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Sample records for 3-d p-wave velocity

  1. 3D P-wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Eastern Canadian Shield and Northern Appalachian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemaire, M.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.

    2010-12-01

    Previous seismic studies of the upper mantle of the Canadian Shield have indicated some low-velocity anomalies within the cratonic lithosphere in the Abitibi-Grenville region. The lack of seismograph station coverage to the east and south-east of the studied area prevented definition of the 3D geometry of these anomalies. Adding new stations from the province of Quebec and from the northeastern United States allows us to carry out new studies of the P-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle, in order to better understand the complexity of the region and the interaction of the lithosphere with possible thermal anomalies in the underlying mantle. We analysed teleseismic P wave arrivals from almost 200 earthquakes, recorded at 45 stations deployed across the provinces of Quebec and Ontario and across the northeastern US. The relative arrival times of teleseismic P waves across the array were measured using the cross-correlation method of VanDecar & Crosson (1990). The travel time data were then inverted to estimate the 3D P-wave velocity structure beneath the region, using the least-squares tomographic inversion code of VanDecar (1991). The model shows some interesting features. We see a diffuse low-velocity structure beneath New-England that extends to at least 500 km depth, and that may be related to the Appalachian Mountain belt. There is also a linear low-velocity structure, flanked by higher velocities, perpendicular to the Grenville Front, and along the Ottawa Valley. We interpret this feature as a mantle signature of the Great Meteor Hotspot track. We have looked for systematic differences between the mantle underlying the Archean Superior craton and the Proterozoic Grenville Province but did not find a significant difference in the upper mantle. We investigate the role of thermal and compositional effects to interpret the velocity models and to relate the patterns of the anomalies to past and present tectonic structures.

  2. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy; Davy, Richard; Sawyer, Dale; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Shillington, Donna; Ranero, Cesar

    2015-04-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  3. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, G.; Minshull, T. A.; Davy, R. G.; Sawyer, D. S.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Reston, T. J.; Shillington, D. J.; Ranero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  4. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the deep Galicia rifted margin: A first analysis of the Galicia 3D wide-angle seismic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy A.; Davy, Richard G.; Karplus, Marianne S.; Kaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Krabbenhoeft, Anne; Sawyer, Dale; Reston, Timothy J.; Shillington, Donna J.; Ranero, César R.

    2014-05-01

    Galicia 3D, a reflection-refraction and long offset seismic experiment was carried out from May through September 2013, at the Galicia rifted margin (in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain) as a collaboration between US, UK, German and Spanish groups. The 3D multichannel seismic acquisition conducted by R/V Marcus Langseth covered a 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2) zone where the main geological features are the Peridotite Ridge (PR), composed of serpentinized peridotite and thought be upper mantle exhumed to the seafloor during rifting, and the S reflector which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault overlain by fault bounded, rotated, continental crustal blocks. In the 3D box, two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. were fired alternately (in flip-flop configuration) every 37.5 m. All shots are recorded by 44 short period four component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 26 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) deployed and recovered by R/V Poseidon, as well as four 6 km hydrophone streamers with 12.5 m channel spacing towed by R/V Marcus Langseth. We present the preliminary results of the first arrival time tomography study which is carried out with a subset of the wide-angle dataset, in order to generate a 3D P-wave velocity volume for the entire depth sampled by the reflection data. After the relocation of OBSs and OBHs, an automatic first-arrival time picking approach is applied to a subset of the dataset, which comprises more than 5.5 million source-receiver pairs. Then, the first-arrival times are checked visually, in 3-dimensions. The a priori model used for the first-arrival time tomography is built up using information from previous seismic surveys carried out at the Galicia margin (e.g. ISE, 1997). The FAST algorithm of Zelt and Barton (1998) is used for the first-arrival time inversion. The 3D P-wave velocity volume can be used in interpreting the reflection dataset, as a starting point for migration, to quantify the thinning of the crustal layers

  5. Test of high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model of Poland by back-azimuthal sections of teleseismic receiver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Geological and seismic structure under area of Poland is well studied by over one hundred thousand boreholes, over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles and by vertical seismic profiling, magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods. Compilation of these studies allowed to create a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Polkowski et al. 2014). Model also provides details about the geometry of main layers of sediments (Tertiary and Quaternary, Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, Permian, old Paleozoic), consolidated/crystalline crust (upper, middle and lower) and uppermost mantle. This model gives an unique opportunity for calculation synthetic receiver function and compering it with observed receiver function calculated for permanent and temporary seismic stations. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) can be used directly to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. So, 3D P-wave velocity model has been interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and back-azimuthal sections of components of receiver function have been calculated. Vp/Vs ratio is assumed to be 1.8, 1.67, 1.73, 1.77 and 1.8 in the sediments, upper/middle/lower consolidated/crystalline crust and uppermost mantle, respectively. Densities were calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Additionally, to test a visibility of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary phases at receiver function sections models have been extended to 250 km depth based on P4-mantle model (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2010). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284 and by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  6. The Updated LLNL-G3D Global P-Wave Velocity Model and Its Performance in Seismic Event Location

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    in our previous reports) and sharp details of subducted slabs around the world. Based on preliminary relocation tests, using LLNL-G3Dv2 travel-time...details of subducted slabs around the world. Based on preliminary relocation tests, using LLNL-G3Dv2 travel-time predictions typically reduces...simultaneously. In addition, sensitivity is spread across broad depth zones and/or multiple model units to mitigate the issue of path-velocity

  7. Uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Chen, W.; Molnar, P.

    1980-01-01

    The uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran were estimated by applying the conventional travel time-distance relation method to arrival times of well located earthquakes recorded at a few stations. The average uppermost mantle P wave velocity under Turkey is estimated from two stations of the World Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN), Istanbul and Tabriz. The data are consistent with a crust of uniform, but poorly determined, thickness and an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 7.73 +- 0.08 km/s. This velocity is very similar to that for the Aegean Sea and suggests that its structure could be closely related to that beneath Turkey. For Iran, the results calculated from travel times to three WWSSN stations, Meshed, Shiraz, and Tabriz, can be explained by a crust dipping toward the south-southeast at about 1/sup 0/ with an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 8.0 +- 0.1 km/s. If the crustal thickness were 34 km in the north it would reach about 49 km in the south. Based on these uppermost mantle velocities, the temperature at Moho beneath Turkey is probably close to the melting temperature of peridotite but that beneath Iran is probably lower.

  8. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part One: P-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D. G.; Abbott, R. E.; Preston, L. A.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    Explosion-source phenomenology is best studied when competing signals (such as instrument, site, and propagation effects), are well understood. The second phase of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is moving from granite geology to alluvium geology at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site. To improve subsurface characterization of Yucca Flat (and therefore better understand propagation and site effects), an active-source seismic survey was conducted using a novel 13,000-kg impulsive hammer source. The source points, spaced 200 m apart, covered a N-S transect spanning 18 km. Three component, 2-Hz geophones were used to record useable signals out to 10 km. We inverted for P-wave velocity by computing travel times using a finite-difference 3D eikonal solver, and then compared that to the picked travel times using a linearized iterative inversion scheme. Preliminary results from traditional reflection processing methods are also presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Teleseismic P-wave Velocity Tomography Beneath The Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Nyblade, A. A.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Amri, A.

    2004-12-01

    We have imaged tomographically the three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Arabian Peninsula using teleseismic P-waves. The data came from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN) operated by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and three permanent stations (RAYN, EIL and MRNI). The KACST network consists of 38 stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period) spread throughout most of western Saudi Arabia. P wave travel time residuals were obtained for 131 earthquakes in the distance range from 30\\deg to 90\\deg, resulting in 1716 rays paths. We find a pronounced low velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Arabian Shield and southern Red Sea that likely represents a northward continuation of the Afar hotspot. We also image smaller low velocity anomalies beneath the Dead Sea Transform, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the northeastern corner of the Arabian Shield. The origin of these low velocity anomalies is uncertain.

  10. High-resolution 3-D P wave attenuation structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone using local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay T.; DeShon, Heather R.; Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution P wave seismic attenuation model for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is determined using P wave path attenuation (t*) values of small-magnitude earthquakes (MD < 3.9). Events were recorded at 89 broadband and short-period seismometers of the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Zone Network and 40 short-period seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition experiment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path (t*), and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for QP using local earthquake tomography methods and a known 3-D P wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit reduced QP (higher attenuation) than the surrounding crust. The highest attenuation anomalies coincide with areas of previously reported high swarm activity attributed to fluid-rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. The QP results are consistent with previous attenuation studies in the region, which showed that active fault zones and fractured crust in the NMSZ are highly attenuating.

  11. P wave velocity structure beneath Greenland using teleseismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Lee, W.; Yoo, H.

    2013-12-01

    A three-dimensional P-wave velocity model was inverted with 3032 ray paths from 416 events observed on the GLISN network from 2009 to 2013. The relative travel times were computed with respect to the IASP91 global reference model using the multi-channel cross correlation method (MCCC) by VanDecar and Crosson {, 1990 #1}. Our model space was parameterized laterally with 1°×1° from 55°N to 85°N in latitude and from 20°W to 80°W in longitude. This high latitude model space causes spatial distortion in the model parameters on the spherical coordinate for the teleseismic body wave tomography. To minimize a distortion in the model parameters the spherical coordinate system was rotated as the referent stations SUMG and SCO, located on the middle of Greenland, to equator, and all stations and seismic events were converted to this new coordinate system. All ray paths were computed by a three dimensional ray tracing algorithm developed with pseudobending technique and Snell's law {Zhao, 1992 #1}, and travel times were corrected by ice and crustal thicknesses for each observed station as well. Our inverted model shows a broad low velocity anomaly ( -1.5%) in the mid-eastern parts of Greenland, which is connected to the low velocity anomaly beneath Iceland. Another low velocity anomaly was observed below 300km in the middle of Greenland where the Icelandic mantle plume was located in 60Ma. P wave velocity anomaly depth slices from 150 km to 400 km on the rotated coordinate from the center of Green land to the equator.

  12. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  13. Crustal P-wave velocity model for the central-western region of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, J.; Escudero, C. R.; Perez, O. G.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Several studies require a p-wave velocity model to obtain accurate results moreover such models could provide an insight of the tectonic structure of the study area. Accordingly, in this study we estimate the crustal 3D p-wave velocity model for the Jalisco Block located at the central-western region of Mexico. The Jalisco Block is limited on its eastern side by the Colima and Tepic-Zacoalcos Rifts, and the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt; while on its western side it is limited by the Mesoamerican Trench. Cocos and Rivera plates are subducting beneath the Jalisco Block conforming a tectonically complex region. We used earthquakes occurring within the limits of lithosphere volume from which we want to estimate the velocity model. Such events were registered by the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone experiment (MARS) and the Seismic and Acelerometric Network of Jalisco (RESAJ). During MARS experiment 51broadband stations active from January 2006 to June 2007 were deployed while RESAJ by July of 2012consists of nine active stations however more stations will be deployed until reach 30 stations. The velocity model is estimated using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) software. FMTOMO uses the Fast Marching Method (FMM) in order to solve the forward problem; the FMM is a numerical algorithm that tracks the interfaces evolution along a nodes narrow band, and travel times are updated solving the eikonal equation. Finally , the inverse problem is about adjusting the model parameters (interface depth, velocity, hypocenter location) in order to try to satisfy the observed data (travel times). We perform a resolution test using several events that show good resolution results up to a 60 km depth. We present a 3D p-wave velocity model, we compare our results within the MARS data with previous results for greater depths, approximately the upper mantle, finally we also present studies towards the northern portion of the Jalisco Block using the RESAJ data.

  14. P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Baikal Rift Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, R. A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Boman, E. C.

    2001-12-01

    Over 100 p wave travel times from the 1500 km en echelon Baikal Rift system are used in this study.The events range 3 to 13 degrees from Talaya, Russia (TLY) along the axis of southwest northeast trending rift in East Siberia. A Herglotz Wiechert inversion of these events resolved a crust of 6.4 km/s and a gradient in the mantle starting at 35 km depth and 7.7 km/s down to 200 km depth and 8.2 km/s. This is compatible with Gao et al,1994 cross sectional structure which cuts the rift at about 400km from TLY. The Baikal Rift hosts the deepest lake and is the most seismically active rift in the world. It is one of the few continental rifts, it separates the Siberian craton and the Syan-Baikal mobile fold belt. Two events, the March 21 1999 magnitude 5.7 earthquake 638 km from TLY and the November 13th 1995 magnitude 5.9 earthquake 863 km from TLY were modeled for there PnL wave structure using the discrete wavenumber method and the Harvard CMT solutions with adjusted depths from p-pP times. The PnL signals match well. A genetic algorithm will used to perturb the velocity structure and compare to a selection of the events between 3 and 13 degrees many will require moment tensor solutions.

  15. Pseudo 3-D P wave refraction seismic monitoring of permafrost in steep unstable bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, Michael; Draebing, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    permafrost in steep rock walls can cause hazardous rock creep and rock slope failure. Spatial and temporal patterns of permafrost degradation that operate at the scale of instability are complex and poorly understood. For the first time, we used P wave seismic refraction tomography (SRT) to monitor the degradation of permafrost in steep rock walls. A 2.5-D survey with five 80 m long parallel transects was installed across an unstable steep NE-SW facing crestline in the Matter Valley, Switzerland. P wave velocity was calibrated in the laboratory for water-saturated low-porosity paragneiss samples between 20°C and -5°C and increases significantly along and perpendicular to the cleavage by 0.55-0.66 km/s (10-13%) and 2.4-2.7 km/s (>100%), respectively, when freezing. Seismic refraction is, thus, technically feasible to detect permafrost in low-porosity rocks that constitute steep rock walls. Ray densities up to 100 and more delimit the boundary between unfrozen and frozen bedrock and facilitate accurate active layer positioning. SRT shows monthly (August and September 2006) and annual active layer dynamics (August 2006 and 2007) and reveals a contiguous permafrost body below the NE face with annual changes of active layer depth from 2 to 10 m. Large ice-filled fractures, lateral onfreezing of glacierets, and a persistent snow cornice cause previously unreported permafrost patterns close to the surface and along the crestline which correspond to active seasonal rock displacements up to several mm/a. SRT provides a geometrically highly resolved subsurface monitoring of active layer dynamics in steep permafrost rocks at the scale of instability.

  16. High-resolution 3-D P-wave tomographic imaging of the shallow magmatic system of Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandomeneghi, D.; Aster, R. C.; Barclay, A. H.; Chaput, J. A.; Kyle, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Erebus volcano (Ross Island), the most active volcano in Antarctica, is characterized by a persistent phonolitic lava lake at its summit and a wide range of seismic signals associated with its underlying long-lived magmatic system. The magmatic structure in a 3 by 3 km area around the summit has been imaged using high-quality data from a seismic tomographic experiment carried out during the 2008-2009 austral field season (Zandomeneghi et al., 2010). An array of 78 short period, 14 broadband, and 4 permanent Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory seismic stations and a program of 12 shots were used to model the velocity structure in the uppermost kilometer over the volcano conduit. P-wave travel times were inverted for the 3-D velocity structure using the shortest-time ray tracing (50-m grid spacing) and LSQR inversion (100-m node spacing) of a tomography code (Toomey et al., 1994) that allows for the inclusion of topography. Regularization is controlled by damping and smoothing weights and smoothing lengths, and addresses complications that are inherent in a strongly heterogeneous medium featuring rough topography and a dense parameterization and distribution of receivers/sources. The tomography reveals a composite distribution of very high and low P-wave velocity anomalies (i.e., exceeding 20% in some regions), indicating a complex sub-lava-lake magmatic geometry immediately beneath the summit region and in surrounding areas, as well as the presence of significant high velocity shallow regions. The strongest and broadest low velocity zone is located W-NW of the crater rim, indicating the presence of an off-axis shallow magma body. This feature spatially corresponds to the inferred centroid source of VLP signals associated with Strombolian eruptions and lava lake refill (Aster et al., 2008). Other resolved structures correlate with the Side Crater and with lineaments of ice cave thermal anomalies extending NE and SW of the rim. High velocities in the summit area possibly

  17. The correlations between the saturated and dry P-wave velocity of rocks.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, S

    2007-11-01

    Sometimes engineers need to estimate the wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity. An estimation equation embracing all rock classes will be useful for the rock engineers. To investigate the predictability of wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity, P-wave velocity measurements were performed on 41 different rock types, 11 of which were igneous, 15 of which were sedimentary and 15 of which was metamorphic. In addition to the dry- and wet-rock P-wave velocity measurements, the P-wave velocity changing as a function of saturation degree was studied. Moreover, dry-rock S-wave velocity measurements were conducted. The test results were modeled using Gassmann's and Wood's theory and it was seen that the measured data did not fit the theories. The unconformity is due to the fact that the theories are valid for high-porosity unconsolidated sediments at low frequencies. Gassmann's equation was modified for the rocks except high-porosity unconsolidated sediments. The dry- and wet-rock P-wave velocity values were evaluated using regression analysis. A strong linear correlation between the dry- and wet-rock P-wave velocities was found. Regression analyses were repeated for the rock classes and it was shown that correlation coefficients were increased. Concluding remark is that the derived equations can be used for the prediction of wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity.

  18. Minimum 1-D P-wave velocity reference model for Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeifar, Meysam; Diehl, Tobias; Kissling, Edi

    2016-04-01

    Uniform high-precision earthquake location is of importance in a seismically active area like northern Iran where the earthquake catalogue is a prerequisite for seismic hazard assessment and tectonic interpretation. We compile a complete and consistent local earthquake data set for the northern Iran region, using information from two independently operating seismological networks, Iran Seismological Center (IRSC) network, administered by the Geophysical Institute of Tehran University, and Iran Broadband network administered by International Institute of Engineering Earthquake and Seismology (IIEES). Special care is taken during the merging process to reduce the number of errors in the data, including station parameters, event pairing, phase identification, and to the assessment of quantitative observation uncertainties. The derived P-wave 1D-velocity model for Northern Iran may serve for consistent routine high-precision earthquake location and as initial reference model for 3D seismic tomography.

  19. Influence of water saturation on ultrasonic P-wave velocity in weakly compacted sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikri Niyartama, Thaqibul; Fauzi, Umar; Fatkhan

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of Ultrasonic P-wave velocities were conducted in weakly compacted sandstone with varying degree of water saturations. We used P wave transducer at frequency 63 kHz and imbibition technique in order to study the influence of water saturation on the P-wave velocity. Our experiment showed that the P-wave velocity (Vp) was reduced significantly at the beginning of the imbibition process. The variations on travel times and the amplitude changes were detected at any degree of saturation. The first and second amplitude of P wave decreased as water saturation (Sw ) increased in the range of 0.1 to 0.6 in B5 sample, the amplitude increased again afterward. The shifting peaks of the signal that indicated attenuation were also observed in the experimental.

  20. Anisotropic P-wave velocity analysis and seismic imaging in onshore Kutch sedimentary basin of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Laxmidhar; Khare, Prakash; Sarkar, Dipankar

    2011-08-01

    The long-offset P-wave seismic reflection data has observable non-hyperbolic moveout, which depend on two parameters such as normal moveout velocity ( Vnmo) and the anisotropy parameter( η). Anisotropy (e.g., directional dependence of velocity at a fixed spatial location in a medium) plays an important role in seismic imaging. It is difficult to know the presence of anisotropy in the subsurface geological formations only from P-wave seismic data and special analysis is required for this. The presence of anisotropy causes two major distortions of moveout in P-wave seismic reflection data. First, in contrast to isotropic media, normal-moveout (NMO) velocity differs from the vertical velocity; and the second is substantial increase of deviations in hyperbolic moveout in an anisotropic layer. Hence, with the help of conventional velocity analysis based on short-spread moveout (stacking) velocities do not provide enough information to determine the true vertical velocity in a transversely isotropic media with vertical symmetry axis (VTI media). Therefore, it is essential to estimate the single anisotropic parameter ( η) from the long-offset P-wave seismic data. It has been demonstrated here as a case study with long-offset P-wave seismic data acquired in onshore Kutch sedimentary basin of western India that suitable velocity analysis using Vnmo and η can improve the stacking image obtained from conventional velocity analysis.

  1. Velocity variations and uncertainty from transdimensional P-wave tomography of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Scott; Lekić, Vedran

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution models of seismic velocity variations constructed using body-wave tomography inform the study of the origin, fate, and thermochemical state of mantle domains. In order to reliably relate these variations to material properties including temperature, composition, and volatile content, we must accurately retrieve both the patterns and amplitudes of variations and quantify the uncertainty associated with the estimates of each. For these reasons, we image the mantle beneath North America with P-wave traveltimes from USArray using a novel method for 3-D probabilistic body-wave tomography. The method uses a Transdimensional Hierarchical Bayesian (THB) framework with a reversible-jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (rj-MCMC) algorithm in order to generate an ensemble of possible velocity models. We analyze this ensemble solution to obtain the posterior probability distribution of velocities, thereby yielding error bars and enabling rigorous hypothesis testing. Overall, we determine that the average uncertainty (1σ) of compressional wave velocity estimates beneath North America is ∼0.25% dVP/VP, increasing with proximity to complex structure and decreasing with depth. The addition of USArray data reduces the uncertainty beneath the Eastern US by over 50% in the upper mantle and 25-40% below the transition zone and ∼30% throughout the mantle beneath the Western US. In the absence of damping and smoothing, we recover amplitudes of variations 10-80% higher than a standard inversion approach. Accounting for differences in data coverage, we infer that the length-scale of heterogeneity is ∼50% longer at shallow depths beneath the continental platform than beneath tectonically active regions. We illustrate the model trade-off analysis for the Cascadia slab and the New Madrid Seismic Zone, where we find that smearing due to the limitations of the illumination is relatively minor.

  2. Anisotropic changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during deformation and fluid infiltration of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanchits, S.A.; Lockner, D.A.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid infiltration and pore fluid pressure changes are known to have a significant effect on the occurrence of earthquakes. Yet, for most damaging earthquakes, with nucleation zones below a few kilometers depth, direct measurements of fluid pressure variations are not available. Instead, pore fluid pressures are inferred primarily from seismic-wave propagation characteristics such as Vp/Vs ratio, attenuation, and reflectivity contacts. We present laboratory measurements of changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during the injection of water into a granite sample as it was loaded to failure. A cylindrical sample of Westerly granite was deformed at constant confining and pore pressures of 50 and 1 MPa, respectively. Axial load was increased in discrete steps by controlling axial displacement. Anisotropic P-wave velocity and attenuation fields were determined during the experiment using an array of 13 piezoelectric transducers. At the final loading steps (86% and 95% of peak stress), both spatial and temporal changes in P-wave velocity and peak-to-peak amplitudes of P and S waves were observed. P-wave velocity anisotropy reached a maximum of 26%. Transient increases in attenuation of up to 483 dB/m were also observed and were associated with diffusion of water into the sample. We show that velocity and attenuation of P waves are sensitive to the process of opening of microcracks and the subsequent resaturation of these cracks as water diffuses in from the surrounding region. Symmetry of the orientation of newly formed microcracks results in anisotropic velocity and attenuation fields that systematically evolve in response to changes in stress and influx of water. With proper scaling, these measurements provide constraints on the magnitude and duration of velocity and attenuation transients that can be expected to accompany the nucleation of earthquakes in the Earth's crust.

  3. Correlating P-wave Velocity with the Physico-Mechanical Properties of Different Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2013-04-01

    In mining and civil engineering projects, physico-mechanical properties of the rock affect both the project design and the construction operation. Determination of various physico-mechanical properties of rocks is expensive and time consuming, and sometimes it is very difficult to get cores to perform direct tests to evaluate the rock mass. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relationships between the different physico-mechanical properties of the various rock types with the P-wave velocity. Measurement of P-wave velocity is relatively cheap, non-destructive and easy to carry out. In this study, representative rock mass samples of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks were collected from the different locations of India to obtain an empirical relation between P-wave velocity and uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength, punch shear, density, slake durability index, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, impact strength index and Schmidt hammer rebound number. A very strong correlation was found between the P-wave velocity and different physico-mechanical properties of various rock types with very high coefficients of determination. To check the sensitivity of the empirical equations, Students t test was also performed, which confirmed the validity of the proposed correlations.

  4. Changes in P-wave velocity with different full waveform sonic transmitter centre frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalki, Majed; Harris, Brett; Dupuis, J. Christian

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform sonic logging, with the transmitter set at different centre frequencies, often provides different compressional wave velocities over the same interval. There may be several reasons why these velocity differences are recovered where the source has different frequency content. Examples include: intrinsic dispersion, scattering dispersion, geometric dispersion, processing artefacts and acquisition artefacts. We acquired and analysed multifrequency monopole full waveform sonic logging data from the cored drill hole intersecting a high-permeability sandy aquifer in the Northern Gnangara Mound, Perth Basin, Western Australia. A key interval of the shallow, sand-dominated Yarragadee Formation was selected and logged four times with transmitter centre frequencies set to 1, 3, 5 and 15 kHz. We compute apparent velocity dispersion as the percentage velocity differences in the P-wave velocity recovered from full waveform sonic logs completed at different dominant transmitter centre frequencies. We find that high-permeability sediments could be placed into broad groups: cross-bedded and non-cross-bedded sandstones. We find a distinctly different relationship between apparent P-wave velocity dispersion and permeability for cross-bedded and non-cross-bedded sandstones. Cross plots for the two sediment types show a general trend of increasing apparent dispersion with increasing permeability. Grouping the sandstone layers based on sediment type, as observed from core samples, illustrates different but positive correlation between the apparent P-wave velocity dispersion and permeability in these shallow, weakly-consolidated sandstones. The cross-bedded sandstone, for its part, has a wider range of permeability than the non-cross-bedded sandstone but a smaller range of apparent P-wave velocity dispersion. Given these results, our hypothesis is that while permeability plays a role, other factors such as geometric dispersion or scattering dispersion likely contribute the

  5. The Evolution of P-wave Velocity in Fault Gouge: Initial Results for Samples from the SAFOD Volume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; Marone, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present initial results from a new technique for observing the evolution of elastic properties in sheared fault zone materials via acoustic wave velocity. The relationship between the mechanical strength of fault gouge and acoustic velocity during active deformation has important implications not only for a physical understanding of elasticity in deforming granular media, but also for the interpretation of the seismic velocity at the field scale. Experiments are conducted at atmospheric temperature and saturation state in a double-direct-shear testing apparatus, with normal stress stepped from 1 to 19 MPa to interrogate behavior during compaction, and sheared at a rate of 10 microns/second to observe changes in velocity with increasing strain. Tests are divided between those involving continuous shear to a displacement of 22.5 mm, and those with intervals of 3.75 mm shear separated by unloading and reloading sequences in normal stress. Velocity is measured by time-of-flight between two piezoelectric P-wave transducers set into the sample configuration on either side of the shearing layers. Samples tested include common laboratory standards for simulated fault gouge and field samples taken from representative localities in the 3D rock volume containing the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth experiment in Parkfield, California. The velocities of sand and clay end-member gouges are observed to behave differently under shear, and mixtures of quartz sand and montmorillonite behave differently from both end-member materials. Initial results suggest that particle sorting exerts a strong influence on both the absolute velocity and the evolution of velocity in response to increasing shear strain where the elastic properties of the grains are similar. We also observe a first-order relationship between the coefficient of friction and P-wave velocity that appears to be related to grain reorganization at the onset of shear following initial compaction.

  6. A detailed three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure in Italy from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Raffaele; Castello, Barbara; Chiarabba, Claudio; Grazia Ciaccio, Maria

    2010-05-01

    We here present an updated high resolution tomographic P-wave velocity model of the lithosphere in Italy, obtained by adding about 296,600 P-wave arrival observations from ~7.200 earthquakes, from the preliminary update of the CSI 2.0, recorded in the period 2003-2007, to the previously inverted dataset (165,000 P-wave arrivals).Additional events have been strictly selected for location quality (azimuthal gap < 135°; horizontal error <= 2km; vertical error <= 4km; rms < 1s) and a number of P-wave observations >= 8. Our results confirm the main structural features in the best resolved parts of the inverted volume and show a much better resolution in some of the previously less resolved areas, due to both the larger number of inverted phases and the more even distribution of seismic stations. Surface basins and relationships between the Adriatic, Tyrrhenian, and European plates are better imaged. The integrated analysis of 20 years of seismicity and the high resolution tomographic images obtained, allows us to add new constraints to the kynematics and the geodynamics of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in this region. We also present preliminary results obtained by thickening the nodes spacing from 15km x15km to 10km x 10km and we finally compare the complex velocity structures imaged by the inversion of the two different grid spacing.

  7. Determination of basic physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks from P-wave velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakuş, Askeri; Akatay, Mahmut

    2013-12-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks used as main building material in historical buildings in Diyarbakir show great diversity depending on the place of origin. Especially, earthquake studies as well as restoration jobs and civil engineers and architects who work on building dynamics need to know basic material properties of basaltic rocks that are the main building material. In this study, the basalt samples obtained from 18 different locations of the Diyarbakir area were tested in order to estimate the main material properties of basalts used in historical buildings without collecting samples from them. Subsequently, statistical relationships between the nondestructive P-wave velocity and other properties of basalts were investigated. Consequently, highly correlated models (R2 = 0.717-0.890) were obtained between P-wave velocity and density, porosity, uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio.

  8. Prediction of building limestone physical and mechanical properties by means of ultrasonic P-wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Concu, Giovanna; De Nicolo, Barbara; Valdes, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic P-wave velocity as a feature for predicting some physical and mechanical properties that describe the behavior of local building limestone. To this end, both ultrasonic testing and compressive tests were carried out on several limestone specimens and statistical correlation between ultrasonic velocity and density, compressive strength, and modulus of elasticity was studied. The effectiveness of ultrasonic velocity was evaluated by regression, with the aim of observing the coefficient of determination r(2) between ultrasonic velocity and the aforementioned parameters, and the mathematical expressions of the correlations were found and discussed. The strong relations that were established between ultrasonic velocity and limestone properties indicate that these parameters can be reasonably estimated by means of this nondestructive parameter. This may be of great value in a preliminary phase of the diagnosis and inspection of stone masonry conditions, especially when the possibility of sampling material cores is reduced.

  9. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Mt. Etna, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.; Filippi, L.; De Luca, G.; Scarpa, R.; Patane, G.; Vinciguerra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Mt. Etna is determined to depths of 15 km by tomographic inversion of first arrival times from local earthquakes recorded by a network of 29 permanent and temporary seismographs. Results show a near-vertical low-velocity zone that extends from beneath the central craters to a depth of 10 km. This low-velocity region is coincident with a band of steeply-dipping seismicity, suggesting a magmatic conduit that feeds the summit eruptions. The most prominent structure is an approximately 8-km-diameter high-velocity body located between 2 and 12 km depth below the southeast flank of the volcano. This high-velocity body is interpreted as a remnant mafic intrusion that is an important structural feature influencing both volcanism and east flank slope stability and faulting.

  10. Prediction of Building Limestone Physical and Mechanical Properties by Means of Ultrasonic P-Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Concu, Giovanna; De Nicolo, Barbara; Valdes, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic P-wave velocity as a feature for predicting some physical and mechanical properties that describe the behavior of local building limestone. To this end, both ultrasonic testing and compressive tests were carried out on several limestone specimens and statistical correlation between ultrasonic velocity and density, compressive strength, and modulus of elasticity was studied. The effectiveness of ultrasonic velocity was evaluated by regression, with the aim of observing the coefficient of determination r2 between ultrasonic velocity and the aforementioned parameters, and the mathematical expressions of the correlations were found and discussed. The strong relations that were established between ultrasonic velocity and limestone properties indicate that these parameters can be reasonably estimated by means of this nondestructive parameter. This may be of great value in a preliminary phase of the diagnosis and inspection of stone masonry conditions, especially when the possibility of sampling material cores is reduced. PMID:24511286

  11. Regional P wave velocity structure of the Northern Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramachandran, K.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the first regional three-dimensional, P wave velocity model for the Northern Cascadia Subduction. Zone (SW British Columbia and NW Washington State) constructed through tomographic inversion of first-arrival traveltime data from active source experiments together with earthquake traveltime data recorded at permanent stations. The velocity model images the structure of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, megathrust, and the fore-arc crust and upper mantle. Beneath southern Vancouver Island the megathrust above the Juan de Fuca plate is characterized by a broad zone (25-35 km depth) having relatively low velocities of 6.4-6.6 km/s. This relative low velocity zone coincides with the location of most of the episodic tremors recently mapped beneath Vancouver Island, and its low velocity may also partially reflect the presence of trapped fluids and sheared lower crustal rocks. The rocks of the Olympic Subduction Complex are inferred to deform aseismically as evidenced by the lack of earthquakes withi the low-velocity rocks. The fore-arc upper mantle beneath the Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound is characterized by velocities of 7.2-7.6 km/s. Such low velocities represent regional serpentinization of the upper fore-arc mantle and provide evidence for slab dewatering and densification. Tertiary sedimentary basins in the Strait of Georgia and Puget Lowland imaged by the velocity model lie above the inferred region of slab dewatering and densification and may therefore partly result from a higher rate of slab sinking. In contrast, sedimentary basins in the Strait of Juan de Fuca lie in a synclinal depression in the Crescent Terrane. The correlation of in-slab earthquake hypocenters M>4 with P wave velocities greater than 7.8 km/s at the hypocenters suggests that they originate near the oceanic Moho of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. The P-wave boundary of the Large-Low Shear Velocity Province beneath the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Daniel A.; Rost, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    The Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle represent volumetrically significant thermal or chemical or thermo-chemical heterogeneities. Their structure and boundaries have been widely studied, mainly using S-waves, but much less is known about their signature in the P-wavefield. We use an extensive dataset recorded at USArray to create, for the first time, a high-resolution map of the location, shape, sharpness, and extent of the boundary of the Pacific LLSVP using P(Pdiff)-waves. We find that the northern edge of the Pacific LLSVP is shallow dipping (26° relative to the horizontal) and diffuse (∼120 km wide transition zone) whereas the eastern edge is steeper dipping (70°) and apparently sharp (∼40 km wide). We trace the LLSVP boundary up to ∼500 km above the CMB in most areas, and 700 km between 120° and 90°W at the eastern extent of the boundary. Apparent P-wave velocity drops are ∼1-3% relative to PREM, indicating a strong influence of LLSVPs on P-wave velocity, at least in the high-frequency wavefield, in contrast to previous studies. A localised patch with a greater velocity drop of ∼15-25% is detected, defined by large magnitude gradients of the travel-time residuals. We identify this as a likely location of an Ultra-Low Velocity Zone (ULVZ), matching the location of a previously detected ULVZ in this area. The boundary of a separate low velocity anomaly, of a similar height to the LLSVP, is detected in the north-west Pacific, matching tomographic images. This outlier appears to be connected to the main LLSVP through a narrow channel close to the CMB and may be in the process of joining or splitting from the main LLSVP. We also see strong velocity increases in the lower mantle to the east of the LLSVP, likely detecting subducted material beneath central America. The LLSVP P-wave boundary is similar to that determined in high-resolution S-wave studies and follows the -0.4% ΔVS iso-velocity contour in the S40RTS

  13. P wave velocity of Proterozoic upper mantle beneath central and southern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Vogfjord, Kristin S.; Langston, Charles A.

    1996-05-01

    P wave velocity structure of Proterozoic upper mantle beneath central and southern Africa was investigated by forward modeling of Pnl waveforms from four moderate size earthquakes. The source-receiver path of one event crosses central Africa and lies outside the African superswell while the source-receiver paths for the other events cross Proterozoic lithosphere within southern Africa, inside the African superswell. Three observables (Pn waveshape, PL-Pn time, and Pn/PL amplitude ratio) from the Pnl waveform were used to constrain upper mantle velocity models in a grid search procedure. For central Africa, synthetic seismograms were computed for 5880 upper mantle models using the generalized ray method and wavenumber integration; synthetic seismograms for 216 models were computed for southern Africa. Successful models were taken as those whose synthetic seismograms had similar waveshapes to the observed waveforms, as well as PL-Pn times within 3 s of the observed times and Pn/PL amplitude ratios within 30% of the observed ratio. Successful models for central Africa yield a range of uppermost mantle velocity between 7.9 and 8.3 km s-1, velocities between 8.3 and 8.5 km s-1 at a depth of 200 km, and velocity gradients that are constant or slightly positive. For southern Africa, successful models yield uppermost mantle velocities between 8.1 and 8.3 km s-1, velocities between 7.9 and 8.4 km s-1 at a depth of 130 km, and velocity gradients between -0.001 and 0.001 s-1. Because velocity gradients are controlled strongly by structure at the bottoming depths for Pn waves, it is not easy to compare the velocity gradients obtained for central and southern Africa. For central Africa, Pn waves turn at depths of about 150-200 km, whereas for southern Africa they bottom at ˜100-150 km depth. With regard to the origin of the African superswell, our results do not have sufficient resolution to test hypotheses that invoke simple lithospheric reheating. However, our models are not

  14. Investigation of surface wave amplitudes in 3-D velocity and 3-D Q models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-12-01

    It has been long recognized that seismic amplitudes depend on both wave speed structures and anelasticity (Q) structures. However, the effects of lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and Q structures on seismic amplitudes has not been well understood. We investigate the effects of 3-D wave speed and 3-D anelasticity (Q) structures on surface-wave amplitudes based upon wave propagation simulations of twelve globally-distributed earthquakes and 801 stations in Earth models with and without lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and anelasticity using a Spectral Element Method (SEM). Our tomographic-like 3-D Q models are converted from a velocity model S20RTS using a set of reasonable mineralogical parameters, assuming lateral perturbations in both velocity and Q are due to temperature perturbations. Surface-wave amplitude variations of SEM seismograms are measured in the period range of 50--200 s using boxcar taper, cosine taper and Slepian multi-tapers. We calculate ray-theoretical predictions of surface-wave amplitude perturbations due to elastic focusing, attenuation, and anelastic focusing which respectively depend upon the second spatial derivative (''roughness'') of perturbations in phase velocity, 1/Q, and the roughness of perturbations in 1/Q. Both numerical experiments and theoretical calculations show that (1) for short-period (~ 50 s) surface waves, the effects of amplitude attenuation due to 3-D Q structures are comparable with elastic focusing effects due to 3-D wave speed structures; and (2) for long-period (> 100 s) surface waves, the effects of attenuation become much weaker than elastic focusing; and (3) elastic focusing effects are correlated with anelastic focusing at all periods due to the correlation between velocity and Q models; and (4) amplitude perturbations are depend on measurement techniques and therefore cannot be directly compared with ray-theoretical predictions because ray theory does not account for the effects of measurement

  15. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  16. P-wave velocity structure beneath Mt. Melbourne in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Evidence of partial melting and volcanic magma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongcheol; Yoo, Hyun Jae; Lee, Won Sang; Lee, Choon-Ki; Lee, Joohan; Park, Hadong; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Yeadong

    2015-12-01

    Mt. Melbourne is a late Cenozoic intraplate volcano located ∼30 km northeast of Jang Bogo Station in Antarctica. The volcano is quiescent with fumarolic activity at the summit. To monitor volcanic activity and glacial movements near Jang Bogo Station, a seismic network was installed during the 2010-11 Antarctic summer field season. The network is maintained during the summer field season every year, and the number of stations has been increased. We used continuous seismic data recorded by the network and an Italian seismic station (TNV) at Mario Zucchelli Station to develop a 3-D P-wave velocity model for the Mt. Melbourne area based on the teleseismic P-wave tomographic method. The new 3-D model presented a relative velocity structure for the lower part of the crust and upper mantle between depths of 30 and 160 km and revealed the presence of two low-velocity anomalies beneath Mt. Melbourne and the Priestley Fault. The low-velocity anomaly beneath Mt. Melbourne may be caused by the edge flow of hot mantle material at the lithospheric step between the thick East Antarctic Craton and thin Ross Sea crust. The other low-velocity anomaly along the Priestley Fault may have been beneath Mt. Melbourne and moved to the southern tip of the Deep Freeze Range, where the crustal thickness is relatively thin. The anomaly was trapped on the fault line and laterally flowed along the fault line in the northwest direction.

  17. Measuring the Stellar Halo Velocity Anisotropy With 3D Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Emily C.; Deason, Alis J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, S. Tony

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the anisotropy parameter β using 3D kinematic information outside of the solar neighborhood. Our sample consists of 13 Milky Way halo stars with measured proper motions and radial velocities in the line of sight of M31. Proper motions were measured using deep, multi-epoch HST imaging, and radial velocities were measured from Keck II/DEIMOS spectra. We measure β = -0.3-0.9 +0.4, which is consistent with isotropy, and inconsistent with measurements in the solar neighborhood. We suggest that this may be the kinematic signature of a relatively early, massive accretion event, or perhaps several such events.

  18. P wave crustal velocity structure in the greater Mount Rainier area from local earthquake tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Lees, J.M.; Malone, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    We present results from a local earthquake tomographic imaging experiment in the greater Mount Rainier area. We inverted P wave arrival times from local earthquakes recorded at permanent and temporary Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network seismographs between 1980 and 1996. We used a method similar to that described by Lees and Crosson [1989], modified to incorporate the parameter separation method for decoupling the hypocenter and velocity problems. In the upper 7 km of the resulting model there is good correlation between velocity anomalies and surface geology. Many focal mechanisms within the St. Helens seismic zone have nodal planes parallel to the epicentral trend as well as to a north-south trending low-velocity trough, leading us to speculate that the trough represents a zone of structural weakness in which a moderate (M 6.5-7.0) earthquake could occur. In contrast, the western Rainier seismic zone does not correlate in any simple way with anomaly patterns or focal mechanism fault planes, leading us to infer that it is less likely to experience a moderate earthquake. A ???10 km-wide low-velocity anomaly occurs 5 to 18 km beneath the summit of Mount Rainier, which we interpret to be a signal of a region composed of hot, fractured rock with possible small amounts of melt or fluid. No systematic velocity pattern is observed in association with the southern Washington Cascades conductor. A midcrustal anomaly parallels the Olympic-Wallowa lineament as well as several other geophysical trends, indicating that it may play an important role in regional tectonics. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Three-dimensional P wave velocity model for the San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, C.H.; Brocher, T.M.; Zhang, H.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2007-01-01

    A new three-dimensional P wave velocity model for the greater San Francisco Bay region has been derived using the double-difference seismic tomography method, using data from about 5,500 chemical explosions or air gun blasts and approximately 6,000 earthquakes. The model region covers 140 km NE-SW by 240 km NW-SE, extending from 20 km south of Monterey to Santa Rosa and reaching from the Pacific coast to the edge of the Great Valley. Our model provides the first regional view of a number of basement highs that are imaged in the uppermost few kilometers of the model, and images a number of velocity anomaly lows associated with known Mesozoic and Cenozoic basins in the study area. High velocity (Vp > 6.5 km/s) features at ???15-km depth beneath part of the edge of the Great Valley and along the San Francisco peninsula are interpreted as ophiolite bodies. The relocated earthquakes provide a clear picture of the geometry of the major faults in the region, illuminating fault dips that are generally consistent with previous studies. Ninety-five percent of the earthquakes have depths between 2.3 and 15.2 km, and the corresponding seismic velocities at the hypocenters range from 4.8 km/s (presumably corresponding to Franciscan basement or Mesozoic sedimentary rocks of the Great Valley Sequence) to 6.8 km/s. The top of the seismogenic zone is thus largely controlled by basement depth, but the base of the seismogenic zone is not restricted to seismic velocities of ???6.3 km/s in this region, as had been previously proposed. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Seismic velocities at the core-mantle boundary inferred from P waves diffracted around the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvander, Matthieu; Ponce, Bruno; Souriau, Annie

    1997-05-01

    The very base of the mantle is investigated with core-diffracted P-wave (P diff) travel times published by the International Seismological Centre (ISC) for the period 1964-1987. Apparent slownesses are computed for two-station profiles using a difference method. As the short-period P diff mostly sample a very thin layer above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a good approximation of the true velocity structure at the CMB can be derived from the apparent slownesses. More than 27000 profiles are built, and this provides an unprecedented P diff sampling of the CMB. The overall slowness distribution has an average value of 4.62 s/deg, which corresponds to a velocity more than 4% lower than that of most mean radial models. An analysis of the residuals of absolute ISC P and P diff travel times is independently carried out and confirms this result. It also shows that the degree of heterogeneities is significantly higher at the CMB than in the lower mantle. A search for lateral velocity variations is then undertaken; a first large-scale investigation reveals the presence of coherent slowness anomalies of very large dimensions of the order of 3000 km at the CMB. A tomographic inversion is then performed, which confirms the existence of pronounced (±8-10%) lateral velocity variations and provides a reliable map of the heterogeneities in the northern hemisphere. The influence of heterogeneity in the overlying mantle, of noise in the data and of CMB topography is evaluated; it seemingly proves minor compared with the contribution of heterogeneities at the CMB. Our results support the rising idea of a thin, low-velocity laterally varying boundary layer at the base of the D″ layer. The two principal candidate interpretations are the occurrence of partial melting, or the presence of a chemically distinct layer, featuring infiltrated core material.

  1. Refining the 3D seismic velocity and attenuation models for Katmai National Park, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. A.; Thurber, C. H.; Prejean, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    We invert data from approximately 4,000 local earthquakes occurring between September 2004 and August 2009 to determine the 3D P-wave velocity and P-wave attenuation structures in the Katmai volcanic region. Arrival information and waveforms for the study come from the Alaska Volcano Observatory’s permanent network of 20 seismometers in the area, which are predominantly single-component, short period instruments. The absolute and relative arrival times are used in a double-difference seismic tomography inversion to solve for an improved velocity model for the main volcanic centers. We use the resulting 3D velocity model to relocate all catalog earthquakes in Katmai between January 1996 and August 2009. Inversions for the quality factor Q are completed using a spectral decay approach to determine source parameters, t*, and site response with a nonlinear inversion. Using the final 3D velocity model to define the ray paths, t* values are then inverted to determine frequency-independent Q models. The final models developed through these inversions reveal a low velocity and low Q zone from the surface to ~7 km depth centered on the volcanic axis and extending ~25 km between Martin and Katmai volcanoes. The relocated hypocenters provide insight into the geometry of seismogenic structures in the area, revealing clustering of events into four distinct zones associated with Martin, Mageik, Trident, and Katmai. While the Martin, Mageik, and Katmai clusters are all at 3-4 km depth, the Trident cluster is slightly deeper at 4-6 km. Many new features are apparent within these clusters, including a strand of earthquakes trending NE-SW between the main Martin and Mageik clusters. Smaller linear features are also visible in the Katmai cluster along with a small migrating swarm which occurred NW of the Katmai caldera during mid-2006. Data from an array of 11 three-component broadband instruments currently deployed in the area between Mageik volcano and Katmai caldera will be

  2. Are high p-wave velocity sediments on thin Tethyan crust, deep-water carbonates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Graindorge, David; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Dellong, David; Kopp, Heidrun; Sallares, Valenti; Bartolome, Rafael; Gallais, Flora

    2016-04-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from the Central Mediterranean and Gulf of Cadiz regions indicate the widespread presence of a seismic unit, marked by strong continuous reflectors, directly overlying the basement. Seismic velocity analysis from seismic reflection and refraction studies indicate high p-wave velocities of 3.5 - 4.5 km/s in this layer. These same seismic studies image a thin crust, typically 6-9 km thick, in most cases thought to be oceanic in nature and related to the Tethys oceanic domain separating Africa (Gondwana) from Laurussia. We interpret this 2-3 km thick reflective layer to be carbonates, deposited in the late Triassic, Jurassic and early Cretaceous in the Tethys Ocean, in deep marine basins. Few drilling studies have penetrated into this layer. In one case (DSDP site 135, drilled at 4152 m water depth on Coral Patch Ridge in the western Gulf of Cadiz), Aptian (early Cretaceous) marls and limestone were drilled (560-689 m sub-seafloor depth). The Calcite compensation depth during the Jurassic to Early Cretaceous was about 4000 m to 3500 m according to compilations from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and is consistent with deposition of deep-water carbonates. For the NW Moroccan margin (Mazagan transect near El Jadida) there is a 2 km thick sedimentary layer with p-wave velocities of 4.0 - 4.5 km/s at the base of a 4 - 6 km thick sedimentary section. This layer extends from seafloor thought to be oceanic crust (west of the West African Coast magnetic anomaly) across a domain of thin/transitional crust with abundant Triassic salt diapirs to the foot of the margin. This reflective basal layer is also observed in reflection and refraction profiles from the Seine abyssal plain, below the toe of the Cadiz accretionary wedge (S. Algarve margin), in the Ionian abyssal plain and below the toe of the Calabrian accretionary wedge, all regions floored by this thin Tethyan crust. Work is in progress to determine the exact nature of this crust.

  3. Poroelastic Wave Propagation With a 3D Velocity-Stress-Pressure Finite-Difference Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.; Bartel, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation within a three-dimensional, heterogeneous, isotropic poroelastic medium is numerically simulated with an explicit, time-domain, finite-difference algorithm. A system of thirteen, coupled, first-order, partial differential equations is solved for the particle velocity vector components, the stress tensor components, and the pressure associated with solid and fluid constituents of the two-phase continuum. These thirteen dependent variables are stored on staggered temporal and spatial grids, analogous to the scheme utilized for solution of the conventional velocity-stress system of isotropic elastodynamics. Centered finite-difference operators possess 2nd-order accuracy in time and 4th-order accuracy in space. Seismological utility is enhanced by an optional stress-free boundary condition applied on a horizontal plane representing the earth's surface. Absorbing boundary conditions are imposed on the flanks of the 3D spatial grid via a simple wavefield amplitude taper approach. A massively parallel computational implementation, utilizing the spatial domain decomposition strategy, allows investigation of large-scale earth models and/or broadband wave propagation within reasonable execution times. Initial algorithm testing indicates that a point force density and/or moment density source activated within a poroelastic medium generates diverging fast and slow P waves (and possibly an S-wave)in accord with Biot theory. Solid and fluid particle velocities are in-phase for the fast P-wave, whereas they are out-of-phase for the slow P-wave. Conversions between all wave types occur during reflection and transmission at interfaces. Thus, although the slow P-wave is regarded as difficult to detect experimentally, its presence is strongly manifest within the complex of waves generated at a lithologic or fluid boundary. Very fine spatial and temporal gridding are required for high-fidelity representation of the slow P-wave, without inducing excessive

  4. Miocene Extension, Volcanism and Possibly Associated Upper Crustal P-Wave Velocity Anomalies in the Northeastern Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, T.; Burke, K.; Zhou, H.; Yeats, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic activity and the formation of the Puente Hills half-graben (PHHG) in the northeastern Los Angeles basin constrain the timing of extension within the greater Los Angeles basin. Eruption of the Glendora Volcanics (ca. 16-14 Ma) and El Modeno Volcanics (ca. 14 Ma) mark the beginning of lithospheric extension. Continuing extension is recorded in strata of the PHHG, with movement on the proto-Whittier normal fault and intrusion of diabase sills into the La Vida Member (13.5-9.4 Ma) of the Puente Formation. A change from extension to N-S horizontal contraction and vertical uplift at ca. 8 Ma, which resulted in compressional inversion of the PHHG, has produced the Puente Hills anticline and the throughgoing Whittier fault. Our high-resolution 3-D P-wave velocity model (with block dimensions 10x10x3 km) shows two anomalous higher-velocity bodies (6.63 km/s) at depths of 9-18 km, which we also relate to extension. The 6.63 km/s velocity of the higher velocity volumes represents an increase over regional velocities of ca. 4 to 8 percent. These tomographic anomalies may be generated by plutons, possibly gabbro with a bulk density ca. 3 gm/cc, that were magma sources for at least some of the overlying volcanic rock. A velocity anomaly near the Whittier Narrows, here named the Whittier Narrows pluton, extends vertically over three stacked grid blocks at depths of 9-18 km and is well placed to have been a source for the Glendora Volcanics and the La Vida diabase sills. A southeast trending layer of four high-velocity grid blocks at depths of 9-12 km marks a possible source for El Modeno Volcanics, here named El Modeno pluton. Three active faults converge and appear to terminate in the vicinity of the Whittier Narrows pluton: (1) the Elysian Park blind thrust, (2) the Puente Hills blind thrust, and (3) the Whittier fault. The Whittier Narrows pluton may play a controlling role in locating and segmenting the faults. The locations of the Whittier Narrows and El Modeno

  5. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure beneath the Indonesian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspito, Nanang T.; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Miyatake, Takashi; Shimazaki, Kunihiko; Hirahara, Kazuro

    1993-04-01

    We present the P-wave seismic tomography image of the mantle to a depth of 1200 km beneath the Indonesian region. The ARTB inversion method is applied to a dataset of 118,203 P-wave travel times of local and teleseismic events taken from ISC bulletins. Although the resolution is sufficient for detailed discussion in only a limited part of the study region, the results clarify the general tectonic framework in this region and indicate a possible remnant seismic slab in the lower mantle. Structures beneath the Philippine Islands and the Molucca Sea region are well resolved and high-velocity zones corresponding to the slabs of the Molucca Sea and Philippine Sea plates are well delineated. Seismic zones beneath the Manila, Negros and Cotabato trenches are characterized by high-velocity anomalies, although shallow structures were not resolved. The Molucca Sea collision zone and volcanic zones of the Sangihe and Philippine arcs are dominated by low-velocity anomalies. The Philippine Sea slab subducts beneath the Philippine Islands at least to a depth of 200 km and may reach depths of 450 km. The southern end of the slab extends at least to about 6°N near southern Mindanao. In the south, the two opposing subducting slabs of the Molucca Sea plate are clearly defined by the two opposing high-velocity zones. The eastward dipping slab can be traced about 400 km beneath the Halmahera arc and may extend as far north as about 5°N. Unfortunately, resolution is not sufficient to reveal detailed structures at the boundary region between the Halmahera and Philippine Sea slabs. The westward dipping slab may subduct to the lower mantle although its extent at depth is not well resolved. This slab trends N-S from about 10°N in the Philippine Islands to northern Sulawesi. A NE-SW-trending high-velocity zone is found in the lower mantle beneath the Molucca Sea region. This high-velocity zone may represent a remnant of the former subduction zone which formed the Sulawesi arc during the

  6. Gas hydrate and P-Wave Velocity Distribution in the Yaquina Basin at the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebscher, C.; Gajewski, D.; Grobys, J.; Kukowski, N.; Netzeband, G.; Wagner, M.; Bialas, J.

    2003-04-01

    The lower boundary of the methane hydrate stability zone in continental margin sediments is often marked by a strong, phase reversed reflection subparallel to the seafloor, called the bottom simulating reflector (BSR). High resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) data from the Yaquina Basin offshore Peru at 8 deg S show a BSR that is varying laterally in amplitude as well as in continuity. The amplitudes of the reflections above the BSR also vary with the appearance of the BSR. Where the BSR is strong, the reflections above it are weaker compared to areas where the BSR is weak. And although the strong part of the BSR is underlain immediately by strong reflections, reflections several hundred meters beneath the BSR appear weaker than those where the BSR is weak. This variation indicates significant heterogeneity in the distribution of gas and gas hydrate in this area. Chemoherms observed at the Yaquina Basin sea floor indicate the presence of free gas in the sediments up to the seafloor. The presence of gas and gas hydrate within the sediment sequence significantly influences the P-wave velocity in the affected layers. Therefore a detailed analysis of velocity variations enables to understand the apparently different conditions for the formation of gas hydrate along the BSR and the migration paths of the free gas. Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from profiles coincident with the MCS data can provide such detailed velocity depth information. Velocity analysis from OBS data included 2D-ray tracing and 1D-interval-velocity analysis by means of DIX-inversion. In order to find a trade-off between vertical resolution and minimization of errors caused by the sensitivity of the DIX' formula to velocity variations in thin layers, the data have undergone a Kirchhoff wave-equation datuming and adjacent coherence filtering was applied to the data to eliminate the one sided travel path through the water column of the OBS-observations. The derived velocity structure confirms

  7. The relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity of pressure cores obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Fujii, T.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    P-wave velocity is an important parameter to estimate gas hydrate saturation in sediments. In this study, the relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity have been analyzed using natural hydrate-bearing-sediments obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The sediment samples were collected by the Hybrid Pressure Coring System developed by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology during June-July 2012, aboard the deep sea drilling vessel CHIKYU. P-wave velocity was measured on board by the Pressure Core Analysis and Transfer System developed by Geotek Ltd. The samples were maintained at a near in-situ pressure condition during coring and measurement. After the measurement, the samples were stored core storage chambers and transported to MHRC under pressure. The samples were manipulated and cut by the Pressure-core Non-destructive Analysis Tools or PNATs developed by MHRC. The cutting sections were determined on the basis of P-wave velocity and visual observations through an acrylic window equipped in the PNATs. The cut samples were depressurized to measure gas volume for saturation calculations. It was found that P-wave velocity correlates well with hydrate saturation and can be reproduced by the hydrate frame component model. Using pressure cores and pressure core analysis technology, nondestructive and near in-situ correlation between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity can be obtained. This study was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan.

  8. 3-D Velocity Measurement of Natural Convection Using Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoki, Masatoshi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Okada, Toshifumi; Kimura, Ichiro

    This paper describes quantitative three-dimensional measurement method for flow field of a rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical cell heated below and cooled above. A correlation method for two-dimensional measurement was well advanced to a spatio-temporal correlation method. Erroneous vectors, often appeared in the correlation method, was successfully removed using Hopfield neural network. As a result, calculated 3-D velocity vector distribution well corresponded to the observed temperature distribution. Consequently, the simultaneous three-dimensional measurement system for temperature and flow field was developed.

  9. Time varying velocity structures in Earth's outer core: Constraints from exotic P-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; Irving, J. C.; Deuss, A. F.; Cormier, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    The outer core is one of the most dynamic divisions of our planet. However, despite undergoing vigorous convection, the outer core is not necessarily a uniform, homogeneous layer of the Earth. Accumulation of light element enriched iron at the top of the outer core, below the core-mantle boundary, may lead to the formation of a stably stratified layer, corresponding to the E' layer as defined by Bullen. The E' layer would have different properties to the rest of the outer core and may be a source of scattering. The lowermost outer core, the F layer, may also have different physical properties than the rest of the outer core, either due to the crystallisation of iron or the release of light elements as the inner core grows. Time varying structure in the Earth's core has been observed in some previous studies, particularly using earthquake doublets. The vigorous convection in the outer core may lead to small-scale lateral variations in its velocity structure over time, due to the movement of fluids and slurry near to the core-mantle and inner core boundaries. We investigate the velocity and attenuation structure of the upper 1500 km of the outer core using high frequency PmKP seismic phases. PmKP waves travel as P-waves throughout the Earth, bouncing m-1 times on the underside of the core-mantle boundary. By analysing the relative arrival times and amplitudes of the PmKP waves and other seismic phases, and comparing these to synthetic waveforms, it is possible to constrain the velocity and attenuation characteristics of the upper 1500 km of the outer core. We correct for known mantle structure and explore the effects of core-mantle boundary topography. To investigate the scattering characteristics of the uppermost outer core and the sharpness of any stratified layers we search for precursors to PmKP phases, which are elusive. P4KP-PcP differential travel times suggest that the uppermost 1300 km of the outer core is up to 0.4% slower than PREM. There is some evidence

  10. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  11. Experimental study on monitoring CO2 sequestration by conjoint analysis of the P-wave velocity and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Shenglai; Huan, Kangning; Li, Fangfang; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Aiai; Zhang, Xing

    2013-09-03

    CO2 sequestration has been considered to be one of the most straightforward carbon management strategies for industrial CO2 emission. Monitoring of the CO2 injection process is one of the best ways to make sure the safety storage but is also a major challenge in CO2 geological sequestration. Previous field and laboratory researches have shown that seismic methods are among the most promising monitoring methods because of the obvious reduction in P-wave velocities caused by CO2 injection. However, as CO2 injection continues, the P-wave velocity becomes increasingly insensitive according to the pilot projects when CO2 saturation is higher than 20-40%. Therefore, the conventional seismic method needs improvement or replacement to solve its limitations. In this study, P-wave velocity and amplitude responses to supercritical CO2 injection in brine-saturated core samples from Jilin oilfield were tested using core displacement and an ultrasonic detection integrated system. Results showed that neither the P-wave velocity nor amplitude could simply be used to monitor the CO2 injection process because of the insensitive or nonmonotonous response. Consequently, a new index was established by synthetically considering these two parameters to invert and monitor the CO2 process, which can be thought of as a newer and more effective assessment criterion for the seismic method.

  12. Anisotropy of Electrical Resistivity and P-wave Velocity in Discrete Samples From Nantroseize Expeditions 315 and 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, L.; Henry, P.; Humbert, F.; Knuth, M.; Likos, W.; Scientists, I.

    2008-12-01

    We present results of electrical conductivity and P-wave velocity measurements in discrete samples processed onboard Chikyu during Nantroseize expeditions 315 and 316 in the Mega Splay fault and Frontal Thrust of the Nankai accretionary prism. Quasi cubes of 20 mm thickness nominally saturated with seawater were measured across the three parallel sets of faces, first for electrical conductivity, then for P-wave velocity. Average properties and their anisotropies appeared to show some sensitivity to both lithological and fault related features. Overall, strong transverse anisotropy due to sedimentary compaction was observed for both properties with minimum electrical conductivity and P-wave velocity along the vertical core axis direction. Within the horizontal plane perpendicular to the core axis, slight anisotropies were also measured, which are likely related to tectonically driven horizontal shortening, affecting noticeably the original compaction fabric. In order to get some structural insight, samples were reoriented in our laboratories using alternative field demagnetization technique and the in-plane (i.e. perpendicular to the core axis) data rotated accordingly. For the P-wave anisotropy, initial cubes were shaped into polyhedrons in order to get even more accurate estimates. These additional measurements allowed for retrieving for each sample the 3 principal values and vectors of the best fitting ellipsoidal function. Resulting stereoplots were then compared with electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and structural data.

  13. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  14. The USGS 3D Seismic Velocity Model for Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Aagaard, B.; Simpson, R. W.; Jachens, R. C.

    2006-12-01

    We present a new regional 3D seismic velocity model for Northern California for use in strong motion simulations of the 1906 San Francisco and other earthquakes. The model includes compressional-wave velocity (Vp), shear-wave velocity (Vs), density, and intrinsic attenuation (Qp, Qs). These properties were assigned for each rock type in a 3D geologic model derived from surface outcrops, boreholes, gravity and magnetic data, and seismic reflection, refraction, and tomography studies. A detailed description of the model, USGS Bay Area Velocity Model 05.1.0, is available online [http://www.sf06simulation.org/geology/velocitymodel]. For ground motion simulations Vs and Qs are more important parameters than Vp and Qp because the strongest ground motions are generated chiefly by shear and surface wave arrivals. Because Vp data are more common than Vs data, however, we first developed Vp versus depth relations for each rock type and then converted these to Vs versus depth relations. For the most important rock types in Northern California we compiled measurements of Vp versus depth using borehole logs, laboratory measurements on hand samples, seismic refraction profiles, and tomography models. These rock types include Salinian and Sierran granitic rocks, metagraywackes and greenstones of the Franciscan Complex, Tertiary and Mesozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks, and Quaternary and Holocene deposits (Brocher, USGS OFR 05-1317, 2005). Vp versus depth curves were converted to Vs versus depth curves using new empirical nonlinear relations between Vs and Vp (Brocher, BSSA, 2005). These relations, showing that Poisson's ratio is a nonlinear function of Vp, were similarly based on compilations of diverse Vs and Vp measurements on a large suite of rock types, mainly from California and the Pacific Northwest. The model is distributed in a discretized form with routines to query the model using C++, C, and Fortran 77 programming languages. The geologic model was discretized at

  15. Seismic modelling study of P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in patchy-saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaobo; Dong, Liangguo; Zhao, Qun

    2014-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation in patchy-saturated porous media is studied by numerical simulation in time domain at the seismic frequency band (1-1000 Hz). The models consist of hundreds of representative elementary volumes (REVs), where the REV is partially saturated with water and gas pockets. Seismic modelling experiments are implemented in a traditional way, with ‘periodic’ boundary conditions applied to get rid of undrained boundary conditions at the outer edges of the REVs. The characteristics of confining pressure, induced pore pressure, solid particle velocities and Darcy filtration velocities are analysed. The snapshots show that strong pore pressure gradients are generated across the interface between gas and water phases, and significant fluid flow occurs. The conversion of a fast P-wave into a dissipating slow P-wave takes place at seismic frequencies, and the converted slow P-wave diffuses strongly in both gas- and water-saturated phases. These numerical results can help us to understand the loss mechanism at seismic frequencies. Then, P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion of a heterogeneous REV are calculated during traditional seismic modelling at seismic frequencies. The numerical results show good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained from patchy saturation theory. Furthermore, the effects of different fluid distributions on P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion are analysed numerically. A series of experiments are implemented by considering large, small and random gas-patchy inclusions. The decrease of gas pocket size makes the peak frequency move towards high frequencies. Random distribution of gas patches may affect both the peak attenuation and peak frequencies. Seismic attenuation caused by Biot global flow, elastic scattering and wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) associated with patchy saturation are computed numerically. The results show that the contribution of Biot’s global flow and scattering to the overall attenuation

  16. P-Wave Velocity Tomography from Local Earthquakes in Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Chávez, Juan A.; Escudero, Christian R.; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco J.; Bandy, William L.

    2016-10-01

    In western Mexico, the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North America plate has deformed and fragmented the overriding plate, forming several structural rifts and crustal blocks. To obtain a reliable subsurface image of the continental crust and uppermost mantle in this complex area, we used P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes along with the Fast Marching Method tomography technique. We followed an inversion scheme consisting of (1) the use of a high-quality earthquake catalog and corrected phase picks, (2) the selection of earthquakes using a maximum location error threshold, (3) the estimation of an improved 1-D reference velocity model, and (4) the use of checkerboard testing to determine the optimum configuration of the velocity nodes and inversion parameters. Surprisingly, the tomography results show a very simple δVp distribution that can be described as being controlled by geologic structures formed during two stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates. The earlier period represents the initial stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath western Mexico; the later period represents the more advanced stage of rifting where the Rivera and Cocos plates had separated sufficiently to allow melt to accumulate below the Colima Volcanic complex. During the earlier period (14 or 10-1.6 Ma), NE-SW-oriented structures/lineaments (such as the Southern Colima Rift) were formed as the two plates separated. During the second period (1.6 Ma to the present), the deformation is attributed to magma, generated within and above the tear zone between the Rivera and Cocos plates, rising beneath the region of the Colima Volcanic Complex. The rising magma fractured the overlying crust, forming a classic triple-rift junction geometry. This triple-rift system is confined to the mid- to lower crust perhaps indicating that this rifting process is still in an early stage. This fracturing, along with fluid circulation and associated

  17. Comparative velocity structure of active Hawaiian volcanoes from 3-D onshore-offshore seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Peters, L.; Benesh, N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the combined subaerial and submarine portions of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii, based on first-arrival seismic tomography of marine airgun shots recorded by the onland seismic network. Our model shows that high-velocity materials (6.5-7.0??km/s) lie beneath Kilauea's summit, Koae fault zone, and the upper Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and upper and middle East Rift Zone (ERZ), indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. A separate high-velocity body of 6.5-6.9??km/s within Kilauea's lower ERZ and upper Puna Ridge suggests a distinct body of magma cumulates, possibly connected to the summit magma cumulates at depth. The two cumulate bodies within Kilauea's ERZ may have undergone separate ductile flow seaward, influencing the submarine morphology of Kilauea's south flank. Low velocities (5.0-6.3??km/s) seaward of Kilauea's Hilina fault zone, and along Mauna Loa's seaward facing Kao'iki fault zone, are attributed to thick piles of volcaniclastic sediments deposited on the submarine flanks. Loihi seamount shows high-velocity anomalies beneath the summit and along the rift zones, similar to the interpreted magma cumulates below Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, and a low-velocity anomaly beneath the oceanic crust, probably indicative of melt within the upper mantle. Around Kilauea's submarine flank, a high-velocity anomaly beneath the outer bench suggests the presence of an ancient seamount that may obstruct outward spreading of the flank. Mauna Loa's southeast flank is also marked by a large, anomalously high-velocity feature (7.0-7.4??km/s), interpreted to define an inactive, buried volcanic rift zone, which might provide a new explanation for the westward migration of Mauna Loa's current SWRZ and the growth of Kilauea's SWRZ. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure derived from local earthquakes at the Katmai group of volcanoes, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jolly, A.D.; Moran, S.C.; McNutt, S.R.; Stone, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure beneath the Katmai group of volcanoes is determined by inversion of more than 10,000 rays from over 1000 earthquakes recorded on a local 18 station short-period network between September 1996 and May 2001. The inversion is well constrained from sea level to about 6??km below sea level and encompasses all of the Katmai volcanoes; Martin, Mageik, Trident, Griggs, Novarupta, Snowy, and Katmai caldera. The inversion reduced the average RMS travel-time error from 0.22??s for locations from the standard one-dimensional model to 0.13??s for the best three-dimensional model. The final model, from the 6th inversion step, reveals a prominent low velocity zone (3.6-5.0??km/s) centered at Katmai Pass and extending from Mageik to Trident volcanoes. The anomaly has values about 20-25% slower than velocities outboard of the region (5.0-6.5??km/s). Moderately low velocities (4.5-6.0??km/s) are observed along the volcanic axis between Martin and Katmai Caldera. Griggs volcano, located about 10??km behind (northwest of) the volcanic axis, has unremarkable velocities (5.0-5.7??km/s) compared to non-volcanic regions. The highest velocities are observed between Snowy and Griggs volcanoes (5.5-6.5??km/s). Relocated hypocenters for the best 3-D model are shifted significantly relative to the standard model with clusters of seismicity at Martin volcano shifting systematically deeper by about 1??km to depths of 0 to 4??km below sea level. Hypocenters for the Katmai Caldera are more tightly clustered, relocating beneath the 1912 scarp walls. The relocated hypocenters allow us to compare spatial frequency-size distributions (b-values) using one-dimensional and three-dimensional models. We find that the distribution of b is significantly changed for Martin volcano, which was characterized by variable values (0.8 < b < 2.0) with standard locations and more uniform values (0.8 < b < 1.2) after relocation. Other seismic clusters at Mageik (1.2 < b

  19. Vel-IO 3D: A tool for 3D velocity model construction, optimization and time-depth conversion in 3D geological modeling workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maesano, Francesco E.; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2017-02-01

    We present Vel-IO 3D, a tool for 3D velocity model creation and time-depth conversion, as part of a workflow for 3D model building. The workflow addresses the management of large subsurface dataset, mainly seismic lines and well logs, and the construction of a 3D velocity model able to describe the variation of the velocity parameters related to strong facies and thickness variability and to high structural complexity. Although it is applicable in many geological contexts (e.g. foreland basins, large intermountain basins), it is particularly suitable in wide flat regions, where subsurface structures have no surface expression. The Vel-IO 3D tool is composed by three scripts, written in Python 2.7.11, that automate i) the 3D instantaneous velocity model building, ii) the velocity model optimization, iii) the time-depth conversion. They determine a 3D geological model that is consistent with the primary geological constraints (e.g. depth of the markers on wells). The proposed workflow and the Vel-IO 3D tool have been tested, during the EU funded Project GeoMol, by the construction of the 3D geological model of a flat region, 5700 km2 in area, located in the central part of the Po Plain. The final 3D model showed the efficiency of the workflow and Vel-IO 3D tool in the management of large amount of data both in time and depth domain. A 4 layer-cake velocity model has been applied to a several thousand (5000-13,000 m) thick succession, with 15 horizons from Triassic up to Pleistocene, complicated by a Mesozoic extensional tectonics and by buried thrusts related to Southern Alps and Northern Apennines.

  20. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  1. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  2. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  3. Oceanic lithospheric S-wave velocities from the analysis of P-wave polarization at the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten; Lange, Dietrich

    2016-12-01

    Our knowledge of the absolute S-wave velocities of the oceanic lithosphere is mainly based on global surface wave tomography, local active seismic or compliance measurements using oceanic infragravity waves. The results of tomography give a rather smooth picture of the actual S-wave velocity structure and local measurements have limitations regarding the range of elastic parameters or the geometry of the measurement. Here, we use the P-wave polarization (apparent P-wave incidence angle) of teleseismic events to investigate the S-wave velocity structure of the oceanic crust and the upper tens of kilometres of the mantle beneath single stations. In this study, we present an up to our knowledge new relation of the apparent P-wave incidence angle at the ocean bottom dependent on the half-space S-wave velocity. We analyse the angle in different period ranges at ocean bottom stations (OBSs) to derive apparent S-wave velocity profiles. These profiles are dependent on the S-wave velocity as well as on the thickness of the layers in the subsurface. Consequently, their interpretation results in a set of equally valid models. We analyse the apparent P-wave incidence angles of an OBS data set which was collected in the Eastern Mid Atlantic. We are able to determine reasonable S-wave-velocity-depth models by a three-step quantitative modelling after a manual data quality control, although layer resonance sometimes influences the estimated apparent S-wave velocities. The apparent S-wave velocity profiles are well explained by an oceanic PREM model in which the upper part is replaced by four layers consisting of a water column, a sediment, a crust and a layer representing the uppermost mantle. The obtained sediment has a thickness between 0.3 and 0.9 km with S-wave velocities between 0.7 and 1.4 km s-1. The estimated total crustal thickness varies between 4 and 10 km with S-wave velocities between 3.5 and 4.3 km s-1. We find a slight increase of the total crustal thickness from

  4. Uncertainty assessment of 3D instantaneous velocity model from stack velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuele Maesano, Francesco; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    3D modelling is a powerful tool that is experiencing increasing applications in data analysis and dissemination. At the same time the need of quantitative uncertainty evaluation is strongly requested in many aspects of the geological sciences and by the stakeholders. In many cases the starting point for 3D model building is the interpretation of seismic profiles that provide indirect information about the geology of the subsurface in the domain of time. The most problematic step in the 3D modelling construction is the conversion of the horizons and faults interpreted in time domain to the depth domain. In this step the dominant variable that could lead to significantly different results is the velocity. The knowledge of the subsurface velocities is related mainly to punctual data (sonic logs) that are often sparsely distributed in the areas covered by the seismic interpretation. The extrapolation of velocity information to wide extended horizons is thus a critical step to obtain a 3D model in depth that can be used for predictive purpose. In the EU-funded GeoMol Project, the availability of a dense network of seismic lines (confidentially provided by ENI S.p.A.) in the Central Po Plain, is paired with the presence of 136 well logs, but few of them have sonic logs and in some portion of the area the wells are very widely spaced. The depth conversion of the 3D model in time domain has been performed testing different strategies for the use and the interpolation of velocity data. The final model has been obtained using a 4 layer cake 3D instantaneous velocity model that considers both the initial velocity (v0) in every reference horizon and the gradient of velocity variation with depth (k). Using this method it is possible to consider the geological constraint given by the geometries of the horizons and the geo-statistical approach to the interpolation of velocities and gradient. Here we present an experiment based on the use of set of pseudo-wells obtained from the

  5. Theoretical and numerical comparison of 3D numerical schemes for their accuracy with respect to P-wave to S-wave speed ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.; Chaljub, E.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical modeling of earthquake ground motion in sedimentary basins and valleys often has to account for the P-wave to S-wave speed ratios (VP/VS) as large as five and even larger, mainly in sediments below groundwater level. The ratio can attain values larger than 10 - the unconsolidated lake sediments in Ciudad de México are a good example. At the same time, accuracy of the numerical schemes with respect to VP/VS has not been sufficiently analyzed. The numerical schemes are often applied without adequate check of the accuracy. We present theoretical analysis and numerical comparison of 18 3D numerical time-domain explicit schemes for modeling seismic motion for their accuracy with the varying VP/VS. The schemes are based on the finite-difference, spectral-element, finite-element and discontinuous-Galerkin methods. All schemes are presented in a unified form. Theoretical analysis compares accuracy of the schemes in terms of local errors in amplitude and vector difference. In addition to the analysis we compare numerically simulated seismograms with exact solutions for canonical configurations. We compare accuracy of the schemes in terms of the local errors, grid dispersion and full wavefield simulations with respect to the structure of the numerical schemes.

  6. Simultaneous inversion of 3D velocity structure, hypocenter locations, and reflector geometry in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Leiph Alexander

    We develop and apply a non-linear inversion of direct and wide-angle reflection travel times for 3-D P-wave velocity structure, earthquake hypocenters, and reflector geometry under NW Washington focusing on the structure of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The first-arrival travel times are derived from both active-source experiments and from local earthquakes. The reflection arrivals were picked from data collected during the 1998 Wet SHIPS active-source experiment, which consisted of air-gun sources within the inland water-ways of NW Washington and SW British Columbia to land-based stations. Our inversion procedure reduces the well-known trade-off between reflector position and the velocities above it by the combination of simultaneous inversion and adequate crossing paths. We interpret the wide-angle reflector as the Moho of the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. The relocated intraslab earthquakes separate into two groups: those located up-dip of the 45km reflector depth contour generally lie below the reflector in material whose velocity exceeds 7.7km/s, placing them within the subducting mantle, while those down-dip of this contour occur within material whose velocities are 6.8--7.5km/s, placing them within subducted oceanic crust. We interpret these groups of earthquakes as resulting from serpentine dehydration in the subducted mantle and the basalt to eclogite transformation in the subducted crust. We have performed velocity checkerboard, slab velocity resolution, and parameter sensitivity tests to estimate our ability to resolve the relationship among the reflector, intraslab hypocenters, and slab velocity structure. These tests indicate we have the necessary resolvability and can distinguish the relative locations among the velocities, reflector, and intraslab hypocenters within the subducting slab to +/-2km. The occurrence of events within the subducted mantle geometrically allows for larger magnitude earthquakes than could occur if they were confined to

  7. Density and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Paraná Magmatic Province: Refertilization of an ancient lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Carlos; Ussami, Naomi; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    We estimate density and P-wave velocity perturbations in the mantle beneath the southeastern South America plate from geoid anomalies and P-wave traveltime residuals to constrain the structure of the lithosphere underneath the Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP) and conterminous geological provinces. Our analysis shows a consistent correlation between density and velocity anomalies. The P-wave speed and density are 1% and 15 kg/m3 lower, respectively, in the upper mantle under the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic alkaline provinces, except beneath the Goiás Alkaline Province (GAP), where density (+20 kg/m3) and velocity (+0.5%) are relatively high. Underneath the PMP, the density is higher by about 50 kg/m3 in the north and 25 kg/m3 in the south, to a depth of 250 - 300 km. These values correlate with high-velocity perturbations of +0.5% and +0.3%, respectively. Profiles of density perturbation versus depth in the upper mantle are different for the PMP and the adjacent Archean São Francisco (SFC) and Amazonian (AC) cratons. The Paleoproterozoic PMP basement has a high-density root. The density is relatively low in the SFC and AC lithospheres. A reduction of density is a typical characteristic of chemically depleted Archean cratons. A more fertile Proterozoic and Phanerozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle has a higher density, as deduced from density estimates of mantle xenoliths of different ages and composition. In conjunction with Re-Os isotopic studies of the PMP basalts, chemical and isotopic analyses of peridodite xenoliths from the GAP in the northern PMP, and electromagnetic induction experiments of the PMP lithosphere, our density and P-wave speed models suggest that the densification of the PMP lithosphere and flood basalt generation are related to mantle refertilization. Metasomatic refertilization resulted from the introduction of asthenospheric components from the mantle wedge above Proterozoic subduction zones, which surrounded the Paraná lithosphere

  8. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure and precise earthquake relocation at Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford H.; DeShon, Heather R.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Zhang, Haijiang

    2008-01-01

    Waveform cross-correlation with bispectrum verification is combined with double-difference tomography to increase the precision of earthquake locations and constrain regional 3D P-wave velocity heterogeneity at Great Sitkin volcano, Alaska. From 1999 through 2005, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) recorded ∼1700 earthquakes in the vicinity of Great Sitkin, including two ML 4.3 earthquakes that are among the largest events in the AVO catalog. The majority of earthquakes occurred during 2002 and formed two temporally and spatially separate event sequences. The first sequence began on 17 March 2002 and was centered ∼20 km west of the volcano. The second sequence occurred on the southeast flank of Great Sitkin and began 28 May 2002. It was preceded by two episodes of volcanic tremor. Earthquake relocations of this activity on the southeast flank define a vertical planar feature oriented radially from the summit and in the direction of the assumed regional maximum compressive stress due to convergence along the Alaska subduction zone. This swarm may have been caused or accompanied by the emplacement of a dike. Relocations of the mainshock–aftershock sequence occurring west of Great Sitkin are consistent with rupture on a strike-slip fault. Tomographic images support the presence of a vertically dipping fault striking parallel to the direction of convergence in this region. The remaining catalog hypocenters relocate along discrete features beneath the volcano summit; here, low P-wave velocities possibly indicate the presence of magma beneath the volcano.

  9. One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya

    2012-06-20

    A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

  10. The 3D velocity structure beneath Iceland: Identifying melt pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The integration of various seismic datasets, recorded by the broadband HOTSPOT network deployed across Iceland, provides one of the highest resolution studies of the crust and mantle structure associated with a plume-ridge system. The mantle P- and S-velocity models (ICEMAN), derived from teleseismic body-wave and surface wave analysis, show a vertical, cylindrical low velocity anomaly ˜200 km in diameter extending from ˜400 km, the maximum depth of resolution, up to ˜200 km above which low velocity material is present beneath all of Iceland. The maximum P- and S-velocity anomalies of -2% and -4% respectively are found beneath the northwestern edge of Vatnajokull. The crustal S-velocity model (ICECRTb) is constrained by local surface waves, refraction experiments and receiver functions, and shows significant variation in crustal thickness. The thinnest, ˜15 km, crust is found around coastal regions, the thickest crust is beneath northwestern Vatnajokull where it reaches a thickness of 45 km. Within this thick crustal root is a vertical low velocity anomaly connecting the core of the mantle anomaly to horizontal low velocity regions that extend along the western and eastern volcanic zones but not the northern volcanic zone. These crustal low velocity zones are interpreted as regions through which melt is fed from the mantle to shallow magma chambers beneath the rift zones, where crustal formation occurs. The pipework between the core of the mantle anomaly and the southern rift zones is responsible for ˜30 km thick crust. Its absence to the north results in relatively thin, ˜20 km thick, crust.

  11. Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, Lee K.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Fehler, Michael C.; Lutter, William J.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G.; Sessions, Robert

    1998-10-01

    New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative P wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of -17% beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of -23% in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities (-15%) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10%. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred.

  12. Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, Lee K.; Fehler, Michael C.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G.; Lutter, William J.; Sessions, Robert

    1998-10-01

    New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative {ital P} wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of {minus}17{percent} beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of {minus}23{percent} in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities ({minus}15{percent}) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10{percent}. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  13. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  14. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  15. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Bandai volcano in northeastern Japan inferred from active seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Teruo; Tanaka, Satoru; Ueki, Sadato; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Nishimura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Jun; Tsutsui, Tomoki; Nishi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Sosuke; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Yamasato, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of the Bandai volcano has been revealed by tomographic inversion using approximately 2200 travel-time data collected during an active seismic survey comprising 298 temporary seismic stations and eight artificial shots. The key result of this study is the delineation of a high-velocity anomaly (Vp>4.6 km/s at sea-level) immediately below the summit peak. This feature extends to depths of 1-2 km below sea-level. The near-surface horizontal position of the high-velocity anomaly coincides well with that of a positive Bouguer gravity anomaly. Geological data demonstrate that sector collapses have occurred in all directions from the summit and that the summit crater has been repeatedly refilled with magmatic material. These observations suggest that the high-velocity region revealed in this study is a manifestation of an almost-solidified magmatic plumbing system. We have also noted that a near-surface low-velocity region (Vp<3.0 km/s at sea-level) on the southern foot of the volcano corresponds to the position of volcanic sediments including ash and debris avalanche material. In addition, we have made use of the tomographic results to recompute the hypocenters of earthquake occurring during seismic swarms beneath the summit in 1988 and 2000. Relocating the earthquakes using the three-dimensional velocity model clearly indicates that they predominantly occurred on two steeply dipping planes. Low-frequency earthquakes observed during the swarms in 2000 occurred in the seismic gap between the two clusters. The hypocentral regions of the seismic swarms and the low-frequency earthquakes are close to the higher-velocity zone beneath the volcano's summit. These observations suggest that the recent seismic activity beneath the summit is likely associated with thermal energy being released within the solidifying magmatic plumbing system.

  16. P wave velocity of the uppermost mantle of the Rio Grande rift region of North Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, J.N.; Jaksha, L.H.

    1981-08-10

    A network of seismograph stations has operated in north-central New Mexico since 1975. The network is approximtely 200 by 300 km in size and encompasses the Rio Grande rift there. Several seismic refraction experiments have been reported in the literature for the region of the network and adjacent areas. Because all of the seismic refraction lines are unreversed, P/sub n/ velocities reported were mainly of the inverse travel time slope for the direction of the corresponding line. The values of the inverse slope for those studies range from 7.6 to 8.2 km/s. The purpose of our study is to estimate the P wave velocity of the uppermost mantle by using the time term method. First, we timed the P/sub n/ waves of strong signals from five explosions and eight shallow earthquakes recorded by the network. The main data set, which contains 87 time-distance pairs, was processed by using the time term method. The P/sub n/ velocity estimated by this method is 8.0 +- 0.1 km/s. To corroborate this estimate, we then processed 10 subsets of the main data set in the same way. Almost allof the solutions show velocities 7.9--8.1 km/s, in agreement with the velocity determined for the main data set. The station time terms of the main data set also are substantied, and they suggest that the base of the crust dips northward by a few degrees in the region of the survey. The smallest value reported by other investigators for the inverse slope (7.6 km/s) appears to be related to the dip. The normal P wave velocity of the uppermost mantle of north-central New Mexico places restrictions on thermal models of the rift. For instance, the results exlude the likelihood of a wide zone of asthenosphere at the base of the crust beneath the rift, but they do not exclude a narrow such zone.

  17. Tomographic inversion of P-wave velocity and Q structures beneath the Kirishima volcanic complex, Southern Japan, based on finite difference calculations of complex traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomatsu, T.; Kumagai, H.; Dawson, P.B.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the P-wave velocity and attenuation structures beneath the Kirishima volcanic complex, southern Japan, by inverting the complex traveltimes (arrival times and pulse widths) of waveform data obtained during an active seismic experiment conducted in 1994. In this experiment, six 200-250 kg shots were recorded at 163 temporary seismic stations deployed on the volcanic complex. We use first-arrival times for the shots, which were hand-measured interactively. The waveform data are Fourier transformed into the frequency domain and analysed using a new method based on autoregressive modelling of complex decaying oscillations in the frequency domain to determine pulse widths for the first-arrival phases. A non-linear inversion method is used to invert 893 first-arrival times and 325 pulse widths to estimate the velocity and attenuation structures of the volcanic complex. Wavefronts for the inversion are calculated with a finite difference method based on the Eikonal equation, which is well suited to estimating the complex traveltimes for the structures of the Kirishima volcano complex, where large structural heterogeneities are expected. The attenuation structure is derived using ray paths derived from the velocity structure. We obtain 3-D velocity and attenuation structures down to 1.5 and 0.5 km below sea level, respectively. High-velocity pipe-like structures with correspondingly low attenuation are found under the summit craters. These pipe-like structures are interpreted as remnant conduits of solidified magma. No evidence of a shallow magma chamber is visible in the tomographic images.

  18. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  19. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the

  20. Estimated Moho Temperature from Observed Heat Flow and Comparison with P-Wave Velocity in the East Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W. Y.; Wood, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    We have estimated temperatures at the Moho surface by employing a published empirical relationship of Perry et al's work (JGR, doi:10.1029/2005JB003921) to the observed heat flow measurements in the East Sea (Sea of Japan), Korea. We assumed in our computation that the parameter values are all the same although the Perry et al's relationship between crustal thickness and heat flows to compute Moho temperature was derived for the Canadian Shield. For the heat flow data, we used the published global heat flow data (http://www.heatflow.und.edu) augmented with some recent heat flow measurements from Korea, and the LLN3_G3Dv3 for P-wave tomography model (JGR, doi:10.1029/2012JB009525). Preliminary results do not show a significant correlation between the computed Moho temperature and the P-wave velocity model perhaps due to uncertainty in the parameter values used in the computation as well as the empirical relation. An empirical relationship between the observed heat flow and the Moho temperature for the Canadian shield might be different for a backarec basin area like the East Sea, Korea. However, we noted that there exists a moderate negative correlation between the total crustal thickness and heat flow - less heat flows with increasing crustal thickness with a relation of Heat_Flow (mW/m2) = 205 - 18.3 * Crustal_Thickness (km). The modeled Moho temperature displays a trend of higher values (900o K -1400o K) from Japan toward the beneath of Yamato Basin and Rise in the NW direction, and beneath the Ulleung Basin area. Another higher Moho temperature (>1000o K) contour band is observed in the area north of Japan Basin, approximately centered along the 139.5o E.

  1. Crustal P-wave velocity structure from Altyn Tagh to Longmen mountains along the Taiwan-Altay geoscience transect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.-X.; Mooney, W.D.; Han, G.-H.; Yuan, X.-C.; Jiang, M.

    2005-01-01

    Based upon the seismic experiments along Geoscience Transect from the Altyn Tagh to the Longmen Mountains, the crustal P-wave velocity structure was derived to outline the characteristics of the crustal structure. The section shows a few significant features. The crustal thickness varies dramatically, and is consistent with tectonic settings. The Moho boundary abruptly drops to 73km depth beneath the southern Altyn Tagh from 50km below the Tarim basin, then rises again to about 58km depth beneath the Qaidam basin. Finally, the Moho drops again to about 70km underneath the Songpan-Garze Terrane and rises to 60km near the Longmen Mountains with a step-shape. Further southeast, the crust thins to 52km beneath the Sichuan basin in the southeast of the Longmen Mountains. In the north of the Kunlun fault, a low-velocity zone, which may be a layer of melted rocks due to high temperature and pressure at depth, exists in the the bottom of the middle crust. The two depressions of the Moho correlate with the Qilian and Songpan-Garze terranes, implying that these two mountains have thick roots. According to our results, it is deduced that the thick crust of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau probably is a result of east-west and northwest-southeast crustal shortening since Mesozoic time during the collision between the Asian and Indian plates.

  2. 3D Anisotropic Velocity Tomography of a Water Saturated Rock under True-Triaxial Stress in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. B.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A cubic specimen of water saturated Fontainebleau Sandstone is tested in the laboratory under true-triaxial loading where three different principal stresses are applied under drained conditions. Due to the loading arrangement, closure and opening of the pre-existing cracks in the rock, as well as creation and growth of the aligned cracks cause elliptical anisotropy and distributed heterogeneities. A Geophysical Imaging Cell equipped with an Acoustic Emission monitoring system is employed to image velocity structure of the sample during the experiment through repeated transducer to transducer non-destructive ultrasonic surveys. Apparent P-wave velocities along the rock body are calculated in different directions and shown in stereonet plots which demonstrate an overall anisotropy of the sample. The apparent velocities in the main three orthogonal cubic directions are used as raw data for building a mean spatial distribution model of anisotropy ratios. This approach is based on the concept of semi-principal axes in an elliptical anisotropic model and appointing two ratios between the three orthogonal velocities in each of the cubic grid cells. The spatial distribution model of anisotropy ratios are used to calculate the anisotropic ray-path segment matrix elements (Gij). These contain segment lengths of the ith ray in the jth cell in three dimensions where, length of each ray in each cell is computed for one principal direction based on the dip and strike of the ray and these lengths differ from the ones in an isotropic G Matrix. 3D strain of the squeezed rock and the consequent geometrical deformation is also included in the ray-path segment matrix. A Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method is used for inversion from the data space of apparent velocities to the model space of P-wave propagation velocities in the three principal directions. Finally, spatial variation and temporal evolution of induced damages in the rock, representing uniformly distributed or

  3. An industrial light-field camera applied for 3D velocity measurements in a slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkin, A. V.; Shestakov, M. V.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Modern light-field cameras have found their application in different areas like photography, surveillance and quality control in industry. A number of studies have been reported relatively low spatial resolution of 3D profiles of registered objects along the optical axis of the camera. This article describes a method for 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using an industrial light-field camera and an alternative reconstruction algorithm based on a statistical approach. This method is more accurate than triangulation when applied for tracking small registered objects like tracer particles in images. The technique was used to measure 3D velocity fields in a turbulent slot jet.

  4. From the Alpine region to the Central Apennines (Italy): 3d upper lithospheric P-velocity model with controlled source seismology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, R.; Tondi, R.; de Luca, L.; Lippitsch, R.; Sandoval, S.; Kissling, E.

    2003-04-01

    The complex lithosphere structure of the Italian region leads to difficulties in uniquely interpreting the results obtained with geophysical investigation methods. Relating to P waves velocity models, the geometry of the moho is the main first order structure influencing the interpretation of controlled source seismology (CSS) profile data and results from local earthquake tomography (LET). Moreover, the crustal structures complexities, though poorly resolved by teleseismic tomography, strongly distort teleseismic wave fronts and thus influence teleseismic traveltimes. In 1996 a method was developed by F. Waldhauser to determine the 3D topography and lateral continuity of seismic interfaces using 2D-derived controlled-source seismic reflector data. This method has been successfully applied to retrieve the moho geometry in the complex Alpine region with the aim to obtain the simplest possible 3D structure consistent with all reflector data and error estimates. For the Alpine region a 3D crustal P-wave velocity model has been thus developed from comparative use of published information from active and passive sources surveys. Here we present the extension of this map to the Italian peninsula to include Northern and Central Apennines. Information from the CROP project and from other CSS experiments performed in the past 40 years, both on land and offshore, has been included to cover the whole area. The first order features of Adriatic and Tyrrhenian moho have been recovered and a Vp crustal velocity model has been produced. For the Northern Apennines we compare the newly derived crustal model with the 3D structure of the crust obtained by the inversion of P-wave first arrivals picked on the CSS data, and of gravity data collected on land and off-shore (see Tondi et al., session SM3).

  5. 3-D Velocity Model of the Coachella Valley, Southern California Based on Explosive Shots from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.; Scheirer, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    We have analyzed explosive shot data from the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) across a 2-D seismic array and 5 profiles in the Coachella Valley to produce a 3-D P-wave velocity model that will be used in calculations of strong ground shaking. Accurate maps of seismicity and active faults rely both on detailed geological field mapping and a suitable velocity model to accurately locate earthquakes. Adjoint tomography of an older version of the SCEC 3-D velocity model shows that crustal heterogeneities strongly influence seismic wave propagation from moderate earthquakes (Tape et al., 2010). These authors improve the crustal model and subsequently simulate the details of ground motion at periods of 2 s and longer for hundreds of ray paths. Even with improvements such as the above, the current SCEC velocity model for the Salton Trough does not provide a match of the timing or waveforms of the horizontal S-wave motions, which Wei et al. (2013) interpret as caused by inaccuracies in the shallow velocity structure. They effectively demonstrate that the inclusion of shallow basin structure improves the fit in both travel times and waveforms. Our velocity model benefits from the inclusion of known location and times of a subset of 126 shots detonated over a 3-week period during the SSIP. This results in an improved velocity model particularly in the shallow crust. In addition, one of the main challenges in developing 3-D velocity models is an uneven stations-source distribution. To better overcome this challenge, we also include the first arrival times of the SSIP shots at the more widely spaced Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) in our inversion, since the layout of the SSIP is complementary to the SCSN. References: Tape, C., et al., 2010, Seismic tomography of the Southern California crust based on spectral-element and adjoint methods: Geophysical Journal International, v. 180, no. 1, p. 433-462. Wei, S., et al., 2013, Complementary slip distributions

  6. Effects of 3D random correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional, finite-difference simulations of a realistic finite-fault rupture on the southern Hayward fault are used to evaluate the effects of random, correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions. Velocity perturbations are added to a three-dimensional (3D) regional seismic velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area using a 3D von Karman random medium. Velocity correlation lengths of 5 and 10 km and standard deviations in the velocity of 5% and 10% are considered. The results show that significant deviations in predicted ground velocities are seen in the calculated frequency range (≤1 Hz) for standard deviations in velocity of 5% to 10%. These results have implications for the practical limits on the accuracy of scenario ground-motion calculations and on retrieval of source parameters using higher-frequency, strong-motion data.

  7. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Syahputra, Ahmad; Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  8. 3D velocity measurement by a single camera using Doppler phase-shifting holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, Nao; Kubo, Yamato; Barada, Daisuke; Kiire, Tomohiro

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand the details of the flow field in micro- and nano-fluidic devices, it is necessary to measure the 3D velocities under a microscopy. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of a new measuring technique for 3D velocity by a single camera. One solution is the use of holography, but it is well known that the accuracy in the depth direction is very poor for the commonly used in-line holography. At present, the Doppler phase-shifting holography is used for the 3D measurement of an object. This method extracts the signal of a fixed frequency caused by the Doppler beat between the object light and the reference light. It can measure the 3D shape precisely. Here, the frequency of the Doppler beat is determined by the velocity difference between the object light and the reference light. This implies that the velocity of an object can be calculated by the Doppler frequency. In this study, a Japanese 5 yen coin was traversed at a constant speed and its holography has been observed by a high-speed camera. By extracting only the first order diffraction signal at the Doppler frequency, a precise measurement of the shape and the position of a 5 yen coin has been achieved. At the same time, the longitudinal velocity of a 5 yen coin can be measured by the Doppler frequency. Furthermore, the lateral velocities are obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. A 5 yen coin has been traversed at different angles and its shapes and the 3D velocities have been measured accurately. This method can be applied to the particle flows in the micro- or nano-devices, and the 3D velocities will be measured under microscopes.

  9. Representation of 3-D surface orientation by velocity and disparity gradient cues in area MT.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Takahisa M; Nguyenkim, Jerry D; Deangelis, Gregory C

    2012-04-01

    Neural coding of the three-dimensional (3-D) orientation of planar surface patches may be an important intermediate step in constructing representations of complex 3-D surface structure. Spatial gradients of binocular disparity, image velocity, and texture provide potent cues to the 3-D orientation (tilt and slant) of planar surfaces. Previous studies have described neurons in both dorsal and ventral stream areas that are selective for surface tilt based on one or more of these gradient cues. However, relatively little is known about whether single neurons provide consistent information about surface orientation from multiple gradient cues. Moreover, it is unclear how neural responses to combinations of surface orientation cues are related to responses to the individual cues. We measured responses of middle temporal (MT) neurons to random dot stimuli that simulated planar surfaces at a variety of tilts and slants. Four cue conditions were tested: disparity, velocity, and texture gradients alone, as well as all three gradient cues combined. Many neurons showed robust tuning for surface tilt based on disparity and velocity gradients, with relatively little selectivity for texture gradients. Some neurons showed consistent tilt preferences for disparity and velocity cues, whereas others showed large discrepancies. Responses to the combined stimulus were generally well described as a weighted linear sum of responses to the individual cues, even when disparity and velocity preferences were discrepant. These findings suggest that area MT contains a rudimentary representation of 3-D surface orientation based on multiple cues, with single neurons implementing a simple cue integration rule.

  10. S and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian hotspot from the PLUME deployments of ocean-bottom and land seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, C. J.; Laske, G.; Solomon, S. C.; Collins, J. A.; Detrick, R. S.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bercovici, D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    Seismological studies can provide key constraints on the existence and characteristics of mantle plumes. Remotely located oceanic hotspots pose challenges for mantle seismic imaging with land stations because of the limited areal extent of oceanic islands and thus are excellent targets for dedicated marine experiments. The PLUME project at Hawaii successfully deployed two networks of ~35 ocean-bottom seismometers and a concurrent set of portable land seismometers, providing unprecedented, dense seismic coverage around Hawaii across an ~1,000-km-wide aperture. Three-dimensional finite-frequency body-wave tomographic images of S- and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian Islands show an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly that is elongated in the direction of the island chain and surrounded by a high-velocity anomaly in the shallow upper mantle that is parabolic in map view. Low velocities continue downward to the mantle transition zone between 410 and 660 km depth and extend into the topmost lower mantle. For P-waves, comparisons of inversions with separate data sets at different frequencies suggest that contamination by water reverberations is not markedly biasing the imaging. Many aspects of the S- and P-wave images are consistent with each other and support the hypothesis that the Hawaiian hotspot is the result of an upwelling, high-temperature plume. The broad upper-mantle low-velocity region beneath the Hawaiian Islands may reflect the "diverging pancake" at the top of the upwelling zone; the surrounding region of high velocities could represent a downwelling curtain; and the low-velocity anomalies southeast of Hawaii in the transition zone and topmost lower mantle are consistent with predictions of a tilted plume conduit. However, there are some differences in upper mantle structure between P-wave and S-wave velocity. Inversions without station terms show a southwestward shift in the location of lowest P-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle relative

  11. Effect of postural changes on 3D joint angular velocity during starting block phase.

    PubMed

    Slawinski, Jean; Dumas, Raphaël; Cheze, Laurence; Ontanon, Guy; Miller, Christian; Mazure-Bonnefoy, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the effect of posture during sprint start. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of the modification of horizontal distance between the blocks during sprint start on three dimensional (3D) joint angular velocity. Nine trained sprinters started using three different starting positions (bunched, medium and elongated). They were equipped with 63 passive reflective markers, and an opto-electronic Motion Analysis system was used to collect the 3D marker trajectories. During the pushing phase on the blocks, norm of the joint angular velocity (NJAV), 3D Euler angular velocity (EAV) and pushing time on the blocks were calculated. The results demonstrated that the decrease of the block spacing induces an opposite effect on the angular velocity of joints of the lower and the upper limbs. The NJAV of the upper limbs is greater in the bunched start, whereas the NJAV of the lower limbs is smaller. The modifications of NJAV were due to a combination of the movement of the joints in the different degrees of freedom. The medium start seems to be the best compromise because it leads, in a short pushing time, to a combination of optimal joint velocities for upper and lower segments.

  12. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  13. UCVM: Open Source Software for Understanding and Delivering 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based ground motion simulations can calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through 3D velocity models of the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework to help researchers build structured or unstructured velocity meshes from 3D velocity models for use in wave propagation simulations. The UCVM software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Currently, the platform supports multiple California models, including SCEC CVM-S4 and CVM-H 11.9.1, and has been designed to support models from any region on earth. UCVM is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. In this presentation, we describe improvements to the UCVM software. The current version, UCVM 14.3.0, released in March of 2014, supports the newest Southern California velocity model, CVM-S4.26, which was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations using CVM-S4 as the starting model (Lee et al., this meeting), and the Broadband 1D velocity model used in the CyberShake 14.2 study. We have ported UCVM to multiple Linux distributions and OS X. Also included in this release is the ability to add small-scale stochastic heterogeneities to extract Cartesian meshes for use in high-frequency ground motion simulations. This tool was built using the C language open-source FFT library, FFTW. The stochastic parameters (Hurst exponent, correlation length, and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio) can be customized by the user. UCVM v14.3.0 also provides visualization scripts for constructing cross-sections, horizontal slices, basin depths, and Vs30 maps. The interface allows researchers to visually review velocity models . Also, UCVM v14.3.0 can extract

  14. Separate Perceptual and Neural Processing of Velocity- and Disparity-Based 3D Motion Signals.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sung Jun; Czuba, Thaddeus B; Cormack, Lawrence K; Huk, Alexander C

    2016-10-19

    Although the visual system uses both velocity- and disparity-based binocular information for computing 3D motion, it is unknown whether (and how) these two signals interact. We found that these two binocular signals are processed distinctly at the levels of both cortical activity in human MT and perception. In human MT, adaptation to both velocity-based and disparity-based 3D motions demonstrated direction-selective neuroimaging responses. However, when adaptation to one cue was probed using the other cue, there was no evidence of interaction between them (i.e., there was no "cross-cue" adaptation). Analogous psychophysical measurements yielded correspondingly weak cross-cue motion aftereffects (MAEs) in the face of very strong within-cue adaptation. In a direct test of perceptual independence, adapting to opposite 3D directions generated by different binocular cues resulted in simultaneous, superimposed, opposite-direction MAEs. These findings suggest that velocity- and disparity-based 3D motion signals may both flow through area MT but constitute distinct signals and pathways.

  15. The terminal velocity of volcanic particles with shape obtained from 3D X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dioguardi, Fabio; Mele, Daniela; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Dürig, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    New experiments of falling volcanic particles were performed in order to define terminal velocity models applicable in a wide range of Reynolds number Re. Experiments were carried out with fluids of various viscosities and with particles that cover a wide range of size, density and shape. Particle shape, which strongly influences fluid drag, was measured in 3D by High-resolution X-ray microtomography, by which sphericity Φ3D and fractal dimension D3D were obtained. They are easier to measure and less operator dependent than the 2D shape parameters used in previous papers. Drag laws that make use of the new 3D parameters were obtained by fitting particle data to the experiments, and single-equation terminal velocity models were derived. They work well both at high and low Re (3 × 10- 2 < Re < 104), while earlier formulations made use of different equations at different ranges of Re. The new drag laws are well suited for the modelling of particle transportation both in the eruptive column, where coarse and fine particles are present, and also in the distal part of the umbrella region, where fine ash is involved in the large-scale domains of atmospheric circulation. A table of the typical values of Φ3D and D3D of particles from known plinian, subplinian and ash plume eruptions is presented. Graphs of terminal velocity as a function of grain size are finally proposed as tools to help volcanologists and atmosphere scientists to model particle transportation of explosive eruptions.

  16. UCVM: An Open Source Software Package for Querying and Visualizing 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide foundational data for ground motion simulations that calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) package for both Linux and OS X. This unique framework provides a cohesive way for querying and visualizing 3D models. UCVM v14.3.0, supports many Southern California velocity models including CVM-S4, CVM-H 11.9.1, and CVM-S4.26. The last model was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations on CVM-S4. Recently, UCVM has been used to deliver a prototype of a new 3D model of central California (CCA) also based on full-3D tomographic inversions. UCVM was used to provide initial plots of this model and will be used to deliver CCA to users when the model is publicly released. Visualizing models is also possible with UCVM. Integrated within the platform are plotting utilities that can generate 2D cross-sections, horizontal slices, and basin depth maps. UCVM can also export models in NetCDF format for easy import into IDV and ParaView. UCVM has also been prototyped to export models that are compatible with IRIS' new Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) visualization utility. This capability allows for user-specified horizontal slices and cross-sections to be plotted in the same 3D Earth space. UCVM was designed to help a wide variety of researchers. It is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. It is also used to provide the initial input to SCEC's CyberShake platform. For those interested in specific data points, the software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Also included in the last release was the ability to add small

  17. Developing Regionalized Models of Lithospheric Thickness and Velocity Structure Across Eurasia and the Middle East from Jointly Inverting P-Wave and S-Wave Receiver Functions with Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    DEVELOPING REGIONALIZED MODELS OF LITHOSPHERIC THICKNESS AND VELOCITY STRUCTURE ACROSS EURASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST FROM JOINTLY INVERTING P-WAVE...09NA293221 and DE-AC52-07NA273442 Proposal No. BAA09-13 ABSTRACT The main goal of this project is to develop models of lithospheric velocity...of the lithosphere are key for accurately modeling not only travel times but also surface-wave dispersion velocities and full waveforms at regional

  18. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jamie; Lefauve, Adrien; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a new experimental setup to study the exchange flow in an inclined square duct between two reservoirs containing fluids of different densities. This system can exhibit stratified shear wave motions, and has a distinct parameter threshold above which turbulence is triggered and progressively fills a larger fraction of the duct. To probe these intrinsically 3D flows, we introduce a new setup in which a traversing laser sheet allows us to obtain near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density fields. Three components of velocity are measured on successive 2D planes using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) with density information obtained simultaneously using laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  19. Analysis of the 3D Structure and Velocity of a CME on 2 January 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, F. M.; Cremades, H.

    We perform an analysis of the 3D structure and velocity of a CME (coronal mass ejection) ejected on 2 January 2008. The event was imaged by both STEREO A and B spacecraft (mutual separation of ˜44°), providing polarized images of the event from two different points of view. To obtain information on the 3D structure of the CME from polarized images, a polarization technique (Moran & Davila, Science 305, 66, 2003) is applied. Aided by this method, we have constructed topographical maps which show the height of the various event features from the plane of the sky (i.e. toward or away from the observer) and have dinamically analyzed and compared the real and projected on the plane of the sky velocities.

  20. A 3D radiative transfer framework . VII. Arbitrary velocity fields in the Eulerian frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelmann, A. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Baron, E.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: A solution of the radiative-transfer problem in 3D with arbitrary velocity fields in the Eulerian frame is presented. The method is implemented in our 3D radiative transfer framework and used in the PHOENIX/3D code. It is tested by comparison to our well-tested 1D co-moving frame radiative transfer code, where the treatment of a monotonic velocity field is implemented in the Lagrangian frame. The Eulerian formulation does not need much additional memory and is useable on state-of-the-art computers, even large-scale applications with 1000's of wavelength points are feasible. Methods: In the Eulerian formulation of the problem, the photon is seen by the atom at a Doppler-shifted wavelength depending on its propagation direction, which leads to a Doppler-shifted absorption and emission. This leads to a different source function and a different Λ^* operator in the radiative transfer equations compared to the static case. Results: The results of the Eulerian 3D spherical calculations are compared to our well-tested 1D Lagrangian spherical calculations, the agreement is, up to vmax = 1 × 103 km s-1 very good. Test calculation in other geometries are also shown.

  1. Using twelve years of USGS refraction lines to calibrate the Brocher and others (1997) 3D velocity model of the Bay Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, John; Blair, Luke; Catchings, Rufus; Goldman, Mark; Perosi, Fabio; Steedman, Clare

    2004-01-01

    Campbell (1983) demonstrated that site amplification correlates with depths to the 1.0, 1.5, and 2.5 km/s S-wave velocity horizons. To estimate these depths for the Bay Area stations in the PEER/NGA database, we compare the depths to the 3.2 and 4.4 km/s P-wave velocities in the Brocher and others (1997) 3D velocity model with the depths to these horizons determined from 6 refraction lines shot in the Bay Area from 1991 to 2003. These refraction lines range from two recent 20 km lines that extend from Los Gatos to downtown San Jose, and from downtown San Jose into Alum Rock Park, to two older 200 km lines than run axially from Hollister up the San Francisco Peninsula to Inverness and from Hollister up the East Bay across San Pablo Bay to Santa Rosa. Comparison of these cross-sections with the Brocher and others (1997) model indicates that the 1.5 km/s S-wave horizon, which we correlate with the 3.2 km/s P-wave horizon, is the most reliable horizon that can be extracted from the Brocher and others (1997) velocity model. We determine simple adjustments to bring the Brocher and others (1997) 3.2 and 4.4 km/s P-wave horizons into an average agreement with the refraction results. Then we apply these adjustments to estimate depths to the 1.5 and 2.5 km/s S-wave horizons beneath the strong motion stations in the PEER/NGA database.

  2. Locating earthquakes in west Texas oil fields using 3-D anisotropic velocity models

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fa; Doser, D.; Baker, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Earthquakes within the War-Wink gas field, Ward County, Texas, that have been located with a 1-D velocity model occur near the edges and top of a naturally occurring overpressured zone. Because the War-Wink field is a structurally controlled anticline with significant velocity anisotropy associated with the overpressured zone and finely layered evaporites, the authors have attempted to re-locate earthquakes using a 3-D anisotropic velocity model. Preliminary results with this model give the unsatisfactory result that many earthquakes previously located at the top of the overpressured zone (3-3.5 km) moved into the evaporites (1-1.5 km) above the field. They believe that this result could be caused by: (1) aliasing the velocity model; or (2) problems in determining the correct location minima when several minima exist. They are currently attempting to determine which of these causes is more likely for the unsatisfactory result observed.

  3. UCVM: An Open Source Framework for 3D Velocity Model Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Small, P.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide fundamental input data to ground motion simulations, in the form of structured or unstructured meshes or grids. Numerous models are available for California, as well as for other parts of the United States and Europe, but models do not share a common interface. Being able to interact with these models in a standardized way is critical in order to configure and run 3D ground motion simulations. The Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software, developed by researchers at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), is an open source framework designed to provide a cohesive way to interact with seismic velocity models. We describe the several ways in which we have improved the UCVM software over the last year. We have simplified the UCVM installation process by automating the installation of various community codebases, improving the ease of use.. We discuss how UCVM software was used to build velocity meshes for high-frequency (4Hz) deterministic 3D wave propagation simulations, and how the UCVM framework interacts with other open source resources, such as NetCDF file formats for visualization. The UCVM software uses a layered software architecture that transparently converts geographic coordinates to the coordinate systems used by the underlying velocity models and supports inclusion of a configurable near-surface geotechnical layer, while interacting with the velocity model codes through their existing software interfaces. No changes to the velocity model codes are required. Our recent UCVM installation improvements bundle UCVM with a setup script, written in Python, which guides users through the process that installs the UCVM software along with all the user-selectable velocity models. Each velocity model is converted into a standardized (configure, make, make install) format that is easily downloaded and installed via the script. UCVM is often run in specialized high performance computing (HPC

  4. Joint Inversion of Geoid Anomaly and Teleseismic P-Wave Delay Times: Modeling Density and Velocity Perturbations Beneath the Parana Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, C. A. M.; Ussami, N.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Parana Magmatic Province (PMP) is one of the largest continental igneous provinces (LIP) on Earth. It is well dated at 133 Ma preceding the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, but the causative geodynamic processes are still poorly understood. Although a low-velocity anomaly has been imaged by seismic tomography in the northeast region of the PMP and interpreted as a fossil conduct of a mantle plume that is related to the flood basalt eruptions, geochemical data indicate that such magmatism is caused by the melting of a heterogeneous and enriched lithospheric mantle with no deep plume participation. Models of density perturbations in the upper mantle estimated from joint inversion of geoid anomalies and P-wave delay times will offer important constraints on mantle dynamics. A new generation of accurate global geopotential models derived from satellite-missions (e.g. GRACE, GOCE) allows us to estimate density distribution within the Earth from geoid inversion. In order to obtain the residual geoid anomaly related to the density structure of the mantle, we use the EGM2008 model removing estimated geoid perturbations owing to variations in crustal structure (i.e., topographical masses, Moho depth, thickness of sediments and basalts). Using a spherical-Earth approximation, the density model space is represented by a set of tesseroids and the velocity model is parameterized in nodes of a spherical grid where cubic B-splines are utilized as an interpolation function. To constrain the density inversion, we add more than 10,000 manually picked teleseismic P-wave delay times. During the inversion procedure, density and P-wave velocity are linked through the optimization of a constant linear factor correlating density and velocity perturbation. Such optimization will be performed using a probability density function (PDF) [Tarantola, 2005]. We will present the preliminary results of this joint inversion scheme and hypothesize on the geodynamic processes responsible for

  5. Ultrasonic 3-D Vector Flow Method for Quantitative In Vivo Peak Velocity and Flow Rate Estimation.

    PubMed

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Thomsen, Carsten; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical ultrasound (US) systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the transverse oscillation method, a 32×32 element matrix array, and the experimental US scanner SARUS is presented. The aim of this paper is to estimate precise flow rates and peak velocities derived from 3-D vector flow estimates. The emission sequence provides 3-D vector flow estimates at up to 1.145 frames/s in a plane, and was used to estimate 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional image plane. The method is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom ( ∅=8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow-rig compared with the expected 79.8 L/min, and to 2.68 ± 0.04 mL/stroke in the pulsating environment compared with the expected 2.57 ± 0.08 mL/stroke. Flow rates estimated in the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer are compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured flow rates using a 1-D through-plane velocity sequence. Mean flow rates were 333 ± 31 mL/min for the presented method and 346 ± 2 mL/min for the MRI measurements.

  6. Developing Regionalized Models of Lithospheric Thickness and Velocity Structure Across Eurasia and the Middle East from Jointly Inverting P-Wave and S-Wave Receiver Functions with Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    DEVELOPING REGIONALIZED MODELS OF LITHOSPHERIC THICKNESS AND VELOCITY STRUCTURE ACROSS EURASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST FROM JOINTLY INVERTING P-WAVE... lithospheric velocity structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East. We expect the regionalized models will improve...important differences in lithospheric structure between the cratonic regions of Eastern Europe and the tectonic regions of Western Europe and the

  7. Estimating Attenuation Coefficients and P-Wave Velocities of the Shallow San Jacinto Fault Zone from Betsy Gunshots Data Recorded by a Spatially Dense Array with 1108 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozakin, Yaman; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    We estimate values of P wave velocity and P attenuation coefficients (QP) for the subsurface material at the Sage Brush Flat site along the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone. The data are generated by 33 Betsy gunshots and recorded by a spatially dense array of 1108 vertical component geophones deployed in a rectangular grid that is approximately 600 m x 600 m. We automatically pick the arrival times of the seismic body waves from each explosion arriving at stations within 200 m. These measurements are used to derive an average velocity map with velocity values ranging from 500 m/s to 1250 m/s. We estimate the energy of the early P waves by squaring the amplitudes in a short window relative to the automatic picks. These energies are fitted to a decay function representing the geometrical spreading and intrinsic attenuation. By separating the stations into spatial bins and calculating attenuation values for each by linear regression, we construct a QP values map. Most of the QP values are in 5-20 range, which is consistent with other studies of shallow fault zone regions.

  8. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  9. Ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with variable effective pressure at the boundary between slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism: IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; 314/315/316 Scientist, I.

    2008-12-01

    IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001 is located on the hanging wall of the midslope megasplay fault in the Nankai subduction zone off Kii peninsula (SW Japan), and penetrated an unconformity between ~200 m thick slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism. While a down-section porosity increase was clearly observed at the boundary from ~50% to ~60%, logging velocity does not appear to decrease at the boundary, which suggests that different diagenetic processes might exist above and below the boundary. In this study, we conducted ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with pore pressure control. We also conducted observations of sediment and chemical analysis. We examined the relationships between the acoustic properties, sediment textures, logging data from IODP Expedition 314 Site C0001 and data from shipboard core analysis. The ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements were conducted under constant pore pressure (500 kPa) and varying confining pressure to control effective pressure. The confining pressure ranges from 550 kPa to a maximum calculated from the density of overlying sediments (lithostatic pressure - hydrostatic pressure). 8 samples were analyzed, located from ~70 m to ~450 m below the sea floor. P-wave velocity ranges from ~1620 m/s to ~1990 m/s under the hydrostatic pressure condition. These velocities are in good agreement with the logging data. Porosity-velocity relationship in the analyzed data also coincide with that observed in the logging data. Samples shallower than ~300 m fall within previously-defined empirical relationships for normal- and high- consolidation. The deeper samples (at ~370 m and ~450 m below sea floor) show much higher velocity than that predicted by the empirical relationship, suggesting that significant cementation is present in those samples. The textural observations of sediments indicate a decrease in pore space with depth. Quartz and feldspar grains are surrounded by clay mineral matrices. Grain size seems to be almost

  10. Seismicity patterns along the Ecuadorian subduction zone: new constraints from earthquake location in a 3-D a priori velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Vaca, Sandro; Theunissen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To improve earthquake location, we create a 3-D a priori P-wave velocity model (3-DVM) that approximates the large velocity variations of the Ecuadorian subduction system. The 3-DVM is constructed from the integration of geophysical and geological data that depend on the structural geometry and velocity properties of the crust and the upper mantle. In addition, specific station selection is carried out to compensate for the high station density on the Andean Chain. 3-D synthetic experiments are then designed to evaluate the network capacity to recover the event position using only P arrivals and the MAXI technique. Three synthetic earthquake location experiments are proposed: (1) noise-free and (2) noisy arrivals used in the 3-DVM, and (3) noise-free arrivals used in a 1-DVM. Synthetic results indicate that, under the best conditions (exact arrival data set and 3-DVM), the spatiotemporal configuration of the Ecuadorian network can accurately locate 70 per cent of events in the frontal part of the subduction zone (average azimuthal gap is 289° ± 44°). Noisy P arrivals (up to ± 0.3 s) can accurately located 50 per cent of earthquakes. Processing earthquake location within a 1-DVM almost never allows accurate hypocentre position for offshore earthquakes (15 per cent), which highlights the role of using a 3-DVM in subduction zone. For the application to real data, the seismicity distribution from the 3-D-MAXI catalogue is also compared to the determinations obtained in a 1-D-layered VM. In addition to good-quality location uncertainties, the clustering and the depth distribution confirm the 3-D-MAXI catalogue reliability. The pattern of the seismicity distribution (a 13 yr record during the inter-seismic period of the seismic cycle) is compared to the pattern of rupture zone and asperity of the Mw = 7.9 1942 and the Mw = 7.7 1958 events (the Mw = 8.8 1906 asperity patch is not defined). We observe that the nucleation of 1942, 1958 and 1906 events coincides with

  11. Model-based correction of velocity measurements in navigated 3-D ultrasound imaging during neurosurgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Daniel Hoyer; Lindseth, Frank; Unsgaard, Geirmund; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2013-09-01

    In neurosurgery, information of blood flow is important to identify and avoid damage to important vessels. Three-dimensional intraoperative ultrasound color-Doppler imaging has proven useful in this respect. However, due to Doppler angle-dependencies and the complexity of the vascular architecture, clinical valuable 3-D information of flow direction and velocity is currently not available. In this work, we aim to correct for angle-dependencies in 3-D flow images based on a geometric model of the neurovascular tree generated on-the-fly from free-hand 2-D imaging and an accurate position sensor system. The 3-D vessel model acts as a priori information of vessel orientation used to angle-correct the Doppler measurements, as well as provide an estimate of the average flow direction. Based on the flow direction we were also able to do aliasing correction to approximately double the measurable velocity range. In vitro experiments revealed a high accuracy and robustness for estimating the mean direction of flow. Accurate angle-correction of axial velocities were possible given a sufficient beam-to-flow angle for at least parts of a vessel segment . In vitro experiments showed an absolute relative bias of 9.5% for a challenging low-flow scenario. The method also showed promising results in vivo, improving the depiction of flow in the distal branches of intracranial aneurysms and the feeding arteries of an arteriovenous malformation. Careful inspection by an experienced surgeon confirmed the correct flow direction for all in vivo examples.

  12. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  13. Rock Physics Interpretation of P-Wave Q and Velocity Structure, Geology, Fluids and Fractures at the Southeast Portion of The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P; Hutchings, L; Wagoner, J; Kasameyer, P

    2001-04-06

    We examine how quantitative rock physics models, such as effective medium theories, can improve the interpretation of seismic parameters and material and fluid properties at The Geysers. We use effective medium theories to estimate effects of fractures on velocities for The Geysers rocks. We compare theoretical velocity estimates to laboratory measurements from the literature and our seismic velocity values from 1992 earthquake data. We approximate the reservoir as being homogeneous in mineral composition, with a constant density of fractures whose total void ratio is reduced by lithostatic pressure. Thus, we expect low velocities near the surface, increasing with depth up to the values observed in the lab on intact samples, 5.5 - 5.7 km/sec. We use a one-dimensional inversion of P-waves to obtain an ''expected'' P-wave velocity (Vp) and attenuation (Qp) relation as a function of depth for The Geysers rocks. We then use a three-dimensional Vp and Qp inversion to find anomalous zones within the reservoir. We find portions with ''high'' Vp and Qp, high Vp and low Qp, and low Vp and low Qp. We interpret the regions with high Vp and Qp to be relatively less fractured, and the regions with low Vp and Qp to be significantly fractured. The high V and Q anomaly is centered on the zone of greatest pressure drop, and is mostly within the shallowest part of the felsite. The anomalous zones within the greywacke reservoir are on either side of the felsite, in areas of more moderate pressure depletion. More work is required to interpret the significance of these observations.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of 3D zooplankton trajectories and surrounding fluid velocity field in complex flows.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Deepak; Gemmell, Brad J; Hallberg, Michael P; Longmire, Ellen K; Buskey, Edward J

    2015-11-01

    We describe an automated, volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tracking method that measures time-resolved, 3D zooplankton trajectories and surrounding volumetric fluid velocity fields simultaneously and non-intrusively. The method is demonstrated for groups of copepods flowing past a wall-mounted cylinder. We show that copepods execute escape responses when subjected to a strain rate threshold upstream of a cylinder, but the same threshold range elicits no escape responses in the turbulent wake downstream. The method was also used to document the instantaneous slip velocity of zooplankton and the resulting differences in trajectory between zooplankton and non-inertial fluid particles in the unsteady wake flow, showing the method's capability to quantify drift for both passive and motile organisms in turbulent environments. Applications of the method extend to any group of organisms interacting with the surrounding fluid environment, where organism location, larger-scale eddies and smaller-scale fluid deformation rates can all be tracked and analyzed.

  15. A 3-D crustal velocity structure across the Variscides of southwest Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, M.; Readman, P. W.; O'Reilly, B. M.; Shannon, P. M.

    2003-04-01

    In the VARNET-96 experiment three seismic refraction profiles were acquired to examine the crustal structure in the south-west of Ireland. The shotpoint geometry allowed for both in-line and off-line fan shot recordings on the three profiles. Results of 3-D inversion modelling illustrate that there is pervasive lateral heterogeneity of the sedimentary and crustal velocity structure south of the Shannon Estuary. Palaeozoic strata at the south coast are about 5-6 km thick associated with the sedimentary infill of the Munster and South Munster Basins. To the north, shallow upper crust in the vicinity of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone is followed by a 3-4 km thick sedimentary succession in the Dingle-Shannon Basin. A zone of high-velocity upper crust (6.4-6.6 km/s) beneath the South Munster Basin correlates with a gravity high between the Kenmare-Killarney and the Leinster Granite gravity lows. Other high-velocity zones beneath Dingle Bay and the Kenmare River region may be associated with the deep traces of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone and the Cork-Kenmare Line. The 3-D velocity model was taken as a basis for the computation of PmP reflected arrivals from the crust-mantle boundary. The Moho depth varies from 28-29 km at the south coast to 32-33 km beneath the Dingle-Shannon Basin. Pervasive Variscan deformation appears to be confined to the sedimentary and upper crustal structure thus supporting a thin-skinned tectonic model for Variscan deformation. Deep-crustal variations only occur where they can be correlated with major tectonic features such as the Caledonian Iapetus Suture near the Shannon Estuary. The shallowing of the Moho towards the coast may result from Mesozoic crustal extension in the adjacent offshore sedimentary basins.

  16. GIA-Induced 3-D Crustal Velocities Predicted Using a New Generation of Viscoelastic Earth Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Latychev, K.; Tamisiea, M. E.; Tromp, J.; Milne, G. A.

    2004-05-01

    In recent work we have described a new finite-volume, time-domain numerical scheme for predicting the response of a complex (Maxwell) viscoelastic Earth model to arbitrary surface mass loads. The method permits the incorporation of 3-D variations in mantle viscoelastic structure including, for example, heterogeneities in elastic plate strength and mantle viscosity. To address these complexities numerically, we have developed our code for a distributed (parallel) computer environment such as a Beowulf PC cluster. In this talk we apply the numerical formulation to compute a suite of predictions of present-day 3-D crustal deformation rates driven by the glacial isostatic adjustment process (GIA). These predictions are generated using an input global ice model and an ocean load computed using a solution to the governing `sea-level equation'. The latter is obtained in a numerical calculation that utilizes the same space-time discretization as in the main solver. Our goal is to assess the sensitivity of previous predictions of GIA-induced 3-D crustal rates based on spherically symmetric Earth models to the introduction of: (1) elastic plate thickness variations within oceanic regions and across the ocean-continent interface; and (2) variations in mantle viscosity inferred, indirectly, from a tomographic model of seismic velocity heterogeneity.

  17. New P-wave Velocity Images of the Lowermost Mantle from a Bayesian Inversion of PKP, PcP, and P4KP Differential Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M.; Tkalcic, H.; Bodin, T.; Sambridge, M.; Tanaka, S.; Rawlinson, N.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the scale-length, magnitude, and distribution of chemical and thermal heterogeneities in the lowermost mantle is crucial to understanding whole mantle dynamics, and yet it remains a much debated and ongoing challenge in geophysics. Common shortcomings of current seismically-derived lowermost mantle models are often the result of a lack of access to and scrutiny in performing travel time measurements from waveform data, consequently incomplete raypath coverage, arbitrary model parameterization, inaccurate uncertainty estimates, and an inadequate definition of the misfit function in the optimization framework. In response, we present a new approach to global tomography where apart from improving the existing ray path coverage using only high quality cross-correlated waveform, the problem is addressed within a Bayesian framework and explicit regularization of model parameters is not required. Our results show that velocity heterogeneities exist on a variety of scales, with anomalies between 600 and 2900 km in lateral extent dominating the lowermost mantle heterogeneity pattern. This provides an important link between the very short-scale imaging achieved through scattering experiments and the long wave-length maps resulting from more traditional tomographic approaches. We also show that the power of heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle has an rms P-wave velocity variation of 0.88%, which is significantly larger than previous global-scale estimates, is fully justified by the data. Comparison of our P-wave velocity model with high-resolution S-wave velocity models refutes a purely thermal origin of mantle heterogeneity. The pattern of correlation between our model and S-wave models, combined with the characteristic scale-length and amplitude of heterogeneity revealed by this study, will help to significantly refine allowable models of thermo-chemical convection in the lowermost mantle. We obtain high resolution images of the lowermost mantle P-wave velocity

  18. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA's) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 - April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  19. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  20. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  1. Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D seismic tomography of refracted and reflected arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was studied by several seismic wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of seismic data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High seismic velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal refractions) only. In this study, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of refracted and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the

  2. 3D P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Tremor Locations in the Parkfield Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Bennington, N. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Harrington, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have assembled a new dataset to refine the 3D seismic velocity model in the Parkfield region. The S arrivals from 184 earthquakes recorded by the Parkfield Experiment to Record MIcroseismicity and Tremor array (PERMIT) during 2010-2011 were picked by a new S wave picker, which is based on machine learning. 74 blasts have been assigned to four quarries, whose locations were identified with Google Earth. About 1000 P and S wave arrivals from these blasts at permanent seismic network were also incorporated. Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are valuable for improving the precision of NVT location and the seismic velocity model at greater depths. Based on previous work (Shelley and Hardebeck, 2010), waveforms of hundreds of LFEs in same family were stacked to improve signal qualify. In a previous study (McClement et al., 2013), stacked traces of more than 30 LFE families at the Parkfileld Array Seismic Observatory (PASO) have been picked. We expanded our work to include LFEs recorded by the PERMIT array. The time-frequency Phase Weight Stacking (tf-PWS) method was introduced to improve the stack quality, as direct stacking does not produce clear S-wave arrivals on the PERMIT stations. This technique uses the coherence of the instantaneous phase among the stacked signals to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the stack. We found that it is extremely effective for picking LFE arrivals (Thurber et al., 2014). More than 500 P and about 1000 S arrivals from 58 LFE families were picked at the PERMIT and PASO arrays. Since the depths of LFEs are much deeper than earthquakes, we are able to extend model resolution to lower crustal depths. Both P and S wave velocity structure have been obtained with the tomoDD method. The result suggests that there is a low velocity zone (LVZ) in the lower crust and the location of the LVZ is consistent with the high conductivity zone beneath the southern segment of the Rinconada fault that

  3. Velocity and Density Models Incorporating the Cascadia Subduction Zone for 3D Earthquake Ground Motion Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies in the Pacific Northwest, three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity (3D Vp and Vs) and density (3D rho) models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone have been developed for the region encompassed from about 40.2?N to 50?N latitude, and from about -122?W to -129?W longitude. The model volume includes elevations from 0 km to 60 km (elevation is opposite of depth in model coordinates). Stephenson and Frankel (2003) presented preliminary ground motion simulations valid up to 0.1 Hz using an earlier version of these models. The version of the model volume described here includes more structural and geophysical detail, particularly in the Puget Lowland as required for scenario earthquake simulations in the development of the Seattle Urban Hazards Maps (Frankel and others, 2007). Olsen and others (in press) used the model volume discussed here to perform a Cascadia simulation up to 0.5 Hz using a Sumatra-Andaman Islands rupture history. As research from the EarthScope Program (http://www.earthscope.org) is published, a wealth of important detail can be added to these model volumes, particularly to depths of the upper-mantle. However, at the time of development for this model version, no EarthScope-specific results were incorporated. This report is intended to be a reference for colleagues and associates who have used or are planning to use this preliminary model in their research. To this end, it is intended that these models will be considered a beginning template for a community velocity model of the Cascadia region as more data and results become available.

  4. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  5. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Sutiyono, Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-01

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  6. Kinematic ground motion simulations on rough faults including effects of 3D stochastic velocity perturbations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert; Pitarka, Arben

    2016-01-01

    We describe a methodology for generating kinematic earthquake ruptures for use in 3D ground‐motion simulations over the 0–5 Hz frequency band. Our approach begins by specifying a spatially random slip distribution that has a roughly wavenumber‐squared fall‐off. Given a hypocenter, the rupture speed is specified to average about 75%–80% of the local shear wavespeed and the prescribed slip‐rate function has a Kostrov‐like shape with a fault‐averaged rise time that scales self‐similarly with the seismic moment. Both the rupture time and rise time include significant local perturbations across the fault surface specified by spatially random fields that are partially correlated with the underlying slip distribution. We represent velocity‐strengthening fault zones in the shallow (<5  km) and deep (>15  km) crust by decreasing rupture speed and increasing rise time in these regions. Additional refinements to this approach include the incorporation of geometric perturbations to the fault surface, 3D stochastic correlated perturbations to the P‐ and S‐wave velocity structure, and a damage zone surrounding the shallow fault surface characterized by a 30% reduction in seismic velocity. We demonstrate the approach using a suite of simulations for a hypothetical Mw 6.45 strike‐slip earthquake embedded in a generalized hard‐rock velocity structure. The simulation results are compared with the median predictions from the 2014 Next Generation Attenuation‐West2 Project ground‐motion prediction equations and show very good agreement over the frequency band 0.1–5 Hz for distances out to 25 km from the fault. Additionally, the newly added features act to reduce the coherency of the radiated higher frequency (f>1  Hz) ground motions, and homogenize radiation‐pattern effects in this same bandwidth, which move the simulations closer to the statistical characteristics of observed motions as illustrated by comparison with recordings from

  7. Using Adjoint Methods to Improve 3-D Velocity Models of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Tape, C.; Maggi, A.; Tromp, J.

    2006-12-01

    We use adjoint methods popular in climate and ocean dynamics to calculate Fréchet derivatives for tomographic inversions in southern California. The Fréchet derivative of an objective function χ(m), where m denotes the Earth model, may be written in the generic form δχ=int Km(x) δln m(x) d3x, where δln m=δ m/m denotes the relative model perturbation. For illustrative purposes, we construct the 3-D finite-frequency banana-doughnut kernel Km, corresponding to the misfit of a single traveltime measurement, by simultaneously computing the 'adjoint' wave field s† forward in time and reconstructing the regular wave field s backward in time. The adjoint wave field is produced by using the time-reversed velocity at the receiver as a fictitious source, while the regular wave field is reconstructed on the fly by propagating the last frame of the wave field saved by a previous forward simulation backward in time. The approach is based upon the spectral-element method, and only two simulations are needed to produce density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels. This method is applied to the SCEC southern California velocity model. Various density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels are presented for different phases in the seismograms. We also generate 'event' kernels for Pnl, S and surface waves, which are the Fréchet kernels of misfit functions that measure the P, S or surface wave traveltime residuals at all the receivers simultaneously for one particular event. Effectively, an event kernel is a sum of weighted Fréchet kernels, with weights determined by the associated traveltime anomalies. By the nature of the 3-D simulation, every event kernel is also computed based upon just two simulations, i.e., its construction costs the same amount of computation time as an individual banana-doughnut kernel. One can think of the sum of the event kernels for all available earthquakes, called the 'misfit' kernel, as a graphical

  8. 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara; Fischer, Karen M.; Abt, David

    2011-03-01

    Using a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, we have developed a 3-D upper-mantle model (SAWum_NA2) of North America that includes isotropic shear velocity, with a lateral resolution of ˜250 km, as well as radial and azimuthal anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of ˜500 km. Combining these results, we infer several key features of lithosphere and asthenosphere structure. A rapid change from thin (˜70-80 km) lithosphere in the western United States (WUS) to thick lithosphere (˜200 km) in the central, cratonic part of the continent closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front (RMF). Changes with depth of the fast axis direction of azimuthal anisotropy reveal the presence of two layers in the cratonic lithosphere, corresponding to the fast-to-slow discontinuity found in receiver functions. Below the lithosphere, azimuthal anisotropy manifests a maximum, stronger in the WUS than under the craton, and the fast axis of anisotropy aligns with the absolute plate motion, as described in the hotspot reference frame (HS3-NUVEL 1A). In the WUS, this zone is confined between 70 and 150 km, decreasing in strength with depth from the top, from the RMF to the San Andreas Fault system and the Juan de Fuca/Gorda ridges. This result suggests that shear associated with lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling dominates mantle deformation down to this depth in the western part of the continent. The depth extent of the zone of increased azimuthal anisotropy below the cratonic lithosphere is not well resolved in our study, although it is peaked around 270 km, a robust result. Radial anisotropy is such that, predominantly, ξ > 1, where ξ= (Vsh/Vsv)2, under the continent and its borders down to ˜200 km, with stronger ξ in the bordering oceanic regions. Across the continent and below 200 km, alternating zones of weaker and stronger radial anisotropy, with predominantly ξ < 1, correlate with zones of small lateral changes in the fast axis direction of

  9. 3-D finite-difference, finite-element, discontinuous-Galerkin and spectral-element schemes analysed for their accuracy with respect to P-wave to S-wave speed ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Galis, Martin; Chaljub, Emmanuel; Etienne, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    We analyse 13 3-D numerical time-domain explicit schemes for modelling seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion for their behaviour with a varying P-wave to S-wave speed ratio (VP/VS). The second-order schemes include three finite-difference, three finite-element and one discontinuous-Galerkin schemes. The fourth-order schemes include three finite-difference and two spectral-element schemes. All schemes are second-order in time. We assume a uniform cubic grid/mesh and present all schemes in a unified form. We assume plane S-wave propagation in an unbounded homogeneous isotropic elastic medium. We define relative local errors of the schemes in amplitude and the vector difference in one time step and normalize them for a unit time. We also define the equivalent spatial sampling ratio as a ratio at which the maximum relative error is equal to the reference maximum error. We present results of the extensive numerical analysis. We theoretically (i) show how a numerical scheme sees the P and S waves if the VP/VS ratio increases, (ii) show the structure of the errors in amplitude and the vector difference and (iii) compare the schemes in terms of the truncation errors of the discrete approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives. We find that four of the tested schemes have errors in amplitude almost independent on the VP/VS ratio. The homogeneity of the approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives in terms of the coefficients of the leading terms of their truncation errors as well as the absolute values of the coefficients are key factors for the behaviour of the schemes with increasing VP/VS ratio. The dependence of the errors in the vector difference on the VP/VS ratio should be accounted for by a proper (sufficiently dense) spatial sampling.

  10. A Detailed 3D Seismic Velocity Structure of the Subducting Pacific Slab Beneath Hokkaido, Tohoku and Kanto, Japan, by Double-Difference Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional heterogeneous structure beneath northeastern (NE) Japan has been investigated by previous studies and an inclined seismic low-velocity zone is imaged in the mantle wedge sub-parallel to the down-dip direction of the subducting slab (Zhao et al., 1992, Nakajima et al., 2001). However, the heterogeneous structure within the slab has not been well studied even though it is very important to understand the whole process of water transportation from the slab to the surface. Here we show a detailed 3D seismic velocity structure within the subducted Pacific slab around Japan and propose a water-transportation path from the slab to the mantle wedge. In this study, we estimated 3D velocity structure within the Pacific slab by the double-difference tomography (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). We divided the study area, from Hokkaido to Kanto, into 6 areas due to the limitation of memory and computation time. In each area, arrival-time data of 7,500-17,000 events recorded at 70-170 stations were used in the analysis. The total number of absolute travel-time data was about 140,000-312,000 for P wave and 123,000-268,000 for S wave, and differential data were about 736,000-1,920,000 for P wave and 644,000-1,488,000 for S wave. Horizontal and vertical grid separations are 10-25 km and 6.5 km, respectively. RMS residuals of travel times for P wave decreased from 0.23s to 0.09s and for S wave from 0.35s to 0.13s. The obtained results are as follows: (1) a remarkable low-Vs zone exists in the uppermost part of the subducting slab, (2) it extends down to a depth of about 80 km, (3) the termination of this low-Vs zone almost corresponds to the "seismic belt" recently detected in the upper plane of the double seismic zone (Kita et al.,2006; Hasegawa et al., 2007), (4) at depths deeper than 80 km, a low-Vs and high-Vp/Vs zone is apparently distributed in the mantle wedge, immediately above the slab crust. We consider that these features reflect water-transportation processes

  11. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  12. Quantification of velocity reduction after flow diverter placement in intracranial aneurysm: An ex vivo study with 3D printed replicas.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeff R; Klucznik, Richard; Diaz, Orlando; Zhang, Y Jonathan; Britz, Gavin W; Grossman, Robert G; Karmonik, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast MRI (pcMRI) was used to measure flow before and after placement of a flow diverter (n = 3). Decreases from 18% to 31% in flow velocity were seen in the inflow jet of the aneurysms. Flow patterns were also compared. It was observed that the gross aneurysmal flow patterns were maintained after flow diverter placement despite decreased fluid velocities. All measurements were carried out in 3D printed aneurysm replicas.

  13. Title of abstract - Different approaches to the determining of 3-d P and S wave velocity structures of the crust beneath Northern Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukova, O.

    2003-04-01

    The seismic images of the crust beneath Northern Tien Shan (NTS) are obtained with using of different sets of data and several algorithms for solution of local earthquake tomography problem. The NTS is a very interesting region from geophysical point if view due to high seismic activity caused by interplate collision: Tien Shan and Kazakh. A rectangular region under investigation is constrained by lines 41.90o N - 43.40o N and 73.50o E- 76.50o E. 14661 P and 14436 S wave arrival times recorded 12 seismic stations of the Kyrgyzstan Broadband Network (KNET) from local earthquake in 1991-1999 years are used. In addition, data from 267 local earthquake recorded over a period of about 20 years by a regional arrays of 93 seismographs in NTS are involved in inversions. 1-d optimal velocity models and stations delays are estimated with help of program VELEST (E.Kissling, 1995). Block parameterization of model and ray tracing described by Thurber and Ellsworth (1980) are used for determination of 3-d velocity structure and relocation of events as one of the approaches (programs S.Roecker Sphypit90 and Sphrel3d). Other approach consists in application linear or cubic B spline interpolation of velocity function and ray tracing Um and Thurber (1987) for the solution of forward problem (program C.Thurber et al. Simulps and own program). The data resolution analysis and statistical analysis of models was carried out. Calculated P wave tomographic models were compared with tomographic models S.Roecker et al. (1993), S.Ghose et al. (1998) and T.Sabitova (1996). The main result is the confirmation of existence of different seismic velocity structure beneath Kyrgyz Range and Chu Basin. Using various sets of date and methods for reconstruction velocity model is effective in reveal of more reliable velocity heterogeneities in the domain of research. The author is grateful to dr. I. Kitov for help and to dr. I.Sanina for useful discussion.

  14. Low-Velocity Impact Response and Finite Element Analysis of Four-Step 3-D Braided Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhong; Zhang, Yan; Gu, Bohong

    2013-08-01

    The low-velocity impact characters of 3-D braided carbon/epoxy composites were investigated from experimental and finite element simulation approaches. The quasi-static tests were carried out at a constant velocity of 2 mm/min on MTS 810.23 material tester system to obtain the indentation load-displacement curves and indentation damages. The low-velocity tests were conducted at the velocities from 1 m/s to 6 m/s (corresponding to the impact energy from 3.22 J to 116 J) on Instron Dynatup 9250 impact tester. The peak force, energy for peak force, time to peak force, and total energy absorption were obtained to determine the impact responses of 3-D braided composites. A unit cell model was established according to the microstructure of 3-D braided composites to derive the constitutive equation. Based on the model, a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT) has been compiled by FORTRAN and connected with commercial finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit to calculate the impact damage. The unit cell model successfully predicted the impact response of 3-D braided composites. Furthermore, the stress wave propagation and failure mechanisms have been revealed from the finite element simulation results and ultimate damage morphologies of specimens.

  15. 3D crustal velocity structure beneath the broadband seismic array in the Gyeongju area of Korea by receiver function analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Jung Mo; Cho, Hyun-Moo; Kang, Tae-Seob

    2016-10-01

    A temporary seismic array was in operation between October 2010 and March 2013 in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Teleseismic records of the seismic array appropriate for receiver function analysis were collected, and selected seismograms were split into five groups based on epicenters-the Banda-Molucca, Sumatra, Iran, Aleutian, and Vanuatu groups. 1D velocity structures beneath each seismic station were estimated by inverting the stacked receiver functions for possible groups. The inversion was done by applying a genetic algorithm, whereas surface wave dispersion data were used as constraints to avoid non-uniqueness in the inversion. The composite velocity structure was constructed by averaging the velocity structures weighted by the number of receiver functions used in stacking. The uncertainty analysis for the velocity structures showed that the average of 95% confidence intervals was ± 0.1 km/s. The 3D velocity structure was modeled through interpolation of 1D composite velocity structures. Moho depths were determined in each composite velocity structure based on the AK135-F S-wave velocity model, and the depths were similar to the H-κ analysis results. The deepest Moho depth in the study area was found to be 31.9 km, and the shallowest, was 25.9 km. The Moho discontinuity dips in a southwestward direction beneath the area. A low velocity layer was also detected between 4 and 14 km depth. Adakitic intrusions and/or a high geothermal gradient appear to be the causes of this low velocity layer. The 3D velocity structure can be used to reliably assess seismic hazards in this area.

  16. A genetic algorithm particle pairing technique for 3D velocity field extraction in holographic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Meng, H.

    This research explores a novel technique, using Genetic Algorithm Particle Pairing (GAPP) to extract three-dimensional (3D) velocity fields of complex flows. It is motivated by Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV), in which intrinsic speckle noise hinders the achievement of high particle density required for conventional correlation methods in extracting 3D velocity fields, especially in regions with large velocity gradients. The GA particle pairing method maps particles recorded at the first exposure to those at the second exposure in a 3D space, providing one velocity vector for each particle pair instead of seeking statistical averaging. Hence, particle pairing can work with sparse seeding and complex 3D velocity fields. When dealing with a large number of particles from two instants, however, the accuracy of pairing results and processing speed become major concerns. Using GA's capability to search a large solution space parallelly, our algorithm can efficiently find the best mapping scenarios among a large number of possible particle pairing schemes. During GA iterations, different pairing schemes or solutions are evaluated based on fluid dynamics. Two types of evaluation functions are proposed, tested, and embedded into the GA procedures. Hence, our Genetic Algorithm Particle Pairing (GAPP) technique is characterized by robustness in velocity calculation, high spatial resolution, good parallelism in handling large data sets, and high processing speed on parallel architectures. It has been successfully tested on a simple HPIV measurement of a real trapped vortex flow as well as a series of numerical experiments. In this paper, we introduce the principle of GAPP, analyze its performance under different parameters, and evaluate its processing speed on different computer architectures.

  17. A New Regional 3-D Velocity Model for Asia from the Joint Inversion of P-Wave Travel Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    global reference model ( Montagner and Kennett, 1996; Kennett et al., 1995). The attenuation profile is held constant everywhere in our model, except over...discrepancy’ between surface waves and body waves that other researchers have described (Baig and Dahlen, 2004; Montagner 216 2008 Monitoring Research...travel times, Geophys. J. Int’l. 122: 108-124. Montagner , J.-P. and B. L. N. Kennett (1996). How to reconcile body-wave and normal-mode reference earth

  18. Experimental study of two-phase fluid flow in two different porosity types of sandstone by P-wave velocity and electrical Impedance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, H.; Mitani, Y.; Kitamura, K.; Ikemi, H.; Takaki, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is recently expected as the promising method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is important to investigate CO2 behavior in the reservoir, to evaluate the safety and to account the stored CO2 volume. In this study, experimental investigation is conducted to discuss the relationships between injected fluid speed (Flow rate: FR) or capillary number (Ca) and non-wetting fluid flow by compressional wave velocity (Vp) and electrical impedance (Z). In the experiment, N2 and supercritical CO2 were injected into the two sandstones with different porosity (φ), Berea sandstone (φ: 18 %), and Ainoura sandstone (φ: 11.9 %). The dimension of the rock specimens is cored cylinder with a 35 mm diameter and 70 mm height. Experimental conditions are nearly same as the reservoir of deep underground (Confining pressure:15MPa, 40℃). Initial conditions of the specimen are brine (0.1wt%-KCl) saturated. Four piezo-electrical transducers (PZTs) are set on the each surface of the top, middle, lower of the specimen to monitor the CO2 bahavior by Vp. To measuring Z, we use for electrodes method with Ag-AgCl electrodes. Four electrodes are wounded around specimen on the both sides of PZTs. We measured the changes of these parameters with injecting N2, injected fluid speed (FR), the differential pore pressure (DP), N2 saturation (SN2), P-wave velocity (Vp) and electrical impedance (Z), respectively. We also estimated the Ca from measured FR. From these experimental results, there are no obvious Vp changes with increasing Ca, while Z measurement indicates clear and continuous increment. In regards to Vp, Vp reduced at the small FR (0.1 to 0.2 ml/min). As the Ca increases, Vp doesn't indicate large reduction. On the other hand, Z is more sensitive to change the fluid saturation than Vp. It is well-known that both of Vp and Z are the function of fluid saturation. Though, these experimental results are not consistent with previous studies. In

  19. Constraining Source Locations of Shallow Subduction Megathrust Earthquakes in 1-D and 3-D Velocity Models - A Case Study of the 2002 Mw=6.4 Osa Earthquake, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake source locations are generally routinely constrained using a global 1-D Earth model. However, the source location might be associated with large uncertainties. This is definitively the case for earthquakes occurring at active continental margins were thin oceanic crust subducts below thick continental crust and hence large lateral changes in crustal thickness occur as a function of distance to the deep-sea trench. Here, we conducted a case study of the 2002 Mw 6.4 Osa thrust earthquake in Costa Rica that was followed by an aftershock sequence. Initial relocations indicated that the main shock occurred fairly trenchward of most large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench off central Costa Rica. The earthquake sequence occurred while a temporary network of ocean-bottom-hydrophones and land stations 80 km to the northwest were deployed. By adding readings from permanent Costa Rican stations, we obtain uncommon P wave coverage of a large subduction zone earthquake. We relocated this catalog using a nonlinear probabilistic approach using a 1-D and two 3-D P-wave velocity models. The 3-D model was either derived from 3-D tomography based on onshore stations and a priori model based on seismic refraction data. All epicentres occurred close to the trench axis, but depth estimates vary by several tens of kilometres. Based on the epicentres and constraints from seismic reflection data the main shock occurred 25 km from the trench and probably along the plate interface at 5-10 km depth. The source location that agreed best with the geology was based on the 3-D velocity model derived from a priori data. Aftershocks propagated downdip to the area of a 1999 Mw 6.9 sequence and partially overlapped it. The results indicate that underthrusting of the young and buoyant Cocos Ridge has created conditions for interpolate seismogenesis shallower and closer to the trench axis than elsewhere along the central Costa Rica margin.

  20. Developing a 3D constrained variational analysis method to obtain accurate gridded atmospheric vertical velocity and horizontal advections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the constrained variational analysis (CVA) algorithm developed by Zhang and Lin (1997), a 3-dimensional (3D) version of CVA is developed. The new algorithm used gridded surface and TOA observations as constraints to adjust atmospheric state variables in each grid point to satisfy column-integrated mass, moisture and static energy conservation. From the process of adjustment a set of high-quality 3D large-scale forcing data (vertical velocity and horizontal advections) can be derived to drive Single-Column models (SCM), Cloud-Resolving Models (CRM) and Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) to evaluate and improve parameterizations. Since the 3D CVA can adjust gridded state variables from any data source with observed precipitation, radiation and surface fluxes, it also gives a potential possibility to use this algorithm in data assimilation system to assimilate precipitation and radiation data.

  1. Segment-interaction in sprint start: Analysis of 3D angular velocity and kinetic energy in elite sprinters.

    PubMed

    Slawinski, J; Bonnefoy, A; Ontanon, G; Leveque, J M; Miller, C; Riquet, A; Chèze, L; Dumas, R

    2010-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to measure during a sprint start the joint angular velocity and the kinetic energy of the different segments in elite sprinters. This was performed using a 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body. Eight elite sprinters (10.30+/-0.14s 100 m time), equipped with 63 passive reflective markers, realised four maximal 10 m sprints start on an indoor track. An opto-electronic Motion Analysis system consisting of 12 digital cameras (250 Hz) was used to collect the 3D marker trajectories. During the pushing phase on the blocks, the 3D angular velocity vector and its norm were calculated for each joint. The kinetic energy of 16 segments of the lower and upper limbs and of the total body was calculated. The 3D kinematic analysis of the whole body demonstrated that joints such as shoulders, thoracic or hips did not reach their maximal angular velocity with a movement of flexion-extension, but with a combination of flexion-extension, abduction-adduction and internal-external rotation. The maximal kinetic energy of the total body was reached before clearing block (respectively, 537+/-59.3 J vs. 514.9+/-66.0 J; p< or =0.01). These results suggested that a better synchronization between the upper and lower limbs could increase the efficiency of pushing phase on the blocks. Besides, to understand low interindividual variances in the sprint start performance in elite athletes, a 3D complete body kinematic analysis shall be used.

  2. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    DOE PAGES

    Debnath, Mithu; Iungo, G. Valerio; Ashton, Ryan; ...

    2017-02-06

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with goodmore » accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.« less

  3. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    SciTech Connect

    Debnath, Mithu; Iungo, G. Valerio; Ashton, Ryan; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Lundquist, Julie K.; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

  4. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Mithu; Valerio Iungo, G.; Ashton, Ryan; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Lundquist, Julie K.; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

  5. On the critical one-component velocity regularity criteria to 3-D incompressible MHD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanlin

    2016-05-01

    Let (u , b) be a smooth enough solution of 3-D incompressible MHD system. We prove that if (u , b) blows up at a finite time T*, then for any p ∈ ] 4 , ∞ [, there holds ∫0T* (‖u3(t‧) ‖ H ˙ 1/2 +2/p p + ‖b(t‧) ‖ H ˙ 1/2 +2/p p) dt‧ = ∞. We remark that all these quantities are in the critical regularity of the MHD system.

  6. 3D Velocity and Density Model of the Los Angeles Basin and Spectral Element Method Earthquake Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, P.; Shaw, J. H.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2001-12-01

    We present a 3D velocity model and a 3D density model of the LA basin. The LA basin velocity model was constructed using sonic log and stacking velocity information, provided by oil industry sources and not previously incorporated into southern California velocity models. The density model is based upon a new database of approximately 300 oil industry density logs from across the Los Angeles basin. These logs use gamma ray emissions to determine formation density at samples of about one meter. We have developed an empirical relation between sonic velocity and density by comparing data from approximately 30 wells in which we have both sonic and density logs. For the remaining wells, we have derived relationships between depth and density, and characterized this relationship for the three main stratigraphic sub-divisions of the SCEC Phase 2 model (Quaternary to base Pico Fm., top Repetto Fm. to top Mohnian, and top Mohnian to basement). The density-depth and density-velocity relations will provide independent rules that can be employed to define density and velocity structure in areas where data does not exist, or in other areas with similar lithology to the Los Angeles basin. We use a spectral element method (SEM) for simulation of seismic wave propagation which is currently being implemented on a 156-node Pentium PC cluster at Cal Tech. Preliminary work shows that SEM results using a 1D velocity model for southern California compare very well to discrete-wavenumber results. Both the density structure and velocity structure must be defined in a 3D model for its use in simulations of seismic wave propagation with a spectral element method, to predict the distribution of hazardous ground shaking during large events. Previous work has typically used density values which were predicted by the sonic velocity values; use of our measured density values should provide more accurate ground shaking predictions, and comparison to previous results will provide a useful

  7. Validation of 3D Seismic Velocity Models Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Larmat, C. S.; Porritt, R. W.; Higdon, D.; Allen, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    For over a decade now, many research institutions have been focusing on addressing the Earth's 3D heterogeneities and complexities by improving tomographic methods. Utilizing dense array datasets, these efforts have led to unprecedented 3D seismic images, but little is done in terms of model validation or to provide any absolute assessment of model uncertainty. Furthermore, the question of "How good is a 3D geophysical model at representing the Earth's true physics? " remains largely not addressed in a time when 3D Earth models are used for societal and energy security. In the last few years, new horizons have opened up in earth structure imaging, with the advent of new numerical and mathematical methods in computational seismology and statistical sciences. We use these methods to tackle the question of model validation taking advantage of unique and extensive High Performance Computing resources available at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We present results from a study focused on validating 3D models for the Western USA generated using both ray-theoretical and finite-frequency approximations. In this manner we do not validate just the model but also the imaging technique. For this test case, we utilize the Dynamic North America (DNA) model family of UC Berkeley, as they are readily available in both formulations. We evaluate model performances by comparing observed and synthetic seismograms generated using the Spectral Element Method. Results show that both, finite-frequency and ray-theoretical DNA09 models, predict the observations well. Waveform cross-correlation coefficients show a difference in performance between models obtained with the finite-frequency or ray-theory limited to smallest periods (<15s), with no perceptible difference at longer periods (50-200s). At those shortest periods, and based on statistical analyses on S-wave phase delay measurements, finite-frequency shows an improvement over ray theory. We are also investigating the breakdown of ray

  8. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North American and Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2015-02-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of the NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along the USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the east-west mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of the Tehuantepec and the Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  9. Finsler p p -waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Andrea; Pabst, Cornelia

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present Finsler gravitational waves. These are a Finslerian version of the well-known p p -waves, generalizing the very special relativity line element. Our Finsler p p -waves are an exact solution of Finslerian Einstein's equations in vacuum and describe gravitational waves propagating in an anisotropic background.

  10. Estimating 3D positions and velocities of projectiles from monocular views.

    PubMed

    Ribnick, Evan; Atev, Stefan; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of localizing a projectile in 3D based on its apparent motion in a stationary monocular view. A thorough theoretical analysis is developed, from which we establish the minimum conditions for the existence of a unique solution. The theoretical results obtained have important implications for applications involving projectile motion. A robust, nonlinear optimization-based formulation is proposed, and the use of a local optimization method is justified by detailed examination of the local convexity structure of the cost function. The potential of this approach is validated by experimental results.

  11. Characterizing 3-D flow velocity in evolving pore networks driven by CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnicki, K. N.; Yoon, H.; Martinez, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding reactive flow in geomaterials is important for optimizing geologic carbon storage practices, such as using pore space efficiently. Flow paths can be complex in large degrees of geologic heterogeneities across scales. In addition, local heterogeneity can evolve as reactive transport processes alter the pore-scale morphology. For example, dissolved carbon dioxide may react with minerals in fractured rocks, confined aquifers, or faults, resulting in heterogeneous cementation (and/or dissolution) and evolving flow conditions. Both path and flow complexities are important and poorly characterized, making it difficult to determine their evolution with traditional 2-D transport models. Here we characterize the development of 3-D pore-scale flow with an evolving pore configuration due to calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation and dissolution. A simple pattern of a microfluidic pore network is used initially and pore structures will become more complex due to precipitation and dissolution processes. At several stages of precipitation and dissolution, we directly visualize 3-D velocity vectors using micro particle image velocimetry and a laser scanning confocal microscope. Measured 3-D velocity vectors are then compared to 3-D simulated flow fields which will be used to simulate reactive transport. Our findings will highlight the importance of the 3-D flow dynamics and its impact on estimating reactive surface area over time. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114.

  12. Modeling and validation of a 3D velocity structure for the Santa Clara Valley, California, for seismic-wave simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Williams, R.A.; Carver, D.; Frankel, A.; Choy, G.; Liu, P.-C.; Jachens, R.C.; Brocher, T.M.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D seismic velocity and attenuation model is developed for Santa Clara Valley, California, and its surrounding uplands to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes. The model is developed using a variety of geologic and geophysical data. Our starting point is a 3D geologic model developed primarily from geologic mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys. An initial velocity model is constructed by using seismic velocities from boreholes, reflection/refraction lines, and spatial autocorrelation microtremor surveys. This model is further refined and the seismic attenuation is estimated through waveform modeling of weak motions from small local events and strong-ground motion from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Waveforms are calculated to an upper frequency of 1 Hz using a parallelized finite-difference code that utilizes two regions with a factor of 3 difference in grid spacing to reduce memory requirements. Cenozoic basins trap and strongly amplify ground motions. This effect is particularly strong in the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the Santa Clara Valley, where the steeply dipping Silver Creek fault forms the southwestern boundary of the basin. In comparison, the Cupertino Basin on the southwestern side of the valley has a more moderate response, which is attributed to a greater age and velocity of the Cenozoic fill. Surface waves play a major role in the ground motion of sedimentary basins, and they are seen to strongly develop along the western margins of the Santa Clara Valley for our simulation of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  13. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-In-Cell Methods on 3-D Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Pusok, A. E.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered to be a flexible and robust method to model advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e. rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems or incompressible Stokes problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an immobile, Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without preserving the zero divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e. non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Jenny et al., 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. Solutions to this problem include: using larger mesh resolutions and/or marker densities, or repeatedly controlling the marker distribution (i.e. inject/delete), but which does not have an established physical background. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (2001) and Meyer and Jenny (2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation (CVI) scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we follow up with these studies and report on the quality of velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We adapt the formulations from both Jenny et al. (2001) and Wang et al. (2015) for use on 3-D staggered grids, where the velocity components have different node locations as compared to finite element, where they share the same node location. We test the different interpolation schemes (CVI and non-CVI) in combination with different advection schemes (Euler, RK2 and RK4) and with/out marker control on Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. We show that a conservative formulation

  14. Investigating particle phase velocity in a 3D spouted bed by a novel fiber high speed photography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Long; Lu, Yong; Zhong, Wenqi; Chen, Xi; Ren, Bing; Jin, Baosheng

    2013-07-01

    A novel fiber high speed photography method has been developed to measure particle phase velocity in a dense gas-solid flow. The measurement system mainly includes a fiber-optic endoscope, a high speed video camera, a metal halide light source and a powerful computer with large memory. The endoscope which could be inserted into the reactors is used to form motion images of particles within the measurement window illuminated by the metal halide lamp. These images are captured by the high speed video camera and processed through a series of digital image processing algorithms, such as calibration, denoising, enhancement and binarization in order to improve the image quality. Then particles' instantaneous velocity is figured out by tracking each particle in consecutive frames. Particle phase velocity is statistically calculated according to the probability of particle velocity in each frame within a time period. This system has been applied to the investigation of particles fluidization characteristics in a 3D spouted bed. The experimental results indicate that the particle fluidization feature in the region investigated could be roughly classified into three sections by particle phase vertical velocity and the boundary between the first section and the second is the surface where particle phase velocity tends to be 0, which is in good agreement with the results published in other literature.

  15. Analysis of non linear partially standing waves from 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevard, D.; Rey, V.; Svendsen, Ib; Fraunie, P.

    2003-04-01

    Surface gravity waves in the ocean exhibit an energy spectrum distributed in both frequency and direction of propagation. Wave data collection is of great importance in coastal zones for engineering and scientific studies. In particular, partially standing waves measurements near coastal structures and steep or barred beaches may be a requirement, for instance for morphodynamic studies. The aim of the present study is the analysis of partially standing surface waves icluding non-linear effects. According to 1st order Stokes theory, synchronous measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity components allow calculation of rate of standing waves (Drevard et al, 2003). In the present study, it is demonstrated that for deep water conditions, partially standing 2nd order Stokes waves induced velocity field is still represented by the 1st order solution for the velocity potential contrary to the surface elevation which exhibits harmonic components. For intermediate water depth, harmonic components appear not only in the surface elevation but also in the velocity fields, but their weight remains much smaller, because of the vertical decreasing wave induced motion. For irregular waves, the influence of the spectrum width on the non-linear effects in the analysis is discussed. Keywords: Wave measurements ; reflection ; non-linear effects Acknowledgements: This work was initiated during the stay of Prof. Ib Svendsen, as invited Professor, at LSEET in autumn 2002. This study is carried out in the framework of the Scientific French National Programmes PNEC ART7 and PATOM. Their financial supports are acknowledged References: Drevard, D., Meuret, A., Rey, V. Piazzola, J. And Dolle, A.. (2002). "Partially reflected waves measurements using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)", Submitted to ISOPE 03, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2003.

  16. Validated 3D Velocity Models in Asia from Joint Regional Body- and Surface-Wave Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-17

    90, 150 and 210 km. Some features of note in the new model include: • Crustal thickening beneath the major orogenic zones in the region...the low velocity area with respect to the background model beneath central Iran, which may have implications for the active subduction processes...occurring beneath the Eurasian continental collision zone . The slice on the right at 85°E cuts across the Himalayan Front, from northeastern India into

  17. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  18. Study on 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in Sichuan-yunnan region, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, C.; Mooney, W.D.; Wang, X.; Wu, J.; Lou, H.; Wang, F.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the first arrival P and S data of 4 625 regional earthquakes recorded at 174 stations dispersed in the Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces, the 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in the region is determined, incorporating with previous deep geophysical data. In the upper crust, a positive anomaly velocity zone exists in the Sichuan basin, whereas a negative anomaly velocity zone exists in the western Sichuan plateau. The boundary between the positive and negative anomaly zones is the Longmenshan fault zone. The images of lower crust and upper mantle in the Longmenshan fault, Xianshuihe fault, Honghe fault and others appear the characteristic of tectonic boundary, indicating that the faults litely penetrate the Moho discontinuity. The negative velocity anomalies at the depth of 50 km in the Tengchong volcanic area and the Panxi tectonic zone appear to be associated with the temperature and composition variations in the upper mantle. The overall features of the crustal and the upper mantle structures in the Sichuan-Yunnan region are the lower average velocity in both crust and uppermost mantle, the large crustal thickness variations, and the existence of high conductivity layer in the crust or/and upper mantle, and higher geothermal value. All these features are closely related to the collision between the Indian and the Asian plates. The crustal velocity in the Sichuan-Yunnan rhombic block generally shows normal.value or positive anomaly, while the negative anomaly exists in the area along the large strike-slip faults as the block boundary. It is conducive to the crustal block side-pressing out along the faults. In the major seismic zones, the seismicity is relative to the negative anomaly velocity. Most strong earthquakes occurred in the upper-mid crust with positive anomaly or normal velocity, where the negative anomaly zone generally exists below.

  19. Seismic moment tensor inversion using 3D velocity model and its application to the 2013 Lushan earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lupei; Zhou, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-01

    Source inversion of small-magnitude events such as aftershocks or mine collapses requires use of relatively high frequency seismic waveforms which are strongly affected by small-scale heterogeneities in the crust. In this study, we developed a new inversion method called gCAP3D for determining general moment tensor of a seismic source using Green's functions of 3D models. It inherits the advantageous features of the "Cut-and-Paste" (CAP) method to break a full seismogram into the Pnl and surface-wave segments and to allow time shift between observed and predicted waveforms. It uses grid search for 5 source parameters (relative strengths of the isotropic and compensated-linear-vector-dipole components and the strike, dip, and rake of the double-couple component) that minimize the waveform misfit. The scalar moment is estimated using the ratio of L2 norms of the data and synthetics. Focal depth can also be determined by repeating the inversion at different depths. We applied gCAP3D to the 2013 Ms 7.0 Lushan earthquake and its aftershocks using a 3D crustal-upper mantle velocity model derived from ambient noise tomography in the region. We first relocated the events using the double-difference method. We then used the finite-differences method and reciprocity principle to calculate Green's functions of the 3D model for 20 permanent broadband seismic stations within 200 km from the source region. We obtained moment tensors of the mainshock and 74 aftershocks ranging from Mw 5.2 to 3.4. The results show that the Lushan earthquake is a reverse faulting at a depth of 13-15 km on a plane dipping 40-47° to N46° W. Most of the aftershocks occurred off the main rupture plane and have similar focal mechanisms to the mainshock's, except in the proximity of the mainshock where the aftershocks' focal mechanisms display some variations.

  20. On the location of microseismic sources in instable rock slope areas: heterogeneous vs. homogenous 3D velocity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coviello, Velio; Manconi, Andrea; Occhiena, Cristina; Arattano, Massimo; Scavia, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Rock-falls are one of the most common and hazardous phenomena occurring in mountainous areas. The formation of cracks in rocks is often accompanied by a sudden release of energy, which propagates in form of elastic waves and can be detected by a suitable transducer array. Therefore, geophones are among the most effective monitoring devices to investigate eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. However, the identification of an efficient procedure to forecast rock-fall occurrence in space and time is still an open challenge. In this study, we aim at developing an efficient procedure to locate microseismic sources relevant to cracking mechanisms, and thus gather indications on eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. Common seismic location tools usually implement homogeneous or multilayered velocity models but, in case of high slope gradients and heavily fractured rock masses, these simplifications may lead to errors on the correct estimation of the source location. Thus, we analyzed how the consideration of 3D material properties on the propagation medium may influence the location. In the framework of the Alcotra 2007-2013 Project MASSA (Medium And Small Size rock-fall hazard Assessment), a monitoring system composed by 8 triaxial geophones was installed in 2010 at the J.A. Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Italian Alps) and during the first year of operation the network recorded more than 600 natural events that exceeded a fixed threshold [1]. Despite the harsh environmental conditions of the study area, eighteen points distributed as uniformly as possible in space were selected for hammering. The artificial source dataset of known coordinates was used to constrain a 3D heterogeneous velocity model through a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique. In order to mitigate the intrinsic uncertainties of the inversion procedure, bootstrapping was performed to extend the dataset and a statistical analysis was issued to improve the model

  1. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  2. A Robust Method to Detect Zero Velocity for Improved 3D Personal Navigation Using Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhengyi; Wei, Jianming; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust zero velocity (ZV) detector algorithm to accurately calculate stationary periods in a gait cycle. The proposed algorithm adopts an effective gait cycle segmentation method and introduces a Bayesian network (BN) model based on the measurements of inertial sensors and kinesiology knowledge to infer the ZV period. During the detected ZV period, an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used to estimate the error states and calibrate the position error. The experiments reveal that the removal rate of ZV false detections by the proposed method increases 80% compared with traditional method at high walking speed. Furthermore, based on the detected ZV, the Personal Inertial Navigation System (PINS) algorithm aided by EKF performs better, especially in the altitude aspect. PMID:25831086

  3. Resolving the 3D velocity field inside a Roughness Sublayer in a turbulent channel flow using HPIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Microscopic holographic PIV is used to measure the 3D velocity field within the roughness sublayer of a turbulent channel flow at Reτ of 3400. Recording holograms through a rough surface is facilitated by matching the optical refractive index of the rough wall with that of the working fluid, a concentrated solution of NaI in water. The pyramidal roughness height is k=0.45mm, the sample volume size is 3.2x1.8x1.8mm^3, the long dimension being in the streamwise direction, and the wall-normal range is -0.333D grid to obtain vectors with a spacing of 60μm or 8.5 wall units. The data show that at y/k<0.5, there is a preferred channeling of the flow along paths that circumvent the pyramid crest lines. Planar vorticity distribution from different perspectives as well as 3D isosurfaces show that the near wall region is flooded by quasi-streamwise vortices that are aligned at shallow angles and have a typical streamwise extent of 1-2k.

  4. Near-wall 3D velocity measurements above biomimetic shark skin denticles using Digital In-line Holographic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Brajkovic, David; Hong, Jiarong

    2014-11-01

    Digital In-line Holography is employed to image 3D flow structures in the vicinity of a transparent rough surface consisting of closely packed biomimetic shark skin denticles as roughness elements. The 3D printed surface replicates the morphological features of real shark skin, and the denticles have a geometrical scale of 2 mm, i.e. 10 times of the real ones. In order to minimize optical aberrations near the fluid-roughness interface and enable flow measurements around denticles, the optical refractive index of the fluid medium is maintained the same as that of the denticle model in an index-matched flow facility using NaI solution as the working fluid. The experiment is conducted in a 1.2 m long test section with 50 mm × 50 mm cross section. The sampling volume is located in the downstream region of a shark skin replica of 12'' stretch where the turbulent flow is fully-developed and the transitional effect from smooth to the rough surface becomes negligible. Several instantaneous realizations of the 3D velocity field are obtained and are used to illustrate turbulent coherent structures induced by shark-skin denticles. This information will provide insights on the hydrodynamic function of shark's unique surface ornamentation.

  5. Retrieving lithospheric velocity structures beneath Taiwan region by nonlinear joint inversion of local and teleseismic P-wave data: Slab continuity and deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wu, Y.; Song, X.; Chang, C.; Kuo-Chen, H.

    2013-12-01

    , although the imaging turns slightly blurred, with the retreat of shallow portion of the EP, a collision seems taking place between the Eurasian lithosphere and the west-dipping PSP edge. We ultimately constructed a schematic model of 3-D slab geometry under Taiwan region through the robustness- test confirmation.

  6. 3D mechanical modeling of the GPS velocity field along the North Anatolian fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Ann-Sophie; Chéry, Jean; Hassani, Riad

    2003-04-01

    The North Anatolian fault (NAF) extends over 1500 km in a complex tectonic setting. In this region of the eastern Mediterranean, collision of the Arabian, African and Eurasian plates resulted in creation of mountain ranges (i.e. Zagros, Caucasus) and the westward extrusion of the Anatolian block. In this study we investigate the effects of crustal rheology on the long-term displacement rate along the NAF. Heat flow and geodetic data are used to constrain our mechanical model, built with the three-dimensional finite element code ADELI. The fault motion occurs on a material discontinuity of the model which is controlled by a Coulomb-type friction. The rheology of the lithosphere is composed of a frictional upper crust and a viscoelastic lower crust. The lithosphere is supported by a hydrostatic pressure at its base (representing the asthenospheric mantle). We model the long-term deformation of the surroundings of the NAF by adjusting the effective fault friction and also the geometry of the surface fault trace. To do so, we used a frictional range of 0.0-0.2 for the fault, and a viscosity varying between 10 19 and 10 21 Pa s. One of the most striking results of our rheological tests is that the upper part of the fault is locked if the friction exceeds 0.2. By comparing our results with geodetic measurements [McClusky et al., J. Geophys. Res. B 105 (2000) 5695-5719] and tectonic observations, we have defined a realistic model in which the displacement rate on the NAF reaches ˜17 mm/yr for a viscosity of 10 19 Pa s and a fault friction of 0.05. This strongly suggests that the NAF is a weak fault like the San Andreas fault in California. Adding topography with its corresponding crustal root does not induce gravity flow of Anatolia. Rather, it has the counter-intuitive effect of decreasing the westward Anatolian escape. We find a poor agreement between our calculated velocity field and what is observed with GPS in the Marmara and the Aegean regions. We suspect that the

  7. A New Ionosphere Tomography Algorithm with Two-Grids Virtual Observations Constraints and 3D Velocity Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Shum, Che-Kwan

    2014-05-01

    Due to the sparsity of world's GNSS stations and limitations of projection angles, GNSS-based ionosphere tomography is a typical ill-posed problem. There are two main ways to solve this problem. Firstly the joint inversion method combining multi-source data is one of the effective ways. Secondly using a priori or reference ionosphere models, e.g., IRI or GIM models, as the constraints to improve the state of normal equation is another effective approach. The traditional way for adding constraints with virtual observations can only solve the problem of sparse stations but the virtual observations still lack horizontal grid constraints therefore unable to fundamentally improve the near-singularity characteristic of the normal equation. In this paper, we impose a priori constraints by increasing the virtual observations in n-dimensional space, which can greatly reduce the condition number of the normal equation. Then after the inversion region is gridded, we can form a stable structure among the grids with loose constraints. We then further consider that the ionosphere indeed changes within certain temporal scale, e.g., two hours. In order to establish a more sophisticated and realistic ionosphere model and obtain the real time ionosphere electron density velocity (IEDV) information, we introduce the grid electron density velocity parameters, which can be estimated with electron density parameters simultaneously. The velocity parameters not only can enhance the temporal resolution of the ionosphere model thereby reflecting more elaborate structure (short-term disturbances) under ionosphere disturbances status, but also provide a new way for the real-time detection and prediction of ionosphere 3D changes. We applied the new algorithm to the GNSS data collected in Europe for tomography inversion for ionosphere electron density and velocity at 2-hour resolutions, which are consistent throughout the whole day variation. We then validate the resulting tomography model

  8. The 3-D strain patterns in Turkey using geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutoglu, Hakan Senol; Toker, Mustafa; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our use of GPS data to obtain and quantify the full continuous strain tensor using a 3-D velocity field in Turkey. In this study, GPS velocities improve the estimation of short-term strain tensor fields for determining the seismic hazard of Turkey. The tensorial analysis presents different aspects of deformation, such as the normal and shear strains, including their directions, the compressional and extensional strains. This analysis is appropriate for the characterizing the state of the current seismic deformation. GPS velocity data from continuous measurements (2009-2012) to estimate deformations were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK software. Using high-rate GPS data from permanent 146 GNSS stations (RTK-CORS-TR network), the strain distribution was determined and interpolated using a biharmonic spline technique. We show the strain field patterns within axial and plane form at several critical locations, and discuss these results within the context of the seismic and tectonic deformation of Turkey. We conclude that the knowledge of the crustal strain patterns provides important information on the location of the main faults and strain accumulation for the hazard assessment. The results show an agreement between the seismic and tectonic strains confirming that there are active crustal deformations in Turkey.

  9. 3D tomographic reconstruction of the internal velocity field of an immiscible drop in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdraon, Paul; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Landel, Julien R.; Peaudecerf, Francois J.

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the internal flow of a drop attached to a flat substrate and immersed in an immiscible shear flow. Transport inside the drop can play a crucial role in cleaning applications. Internal advection can enhance the mass transfer across the drop surface, thus increasing the cleaning rate. We used microlitre water-glycerol drops on a hydrophobic substrate. The drops were spherical and did not deform significantly under the shear flow. An oil phase of relative viscosity 0.01 to 1 was flowed over the drop. Typical Reynolds numbers inside the drops were of the order of 0.1 to 10. Using confocal microscopy, we performed 3D tomographic reconstruction of the flow field in the drop. The in-plane velocity field was measured using micro-PIV, and the third velocity component was computed from incompressibility. To our knowledge, this study gives the first experimental measurement of the three-dimensional internal velocity field of a drop in a shear flow. Numerical simulations and theoretical models published in the past 30 years predict a toroidal internal recirculation flow, for which the entire surface flows streamwise. However, our measurements reveal a qualitatively different picture with a two-lobed recirculation, featuring two stagnation points at the surface and a reverse surface flow closer to the substrate. This finding appears to be independent of Reynolds number and viscosity ratio in the ranges studied; we conjecture that the observed flow is due to the effect of surfactants at the drop surface.

  10. Illuminating the near-sonic rupture velocities of the intracontinental Kokoxili Mw 7.8 and Denali fault Mw 7.9 strike-slip earthquakes with global P wave back projection imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristoffer T.; Shearer, Peter M.

    2009-02-01

    The Denali and Kokoxili strike-slip earthquakes are two of the longest recent intracontinental ruptures. Previous studies report a range of rupture velocities. Here we image these earthquakes by reverse time migration of the intermediate-frequency P wave train recorded by global broadband seismometers. This technique permits a relatively direct measure of rupture velocity (speed and direction) as constrained by the radiated seismic energy, free from restrictive assumptions or rupture speed bounds placed on the solution. We compare our results with published seismic, GPS displacement, and surface slip inversion results. Both ruptures were initially subshear and transitioned over a distance no longer than 40 km to supershear speeds close to the P wave speed of ˜5.6 km/s. We investigate the accuracy of our results with synthetic data and experiment with using different imaging parameters and seismic subnetworks. These tests allow us to rule out the possibility of subshear speeds along the supershear segments. Although we cannot exclude supershear speeds of 4.5-6.5 km/s, our most reliable rupture velocities of ˜5.6 km/s are close to the local P wave speeds. We hypothesize that these intracontinental faults have weak shear strengths or high breakdown slips or crustal rigidities and experience at least moderate slip or slip rate weakening. Our observations and previous published results lead us to speculate that very long, surface-extending faults with general homogeneity in prestress and fault strength, together with smaller adjacent fault segments to provide triggering, may be necessary ingredients for the sub-Rayleigh to supershear rupture speed transition in strike-slip earthquakes.

  11. Low velocity crustal flow and crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan, SE Tibet, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haopeng; Zhu, Liangbao; Su, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    We used teleseismic data recorded by a permanent seismic network in Yunnan, SE Tibet, and measured the interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 10 and 60 s. A two-step inversion scheme was used to invert for the 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy structure of 10-110 km. The results show that there are two low velocity channels between depths of 20-30 km in Yunnan and that the fast axes are sub-parallel to the strikes of the low velocity channels, which supports the crustal flow model. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern is quite complicated and reveals a complex crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan. The N-S trending Lüzhijiang Fault separates the Dianzhong Block into two parts. In the western Dianzhong Block, the fast axis of the S-wave changes with depth, which indicates that the crust and the lithospheric mantle are decoupled. In the eastern Dianzhong Block and the western Yangtze Craton, the crust and the lithospheric mantle may be decoupled because of crustal flow, despite a coherent S-wave fast axis at depths of 10-110 km. In addition, the difference between the S-wave fast axis in the lithosphere and the SKS splitting measurement suggests that the lithosphere and the upper mantle are decoupled there. In the Baoshan Block, the stratified anisotropic pattern suggests that the crust and the upper mantle are decoupled.

  12. A compact single-camera system for high-speed, simultaneous 3-D velocity and temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2013-09-01

    The University of Michigan and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated on the initial development of a compact single-camera approach for simultaneously measuring 3-D gasphase velocity and temperature fields at high frame rates. A compact diagnostic tool is desired to enable investigations of flows with limited optical access, such as near-wall flows in an internal combustion engine. These in-cylinder flows play a crucial role in improving engine performance. Thermographic phosphors were proposed as flow and temperature tracers to extend the capabilities of a novel, compact 3D velocimetry diagnostic to include high-speed thermometry. Ratiometric measurements were performed using two spectral bands of laser-induced phosphorescence emission from BaMg2Al10O17:Eu (BAM) phosphors in a heated air flow to determine the optimal optical configuration for accurate temperature measurements. The originally planned multi-year research project ended prematurely after the first year due to the Sandia-sponsored student leaving the research group at the University of Michigan.

  13. Solar Wind Heating as Revealed from the Variation of 3D Ion Velocity Distributions across the Magnetic Reconnection Exhaust Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection within current sheet has been regarded as one of the crucial dissipation and heating processes of coherent structures in the solar wind turbulence. Counter-streaming of ions is an important phenomenon in the reconnection exhaust region ranged from the ion diffusion region to the extended outflow region. It has been suggested by theoretical and numerical models that the ions are going to be picked up by the ejecting magnetic field and show larger T_perpendicular than T_parallel, if the guide field is strong enough (in other word, the shear angle is relatively low). The pick-up behavior seems to favor the heating of heavy ions with high mass-to-charge ratio, since the high M/Q ions have larger gyro-period/transit-time and tend to be non-adiabatic more easily. The above statements from theoretical models have not been thoroughly testified in the solar wind observations, though the changes in total temperature and 1D reduced velocity distribution function had been studied. Until now, it remains unclear about the difference of full 3D velocity distribution for the proton and helium ions between the upstream and the exhaust regions. Here, we will analyze the plasma measurement data from WIND/3DP to explore and compare the parallel and perpendicular heating effect of different species of ions. As a preliminary result, the proton is found to show bi-directional streams in its velocity distribution in some reconnection exhaust regions. The thermalization of the counter-streaming protons will be presented. The relation between proton T_parallel/T_perpendicular and guide field strength (or shear angle) will be studied. The velocity distributions of helium ions will be illustrated, which shows the difference of heating effect between different M/Q ratios.

  14. 3-D P- and S-wave velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara

    2016-09-01

    To refine the 3-D seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time-frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.

  15. 3-D P- and S-wave velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara

    2016-01-01

    To refine the 3-D seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time–frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.

  16. Hypocenter relocation using a fast grid search method and a 3-D seismic velocity model for the Sumatra region

    SciTech Connect

    Nugroho, Hendro; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2013-09-09

    Determination of earthquake hypocenter in Indonesia conducted by the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) has still used a 1-D seismic velocity model. In this research, we have applied a Fast Grid Search (FGM) method and a 3-D velocity model resulting from tomographic imaging to relocate earthquakes in the Sumatran region. The data were taken from the MCGA data catalog from 2009 to 2011 comprising of subduction zone and on land fault earthquakes with magnitude greater than 4 Mw. Our preliminary results show some significant changes in the depths of the relocated earthquakes which are in general deeper than the depths of hypocenters from the MCGA data catalog. The residual times resulting from the relocation process are smaller than those prior to the relocation. Encouraged by these results, we will continue to conduct hypocenter relocation for all events from the MCGA data catalog periodically in order to produce a new data catalog with good quality. We hope that the new data catalog will be useful for further studies.

  17. Zemmouri earthquake rupture zone (Mw 6.8, Algeria): Aftershocks sequence relocation and 3D velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, A.; Dorbath, C.; Ousadou, F.; Maouche, S.; Chikh, M.; Bounif, M. A.; Meghraoui, M.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze the aftershocks sequence of the Zemmouri thrust faulting earthquake (21 May 2003, Mw 6.8) located east of Algiers in the Tell Atlas. The seismic sequence located during ˜2 months following the mainshock is made of more than 1500 earthquakes and extends NE-SW along a ˜60-km fault rupture zone crossing the coastline. The earthquake relocation was performed using handpicked P and S phases located with the tomoDD in a detailed 3D velocity structure of the epicentral area. Contrasts between velocity patches seem to correlate with contacts between granitic-volcanic basement rocks and the sedimentary formation of the eastern Mitidja basin. The aftershock sequence exhibits at least three seismic clouds and a well-defined SE-dipping main fault geometry that reflects the complex rupture. The distribution of seismic events presents a clear contrast between a dense SW zone and a NE zone with scattered aftershocks. We observe that the mainshock locates between the SW and NE seismic zones; it also lies at the NNS-SSE contact that separates a basement block to the east and sedimentary formations to the west. The aftershock distribution also suggests fault bifurcation at the SW end of the fault rupture, with a 20-km-long ˜N 100° trending seismic cluster, with a vertical fault geometry parallel to the coastline juxtaposed. Another aftershock cloud may correspond to 75° SE dipping fault. The fault geometry and related SW branches may illustrate the interference between pre-existing fault structures and the SW rupture propagation. The rupture zone, related kinematics, and velocity contrasts obtained from the aftershocks distribution are in agreement with the coastal uplift and reflect the characteristics of an active zone controlled by convergent movements at a plate boundary.

  18. Constructing a 3D Crustal Model Across the Entire Contiguous US Using Broadband Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity and Ellipticity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F. C.; Schmandt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging the crust and lithosphere structure beneath North America is one of the primary targets for the NSF-funded EarthScope project. In this study, we apply the recently developed ambient noise and surface wave tomography methods to construct a detailed 3D crustal model across the entire contiguous US using USArray data between January 2007 and May 2015. By using both Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity measurements between 8 and 100 sec period, the shear velocity structure can be well resolved within the five crustal layers we modeled: three upper crust, one middle crust, and one lower crust. Clear correlations are observed between the resolved velocity anomalies and known geological features at all depths. In the uppermost crust, slow Vs anomalies are observed within major sedimentary environments such as the Williston Basin, Denver Basin, and Mississippi embayment, and fast Vs anomalies are observed in environments with deeply exhumed bedrock outcrops at the surface including the Laurentian Highlands, Ouachita-Ozark Interior Highlands, and Appalachian Highlands. In the deeper upper crust, slow anomalies are observed in deep sedimentary basins such as the Green River Basin, Appalachian Basin, Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, and areas surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. Fast anomalies, on the other hand, are observed in the Colorado Plateau, within the Great Plains between the Front Ranges and Midcontinental Rift, and east of the Appalachian Mountains. At this depth, the Midcontinental Rift and Grenville Front clearly correlate well with various velocity structure boundaries. In the middle crust, slow anomalies are mostly observed in the tectonically active areas in the western US, but relatively slow anomalies are also observed southeast of the Precambrian Rift Margins. At this depth, fast anomalies are observed beneath various deep sedimentary basins such as the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, Appalachian Basin, and Central Valley. In the lower crust, a clear

  19. Well log analysis to assist the interpretation of 3-D seismic data at Milne Point, north slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2005-01-01

    In order to assess the resource potential of gas hydrate deposits in the North Slope of Alaska, 3-D seismic and well data at Milne Point were obtained from BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. The well-log analysis has three primary purposes: (1) Estimate gas hydrate or gas saturations from the well logs; (2) predict P-wave velocity where there is no measured P-wave velocity in order to generate synthetic seismograms; and (3) edit P-wave velocities where degraded borehole conditions, such as washouts, affected the P-wave measurement significantly. Edited/predicted P-wave velocities were needed to map the gas-hydrate-bearing horizons in the complexly faulted upper part of 3-D seismic volume. The estimated gas-hydrate/gas saturations from the well logs were used to relate to seismic attributes in order to map regional distribution of gas hydrate inside the 3-D seismic grid. The P-wave velocities were predicted using the modified Biot-Gassmann theory, herein referred to as BGTL, with gas-hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, porosity, and clay volume content. The effect of gas on velocities was modeled using the classical Biot-Gassman theory (BGT) with parameters estimated from BGTL.

  20. P wave azimuthal and radial anisotropy of the Hokkaido subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiongwei; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Jiabiao; Ruan, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the Hokkaido subduction zone, as well as P wave azimuthal anisotropy and S wave tomography, which are determined by inverting 298,430 P wave and 233,934 S wave arrival times from 14,245 local earthquakes recorded by 344 seismic stations. Our results reveal significant velocity heterogeneity, seismic anisotropy, and upwelling flows beneath the study region. In the mantle wedge, prominent low-velocity (low-V) anomalies exhibit trench-normal fast-velocity directions (FVDs) and a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., vertical velocity > horizontal velocity), which may reflect upwelling mantle flows. Fan-shaped FVDs are found at depths of 65-90 km, and a detailed 3-D mantle flow pattern is revealed, which may be caused by a combination of oblique subduction of the Pacific plate and collision of the Kuril arc with the Honshu arc beneath southern Hokkaido. The radial anisotropy changes at ~100 km depth, which may reflect variations in temperature and fluid conditions there. The subducting Pacific slab exhibits a positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal velocity > vertical velocity), which may reflect the original fossil anisotropy when the Pacific plate formed at the mid-ocean ridge.

  1. Three-Dimensional P-wave Velocity Structure Beneath Long Valley Caldera, California, Using Local-Regional Double-Difference Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, H. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    Eastern California's Long Valley Caldera (LVC) and the Mono-Inyo Crater volcanic systems have been active for the past ~3.6 million years. Long Valley is known to produce very large silicic eruptions, the last of which resulted in the formation of a 17 km by 32 km wide, east-west trending caldera. Relatively recent unrest began between 1978-1980 with five ML ≥ 5.7 non-double-couple (NDC) earthquakes and associated aftershock swarms. Similar shallow seismic swarms have continued south of the resurgent dome and beneath Mammoth Mountain, surrounding sites of increased CO2 gas emissions. Nearly two decades of increased volcanic activity led to the 1997 installation of a temporary three-component array of 69 seismometers. This network, deployed by the Durham University, the USGS, and Duke University, recorded over 4,000 high-frequency events from May to September. A local tomographic inversion of 283 events surrounding Mammoth Mountain yielded a velocity structure with low Vp and Vp/Vs anomalies at 2-3 km bsl beneath the resurgent dome and Casa Diablo hot springs. These anomalies were interpreted to be CO2 reservoirs (Foulger et al., 2003). Several teleseismic and regional tomography studies have also imaged low Vp anomalies beneath the caldera at ~5-15 km depth, interpreted to be the underlying magma reservoir (Dawson et al., 1990; Weiland et al., 1995; Thurber et al., 2009). This study aims to improve the resolution of the LVC regional velocity model by performing tomographic inversions using the local events from 1997 in conjunction with regional events recorded by the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) between 1980 and 2010 and available refraction data. Initial tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity zone at ~2 to 6 km depth beneath the caldera. This structure may simply represent the caldera fill. Further iterations and the incorporation of teleseismic data may better resolve the overall shape and size of the underlying magma reservoir.

  2. Velocity Measurement in Carotid Artery: Quantitative Comparison of Time-Resolved 3D Phase-Contrast MRI and Image-based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Nasiraei Moghaddam, Abbas; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza; Firouznia, Kavous; Shakiba, Madjid; Ghanaati, Hossein; Wilkinson, Iain David; Frangi, Alejandro Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background: Understanding hemodynamic environment in vessels is important for realizing the mechanisms leading to vascular pathologies. Objectives: Three-dimensional velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation is visualized using TR 3D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (TR 3D PC MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This study aimed to present a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the velocity vector field obtained by each technique. Subjects and Methods: MR imaging was performed on a 30-year old male normal subject. TR 3D PC MRI was performed on a 3 T scanner to measure velocity in carotid bifurcation. 3D anatomical model for CFD was created using images obtained from time-of-flight MR angiography. Velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation was predicted using CFD and PC MRI techniques. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the agreement between the two methods. Results: Although the main flow patterns were the same for the both techniques, CFD showed a greater resolution in mapping the secondary and circulating flows. Overall root mean square (RMS) errors for all the corresponding data points in PC MRI and CFD were 14.27% in peak systole and 12.91% in end diastole relative to maximum velocity measured at each cardiac phase. Bland-Altman plots showed a very good agreement between the two techniques. However, this study was not aimed to validate any of methods, instead, the consistency was assessed to accentuate the similarities and differences between Time-resolved PC MRI and CFD. Conclusion: Both techniques provided quantitatively consistent results of in vivo velocity vector fields in right internal carotid artery (RCA). PC MRI represented a good estimation of main flow patterns inside the vasculature, which seems to be acceptable for clinical use. However, limitations of each technique should be considered while interpreting results. PMID:26793288

  3. Assessment of earthquake locations in 3-D deterministic velocity models: A case study from the Altotiberina Near Fault Observatory (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, D.; Mirabella, F.; Chiaraluce, L.; Trippetta, F.; Lomax, A.

    2016-11-01

    The accuracy of earthquake locations and their correspondence with subsurface geology depends strongly on the accuracy of the available seismic velocity model. Most modern methods to construct a velocity model for earthquake location are based on the inversion of passive source seismological data. Another approach is the integration of high-resolution geological and geophysical data to construct deterministic velocity models in which earthquake locations can be directly correlated to the geological structures. Such models have to be kinematically consistent with independent seismological data in order to provide precise hypocenter solutions. We present the Altotiberina (AT) seismic model, a three-dimensional velocity model for the Upper Tiber Valley region (Northern Apennines, Italy), constructed by combining 300 km of seismic reflection profiles, six deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth), detailed data from geological surveys and direct measurements of P and S wave velocities performed in situ and in laboratory. We assess the robustness of the AT seismic model by locating 11,713 earthquakes with a nonlinear, global-search inversion method and comparing the probabilistic hypocenter solutions to those calculated in three previously published velocity models, constructed by inverting passive seismological data only. Our results demonstrate that the AT seismic model is able to provide higher-quality hypocenter locations than the previous velocity models. Earthquake locations are consistent with the subsurface geological structures and show a high degree of spatial correlation with specific lithostratigraphic units, suggesting a lithological control on the seismic activity evolution.

  4. Earthquake relocation using a 3D a-priori geological velocity model from the western Alps to Corsica: Implication for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, Nicole; Theunissen, Thomas; Beslier, Marie-Odile; Font, Yvonne; Thouvenot, François; Dessa, Jean-Xavier; Simon, Soazig; Courrioux, Gabriel; Guillen, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The region between the inner zones of the Alps and Corsica juxtaposes an overthickened crust to an oceanic domain, which makes difficult to ascertain the focal depth of seismic events using routine location codes and average 1D velocity models. The aim of this article is to show that, even with a rather lose monitoring network, accurate routine locations can be achieved by using realistic 3D modelling and advanced location techniques. Previous earthquake tomography studies cover the whole region with spatial resolutions of several tens of kilometres on land, but they fail to resolve the marine domain due to the absence of station coverage and sparse seismicity. To overcome these limitations, we first construct a 3D a-priori P and S velocity model integrating known geophysical and geological information. Significant progress has been achieved in the 3D numerical modelling of complex geological structures by the development of dedicated softwares (e.g. 3D GeoModeller), capable at once of elaborating a 3D structural model from geological and geophysical constraints and, possibly, of refining it by inversion processes (Calcagno et al., 2008). Then, we build an arrival-time catalogue of 1500 events recorded from 2000 to 2011. Hypocentres are then located in this model using a numerical code based on the maximum intersection method (Font et al., 2004), updated by Theunissen et al. (2012), as well as another 3D location technique, the NonLinLoc software (Lomax and Curtis, 2001). The reduction of arrival-time residuals and uncertainties (dh, dz) with respect to classical 1D locations demonstrates the improved accuracy allowed by our approach and confirms the coherence of the 3D geological model built and used in this study. Our results are also compared with previous works that benefitted from the installation of dense temporary networks surrounding the studied epicentre area. The resulting 3D location catalogue allows us to improve the regional seismic hazard assessment

  5. Finite-difference P wave travel time seismic tomography of the crust and uppermost mantle in the Italian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Serretti, P.; Morelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a 3-D P wave velocity model of the crust and shallowest mantle under the Italian region, that includes a revised Moho depth map, obtained by regional seismic travel time tomography. We invert 191,850 Pn and Pg wave arrival times from 6850 earthquakes that occurred within the region from 1988 to 2007, recorded by 264 permanent seismic stations. We adopt a high-resolution linear B-spline model representation, with 0.1° horizontal and 2 km vertical grid spacing, and an accurate finite-difference forward calculation scheme. Our nonlinear iterative inversion process uses the recent European reference 3-D crustal model EPcrust as a priori information. Our resulting model shows two arcs of relatively low velocity in the crust running along both the Alps and the Apennines, underlying the collision belts between plates. Beneath the Western Alps we detect the presence of the Ivrea body, denoted by a strong high P wave velocity anomaly. We also map the Moho discontinuity resulting from the inversion, imaged as the relatively sharp transition between crust and mantle, where P wave velocity steps up to values larger than 8 km/s. This simple condition yields an image quite in agreement with previous studies that use explicit representations for the discontinuity. We find a complex lithospheric structure characterized by shallower Moho close by the Tyrrhenian Sea, intermediate depth along the Adriatic coast, and deepest Moho under the two mountain belts.

  6. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North America and the Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2014-10-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh-waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the E-W mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  7. Crustal and upper mantle 3D shear wave velocity structure of the High Lava Plains, Oregon, determined from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Hedgecock, S.; Wagner, L.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of inversions for 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon using data from ~300 broadband stations of the High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA). The High Lava Plains (HLP) is a WNW progressive silicic volcanism, initiated ~14.5 Ma near the Owyhee Plateau and is currently active at the Newberry caldera. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic track is temporally contemporaneous with the HLP, but trends to the northeast, parallel to North American plate motion. The cause of volcanism along the HLP is debated and has been variously attributed to Basin and Range extension, back-arc extension, rollback of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and an intra-continental hotspot/plume source. Additionally the relationship between the HLP, YSRP, and Columbia River Basalts (CRB), the three major post-17Ma intracontinental volcanic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, is not well understood. The 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle to ~65km depth is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh wave ambient noise phase velocity maps at periods up to 40s. The use of ambient noise tomography with the dense station spacing of the combined High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) datasets allows the shallow structure of the High Lava Plains to be imaged in finer detail than previous ANT studies that focused on the entire western United States. In the crust, low velocities in central Oregon are observed in association with the Brothers Fault Zone, Jordan and Diamond Craters and Steens Mountain regions in addition to the strong low velocity zone associated with the Cascades to the west. To the east of the HLP, low velocities are observed to about 10km depth in the western SRP. In the eastern SRP we observe a shallow veneer of low velocities underlain by a ~10km thick high velocity

  8. Regional 3D Numerical Modeling of the Lithosphere-Mantle System: Implications for Continental Rift-Parallel Surface Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, S.; Bangerth, W.; Hager, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) is an active divergent plate boundary with slow, approximately E-W extension rates ranging from <1-6 mm/yr. Previous work using thin-sheet modeling indicates lithospheric buoyancy dominates the force balance driving large-scale Nubia-Somalia divergence, however GPS observations within the Western Branch of the EARS show along-rift motions that contradict this simple model. Here, we test the role of mantle flow at the rift-scale using our new, regional 3D numerical model based on the open-source code ASPECT. We define a thermal lithosphere with thicknesses that are systematically changed for generic models or based on geophysical constraints in the Western branch (e.g. melting depths, xenoliths, seismic tomography). Preliminary results suggest existing variations in lithospheric thicknesses along-rift in the Western Branch can drive upper mantle flow that is consistent with geodetic observations.

  9. A Global 3D P-Velocity Model of the Earth’s Crust and Mantle for Improved Event Location

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    locations were based on the ak135 model (Kennett et al., 1995). This shifting of locations tends to occur mostly along subduction zones , where the...features, many structural features present themselves. Clearly visible in the figures are subduction zones , mid-ocean ridges, slower velocities in...produced. Colors are percent change from the ak135 model. Clearly visible are tectonic features such as mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones , and large

  10. Waveform inversion for 3-D S-velocity structure of D'' beneath the Northern Pacific: possible evidence for a remnant slab and a passive plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.; Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke

    2016-12-01

    We conduct waveform inversion to infer the three-dimensional (3-D) S-velocity structure in the lowermost 400 km of the mantle (the D'' region) beneath the Northern Pacific region. Our dataset consists of about 20,000 transverse component broadband body-wave seismograms observed at North American stations for 131 intermediate and deep earthquakes which occurred beneath the western Pacific subduction region. We use S, ScS, and other phases that arrive between them. Resolution tests indicate that our methods and dataset can resolve the velocity structure in the target region with a horizontal scale of about 150 km and a vertical scale of about 50 km. The 3-D S-velocity model obtained in this study shows three prominent features: (1) prominent sheet-like lateral high-velocity anomalies up to ˜3% faster than the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) with a thickness of ˜200 km, whose lower boundary is ˜150 km above the core-mantle boundary (CMB). (2) A prominent low-velocity anomaly block located to the west of the Kamchatka peninsula, which is ˜2.5% slower than PREM, immediately above the CMB beneath the high-velocity anomalies. (3) A relatively thin (˜300 km) low-velocity structure continuous from the low-velocity anomaly "(2)" to at least 400 km above the CMB. We also detect a continuous low-velocity anomaly from the east of the Kamchatka peninsula at an altitude of 50 km above the CMB to the far east of the Kuril islands at an altitude of 400 km above the CMB. We interpret these features respectively as: (1) remnants of slab material where the bridgmanite to Mg-post-perovskite phase transition may have occurred within the slab, (2, 3) large amounts of hot and less dense materials beneath the cold Kula or Pacific slab remnants just above the CMB which ascend and form a passive plume upwelling at the edge of the slab remnants.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. 3D seismic velocity structure in the rupture area of the 2014 M8.2 Iquique earthquake in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, Jack; Fuenzallida, Amaya; Garth, Tom; Rietbrock, Andreas; Ruiz, Sergio; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-04-01

    Seismic velocity tomography is one of the key tools in Earth sciences to image the physical properties of the subsurface. In recent years significant advances have been made to image the Chilean subductions zone, especially in the area of the 2010 M8.8 Maule earthquake (e.g. Hicks et al., 2014), providing much needed physical constraints for earthquakes source inversions and rupture models. In 2014 the M8.2 Iquique earthquake struck the northern part of the Chilean subduction zone in close proximity to the Peruvian boarder. The pre- and aftershock sequence of this major earthquake was recorded by a densified seismological network in Northern Chile and Southern Peru, which provides an excellent data set to study in depth the 3D velocity structure along the subduction megathrust. Based on an automatic event catalogue of nearly 10,000 events spanning the time period March to May 2014 we selected approximately 450 events for a staggered 3D inversion approach. Events are selected to guarantee an even ray coverage through the inversion volume. We only select events with a minimum GAP of 200 to improve depth estimates and therefore increase resolution in the marine forearc. Additionally, we investigate secondary arrivals between the P- and S-wave arrival to improve depth location. Up to now we have processed about 450 events, from which about 150 with at least 30 P- and S-wave observations have been selected for the subsequent 3D tomography. Overall the data quality is very high, which allows arrival time estimates better than 0.05s on average. We will show results from the 1D, 2D, and preliminary 3D inversions and discuss the results together with the obtained seismicity distribution.

  12. A high resolution 3D velocity model beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area by MeSO-net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Sakai, S.; Honda, R.; Kimura, H.; Hirata, N.

    2015-12-01

    Beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) subducts and causes devastating mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). An M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this area at present has high potential to produce devastating serious loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates that an M7+ earthquake will cause 23,000 fatalities and 95 trillion yen (about 1 trillion US$) economic loss. We have launched the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters in collaboration with scientists, engineers, and social-scientists in nationwide institutions since 2012. We analyze data from the dense seismic array called Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), which has 296 seismic stations with spacing of 5 km (Sakai and Hirata, 2009; Kasahara et al., 2009). We applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) and estimated the velocity structure and the upper boundary of PSP (Nakagawa et al., 2010). The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) has activated seismicity also in Kanto region, providing better coverage of ray paths for tomographic analysis. We obtain much higher resolution velocity models from whole dataset observed by MeSO-net between 2008 and 2015. A detailed image of tomograms shows that PSP contacts Pacific plate at a depth of 50 km beneath northern Tokyo bay. A variation of velocity along the oceanic crust suggests dehydration reaction to produce seismicity in a slab, which may related to the M7+ earthquake. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters of MEXT, Japan and the Earthquake Research Institute cooperative research program.

  13. Isotropic photon drag: Analytic expressions for velocity (3D) and position (1D) with applications to blackbody friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    The motion of objects traveling at relativistic speeds and subject only to isotropic photon drag (blackbody friction as a special case) is modeled. The objects are assumed to be perfectly absorbing. Analytic expressions for velocity and position as a function of time for objects subject to photon drag are obtained for the case in which the photons are constrained to one-dimensional motion. If the object is also assumed to be a perfect emitter of energy, analytic expressions are found for time as a function of velocity of the body for photons constrained to one-dimensional motion, and for a full three-dimensional isotropic photon background. The derivations are carried out entirely from the point of view of a reference frame at rest relative to the isotropic photon field, so that no changes of reference frame are involved. The results for the three-dimensional model do not agree with work by previous authors, and this discrepancy is discussed. The derivations are suitable for use in the undergraduate classroom. Example cases for a light sail and a micron-sized sand grain are examined for interactions with the cosmic background radiation, assuming a temperature of 3000 K, the temperature at the time the universe became transparent, and it is found that relativistic speeds would decay on a time scale of years.

  14. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  15. Temperature surface measurements with a 3D velocity fluid flow measurement system using the same laser source and a single instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cervantes, Victor; Guerrero-Viramontes, J. Ascencion; Funes-Gallanzi, Marcelo

    2005-02-01

    The combination of flow velocimetry techniques and Temperature Sensitive Paints, (TSP), requires working with different laser beam intensities. Because velocity flow measurements (i.e. Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV) needs high level laser power compared with temperature surface measurement, where lower levels of laser power is required, is necessary to adjust the system to avoid the damage of the paint due to the high intensities in laser velocimetry measurements. The use of a paint of different grey levels, from white to black, as backgrounds above the TSP film deposition allows to make both, velocity and temperature measurements with the same laser power without damaging the TSP. This work is centered in the characterization, testing and calibration improvements of the temperature surface measurements using Temperature Sensitive Paints as a part of the 3D tunneling velocimetry system.

  16. Anisotropic 3-D Crustal Velocity Structure of Idaho/ Oregon from a Joint Inversion of Group and Phase Velocities of Love and Rayleigh Waves from Ambient Seismic Noise: Results from the IDOR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    We present new 3-D radially anisotropic and isotropic crustal velocity models beneath central Idaho and eastern Oregon. We produced the velocity models from Love and horizontal component Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity measurements on the IDaho/ORegon (IDOR) Passive seismic network, 86 broadband seismic stations, dataset using ambient noise tomography and the methods of Gallego et. al (2010) and Lin et. al (2008). We calculated inter-station group/phase velocities in narrow frequency bands from travel-time measurements of the rotated stacked horizontal component cross-correlations (bandpass filtered between 2 and 30 seconds), which we used to invert for velocity structure beneath the network. We derived group and phase velocity maps for each frequency band using the damped least-squares inversion method of Tarantola (2005), and then jointly inverted for velocity with depth. Moho depths are prescribed in the joint inversions based on receiver functions, also from the IDOR seismic data, and provides a starting crustal velocity model. Goals of our work include refining models of crustal structure in the accreted Blue Mountain terranes in the western study area; determining the depth extent of the Salmon River Suture/West Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which crosses north-south through the middle of the network; determining the architecture of the Idaho batholith, an extensive largely crustal-derived pluton; and examining the nature of the autochthonous (?) North American crust and lithosphere beneath and east of the batholith.

  17. Validation of a CFD Model by Using 3D Sonic Anemometers to Analyse the Air Velocity Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A. Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD model was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The model was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD model were not significantly different from the measured values. PMID:25621611

  18. Characterizing spatial variability in velocity and turbulence intensity using 3-D acoustic Doppler velocimeter data in a plane-bed reach of East St. Louis Creek, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Gabrielle C. L.; Legleiter, Carl J.; Wohl, Ellen; Yochum, Steven E.

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the influence on flow resistance of flow structure and turbulence at the reach scale in a mountain channel using 3-D velocity measurements and geostatistical analysis to understand the complexity of the flow structure in a reach with limited bed irregularities. The increase in flow resistance at low flows in a plane-bed reach was not fully explained by grain resistance, therefore detailed 3-D velocity measurements were made to investigate spatial variability in velocity and turbulence components and potential controls on flow resistance. One plane-bed reach was surveyed over two stages in Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado, using a combination of a total station, LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), and a SonTek Flowtracker handheld ADV (acoustic Doppler velocimeter). LiDAR was used to capture bank and channel geometry at low flows, whereas the water surface and bed data were collected with the total station at all flows. We used the standard deviation of bed elevation (σb) within a moving window as an index of roughness height (ks) and calculated the relative submergence of the bed at different stages as h/ks, where h is the local flow depth. ADV measurements were collected on a grid with a 0.3 m to 0.5 m spacing. Geostatistical analysis of the velocity data indicated that the flow was highly three-dimensional and varied based on stage, demonstrating that even small irregularities in the bed have a significant influence on the flow characteristics. The streamwise component was the largest at both low and high flow, but varied more throughout the reach at low flow. At high flow, the greatest streamwise velocities were located within the thalweg. Areas of upwelling and downwelling also varied based on stage, with this component being strongly influenced by small changes in the morphology at high flow, and by protuberant grains at low flows. The cross-stream velocity and turbulence components were controlled by the flow structure and less by the

  19. Calculation of three-dimensional (3-D) internal flow by means of the velocity-vorticity formulation on a staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to accurately compute the viscous flow in three-dimensional (3-D) enclosures. This method is the 3-D extension of a two-dimensional (2-D) method developed for the calculation of flow over airfoils. The 2-D method has been tested extensively and has been shown to accurately reproduce experimental results. As in the 2-D method, the 3-D method provides for the non-iterative solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations by means of a fully coupled implicit technique. The solution is calculated on a body fitted computational mesh incorporating a staggered grid methodology. In the staggered grid method, the three components of vorticity are defined at the centers of the computational cell sides, while the velocity components are defined as normal vectors at the centers of the computational cell faces. The staggered grid orientation provides for the accurate definition of the vorticity components at the vorticity locations, the divergence of vorticity at the mesh cell nodes and the conservation of mass at the mesh cell centers. The solution is obtained by utilizing a fractional step solution technique in the three coordinate directions. The boundary conditions for the vorticity and velocity are calculated implicitly as part of the solution. The method provides for the non-iterative solution of the flow field and satisfies the conservation of mass and divergence of vorticity to machine zero at each time step. To test the method, the calculation of simple driven cavity flows have been computed. The driven cavity flow is defined as the flow in an enclosure driven by a moving upper plate at the top of the enclosure. To demonstrate the ability of the method to predict the flow in arbitrary cavities, results will he shown for both cubic and curved cavities.

  20. 3D CFD modeling of flowing-gas DPALs with different pumping geometries and various flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacoby, Eyal; Waichman, Karol; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Scaling-up flowing-gas diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) to megawatt class power is studied using accurate three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, taking into account the effects of temperature rise and losses of alkali atoms due to ionization. Both the maximum achievable power and laser beam quality are estimated for Cs and K lasers. We examined the influence of the flow velocity and Mach number M on the maximum achievable power of subsonic and supersonic lasers. For Cs DPAL devices with M = 0.2 - 3 the output power increases with increasing M by only 20%, implying that supersonic operation mode has only small advantage over subsonic. In contrast, the power achievable in K DPALs strongly depends on M. The output power increases by 100% when M increases from 0.2 to 4, showing a considerable advantage of supersonic device over subsonic. The reason for the increase of the power with M in both Cs and K DPALs is the decrease of the temperature due to the gas expansion in the flow system. However, the power increase for K lasers is much larger than for the Cs devices mainly due to the much smaller fine-structure splitting of the 2P states ( 58 cm-1 for K and 554 cm-1 for Cs), which results in a much stronger effect of the temperature decrease in K DPALs. For pumping by beams of the same rectangular cross section, comparison between end-pumping and transverse-pumping shows that the output power is not affected by the pump geometry. However, the intensity of the output laser beam in the case of transverse-pumped DPALs is strongly non-uniform in the laser beam cross section resulting in higher brightness and better beam quality in the far field for the end-pumping geometry where the intensity of the output beam is uniform.

  1. 3-D GPS velocity field and its implications on the present-day post-orogenic deformation of the Western Alps and Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninh Nguyen, Hai; Vernant, Philippe; Mazzotti, Stephane; Khazaradze, Giorgi; Asensio, Eva

    2016-09-01

    We present a new 3-D GPS velocity solution for 182 sites for the region encompassing the Western Alps, Pyrenees, and southern France. The velocity field is based on a Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solution, to which we apply a common-mode filter, defined by the 26 longest time series, in order to correct for network-wide biases (reference frame, unmodeled large-scale processes, etc.). We show that processing parameters, such as troposphere delay modeling, can lead to systematic velocity variations of 0.1-0.5 mm yr-1 affecting both accuracy and precision, especially for short (< 5 years) time series. A velocity convergence analysis shows that minimum time-series lengths of ˜ 3 and ˜ 5.5 years are required to reach a velocity stability of 0.5 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. On average, horizontal residual velocities show a stability of ˜ 0.2 mm yr-1 in the Western Alps, Pyrenees, and southern France. The only significant horizontal strain rate signal is in the western Pyrenees with up to 4 × 10-9 yr-1 NNE-SSW extension, whereas no significant strain rates are detected in the Western Alps (< 1 × 10-9 yr-1). In contrast, we identify significant uplift rates up to 2 mm yr-1 in the Western Alps but not in the Pyrenees (0.1 ± 0.2 mm yr-1). A correlation between site elevations and fast uplift rates in the northern part of the Western Alps, in the region of the Würmian ice cap, suggests that part of this uplift is induced by postglacial rebound. The very slow uplift rates in the southern Western Alps and in the Pyrenees could be accounted for by erosion-induced rebound.

  2. Dynamics of pickup ion velocity distribution function in Titan's plasma environment (TA encounter): 3D hybrid kinetic modeling and comparison with CAPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a very important role in the plasma dynamics near Titan: mass loading, excitation of the low-frequency waves and the formation of the particle velocity distribution function, e.g. ring/shell-like distributions, etc. The kinetic approach is important for estimation of the collision processes e.g. a charge exchange. The particle velocity distribution function also plays a key role for understanding the observed particle fluxes. In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution function dynamics from 3D hybrid modeling. The modeling is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) ion measurements during the TA flyby. In our model the background ions, all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperatures of the background electrons and pickup electrons were also included into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. We use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components and include a simple ionosphere model with M=28 ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our modeling shows that interaction between background plasma and pickup ions H+, H2+, CH4+ and N2+ has a more complicated structure than was observed in the T9 flyby and modeling due to the large gyroradius of the background O+ ions [1,2,3,4]. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS TA observations. We also compare our kinetic modeling with other hybrid and MHD modeling of Titan's environment. References [1] Sittler, E.C., et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds

  3. Application of the H/V and SPAC Method to Estimate a 3D Shear Wave Velocity Model, in the City of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. E. A. P.; Aguirre, J.; Vazquez Rosas, R.; Suarez, G.; Contreras Ruiz-Esparza, M. G.; Farraz, I.

    2014-12-01

    Methods that use seismic noise or microtremors have become very useful tools worldwide due to its low costs, the relative simplicity in collecting data, the fact that these are non-invasive methods hence there is no need to alter or even perforate the study site, and also these methods require a relatively simple analysis procedure. Nevertheless the geological structures estimated by this methods are assumed to be parallel, isotropic and homogeneous layers. Consequently precision of the estimated structure is lower than that from conventional seismic methods. In the light of these facts this study aimed towards searching a new way to interpret the results obtained from seismic noise methods. In this study, seven triangular SPAC (Aki, 1957) arrays were performed in the city of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, varying in sizes from 10 to 100 meters. From the autocorrelation between the stations of each array, a Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curve was calculated. Such dispersion curve was used to obtain a S wave parallel layers velocity (VS) structure for the study site. Subsequently the horizontal to vertical ratio of the spectrum of microtremors H/V (Nogoshi and Igarashi, 1971; Nakamura, 1989, 2000) was calculated for each vertex of the SPAC triangular arrays, and from the H/V spectrum the fundamental frequency was estimated for each vertex. By using the H/V spectral ratio curves interpreted as a proxy to the Rayleigh wave ellipticity curve, a series of VS structures were inverted for each vertex of the SPAC array. Lastly each VS structure was employed to calculate a 3D velocity model, in which the exploration depth was approximately 100 meters, and had a velocity range in between 206 (m/s) to 920 (m/s). The 3D model revealed a thinning of the low velocity layers. This proved to be in good agreement with the variation of the fundamental frequencies observed at each vertex. With the previous kind of analysis a preliminary model can be obtained as a first

  4. Identification of source velocities on 3D structures in non-anechoic environments: Theoretical background and experimental validation of the inverse patch transfer functions method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucejo, M.; Totaro, N.; Guyader, J.-L.

    2010-08-01

    In noise control, identification of the source velocity field remains a major problem open to investigation. Consequently, methods such as nearfield acoustical holography (NAH), principal source projection, the inverse frequency response function and hybrid NAH have been developed. However, these methods require free field conditions that are often difficult to achieve in practice. This article presents an alternative method known as inverse patch transfer functions, designed to identify source velocities and developed in the framework of the European SILENCE project. This method is based on the definition of a virtual cavity, the double measurement of the pressure and particle velocity fields on the aperture surfaces of this volume, divided into elementary areas called patches and the inversion of impedances matrices, numerically computed from a modal basis obtained by FEM. Theoretically, the method is applicable to sources with complex 3D geometries and measurements can be carried out in a non-anechoic environment even in the presence of other stationary sources outside the virtual cavity. In the present paper, the theoretical background of the iPTF method is described and the results (numerical and experimental) for a source with simple geometry (two baffled pistons driven in antiphase) are presented and discussed.

  5. Background and Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Dynamics in Titan's Plasma Environment: 3D Hybrid Simulation and Comparison with CAPS T9 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution dynamics from the 3D hybrid simulation. In our model the background, pickup, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. The current simulation shows that mass loading by pickup ions H(+); H2(+), CH4(+) and N2(+) is stronger than in the previous simulations when O+ ions are introduced into the background plasma. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the atmospheric components. We also include a simple ionosphere model with average mass M = 28 amu ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS T9 observations. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of the Alfve n wing-like structures. The simulation also shows that the ring-like velocity distribution for pickup ions relaxes to a Maxwellian core and a shell-like halo.

  6. Estimating Subglacial Structure Using P-Wave Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, C.; Ammon, C. J.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.

    2017-02-01

    Reverberations of teleseismic compressional (P-) waves within a glacier or ice sheet may mask signals associated with crustal structure beneath the ice. We remove the signal associated with the ice from teleseismic P-waves using a wavefield downward continuation and decomposition technique that depends on known ice layer properties such as ice thickness, velocity, and attenuation. We test the method using data from nine stations in Antarctica and one station in Greenland. We deconvolve the downward-continued seismic wave vectors to create P-wave receiver functions that minimize the ice-layer reverberations in order to better measure signals from deeper structures. The subsurface P-wave receiver functions have similar sensitivities to crustal structure as those calculated from stations installed on bedrock. Synthetic experiments indicate subsurface P-wave receiver functions can constrain crustal structure more tightly than surface P-wave receiver functions when ice layer properties are known. We model the subsurface P-wave receiver functions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion and constrain the product of crustal thickness and the column-average crustal-slowness beneath the stations. Our subglacial shear-speed and thickness estimates are consistent with previous investigations at most stations. At station SUMG in south-central Greenland, our results suggest a thicker crust than from previous estimates.

  7. New constraints on the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle underneath Southern Scandinavia revealed from non-linear tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Roy, C.

    2013-08-01

    We analyse travel times of shear waves, which were recorded at the MAGNUS network, to determine the 3D shear wave velocity (vS) structure underneath Southern Scandinavia. The travel time residuals are corrected for the known crustal structure of Southern Norway and weighted to account for data quality and pick uncertainties. The resulting residual pattern of subvertically incident waves is very uniform and simple. It shows delayed arrivals underneath Southern Norway compared to fast arrivals underneath the Oslo Graben and the Baltic Shield. The 3D upper mantle vS structure underneath the station network is determined by performing non-linear travel time tomography. As expected from the residual pattern the resulting tomographic model shows a simple and continuous vS perturbation pattern: a negative vS anomaly is visible underneath Southern Norway relative to the Baltic Shield in the east with a contrast of up to 4% vS and a sharp W-E dipping transition zone. Reconstruction tests reveal besides vertical smearing a good lateral reconstruction of the dipping vS transition zone and suggest that a deep-seated anomaly at 330-410 km depth is real and not an inversion artefact. The upper part of the reduced vS anomaly underneath Southern Norway (down to 250 km depth) might be due to an increase in lithospheric thickness from the Caledonian Southern Scandes in the west towards the Proterozoic Baltic Shield in Sweden in the east. The deeper-seated negative vS anomaly (330-410 km depth) could be caused by a temperature anomaly possibly combined with effects due to fluids or hydrous minerals. The determined simple 3D vS structure underneath Southern Scandinavia indicates that mantle processes might influence and contribute to a Neogene uplift of Southern Norway.

  8. 3D time-lapse seismic traveltime tomography for detecting near surface velocity variations: a case study from the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Juhlin, Christopher; Huang, Fei; Lüth, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse seismic methods are an important tool for monitoring CO2 migration and storage in geological formations. Near surface variations are one of the major problems which may introduce time-lapse noise in the application of land based seismic monitoring. Conventional reflection seismic methods have difficulties in imaging near surface structures (10-30 m depth) due to the limitation of the methods themselves. Traveltime tomography is a commonly used method to reconstruct the subsurface velocity model. It can often provide extra information on near surface structures which is difficult to obtain by the conventional reflection seismic method. In this study, we apply traveltime tomography to 3D time-lapse seismic data sets acquired from at the Ketzin CO2 storage site. We also test different inversion strategies for traveltime tomography to investigate which one is more suitable for this case study. The results show good correlation with near surface variations obtained by other studies.

  9. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  10. Black Hole Window into p-Wave Dark Matter Annihilation.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jessie; Shapiro, Stuart L; Fields, Brian D

    2015-12-04

    We present a new method to measure or constrain p-wave-suppressed cross sections for dark matter (DM) annihilations inside the steep density spikes induced by supermassive black holes. We demonstrate that the high DM densities, together with the increased velocity dispersion, within such spikes combine to make thermal p-wave annihilation cross sections potentially visible in γ-ray observations of the Galactic center (GC). The resulting DM signal is a bright central point source with emission originating from DM annihilations in the absence of a detectable spatially extended signal from the halo. We define two simple reference theories of DM with a thermal p-wave annihilation cross section and establish new limits on the combined particle and astrophysical parameter space of these models, demonstrating that Fermi Large Area Telescope is currently sensitive to thermal p-wave DM over a wide range of possible scenarios for the DM distribution in the GC.

  11. Contribution of a 3D velocity model and of beam forming method for the location of microseismic sources generated in soft rock landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Helmstetter, Agnès; Doubre, Cécile; Gance, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity monitoring has proven to be an important tool for a better understanding of the deformation occurring in slow-sliding landslides. However locating the seismic sources generated by a landslide remains a challenging problem due to (1) the small sizes of the landslide, (b) the heterogenous and time-changing petro-physical properties of the landslide material, (c) the complexity of the recorded signals with unclear discriminations of the wave onsets, and (d) the difficulties to install and maintain a dense seismological network on-site close to the seismic sources. We studied the seismic sources generated by the deformation of the clay-rich Super-Sauze landslide (South French Alps). Previous studies show that the most active zone is the uphill part of the landslide within a zone of 300x300m2. Two seismic antennas have been installed on the sides of this zone and a seismic campaign was conducted to build a 3D velocity model of the area. Calibration shots were performed to test the performance of the location method. We show that the use of a 3D velocity model integrated in a beam forming location method slightly improves the accuracy of the shot location epicenter. However, this approach does not help to interpret with confidence the location of the natural events because the horizontal error remains larger than 50m for more than 50% of the shots. Nevertheless, adding station corrections and constraining the grid search area with additional informations based on the signal and the landslide behavior such as SNR, seismic event typology, and surface kinematics of the landslide allow obtaining reliable results. More than 70% of the calibration shots could be located with a horizontal error of less than 40m. The lack of sensor installed in depth as well as the the lack of calibration shots realized at different depths does not permit us to identify the depth of the sources.

  12. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    this work we propose instead to directly tackle the non-linearity of the inverse problem by using stochastic methods to construct a 3D starting model with a good estimate of the depths of the main layering interfaces. We present preliminary results of the construction of such a starting 3D model based on: (1) Regionalizing the study area to define provinces within which lateral variations are smooth; (2) Applying trans-dimensional stochastic inversion (Bodin et al., 2012) to obtain accurate 1D models in each province as well as the corresponding error distribution, constrained by receiver function and surface wave dispersion data as well as the previously constructed 3D model (name), and (3) connecting these models laterally using data-driven smoothing operators to obtain a starting 3D model with errors. References Bodin, T.,et al. 2012, Transdimensional inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301, doi:10.1029/2011JB008560. Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013, in revison. Yuan, H., et al. 2011, 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International, 184: 1237-1260. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2010.04901.x Yuan, H. & Romanowicz, B., 2010. Lithospheric layering in the North American Craton, Nature, 466, 1063-1068.

  13. New insights in the velocity dependency of the external mass transfer coefficient in 2D and 3D porous media for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2012-03-02

    Numerical calculations of the mobile zone mass transfer rate in a variety of ordered 2D and 3D structures are presented. These calculations are in line with earlier theoretical and experimental findings made in the field of chemical engineering and suggest that the Sherwood-number (Sh(m)) appearing in the mobile phase mass transfer term of the general plate height expression of liquid chromatography is not correctly predicted by the Wilson-Geankoplis--or the Kataoka--or the penetration model expression that have been used up to now to in the field of LC, and that at least more research is needed before these expressions can be continued to be used with confidence. The aforementioned expressions were obtained by neglecting the effect of axial dispersion on the mass transfer process, and it seems that they therefore underestimate the true Sh(m)-number by a factor of 2-5 around the minimum of the van Deemter-curve. New correlations describing the variation of the Sh(m)-coefficient as a function of the reduced velocity for a number of other packing geometries (tetrahedral monolith, 2D pillar array) are proposed. These correlations are in agreement with earlier theoretical and experimental studies showing that at low velocities the local-driving force-based Sh(m)-value is of the order of 10-20 in a packed bed column with an external porosity on the order of 35-40%.

  14. Can we trace the eastern Gondwanan margin in Australia? New perspectives from transdimensional inversion of ambient noise for 3D shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    Although the notion of Rodinia is quite well accepted in the geoscience community, the location and nature of the eastern continental margin of the Gondwana fragment in Australia is still vague and remains one of the most hotly debated topics in Australian geology. Moreover, most post-Rodinian reconstructions models choose not to tackle the ';Tasmanian challenge', and focus only on the tectonic evolution of mainland southeast Australia, thereby conveniently ignoring the wider tectonic implications of Tasmania's complex geological history. One of the chief limitations of the tectonic reconstructions in this region is a lack of information on Paleozoic (possibly Proterozoic) basement structures. Vast Mesozoic-Cainozoic sedimentary and volcanic cover sequences obscure older outcrops and limit the power of direct observational techniques. In response to these challenges, our effort is focused on ambient seismic noise for imaging 3D crustal shear velocity structure using surface waves, which is capable of illuminating basement structure beneath younger cover. The data used in this study is sourced from the WOMBAT transportable seismic array, which is compounded by around 650 stations spanning the majority of southeastern Australia, including Tasmania and several islands in Bass Strait. To produce the highest quality Green's functions, careful processing of the data has been performed, after which group velocity dispersion measurements have been carried out using a frequency-time analysis method on the symmetric component of the empirical Green's functions (EGFs). Group dispersion measurements from the EGFs have been inverted using a novel hierarchical, transdimensional, Bayesian algorithm to obtain Rayleigh-wave group velocity maps at different periods from 2 to 30 s. The new approach has several advantages in that the number and distribution of model parameters are implicitly controlled by the data, in which the noise is treated as unknown in the inversion. This

  15. P wave anisotropic tomography of the Nankai subduction zone in Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhao, Dapeng

    2012-05-01

    The active subduction of the young Philippine Sea (PHS) plate and the old Pacific plate has resulted in significant seismic heterogeneity and anisotropy in Southwest (SW) Japan. In this work we determined a detailed 3-D P wave anisotropic tomography of the crust and upper mantle beneath SW Japan using ˜540,000 P wave arrival times from 5,249 local earthquakes recorded by 1095 stations. The PHS slab is imaged clearly as a high-velocity (high-V) anomaly which exhibits considerable lateral variations. Significant low-velocity (low-V) anomalies are revealed above and below the PHS slab. The low-V anomalies above the PHS slab may reflect the upwelling flow in the mantle wedge and the PHS slab dehydration, and they form the source zone of the arc volcanoes in SW Japan. The low-V zones under the PHS slab may reflect the upwelling flow in the big mantle wedge above the Pacific slab. The anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle is complex. In Kyushu, the P wave fast velocity direction (FVD) is generally trench-normal in the mantle wedge under the back-arc, which is consistent with the corner flow driven by the PHS slab subduction. The FVD is trench-parallel in the subducting PHS slab under Kyushu. We think that the intraslab seismicity is a potential indicator to the slab anisotropy. That is, the PHS slab with seismicity has kept its original fossil anisotropy formed at the mid-ocean ridge, while the aseismic PHS slab has reproduced the anisotropy according to its current deformation.

  16. High-Resolution Seismic Images and 3-D Seismic Velocities of the San Andreas Fault Zone at Burro Flats, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    The southern San Andreas fault (SAF) has produced large earthquakes in the past 1500 yrs. Burro Flats, a basin within the San Bernardino Mountains, is bounded on the southwest by the southern San Andreas fault. Burro Flats has been the site of paleoseismological investigations to determine the slip history of the fault. Additional paleoseismic studies at this location are needed to further resolve the structure and slip history of the SAF. In addition to the main trace of the SAF at Burro Flats, there are splay faults, suggesting a complex geometry for the fault. To better understand the structure of the SAF, we acquired a 3-D, combined seismic reflection/refraction profile centered on the main trace at Burro Flats. The seismic investigation included a 60 m by 70 m rectangular array. Sensors were spaced every 5 m; seismic sources, likewise with a spacing of 5 m, consisted of a combination of down-hole explosives and shallow (approximately 0.3 m) Betsy Seisgun shots. Data were recorded without acquisition filters for 5 s at a 0.5-ms sampling rate. To analyze the data for velocity structure, we used a tomographic inversion procedure to invert first-arrival refractions. Preliminary measurements from shot gathers show that near-surface velocities range between 700 m/s and 1500 m/s. We observe apparent travel-time delays of approximately 7 ms near the main surface trace of the SAF, suggesting that seismic imaging methods may be useful in identifying this and other fault traces. These results will be useful for paleoseismic investigations.

  17. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl: Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Wendel, D. E.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The current hypothesis of the formation of the solar wind halo electrons is that they are produced from scattering of the strahl. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the halo in an isolated event. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions, a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a limited energy range. The observation implies that the formation of the halo is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicates that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal ~ 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  18. Waveform prediction with travel time model LLNL-G3D assessed by Spectral-Element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic monitoring requires accurate prediction of travel times, amplitudes, and whole waveforms. As a first step towards developing a model that is suited to seismic monitoring, LLNL developed the LLNL-G3D P-wave travel time model (Simmons et al., 2012, JGR) to improve seismic event location accuracy. LLNL-G3D fulfills the need to predict travel times from events occurring anywhere in the globe to stations ranging from local to teleseismic distances. Prediction over this distance range requires explicit inclusion of detailed 3-dimensional structure from Earths surface to the core. An open question is how well a model optimized to fit P-wave travel time data can predict waveforms? We begin to address this question by using the P-wave velocities in LLNL-G3D as a proxy for S-wave velocity and density, then performing waveform simulations via the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE spectral-element code. We assess the ability of LLNL-G3D to predict waveforms and draw comparisons to other 3D models available in SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package and widely used in the scientific community. Although we do not expect the P-wave model to perform as well as waveform based models, we view our effort as a first step towards accurate prediction of time times, amplitudes and full waveforms based on a single model. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Laboratory monitoring of P-waves in partially saturated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrière, J.; Bordes, C.; Brito, D.; Sénéchal, P.; Perroud, H.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic data depends on a variety of hydrogeological properties of the prospected porous media such as porosity, permeability and fluid saturation. We have performed a laboratory experiment in the kiloHertz range in order to analyze the role of partial saturation on direct propagating P-waves phase velocity and attenuation. The experiment consists of a sand-filled tank 107 cm x 34 cm x 35cm equipped with accelerometers and water capacitance probes. The P-waves seismic propagation is generated by hitting a steel ball on a granite plate on the one lateral side of the container. Several imbibition/drainage cycles are performed between the water residual saturation and the gas residual saturation. The laboratory seismic data are processed by two Continuous Wavelet Transforms using one real mother wavelet (Mexican hat) and one complex (Morlet) to recover velocity and attenuation as a function of frequency. Phase velocity of direct P-wave decreases with an increase of water content and is quite consistent with the low frequency limit of the Biot's theory both for imbibition and drainage. The interpretation of the P-waves attenuation needs to go beyond the macroscopic fluid flow of Biot's theory and to introduce a viscoelastic contribution linked to the grain to grain overall losses which are described by a constant Q-model. A strong hysteresis between imbibition and drainage is observed and explained by introducing an effective permeability depending on water and gas relative permeabilities (Van Genuchten model).

  20. Constraints on the 3D shape of the ultra low shear velocity zone at the base of the mantle beneath the central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Capdeville, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Prominent postcursors to S/Sdiff waves with delays as large as 26 s are observed in Northern America for Papua New Guinea events (To et al., 2011). The emergence of the postcursor is explained by placing a laterally localized ultra low shear velocity zone (ULSVZ, dVs/Vs<-25%) on the CMB, which is fully or partially covered by a broad and weak anomaly region (dVs/Vs~-5%). The ULSVZ is located approximately 900 km southwest of the projection of the Hawaiian hotspot onto the CMB. In the previous study, we limited our focus to an azimuthal range around 60 degrees from the source in Papua New Guinea, where the records show a relatively small azimuthal variation, suggesting a relatively small 3D effect there. The modelling was limited to 2D structure along the great circle plane, partly because of the sparse station distribution in Midwestern US at the time. In this study, we investigated data from USArray and further constrained the 3D shape of the ULSVZ. The postcursors to S/Sdiff waves are observed at 240 USArray stations for an event, which occurred near Papua New Guinea in 2010. The records from the large number of stations enabled us to conduct array analysis. First, we mapped the variation of incident azimuth and slowness of the secondary arrivals to the stations. In southern stations, which are located along the azimuth of approximately 60 degrees from the source, the postcursors arrive from the direction of the source. On the other hand, in northern stations, which are located at the azimuth of approximately 52 degrees from the source, the postcursors arrive from the azimuth of 5 to 10 degrees to the south with respect to the direction toward the source. Second, we compared the observed amplitude of the main S/Sdiff phase with synthetic waveforms created by Direct solution method (Kawai et al., 2006). The comparison shows that the amplitude of the main phase become very small at stations which are located approximately at the distance of 100 degrees and the

  1. A methodology to accurately quantify patellofemoral cartilage contact kinematics by combining 3D image shape registration and cine-PC MRI velocity data.

    PubMed

    Borotikar, Bhushan S; Sipprell, William H; Wible, Emily E; Sheehan, Frances T

    2012-04-05

    Patellofemoral osteoarthritis and its potential precursor patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) are common, costly, and debilitating diseases. PFPS has been shown to be associated with altered patellofemoral joint mechanics; however, an actual variation in joint contact stresses has not been established due to challenges in accurately quantifying in vivo contact kinematics (area and location). This study developed and validated a method for tracking dynamic, in vivo cartilage contact kinematics by combining three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, cine-phase contrast (CPC), multi-plane cine (MPC), and 3D high-resolution static imaging. CPC and MPC data were acquired from 12 healthy volunteers while they actively extended/flexed their knee within the MRI scanner. Since no gold standard exists for the quantification of in vivo dynamic cartilage contact kinematics, the accuracy of tracking a single point (patellar origin relative to the femur) represented the accuracy of tracking the kinematics of an entire surface. The accuracy was determined by the average absolute error between the PF kinematics derived through registration of MPC images to a static model and those derived through integration of the CPC velocity data. The accuracy ranged from 0.47 mm to 0.77 mm for the patella and femur and from 0.68 mm to 0.86 mm for the patellofemoral joint. For purely quantifying joint kinematics, CPC remains an analytically simpler and more accurate (accuracy <0.33 mm) technique. However, for application requiring the tracking of an entire surface, such as quantifying cartilage contact kinematics, this combined imaging approach produces accurate results with minimal operator intervention.

  2. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  3. Corrigendum to "The 3-D strain patterns in Turkey using geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) network" [J. African Earth Sci. 115 (2016) 246-270

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutoglu, Hakan Senol; Toker, Mustafa; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-12-01

    In the article titled "The 3-D Strain patterns in Turkey using Geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) Network" published in Journal of African Earth Sciences Vol. 11, pp.246-270, the black arrows on the Figs. 10 and 12 are shifted due to printing error to undesired places. The correct form of Figs. 10 and 12 are given below:

  4. Imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH): Details of passive-source seismic deployment and preliminary 3-D velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Denlinger, R. P.; Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Vidale, J. E.; Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schultz, A.

    2014-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment aims to delineate the extent of the magmatic system beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH) in Washington State. The experiment involves active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics, and geochemistry/petrology. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers were deployed in a 100-km-diameter array centered on MSH, with an average spacing of 10 km, and a planned duration of two years. The deployment over two weeks in June 2014 involved a group of 18 people split into 6 teams. Approximately half of the seismic stations have aircell batteries and/or pole-mounted solar panels in order to maintain power through deep snow at higher elevations during the winter months. Data will be retrieved 2-4 times a year throughout the duration of the experiment. The first service run performed in mid-July 2014 had a 98.4% data recovery. This is one of the largest wide-aperture two-dimensional arrays covering a volcano anywhere. The active-source portion of the experiment successfully set off 23 shots in late-July 2014. These were recorded clearly at permanent stations run by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network up to 200 km away, and are expected to be well-recorded on many of the 70 broadband seismometers in addition to the 2500 Reftek "Texans" deployed temporarily for this purpose. For the 2-4 weeks of broadband data collected in July, local earthquakes down to magnitude 0 are recorded across the array, with clear P- and S- arrivals. Earthquakes of this size occur daily within 50 km of MSH. We are keeping a careful catalog of all activity in the region for the duration of the iMUSH experiment. We will pick P- and S-wave travel times at the 70 broadband stations from local earthquakes and active shots, for available data from between June and October 2014. We will also use a tomographic code (Preston et al, 2003, Science) to invert the travel times to obtain preliminary earthquake location and 3-D velocity structure.

  5. Time-lapse 3-D seismic imaging of shallow subsurface contaminant flow.

    PubMed

    McKenna, J; Sherlock, D; Evans, B

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling study outlining a technique whereby buoyant contaminant flow within water-saturated unconsolidated sand was remotely monitored utilizing the time-lapse 3-D (TL3-D) seismic response. The controlled temperature and pressure conditions, along with the high level of acquisition repeatability attainable using sandbox physical models, allow the TL3-D seismic response to pore fluid movement to be distinguished from all other effects. TL3-D seismic techniques are currently being developed to monitor hydrocarbon reserves within producing reservoirs in an endeavour to improve overall recovery. However, in many ways, sandbox models under atmospheric conditions more accurately simulate the shallow subsurface than petroleum reservoirs. For this reason, perhaps the greatest application for analogue sandbox modelling is to improve our understanding of shallow groundwater and environmental flow mechanisms. Two fluid flow simulations were conducted whereby air and kerosene were injected into separate water-saturated unconsolidated sand models. In both experiments, a base 3-D seismic volume was recorded and compared with six later monitor surveys recorded while the injection program was conducted. Normal incidence amplitude and P-wave velocity information were extracted from the TL3-D seismic data to provide visualization of contaminant migration. Reflection amplitudes displayed qualitative areal distribution of fluids when a suitable impedance contrast existed between pore fluids. TL3-D seismic reflection tomography can potentially monitor the change in areal distribution of fluid contaminants over time, indicating flow patterns. However, other research and this current work have not established a quantifiable relationship between either normal reflection amplitudes and attenuation and fluid saturation. Generally, different pore fluids will have unique seismic velocities due to differences in compressibility and density. The predictable

  6. Calculating Path-Dependent Travel Time Prediction Variance and Covariance for a Global Tomographic P-Velocity Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    LLNL-3D global P-wave velocity model and its performance in seismic event location, presentation at the 2011 Seismological Society of America Meeting...CALCULATING PATH-DEPENDENT TRAVEL TIME PREDICTION VARIANCE AND COVARIANCE FOR A GLOBAL TOMOGRAPHIC P-VELOCITY MODEL Jim R. Hipp1, Andre V...06NA25396/LA09-IRP-NDD022 ABSTRACT Several studies have shown that global 3D models of the compression wave speed in the Earth’s mantle can

  7. Hip and knee joints are more stabilized than driven during the stance phase of gait: an analysis of the 3D angle between joint moment and joint angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Dumas, R; Cheze, L

    2008-08-01

    Joint power is commonly used in orthopaedics, ergonomics or sports analysis but its clinical interpretation remains controversial. Some basic principles on muscle actions and energy transfer have been proposed in 2D. The decomposition of power on 3 axes, although questionable, allows the same analysis in 3D. However, these basic principles have been widely criticized, mainly because bi-articular muscles must be considered. This requires a more complex computation in order to determine how the individual muscle force contributes to drive the joint. Conversely, with simple 3D inverse dynamics, the analysis of both joint moment and angular velocity directions is essential to clarify when the joint moment can contribute or not to drive the joint. The present study evaluates the 3D angle between the joint moment and the joint angular velocity and investigates when the hip, knee and ankle joints are predominantly driven (angle close to 0 degrees and 180 degrees ) or stabilized (angle close to 90 degrees ) during gait. The 3D angle curves show that the three joints are never fully but only partially driven and that the hip and knee joints are mainly stabilized during the stance phase. The notion of stabilization should be further investigated, especially for subjects with motion disorders or prostheses.

  8. High-resolution 3D seismic model of the crustal and uppermost mantle structure in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin; Ostaficzuk, Stanisław R.

    2016-01-01

    In the area of Poland a contact between the Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe and the Carpathians has a complicated structure and a complex P-wave velocity of the sedimentary cover, crystalline crust, Moho depth and the uppermost mantle. The geometry of the uppermost several kilometers of sediments is relatively well recognized from over 100,000 boreholes. The vertical seismic profiling (VSP) from 1188 boreholes provided detailed velocity data for regional tectonic units and for stratigraphic successions from Permian to the Tertiary and Quaternary deposits. These data, however, do not provide information about the velocity and basement depth in the central part of the Trans-European suture zone (TESZ) and in the Carpathians. So, the data set is supplemented by 2D velocity models from 32 deep seismic sounding refraction profiles which also provide information about the crust and uppermost mantle. Together with the results of other methods: vertical seismic profiling, magnetotelluric, allow for the creation of a detailed, high-resolution 3D model for the entire Earth's crust and the uppermost mantle down to a depth of 60 km. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclise is only 0.3 to 1 km thick, which increases to 7 to 8 km along the East European Craton (EEC) margin, and 9 to 12 km in the TESZ. The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1-4 km thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sedimentary layers, up to about 20 km. The crystalline crust is differentiated and has a layered structure. The crust beneath the West European Platform (WEP; Variscan domain) is characterized by P-wave velocities of 5.8-6.6 km/s. The upper and middle crusts beneath the EEC are characterized by velocities of 6.1-6.6 km/s, and are underlain by a high velocity lower crust with a velocity of about 7 km/s. A general decrease in velocity is observed from the older to the younger tectonic domains. The TESZ is associated with a steep dip

  9. Next-generation seismic experiments - II: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, 3-D, full-waveform inversion of sparse field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Arnoux, Gillean; Hooft, Emilie; Toomey, Douglas; VanderBeek, Brandon; Wilcock, William

    2016-02-01

    3-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has been widely adopted by the oil and gas industry to obtain high-fidelity models of P-wave velocity that lead to improvements in migrated images of the reservoir. Most industrial applications of 3-D FWI model the acoustic wavefield, often account for the kinematic effect of anisotropy, and focus on matching the low-frequency component of the early arriving refractions that are most sensitive to P-wave velocity structure. Here, we have adopted the same approach in an application of 3-D acoustic, anisotropic FWI to an ocean-bottom-seismometer (OBS) field data set acquired across the Endeavour oceanic spreading centre in the northeastern Pacific. Starting models for P-wave velocity and anisotropy were obtained from traveltime tomography; during FWI, velocity is updated whereas anisotropy is kept fixed. We demonstrate that, for the Endeavour field data set, 3-D FWI is able to recover fine-scale velocity structure with a resolution that is 2-4 times better than conventional traveltime tomography. Quality assurance procedures have been employed to monitor each step of the workflow; these are time consuming but critical to the development of a successful inversion strategy. Finally, a suite of checkerboard tests has been performed which shows that the full potential resolution of FWI can be obtained if we acquire a 3-D survey with a slightly denser shot and receiver spacing than is usual for an academic experiment. We anticipate that this exciting development will encourage future seismic investigations of earth science targets that would benefit from the superior resolution offered by 3-D FWI.

  10. Volcano-tectonic implications of 3-D velocity structures derived from joint active and passive source tomography of the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a velocity model of the onshore and offshore regions around the southern part of the island of Hawaii, including southern Mauna Kea, southeastern Hualalai, and the active volcanoes of Mauna Loa, and Kilauea, and Loihi seamount. The velocity model was inverted from about 200,000 first-arrival traveltime picks of earthquakes and air gun shots recorded at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Reconstructed volcanic structures of the island provide us with an improved understanding of the volcano-tectonic evolution of Hawaiian volcanoes and their interactions. The summits and upper rift zones of the active volcanoes are characterized by high-velocity materials, correlated with intrusive magma cumulates. These high-velocity materials often do not extend the full lengths of the rift zones, suggesting that rift zone intrusions may be spatially limited. Seismicity tends to be localized seaward of the most active intrusive bodies. Low-velocity materials beneath parts of the active rift zones of Kilauea and Mauna Loa suggest discontinuous rift zone intrusives, possibly due to the presence of a preexisting volcanic edifice, e.g., along Mauna Loa beneath Kilauea's southwest rift zone, or alternatively, removal of high-velocity materials by large-scale landsliding, e.g., along Mauna Loa's western flank. Both locations also show increased seismicity that may result from edifice interactions or reactivation of buried faults. New high-velocity regions are recognized and suggest the presence of buried, and in some cases, previously unknown rift zones, within the northwest flank of Mauna Loa, and the south flanks of Mauna Loa, Hualalai, and Mauna Kea. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Along-strike variation in subducting plate velocity induced by along-strike variation in overriding plate structure: Insights from 3D numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, Juan; Billen, Magali I.; Negredo, Ana M.; Montesi, Laurent G. J.

    2016-10-01

    Subduction dynamics can be understood as the result of the balance between driving and resisting forces. Previous work has traditionally regarded gravitational slab pull and viscous mantle drag as the main driving and resistive forces for plate motion respectively. However, this paradigm fails to explain many of the observations in subduction zones. For example, subducting plate velocity varies significantly along-strike in many subduction zones and this variation is not correlated to the age of subducting lithosphere. Here we present three-dimensional and time-dependent numerical models of subduction. We show that along-strike variations of the overriding plate thermal structure can lead to along-strike variations in subducting plate velocity. In turn, velocity variations lead to significant migration of the Euler pole over time. Our results show that the subducting plate is slower beneath the colder portion of the overriding plate due to two related mechanisms. First, the mantle wedge beneath the colder portion of the overriding plate is more viscous, which increases mantle drag. Second, where the mantle wedge is more viscous, hydrodynamic suction increases, leading to a lower slab dip. Both factors contribute to decreasing subducting plate velocity in the region; therefore, if the overriding plate is not uniform, the resulting velocity varies significantly along-strike, which causes the Euler pole to migrate closer to the subducting plate. We present a new mechanism to explain observations of subducting plate velocity in the Cocos and Nazca plates. These results shed new light on the balance of forces that control subduction dynamics and prove that future studies should take into consideration the three-dimensional structure of the overriding plate.

  12. Characterization of landslide geometry using 3D seismic refraction traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, K.; Travelletti, J.; Bitri, A.; Grandjean, G.; Malet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    The geometry of the bedrock, internal layers and shear surfaces/bands controls the deformation pattern and the mechanisms of landslides. A challenge to progress in the forecast of landslide acceleration in terms of early-warning is therefore to characterize the 3D geometry of the unstable mass at a high level of spatial resolution, both in the horizontal and vertical directions, by integrating information from different surveying techniques. For such characterization, seismic investigations are potentially of a great interest. In the case of complex structures, the measure and the processing of seismic data need to be performed in 3D. The objective of this work is to present the implementation of a 3D seismic refraction traveltime tomography technique based on an existing 2D Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). First the processing algorithm is detailed and its performance is discussed, and second an application to the La Valette complex landslide is presented. Inversion of first-arrival traveltimes produces a 3D tomogram that underlines the presence of many areas characterized by low P-wave velocity of 500-1800 m.s-1. These low P-wave velocity structures result from the presence of reworked blocks, surficial cracks and in-depth fracture zones. These structures seem to extend to around 25 m in depth over a 80 x 130 m area. Based on borehole geotechnical data and previous geophysical investigations, an interface corresponding to an internal slip surface can be suspected near the isovalue of 1200 m.s-1 at a depth of -10 to -15 m. The stable substratum is characterized by higher values of P-wave velocity of 1800-3000 m.s-1. The features identified in the 3D tomogram allow to better (1) delineate the boundary between the landslide and the surrounding stable slopes, and (2) understand the morphological structures within the landslide at a hectometric scale. The integration of the 3D seismic tomography interpretation to previous geophysical

  13. Elastic Properties of 3D-Printed Rock Models: Dry and Saturated Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Stewart, R.; Dyaur, N.

    2014-12-01

    Many regions of subsurface interest are, or will be, fractured. In addition, these zones many be subject to varying saturations and stresses. New 3D printing techniques using different materials and structures, provide opportunities to understand porous or fractured materials and fluid effects on their elastic properties. We use a 3D printer (Stratasys Dimension SST 768) to print two rock models: a solid octahedral prism and a porous cube with thousands of penny-shaped cracks. The printing material is ABS thermal plastic with a density of 1.04 g/cm3. After printing, we measure the elastic properties of the models, both dry and 100% saturated with water. Both models exhibit VTI (Vertical Transverse Isotropic) symmetry due to laying (about 0.25 mm thick) of the printing process. The prism has a density of 0.96 g/cm3 before saturation and 1.00 g/cm3 after saturation. Its effective porosity is calculated to be 4 %. We use ultrasonic transducers (500 kHz) to measure both P- and shear-wave velocities, and the raw material has a P-wave velocity of 1.89 km/s and a shear-wave velocity of 0.91 km/s. P-wave velocity in the un-saturated prism increases from 1.81 km/s to 1.84 km/s after saturation in the direction parallel to layering and from 1.73 km/s to 1.81 km/s in the direction perpendicular to layering. The fast shear-wave velocity decreases from 0.88 km/s to 0.87 km/s and the slow shear-wave velocity decreases from 0.82 km/s to 0.81 km/s. The cube, printed with penny-shaped cracks, gives a density of 0.79 g/cm3 and a porosity of 24 %. We measure its P-wave velocity as 1.78 km/s and 1.68 km/s in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the layering, respectively. Its fast shear-wave velocity is 0.88 km/s and slow shear-wave velocity is 0.70 km/s. The penny-shaped cracks have significant influence on the elastic properties of the 3D-printed rock models. To better understand and explain the fluid effects on the elastic properties of the models, we apply the extended

  14. Detailed 3-D S-wave velocity beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon, from 2-plane-wave Rayleigh wave inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Forsyth, D. W.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The High Lava Plains (HLP) of eastern Oregon represent an unusual track of bimodal volcanism extending from the southeastern-most corner of the state to its current position beneath the Newberry Volcano on the eastern margin of the Cascades. The silicic volcanism is time progressive along this track, beginning some 15 Ma near the Owyhee plateau and then trending to the north east. The timing and location of the start of the HLP coincides with that of the initial volcanism associated with the Yellowstone/Snake River Plain track (YSRP). While the YSRP has often been interpreted as the classic intra-continental hot spot track, the HLP, which trends almost normal to absolute plate motion, is harder to explain. This study uses the 100+ stations associated with the HLP seismic deployment together with another ~100 Earthscope Transportable Array stations (TA) to perform a high resolution inversion for Rayleigh wave phase velocities using the 2-plane-wave methodology of Forsyth and Li (2004). Because of the comparatively small grid spacing of this study, we are able to discern much finer scale structures than studies looking at the entire western U.S. with only TA stations. Preliminary results indicate very low velocities across the study area, especially at upper mantle depths. Especially low velocities are seen beneath the Owyhee plateau and along both the HLP and YSRP tracks. Final details about the exact geometries of these features will help constrain possible scenarios for the formation of the HLP volcanic sequence.

  15. Recovering physical property information from subduction plate boundaries using 3D full-waveform seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. E.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M.

    2013-12-01

    this basin in 1999 suitable for future 3D FWI. We build a 3D model of the sub-surface based on an existing velocity model that was used to migrate these data (Tsuji et al. 2000, JGR). We then add a low P-wave velocity layer along the décollement, which is supported by ODP core data but does not feature in the current seismic velocity model, to test if it could be recovered using 3D FWI. We use the same acquisition parameters as in the 1999 seismic survey (including a 6 km long streamer) to generate a fully-elastic synthetic seismic dataset, added noise and inverted the windowed transmitted arrivals only. We also ran a suite of resolution tests across the model. The results show that 3D FWI of conventionally collected 3D seismic data across the Muroto Basin would be capable of resolving variations in P-wave velocity along the décollement of the order of half the seismic wavelength at the plate boundary. This is a significant improvement on conventional travel-time tomography which resolves to the Fresnel width. In this presentation we will also postulate on the optimal 3D FWI experiment design for the next generation of 3D seismic surveys across subduction margins as a guide for those embarking on new data collection.

  16. A new approach to obtaining a 3D shear wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle: An application to eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion data and receiver functions by utilizing Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking to reconcile the different sampling domains of the two datasets. Utilizing CCP stacking allows us to suppress noise in the data by waveform stacking, and correct for backazimuthal variations and complex crustal structure by mapping receiver functions back to their theoretical location. When applied to eastern Turkey, this approach leads to a higher resolution image of the subsurface and clearly delineates different tectonic features in eastern Turkey that were not apparent using other approaches. We observe that the slow seismic velocities near the Karliova Triple Junction correlate to moderate strain rates and high heat flow, which leads to a rheologically weak crust that has allowed for the upward propagation of Miocene and younger volcanics near the triple junction. We find seismically fast, presumably rigid blocks located in the southeastern Anatolian Plate and Arabian Plate are separated by a band of low shear wave velocities that correspond to the East Anatolian Fault Zone, which is consistent with the presence of fluids in the fault zone. We observe that the Arabian Plate has underthrust the Eurasian Plate as far as the northern boundary of the Bitlis Massif, which can explain the high exhumation rates in the Bitlis Massif as a result of slab break-off of the Arabian oceanic lithosphere. We also find a shallow ( 33 km) anomaly beneath eastern Turkey that we interpret as a localized wedge of mantle that was underthrust by a crustal fragment during the collision of Arabia and Eurasia. These observations are possible because of the high-resolution images obtained by combining common conversion point receiver function stacks with ambient noise dispersion data to create a data-driven three-dimensional shear wave velocity model.

  17. 3D Position and Velocity Vector Computations of Objects Jettisoned from the International Space Station Using Close-Range Photogrammetry Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshle, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object s imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object s position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies. Keywords: Photogrammetry, International Space Station, jettisons, image analysis.

  18. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  19. 3D velocity field time series using synthetic aperture radar: application to tidal-timescale ice-flow variability in Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Pietro; Minchew, Brent; Agram, Piyush; Riel, Bryan; Simons, Mark

    2016-10-01

    We present a general method for retrieving time-series of three component surface velocity field vector given a set of continuous synthetic aperture radar (SAR) acquisitions collected from multiple geometries. Our algorithm extends the single-line-of-sight mathematical framework developed for time-series analysis using interferometric SAR (InSAR) to three spatial dimensions. The inversion is driven by a design matrix corresponding to a dictionary of displacement functions parameterized in time. The resulting model minimizes a cost function using a non-regularized least-squares method. We applied our method to Rutford ice stream (RIS), West Antarctica, using a set of 101 multi-track multi-angle COSMO-SkyMed displacement maps generating azimuth and range pixel offsets.

  20. A Multi-scale Finite-frequency Approach to the Inversion of Reciprocal Travel Times for 3-D Velocity Structure beneath Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Hung, S.; Kuo, B.; Kuochen, H.

    2012-12-01

    Taiwan is one of the archetypical places for studying the active orogenic process in the world, where the Luzon arc has obliquely collided into the southwest China continental margin since 5 Ma ago. Because of the lack of convincing evidence for the structure in the lithospheric mantle and at even greater depths, several competing models have been proposed for the Taiwan mountain-building process. With the deployment of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) on the seafloor around Taiwan from the TAIGER (TAiwan Integrated GEodynamic Research) and IES seismic experiments, the aperture of the seismic network is greatly extended to improve the depth resolution of tomographic imaging, which is critical to illuminate the nature of the arc-continent collision and accretion in Taiwan. In this study, we use relative travel-time residuals between a collection of teleseismic body wave arrivals to tomographically image the velocity structure beneath Taiwan. In addition to those from common distant earthquakes observed across an array of stations, we take advantage of dense seismicity in the vicinity of Taiwan and the source and receiver reciprocity to augment the data coverage from clustered earthquakes recorded by global stations. As waveforms are dependent of source mechanisms, we carry out the cluster analysis to group the phase arrivals with similar waveforms into clusters and simultaneously determine relative travel-time anomalies in the same cluster accurately by a cross correlation method. The combination of these two datasets would particularly enhance the resolvability of the tomographic models offshore of eastern Taiwan, where the two subduction systems of opposite polarity are taking place and have primarily shaped the present tectonic framework of Taiwan. On the other hand, our inversion adopts an innovation that invokes wavelet-based, multi-scale parameterization and finite-frequency theory. Not only does this approach make full use of frequency-dependent travel

  1. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  3. 3-D shear wave velocity model of Mexico and South US: bridging seismic networks with ambient noise cross-correlations (C1) and correlation of coda of correlations (C3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba-Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group traveltimes are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  4. Investigation of the dynamics of spiral galaxies on the base of 3D vector velocity field of their gaseous disks reconstructed from observed line-of-sight velocity field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.; Lyakhovich, V. V.; Silchenko, O. K.; Zasov, A. V.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Dodonov, S. N.

    The method is based on Fourier analysis of observed velocity field. The Fourier harmonics are interpreted in the frame of the consensus on the wave nature of spiral arms. We measured the line-of-sight velocity fields in five spiral galaxies. In grand design galaxies NGC 157, NGC 6181 and NGC 3893 we determined with high accuracy all basic parameters: corotation radius, velocity amplitudes in spiral pattern, the rotation velocity curve with account for motions in spiral arms. The analysis of the flocculent galaxy NGC 2841 helped us to understand the nature of the flocculent spirals. The analysis of grand design galaxy NGC 3631 which is seen face on gave the possibility to explain the nature of vertical motion along the disk rotation axis.

  5. Crustal Seismicity and 3-D Velocity Structure in the Principal Cordillera of Central Chile (33- 34.5 S, 69.5-71 W): Implications on Andean Geodynamic and Seismic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, M.; Monfret, T.; Vera, E.; Yañez, G.; Eisenberg, A.

    2007-12-01

    Based on data from a dense local temporary seismological network, crustal seismicity is characterized, and a 3- D body wave velocity structure is obtained by tomographic inversion down to the subducted slab. In the framework of Fondecyt 1050758, GeoAzur-IRD and ACT-18 projects, 35 broadband and short period instruments, were deployed in the studied zone for 135 days recording in continuous mode. At this zone the Andean active volcanism reappears after a gap of volcanic activity since late Miocene occurring north of 33 S due to the Central Chile flat slab subduction zone. Crustal seismicity in the depth range 0-30 km is well correlated with known geological faults that become now important in the assessment of the regional seismic hazard. This seismicity also clusters around the giant porphyry cooper deposits in the region (Rio Blanco, El Teniente), and are neither related to mine-blasts nor induced by mining activity. Moreover, the local 3-D velocity structure shows that the zone surrounding each deposit is characterized by high Vp/Vs greater than 1.8, which may indicate fluid phases located in the weakest and more fractured zone of the crust. The body wave velocity pattern shown at depth by the local tomography indicates channels of high Vp/Vs connecting the subducted slab with the surface at places where active volcanism is present, suggesting upward migration of hydrous or melted rocks. This pattern agrees with the one observed with a previous regional tomography that includes this zone, while this Vp/Vs pattern tends to be horizontal at the flat slab zone. At depths of 20-25 km, a layer of high Vp/Vs is observed beneath the Andes Cordillera that could be associated to changes in the rheological properties between the upper and lower crust, or to accumulation of magma. The average stress tensor, derived from focal mechanisms, indicate that the Andean zone is under compression in the plate convergence direction.

  6. Effect of a low-velocity sedimentary cover on the 3-D velocity models derived from inversion of local arrival times. An example from the New Madrid seismic zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, J. M.; Chiu, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    When applying seismic tomography to local arrival times from an area with a low-velocity sedimentary cover, the effect of the sediments on travel times should be taken into account. If that is not done, the resulting velocity model(s) cannot be assumed to be correct. This fairly obvious statement has been challenged recently by Powell et al. (JGR, 2010), who claimed that the sediments that cover the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ, central United States) can be ignored. This claim is examined here and shown to be incorrect. The NMSZ is covered by low-velocity, poorly consolidated sediments (Vp=1.8 km/s, Vs=3), which are underlain by Paleozoic rocks of much higher velocity. In the central NMSZ the sediment thickness varies between about 0.1 and 0.7 km. The JHD analysis of the data collected in that area by a portable network (PANDA) showed that the P- and S-wave station corrections spanned large ranges (0.35 and 0.63 s, respectively, Pujol et al., Eng. Geol., 1997). This study also showed that a Vp/Vs of 3 for the sediments would be too high if the lateral velocity variations were confined to the sedimentary cover. Here we generate synthetic traveltimes for a model with a sedimentary cover having variable depth (as determined from boreholes) underlain by the high-velocity layers in the 1-D model used for the JHD analysis. The synthetic data were generated for the station and event distributions corresponding to the Panda data. The tomographic inversion of the synthetic times produces spurious anomalies in Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs, from the surface to a depth of 10 km. In addition, the events are mislocated in depth, with errors between 0 and 1 km for most of them. These results should dispel the notion that the effect of the unconsolidated sediments can be ignored. On the other hand, the inversion of the actual Panda data results in velocity anomalies similar to the synthetic anomalies, although larger, which is consistent with the conclusions of Pujol et al. (1997

  7. Teleseismic P-wave tomography and mantle dynamics beneath Eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jianshe; Zhao, Dapeng

    2016-05-01

    We determined a new 3-D P-wave velocity model of the upper mantle beneath eastern Tibet using 112,613 high-quality arrival-time data collected from teleseismic seismograms recorded by a new portable seismic array in Yunnan and permanent networks in southwestern China. Our results provide new insights into the mantle structure and dynamics of eastern Tibet. High-velocity (high-V) anomalies are revealed down to 200 km depth under the Sichuan basin and the Ordos and Alashan blocks. Low-velocity (low-V) anomalies are imaged in the upper mantle under the Kunlun-Qilian and Qinling fold zones, and the Songpan-Ganzi, Qiangtang, Lhasa and Chuan-Dian diamond blocks, suggesting that eastward moving low-V materials are extruded to eastern China after the obstruction by the Sichuan basin, and the Ordos and Alashan blocks. Furthermore, the extent and thickness of these low-V anomalies are correlated with the surface topography, suggesting that the uplift of eastern Tibet could be partially related to these low-V materials having a higher temperature and strong positive buoyancy. In the mantle transition zone (MTZ), broad high-V anomalies are visible from the Burma arc northward to the Kunlun fault and eastward to the Xiaojiang fault, and they are connected upward with the Wadati-Benioff seismic zone. These results suggest that the subducted Indian slab has traveled horizontally for a long distance after it descended into the MTZ, and return corner flow and deep slab dehydration have contributed to forming the low-V anomalies in the big mantle wedge. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of the eastern Tibetan plateau.

  8. Reactivation and mantle dynamics of North China Craton: insight from P-wave anisotropy tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2013-12-01

    We determined the first 3-D P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath the North China Craton (NCC) using a large number of high-quality arrival-time data from local earthquakes and teleseismic events, which reveals depth-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle down to 600 km depth. In the NCC western block, the fast velocity direction (FVD) varies from east-west in the southern part to northeast-southwest in the northern part, which may reflect either the interaction between the Yangtze block and NCC or fossil lithospheric fabrics in the craton. Under the NCC eastern block, a uniform northwest-southeast FVD is revealed in the lower part of the upper mantle (300-410 km depths) and the mantle transition zone (410-660 km depths), which may reflect horizontal and upwelling flows in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone. The NCC central block exhibits a northeast-southwest FVD, consistent with the surface tectonic orientation there, suggesting that the cold and thick (>300 km) cratonic root of the NCC western block may obstruct the northwest-southeast trending mantle flow induced by the Pacific Plate subduction, resulting in a northeast-southwest trending mantle flow under the central block. Our present results indicate that the corner flow in the BMW associated with the deep subduction of the Pacific Plate is the main cause of NCC reactivation and mantle dynamics under East China.

  9. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  10. 3-D Attenuation Structure around the SAFOD site, Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, N. L.; Thurber, C. H.; Zhang, H.; Roecker, S.

    2006-12-01

    We are developing models of the 3-D attenuation structure, both Qp and Qs, for a region about 15 km square centered on SAFOD. We are analyzing local earthquake data collected in 2001 and 2002 from the UW/RPI PASO array, the UC-Berkeley HRSN, and USGS seismic network stations around Parkfield. We determine the P- or S-wave t* values for an individual local earthquake for each of the observing stations by fitting observed spectra using a joint inversion for a common corner frequency, low-frequency amplitude, and t*. Within our initial data set, we examine 575 events recorded at up to 111 stations and obtain over 19000 P- wave t* values. We use these t* values in simul2000 and tomoDD to perform the inversion to obtain a 3-D, frequency-independent Qp model of the attenuation structure, using an existing 3-D Vp model and associated event locations. We will use this same procedure to obtain the Qs structure. In our preliminary Qp structure results, we observe a high Qp feature (about 250) at 0-8 km depth on the southwest side of the fault. We associate this feature with the high density, high velocity Salinian basement rocks. We also see a moderate Qp feature (about 150) in the fault zone that encompasses the hypocenters of our events. On the northeast side of the fault, we observe Qp values generally increasing with depth, from 125 at the surface to 200 at 8 km. We will present our final Qp and Qs models, identify major features within the two, and discuss how these features relate to the findings of other geophysical studies in the area (seismic velocity, electrical resistivity, anisotropy). We will discuss how these features relate to the nature of the crust in that area, including the local geology, presence of fluids, fracturing, etc.

  11. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND MOTION SIMULATIONS FOR SCENARIO EARTHQUAKES ON THE HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK FAULT SYSTEM USING THE USGS 3D VELOCITY MODEL AND REALISTIC PSEUDODYNAMIC RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Xie, X

    2008-01-09

    This project seeks to compute ground motions for large (M>6.5) scenario earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using realistic pseudodynamic ruptures, the USGS three-dimensional (3D) velocity model and anelastic finite difference simulations on parallel computers. We will attempt to bound ground motions by performing simulations with suites of stochastic rupture models for a given scenario on a given fault segment. The outcome of this effort will provide the average, spread and range of ground motions that can be expected from likely large earthquake scenarios. The resulting ground motions will be based on first-principles calculations and include the effects of slip heterogeneity, fault geometry and directivity, however, they will be band-limited to relatively low-frequency (< 1 Hz).

  12. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  13. P-Wave Electron-Hydrogen Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhtia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A variational wave function incorporating short range correlations via Hylleraas type functions plus long-range polarization terms of the polarized orbital type but with smooth cut-off factors has been used to calculate P-wave phase shifts for electron-hydrogen scattering. This approach gives the direct r(exp -4) potential and a non-local optical potential which is definite. The resulting phase shifts have rigorous lower bounds and the convergence is much faster than those obtained without the modification of the target function. Final results will be presented at the conference.

  14. Testing & Validating: 3D Seismic Travel Time Tomography (Detailed Shallow Subsurface Imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, David; Marzan, Ignacio; Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    A detailed full 3 dimensional P wave seismic velocity model was constrained by a high-resolution seismic tomography experiment. A regular and dense grid of shots and receivers was use to image a 500x500x200 m volume of the shallow subsurface. 10 GEODE's resulting in a 240 channels recording system and a 250 kg weight drop were used for the acquisition. The recording geometry consisted in 10x20m geophone grid spacing, and a 20x20 m stagered source spacing. A total of 1200 receivers and 676 source points. The study area is located within the Iberian Meseta, in Villar de Cañas (Cuenca, Spain). The lithological/geological target consisted in a Neogen sedimentary sequence formed from bottom to top by a transition from gyspum to silstones. The main objectives consisted in resolving the underground structure: contacts/discontinuities; constrain the 3D geometry of the lithology (possible cavities, faults/fractures). These targets were achieved by mapping the 3D distribution of the physical properties (P-wave velocity). The regularly space dense acquisition grid forced to acquire the survey in different stages and with a variety of weather conditions. Therefore, a careful quality control was required. More than a half million first arrivals were inverted to provide a 3D Vp velocity model that reached depths of 120 m in the areas with the highest ray coverage. An extended borehole campaign, that included borehole geophysical measurements in some wells provided unique tight constraints on the lithology an a validation scheme for the tomographic results. The final image reveals a laterally variable structure consisting of four different lithological units. In this methodological validation test travel-time tomography features a high capacity of imaging in detail the lithological contrasts for complex structures located at very shallow depths.

  15. Characterization of a landslide geometry using 3D seismic refraction traveltime tomography: The La Valette landslide case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, K.; Travelletti, J.; Bitri, A.; Grandjean, G.; Malet, J.-P.

    2012-11-01

    The geometry of the bedrock, internal layers and shear surfaces/bands controls the deformation pattern and the mechanisms of landslides. A challenge to progress in the forecast of landslide acceleration in terms of early-warning is therefore to characterize the 3D geometry of the unstable mass at a high level of spatial resolution, both in the horizontal and vertical directions, by integrating information from different surveying techniques. For such characterization, seismic investigations are potentially of a great interest. In the case of complex structures, the measure and the processing of seismic data need to be performed in 3D. The objective of this work is to present the development of a 3D extension of a seismic refraction traveltime tomography technique based on a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). First the processing algorithm is detailed and its performance is discussed, and second an application to the La Valette complex landslide is presented. Inversion of first-arrival traveltimes produces a 3D tomogram that underlines the presence of many areas characterized by low P-wave velocity of 500-1800 m.s- 1. These low P-wave velocity structures result from the presence of reworked blocks, surficial cracks and in-depth fracture zones. These structures seem to extend to around 25 m in depth over a 80 × 130 m area. Based on borehole geotechnical data and previous geophysical investigations, an interface corresponding to an internal slip surface can be suspected near the isovalue of 1200 m.s- 1 at a depth of - 10 to - 15 m. The stable substratum is characterized by higher values of P-wave velocity of 1800-3000 m.s- 1. The features identified in the 3D tomogram allow to better (1) delineate the boundary between the landslide and the surrounding stable slopes, and (2) understand the morphological structures within the landslide at a hectometric scale. The integration of the 3D seismic tomography interpretation to previous geophysical

  16. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  17. Holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shancheng; Pan, Qiyuan; Jing, Jiliang

    2017-02-01

    We construct the holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity via a Maxwell complex vector field model and investigate the effect of the curvature correction on the superfluid phase transition in the probe limit. We obtain the rich phase structure and find that the higher curvature correction hinders the condensate of the vector field but makes it easier for the appearance of translating point from the second-order transition to the first-order one or for the emergence of the Cave of Winds. Moreover, for the supercurrents versus the superfluid velocity, we observe that our results near the critical temperature are independent of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and agree well with the Ginzburg-Landau prediction.

  18. Integrating Mach-Zehnder interferometry with TPIV to measure the time-resolved deformation of a compliant wall along with the 3D velocity field in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cao; Miorini, Rinaldo; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    A system combining tomographic PIV (TPIV) and Mach-Zehnder interferometry (MZI) simultaneously measures the time- resolved 3D flow field and 2D distribution of wall-normal deformation in a turbulent channel flow over a transparent compliant surface. This paper focuses on the experimental techniques and data analysis procedures, but includes sample results. Standard TPIV analysis resolves the log layer of the mean velocity and the linear decrease in total shear stress with distance from the wall. Single-pixel ensemble correlations reveal the buffer layer and top of the viscous sublayer. Analysis of the MZI data consists of two steps, namely critical spatial filtering of interferograms to remove noise and phase demodulation to calculate the surface shape. A new technique to improve the filtration of noise from interferograms based on spatial correlations of small windows is introduced and optimized. Taking advantage of this enhancement, the phase/deformation distribution is calculated directly from arccosines of the intensity, which avoids edge artifacts affecting spectral calculations. Validations using synthetic noisy interferograms indicate that errors associated with correlation-based enhancement are consistently lower and much less sensitive to fringe shape than spectral band-pass filtering. The experimental wavenumber-frequency spectra show that the deformation consists of patterns that are larger than the field of view, surface waves and small-scale patterns. Some of the latter are advected at the freestream velocity, but mostly at 70 % of the freestream, the mean speed at 10 % of the channel half height. Indeed, spatial correlations of the deformation with velocity components peak at this elevation.

  19. Joint Impact Proposal: A complete velocity resolved 3-D [CII] map of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy: Unraveling the impact of spiral density waves on the evolution of the ISM and star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzki, Juergen

    2015-10-01

    We propose to obtain the first complete, velocity resolved [CII] 158um image of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy with the upGREAT and FIFI-LS instruments on SOFIA. Spiral density waves play a fundamental role on the conversion of atomic to molecular gas, leading to gravitational contraction and thus to star formation. Understanding the impact of spiral density waves on the lifecycle of the interstellar medium and on star formation in galaxies is thus critical for our understanding of galaxy evolution. The [CII] line (in combination with the low-J CO lines and HI 21 cm) is an important tool to diagnose the physical state of the ISM. It can reveal the distribution of the gas that is making a transition between atomic and molecular phases, including the CO-dark H2 gas (hydrogen molecular but carbon ionized, and thus not traced by either HI or CO) in the spiral arms and interarm regions of M51. We will use the high spectral resolution of the upGREAT instrument to resolve spiral arms in velocity, allowing us to study the flow of gas through spiral arms and measure line widths and determine the dynamical state of prominent interarm clouds. The significantly more sensitive FIFI-LS will be used to detect extended faint [CII] emission in the interarm regions and outskirts of the galaxy, including the gas connection to the companion galaxy. The 3-D data cube of velocity-resolved [CII] in this nearby galaxy, combined with the wealth of ancillary data, can be used for a large set of investigations by the broader astronomical community. It will provide for the first time the link between the detailed physical processes in the star-forming ISM in the Milky Way and the average properties of distant external galaxies. This complete map will be also an excellent showcase of SOFIA's capabilities for years to come.

  20. Joint Impact Proposal: A complete velocity resolved 3-D [CII] map of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy: Unraveling the impact of spiral density waves on the evolution of the ISM and star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    We propose to obtain the first complete, velocity resolved [CII] 158um image of the M51 grand-design spiral galaxy with the upGREAT and FIFI-LS instruments on SOFIA. Spiral density waves play a fundamental role on the conversion of atomic to molecular gas, leading to gravitational contraction and thus to star formation. Understanding the impact of spiral density waves on the lifecycle of the interstellar medium and on star formation in galaxies is thus critical for our understanding of galaxy evolution. The [CII] line (in combination with the low-J CO lines and HI 21 cm) is an important tool to diagnose the physical state of the ISM. It can reveal the distribution of the gas that is making a transition between atomic and molecular phases, including the CO-dark H2 gas (hydrogen molecular but carbon ionized, and thus not traced by either HI or CO) in the spiral arms and interarm regions of M51. We will use the high spectral resolution of the upGREAT instrument to resolve spiral arms in velocity, allowing us to study the flow of gas through spiral arms and measure line widths and determine the dynamical state of prominent interarm clouds. The significantly more sensitive FIFI-LS will be used to detect extended faint [CII] emission in the interarm regions and outskirts of the galaxy, including the gas connection to the companion galaxy. The 3-D data cube of velocity--resolved [CII] in this nearby galaxy, combined with the wealth of ancillary data, can be used for a large set of investigations by the broader astronomical community. It will provide for the first time the link between the detailed physical processes in the star-forming ISM in the Milky Way and the average properties of distant external galaxies. This complete map will be also an excellent showcase of SOFIA's capabilities for years to come.

  1. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  2. 3D Seismic Imaging over a Potential Collapse Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, Roland; O'Connell, Daniel; Elobaid Elnaiem, Ali; Mohamed, Fathelrahman; Sadooni, Fadhil

    2016-04-01

    The Middle-East has seen a recent boom in construction including the planning and development of complete new sub-sections of metropolitan areas. Before planning and construction can commence, however, the development areas need to be investigated to determine their suitability for the planned project. Subsurface parameters such as the type of material (soil/rock), thickness of top soil or rock layers, depth and elastic parameters of basement, for example, comprise important information needed before a decision concerning the suitability of the site for construction can be made. A similar problem arises in environmental impact studies, when subsurface parameters are needed to assess the geological heterogeneity of the subsurface. Environmental impact studies are typically required for each construction project, particularly for the scale of the aforementioned building boom in the Middle East. The current study was conducted in Qatar at the location of a future highway interchange to evaluate a suite of 3D seismic techniques in their effectiveness to interrogate the subsurface for the presence of karst-like collapse structures. The survey comprised an area of approximately 10,000 m2 and consisted of 550 source- and 192 receiver locations. The seismic source was an accelerated weight drop while the geophones consisted of 3-component 10 Hz velocity sensors. At present, we analyzed over 100,000 P-wave phase arrivals and performed high-resolution 3-D tomographic imaging of the shallow subsurface. Furthermore, dispersion analysis of recorded surface waves will be performed to obtain S-wave velocity profiles of the subsurface. Both results, in conjunction with density estimates, will be utilized to determine the elastic moduli of the subsurface rock layers.

  3. Combining controlled-source seismology and local earthquake tomography to derive a 3-D crustal model of the western Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Michael; Kissling, Edi; Husen, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    We present a newly developed approach of combining controlled-source seismology (CSS) and local earthquake tomography (LET) data to obtain a new 3-D crustal model of the western Alpine region. Our approach combines either data by taking into account the strengths of the individual seismic methods. Our western Alpine 3-D model is primarily based on a well-defined Moho, constrained by CSS and LET data, and includes smooth lateral variations in seismic velocities mainly constrained by LET data, but locally also by CSS data. The consistent combination of results from the two different seismic methods is feasible due to LET Moho elements, as defined by characteristic P-wave velocities and their uncertainty estimates. These uncertainty estimates are based on values of the diagonal element of the resolution matrix, absolute P-wave velocities that are typical for crust and mantle and a specific velocity gradient across the Moho discontinuity. Finally, our definition of LET Moho elements and their uncertainties is validated by comparisons of highest quality Moho results from both methods coinciding in 353 localities. Our model clearly shows three Moho surfaces, being Europe, Adria and Liguria as well as major tectonic structures like suture zones and the high-velocity Ivrea body. In general, it is in a good agreement with previous studies. The biggest differences occur along plate boundaries, where the strong lateral velocity variations are best resolved by LET. Due to the larger number of available Moho reflector elements a more accurate definition of plate boundaries at Moho level is possible and, therefore, new insights in deep lithosphere structures of the Alpine collision zone can be expected. Furthermore, our new 3-D crustal model directly includes a 3-D migrated image of the Ivrea body.

  4. Model Parameterization and P-wave AVA Direct Inversion for Young's Impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-03-01

    AVA inversion is an important tool for elastic parameters estimation to guide the lithology prediction and "sweet spot" identification of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The product of the Young's modulus and density (named as Young's impedance in this study) is known as an effective lithology and brittleness indicator of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Density is difficult to predict from seismic data, which renders the estimation of the Young's impedance inaccurate in conventional approaches. In this study, a pragmatic seismic AVA inversion approach with only P-wave pre-stack seismic data is proposed to estimate the Young's impedance to avoid the uncertainty brought by density. First, based on the linearized P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of P-wave and S-wave moduli, the P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of the Young's impedance is derived according to the relationship between P-wave modulus, S-wave modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson ratio. This equation is further compared to the exact Zoeppritz equation and the linearized P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of P- and S-wave velocities and density, which illustrates that this equation is accurate enough to be used for AVA inversion when the incident angle is within the critical angle. Parameter sensitivity analysis illustrates that the high correlation between the Young's impedance and density render the estimation of the Young's impedance difficult. Therefore, a de-correlation scheme is used in the pragmatic AVA inversion with Bayesian inference to estimate Young's impedance only with pre-stack P-wave seismic data. Synthetic examples demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to predict the Young's impedance stably even with moderate noise and the field data examples verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach in Young's impedance estimation and "sweet spots" evaluation.

  5. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  6. P-wave Receiver Functions reveal the Bohemian Massif crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampfova Exnerova, Hana; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Vecsey, Ludek

    2015-04-01

    In this study we present initial results of P-wave Receiver Functions (RF) calculated from broad-band waveforms of teleseismic events recorded by temporary and permanent stations in the Bohemian Massif (BM, Central Europe). Temporary arrays BOHEMA I (2001-2003), BOHEMA II (2004-2005) and BOHEMA III (2005-2006) operated during passive seismic experiments oriented towards studying velocity structure of the lithosphere and the upper mantle. Receiver Functions show relative response of the Earth structure under a seismic station and nowadays represent frequently-used method to retrieve structure of the crust, whose knowledge is needed in various studies of the upper mantle. The recorded waveforms are composites of direct P and P-to-S converted waves that reverberate in the structure beneath the receiver (Ammon, 1997). The RFs are sensitive to seismic velocity contrast and are thus suited to identifying velocity discontinuities in the crust, including the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho). Relative travel-time delays of the converted phases detected in the RFs are transformed into estimates of discontinuity depths assuming external information on the vp/vs and P velocity. To evaluate RFs we use the Multiple-taper spectral correlation (MTC) method (Park and Levin, 2000) and process signals from teleseismic events at epicentral distances of 30 - 100° with magnitude Mw > 5.5. Recordings are filtered with Butterworth band-pass filter of 2 - 8 s. To select automatically signals which are strong enough, we calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) in two steps. In the first step we calculate SNR for signals from intervals (-1s, 3s)/(-10s, -2s), where P-arrival time represent time zero. In the second step we broaden the intervals and calculate SNR for (-1s, 9s)/(-60s, -2s). We also employ forward modelling of the RFs using Interactive Receiver Functions Forward Modeller (IRFFM) (Tkalčić et al., 2010) to produce, in the first step, one-dimensional velocity models under

  7. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  8. 3D Porosity Estimation of the Nankai Trough Sediments from Core-log-seismic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough off southwest Japan is one of the best subduction-zone to study megathrust earthquake fault. Historic, great megathrust earthquakes with a recurrence interval of 100-200 yr have generated strong motion and large tsunamis along the Nankai Trough subduction zone. At the Nankai Trough margin, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) is being subducted beneath the Eurasian Plate to the northwest at a convergence rate ~4 cm/yr. The Shikoku Basin, the northern part of the PSP, is estimated to have opened between 25 and 15 Ma by backarc spreading of the Izu-Bonin arc. The >100-km-wide Nankai accretionary wedge, which has developed landward of the trench since the Miocene, mainly consists of offscraped and underplated materials from the trough-fill turbidites and the Shikoku Basin hemipelagic sediments. Particularly, physical properties of the incoming hemipelagic sediments may be critical for seismogenic behavior of the megathrust fault. We have carried out core-log-seismic integration (CLSI) to estimate 3D acoustic impedance and porosity for the incoming sediments in the Nankai Trough. For the CLSI, we used 3D seismic reflection data, P-wave velocity and density data obtained during IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Expeditions 322 and 333. We computed acoustic impedance depth profiles for the IODP drilling sites from P-wave velocity and density data. We constructed seismic convolution models with the acoustic impedance profiles and a source wavelet which is extracted from the seismic data, adjusting the seismic models to observed seismic traces with inversion method. As a result, we obtained 3D acoustic impedance volume and then converted it to 3D porosity volume. In general, the 3D porosities show decrease with depth. We found a porosity anomaly zone with alteration of high and low porosities seaward of the trough axis. In this talk, we will show detailed 3D porosity of the incoming sediments, and present implications of the porosity anomaly zone for the

  9. Improving depth resolution of teleseismic tomography by simultaneous inversion of teleseismic and global P-wave traveltime data-application to the Vrancea region in Southeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidle, C.; Widiyantoro, S.

    2005-09-01

    Over the years, teleseismic tomography has developed to be a sophisticated method to study the Earth's upper mantle on a regional scale. Using data from tomographic experiments with temporary station networks, one faces some inherent problems, which include limited resolution at depth and artefacts due to a plane-wave approximation at the bottom of the model volume. Simultaneous inversion of dense regionally recorded teleseismic and global P-wave traveltime data provides an opportunity to overcome these specific problems. The calculation of the entire ray path using a 3-D ray tracing algorithm and a non-linear iterative inversion scheme allow to localize heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle and to improve resolution at depth. Application of a variable parametrization scheme provides not only a regional high-resolution model but additionally allows to include a priori constrained structures such as a crustal model derived from independent studies. We investigated the effect of different inversion strategies for a priori constrained model parameters and found that, for upper-mantle studies, one must allow further perturbation of the known velocity structure during inversion to avoid artefacts down to the mantle transition zone. We apply this approach to the Romanian Vrancea region in Southeastern Europe. The results show a near-vertical, narrow high-velocity body underneath that region extending down to 280 km depth, approximately outlining the narrowly spaced seismogenic volume and a deeper, differently oriented positive anomaly coupled to the shallower segment at the latter's southwestern edge. At north, northwest and west of the Vrancea region, we find an extended region of decreased seismic P-wave velocity down to 200 km depth, being interpreted as a shallow lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and asthenospheric mantle flow due to lateral migration of the high-velocity body. From synthetic reconstruction tests, we found that inversion of the combined data set of

  10. Estimating Earthquake Source Parameters from P-wave Spectra: Lessons from Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, P. M.; Denolle, M.; Kaneko, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Observations make clear that some earthquakes radiate relatively more high frequency energy that others of the same moment. But translating these differences into traditional source parameter measures, such as stress drop and radiated energy, can be problematic. Some of the issues include: (1) Because of directivity and other rupture propagation details, theoretical results show that recorded spectra will vary in shape among stations. Observational studies often neglect this effect or assume it will average out when multiple stations are used, but this averaging is rarely perfect, particularly considering the narrow range of takeoff angles used in teleseismic studies. (2) Depth phases for shallow events create interference in the spectra that can severely bias spectral estimates, unless depth phases are taken into account. (3) Corner frequency is not a well-defined parameter and different methods for its computation will yield different results. In addition, stress drop estimates inferred from corner frequencies rely on specific theoretical rupture models, and different assumed crack geometries and rupture velocities will yield different stress drop values. (4) Attenuation corrections may be inaccurate or not fully reflect local 3D near-source attenuation structure. The use of empirical Green's function (EGF) events can help, but these often have signal-to-noise issues or are not very close to the target earthquake. (5) Energy estimates typically rely on some degree of extrapolation of spectra beyond their observational band, introducing model assumptions into what is intended to be a direct measure of an earthquake property. (6) P-wave spectra are analyzed much more than S-wave spectra because of their greater frequency content, but they only carry a small fraction of the total radiated seismic energy and thus total energy estimates may rely on poorly known Es/Ep scaling relations. We will discuss strategies to address these problems and to compute improved source

  11. Teleseismic P wave spectra from USArray and implications for upper mantle attenuation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafferky, Samantha; Schmandt, Brandon

    2015-10-01

    Teleseismic P wave amplitude spectra from deep earthquakes recorded by USArray are inverted for maps of upper mantle Δt* for multiple frequency bands within 0.08-2 Hz. All frequency bands show high Δt* regions in the southwestern U.S., southern Rocky Mountains, and Appalachian margin. Low Δt* is more common across the cratonic interior. Inversions with narrower frequency bands yield similar patterns, but greater Δt* magnitudes. Even the two standard deviation Δt* magnitude for the widest band is ˜2-7 times greater than predicted by global QS tomography or an anelastic olivine thermal model, suggesting that much of the Δt* signal is nonthermal in origin. Nonthermal contributions are further indicated by only a moderate correlation between Δt* and P travel times. Some geographic variations, such as high Δt* in parts of the cratonic interior with high mantle velocities and low heat flow, demonstrate that the influence of temperature is regionally overwhelmed. Transverse spectra are used to investigate the importance of scattering because they would receive no P energy in the absence of 3-D heterogeneity or anisotropy. Transverse to vertical (T/Z) spectral ratios for stations with high Δt* are higher and exhibit steeper increases with frequency compared to T/Z spectra for low Δt* stations. The large magnitude of Δt* estimates and the T/Z spectra are consistent with major contributions to Δt* from scattering. A weak positive correlation between intrinsic attenuation and apparent attenuation due to scattering may contribute to Δt* magnitude and the moderate correlation of Δt* with travel times.

  12. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  13. Global P-wave tomography of mantle plumes and subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    There are many volcanoes on the Earth which can be generally classified into 3 categories: island arc volcanoes, mid-ocean ridge volcanoes, and hotspot volcanoes. Hotspot volcanoes denote intraplate volcanoes like Hawaii, or anomalously large mid-ocean ridge volcanoes like Iceland. So far many researchers have studied the origin of hotspot volcanoes and have used mantle plume hypothesis to explain them. However, we still have little knowledge about mantle plumes yet. In this study, we determined a new model of whole mantle P-wave tomography to understand the origin of hotspot volcanoes. We used the global tomography method of Zhao (2001, 2004). A 3-D grid net was set up in the mantle, and velocity perturbations at every grid nodes were taken as unknown parameters. The iasp91 velocity model (Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) was taken as the 1-D initial model. We selected 9106 earthquakes from the events occurred in the last forty years from the ISC catalog. About 1.6 million arrival-time data of five-type P phases (P, pP, PP, PcP, and Pdiff) were used to conduct the tomographic inversion. In our previous model (Zhao, 2004), the grid interval in the E-W direction is too small in the polar regions. In this study, in order to remedy this problem, we use a flexible-grid approach to make the lateral grid intervals in the polar regions nearly the same as the other portions of the mantle. As a result, the tomographic images in the polar regions are remarkably improved. Our new tomographic model shows huge low-velocity (low-V) zones in the entire mantle under Tahiti and Lake Victoria, which reflect the Pacific and African superplumes, being consistent with the previous studies. A clear low-V zone is revealed under Mt. Erebus volcano in Antarctica. Other major hotspots also exhibit significant low-V zones in the mantle under their surface locations. Beneath Bering Sea, we found that the Pacific slab is subducting from the Aleutian trench and it is stagnant in the mantle transition

  14. P-wave seismic imaging through dipping transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Jennifer Meryl

    2000-10-01

    P-wave seismic anisotropy is of growing concern to the exploration industry. The transmissional effects through dipping anisotropic strata, such as shales, cause substantial depth and lateral positioning errors when imaging subsurface targets. Using anisotropic physical models the limitations of conventional isotropic migration routines were determined to be significant. In addition, these models were used to validate both anisotropic depth migration routines and an anisotropic, numerical raytracer. In order to include anisotropy in these processes, one must be able to quantify the anisotropy using two parameters, epsilon and delta. These parameters were determined from headwave velocity measurements on anisotropic strata, in the parallel-, perpendicular- and 45°-to-bedding directions. This new method was developed using refraction seismic techniques to measure the necessary velocities in the Wapiabi Formation shales, the Brazeau Group interbedded sandstones and shales, the Cardium Formation sandstones and the Palliser Formation limestones. The Wapiabi Formation and Brazeau Group rocks were determined to be anisotropic with epsilon = 0.23 +/- 0.05, delta = --0.05 +/- 0.07 and epsilon = 0.11 +/- 0.04, delta = 0.42 +/- 0.06, respectively. The sandstones and limestones of the Cardium and Palliser formations were both determined to be isotropic, in these studies. In a complementary experiment, a new procedure using vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques was developed to measure the anisotropic headwave velocities. Using a multi-offset source configuration on an appropriately dipping, uniform panel of anisotropic strata, the required velocities were measured directly and modelled. In this study, the geologic model was modelled using an anisotropic raytracer, developed for the experiment. The anisotropy was successfully modelled using anisotropic parameters based on the refraction seismic results. With a firm idea of the anisotropic parameters from the

  15. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  16. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  17. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  18. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  19. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  20. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  1. Lithospheric structure of the Illinois Basin from teleseismic P-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B.; Gilbert, H. J.; Hamburger, M. W.; Merrell, T.; Pavlis, G. L.; Sherrill, E.

    2013-12-01

    We examine heterogeneity of the crust and upper mantle associated with a major intracratonic basin, using arrival time data from a regional EarthScope experiment extending across the western margin of the Illinois Basin. We measured 24,062 P-wave residuals associated with 399 teleseismic events recorded from January 2012 to March 2013 by 122 stations in the Illinois Basin region. We used data from the Ozark Illinois INdiana Kentucky (OIINK) Flexible Array, the permanent New Madrid Seismic Network, and a portion of the Earthscope Transportable Array. Precise relative arrival times were determined using array cross-correlation methods. We plotted the measured arrivals as residual maps to identify first order patterns of velocity heterogeneity and to fix outliers. These data were then inverted for P-wave velocity using non-linear tomography code developed by Steven Roecker. Our preliminary results indicate the upper 200 km of the mantle can be characterized by two blocks with a transition zone centered roughly parallel to the Ohio River boundary of Illinois and Kentucky. Estimated P-wave velocities are higher in Kentucky, located southeast of the transition zone compared to Missouri and Illinois, located northwest. We caution that at this stage our tomography model may be biased as we have not accounted for variations in crustal structure or applied corrections associated with the Illinois Basin. Parallel work with receiver functions by our group and the known geometry of the Illinois Basin will be used to calculate these corrections and modify the tomographic model accordingly.

  2. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  3. Effects of p-wave annihilation on the angular power spectrum of extragalactic gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sheldon; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2011-10-01

    We present a formalism for estimating the angular power spectrum of extragalactic gamma-rays produced by dark matter annihilating with any general velocity-dependent cross section. The relevant density and velocity distribution of dark matter is modeled as an ensemble of smooth, universal, rigid, disjoint, spherical halos with distribution and universal properties constrained by simulation data. We apply this formalism to theories of dark matter with p-wave annihilation, for which the relative-velocity-weighted annihilation cross section is σv=a+bv2. We determine that this significantly increases the gamma-ray power if b/a≳106. The effect of p-wave annihilation on the angular power spectrum is very similar for the sample of particle physics models we explored, suggesting that the important effect for a given b/a is largely determined by the cosmic dark matter distribution. If the dark matter relic from strong p-wave theories is thermally produced, the intensities of annihilation gamma-rays are strongly p-wave suppressed, making them difficult to observe. If an angular power spectrum consistent with a strong p wave were to be observed, it would likely indicate nonthermal production of dark matter in the early Universe.

  4. Lithospheric architecture of the Slave craton, northwest Canada, as determined from an interdisciplinary 3-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Hillier, M. J.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; de Kemp, E. A.; Craven, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    geologic structures characteristic of mantle lithosphere within cratons found in continent interiors are interpreted using geo-registered diverse data sets from the Slave craton of northwest Canada. We developed and applied a new method for mapping seismic discontinuities in three dimensions using multiyear observations at sparse, individual broadband receivers. New, fully 3-D conductivity models used all available magnetotelluric data. Discontinuity surfaces and conductivity models were geo-registered with previously published P-wave and surface-wave velocity models to confirm first-order structures such as a midlithosphere discontinuity. Our 3-D model to 400 km depth was calibrated by "drill hole" observations derived from xenolith suites extracted from kimberlites. A number of new structural discontinuities emerge from direct comparison of coregistered data sets and models. Importantly, we distinguish primary mantle layers from secondary features related to younger metasomatism. Subhorizontal Slave craton layers with tapered, wedge-shaped margins indicate construction of the craton core at 2.7 Ga by underthrusting and flat stacking of lithosphere. Mapping of conductivity and metasomatism in 3-D, the latter inferred via mineral recrystallization and resetting of isotopic ages in xenoliths, indicates overprinting of the primary layered structures. The observed distribution of relatively conductive mantle at 100-200 km depths is consistent with pervasive metasomatism; vertical "chimneys" reaching to crustal depths in locations where kimberlites erupted or where Au mineralization is known.

  5. Constraining seismic velocity features combining short and long period signals: Test ground is Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, Fatih; Eken, Tuna; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2015-04-01

    Verifying the seismic velocity models requires combining different techniques to obtain more reliable basement for further steps, e.g., earthquake location, moment tensor analysis etc. Especially, 2D/3D heterogeneities and velocity contrasts are the key unknowns to be addressed in order to achieve the best-possible setup for further analysis. In that frame, short and long period signals are combined to better constrain the unusual velocity features. Our approach employs P-wave particle motions and receiver functions to discriminate the velocity structure of different crustal blocks. P-wave particle motions are basically used to differentiate direction of incoming waves, which is an indirect measure of potential velocity contrast/heterogeneity in horizontal axis. In the meanwhile, P-wave receiver functions are used to estimate frequency dependent S-wave velocities at different crustal spots. Turkey, seismically the most active region in Europe, is selected to be the test ground for joint analysis scheme. The region has been continuously monitored by AFAD (Prime Ministry, Ankara) and Kandilli Observatory (Boğaziçi Üniversity, Istanbul). Furthermore, some particular regions have been densely monitored for a couple of years by temporary seismic networks, e.g., the IRIS network deployed in the frame of the North Anatolian Fault experiment. We integrated all available data to reach to the highest possible coverage for selected test sites. The results are jointly interpreted to refine existing crustal models in Turkey.

  6. 3-D Tomographic Imaging of the Chicxulub Impact Crater: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendra, A. T.; Barton, P. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Melosh, H. J.; McDonald, M. A.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure provides a unique opportunity to investigate the sub-surface morphology of large craters on Earth and other planets. The structure of the crater interior is still poorly known and there is much uncertainty over the sequence of events by which these large craters form and the magnitude of the subsequent catastrophic environmental effects. In early 2005, a reflection-refraction survey aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing imaged the deep structure of the Chicxulub impact. We present wide-angle data collected by a 3-D grid of 50 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs), 86 three-component land stations and a 6 km long hydrophone streamer. The OBS grid, designed to image the peak ring and underlying structure of the northwestern quadrant of the crater, recorded shots from several seismic profiles in various orientations. Many of these profiles extended past the crater rim imaging to the base of the crust. Travel-time picks from this dataset, combined with existing 1996 data, will be inverted using the JIVE3-D tomographic inversion program to create a fully 3-D velocity model of the crater interior. The interpretation of the velocity model will focus on the morphology of the peak ring and the central uplift, and the distribution of breccia and suevite (an impact related breccia/melt) in the centre of the crater. We will calculate the Poisson's ratio for different areas of the crater using both the P-wave velocity model and S-wave arrivals, including those from the 1996 land station data. Comparisons of these values with measurements on the Yaxcopoil-1 core taken from within the crater provide ground-truth for our tomographic model. The contrast in Poisson's ratio between areas of suevite and the surrounding rock further constrain the distribution of breccia and suevite.

  7. Holographic p-wave superconductor models with Weyl corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Pan, Qiyuan; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-04-01

    We study the effect of the Weyl corrections on the holographic p-wave dual models in the backgrounds of AdS soliton and AdS black hole via a Maxwell complex vector field model by using the numerical and analytical methods. We find that, in the soliton background, the Weyl corrections do not influence the properties of the holographic p-wave insulator/superconductor phase transition, which is different from that of the Yang-Mills theory. However, in the black hole background, we observe that similarly to the Weyl correction effects in the Yang-Mills theory, the higher Weyl corrections make it easier for the p-wave metal/superconductor phase transition to be triggered, which shows that these two p-wave models with Weyl corrections share some similar features for the condensation of the vector operator.

  8. Novel p-wave superfluids of fermionic polar molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, A. K.; Matveenko, S. I.; Yudson, V. I.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Recently suggested subwavelength lattices offer remarkable prospects for the observation of novel superfluids of fermionic polar molecules. It becomes realistic to obtain a topological p-wave superfluid of microwave-dressed polar molecules in 2D lattices at temperatures of the order of tens of nanokelvins, which is promising for topologically protected quantum information processing. Another foreseen novel phase is an interlayer p-wave superfluid of polar molecules in a bilayer geometry. PMID:27278711

  9. P-wave dispersion: What we know till now?

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    P-wave dispersion is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum P-wave duration recorded from multiple different-surface ECG leads. It has been known that increased P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion reflect prolongation of intraatrial and interatrial conduction time and the inhomogeneous propagation of sinus impulses, which are well-known electrophysiologic characteristics in patients with atrial arrhythmias and especially paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Extensive clinical evaluation of P-wave dispersion has been performed in the assessment of the risk for atrial fibrillation in patients without apparent heart disease, in hypertensives, in patients with coronary artery disease, in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, in patients with congenital heart diseases, as well as in other groups of patients suffering from various cardiac or non-cardiac diseases. In this paper, we aimed to summarize the measurement methods, current use in different clinical situations, strengths and limitations of the of P-wave dispersion. PMID:27081484

  10. Ray-theoretical modeling of secondary microseism P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farra, V.; Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-09-01

    Secondary microseism sources are pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic P waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We present the theory for computing the displacement power spectral density of secondary microseism P waves recorded by receivers in the far field. In the frequency domain, the P-wave displacement can be modeled as the product of (1) the pressure source, (2) the source site effect that accounts for the constructive interference of multiply reflected P waves in the ocean, (3) the propagation from the ocean bottom to the stations and (4) the receiver site effect. Secondary microseism P waves have weak amplitudes, but they can be investigated by beamforming analysis. We validate our approach by analysing the seismic signals generated by typhoon Ioke (2006) and recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. Backprojecting the beam onto the ocean surface enables to follow the source motion. The observed beam centroid is in the vicinity of the pressure source derived from the ocean wave model WAVEWATCH IIIR. The pressure source is then used for modeling the beam and a good agreement is obtained between measured and modeled beam amplitude variation over time. This modeling approach can be used to invert P-wave noise data and retrieve the source intensity and lateral extent.

  11. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  12. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  13. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  14. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  15. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. NACr14: A 3D model for the crustal structure of the North American Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Mooney, Walter D.; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-09-01

    Based on the large number of crustal seismic experiments carried out in the last decades we create NACr14, a 3D crustal model of the North American continent at a resolution of 1° × 1°. We present maps of thickness and average velocities of the main layers that comprise the North American crystalline crust, obtained from the most recent seismic crustal models within the USGS crustal structure database. However, the crustal data are unevenly distributed and in some cases discrepancies exist between published models. In order to construct a consistent 3D crustal model with three layers in the crystalline crust, we refrained from a direct interpolation of the crustal seismic parameters in the database. Instead, we implemented the following sequence of steps: 1. Definition of the geometry of the main tectonic provinces of North America; 2. Selection and evaluation of the reliability of seismic crustal models in the database; 3. Estimation of the P-wave seismic velocity and thickness of the upper, middle and lower crust for each tectonic province; 4. Estimation of the interpolated Pn velocity distribution. The resulting average velocity of the crystalline crust is mostly consistent with that of the seismic points. The main variations of the structure of the crystalline crust of North America displayed in the model can be related to its tectonic evolution. The model, available in a digital form, can be used in various geophysical applications, such as the correction for the crustal effects in gravity and seismic tomography and models of dynamic topography, in order to detect heterogeneities characterizing the underlying upper mantle.

  17. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  18. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. Material and Methods The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. Results The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (p<0.001 for both). In terms of the P wave dispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Conclusion Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:28149660

  19. High-resolution imaging of crustal melts using 3D full-waveform seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, M.; Morgan, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    A newly practical seismic imaging technique, 3D full-waveform inversion (FWI), now has the ability to image zones of melt and melt pathways throughout the crust with a better resolution than any other geophysical method. 3D FWI has recently changed practice within the petroleum industry where it is used to obtain high-resolution high-fidelity models of physical properties in the sub-surface that are both interpreted directly and used to improve the migration of deeper reflections. This technology has been spectacularly successful in improving the imaging of reservoirs beneath shallow heterogeneities produced by, for example, gas clouds, buried fluvial channels, carbonate reefs and salt bodies. During FWI, the sub-surface model is recovered principally by using the low-frequency transmitted, refracted portion of the wavefield which is most sensitive to the macro-velocity structure. In the petroleum industry, these inversions are now routinely performed using long-offset surface-streamer and ocean-bottom data to maximum source-receiver offsets of about 15 km, leading to a maximum penetration depth of around 5 km. Using longer offsets, it is possible to extend this technology to image deeper crustal targets. Localised zones of partial melt produce large changes in p-wave and s-wave properties that are restricted in their spatial extent, and that therefore form ideal targets for 3D FWI. We have performed a suite of tests to explore the use of 3D FWI in imaging melt distribution beneath the active volcano of Montserrat. We built a model of the subsurface using a 3D travel-time tomographic model obtained from the SEA CALIPSO experiment. We added two magma chambers in accordance with a model obtained using surface-elevation changes and geochemical data. We used a wide-angle, wide-azimuth acquisition geometry to generate a fully-elastic synthetic seismic dataset, added noise, and inverted the windowed transmitted arrivals only. We used an elastic code for the forward

  20. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2016-10-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  1. Joint Stochastic Inversion of Pre-Stack 3D Seismic Data and Well Logs for High Resolution Hydrocarbon Reservoir Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Verdin, C.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the successful implementation of a new 3D AVA stochastic inversion algorithm to quantitatively integrate pre-stack seismic amplitude data and well logs. The stochastic inversion algorithm is used to characterize flow units of a deepwater reservoir located in the central Gulf of Mexico. Conventional fluid/lithology sensitivity analysis indicates that the shale/sand interface represented by the top of the hydrocarbon-bearing turbidite deposits generates typical Class III AVA responses. On the other hand, layer- dependent Biot-Gassmann analysis shows significant sensitivity of the P-wave velocity and density to fluid substitution. Accordingly, AVA stochastic inversion, which combines the advantages of AVA analysis with those of geostatistical inversion, provided quantitative information about the lateral continuity of the turbidite reservoirs based on the interpretation of inverted acoustic properties (P-velocity, S-velocity, density), and lithotype (sand- shale) distributions. The quantitative use of rock/fluid information through AVA seismic amplitude data, coupled with the implementation of co-simulation via lithotype-dependent multidimensional joint probability distributions of acoustic/petrophysical properties, yields accurate 3D models of petrophysical properties such as porosity and permeability. Finally, by fully integrating pre-stack seismic amplitude data and well logs, the vertical resolution of inverted products is higher than that of deterministic inversions methods.

  2. 3D crustal and lithospheric structure of the Pyrenean orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theunissen, Thomas; Chevrot, Sébastien; Sylvander, Matthieu; Monteiller, Vadim; Villasenor, Antonio; Benahmed, Sébastien; Calvet, Marie

    2013-04-01

    including temporary arrays data. The travel-time local and teleseismic tomography uses a 3D a priori crustal velocity model based on all available geophysical data as initial velocity model (Moho, Conrad, Basement, Topography and P-waves velocity gradients). Additional constraints from receiver functions and local tomography are used to converge toward the best Moho solution. The upper-mantle tomography takes into account the crustal structure from receiver functions to correct travel-times residuals. Combinations of receiver functions, upper-mantle tomography, 3D crustal tomography (VP and VS) and relocated seismicity give us new improved 3D images of the deep structures beneath the Pyrenees.

  3. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  4. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  5. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. Spectral modulation effect in teleseismic P-waves from DPRK nuclear tests recorded at different azimuths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Yefim; Kim, So Gu; Hofstetter, Abraham

    2014-05-01

    Two underground nuclear explosions conducted by North Korea in 2009 and 2013 were recorded by the Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced coherent minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth (relatively to an earthquake), this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. A similar effect was observed at ISN stations for the Pakistan nuclear explosion at a different frequency 1.7 Hz indicating a source and not site-effect. Similar spectral minima with about the same frequency were observed in teleseismic P-waves of all three North Korea explosions (including the 2006 test) recorded at network stations and arrays in Kazakhstan (KURK), Norway (NORESS, ARCESS), Australia (Alice Springs, Warramunga) and Canada (Yellowknife), covering a broad azimuthal range. Data of the 2013 test at Warramunga array showed harmonic spectral modulation with several minima, evidencing a clear interference effect. These observations support the above-mentioned interpretation. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of the North Korea tests was estimated as ~2 km (different from the value ~1 km reported by USGS for the third test). This unusual depth estimation needs an additional validation based on more stations and verification by other methods.

  7. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  8. Finite-frequency traveltime tomography of San Francisco Bay region crustal velocity structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2007-01-01

    Seismic velocity structure of the San Francisco Bay region crust is derived using measurements of finite-frequency traveltimes. A total of 57 801 relative traveltimes are measured by cross-correlation over the frequency range 0.5-1.5 Hz. From these are derived 4862 'summary' traveltimes, which are used to derive 3-D P-wave velocity structure over a 341 ?? 140 km2 area from the surface to 25 km depth. The seismic tomography is based on sensitivity kernels calculated on a spherically symmetric reference model. Robust elements of the derived P-wave velocity structure are: a pronounced velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault in the south Bay region (west side faster); a moderate velocity contrast across the Hayward fault (west side faster); moderately low velocity crust around the Quien Sabe volcanic field and the Sacramento River delta; very low velocity crust around Lake Berryessa. These features are generally explicable with surface rock types being extrapolated to depth ???10 km in the upper crust. Generally high mid-lower crust velocity and high inferred Poisson's ratio suggest a mafic lower crust. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  9. Teleseismic P-wave polarization analysis at the Gräfenberg array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, L.; Meier, T.; Krüger, F.; Keers, H.; Weidle, C.

    2016-12-01

    P-wave polarization at the Gräfenberg array (GRF) in southern Germany is analysed in terms of azimuthal deviations and deviations in the vertical polarization using 20 yr of broad-band recordings. An automated procedure for estimating P-wave polarization parameters is suggested, based on the definition of a characteristic function, which evaluates the polarization angles and their time variability as well as the amplitude, linearity and the signal-to-noise ratio of the P wave. P-wave polarization at the GRF array is shown to depend mainly on frequency and backazimuth and only slightly on epicentral distance indicating depth-dependent local anisotropy and lateral heterogeneity. A harmonic analysis is applied to the azimuthal anomalies to analyse their periodicity as a function of backazimuth. The dominant periods are 180° and 360°. At low frequencies, between 0.03 and 0.1 Hz, the observed fast directions of azimuthal anisotropy inferred from the 180° periodicity are similar across the array. The average fast direction of azimuthal anisotropy at these frequencies is N20°E with an uncertainty of about 8° and is consistent with fast directions of Pn-wave propagation. Lateral velocity gradients determined for the low-frequency band are compatible with the Moho topography of the area. A more complex pattern in the horizontal fast axis orientation beneath the GRF array is observed in the high-frequency band between 0.1 and 0.5 Hz, and is attributed to anisotropy in the upper crust. A remarkable rotation of the horizontal fast axis orientation across the suture between the geological units Moldanubicum and Saxothuringicum is observed. In contrast, the 360° periodicity at high frequencies is rather consistent across the array and may either point to lower velocities in the upper crust towards the Bohemian Massif and/or to anisotropy dipping predominantly in the NE-SW direction. Altogether, P-wave polarization analysis indicates the presence of layered lithospheric

  10. LLNL-G3Dv3: Global P wave tomography model for improved regional and teleseismic travel time prediction: LLNL-G3DV3---GLOBAL P WAVE TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.

    2012-10-06

    [1] We develop a global-scale P wave velocity model (LLNL-G3Dv3) designed to accurately predict seismic travel times at regional and teleseismic distances simultaneously. The model provides a new image of Earth's interior, but the underlying practical purpose of the model is to provide enhanced seismic event location capabilities. The LLNL-G3Dv3 model is based on ∼2.8 millionP and Pnarrivals that are re-processed using our global multiple-event locator called Bayesloc. We construct LLNL-G3Dv3 within a spherical tessellation based framework, allowing for explicit representation of undulating and discontinuous layers including the crust and transition zone layers. Using a multiscale inversion technique, regional trends as well as fine details are captured where the data allow. LLNL-G3Dv3 exhibits large-scale structures including cratons and superplumes as well numerous complex details in the upper mantle including within the transition zone. Particularly, the model reveals new details of a vast network of subducted slabs trapped within the transition beneath much of Eurasia, including beneath the Tibetan Plateau. We demonstrate the impact of Bayesloc multiple-event location on the resulting tomographic images through comparison with images produced without the benefit of multiple-event constraints (single-event locations). We find that the multiple-event locations allow for better reconciliation of the large set of direct P phases recorded at 0–97° distance and yield a smoother and more continuous image relative to the single-event locations. Travel times predicted from a 3-D model are also found to be strongly influenced by the initial locations of the input data, even when an iterative inversion/relocation technique is employed.

  11. Detecting π-phase superfluids with p-wave symmetry in a quasi-1D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaopeng; Hulet, Randall G.; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We propose an experimental protocol to create a p-wave superfluid in a spin-polarized cold Fermi gas tuned by an s-wave Feshbach resonance. A crucial ingredient is to add an anisotropic 3D optical lattice and tune the fillings of two spins to the s and p band, respectively. The pairing order parameter is confirmed to inherit p-wave symmetry in its center-of-mass motion. We find that it can further develop into a state of unexpected π-phase modulation in a broad parameter regime. Experimental signatures are predicted in the momentum distributions, density of states and spatial densities for a realistic experimental setup. The π-phase p-wave superfluid is reminiscent of the π-state in superconductor-ferromagnet heterostructures but differs in symmetry and physical origin. The spatially-varying phases of the superfluid gap provide a novel approach to synthetic magnetic fields for neutral atoms. It would represent another example of p-wave pairing, first discovered in He-3 liquids. Work supported in part by U.S. ARO, AFOSR, NSF, ONR, Charles E. Kaufman Foundation, and The Pittsburgh Foundation, LPS-MPO-CMTC, JQI-NSF-PFC, ARO-Atomtronics-MURI, the Welch Foundation, ARO-MURI and NSF of China.

  12. Predicting the macroseismic intensity from early radiated P wave energy for on-site earthquake early warning in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brondi, P.; Picozzi, M.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.; Mucciarelli, M.

    2015-10-01

    Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) are potentially effective tools for risk mitigation in active seismic regions. The present study explores the possibility of predicting the macroseismic intensity within EEW timeframes using the squared velocity integral (IV2) measured on the early P wave signals, a proxy for the P wave radiated energy of earthquakes. This study shows that IV2 correlates better than the peak displacement measured on P waves with both the peak ground velocity and the Housner Intensity, with the latter being recognized by engineers as a reliable proxy for damage assessment. Therefore, using the strong motion recordings of the Italian Accelerometric Archive, a novel relationship between the parameter IV2 and the macroseismic intensity (IM) has been derived. The validity of this relationship has been assessed using the strong motion recordings of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Strong Motion Data and Osservatorio Sismico delle Strutture databases, as well as, in the case of the MW 6, 29 May 2012 Emilia earthquake (Italy), comparing the predicted intensities with the ones observed after a macroseismic survey. Our results indicate that P wave IV2 can become a key parameter for the design of on-site EEWS, capable of proving real-time predictions of the IM at target sites.

  13. Rubber Impact on 3D Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbs, Sebastian; Van Den Broucke, Björn; Duplessis Kergomard, Yann; Dau, Frederic; Malherbe, Benoit

    2012-06-01

    A low velocity impact study of aircraft tire rubber on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates was performed experimentally and numerically. In contrast to regular unidirectional composite laminates, no delaminations occur in such a 3D textile composite. Yarn decohesions, matrix cracks and yarn ruptures have been identified as the major damage mechanisms under impact load. An increase in the number of 3D warp yarns is proposed to improve the impact damage resistance. The characteristic of a rubber impact is the high amount of elastic energy stored in the impactor during impact, which was more than 90% of the initial kinetic energy. This large geometrical deformation of the rubber during impact leads to a less localised loading of the target structure and poses great challenges for the numerical modelling. A hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin constitutive law was used in Abaqus/Explicit based on a step-by-step validation with static rubber compression tests and low velocity impact tests on aluminium plates. Simulation models of the textile weave were developed on the meso- and macro-scale. The final correlation between impact simulation results on 3D textile-reinforced composite plates and impact test data was promising, highlighting the potential of such numerical simulation tools.

  14. Orienting ocean-bottom seismometers from P-wave and Rayleigh wave polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, John-Robert; Barruol, Guilhem; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Sigloch, Karin; Crawford, Wayne C.; Deen, Martha

    2017-03-01

    We present two independent, automated methods for estimating the absolute horizontal misorientation of seismic sensors. We apply both methods to 44 free-fall ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) of the RHUM-RUM experiment (http://www.rhum-rum.net/). The techniques measure the 3-D directions of particle motion of (1) P-waves and (2) Rayleigh waves of earthquake recordings. For P-waves, we used a principal component analysis to determine the directions of particle motions (polarizations) in multiple frequency passbands. We correct for polarization deviations due to seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities using a simple fit equation, which yields significantly more accurate OBS orientations. For Rayleigh waves, we evaluated the degree of elliptical polarization in the vertical plane in the time and frequency domain. The results obtained for the RHUM-RUM OBS stations differed, on average, by 3.1° and 3.7° between the methods, using circular mean and median statistics, which is within the methods' estimate uncertainties. Using P-waves, we obtained orientation estimates for 31 ocean-bottom seismometers with an average uncertainty (95 per cent confidence interval) of 11° per station. For 7 of these OBS, data coverage was sufficient to correct polarization measurements for underlying seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities, improving their average orientation uncertainty from 11° to 6° per station. Using Rayleigh waves, we obtained misorientation estimates for 40 OBS, with an average uncertainty of 16° per station. The good agreement of results obtained using the two methods indicates that they should also be useful for detecting misorientations of terrestrial seismic stations.

  15. Testing long-period ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes using the Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah mainshock: Evaluation of finite-fault rupture characterization and 3D seismic velocity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert W.; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Using a suite of five hypothetical finite-fault rupture models, we test the ability of long-period (T>2.0 s) ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes to produce waveforms throughout southern California consistent with those recorded during the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The hypothetical ruptures are generated using the methodology proposed by Graves and Pitarka (2010) and require, as inputs, only a general description of the fault location and geometry, event magnitude, and hypocenter, as would be done for a scenario event. For each rupture model, two Southern California Earthquake Center three-dimensional community seismic velocity models (CVM-4m and CVM-H62) are used, resulting in a total of 10 ground-motion simulations, which we compare with recorded ground motions. While the details of the motions vary across the simulations, the median levels match the observed peak ground velocities reasonably well, with the standard deviation of the residuals generally within 50% of the median. Simulations with the CVM-4m model yield somewhat lower variance than those with the CVM-H62 model. Both models tend to overpredict motions in the San Diego region and underpredict motions in the Mojave desert. Within the greater Los Angeles basin, the CVM-4m model generally matches the level of observed motions, whereas the CVM-H62 model tends to overpredict the motions, particularly in the southern portion of the basin. The variance in the peak velocity residuals is lowest for a rupture that has significant shallow slip (<5 km depth), whereas the variance in the residuals is greatest for ruptures with large asperities below 10 km depth. Overall, these results are encouraging and provide confidence in the predictive capabilities of the simulation methodology, while also suggesting some regions in which the seismic velocity models may need improvement.

  16. Improved P-wave Tomography of the Lowermost Mantle and Consequences for Mantle and Core Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalcic, H.; Young, M. K.; Muir, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The core mantle boundary (CMB) separates the liquid iron core from the slowly-convecting solid mantle. The ~300 km thick barrier above the boundary has proven to be far more than a simple dividing layer; rather it is a complex region with a range of proposed phenomena such as thermal and compositional heterogeneity, partial melting and anisotropy. Characterizing the heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle through seismic tomography will prove crucial to accurately understanding key geodynamical processes within our planet, not just in the mantle above, but also a possible "mapping" onto the inner core boundary (ICB) through a thermochemical convection in the outer core, which in turn might control the growth of the inner core (e.g. Aubert et al., 2008; Gubbins et al., 2011). Here we obtain high-resolution compressional wave (P-wave) velocity images and uncertainty estimates for the lowermost mantle using travel time data collected by waveform cross-correlation. Strikingly, independent datasets of seismic phases that "see" the lowermost mantle in a different way yield similar P-wave velocity distributions at lower harmonic degrees. We also consider the effect of CMB topography. The images obtained are void of explicit model parameterization and regularization (through transdimensional Bayesian tomography) and contain features on multiple spatial scales. Subsequent spectral analyses reveal a power of heterogeneity three times larger than previous estimates. The P-wave tomograms of the lowermost mantle contain the harmonic degree 2-structure, similar to tomographic images derived from S-wave data (e.g. Ritsema et al. 2011), but with additional higher harmonic degrees (notably, 3-7). In other words, the heterogeneity size is uniformly distributed between about 500 and 6000 km. Inter alia, the resulting heterogeneity spectrum provides a bridge between the long-wavelength features of most global models and the very short-scale dimensions of scatterers mapped in independent

  17. How 3-D, 3-C seismic characterized a carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Arestad, J.F.; Mattocks, B.W.; Davis, T.L.; Benson, R.D.

    1995-04-01

    The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) at the Colorado School of Mines has pioneered research into 3-D, 3-C (multicomponent) reflection seismology for nearly a decade utilizing both P-wave and S-wave sources. Multicomponent-seismic surveys provide significantly more information about petroleum reservoirs than compressional-wave surveys. Initial 3-D, 3-C surveys acquired by RCP were targeted at characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs. The current phase of the project is oriented towards utilizing shear waves to discriminate lithologic and diagenetic changes within stratigraphic reservoirs where compressional-seismic data has not be effective. The Joffre field, Nisku reservoir, is the site of RCP`s ongoing multidisciplinary research effort in Western Canada. The research team is directed by Colorado School of Mines faculty with graduate team members from geology, geophysics and petroleum engineering departments. While this study is still in progress, some key findings and directions of this research are reported here. The following topics will be discussed: Joffre field 3-D, 3-C survey; compressional wave 3-D technique; shear-wave 3-D technique; converted-wave 3-D technique; reservoir characterization, and future directions.

  18. Double-difference relocations and spectral ratio analysis of volcanic seismic events in the Mount St. Helens crater using a 3D velocity model suggest slip events under the new dome with constant stress-drop scaling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, R. M.; Kwiatek, G.; Moran, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow low frequency seismic events are common features associated with restless and erupting volcanoes. The physical mechanisms generating their characteristic low frequency, and often extended duration signals remain poorly understood. Here we present new double-difference relocations and spectral scaling of a group of ~400 shallow low-frequency seismic events occurring within the Mount St. Helens edifice during its 2004-2008 dome-building eruption, as recorded by a temporary seismic array for a month within the crater in 2006. Relocation results suggest that the majority of earthquakes occurred in the center of the crater close to the vent at depths < 500 m, with some events potentially locating under the new dome but ~200-300m southwest of the vent. Low-frequency events exhibit moment-corner frequency scaling roughly consistent with a constant static stress-drop, similar to tectonic earthquakes occurring elsewhere in shallow crustal faults. The scaling suggests that the ~400 events result from stick-slip behavior, and that the low frequency character of the waveforms may result from a combination of path effects and slow rupture speeds. For relocation, we divide the 400 events into eight families based on waveform similarity, and use a subset of nearly 40 earthquakes with clear first arrivals ranging in moment magnitude from 0.4 - 1.8 to calculate hypocenters. We then relocate these events using a double-difference method with a three-dimensional velocity model of the edifice from Waite and Moran (2009). The relocated events are then used to estimate source parameters of the remaining earthquakes via a spectral ratio technique. Spectral corner frequency estimations based on this spectral ratio approach produce stress-drop values of ~1 MPa assuming a shear-wave velocity of 1500 m/s. The estimations also indicate a constant stress-drop scaling for all events, with two event families having lower estimated stress drops of ~0.1 MPa. While localized lithological

  19. Imaging the Juan de Fuca plate beneath southern Oregon using teleseismic P wave residuals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Iyer, H.M.; Dawson, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Images the Juan de Fuca plate in southern Oregon using seismic tomography. P wave travel time residuals from a 366-km-long seismic array operated in southern Oregon in 1982 are inverted. The southeast striking array extended from the Coast ranges to the Modoc Plateau and crossed the High Cascades at Crater Lake, Oregon. Three features under the array were imaged: one high-velocity zone and two low-velocity zones. The high-velocity zone is 3-4% faster than the surrounding upper mantle. It dips steeply at 65?? to the east beneath the Cascade Range and extends down to at least 200 km. It is proposed that this high-velocity feature is subducted Juan de Fuca plate. Two low-velocity zones were also imaged, both of which are 3-4% slower than the surrounding earth structure. The southeastern low-velocity zone may be caused by partially molten crust underlying the Crater Lake volcano region. -from Authors

  20. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  1. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  2. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  3. P-wave attenuation anisotropy in TI media and its application in fracture parameters inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Yuan; Hu, Tian-Yue; He, Chuan; Tan, Yu-Yang

    2016-12-01

    The existence of aligned fractures in fluid-saturated rocks leads to obvious attenuation anisotropy and velocity anisotropy. Attenuation anisotropy analysis can be applied to estimate fracture density and scale, which provide important information for reservoir identification. This paper derives P-wave attenuation anisotropy in the ATI media where the symmetry axis is in the arbitrary direction theoretically and modifies the spectral ratio method to measure attenuation anisotropy in the ATI media, thus avoiding a large measurement error when applied to wide azimuth or full azimuth data. Fracture dip and azimuth can be estimated through attenuation anisotropy analysis. For small-scale fractures, fracture scale and fracture density can be determined with enhanced convergence if velocity and attenuation information are both used. We also apply the modified spectralratio method to microseismic field data from an oilfield in East China and extract the fracture dip through attenuation anisotropy analysis. The result agrees with the microseismic monitoring.

  4. Retrieval of the P wave reflectivity response from autocorrelation of seismic noise: Jakarta Basin, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil R.; Lumley, David

    2017-01-01

    We autocorrelate the continuously recorded seismic wavefield across a dense network of seismometers to map the P wave reflectivity response of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia. The proximity of this mega city to known active faults and the subduction of the Australian plate, especially when the predominance of masonry construction and thick sedimentary basin fill are considered, suggests that it is a hot spot for seismic risk. In order to understand the type of ground motion that earthquakes might cause in the basin, it is essential to obtain reliable information on its seismic velocity structure. The body wave reflections are sensitive to the sharp velocity contrasts, which makes them useful in seismic imaging. Results show autocorrelograms at different seismic stations with reflected-wave travel time variations, which reflect the variation in basement depth across the thick sedimentary basin. We also confirm the validity of the observed autocorrelation waveforms by conducting a 2-D full waveform modeling.

  5. P-wave autodissociating resonant states of positronium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zong-Chao; Ho, Y. K.

    1998-05-01

    P-wave autodissociating resonances in positronium-hydrogen scattering are calculated using the method of complex-coordinate rotation. The two lowest P-wave resonance energies and widths are determined by employing extensive Hylleraas-type wave functions, with the sizes of basis sets up to N=2513 terms. The calculated energy and width for the lowest P-state are E_r=-0.59253± 0.00005 a.u. and Γ=0.00160± 0.00010 a.u. We will show the details of our calculations, as well as a comparison with the published values. Results for S- and D-waves will also be presented.

  6. Skyrmion-induced bound states in a p -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöyhönen, Kim; Westström, Alex; Pershoguba, Sergey S.; Ojanen, Teemu; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2016-12-01

    In s -wave systems, it has been theoretically shown that a ferromagnetic film hosting a skyrmion can induce a bound state embedded in the opposite-spin continuum. In this work, we consider a case of skyrmion-induced state in a p -wave superconductor. We find that the skyrmion induces a bound state that generally resides within the spectral gap and is isolated from all other states, in contrast to the case of conventional superconductors. To this end, we derive an approximate expression for the T matrix, through which we calculate the spin-polarized local density of states which is observable in scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We find the unique spectroscopic features of the skyrmion-induced bound state and discuss how our predictions could be employed as experimental probes for p -wave superconducting states.

  7. Holographic p-wave superconductors from Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Nie Zhangyu; Zhang Haiqing

    2010-09-15

    We study the holographic p-wave superconductors in a five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity with an SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge field. In the probe approximation, we find that when the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient grows, the condensation of the vector field becomes harder, both the perpendicular and parallel components, with respect to the direction of the condensation, of the anisotropic conductivity decrease. We also study the mass of the quasiparticle excitations, the gap frequency and the DC conductivities of the p-wave superconductor. All of them depend on the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient. In addition, we observe a strange behavior for the condensation and the relation between the gap frequency and the mass of quasiparticles when the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient is larger than 9/100, which is the upper bound for the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient from the causality of the dual field theory.

  8. Long range p -wave proximity effect into a disordered metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keser, Aydin Cem; Stanev, Valentin; Galitski, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We use quasiclassical methods of superconductivity to study the superconducting proximity effect from a topological p -wave superconductor into a disordered quasi-one-dimensional metallic wire. We demonstrate that the corresponding Eilenberger equations with disorder reduce to a closed nonlinear equation for the superconducting component of the matrix Green's function. Remarkably, this equation is formally equivalent to a classical mechanical system (i.e., Newton's equations), with the Green function corresponding to a coordinate of a fictitious particle and the coordinate along the wire corresponding to time. This mapping allows us to obtain exact solutions in the disordered nanowire in terms of elliptic functions. A surprising result that comes out of this solution is that the p -wave superconductivity proximity induced into the disordered metal remains long range, decaying as slowly as the conventional s -wave superconductivity. It is also shown that impurity scattering leads to the appearance of a zero-energy peak.

  9. Kondo resonance from p-wave hybridization in graphene.

    PubMed

    Jafari, S A; Tohyama, T

    2014-10-15

    The p-wave hybridization in graphene present a distinct class of Kondo problem in pseudogap Fermi systems with bath density of states (DOS) ρ₀(ε) ∝ |ε|. The peculiar geometry of substitutional and hollow-site ad-atoms, and effectively the vacancies allow for a p-wave form of momentum dependence in the hybridization of the associated local orbital with the Dirac fermions of the graphene host which results in a different picture than the s-wave momentum independent hybridization. For the p-wave hybridization function, away from the Dirac point we find closed-form formulae for the Kondo temperature TK which in contrast to the s-wave case is non-zero for any value of hybridization strength V of the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM). At the Dirac point where the DOS vanishes, we find a conceivably small value of Vmin above which the Kondo screening takes place even in the presence of particle-hole symmetry. We also show that the non-Lorentzian line shape of the local spectrum arising from anomalous hybridization function leads to much larger TK in vacant graphene compared to a metallic host with similar bandwidth and SIAM parameters.

  10. Kramer Pesch Effect in Chiral p-Wave Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuhiko

    2001-11-01

    The pair-potential and current density around a single vortex of the two-dimensional chiral p-wave superconductor with \\mbi{d}=\\hat{\\mbi{z}}(px ± i py) are determined self-consistently within the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity. Shrinking of the vortex core at low temperatures are considered numerically and analytically. Temperature-dependences of the spatial variation of pair-potential and circular current around the core and density of states at zero energy are the same as those in the isotropic s-wave case. When the senses of vorticity and chirality are opposite, however, we find two novel results; 1) the scattering rate due to non-magnetic impurities is considerably suppressed, compared to that in the s-wave vortex. From this observation, we expect that the chiral p-wave superconductors provide the best chance to observe the shrinking of the vortex (“Kramer Pesch effect”) experimentally. 2) The pair-potential of chiral p-wave superconductors inside vortex core recovers a combined time-reversal-Gauge symmetry, although this symmetry is broken in the region far from the vortex core. This local recovery of symmetry leads to the suppression of the impurity effect inside vortex core.

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  12. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  13. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  14. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  15. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  16. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  17. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  18. Teleseismic P-wave tomography and the upper mantle structure of the Sulu orogenic belt (China): implications for Triassic collision and exhumation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Miao; Tan, Handong; Jiang, Mei; Xu, Zhiqin; Li, Zhonghai; Xu, Lehong

    2016-12-01

    As the largest ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic tectonic unit outcropping in the world, the Dabie-Sulu UHP metamorphic belt is considered to be one of the best areas for studying the continental dynamics. However, their continental collision and exhumation mechanism are still debated. We performed a 3D teleseismic P-wave tomography beneath the Sulu orogen for the purpose of understanding the deep structure. The tomographic results show that there is a prominently near-SN-trending low-velocity zone (LVZ) close to the Tanlu fault (TLF), indicating a slab tear of the subducted Yangtze plate (YZP) during the initial Early Triassic collision. Our results also suggest that both the Yangze crustal slab and the North China lithospheric slab were dragged downwards by the subducted oceanic slab, which constituted a ‘two-sided’ subduction mode. A conceptual geodynamic model is proposed to explain the exhumation of Sulu high- to UHP rocks and imply a polyphase exhumation driven by buoyancy of continental materials at different depth and upward extrusion of crustal partial melting rocks to the surface at the later stage.

  19. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  2. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  4. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  8. The consequence of measured porosities and clay contents on P-wave AVO for shaly sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Adel A. A.

    2004-12-01

    The modified AVO (amplitude versus offset) equations presented in Othman (2003 Tecnologia de la Intrusión de Agua de Mar en Acuifros Costeros: Paises Mediterráneos—Coastal Acquifer Intrusion Technology: Mediterranean Countries (Madrid: IGME) pp 295-302) are confirmed by application of our data. About 26 layers composed mainly of shales and sandstones encountered in an oil well in the Gulf of Suez are utilized in the present study. P-wave velocity, density, porosity and the clay content of these rocks are principal feedback parameters in this investigation. The attributes of the assessed AVO coefficient (Ra) are studied with reference to several parameter ratios in the AVO case. These ratios include the porosity ratio (phgr1/phgr2), Poisson's ratio (σ1/σ2), density ratio (ρ1/ρ2), clay content ratio (C1/C2) and P-wave velocity ratio (α1/α2). Subscripts 1 and 2 respectively refer to the upper and lower layers relative to the interface. The applied data reveal linear relationships between the velocity ratio, α1/α2, and the porosity ratio, phgr1/phgr2. α1/α2 is found to decrease with increasing phgr1/phgr2. The clay content ratio C1/C2 increases linearly with increasing phgr1/phgr2 as well as with increasing Poisson's ratio, σ1/σ2. The density ratio, ρ1/ρ2, demonstrates a weak decrease proportional to phgr1/phgr2. Ra generally increases with increasing phgr1/phgr2, C1/C2 and σ1/σ2. On the other hand, Ra decreases with increasing ρ1/ρ2 and α1/α2. These relations are valid for the offset condition according to our data.

  9. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  12. P -wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    P -wave coupled channel effects arising from the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds in e+e- annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the P -wave interactions in the e+e- annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet P -wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers JPC=1-+ . In the mass region of the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ), which are assigned as (13D1) and (31S1) states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of e+e-→D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , D*D¯*, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and extract the pole positions of the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ). The deviation of the ratios from that in the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) limit reflects the HQSS breaking effect due to the mass splitting between the D and the D*. Besides the two poles, we also find a pole a few MeV above the D D¯ *+c .c . threshold which can be related to the so-called G (3900 ) observed earlier by BABAR and Belle. This scenario can be further scrutinized by measuring the angular distribution in the D*D¯* channel with high luminosity experiments.

  13. Development and Calibration of New 3-D Vector VSP Imaging Technology: Vinton Salt Dome, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt J. Marfurt; Hua-Wei Zhou; E. Charlotte Sullivan

    2004-09-01

    Vinton salt dome is located in Southwestern Louisiana, in Calcasieu Parish. Tectonically, the piercement dome is within the salt dome minibasin province. The field has been in production since 1901, with most of the production coming from Miocene and Oligocene sands. The goal of our project was to develop and calibrate new processing and interpretation technology to fully exploit the information available from a simultaneous 3-D surface seismic survey and 3-C, 3-D vertical seismic profile (VSP) survey over the dome. More specifically the goal was to better image salt dome flanks and small, reservoir-compartmentalizing faults. This new technology has application to mature salt-related fields across the Gulf Coast. The primary focus of our effort was to develop, apply, and assess the limitations of new 3-C, 3-D wavefield separation and imaging technology that could be used to image aliased, limited-aperture, vector VSP data. Through 2-D and 3-D full elastic modeling, we verified that salt flank reflections exist in the horizontally-traveling portion of the wavefield rather than up- and down-going portions of the wavefield, thereby explaining why many commercial VSP processing flow failed. Since the P-wave reflections from the salt flank are measured primarily on the horizontal components while P-wave reflections from deeper sedimentary horizons are measured primarily on the vertical component, a true vector VSP analysis was needed. We developed an antialiased discrete Radon transform filter to accurately model P- and S-wave data components measured by the vector VSP. On-the-fly polarization filtering embedded in our Kirchhoff imaging algorithm was effective in separating PP from PS wave images. By the novel application of semblance-weighted filters, we were able to suppress many of the migration artifacts associated with low fold, sparse VSP acquisition geometries. To provide a better velocity/depth model, we applied 3-D prestack depth migration to the surface data

  14. Preliminary Results for Crustal Structure in Southeastern Africa from P-wave Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachingwe, M.; Nyblade, A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Mulowezi, A.; Kunkuta, E.; De Magalhães, V.; Wiens, D. A.; Wysession, M. E.; Julia, J.

    2013-12-01

    The crustal structure of southeastern Africa is investigated by modeling P-wave receiver functions using H-k stacking and joint inversion methods. P-wave receiver functions are analyzed for 29 broadband seismic stations in Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique. Estimates for the Moho depth and Poisson's ratio are determined from H-k stacking, and estimates for the shear wave velocity are determined by the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion. Preliminary results show that Moho depths beneath southeastern Africa range from 32 km to 51 km. Thicker crust is found in Proterozoic terrains, such as the Irumide Belt, while thinner crust is found in reworked Archean terrains, such as the Bangweulu Block. These results are consistent with previous studies and global averages for Precambrian terrains. The preliminary results also show a range of Poisson's ratios from 0.2 to 0.3. These new results for southeastern Africa are being combined with similar results from elsewhere in eastern and southern Africa to improve our understanding of African crustal structure.

  15. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab. PMID:27432744

  16. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-07-01

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab.

  17. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-07-19

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab.

  18. Rupture history of the 1997 Cariaco, Venezuela, earthquake from teleseismic P waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendoza, C.

    2000-01-01

    A two-step finite-fault waveform inversion scheme is applied to the broadband teleseismic P waves recorded for the strike-slip, Cariaco, Venezuela, earthquake of 9 July 1997 to recover the distribution of mainshock slip. The earthquake is first analyzed using a long narrow fault with a maximum rise time of 20 sec. This line-source analysis indicates that slip propagated to the west with a constant rupture velocity and a relatively short rise time. The results are then used to constrain a second inversion of the P waveforms using a 60-km by 20-km two-dimensional fault. The rupture shows a zone of large slip (1.3-m peak) near the hypocenter and a second, broader source extending updip and to the west at depths shallower than 5 km. The second source has a peak slip of 2.1 meters and accounts for most of the moment of 1.1 × 1026 dyne-cm (6.6 Mww) estimated from the P waves. The inferred rupture pattern is consistent with macroseismic effects observed in the epicentral area.

  19. Observability of surface currents in p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu; Golubov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    A general approach is formulated to describe spontaneous surface current distribution in a chiral p-wave superconductor. We use the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism in the Ricatti parametrization to describe various types of the superconductor surface, including arbitrary roughness and metallic behavior of the surface layer. We calculate angle resolved distributions of the spontaneous surface currents and formulate the conditions of their observability. We argue that local measurements of these currents by muon spin rotation technique may provide an information on the underlying pairing symmetry in the bulk superconductor.

  20. p-Wave Cold Collisions in an Optical Lattice Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-09-02

    We study ultracold collisions in fermionic ytterbium by precisely measuring the energy shifts they impart on the atoms' internal clock states. Exploiting Fermi statistics, we uncover p-wave collisions, in both weakly and strongly interacting regimes. With the higher density afforded by two-dimensional lattice confinement, we demonstrate that strong interactions can lead to a novel suppression of this collision shift. In addition to reducing the systematic errors of lattice clocks, this work has application to quantum information and quantum simulation with alkaline-earth atoms.

  1. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  2. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  3. A Split of Direction of Propagation and Attenuation of P Waves in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, R.; Tento, A.; Marcellini, A.

    2013-12-01

    On July 17, 2011 a ML 4.8 earthquake occurred in the PO valley at a 48 km epicentral distance from a seismic station located at Palazzo Te (Mantova). The station is situated on deep quaternary sediments: the uppermost layers are mainly composed of clay and silty clay with interbedded sands; the Robertson index is 1.4P wave particle motion, that appears rather difficult to explain if we assume the homogeneity of the P waves (that means attenuation is scalar). Note that the degree of nonlinearity is very low given that the maximum strain can be roughly estimated as 10-5 on the basis of maximum ground velocity of the P wave train considered and the Vp. On the contrary we show that P wave particle motion can be fully (and easily) described by a Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic model (HILV). HILV, as in the 2009 Borcherdt formulation adopted here, allows two different directions of propagation and attenuation; in other words attenuation becomes a vector that is not necessarily parallel to the propagation vector. The results evidence that the incidence angle and the inhomogeneity angle (it is the angle between propagation and attenuation vectors and it is closely related to Q factor) are in good agreement with the geological conditions of the site. Finally, we observed that these results are very similar to the ones obtained when we analyzed two explosions recorded by a seismic station in Milano, also situated in the Po valley at some 140 km from Mantova (Marcellini & Tento, 2011). Borcherdt, R.D. (2009) 'Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media', Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 305 pp. Marcellini, A. and A. Tento (2011) ' Explosive Sources Prove the Validity of Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Models', BSSA, Vol. 101, No. 4, pp. 1576-1583.

  4. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  5. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J.; Zhao, Huaying

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation. PMID:27525659

  6. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation.

  7. The 3D rocket combustor acoustics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1992-01-01

    The theory and procedures for determining the characteristics of pressure oscillations in rocket engines with prescribed burning rate oscillations are presented. Analyses including radial and hub baffles and absorbers can be performed in one, two, and three dimensions. Pressure and velocity oscillations calculated using this procedure are presented for the SSME to show the influence of baffles and absorbers on the burning rate oscillations required to achieve neutral stability. Comparisons are made between the results obtained utilizing 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D assumptions with regards to capturing the physical phenomena of interest and computational requirements.

  8. 3-D crustal structure along the North Anatolian Fault Zone in north-central Anatolia revealed by local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolsal-Ćevikbilen, Seda; Biryol, C. Berk; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Taymaz, Tuncay; Adıyaman, Hande E.; Özacar, A. Arda

    2012-03-01

    3-D P-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs variations in the crust along the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in north-central Anatolia were investigated by the inversion of local P- and S-wave traveltimes, to gain a better understanding of the seismological characteristics of the region. The 3-D local earthquake tomography inversions included 5444 P- and 3200 S-wave readings obtained from 168 well-located earthquakes between 2006 January and 2008 May. Dense ray coverage yields good resolution, particularly in the central part of the study area. The 3-D Vp and Vp/Vs tomographic images reveal clear correlations with both the surface geology and significant tectonic units in the region. We observed the lower limit of the seismogenic zone for north-central Anatolia at 15 km depth. Final earthquake locations display a distributed pattern throughout the study area, with most of the earthquakes occurring on the major splays of the NAFZ, rather than its master strand. We identify three major high-velocity blocks in the mid-crust separated by the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture and interpret these blocks to be continental basement fragments that were accreted onto the margin following the closure of Neo-Tethyan Ocean. These basement blocks may have in part influenced the rupture propagations of the historical 1939, 1942 and 1943 earthquakes. In addition, large variations in the Vp/Vs ratio in the mid-crust were observed and have been correlated with the varying fluid contents of the existing lithologies and related tectonic structures.

  9. A Novel Route to Reach a p-Wave Superfluid Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tokitake; Inotani, Daisuke; Ohashi, Yoji

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically propose an idea to realize a p-wave superfluid Fermi gas. To overcome the experimental difficulty that a p-wave pairing interaction to form p-wave Cooper pairs damages the system before the condensation growth, we first prepare a p-wave pair amplitude (Φp) in a spin-orbit coupled s-wave superfluid Fermi gas, without any p-wave interaction. Then, by suddenly changing the s-wave interaction with a p-wave one (Up) by using a Feshbach resonance, we reach the p-wave superfluid phase with the p-wave superfluid order parameter being symbolically written as Δp ˜ UpΦp. In this letter, we assess this scenario within the framework of a time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Our results would contribute to the study toward the realization of unconventional pairing states in an ultracold Fermi gas.

  10. p-Wave superconductors in D-brane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yanyan

    2012-11-01

    In this work we take the intersecting D-brane models to explore some properties of p-wave superconductor at strong coupling. Our studies are focused on four-dimensional spacetime, which is not completely researched as in planar case. Optimistically, the AdS/CFT approach to superconductor, or more precisely superconducting-like phase transition, can give us some intuitions about mysterious high Tc superconductors. Concretely, we use defect D4/D6 and D4/D4 (noncritical) models to carry out comparative investigations. To make the system in the finite temperature bath, we assume that the superconducting phase is in the deconfined and chiral symmetry restoring phase for black D4-brane geometry. For the background fields, we use both analytical and numerical methods to solve the coupled nonlinear equations of motion. Near the phase transition, both methods give the mean filed behavior for the superconducting condensate. We then study gauge field perturbations of the systems to probe the AC conductivity. Similar to previous results, there comes out a gap in low frequency regime and the conductivity gets exponentially small as the condensation is enhanced. In contrast to previous investigations, we also compute the AC conductivity along the x direction, which needs to study a coupled sets of fluctuation modes. This shows us the anisotropic feature of p-wave superconductors.

  11. Anatomy of a Periodically Driven p-Wave Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Erhai

    2016-10-01

    The topological properties of periodically driven many-body systems often have no static analogs and defy a simple description based on the effective Hamiltonian. To explore the emergent edge modes in driven p-wave superconductors in two dimensions, we analysed a toy model of Kitaev chains (one-dimensional spinless p-wave superconductors with Majorana edge states) coupled by time-periodic hopping. We showed that with proper driving, the coupled Kitaev chains can turn into a fully gapped superconductor, which is analogous to the px+ipy state but has two, rather than one, chiral edge modes. A different driving protocol turns it into a gapless superconductor with isolated point nodes and completely flat edge states at quasienergy ω=0 or π/T, with T as the driving period. The time evolution operator U(kx, ky, t) of the toy model is computed exactly to yield the phase bands. And the "topological singularities" of the phase bands are exhausted and compared to those of a periodically driven Hofstadter model, which features counter-propagating chiral edge modes. These examples demonstrate the unique edge states in driven superconducting systems and suggest driving as a potentially fruitful route to engineer new topological superconductors.

  12. Skyrmion Flux Lattices in p,-wave Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Toner, John; Belitz, Dietrich

    2007-03-01

    In p,-wave superconductors, topological excitations known as skyrmions are allowed, in addition to the usual vortices. In strongly type-II materials in an external magnetic field, a skyrmion flux lattice is expected to be energetically favored compared to a vortex flux lattice [1]. We analytically calculate the energy, magnetization curves (B(H)), and elasticity of skyrmion flux lattices in p,-wave superconductors near the lower critical field Hc1, and use these results with the Lindemann criterion to predict their melting curve [2]. In striking contrast to vortex flux lattices, which always melt at an external field H > Hc1, skyrmion flux lattices never melt near Hc1. This provides a simple and unambiguous test for the presence of skyrmions. In addition, the internal magnetic field distributions (which are measurable by muon spin rotation techniques [3]) of skyrmion and vortex lattices are very different. [1] A. Knigavko, B. Rosenstein, and Y.F. Chen, Phys. Rev. B 60, 550 (1999). [2] Qi Li, John Toner, and D. Belitz, cond-mat/0607391 [3] J.E. Sonier, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, S4499 (2004)

  13. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Scattered Teleseismic Wavefields in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, I. B.; Zheng, H.

    2005-12-01

    For a teleseismic array targeting subducting crust in a zone of active subduction, scattering from the zone underlying the trench result in subhorizontally-propagating waves that could be difficult to distinguish from converted P- and S- wave backscattered from the surface. Because back-scattered modes often provide the most spectacular images of subducting slabs, it is important to understand their differences from the arrivals scattered from the trench zone. To investigate the detailed teleseismic wavefield in a subduction zone environment, we performed a full-waveform, 3-D visco-elastic finite-difference modeling of teleseismic wave propagation using a Beowulf cluster. The synthetics show strong scattering from the trench zone, dominated by the mantle and crustal P-waves propagating at 6.2-8.1.km/s and slower. These scattered waves occupy the same time and moveout intervals as the backscattered modes, and also have similar amplitudes. Although their amplitude decay characters are different, with the uncertainties in the velocity and density structure of the subduction zone, unambiguous distinguishing of these modes appears difficult. However, under minimal assumptions (in particular, without invoking slab dehydration), recent observations of receiver function amplitudes decreasing away from the trench favor the interpretation of trench-zone scattering.

  14. Tall P waves associated with severe hypokalemia and combined electrolyte depletion.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Chiharu; Tamaru, Kosaku; Kuwahara, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa showing tall P waves on electrocardiogram (ECG) was reported. Her ECG showed tall P waves (5.5mm in voltage, lead II) at 2.2mEq/L of serum potassium. After the treatment, P waves decreased in voltage with the normalization of serum potassium. Tall P waves may be considered to be the so-called pseudo-P pulmonale, and added to the criteria of hypokalemia on ECG.

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity from teleseismic P-wave residuals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monfort, Mary E.; Evans, John R.

    1982-01-01

    A teleseismic P-wave travel-time residual study is described which reveals the regional compressional-velocity structure of southern Nevada and neighboring parts of California to a depth of 280 km. During 1980, 98 teleseismic events were recorded at as many as 53 sites in this area. P-wave residuals were calculated relative to a network-wide average residual for each event and are displayed on maps of the stations for each of four event-azimuth quadrants. Fluctuations in these map-patterns of residuals with approach azimuth combined with results of linear, three-dimensional inversions of some 2887 residuals indicate the following characteristics of the velocity structure of the southern Nevada region: 1) a low-velocity body exists in the upper crust 50 km northeast of Beatty, Nevada, near the Miocene Timber Mountain-Silent Canyon caldera complex. Another highly-localized low-velocity anomaly occurs near the southwest corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These two anomalies seem to be part of a low-velocity trough extending from Death Valley, California, to about 50 km north of NTS. 2) There is a high-velocity body in the mantle between 81 and 131 km deep centered about i0 km north of the edge of the Timber Mountain caldera, 3) a broad low-velocity body is delineated between 81 and 131 km deep centered about 30 km north of Las Vegas, 4) there is a monotonic increase in travel-time delays from west to east across the region, probably indicating an eastward decrease in velocity, and lower than average velocities in southeastern Nevada below 31 km, and 5) considerable complexity in three-dimensional velocity structure exists in this part of the southern Great Basin. Inversions of teleseismic P-wave travel-time residuals were also performed on data from 12 seismometers in the immediate vicinity of the Nevada Test Site to make good use of the closer station spacing i in that area. Results of these inversions show more details of the velocity structure but generally the

  16. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  17. Formation and Propagation of Love Waves in a Surface Layer with a P-Wave Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    AD- A225 559 GL-TR-90-0100 Formation and Propagation of Love Waves in a Surface Layer with a P-Wave Source A. L. Florence S. A. Miller PTh FILE COP...describing outgoing waves is (p(r,t) = - f(s) s = t - (r- a)/ cr (27) In terms of the function f(s), the displacement, velocity, and stresses are cr r2...28) cr r2 (29) CyrpC2 - +2(1- 2,0) ’ + = 1 -1 (r2 (30) ce P21 - I -M I= I$ C(2r )x + ) (31) in which 1) is Poisson’s ratio. For a given cavity wall

  18. 2.5D S-wave velocity model of the TESZ area in northern Poland from receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Receiver function (RF) locally provides the signature of sharp seismic discontinuities and information about the shear wave (S-wave) velocity distribution beneath the seismic station. The data recorded by "13 BB Star" broadband seismic stations (Grad et al., 2015) and by few PASSEQ broadband seismic stations (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2008) are analysed to investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) in northern Poland. The TESZ is one of the most prominent suture zones in Europe separating the young Palaeozoic platform from the much older Precambrian East European craton. Compilation of over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles, vertical seismic profiling in over one hundred thousand boreholes and magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods allowed for creation a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Grad et al. 2016). On the other hand the receiver function methods give an opportunity for creation the S-wave velocity model. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) are used to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. 3D P-wave velocity model are interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and synthetic back-azimuthal sections of receiver function are calculated for different Vp/Vs ratio. Densities are calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Next, the synthetic back-azimuthal sections of RF are compared with observed back-azimuthal sections of RF for "13 BB Star" and PASSEQ seismic stations to find the best 2.5D S-wave models down to 60 km depth. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  19. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  20. A crustal seismic velocity model for the UK, Ireland and surrounding seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, A.; England, R.W.; Maguire, Peter K.H.

    2007-01-01

    A regional model of the 3-D variation in seismic P-wave velocity structure in the crust of NW Europe has been compiled from wide-angle reflection/refraction profiles. Along each 2-D profile a velocity-depth function has been digitised at 5 km intervals. These 1-D velocity functions were mapped into three dimensions using ordinary kriging with weights determined to minimise the difference between digitised and interpolated values. An analysis of variograms of the digitised data suggested a radial isotropic weighting scheme was most appropriate. Horizontal dimensions of the model cells are optimised at 40 ?? 40 km and the vertical dimension at 1 km. The resulting model provides a higher resolution image of the 3-D variation in seismic velocity structure of the UK, Ireland and surrounding areas than existing models. The construction of the model through kriging allows the uncertainty in the velocity structure to be assessed. This uncertainty indicates the high density of data required to confidently interpolate the crustal velocity structure, and shows that for this region the velocity is poorly constrained for large areas away from the input data. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  1. A Computational Method for 3D Anisotropic Travel-time Tomography of Rocks in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofranitabari, Mehdi; Young, R. Paul

    2013-04-01

    True triaxial loading in the laboratory applies three principal stresses on a cubic rock specimen. Elliptical anisotropy and distributed heterogeneities are introduced in the rock due to closure and opening of the pre-existing cracks and creation and growth of the new aligned cracks. The rock sample is tested in a Geophysical Imaging Cell that is armed with an Acoustic Emission monitoring system which can perform transducer to transducer velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample during the experiment. Ultrasonic travel-time tomography as a non-destructive method outfits a map of wave propagation velocity in the sample in order to detect the uniformly distributed or localised heterogeneities and provide the spatial variation and temporal evolution of induced damages in rocks at various stages of loading. The rock sample is partitioned into cubic grid cells as model space. Ray-based tomography method measuring body wave travel time along ray paths between pairs of emitting and receiving transducers is used to calculate isotropic ray-path segment matrix elements (Gij) which contain segment lengths of the ith ray in the jth cell in three dimensions. Synthetic P wave travel times are computed between pairs of transducers in a hypothetical isotropic heterogeneous cubic sample as data space along with an error due to precision of measurement. 3D strain of the squeezed rock and the consequent geometrical deformation is also included in computations for further accuracy. Singular Value Decomposition method is used for the inversion from data space to model space. In the next step, the anisotropic ray-path segment matrix and the corresponded data space are computed for hypothetical anisotropic heterogeneous samples based on the elliptical anisotropic model of velocity which is obtained from the real laboratory experimental data. The method is examined for several different synthetic heterogeneous models. An "Inaccuracy factor" is utilized to inquire the

  2. Spatial variations of P wave attenuation in the mantle beneath North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yong Keun; Ritsema, Jeroen; Goes, Saskia

    2009-06-01

    We estimate the spatial variation of the seismic parameter t* using teleseismic (epicentral distance = 30°-85°) P wave spectra of about 200 deep (focal depths > 200 km) earthquakes recorded by 378 broadband seismometers in the United States and Canada. Relative P wave spectral ratios up to 1 Hz for about 63,000 station pairs with high signal-to-noise ratio and impulsive P waveforms are inverted for t*P by least squares inversion. The continental-scale t*P pattern correlates to the age of geological terrains and the seismic, heat flow, gravity, and magnetic variations across North America. Predominantly low values of t*P are obtained in stable central North America (SNA), and high t*P values are obtained for stations in the tectonically active western part of the continent (TNA). This variation is similar to that observed previously in short-period amplitude anomalies, spectral ratio variations, and ScS reverberations. On average, we resolve a contrast in t*P between SNA and TNA of about 0.2 s. We resolve regional variations in t*P, which correlate with tectonics. Relatively low t*P is associated with currently active subduction below Alaska. Relatively high t*P is found in SNA below the Appalachians and the Gulf Coast. The consistency between t*P and tectonics suggests that the observed variations in t*P are, on the scale of around 200-500 km, predominantly due to intrinsic attenuation. The similar patterns in t*P and predicted values for a recent global attenuation model confirm this further. The compatibility with the t*P computed for attenuation estimated via a thermal interpretation of shear wave velocity anomalies illustrates that variations in seismic velocity are predominantly due to physical effects with a strong attenuation signature, most likely temperature or a combination of temperature and water content.

  3. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  4. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  5. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  6. Near-surface mapping using SH-wave and P-wave seismic land-streamer data acquisition in Illinois, U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugin, Andre J.M.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; McBride, J.H.; Bexfield, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    SH-wave and P-wave high-resolution seismic reflection combined with land-streamer technology provide 3D regional maps of geologic formations that can be associated with aquifers and aquitards. Examples for three study areas are considered to demonstrate this. In these areas, reflection profiling detected near-surface faulting and mapped a buried glacial valley and its aquifers in two settings. The resulting seismic data can be used directly to constrain hydrogeologic modeling of shallow aquifers.

  7. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  8. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  9. Low P-wave velocity at the base of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; Grand, Stephen P.; Helmberger, Donald V.

    1993-09-01

    Anomalous differential times between LP SPdKS and SKS are presented for two different source-receiver geometries. The SPdKS-SKS times depend most strongly on V(P) at the base of the mantle near the SKS core entrance and exit locations. The anomalous times can be fit, on average, by models containing a 5 percent reduction in V(P) from PREM at the core-mantle boundary, distributed over 100 km.

  10. Systematics of S- and P-wave radiation widths

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.S.

    1980-09-22

    The question of calculating differences in s- and p-wave radiation widths as a valid evaluation tool is explored. A purely statistical approach such as that provided by the Brink-Axel formula depends upon two factors: 1) an adequate description of the giant dipole resonance shape at energies well below the resonance, and 2) an adequate description of the level densities between the ground state and the excitation of the compound nucleus near the neutron separation energy. Some success has been obtained in certain regions of the periodic table with this simple approach, e.g., in the actinides where all nuclei exhibit similar rigid permanent deformations. However, if the method is to be used as a general evaluation procedure throughout the periodic table and particularly in regions where the radiative transition probabilities are enhanced by direct processes, it appears that much more nuclear structure information needs to be incorporated into the calculations.

  11. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  12. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  13. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  14. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  15. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  16. Characteristic wavefield in an experimental rock sample inferred from a 3D FDM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, N.; Furumura, T.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the origin of wave packets in elastic waves propagate through a rock sample based on a 3D finite difference method (FDM) simulation. Though direct waves of the transmitted waves have been applied to estimate the internal structure of a rock sample, later part of the waveforms did not utilized because their origin were unclear. Understanding the reflection and conversion effect in a rock sample would help to retrieve more information from whole waveform as with the analysis in natural fields. We numerically simulated the elastic wave propagation in a medium model which covers a cylindrical shape of a rock sample. The model was discretized into 1024 x 1024 x 2048 grid points with an interval of 54 micrometer in horizontal direction and 60 micrometer in vertical direction. The density, P wave velocity, and S wave velocity of the each grid point are assumed to be proportional to the X-ray absorption coefficient derived from the micro focus X-ray CT images of a Westery granite sample. We applied a single point force on the boundary of the model sample which mimics realistic transducer movement. The wave propagation movie obtained from the numerical simulation shows very complicated wavefield in a rock sample. Because a rock sample is small and closed, once waves are radiated, they were trapped in the sample by repeating reflection and conversion. Many reflected waves which followed by the converted waves were generated at the sample side surface as well as the upper and lower end. The phase with the largest amplitude propagate along the curved boundary was detected as Rayleigh wave from the particle motions on the sample side surface. Additionally, the surface waves were observed not only in the horizontal section but also in the vertical section. Our simulation indicated that the later phases of the transmitted waves are highly affected by the sample boundary. In order to extract accurate interior information from the transmitted waves, elimination

  17. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  18. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  19. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  20. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  1. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  2. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann Method for 3-D Flows with Curved Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Shyy, Wei; Yu, Dazhi; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we investigate two issues that are important to computational efficiency and reliability in fluid dynamics applications of the lattice, Boltzmann equation (LBE): (1) Computational stability and accuracy of different lattice Boltzmann models and (2) the treatment of the boundary conditions on curved solid boundaries and their 3-D implementations. Three athermal 3-D LBE models (D3QI5, D3Ql9, and D3Q27) are studied and compared in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness. The boundary treatment recently developed by Filippova and Hanel and Met et al. in 2-D is extended to and implemented for 3-D. The convergence, stability, and computational efficiency of the 3-D LBE models with the boundary treatment for curved boundaries were tested in simulations of four 3-D flows: (1) Fully developed flows in a square duct, (2) flow in a 3-D lid-driven cavity, (3) fully developed flows in a circular pipe, and (4) a uniform flow over a sphere. We found that while the fifteen-velocity 3-D (D3Ql5) model is more prone to numerical instability and the D3Q27 is more computationally intensive, the 63Q19 model provides a balance between computational reliability and efficiency. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the boundary treatment for 3-D arbitrary curved geometry has second-order accuracy and possesses satisfactory stability characteristics.

  4. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  5. Characterization of gas hydrate distribution using conventional 3D seismic data in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, South China Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Xiujuan; Qiang, Jin; Collett, Timothy S.; Shi, Hesheng; Yang, Shengxiong; Yan, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanping; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Duanxin

    2016-01-01

    A new 3D seismic reflection data volume acquired in 2012 has allowed for the detailed mapping and characterization of gas hydrate distribution in the Pearl River Mouth Basin in the South China Sea. Previous studies of core and logging data showed that gas hydrate occurrence at high concentrations is controlled by the presence of relatively coarse-grained sediment and the upward migration of thermogenic gas from the deeper sediment section into the overlying gas hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ); however, the spatial distribution of the gas hydrate remains poorly defined. We used a constrained sparse spike inversion technique to generate acoustic-impedance images of the hydrate-bearing sedimentary section from the newly acquired 3D seismic data volume. High-amplitude reflections just above the bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) were interpreted to be associated with the accumulation of gas hydrate with elevated saturations. Enhanced seismic reflections below the BSRs were interpreted to indicate the presence of free gas. The base of the BGHSZ was established using the occurrence of BSRs. In areas absent of well-developed BSRs, the BGHSZ was calculated from a model using the inverted P-wave velocity and subsurface temperature data. Seismic attributes were also extracted along the BGHSZ that indicate variations reservoir properties and inferred hydrocarbon accumulations at each site. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the inversion of acoustic impedance of conventional 3D seismic data, along with well-log-derived rock-physics models were also used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Our analysis determined that the gas hydrate petroleum system varies significantly across the Pearl River Mouth Basin and that variability in sedimentary properties as a product of depositional processes and the upward migration of gas from deeper thermogenic sources control the distribution of gas hydrates in this basin.

  6. Applications of Doppler Tomography in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M.; Budaj, J.; Agafonov, M.; Sharova, O.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past few years, the applications of Doppler tomography have been extended beyond the usual calculation of 2D velocity images of circumstellar gas flows. This technique has now been used with the new Shellspec spectrum synthesis code to demonstrate the effective modeling of the accretion disk and gas stream in the TT Hya Algol binary. The 2D tomography procedure projects all sources of emission onto a single central (Vx, Vy) velocity plane even though the gas is expected to flow beyond that plane. So, new 3D velocity images were derived with the Radioastronomical Approach method by assuming a grid of Vz values transverse to the central 2D plane. The 3D approach has been applied to the U CrB and RS Vul Algol-type binaries to reveal substantial flow structures beyond the central velocity plane.

  7. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  8. Threshold effects in P -wave bottom-strange mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Pablo G.; Segovia, Jorge; Entem, David R.; Fernández, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    Using a nonrelativistic constituent quark model in which the degrees of freedom are quark-antiquark and meson-meson components, we have recently shown that the D(*)K thresholds play an important role in lowering the mass of the c s ¯ states associated with the physical Ds0 *(2317 ) and Ds 1(2460 ) mesons. This observation is also supported by other theoretical approaches such as lattice-regularized QCD or chiral unitary theory in coupled channels. Herein, we extend our computation to the lowest P -wave Bs mesons, taking into account the corresponding JP=0+, 1+ and 2+ bottom-strange states predicted by the naive quark model and the B K and B*K thresholds. We assume that mixing with Bs(*)η and isospin-violating decays to Bs(*)π are negligible. This computation is important because there is no experimental data in the b s ¯ sector for the equivalent jqP=1 /2+ (Ds0 *(2317 ), Ds 1(2460 )) heavy-quark multiplet and, as it has been seen in the c s ¯ sector, the naive theoretical result can be wrong by more than 100 MeV. Our calculation allows us to introduce the coupling with the D -wave B*K channel and to compute the probabilities associated with the different Fock components of the physical state.

  9. Crustal structure of Nigeria and Southern Ghana, West Africa from P-wave receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Ofonime; Nyblade, Andrew; Okereke, Chiedu; Oden, Michael; Emry, Erica; Julià, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    We report new estimates of crustal thickness (Moho depth), Poisson's ratio and shear-wave velocities for eleven broadband seismological stations in Nigeria and Ghana. Data used for this study came from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at epicentral distances between 30° and 95° and with moment magnitudes greater than or equal to 5.5. P-wave receiver functions were modeled using the Moho Ps arrival times, H-k stacking, and joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities. The average crustal thickness of the stations in the Neoproterozoic basement complex of Nigeria is 36 km, and 23 km for the stations in the Cretaceous Benue Trough. The crustal structure of the Paleoproterozoic Birimian Terrain, and Neoproterozoic Dahomeyan Terrain and Togo Structural Unit in southern Ghana is similar, with an average Moho depth of 44 km. Poisson's ratios for all the stations range from 0.24 to 0.26, indicating a bulk felsic to intermediate crustal composition. The crustal structure of the basement complex in Nigeria is similar to the average crustal structure of Neoproterozoic terrains in other parts of Africa, but the two Neoproterozoic terrains in southern Ghana have a thicker crust with a thick mafic lower crust, ranging in thickness from 12 to 17 km. Both the thicker crust and thick mafic lower crustal section are consistent with many Precambrian suture zones, and thus we suggest that both features are relict from the collisional event during the formation of Gondwana.

  10. Increased P-wave dispersion a risk for atrial fibrillation in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ertuğrul, İlker; Akgül, Sinem; Derman, Orhan; Karagöz, Tevfik; Kanbur, Nuray

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a prolonged P-wave dispersion is a risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate P-wave dispersion in adolescents with anorexia nervosa at diagnosis. We evaluated electrocardiographic findings, particularly the P-wave dispersion, at initial assessment in 47 adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Comparison of P-wave dispersion between adolescents with anorexia nervosa and controls showed a statistically significant higher P-wave dispersion in patients with anorexia nervosa (72 ± 16.3 msec) when compared to the control group (43.8 ± 9.5 msec). Percent of body weight lost, lower body mass index, and higher weight loss rate in the patients with anorexia nervosa had no effect on P-wave dispersion. Due to the fact that anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate we believe that cardiac pathologies such as atrial fibrillation must also be considered in the medical evaluation.

  11. Dynamics of 3D isolated thermal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, N. R.; Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations have been carried out to establish how electron thermal physics, introduced in the form of a dynamic electron temperature, affects isolated filament motion and dynamics in 3D. It is found that thermal effects impact filament motion in two major ways when the pressure perturbation within the filament is supported primarily through a temperature increase as opposed to density: they lead to a strong increase in filament propagation in the bi-normal direction and a significant decrease in net radial propagation. Both effects arise from the temperature dependence of the sheath current which leads to a non-uniform floating potential, with the latter effect supplemented by faster pressure loss. The reduction in radial velocity can only occur when the filament cross-section loses angular symmetry. The behaviour is observed across different filament sizes and suggests that filaments with much larger temperature perturbations than density perturbations are more strongly confined to the near SOL region.

  12. 2.5D real waveform and real noise simulation of receiver functions in 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Christian; Jacobsen, Bo; Balling, Niels

    2014-05-01

    , the comparison can even be made quantitative, and an iterative inverse 3D model updating would be possible. Furthermore the "2.5D" modelling approach of the in reality 3D problem must be investigated in terms of accuracy of the approximation, in particular with focus on highly 3D structures and multiple phases. References: Schiffer et al. 2013, A fossil subduction zone in the East Greenland Caledonides revealed by a Receiver Function analysis, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 15, EGU2013-6947, 2013, EGU General Assembly 2013 Schlindwein, V. and Jokat, W., 1999, Structure and evolution of the continental crust of northern east Greenland from integrated geophysical studies: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 104, no. B7, p. 15227-15,245 Voss, M. and Jokat, W., 2007, Continent-ocean transition and voluminous magmatic underplating derived from P-wave velocity modelling of the East Greenland continental margin: Geophysical Journal International, v.170, no. 2, p. 580-604

  13. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  14. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  15. Ensemble 3D PTV for high resolution turbulent statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüera, Nereida; Cafiero, Gioacchino; Astarita, Tommaso; Discetti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    A method to extract turbulent statistics from three-dimensional (3D) PIV measurements via ensemble averaging is presented. The proposed technique is a 3D extension of the ensemble particle tracking velocimetry methods, which consist in summing distributions of velocity vectors calculated on low image density samples and then extract the statistical moments from the velocity vectors within sub-volumes, with the size of the sub-volume depending on the desired number of particles and on the available number of snapshots. The extension to 3D measurements poses the additional difficulty of sparse velocity vectors distributions, thus requiring a large number of snapshots to achieve high resolution measurements with a sufficient degree of accuracy. At the current state, this hinders the achievement of single-voxel measurements, unless millions of samples are available. Consequently, one has to give up spatial resolution and live with still relatively large (if compared to the voxel) sub-volumes. This leads to the further problem of the possible occurrence of a residual mean velocity gradient within the sub-volumes, which significantly contaminates the computation of second order moments. In this work, we propose a method to reduce the residual gradient effect, allowing to reach high resolution even with relatively large interrogation spots, therefore still retrieving a large number of particles on which it is possible to calculate turbulent statistics. The method consists in applying a polynomial fit to the velocity distributions within each sub-volume trying to mimic the residual mean velocity gradient.

  16. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  17. 3D Nanostructuring of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Modern semiconductor technology allows to machine devices on the nanometer scale. I will discuss the current limits of the fabrication processes, which enable the definition of single electron transistors with dimensions down to 8 nm. In addition to the conventional 2D patterning and structuring of semiconductors, I will demonstrate how to apply 3D nanostructuring techniques to build freely suspended single-crystal beams with lateral dimension down to 20 nm. In transport measurements in the temperature range from 30 mK up to 100 K these nano-crystals are characterized regarding their electronic as well as their mechanical properties. Moreover, I will present possible applications of these devices.

  18. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  19. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  20. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  1. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  2. Imaging the Antarctic mantle using adaptively parameterized P-wave tomography: Evidence for heterogeneous structure beneath West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Samantha E.; Graw, Jordan H.; Kenyon, Lindsey M.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Aster, Richard C.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Wilson, Terry

    2014-12-01

    Previously developed continental-scale surface wave models for Antarctica provide only broad interpretations of the mantle structure, and the best resolved features in recent regional-scale seismic models are restricted above ∼300-400 km depth. We have developed the first continental-scale P-wave velocity model beneath Antarctica using an adaptively parameterized tomography approach that includes data from many new seismic networks. Our model shows considerable, previously unrecognized mantle heterogeneity, especially beneath West Antarctica. A pronounced slow velocity anomaly extends between Ross Island and Victoria Land, further grid south than previous studies indicate. However, at least for mantle depths ≥∼200 km, this anomaly does not extend grid north along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) and beneath the West Antarctic Rift System. The boundary between these slow velocities and fast velocities underlying East Antarctica is ∼100-150 km beneath the front of the TAMs, consistent with flexural uplift models. The lateral extent of the low velocity anomaly is best explained by focused, rift-related decompression melting. In West Antarctica, Marie Byrd Land is underlain by a deep (∼800 km) low velocity anomaly. Synthetic tests illustrate that the low velocities also extend laterally below the transition zone, consistent with a mantle plume ponded below the 660 km discontinuity. The slow anomalies beneath Ross Island and Marie Byrd Land are separate features, highlighting the heterogeneous upper mantle of West Antarctica.

  3. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  4. Observation of P-Wave Capture Strength in the Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Laird Hayman

    The ^2H(d,gamma) ^4He reaction is expected to be dominated by electric quadrupole (E2) s-wave (l = 0) capture to the D-state (l = 2) of ^4He below E _{rm d}(lab) = 500 keV, where the centrifugal barrier should suppress the electric quadrupole (E2) d-wave (l = 2) capture to the S-state (l = 0). Enhancement of the total cross section below E_{ rm d}(lab) = 500 keV has been attributed to this mechanism, although no direct evidence exists to support this claim. To investigate this issue, we have measured the vector and tensor analyzing powers of the ^2 H(vec{rm d}{, }gamma)^4He reaction using an 80 keV beam of polarized deuterons. We present results for the vector and tensor analyzing powers A_ {rm y}(theta) and A _{rm yy}(theta) and the differential cross section sigma(theta) /A_0 for E_ {rm d}(lab) = 80 - 0 keV at theta_{rm c.m. } = 0^circ, 45^ circ, and 82^circ. A model-independent transition matrix element analysis of the data finds that a major portion of the capture strength results from electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) p-wave capture (l = 1). The data are also compared to a recent microscopic coupled -channel resonating group model calculation which includes electric quadrupole (E2), electric dipole (E1), magnetic quadrupole (M2), and magnetic dipole (M1) transitions and the coupled deuteron-deuteron, proton-triton, and neutron -^3He channels. The model produces fair agreement with the experimental data when a semi-realistic force is used.

  5. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  6. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  7. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  8. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  9. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  11. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity by Nanoscale 3D Phononic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  12. Reduction of thermal conductivity by nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

  13. Tomographic 3D-PIV and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsinga, Gerrit E.; Wieneke, Bernhard; Scarano, Fulvio; Schröder, Andreas

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry is a 3D PIV technique based on the illumination, recording, reconstruction and analysis of tracer-particle motion within a three-dimensional measurement volume. The recently developed technique makes use of several simultaneous views of the illuminated particles, typically 4, and their three-dimensional reconstruction as a light-intensity distribution by means of optical tomography. The reconstruction is performed with the MART algorithm (multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique), yielding a 3D distribution of light intensity discretized over a