali Jawad; Rashad, Ahmed Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    A boundary layer analysis is presented for the mixed convection past a vertical wedge in a porous medium saturated with a nano fluid. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of non-similar equations and solved numerically by an efficient, implicit, iterative, finite-difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of various physical parameters is performed. Numerical results for the velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as the friction factor, surface heat and mass transfer rates have been presented for parametric variations of the buoyancy ratio parameter Nr, Brownian motion parameter Nb, thermophoresis parameter Nt, and Lewis number Le. The dependency of the friction factor, surface heat transfer rate (Nusselt number), and mass transfer rate (Sherwood number) on these parameters has been discussed.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics for modeling the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Guillén, I.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.; Arce, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Gijón-Rivera, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the modeling of the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney (SC-DC) and its comparison with a single air-channel solar chimney (SC-C). Prediction of the mass flow and the thermal behavior of the SC-DC were obtained under three different climates of Mexico during one summer day. The climates correspond to: tropical savannah (Mérida), arid desert (Hermosillo) and temperate with warm summer (Mexico City). A code based on the Finite Volume Method was developed and a k-ω turbulence model has been used to model air turbulence in the solar chimney (SC). The code was validated against experimental data. The results indicate that during the day the SC-DC extracts about 50% more mass flow than the SC-C. When the SC-DC is located in Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, the air-changes extracted along the day were 60, 63 and 52, respectively. The air temperature at the outlet of the chimney increased up to 33%, 38% and 61% with respect to the temperature it has at the inlet for Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, respectively.

  13. Natural convective heat and mass transfer in a porous triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid in presence of heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Raju; Parvin, Salma; Khan, Md. Abdul Hakim

    2016-07-01

    The problem of natural convective heat and mass transfer in a triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid saturated porous medium in presence of heat generation has been studied in this paper. The bottom wall of the cavity is heated uniformly, the left inclined wall is heated linearly and the right inclined wall is considered to be cold. The concentration is higher at bottom wall, lower at right inclined wall and linearly concentrated at left inclined wall of the cavity. The governing equations are transformed to the dimensionless form and solved numerically using Galerkin weighted residual technique of finite element method. The results are obtained in terms of streamline, isotherms, isoconcentrations, Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) for the parameters thermal Rayleigh number (RaT), Heat generation parameter (λ) and Lewis number (Le) while Prandtl number (Pr), Buoyancy ratio (N) and Darcy number (Da) are considered to be fixed. It is observed that flow pattern, temperature fields and concentration fields are affected by the variation of above considered parameters.

  14. Inclination angle effect on natural convection in a square cavity partially filled with non-Newtonian fluids layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabery, Ammar I.; Hussain, Salam H.; Saleh, Habibis; Hashim, Ishak

    2015-09-01

    The problem of inclination angle effect on natural convection in a square cavity partially filled with non-Newtonian fluid layer is studied numerically using The Finite Volume Method. Governing equations are solved over wide range of Darcy number (10-5 ≤ Da ≤ 10-1), power-law index(0.6 ≤ n ≤ 1.4), the inclination angle of the cavity (0° ≤ ω ≤ 90°), Rayleigh number (Ra = 105) and porous layer thickness (S = 0.5). The results presented for values of the governing parameters in terms of streamlines in both porous/non-Newtonian fluid-layer, isotherms in both porous/non-Newtonian fluid-layer and average Nusselt number. It is shown that the heat transfer has maximum value when the power-law index is less than one (pseudoplastic fluid), and then decreases remarkably as the power-law index increases. The results have possible applications in heat-removal and heat-storage non-Newtonian fluid-saturated porous systems.

  15. Natural convection of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder using modified power-law model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thohura, Sharaban; Molla, Md. Mamun; Sarker, M. M. A.

    2016-07-01

    A study on the natural convection flow of non-Newtonian fluid along a vertical thin cylinder with constant wall temperature using modified power law viscosity model has been done. The basic equations are transformed to non dimensional boundary layer equations and the resulting systems of nonlinear partial differential equations are then solved employing marching order implicit finite difference method. The evolution of the surface shear stress in terms of local skin-friction, the rate of heat transfer in terms of local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles for shear thinning as well as shear-thickening fluid considering the different values of Prandtl number have been focused. For the Newtonian fluids the present numerical results are compared with available published results which show a good agreement indeed. From the results it can be concluded that, at the leading edge, a Newtonian-like solution exists as the shear rate is not large enough to trigger non-Newtonian effects. Non-Newtonian effects can be found when the shear-rate increases beyond a threshold value.

  16. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  17. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  18. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  19. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  20. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  1. CATHARE thermal-hydraulic system code for HLM preliminary validation in natural convection tests

    SciTech Connect

    Polidori, M.; Meloni, P.; Lombardo, C.; Bandini, G.; Geffraye, G.; Kadri, D.

    2012-07-01

    The innovative nuclear systems cooled by Heavy Liquid Metal (HLM) are the subject of an ongoing interest both in Europe and outside, evidenced by a number of projects in progress. In the frame of the European Framework Programmes have been evidenced the need to adopt a thermalhydraulic system code capable to treat lead and Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) systems, with a particular interest in developing a 'European' code. Considering this scenario, within a specific collaboration between ENEA and CEA, the CATHARE French system code has been modified extending its capabilities to simulate HLM systems. In the present paper, the state of the validation process of CATHARE-HLM is discussed. The activity aims to assess the capabilities and limitations of the code to simulate the behavior of integral facilities, in particular in natural circulation conditions. The experimental data come from NACIE LBE-cooled facility sited at the ENEA Brasimone laboratories. The results obtained show a good capability in reproducing the systems behavior, despite some uncertainties on the experimental measurements. Future improvements on the code are going to be planned within the collaboration ENEA/CEA. (authors)

  2. Parallel CARLOS-3D code development

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, J.M.; Kotulski, J.D.

    1996-02-01

    CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional scattering code which was developed under the sponsorship of the Electromagnetic Code Consortium, and is currently used by over 80 aerospace companies and government agencies. The code has been extensively validated and runs on both serial workstations and parallel super computers such as the Intel Paragon. CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional surface integral equation scattering code based on a Galerkin method of moments formulation employing Rao- Wilton-Glisson roof-top basis for triangular faceted surfaces. Fully arbitrary 3D geometries composed of multiple conducting and homogeneous bulk dielectric materials can be modeled. This presentation describes some of the extensions to the CARLOS-3D code, and how the operator structure of the code facilitated these improvements. Body of revolution (BOR) and two-dimensional geometries were incorporated by simply including new input routines, and the appropriate Galerkin matrix operator routines. Some additional modifications were required in the combined field integral equation matrix generation routine due to the symmetric nature of the BOR and 2D operators. Quadrilateral patched surfaces with linear roof-top basis functions were also implemented in the same manner. Quadrilateral facets and triangular facets can be used in combination to more efficiently model geometries with both large smooth surfaces and surfaces with fine detail such as gaps and cracks. Since the parallel implementation in CARLOS-3D is at high level, these changes were independent of the computer platform being used. This approach minimizes code maintenance, while providing capabilities with little additional effort. Results are presented showing the performance and accuracy of the code for some large scattering problems. Comparisons between triangular faceted and quadrilateral faceted geometry representations will be shown for some complex scatterers.

  3. Analysis of Phenix end-of-life natural convection test with the MARS-LMR code

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, H. Y.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, K. L.; Chang, W. P.; Kim, Y. I.

    2012-07-01

    The end-of-life test of Phenix reactor performed by the CEA provided an opportunity to have reliable and valuable test data for the validation and verification of a SFR system analysis code. KAERI joined this international program for the analysis of Phenix end-of-life natural circulation test coordinated by the IAEA from 2008. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the capability of existing SFR system analysis code MARS-LMR and to identify any limitation of the code. The analysis was performed in three stages: pre-test analysis, blind posttest analysis, and final post-test analysis. In the pre-test analysis, the design conditions provided by the CEA were used to obtain a prediction of the test. The blind post-test analysis was based on the test conditions measured during the tests but the test results were not provided from the CEA. The final post-test analysis was performed to predict the test results as accurate as possible by improving the previous modeling of the test. Based on the pre-test analysis and blind test analysis, the modeling for heat structures in the hot pool and cold pool, steel structures in the core, heat loss from roof and vessel, and the flow path at core outlet were reinforced in the final analysis. The results of the final post-test analysis could be characterized into three different phases. In the early phase, the MARS-LMR simulated the heat-up process correctly due to the enhanced heat structure modeling. In the mid phase before the opening of SG casing, the code reproduced the decrease of core outlet temperature successfully. Finally, in the later phase the increase of heat removal by the opening of the SG opening was well predicted with the MARS-LMR code. (authors)

  4. 3D stochastic inversion of magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipour, Pejman; Chouteau, Michel; Marcotte, Denis

    2011-04-01

    A stochastic inversion method based on a geostatistical approach is presented to recover 3D susceptibility models from magnetic data. The aim of applying geostatistics is to provide quantitative descriptions of natural variables distributed in space or in time and space. Cokriging, the method which is used in this paper, is a method of estimation that minimizes the theoretical estimation error variance by using auto- and cross-correlations of several variables. The covariances for total field, susceptibility and total field-susceptibility are estimated using the observed data. Then, the susceptibility is cokriged or simulated as the primary variable. In order to avoid the natural tendency of the estimated structure to lay near the surface, depth weighting is included in the cokriging system. The algorithm assumes there is no remanent magnetization and the observation data represent only induced magnetization effects. The method is applied on different synthetic models to demonstrate its suitability for 3D inversion of magnetic data. A case study using ground measurements of total field at the Perseverance mine (Quebec, Canada) is presented. The recovered 3D susceptibility model provides beneficial information that can be used to analyze the geology of massive sulfide for the domain under study.

  5. Automating Shallow 3D Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don; Tsoflias, George

    2009-01-15

    Our efforts since 1997 have been directed toward developing ultra-shallow seismic imaging as a cost-effective method applicable to DOE facilities. This report covers the final year of grant-funded research to refine 3D shallow seismic imaging, which built on a previous 7-year grant (FG07-97ER14826) that refined and demonstrated the use of an automated method of conducting shallow seismic surveys; this represents a significant departure from conventional seismic-survey field procedures. The primary objective of this final project was to develop an automated three-dimensional (3D) shallow-seismic reflection imaging capability. This is a natural progression from our previous published work and is conceptually parallel to the innovative imaging methods used in the petroleum industry.

  6. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  7. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  8. PAPERS DEVOTED TO THE 250TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MOSCOW STATE UNIVERSITY: Natural convection in laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Aleksei I.; Uvarov, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    The general type of boundary conditions in heat exchange problems, including heat exchange in laser systems, is discussed. The appearance of convection in a plane layer of a nonequilibrium gas with the volume energy release and its temperature dependence is briefly considered. Convection in a cylindrical system and in a system of coaxial cylinders with a cooled central part is considered in detail. Such systems simulate real laser devices. It is shown that the maximum temperature in the cylindrical system decreases due to convection, whereas the maximum temperature in the system of coaxial cylinders increases, i.e., the analysis of heat removal in a laser system reveals a very important role of convection.

  9. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  10. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  11. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  12. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  13. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  14. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN TURBULENT CONVECTION AND STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; Mösta, Philipp; Klion, Hannah; Schnetter, Erik

    2015-07-20

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a 27 M{sub ⊙} progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and (3) SASI-dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. and Couch and Connor. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of ∼4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more fully buoyant mass, and stronger neutrino heating. In the SASI-dominated case, lower resolution damps SASI oscillations. In the convection-dominated case, a quasi-stationary angular kinetic energy spectrum E(ℓ) develops in the heating layer. Like other 3D studies, we find E(ℓ) ∝ℓ{sup −1} in the “inertial range,” while theory and local simulations argue for E(ℓ) ∝ ℓ{sup −5/3}. We argue that current 3D simulations do not resolve the inertial range of turbulence and are affected by numerical viscosity up to the energy-containing scale, creating a “bottleneck” that prevents an efficient turbulent cascade.

  15. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    DOE PAGES

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified.more » Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.« less

  16. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  17. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  18. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  19. Evaluating the Moisture Conditions in the Fractured Rock at YuccaMountain: The Impact of Natural Convection Processes in HeatedEmplacement Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Halecky, N.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2005-12-14

    The energy output of the high-level radioactive waste to beemplaced in the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada,will strongly affect the thermal-hydrological (TH) conditions in thenear-drift fractured rock. Heating of rock water to above-boilingconditions will induce large water saturation changes and fluxperturbations close to the waste emplacement tunnels (drifts) that willlast several thousand years. Understanding these perturbations isimportant for the performance of the repository, because they couldincrease, for example, the amount of formation water seeping into theopen drifts and contacting waste packages. Recent computational fluiddynamics (CFD) analysis has demonstrated that the drifts will act asimportant conduits for gas flows driven by natural convection. As aresult, vapor generated from boiling of formation water nearelevated-temperature sections of the drifts may effectively betransported to cooler end sections (where no waste is emplaced), wouldcondense there, and subsequently drain into underlying rock units. Thus,natural convection processes have great potential for reducing thenear-drift moisture content in heated drift sections, which has positiveramifications for repository performance. To study these processes, wehave developed a new simulation method that couples existing tools forsimulating TH conditions in the fractured formation with modules thatapproximate natural convection and evaporation conditions in heatedemplacement drifts. The new method is applied to evaluate the future THconditions at Yucca Mountain in a three-dimensional model domaincomprising a representative emplacement drift and the surroundingfractured rock.

  20. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  1. Performance Analysis and Parametric Study of a Natural Convection Solar Air Heater With In-built Oil Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhote, Yogesh; Thombre, Shashikant

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the thermal performance of the proposed double flow natural convection solar air heater with in-built liquid (oil) sensible heat storage. Unused engine oil was used as thermal energy storage medium due to its good heat retaining capacity even at high temperatures without evaporation. The performance evaluation was carried out for a day of the month March for the climatic conditions of Nagpur (India). A self reliant computational model was developed using computational tool as C++. The program developed was self reliant and compute the performance parameters for any day of the year and would be used for major cities in India. The effect of change in storage oil quantity and the inclination (tilt angle) on the overall efficiency of the solar air heater was studied. The performance was tested initially at different storage oil quantities as 25, 50, 75 and 100 l for a plate spacing of 0.04 m with an inclination of 36o. It has been found that the solar air heater gives the best performance at a storage oil quantity of 50 l. The performance of the proposed solar air heater is further tested for various combinations of storage oil quantity (50, 75 and 100 l) and the inclination (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o, 90o). It has been found that the proposed solar air heater with in-built oil storage shows its best performance for the combination of 50 l storage oil quantity and 60o inclination. Finally the results of the parametric study was also presented in the form of graphs carried out for a fixed storage oil quantity of 25 l, plate spacing of 0.03 m and at an inclination of 36o to study the behaviour of various heat transfer and fluid flow parameters of the solar air heater.

  2. Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Xin, S.

    2014-02-15

    The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

  3. Scalability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) data to VHTR/NGNP RCCS designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R .B.; Feldman, E. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-07

    Passive safety in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is strongly dependent on the thermal performance of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Scaled experiments performed in the Natural Shutdown Test Facility (NSTF) are to provide data for assessing and/or improving computer code models for RCCS phenomena. Design studies and safety analyses that are to support licensing of the VHTR will rely on these models to achieve a high degree of certainty in predicted design heat removal rate. To guide in the selection and development of an appropriate set of experiments a scaling analysis has been performed for the air-cooled RCCS option. The goals were to (1) determine the phenomena that dominate the behavior of the RCCS, (2) determine the general conditions that must be met so that these phenomena and their relative importance are preserved in the experiments, (3) identify constraints specific to the NSTF that potentially might prevent exact similitude, and (4) then to indicate how the experiments can be scaled to prevent distortions in the phenomena of interest. The phenomena identified as important to RCCS operation were also the subject of a recent PIRT study. That work and the present work collectively indicate that the main phenomena influencing RCCS heat removal capability are (1) radiation heat transport from the vessel to the air ducts, (2) the integral effects of momentum and heat transfer in the air duct, (3) buoyancy at the wall inside the air duct giving rise to mixed convection, and (4) multidimensional effects inside the air duct caused by non-uniform circumferential heat flux and non-circular geometry.

  4. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  5. INCORPORATING DYNAMIC 3D SIMULATION INTO PRA

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Prescott; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    Through continued advancement in computational resources, development that was previously done by trial and error production is now performed through computer simulation. These virtual physical representations have the potential to provide accurate and valid modeling results and are being used in many different technical fields. Risk assessment now has the opportunity to use 3D simulation to improve analysis results and insights, especially for external event analysis. By using simulations, the modeler only has to determine the likelihood of an event without having to also predict the results of that event. The 3D simulation automatically determines not only the outcome of the event, but when those failures occur. How can we effectively incorporate 3D simulation into traditional PRA? Most PRA plant modeling is made up of components with different failure modes, probabilities, and rates. Typically, these components are grouped into various systems and then are modeled together (in different combinations) as a “system” with logic structures to form fault trees. Applicable fault trees are combined through scenarios, typically represented by event tree models. Though this method gives us failure results for a given model, it has limitations when it comes to time-based dependencies or dependencies that are coupled to physical processes which may themselves be space- or time-dependent. Since, failures from a 3D simulation are naturally time related, they should be used in that manner. In our simulation approach, traditional static models are converted into an equivalent state diagram representation with start states, probabilistic driven movements between states and terminal states. As the state model is run repeatedly, it converges to the same results as the PRA model in cases where time-related factors are not important. In cases where timing considerations are important (e.g., when events are dependent upon each other), then the simulation approach will typically

  6. Viewing 3D MRI data in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Chin, Chialei

    2000-10-01

    In medical imaging applications, 3D morphological data set is often presented in 2D format without considering visual perspective. Without perspective, the resulting image can be counterintuitive to natural human visual perception, specially in a setting of MR guided neurosurgical procedure where depth perception is crucial. To address this problem we have developed a new projection scheme that incorporates linear perspective transformation in various image reconstructions, including MR angiographical projection. In the scheme, an imaginary picture plane (PP) can be placed within or immediately in front of a 3D object, and the stand point (SP) of an observer is fixed at a normal viewing distance os 25 cm in front of the picture plane. A clinical 3D angiography data set (TR/TF/Flipequals30/5.4/15) was obtained from a patient head on a 1.5T MR scanner in 4 min 10 sec (87.5% rectangular, 52% scan). The length, width and height of the image volume were 200mm, 200mm and 72.4mm respectively, corresponding to an effective matrix size of 236x512x44 in transverse orientation (512x512x88 after interpolation). Maximum intensity project (MaxIP) algorithm was used along the viewing trace of perspective projection than rather the parallel projection. Consecutive 36 views were obtained at a 10 degree interval azimuthally. When displayed in cine-mode, the new MaxIP images appeared realistic with an improved depth perception.

  7. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  8. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  9. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  10. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  11. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  12. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  13. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  14. Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John; Cockream, Kandi

    2009-05-01

    3D spacetime was developed by the IWPD Scale Metrics (SM) team using a coordinate system that translates n dimensions to n-1. 4-vectors are expressed in 3D along with a scaling factor representing time. Time is not orthogonal to the three spatial dimensions, but rather in alignment with an object's axis-of-motion. We have defined this effect as the object's ``orientation'' (X). The SM orientation (X) is equivalent to the orientation of the 4-velocity vector positioned tangent to its worldline, where X-1=θ+1 and θ is the angle of the 4-vector relative to the axis-of -motion. Both 4-vectors and SM appear to represent valid conceptualizations of the relationship between space and time. Why entertain SM? Scale Metrics gravity is quantized and may suggest a path for the full unification of gravitation with quantum theory. SM has been tested against current observation and is in agreement with the age of the universe, suggests a physical relationship between dark energy and dark matter, is in agreement with the accelerating expansion rate of the universe, contributes to the understanding of the fine-structure constant and provides a physical explanation of relativistic effects.

  15. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  16. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  17. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  18. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  19. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  20. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  1. Natural convection of water-fine particle suspension in a rectangular cell heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Kang, Chaedong; Oyama, Kazuya; Yano, Satoshi

    1999-07-01

    Experiments of a natural convection of a water-fine particle suspension in a rectangular cell which was headed from a vertical wall and cooled from the opposing vertical wall were carried out. The suspension was a mixture of micro beads and water. Two kinds of particles were used. One was the micro beads made of soda glass of which specific gravity was 2.5. Mean diameter of the particle was 5.85{micro}m and standard deviation was 2.65{micro}m. It was considered that this particle size distribution was wide relatively. The other was micro beads made of SiO{sub 2} of which specific gravity was 2.15. Mean diameter of the particles was 2.97{micro}m and the standard deviation was 0.033{micro}m. This particle size distribution was considered to be narrow relatively. In the case of the suspension with particles whose size distribution is wide, many layers separated by almost-horizontal sharp interfaces were observed. In the beginning many layers appeared, and each interface of the layers fell gradually with a constant velocity, and finally all layers vanished. In the case of the suspension with the particles whose size distribution is narrow many layers were not formed but three layers were. The location of the interface was measured by video camera and at that time the temperature distribution in the vertical direction along the centerline of the test cell was measured. Furthermore the mean diameter and concentration of beads in each layer of the suspension were measured. In the above measurements the following results were obtained. The falling velocity of the interface becomes smaller as the initial concentration of particles becomes larger and the lower interface has the larger falling velocity. Each layer has a circular flow and each flow in a layer does not go into neighboring layers. The concentration of particles in each layer is almost uniform and the lower layer has the larger concentration and the larger mean diameter of particles. When the particle size

  2. The pulsed nature of the nightside contribution to polar cap convection: Repetitive substorm activity under steady interplanetary driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandholt, P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Andalsvik, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the contributions of substorm processes to temporal structure of polar cap plasma convection. The central parameter is the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP). Selecting a ten hour-long interval of stable interplanetary driving by an interplanetary CME (ICME), we are able to distinguish between the dayside and nightside sources of the convection. The event was initiated by an abrupt enhancement of the magnetopause (MP) reconnection rate triggered by a southward turning of the ICME magnetic field. This was followed by long interval (ten hours) of steady and strong driving. Under the latter condition a long series of electrojet intensifications (polar cap contractions) was observed which recurred at 50 min. intervals. The detailed temporal structure of polar cap convection in relation to the polar cap contraction events is obtained by combining continuous ground observations of convection - related magnetic deflections (including polar cap magnetic indices in the northern and southern hemispheres, PCN and PCS) and the more direct but lower resolution ion drift data obtained from a satellite (DMSP F13) in polar orbit. The observed PCN enhancements combined with satellite observations (DMSP F13 and F15 data) of polar cap contractions during the evolution of selected substorm expansions allowed us to calculate the CPCP enhancements associated with each event in the series.

  3. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  4. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  5. 3D dimeron as a stable topological object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shijie; Liu, Yongkai

    2015-03-01

    Searching for novel topological objects is always an intriguing task for scientists in various fields. We study a new three-dimensional (3D) topological structure called 3D dimeron in the trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. The 3D dimeron differs to the conventional 3D skyrmion for the condensates hosting two interlocked vortex-rings. We demonstrate that the vortex-rings are connected by a singular string and the complexity constitutes a vortex-molecule. The stability is investigated through numerically evolving the Gross-Pitaevskii equations, giving a coherent Rabi coupling between the two components. Alternatively, we find that the stable 3D dimeron can be naturally generated from a vortex-free Gaussian wave packet via incorporating a synthetic non-Abelian gauge potential into the condensates. This work is supported by the NSF of China under Grant No. 11374036 and the National 973 program under Grant No. 2012CB821403.

  6. Moist convective storms in the atmosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2003-05-01

    Moist convective storms might be a key aspect in the global energy budget of the atmospheres of the Giant Planets. In spite of its dull appearance, Saturn is known to develop the largest scale convective storms in the Solar System, the Great White Spots, the last of them arising in 1990 triggered a planetary scale disturbance that encircled the whole Equatorial region. However, Saturn seems to be very much less convective than Jupiter, being convective storms rare and small for the most part of the cases. Here we present simulations of moist convective storms in the atmosphere of Saturn at different latitudes, the Equator and 42 deg S, the regions where most of the convective activity of the planet has been observed. We use a 3D anelastic model of the atmosphere with parameterized microphysics (Hueso and Sánchez-Lavega, 2001) and we study the onset and evolution of moist convective storms. Ammonia storms are able to develop only if the static stability of the upper atmosphere is slightly decreased. Water storms are difficult to develop requiring very specific atmospheric conditions. However, when they develop they can be very energetic arriving at least to the 150 mbar level. The Coriolis forces play a mayor role in the characteristics of water based storms in the atmosphere of Saturn. The 3-D Coriolis forces at the Equator transfer upward momentum to westward motions acting to diminish the strength of the equatorial jet. The GWS of 1990 could have been a mayor force in reducing the intensity of the equatorial jet stream as revealed recently (Sánchez-Lavega et al. Nature, 2003). The Cassini spacecraft will arrive to Saturn in a year. Its observations of the atmosphere will allow to measure the amount of convective activity on the planet, its characteristics and it will clarify the role of moist convection in the atmospheric dynamics of the Giant Planets. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT PNAYA 2000-0932. RH acknowledges a Post

  7. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  8. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  9. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Castillo-León, Jaime; Emnéus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements. PMID:22163508

  10. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  11. The pulsed nature of the nightside contribution to polar cap convection: repetitive substorm activity under steady interplanetary driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandholt, P. E.; Andalsvik, Y. L.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relative contributions of dayside and nightside processes to the spatial and temporal structure of polar cap plasma convection. The central parameter is the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP). Selecting a 10-h-long interval of stable interplanetary driving by an interplanetary CME (ICME), we are able to distinguish between the dayside and nightside sources of the convection. The event was initiated by an abrupt enhancement of the magnetopause (MP) reconnection rate triggered by a southward turning of the ICME magnetic field. This was followed by a long interval (10 h) of steady and strong driving. Under the latter condition a long series of electrojet intensifications was observed which recurred at 50 min intervals. The detailed temporal structure of polar cap convection in relation to polar cap contraction events is obtained by combining continuous ground observations of convection-related magnetic deflections (including polar cap magnetic indices in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, PCN and PCS) and the more direct, but lower-resolution ion drift data obtained from a satellite (DMSP F13) in polar orbit. The observed PCN enhancements combined with DMSP satellite observations (F13 and F15 data) of polar cap contractions during the evolution of selected substorm expansions allowed us to estimate the CPCP enhancements (25%) associated with individual events in the series. Ground-satellite conjunctions are further used to investigate the spatial structure of polar cap convection, i.e., the homogeneous plasma flow in the centre (Vi ≤ 1 km s-1) versus channels of enhanced antisunward flows (Vi ≥ 1 km s-1) along the periphery of the polar cap. We emphasise the temporal structure of these polar cap flow phenomena in relation to the prevailing solar wind forcing and the repetitive substorm activity.

  12. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  13. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  14. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  15. 3D human pose recognition for home monitoring of elderly.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Bart; Temmermans, Frederik; Deklerck, Rudi

    2007-01-01

    A toolbox for the automatic monitoring of elderly in a nursing home or in the natural home environment is proposed. Rather than monitoring vital signs or other biomedical parameters, the toolbox is focussed on the monitoring of activity patterns and changes therein. Activity information is derived from visual information using image processing algorithms. The visual information is acquired using 3D camera technology. Besides a traditional visual image, 3D cameras also provide highly accurate depth information. The 3D position of the subject is derived and serves as the primary information source for the different components in the toolbox.

  16. 3-D stimulated emission depletion microscopy with programmable aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Martin O; Sinclair, Hugo G; Savell, Alexander; Clegg, James H; Brown, Alice C N; Davis, Daniel M; Dunsby, Chris; Neil, Mark A A; French, Paul M W

    2014-01-01

    We present a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope that provides 3-D super resolution by simultaneous depletion using beams with both a helical phase profile for enhanced lateral resolution and an annular phase profile to enhance axial resolution. The 3-D depletion point spread function is realised using a single spatial light modulator that can also be programmed to compensate for aberrations in the microscope and the sample. We apply it to demonstrate the first 3-D super-resolved imaging of an immunological synapse between a Natural Killer cell and its target cell.

  17. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  18. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  19. Micro-gravity: Superconducting coils for crystal growth. Influence of the levitation force on natural convection in the fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quettier, L.; Vincent-Viry, O.; Mailfert, A.; Juster, F. P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a novel design of superconducting coils able to generate a micro-gravity environment for protein crystal growth in aqueous solution. The structures have been calculated thanks to a method for “inverse source synthesis problem" developed at the GREEN Choice of the angular offset between the directions of magnetic force field and magnetic field in the working area as well as convection phenomena are also studied.

  20. Predicting natural-convection-dominated phase change problems by control volume unstructured triangular grid: Applications to the melting of pure metal

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Z.C.; Liou, J.H.

    1998-02-20

    Control volume methods have recently been developed for fluid flow and heat transfer on unstructured meshes. In this study, the authors extend these methods to implement the solution of natural-convection-dominated melting of gallium by a fixed-grid method. A simple, robust, and reliable explicit numerical method (MAC method) is applied for an unstructured triangular grid. This investigation also applies the implicit SIMPLER method for an unstructured triangular grid. Results obtained from the unstructured triangular grid correlate well with the structured mesh computations and experimental data. Also, the feasibility of applying the triangular grid to complex geometric problems is demonstrated by calculating two different triangular domains.

  1. Transient natural and surface-tension-driven convection in a two-layer gas-and-liquid enclosure with nonuniform radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramzon, B.; Edwards, D. K.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of transient heat transfer and fluid flow in a cylindrical enclosure containing a two-layer gas-and-liquid system. The geometric configuration and the boundary conditions of the problem are relevant to the analysis of the preignition processes during the fire accident situation involving a pool of liquid fuel in the vicinity of an ignition source. It is demonstrated that the effects of the natural and thermocapillary convection, radiative transfer, thermal inertia and conduction of the walls bounding the enclosure, as well as, the magnitude of the gravity field play important roles in the development of the temperature and velocity fields in the container.

  2. Specific differential phase observations of multicell convection during natural and triggered lightning strikes at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, P.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.

    2012-12-01

    During the summers of 2011-2012, a C-band polarimetric Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching (SMART) radar from the University of Oklahoma was deployed to Keystone Heights, FL to study the relationship between cloud structure and the propagation of triggered and natural lightning channels. The radar was operated in Range-Height-Indicator (RHI) volume scanning mode over a narrow azimuthal sector that provided high spatial vertical resolution every 90 seconds over the rocket launch facility at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) at Camp Blanding, FL. In this presentation, we will focus on observations collected in 2011. Seven successful triggers (with return strokes) out of 20 attempts were sampled by the SMART-R from June to August. Most of the trigger attempts occurred during the dissipating stages of convection with steady ground electric field values. Specific differential phase (KDP) showed evidence of ice crystal alignment due to strong electric fields within the upper portions of the convection over ICLRT around the time of launch attempts. Consecutive RHI sweeps over ICLRT revealed changes in KDP that suggested the building of electric fields and subsequent relaxation after a triggered flash. KDP signatures relative to other radar variables will also be investigated to determine the microphysical and convective nature of the storms in which natural and triggered lightning strikes occurred. Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) sources of the triggered flash channels showed a preference for horizontal propagation just above the radar bright band associated with the melting layer. This finding agrees with several past studies that used balloon soundings and found intense layers of charge near the 0°C isotherm. The propagation path also seemed to be related to the vertical distribution of KDP in some of the triggered flashes. A preferred path through areas of generally positive values of KDP suggests that triggered lightning

  3. Various computational conditions of oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kazuto . Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science); Ozoe, Hiroyuki . Inst. of Advanced Material Study)

    1993-03-01

    The finite-difference computational scheme is developed for two-dimensional oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls. Various computational conditions are tested, such as the initial condition, time step length, finite-difference width, and finite-difference scheme. Instantaneous contour maps and velocity vectors in oscillatory states are presented in a series of maps to represent the fluctuating characteristics of two-dimensional roll cells. The physical conditions are for a boat with aspect ratio A = 3[minus]5 at Pr = 0 and Gr = 14,000-40,000.

  4. Effect of the buoyancy force on natural convection in a cubical cavity with a heat source of triangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibanov, N. S.; Sheremet, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical analysis of laminar natural convection inside a cubical cavity with a local heat source of triangular cross-section has been conducted. The mathematical model formulated in dimensionless variables such as "vector potential functions - vorticity vector" has been solved by the finite difference method of the second order accuracy. The three-dimensional temperature fields, 2D streamlines and isotherms in a wide range of the Rayleigh number from 104 to 106 have been presented illustrating variations of the fluid flow and heat transfer.

  5. Locomotive wheel 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xin; Luo, Zhisheng; Gao, Xiaorong; Wu, Jianle

    2010-08-01

    In the article, a system, which is used to reconstruct locomotive wheels, is described, helping workers detect the condition of a wheel through a direct view. The system consists of a line laser, a 2D camera, and a computer. We use 2D camera to capture the line-laser light reflected by the object, a wheel, and then compute the final coordinates of the structured light. Finally, using Matlab programming language, we transform the coordinate of points to a smooth surface and illustrate the 3D view of the wheel. The article also proposes the system structure, processing steps and methods, and sets up an experimental platform to verify the design proposal. We verify the feasibility of the whole process, and analyze the results comparing to standard date. The test results show that this system can work well, and has a high accuracy on the reconstruction. And because there is still no such application working in railway industries, so that it has practical value in railway inspection system.

  6. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  7. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  8. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  9. Laser 3D micro-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Kim, Heungsoo; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-based materials processing techniques are gaining widespread use in micro-manufacturing applications. The use of laser microfabrication techniques enables the processing of micro- and nanostructures from a wide range of materials and geometries without the need for masking and etching steps commonly associated with photolithography. This review aims to describe the broad applications space covered by laser-based micro- and nanoprocessing techniques and the benefits offered by the use of lasers in micro-manufacturing processes. Given their non-lithographic nature, these processes are also referred to as laser direct-write and constitute some of the earliest demonstrations of 3D printing or additive manufacturing at the microscale. As this review will show, the use of lasers enables precise control of the various types of processing steps—from subtractive to additive—over a wide range of scales with an extensive materials palette. Overall, laser-based direct-write techniques offer multiple modes of operation including the removal (via ablative processes) and addition (via photopolymerization or printing) of most classes of materials using the same equipment in many cases. The versatility provided by these multi-function, multi-material and multi-scale laser micro-manufacturing processes cannot be matched by photolithography nor with other direct-write microfabrication techniques and offer unique opportunities for current and future 3D micro-manufacturing applications.

  10. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  11. Accommodation response measurements for integral 3D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiura, H.; Mishina, T.; Arai, J.; Iwadate, Y.

    2014-03-01

    We measured accommodation responses under integral photography (IP), binocular stereoscopic, and real object display conditions, and viewing conditions of binocular and monocular viewing conditions. The equipment we used was an optometric device and a 3D display. We developed the 3D display for IP and binocular stereoscopic images that comprises a high-resolution liquid crystal display (LCD) and a high-density lens array. The LCD has a resolution of 468 dpi and a diagonal size of 4.8 inches. The high-density lens array comprises 106 x 69 micro lenses that have a focal length of 3 mm and diameter of 1 mm. The lenses are arranged in a honeycomb pattern. The 3D display was positioned 60 cm from an observer under IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. The target was presented at eight depth positions relative to the 3D display: 15, 10, and 5 cm in front of the 3D display, on the 3D display panel, and 5, 10, 15 and 30 cm behind the 3D display under the IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. Under the real object display condition, the target was displayed on the 3D display panel, and the 3D display was placed at the eight positions. The results suggest that the IP image induced more natural accommodation responses compared to the binocular stereoscopic image. The accommodation responses of the IP image were weaker than those of a real object; however, they showed a similar tendency with those of the real object under the two viewing conditions. Therefore, IP can induce accommodation to the depth positions of 3D images.

  12. 3D grain boundary migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. K.; Bons, P. D.

    2009-04-01

    Microstructures of rocks play an important role in determining rheological properties and help to reveal the processes that lead to their formation. Some of these processes change the microstructure significantly and may thus have the opposite effect in obliterating any fabrics indicative of the previous history of the rocks. One of these processes is grain boundary migration (GBM). During static recrystallisation, GBM may produce a foam texture that completely overprints a pre-existing grain boundary network and GBM actively influences the rheology of a rock, via its influence on grain size and lattice defect concentration. We here present a new numerical simulation software that is capable of simulating a whole range of processes on the grain scale (it is not limited to grain boundary migration). The software is polyhedron-based, meaning that each grain (or phase) is represented by a polyhedron that has discrete boundaries. The boundary (the shell) of the polyhedron is defined by a set of facets which in turn is defined by a set of vertices. Each structural entity (polyhedron, facets and vertices) can have an unlimited number of parameters (depending on the process to be modeled) such as surface energy, concentration, etc. which can be used to calculate changes of the microstructre. We use the processes of grain boundary migration of a "regular" and a partially molten rock to demonstrate the software. Since this software is 3D, the formation of melt networks in a partially molten rock can also be studied. The interconnected melt network is of fundamental importance for melt segregation and migration in the crust and mantle and can help to understand the core-mantle differentiation of large terrestrial planets.

  13. Application and Refinement of a Method to Achieve Uniform Convective Response on Variable-Resolution Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, R. L.; Medvigy, D.; Avissar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Variable-resolution computational grids can substantially improve the benefit-to-cost ratio in many environmental modeling applications, but they can also introduce unwanted and unrealistic numerical anomalies if not properly utilized. For example, we showed in previous studies that resolved (non-parameterized) atmospheric convection develops more quickly as resolution increases. Furthermore, on variable grids that transition from resolved to parameterized convection, timing and intensity of the convection in both regimes is generally disparate unless special care is taken to tune the parameterization. In both cases, the convection that develops first (due to purely numerical reasons) tends to suppress convection elsewhere by inducing subsidence in the surrounding environment. This highly nonlinear competition, while desirable when induced by natural causes such as surface inhomogeneity, is highly undesirable when it is a numerical artifact of variable grid resolution and/or selective application of convective parameterization. Our current research is aimed at leveling the playing field for convection across a variable resolution grid so that the above problems are avoided. The underlying idea is to apply the same or very similar 'convective machinery' to all areas of the grid. For convection-resolving regions of the grid, this machinery is simply the model grid itself, along with explicit representation of dynamics and a bulk microphysics parameterization. For coarser regions of the grid, the local environment is sampled from one or more grid columns (depending on local resolution) and fed to a separate 'convective processor', which determines the convective response to that environment and feeds the result back to the host grid. The convective processor chooses to either (1) explicitly resolve convective activity in the given environment on a separate (independent) limited-area 3D computational grid of comparable resolution to the convection-resolving part of the

  14. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  15. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  16. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology.

  17. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  18. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  19. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  20. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  1. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  2. Magnetic field effect on natural convection and entropy generation in a half-moon shaped cavity with semi-circular bottom heater having different ferrofluid inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Rabbi, Khan Md.; Saha, Sourav; Hasan, MN; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-06-01

    In this study magneto-hydrodynamic convection in a half-moon shaped cavity filled with ferrofluid has been analyzed numerically. The cavity has two semi-circular bottom heaters and effect of the distance between these two heaters (λ = 0.1 , 0.4) has been thoroughly investigated. Numerical simulation has been carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh number (Ra =103 ∼107), Hartmann number (Ha = 0 ∼ 100) and inclination angle of magnetic field (γ = 0 ° ∼ 90 °) to understand the flow field, thermal field and entropy generation respectively. Cobalt-kerosene and Fe3 O4 -water ferrofluids are used for the present investigation and considered as a single phase fluid. Galerkin weighted residual method of finite element analysis has been used for numerical solution. The code validation and grid independency test have been carried out to justify the numerical accuracy. It has been observed that increment of magnetic field reduces the heat transfer rate, whereas increment of heater distance augments the heat transfer rate significantly. Results are discussed on the basis of Nusselt number (Nu), Bejan number (Be) and shown by contours and 3D plots. It has also been found that λ = 0.4 always shows better heat transfer rate and entropy optimization.

  3. Examining the form-function relationship of convective organization and the larger scale with observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Emily Marie

    domains reveal the 3D isotropic domain has scattered, unorganized convection, while the addition of shear leads to squall lines, and the increasingly 2D domains lead to widely spaced infinite lines (in the periodic sense) of convective blobs. When the CSRM domain mean state is coupled to a large-scale wave equation, the coupled CSRM-wave system responds to the change in organization. The shear simulations are very similar to the no-shear simulations, suggesting the convectively coupled wave is indifferent to organized convection. However, wave amplitude at equilibrium increases as the domains are stretched from 3D to 2D, though only up to a certain xy aspect. Why a particular xy aspect gives the most responsive domain remains a mystery despite many sensitivity and forcing experiments (described in appendices here). Nonetheless, this framework for studying the convective, large-scale system offers uniquely tractable and controllable ways forward to understanding the multi-scale nature of atmospheric convection. The interdependence of convective organization and the larger-scale should help guide the future of cumulus parameterization and/or other options for representing the convective scale in general circulation models (GCMs; e.g. superparameterization techniques).

  4. Examination of 3D visual attention in stereoscopic video content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh-Thu, Quan; Schiatti, Luca

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in video technology and digital cinema have made it possible to produce entertaining 3D stereoscopic content that can be viewed for an extended duration without necessarily causing extreme fatigue, visual strain and discomfort. Viewers focus naturally their attention on specific areas of interest in their visual field. Visual attention is an important aspect of perception and its understanding is therefore an important aspect for the creation of 3D stereoscopic content. Most of the studies on visual attention have focused on the case of still images or 2D video. Only a very few studies have investigated eye movement patterns in 3D stereoscopic moving sequences, and how these may differ from viewing 2D video content. In this paper, we present and discuss the results of a subjective experiment that we conducted using an eye-tracking apparatus to record observers' gaze patterns. Participants were asked to watch the same set of video clips in a free-viewing task. Each clip was shown in a 3D stereoscopic version and 2D version. Our results indicate that the extent of areas of interests is not necessarily wider in 3D. We found a very strong content dependency in the difference of density and locations of fixations between 2D and 3D stereoscopic content. However, we found that saccades were overall faster and that fixation durations were overall lower when observers viewed the 3D stereoscopic version.

  5. Application of Karhunen-Loève Expansions for the Dynamic Analysis of a Natural Convection Loop for Known Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Tobias; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study we use Karhunen-Loève (KL) expansions to model the dynamic behavior of a single-phase natural convection loop. The loop is filled with an incompressible fluid that exchanges heat through the walls of its toroidal shape. Influx and efflux of energy take place at different parts of the loop. The focus here is a sinusoidal variation of the heat flux exchanged with the environment for three different scenarios; i.e., stable, limit cycles and chaos. For the analysis, one-dimensional models, in which the tilt angle and the amplitude of the heat flux are used as parameters, were first developed under suitable assumptions and then solved numerically to generate the data from which the KL-based models could be constructed. The method of snapshots, along with a Galerkin projection, was then used to find the basis functions and corresponding constants of each expansion, thus producing the optimal representation of the system. Results from this study indicate that the dimension of the KL-based dynamical system depends on the linear stability of the steady states; the number of basis functions necessary to describe the system increases with increased complexity of the system operation. When compared to typical dynamical systems based on Fourier expansions the KL-based models are, in general, more compact and equally accurate in the dynamic description of the natural convection loop.

  6. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  7. Apple Derived Cellulose Scaffolds for 3D Mammalian Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Modulevsky, Daniel J.; Lefebvre, Cory; Haase, Kristina; Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous approaches for producing natural and synthetic 3D scaffolds that support the proliferation of mammalian cells. 3D scaffolds better represent the natural cellular microenvironment and have many potential applications in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that 3D cellulose scaffolds produced by decellularizing apple hypanthium tissue can be employed for in vitro 3D culture of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, mouse C2C12 muscle myoblasts and human HeLa epithelial cells. We show that these cells can adhere, invade and proliferate in the cellulose scaffolds. In addition, biochemical functionalization or chemical cross-linking can be employed to control the surface biochemistry and/or mechanical properties of the scaffold. The cells retain high viability even after 12 continuous weeks of culture and can achieve cell densities comparable with other natural and synthetic scaffold materials. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds are easily produced, inexpensive and originate from a renewable source. Taken together, these results demonstrate that naturally derived cellulose scaffolds offer a complementary approach to existing techniques for the in vitro culture of mammalian cells in a 3D environment. PMID:24842603

  8. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  9. RELAP5-3D User Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Riemke, Richard Allan

    2002-09-01

    The Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program with 3D capability1 (RELAP5-3D) is a reactor system analysis code that has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 3D capability in RELAP5-3D includes 3D hydrodynamics2 and 3D neutron kinetics3,4. Assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability in RELAP5-3D is discussed in the literature5,6,7,8,9,10. Additional assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability of RELAP5-3D will be presented in other papers in this users seminar. As with any software, user problems occur. User problems usually fall into the categories of input processing failure, code execution failure, restart/renodalization failure, unphysical result, and installation. This presentation will discuss some of the more generic user problems that have been reported on RELAP5-3D as well as their resolution.

  10. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  11. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  12. 3D annotation and manipulation of medical anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Schaller, Christian; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Although the medical scanners are rapidly moving towards a three-dimensional paradigm, the manipulation and annotation/labeling of the acquired data is still performed in a standard 2D environment. Editing and annotation of three-dimensional medical structures is currently a complex task and rather time-consuming, as it is carried out in 2D projections of the original object. A major problem in 2D annotation is the depth ambiguity, which requires 3D landmarks to be identified and localized in at least two of the cutting planes. Operating directly in a three-dimensional space enables the implicit consideration of the full 3D local context, which significantly increases accuracy and speed. A three-dimensional environment is as well more natural optimizing the user's comfort and acceptance. The 3D annotation environment requires the three-dimensional manipulation device and display. By means of two novel and advanced technologies, Wii Nintendo Controller and Philips 3D WoWvx display, we define an appropriate 3D annotation tool and a suitable 3D visualization monitor. We define non-coplanar setting of four Infrared LEDs with a known and exact position, which are tracked by the Wii and from which we compute the pose of the device by applying a standard pose estimation algorithm. The novel 3D renderer developed by Philips uses either the Z-value of a 3D volume, or it computes the depth information out of a 2D image, to provide a real 3D experience without having some special glasses. Within this paper we present a new framework for manipulation and annotation of medical landmarks directly in three-dimensional volume.

  13. Chaotic Convection in CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, D. A.; Branson, M.; Dutta, R.; Jones, T.

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that stochastic fluctuations of convective activity can lead to systematic changes in large-scale weather and climate. We present results of recent ensemble-prediction experiments with the super-parameterized version of CAM that provide a new way to explore such effects, without the need for adhoc assumptions about the nature of the stochastic effects.

  14. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  15. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  16. Automatic 3D video format detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhe; Zhai, Jiefu; Doyen, Didier

    2011-03-01

    Many 3D formats exist and will probably co-exist for a long time even if 3D standards are today under definition. The support for multiple 3D formats will be important for bringing 3D into home. In this paper, we propose a novel and effective method to detect whether a video is a 3D video or not, and to further identify the exact 3D format. First, we present how to detect those 3D formats that encode a pair of stereo images into a single image. The proposed method detects features and establishes correspondences between features in the left and right view images, and applies the statistics from the distribution of the positional differences between corresponding features to detect the existence of a 3D format and to identify the format. Second, we present how to detect the frame sequential 3D format. In the frame sequential 3D format, the feature points are oscillating from frame to frame. Similarly, the proposed method tracks feature points over consecutive frames, computes the positional differences between features, and makes a detection decision based on whether the features are oscillating. Experiments show the effectiveness of our method.

  17. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  18. Self-organization of convective clouds and extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Christopher; Hohenegger, Cathy; Berg, Peter; Haerter, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The response of convective-type cloud and associated precipitation rates to temperature changes is far from clear. Observational studies have identified a strong sensitivity of convective precipitation extreme intensities to surface temperature --- even exceeding the thermodynamic constraint through the Clausius-Clapayron relationship (Berg et al., Nature Geoscience, 2013). It has been speculated that such strong changes may result from dynamical changes of the atmospheric flow, whereby thermodynamic constraints could be bypassed. Indeed, convective cloud has long been suspected to self-organize or even aggregate, but whether and how such structural transitions relate to modified precipitation rates is largely unexplored. Large-eddy simulations (LES) are a versatile tool suited for high-resolution numerical experiments of the convective cloud field. At horizontal resolutions on the scale of 100 m, they now allow 3d simulations of the moist atmospheric dynamics within domains of hundreds of kilometers laterally. Such simulations grant access to virtually all relevant observables. Using LES along with precipitation cell tracking, we isolate the effect of self-organization, quantify structural changes within the cloud field as a function of time and extract mechanisms that lead to increased convective precipitation intensities. We make contact to classical measures of large-scale convective potential, e.g. CAPE, CIN and moisture convergence, and contrast cloud-scale feedbacks to those previously implicated in quasi-equilibrium, large-scale, aggregation processes. Together, our results suggest that the build-up of extreme precipitation must ultimately be understood within a non-equilibrium framework. We relate our findings to current developments in global and regional climate modeling.

  19. Spatial and thermal features of three dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R.; Frederick, R. L.

    1995-02-01

    A full 3-D numerical study is reported on natural convection of air in six heated-from-below parallelepipedic enclosures. A supercritical Rayleigh number (Ra = 8 X 10(exp3), was used in order to track the evolution of convective structures as a function of the enclosure's aspect ratio (A) only. The six situations (1 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 5) exhibit a characteristic torodial flow pattern which can be seen, at the lowest aspect ratio, as a unicellular structure which evolves to a multicellular combination of concentric roll-cells at higher aspect ratios. The transition from one convective structure to another has the features of a flow bifurcation controlled by A. The overall Nusselt number changed continuously when the aspect ratio was increased. At the lowest aspect ratios the change was significant, but further increments in A did not produce important variations in this parameter, in the range of aspect ratios studied.

  20. Double multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change with natural convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; He, Ya-Ling

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a double multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model is developed for simulating transient solid-liquid phase change problems in porous media at the representative elementary volume scale. The model uses two different multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equations, one for the flow field and the other for the temperature field with nonlinear latent heat source term. The model is based on the generalized non-Darcy formulation, and the solid-liquid interface is traced through the liquid fraction which is determined by the enthalpy-based method. The present model is validated by numerical simulations of conduction melting in a semi-infinite space, solidification in a semi-infinite corner, and convection melting in a square cavity filled with porous media. The numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the present model for simulating transient solid-liquid phase change problems in porous media.