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Sample records for 3-d particle tracking

  1. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bergonzo, P.; Caylar, B.; Forcolin, G.; Haughton, I.; Hits, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Li, L.; Oh, A.; Phan, S.; Pomorski, M.; Smith, D. S.; Tyzhnevyi, V.; Wallny, R.; Whitehead, D.

    2015-06-01

    A novel device using single-crystal chemical vapour deposited diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond detector is presented. The electrodes of the device were fabricated with laser assisted phase change of diamond into a combination of diamond-like carbon, amorphous carbon and graphite. The connections to the electrodes of the device were made using a photo-lithographic process. The electrical and particle detection properties of the device were investigated. A prototype detector system consisting of the 3D device connected to a multi-channel readout was successfully tested with 120 GeV protons proving the feasibility of the 3D diamond detector concept for particle tracking applications for the first time.

  2. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chau, C.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Costa, S.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D`Alessandro, R.; de Boer, W.; Dehning, B.; Dobos, D.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gonella, L.; Gorišek, A.; Graber, L.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; McFadden, N.; McGoldrick, G.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Oh, A.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sapinski, M.; Scaringella, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Schreiner, T.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shimchuk, G.; Smith, D. S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weilhammer, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, results towards the development of a 3D diamond sensor are presented. Conductive channels are produced inside the sensor bulk using a femtosecond laser. This electrode geometry allows full charge collection even for low quality diamond sensors. Results from testbeam show that charge is collected by these electrodes. In order to understand the channel growth parameters, with the goal of producing low resistivity channels, the conductive channels produced with a different laser setup are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy.

  3. On the dynamics of jellyfish locomotion via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, Matthew; Kim, Jin-Tae; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) locomotion is experimentally studied via 3D particle tracking velocimetry. 3D locations of the bell tip are tracked over 1.5 cycles to describe the jellyfish path. Multiple positions of the jellyfish bell margin are initially tracked in 2D from four independent planes and individually projected in 3D based on the jellyfish path and geometrical properties of the setup. A cubic spline interpolation and the exponentially weighted moving average are used to estimate derived quantities, including velocity and acceleration of the jellyfish locomotion. We will discuss distinctive features of the jellyfish 3D motion at various swimming phases, and will provide insight on the 3D contraction and relaxation in terms of the locomotion, the steadiness of the bell margin eccentricity, and local Reynolds number based on the instantaneous mean diameter of the bell.

  4. A Gaussian process guided particle filter for tracking 3D human pose in video.

    PubMed

    Sedai, Suman; Bennamoun, Mohammed; Huynh, Du Q

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid method that combines Gaussian process learning, a particle filter, and annealing to track the 3D pose of a human subject in video sequences. Our approach, which we refer to as annealed Gaussian process guided particle filter, comprises two steps. In the training step, we use a supervised learning method to train a Gaussian process regressor that takes the silhouette descriptor as an input and produces multiple output poses modeled by a mixture of Gaussian distributions. In the tracking step, the output pose distributions from the Gaussian process regression are combined with the annealed particle filter to track the 3D pose in each frame of the video sequence. Our experiments show that the proposed method does not require initialization and does not lose tracking of the pose. We compare our approach with a standard annealed particle filter using the HumanEva-I dataset and with other state of the art approaches using the HumanEva-II dataset. The evaluation results show that our approach can successfully track the 3D human pose over long video sequences and give more accurate pose tracking results than the annealed particle filter.

  5. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  6. Particle Filters and Occlusion Handling for Rigid 2D-3D Pose Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jehoon; Sandhu, Romeil; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of 2D-3D pose estimation. Specifically, we propose an approach to jointly track a rigid object in a 2D image sequence and to estimate its pose (position and orientation) in 3D space. We revisit a joint 2D segmentation/3D pose estimation technique, and then extend the framework by incorporating a particle filter to robustly track the object in a challenging environment, and by developing an occlusion detection and handling scheme to continuously track the object in the presence of occlusions. In particular, we focus on partial occlusions that prevent the tracker from extracting an exact region properties of the object, which plays a pivotal role for region-based tracking methods in maintaining the track. To this end, a dynamical choice of how to invoke the objective functional is performed online based on the degree of dependencies between predictions and measurements of the system in accordance with the degree of occlusion and the variation of the object’s pose. This scheme provides the robustness to deal with occlusions of an obstacle with different statistical properties from that of the object of interest. Experimental results demonstrate the practical applicability and robustness of the proposed method in several challenging scenarios. PMID:24058277

  7. 3D tracking the Brownian motion of colloidal particles using digital holographic microscopy and joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Nicolas; Fournier, Corinne; Fournel, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    In-line digital holography is a valuable tool for sizing, locating, and tracking micro- or nano-objects in a volume. When a parametric imaging model is available, inverse problem approaches provide a straightforward estimate of the object parameters by fitting data with the model, thereby allowing accurate reconstruction. As recently proposed and demonstrated, combining pixel super-resolution techniques with inverse problem approaches improves the estimation of particle size and 3D position. Here, we demonstrate the accurate tracking of colloidal particles in Brownian motion. Particle size and 3D position are jointly optimized from video holograms acquired with a digital holographic microscopy setup based on a low-end microscope objective (×20, NA 0.5). Exploiting information redundancy makes it possible to characterize particles with a standard deviation of 15 nm in size and a theoretical resolution of 2×2×5  nm3 for position under additive white Gaussian noise assumption.

  8. Analysis of thoracic aorta hemodynamics using 3D particle tracking velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Diego; Gülan, Utku; Di Stefano, Antonietta; Ponzini, Raffaele; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2014-09-22

    Parallel to the massive use of image-based computational hemodynamics to study the complex flow establishing in the human aorta, the need for suitable experimental techniques and ad hoc cases for the validation and benchmarking of numerical codes has grown more and more. Here we present a study where the 3D pulsatile flow in an anatomically realistic phantom of human ascending aorta is investigated both experimentally and computationally. The experimental study uses 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to characterize the flow field in vitro, while finite volume method is applied to numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the same domain, under the same conditions. Our findings show that there is an excellent agreement between computational and measured flow fields during the forward flow phase, while the agreement is poorer during the reverse flow phase. In conclusion, here we demonstrate that 3D PTV is very suitable for a detailed study of complex unsteady flows as in aorta and for validating computational models of aortic hemodynamics. In a future step, it will be possible to take advantage from the ability of 3D PTV to evaluate velocity fluctuations and, for this reason, to gain further knowledge on the process of transition to turbulence occurring in the thoracic aorta.

  9. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  10. Ultra-high-speed 3D astigmatic particle tracking velocimetry: application to particle-laden supersonic impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Cierpka, C.; Kähler, C. J.; Soria, J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper demonstrates ultra-high-speed three-component, three-dimensional (3C3D) velocity measurements of micron-sized particles suspended in a supersonic impinging jet flow. Understanding the dynamics of individual particles in such flows is important for the design of particle impactors for drug delivery or cold gas dynamic spray processing. The underexpanded jet flow is produced via a converging nozzle, and micron-sized particles ( d p = 110 μm) are introduced into the gas flow. The supersonic jet impinges onto a flat surface, and the particle impact velocity and particle impact angle are studied for a range of flow conditions and impingement distances. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high-speed digital camera (Shimadzu HPV-1) capable of recording rates of up to 1 Mfps. Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is used to measure the 3D particle position (Cierpka et al., Meas Sci Technol 21(045401):13, 2010) by coding the particle depth location in the 2D images by adding a cylindrical lens to the high-speed imaging system. Based on the reconstructed 3D particle positions, the particle trajectories are obtained via a higher-order tracking scheme that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution to increase robustness and accuracy of the measurement. It is shown that the particle velocity and impingement angle are affected by the gas flow in a manner depending on the nozzle pressure ratio and stand-off distance where higher pressure ratios and stand-off distances lead to higher impact velocities and larger impact angles.

  11. Application of 3d-ptv To Track Particle Moving Inside Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenedese, A.; Cushman, J. H.; Moroni, M.

    There exist a number of imaging-based measurement techniques for determining 3D velocity fields in an observation volume. Among these are: a) scanning techniques (Guezennec et al. 1994, Moroni and Cushman, 2001); b) holographic techniques (Hin- sch and Hinrichs 1996); c) defocusing techniques (Willert and Gharib 1992); d) stereo- scopic techniques (Maas et al. 1993, Kasagi and Nishino 1990). We have focused our attention on 3D-PTV which is an experimental technique based on reconstructing 3D trajectories of reflecting tracer particles through a stereoscopic recording of image se- quences. Coordinates are determined first and then trajectories are defined. 3D-PTV requires the operator to light a volume of the test section as opposed to 2D techniques that require a light sheet. Stereoscopic methods share the following basic steps (Pa- pantoniou, 1990): a) stereoscopic calibrated imaging and recording of a suitably illu- minated particle flow; b) subsequent photogrammetric analysis of the resulting images to derive the instantaneous 3-D particle positions and c) tracking of the 3-D coordinate sets in time to derive the tracer trajectories. The ideal setup for obtaining highly accu- rate trajectories requires the cameras to be mounted with the distance between them equal to the distance to the center of the measurement volume (with three cameras this requires a hexagonal cell). But the camera arrangement is usually a compromise between ideal geometrical conditions for a homogeneous distribution of accuracies in the measuring volume and practical restrictions associated with the experiment. The position of the cameras in object space (exterior orientation) and the parameters of each camera (interior orientation) are needed to reconstruct the 3D objects. These pa- rameters can be calculated simultaneously in a so-called "bundle adjustment" or by pre-calibration. A matched index (of refraction) porous medium heterogeneous at the bench scale has been constructed by filling

  12. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  13. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  14. A Framework for 3D Model-Based Visual Tracking Using a GPU-Accelerated Particle Filter.

    PubMed

    Brown, J A; Capson, D W

    2012-01-01

    A novel framework for acceleration of particle filtering approaches to 3D model-based, markerless visual tracking in monocular video is described. Specifically, we present a methodology for partitioning and mapping the computationally expensive weight-update stage of a particle filter to a graphics processing unit (GPU) to achieve particle- and pixel-level parallelism. Nvidia CUDA and Direct3D are employed to harness the massively parallel computational power of modern GPUs for simulation (3D model rendering) and evaluation (segmentation, feature extraction, and weight calculation) of hundreds of particles at high speeds. The proposed framework addresses the computational intensity that is intrinsic to all particle filter approaches, including those that have been modified to minimize the number of particles required for a particular task. Performance and tracking quality results for rigid object and articulated hand tracking experiments demonstrate markerless, model-based visual tracking on consumer-grade graphics hardware with pixel-level accuracy up to 95 percent at 60+ frames per second. The framework accelerates particle evaluation up to 49 times over a comparable CPU-only implementation, providing an increased particle count while maintaining real-time frame rates.

  15. Computer Vision Tracking Using Particle Filters for 3D Position Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    5 2.2 Photogrammetry ...focus on particle filters. 2.2 Photogrammetry Photogrammetry is the process of determining 3-D coordinates through images. The mathematical underpinnings...of photogrammetry are rooted in the 1480s with Leonardo da Vinci’s study of perspectives [8, p. 1]. However, digital photogrammetry did not emerge

  16. Lagrangian 3D particle tracking in high-speed flows: Shake-The-Box for multi-pulse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Schanz, Daniel; Reuther, Nico; Kähler, Christian J.; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The Shake-The-Box (STB) particle tracking technique, recently introduced for time-resolved 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) images, is applied here to data from a multi-pulse investigation of a turbulent boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradient in air at 36 m/s ( Re τ = 10,650). The multi-pulse acquisition strategy allows for the recording of four-pulse long time-resolved sequences with a time separation of a few microseconds. The experimental setup consists of a dual-imaging system and a dual-double-cavity laser emitting orthogonal polarization directions to separate the four pulses. The STB particle triangulation and tracking strategy is adapted here to cope with the limited amount of realizations available along the time sequence and to take advantage of the ghost track reduction offered by the use of two independent imaging systems. Furthermore, a correction scheme to compensate for camera vibrations is discussed, together with a method to accurately identify the position of the wall within the measurement domain. Results show that approximately 80,000 tracks can be instantaneously reconstructed within the measurement volume, enabling the evaluation of both dense velocity fields, suitable for spatial gradients evaluation, and highly spatially resolved boundary layer profiles. Turbulent boundary layer profiles obtained from ensemble averaging of the STB tracks are compared to results from 2D-PIV and long-range micro particle tracking velocimetry; the comparison shows the capability of the STB approach in delivering accurate results across a wide range of scales.

  17. Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afik, Eldad

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, fluid dynamics in microfluidic devices, bacteria taxis, cellular trafficking. The 3d position can be determined using 2d imaging alone by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus fluorescent particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, and allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. The proposed algorithm, an offspring of the circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of many particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem, and overcomes the challenges of finding local maxima in the complex parameter space which results from ring clusters and noise. Several algorithmic concepts introduced here can be advantageous in other cases, particularly when dealing with noisy and sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. It is implemented in a microfluidic experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70 Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection.

  18. Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging

    PubMed Central

    Afik, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, fluid dynamics in microfluidic devices, bacteria taxis, cellular trafficking. The 3d position can be determined using 2d imaging alone by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus fluorescent particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, and allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. The proposed algorithm, an offspring of the circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of many particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem, and overcomes the challenges of finding local maxima in the complex parameter space which results from ring clusters and noise. Several algorithmic concepts introduced here can be advantageous in other cases, particularly when dealing with noisy and sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. It is implemented in a microfluidic experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70 Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection. PMID:26329642

  19. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude.

  20. Applications of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models in the San Francisco bay-delta estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Donovan, J.M.; Wong, H.F.N.

    2005-01-01

    Three applications of three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle-tracking models are currently underway by the United States Geological Survey in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary. The first application is to the San Francisco Bay and a portion of the coastal ocean. The second application is to an important, gated control channel called the Delta Cross Channel, located within the northern portion of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The third application is to a reach of the San Joaquin River near Stockton, California where a significant dissolved oxygen problem exists due, in part, to conditions associated with the deep-water ship channel for the Port of Stockton, California. This paper briefly discusses the hydrodynamic and particle tracking models being used and the three applications. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  1. Electrically tunable lens speeds up 3D orbital tracking

    PubMed Central

    Annibale, Paolo; Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    3D orbital particle tracking is a versatile and effective microscopy technique that allows following fast moving fluorescent objects within living cells and reconstructing complex 3D shapes using laser scanning microscopes. We demonstrated notable improvements in the range, speed and accuracy of 3D orbital particle tracking by replacing commonly used piezoelectric stages with Electrically Tunable Lens (ETL) that eliminates mechanical movement of objective lenses. This allowed tracking and reconstructing shape of structures extending 500 microns in the axial direction. Using the ETL, we tracked at high speed fluorescently labeled genomic loci within the nucleus of living cells with unprecedented temporal resolution of 8ms using a 1.42NA oil-immersion objective. The presented technology is cost effective and allows easy upgrade of scanning microscopes for fast 3D orbital tracking. PMID:26114037

  2. FFT integration of instantaneous 3D pressure gradient fields measured by Lagrangian particle tracking in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; Schanz, D.; Gesemann, S.; Schröder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Pressure gradient fields in unsteady flows can be estimated through flow measurements of the material acceleration in the fluid and the assumption of the governing momentum equation. In order to derive pressure from its gradient, almost exclusively two numerical methods have been used to spatially integrate the pressure gradient until now: first, direct path integration in the spatial domain, and second, the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. Instead, we propose an alternative third method that integrates the pressure gradient field in Fourier space. Using a FFT function, the method is fast and easy to implement in programming languages for scientific computing. We demonstrate the accuracy of the integration scheme on a synthetic pressure field and apply it to an experimental example based on time-resolved material acceleration data from high-resolution Lagrangian particle tracking with the Shake-The-Box method.

  3. Self consistent particles dynamics in/out of the cusp region by using back tracking technics; a global 3D PIC simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Cai, D.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale three dimensionbal PIC (particle in cell) simulations are presently used in order to analyze the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere intreraction within a full self-consistent approach, and where both electrons and ions are treated as an assembly of individual particles. This 3D kinetic approach allows us to analyze in particular the dynamics and the fine structures of the cusp region when including self consistently not only its whole neighborhood (in the terrestrial magnetosphere) but also the impact of the solar wind and the interplanetary field (IMF) features. Herein, we focuss our attention on the cusp region and in particular on the acceleration and precipitation of particles (both ions and electrons) within the cusp. In present simulations, the IMF is chosen northward, (i.e. where the X -reconnection region is just above the cusp, in the meridian plane). Back-trackings of self-consistent particles are analyzed in details in order to determine (i) which particles (just above the cusp) are precipitated deeply into the cusp, (ii) which populations are injected from the cusp into the nearby tail, (iii) where the particles suffer the largest energisation along their self-consistent trajectories, (iv) where these populations accumulate, and (v) where the most energetic particles are originally coming from. This approach allows to make a traking of particles within the scenario "solar wind-magnetosheath- cusp -nearbytail"; moreover it strongly differs from the standard test particles technics and allows to provide informations not accessible when using full MHD approach. Keywords: Tracing Particles, Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation, double cusp, test particles method, IMF, Solar wind, Magnetosphere

  4. 3-D model-based vehicle tracking.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianguang; Tan, Tieniu; Hu, Weiming; Yang, Hao; Maybank, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    This paper aims at tracking vehicles from monocular intensity image sequences and presents an efficient and robust approach to three-dimensional (3-D) model-based vehicle tracking. Under the weak perspective assumption and the ground-plane constraint, the movements of model projection in the two-dimensional image plane can be decomposed into two motions: translation and rotation. They are the results of the corresponding movements of 3-D translation on the ground plane (GP) and rotation around the normal of the GP, which can be determined separately. A new metric based on point-to-line segment distance is proposed to evaluate the similarity between an image region and an instantiation of a 3-D vehicle model under a given pose. Based on this, we provide an efficient pose refinement method to refine the vehicle's pose parameters. An improved EKF is also proposed to track and to predict vehicle motion with a precise kinematics model. Experimental results with both indoor and outdoor data show that the algorithm obtains desirable performance even under severe occlusion and clutter.

  5. Tracking earthquake source evolution in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Gorbatov, A.; Spiliopoulos, S.

    2014-08-01

    Starting from the hypocentre, the point of initiation of seismic energy, we seek to estimate the subsequent trajectory of the points of emission of high-frequency energy in 3-D, which we term the `evocentres'. We track these evocentres as a function of time by energy stacking for putative points on a 3-D grid around the hypocentre that is expanded as time progresses, selecting the location of maximum energy release as a function of time. The spatial resolution in the neighbourhood of a target point can be simply estimated by spatial mapping using the properties of isochrons from the stations. The mapping of a seismogram segment to space is by inverse slowness, and thus more distant stations have a broader spatial contribution. As in hypocentral estimation, the inclusion of a wide azimuthal distribution of stations significantly enhances 3-D capability. We illustrate this approach to tracking source evolution in 3-D by considering two major earthquakes, the 2007 Mw 8.1 Solomons islands event that ruptured across a plate boundary and the 2013 Mw 8.3 event 610 km beneath the Sea of Okhotsk. In each case we are able to provide estimates of the evolution of high-frequency energy that tally well with alternative schemes, but also to provide information on the 3-D characteristics that is not available from backprojection from distant networks. We are able to demonstrate that the major characteristics of event rupture can be captured using just a few azimuthally distributed stations, which opens the opportunity for the approach to be used in a rapid mode immediately after a major event to provide guidance for, for example tsunami warning for megathrust events.

  6. On the local acceleration and flow trajectory of jet flows from circular and semi-circular pipes via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The distinctive differences between two jet flows that share the same hydraulic diameter dh = 0.01 m and Re ~ 6000, but different (nozzle) shape are explored via 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry using OpenPTV (http://www.openptv.net). The two jets are formed from circular and semicircular pipes and released in a quiescent water tank of 40 dh height, 40 dh wide, and 200 dh long. The recirculating system is seeded with 100 μm particles, where flow measurements are performed in the intermediate flow field (14.5 < x /dh <18.5) at 550Hz for a total of ~ 30,000 frames. Analysis is focused on the spatial distribution of the local flow acceleration and curvature of the Lagrangian trajectories. The velocity and acceleration of particles are estimated by low-pass filtering their position with a moving cubic spline fitting, while the curvature is obtained from the Frenet-Serret equations. Probability density functions (p.d.f.) of these quantities are obtained at various sub-volumes containing a given streamwise velocity range, and compared between the two cases to evaluate the memory effects in the intermediate flow field.

  7. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  8. Dual-color multiple-particle tracking at 50-nm localization and over 100-µm range in 3D with temporal focusing two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yu; Li, Chunqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale particle tracking in three dimensions is crucial to directly observe dynamics of molecules and nanoparticles in living cells. Here we present a three-dimensional particle tracking method based on temporally focused two-photon excitation. Multiple particles are imaged at 30 frames/s in volume up to 180 × 180 × 100 µm3. The spatial localization precision can reach 50 nm. We demonstrate its capability of tracking fast swimming microbes at speed of ~200 µm/s. Two-photon dual-color tracking is achieved by simultaneously exciting two kinds of fluorescent beads at 800 nm to demonstrate its potential in molecular interaction studies. Our method provides a simple wide-field fluorescence imaging approach for deep multiple-particle tracking. PMID:27867724

  9. 3-D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localization.

    PubMed

    Teulière, Céline; Marchand, Eric; Eck, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel model-based tracking approach for 3-D localization. One main difficulty of standard model-based approach lies in the presence of low-level ambiguities between different edges. In this paper, given a 3-D model of the edges of the environment, we derive a multiple hypotheses tracker which retrieves the potential poses of the camera from the observations in the image. We also show how these candidate poses can be integrated into a particle filtering framework to guide the particle set toward the peaks of the distribution. Motivated by the UAV indoor localization problem where GPS signal is not available, we validate the algorithm on real image sequences from UAV flights.

  10. 3D visualisation and analysis of single and coalescing tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Brown, Louise; Petford, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionising decay products can cause lung cancer in humans (1). Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) can be used to monitor radon concentrations (2). Radon particles form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable 2D surface image analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (3). The aim of the study was to further investigate track angles and patterns in SSNTDs. A 'LEXT' confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 3D image datasets of five CR-39 plastic SSNTD's. The resultant 3D visualisations were analysed by eye and inclination angles assessed on selected tracks. From visual assessment, single isolated tracks as well as coalescing tracks were observed on the etched detectors. In addition varying track inclination angles were observed. Several different patterns of track formation were seen such as single isolated and double coalescing tracks. The observed track angles of inclination may help to assess the angle at which alpha particles hit the detector. Darby, S et al. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer : collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies. British Medical Journal 2005; 330, 223-226. Phillips, P.S., Denman, A.R., Crockett, R.G.M., Gillmore, G., Groves-Kirkby, C.J., Woolridge, A., Comparative Analysis of Weekly vs. Three monthly radon measurements in dwellings. DEFRA Report No., DEFRA/RAS/03.006. (2004). Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Journal of Microscopy 2010; 237: 1-6.

  11. (abstract) 3D Electromagnetic Plasma Particle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Liewer, P. C.; Lyster, P.; Decyk, V. K.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D electromagnetic plasma particle-in-cell code has been developed using the General Concurrent PIC algorithm. The GCPIC algorithm uses a domain decomposition to divide the computation among the processors. Particles must be exchanged between processors as they move. The efficiencies for 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional partitions of the three dimensional domain are compared, and the algorithm is found to be very efficient even when a large fraction (e.g., 30%) of the particles must be exchanged at every time step. This PIC code has been used to perform simulations of a variety of space plasma physics problems. Results of three applications will be discussed: 1) plasma disturbances induced by moving conducting bodies in a magnetized plasma; 2) plasma plume interactions; and 3) solar wind termination shock.

  12. 3D Tracking via Shoe Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fangmin; Liu, Guo; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xiaochuang; Ma, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Most location-based services are based on a global positioning system (GPS), which only works well in outdoor environments. Compared to outdoor environments, indoor localization has created more buzz in recent years as people spent most of their time indoors working at offices and shopping at malls, etc. Existing solutions mainly rely on inertial sensors (i.e., accelerometer and gyroscope) embedded in mobile devices, which are usually not accurate enough to be useful due to the mobile devices’ random movements while people are walking. In this paper, we propose the use of shoe sensing (i.e., sensors attached to shoes) to achieve 3D indoor positioning. Specifically, a short-time energy-based approach is used to extract the gait pattern. Moreover, in order to improve the accuracy of vertical distance estimation while the person is climbing upstairs, a state classification is designed to distinguish the walking status including plane motion (i.e., normal walking and jogging horizontally), walking upstairs, and walking downstairs. Furthermore, we also provide a mechanism to reduce the vertical distance accumulation error. Experimental results show that we can achieve nearly 100% accuracy when extracting gait patterns from walking/jogging with a low-cost shoe sensor, and can also achieve 3D indoor real-time positioning with high accuracy. PMID:27801839

  13. 3D View of Mars Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a 3D representation of the pits seen in the first Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM, images sent back from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Red represents the highest point and purple represents the lowest point.

    The particle in the upper left corner shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a rounded particle about one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across. It is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. 3D gaze tracking system for NVidia 3D Vision®.

    PubMed

    Wibirama, Sunu; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate parallax setting in stereoscopic content generally causes visual fatigue and visual discomfort. To optimize three dimensional (3D) effects in stereoscopic content by taking into account health issue, understanding how user gazes at 3D direction in virtual space is currently an important research topic. In this paper, we report the study of developing a novel 3D gaze tracking system for Nvidia 3D Vision(®) to be used in desktop stereoscopic display. We suggest an optimized geometric method to accurately measure the position of virtual 3D object. Our experimental result shows that the proposed system achieved better accuracy compared to conventional geometric method by average errors 0.83 cm, 0.87 cm, and 1.06 cm in X, Y, and Z dimensions, respectively.

  15. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  16. 3D hand tracking using Kalman filter in depth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangheon; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-12-01

    Hand gestures are an important type of natural language used in many research areas such as human-computer interaction and computer vision. Hand gestures recognition requires the prior determination of the hand position through detection and tracking. One of the most efficient strategies for hand tracking is to use 2D visual information such as color and shape. However, visual-sensor-based hand tracking methods are very sensitive when tracking is performed under variable light conditions. Also, as hand movements are made in 3D space, the recognition performance of hand gestures using 2D information is inherently limited. In this article, we propose a novel real-time 3D hand tracking method in depth space using a 3D depth sensor and employing Kalman filter. We detect hand candidates using motion clusters and predefined wave motion, and track hand locations using Kalman filter. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare the performance of the proposed method with the visual-based method. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed method out performs visual-based method.

  17. Deployment of a 3D tag tracking method utilising RFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasif Reza, Ahmed; Yun, Teoh Wei; Dimyati, Kaharudin; Geok Tan, Kim; Ariffin Noordin, Kamarul

    2012-04-01

    Recent trend shows that one of the crucial problems faced while using radio frequency to track the objects is the inconsistency of the signal strength reception, which can be mainly due to the environmental factors and the blockage, which always have the most impact on the tracking accuracy. Besides, three dimensions are more relevant to a warehouse scanning. Therefore, this study proposes a highly accurate and new three-dimensional (3D) radio frequency identification-based indoor tracking system with the consideration of different attenuation factors and obstacles. The obtained results show that the proposed system yields high-quality performance with an average error as low as 0.27 m (without obstacles and attenuation effects). The obtained results also show that the proposed tracking technique can achieve relatively lower errors (0.4 and 0.36 m, respectively) even in the presence of the highest attenuation effect, e = 3.3 or when the environment is largely affected by 50% of the obstacles. Furthermore, the superiority of the proposed 3D tracking system has been proved by comparing with other existing approaches. The 3D tracking system proposed in this study can be applicable to a warehouse scanning.

  18. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  19. A 3D feature point tracking method for ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenberg, Jasper J. M.; Ulrich, Leonie; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    A robust and computationally efficient algorithm for automated tracking of high densities of particles travelling in (semi-) straight lines is presented. It extends the implementation of (Sbalzarini and Koumoutsakos 2005) and is intended for use in the analysis of single ion track detectors. By including information of existing tracks in the exclusion criteria and a recursive cost minimization function, the algorithm is robust to variations on the measured particle tracks. A trajectory relinking algorithm was included to resolve the crossing of tracks in high particle density images. Validation of the algorithm was performed using fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) irradiated with high- and low (heavy) ion fluences and showed less than 1% faulty trajectories in the latter.

  20. Monocular 3-D gait tracking in surveillance scenes.

    PubMed

    Rogez, Grégory; Rihan, Jonathan; Guerrero, Jose J; Orrite, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Gait recognition can potentially provide a noninvasive and effective biometric authentication from a distance. However, the performance of gait recognition systems will suffer in real surveillance scenarios with multiple interacting individuals and where the camera is usually placed at a significant angle and distance from the floor. We present a methodology for view-invariant monocular 3-D human pose tracking in man-made environments in which we assume that observed people move on a known ground plane. First, we model 3-D body poses and camera viewpoints with a low dimensional manifold and learn a generative model of the silhouette from this manifold to a reduced set of training views. During the online stage, 3-D body poses are tracked using recursive Bayesian sampling conducted jointly over the scene's ground plane and the pose-viewpoint manifold. For each sample, the homography that relates the corresponding training plane to the image points is calculated using the dominant 3-D directions of the scene, the sampled location on the ground plane and the sampled camera view. Each regressed silhouette shape is projected using this homographic transformation and is matched in the image to estimate its likelihood. Our framework is able to track 3-D human walking poses in a 3-D environment exploring only a 4-D state space with success. In our experimental evaluation, we demonstrate the significant improvements of the homographic alignment over a commonly used similarity transformation and provide quantitative pose tracking results for the monocular sequences with a high perspective effect from the CAVIAR dataset.

  1. Linear tracking for 3-D medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Zhao; Hu, Wei; Jin, Lian-Wen; Wei, Gang; Li, Xuelong

    2013-12-01

    As the clinical application grows, there is a rapid technical development of 3-D ultrasound imaging. Compared with 2-D ultrasound imaging, 3-D ultrasound imaging can provide improved qualitative and quantitative information for various clinical applications. In this paper, we proposed a novel tracking method for a freehand 3-D ultrasound imaging system with improved portability, reduced degree of freedom, and cost. We designed a sliding track with a linear position sensor attached, and it transmitted positional data via a wireless communication module based on Bluetooth, resulting in a wireless spatial tracking modality. A traditional 2-D ultrasound probe fixed to the position sensor on the sliding track was used to obtain real-time B-scans, and the positions of the B-scans were simultaneously acquired when moving the probe along the track in a freehand manner. In the experiments, the proposed method was applied to ultrasound phantoms and real human tissues. The results demonstrated that the new system outperformed a previously developed freehand system based on a traditional six-degree-of-freedom spatial sensor in phantom and in vivo studies, indicating its merit in clinical applications for human tissues and organs.

  2. Light driven micro-robotics with holographic 3D tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We recently pioneered the concept of light-driven micro-robotics including the new and disruptive 3D-printed micro-tools coined Wave-guided Optical Waveguides that can be real-time optically trapped and "remote-controlled" in a volume with six-degrees-of-freedom. To be exploring the full potential of this new drone-like 3D light robotics approach in challenging microscopic geometries requires a versatile and real-time reconfigurable light coupling that can dynamically track a plurality of "light robots" in 3D to ensure continuous optimal light coupling on the fly. Our latest developments in this new and exciting area will be reviewed in this invited paper.

  3. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  4. Note: Time-gated 3D single quantum dot tracking with simultaneous spinning disk imaging

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, M. S.; Stich, D. G.; Keller, A. M.; Phipps, M. E.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Goodwin, P. M.; Werner, J. H.; Cleyrat, C.; Lidke, D. S.; Wilson, B. S.

    2015-12-15

    We describe recent upgrades to a 3D tracking microscope to include simultaneous Nipkow spinning disk imaging and time-gated single-particle tracking (SPT). Simultaneous 3D molecular tracking and spinning disk imaging enable the visualization of cellular structures and proteins around a given fluorescently labeled target molecule. The addition of photon time-gating to the SPT hardware improves signal to noise by discriminating against Raman scattering and short-lived fluorescence. In contrast to camera-based SPT, single-photon arrival times are recorded, enabling time-resolved spectroscopy (e.g., measurement of fluorescence lifetimes and photon correlations) to be performed during single molecule/particle tracking experiments.

  5. Geometric-model-free tracking of extended targets using 3D lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinemann, Philipp; Klappstein, Jens; Dickmann, Juergen; von Hundelshausen, Felix; Wünsche, Hans-Joachim

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of extended targets in high definition, 360-degree 3D-LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurements is a challenging task and a current research topic. It is a key component in robotic applications, and is relevant to path planning and collision avoidance. This paper proposes a new method without a geometric model to simultaneously track and accumulate 3D-LIDAR measurements of an object. The method itself is based on a particle filter and uses an object-related local 3D grid for each object. No geometric object hypothesis is needed. Accumulation allows coping with occlusions. The prediction step of the particle filter is governed by a motion model consisting of a deterministic and a probabilistic part. Since this paper is focused on tracking ground vehicles, a bicycle model is used for the deterministic part. The probabilistic part depends on the current state of each particle. A function for calculating the current probability density function for state transition is developed. It is derived in detail and based on a database consisting of vehicle dynamics measurements over several hundreds of kilometers. The adaptive probability density function narrows down the gating area for measurement data association. The second part of the proposed method addresses weighting the particles with a cost function. Different 3D-griddependent cost functions are presented and evaluated. Evaluations with real 3D-LIDAR measurements show the performance of the proposed method. The results are also compared to ground truth data.

  6. Characterisation of walking loads by 3D inertial motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nimmen, K.; Lombaert, G.; Jonkers, I.; De Roeck, G.; Van den Broeck, P.

    2014-09-01

    The present contribution analyses the walking behaviour of pedestrians in situ by 3D inertial motion tracking. The technique is first tested in laboratory experiments with simultaneous registration of the ground reaction forces. The registered motion of the pedestrian allows for the identification of stride-to-stride variations, which is usually disregarded in the simulation of walking forces. Subsequently, motion tracking is used to register the walking behaviour of (groups of) pedestrians during in situ measurements on a footbridge. The calibrated numerical model of the structure and the information gathered using the motion tracking system enables detailed simulation of the step-by-step pedestrian induced vibrations. Accounting for the in situ identified walking variability of the test-subjects leads to a significantly improved agreement between the measured and the simulated structural response.

  7. Speeding up 3D speckle tracking using PatchMatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zontak, Maria; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Echocardiography provides valuable information to diagnose heart dysfunction. A typical exam records several minutes of real-time cardiac images. To enable complete analysis of 3D cardiac strains, 4-D (3-D+t) echocardiography is used. This results in a huge dataset and requires effective automated analysis. Ultrasound speckle tracking is an effective method for tissue motion analysis. It involves correlation of a 3D kernel (block) around a voxel with kernels in later frames. The search region is usually confined to a local neighborhood, due to biomechanical and computational constraints. For high strains and moderate frame-rates, however, this search region will remain large, leading to a considerable computational burden. Moreover, speckle decorrelation (due to high strains) leads to errors in tracking. To solve this, spatial motion coherency between adjacent voxels should be imposed, e.g., by averaging their correlation functions.1 This requires storing correlation functions for neighboring voxels, thus increasing memory demands. In this work, we propose an efficient search using PatchMatch, 2 a powerful method to find correspondences between images. Here we adopt PatchMatch for 3D volumes and radio-frequency signals. As opposed to an exact search, PatchMatch performs random sampling of the search region and propagates successive matches among neighboring voxels. We show that: 1) Inherently smooth offset propagation in PatchMatch contributes to spatial motion coherence without any additional processing or memory demand. 2) For typical scenarios, PatchMatch is at least 20 times faster than the exact search, while maintaining comparable tracking accuracy.

  8. Tracking people and cars using 3D modeling and CCTV.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Gerda; Bijhold, Jurrien

    2010-10-10

    The aim of this study was to find a method for the reconstruction of movements of people and cars using CCTV footage and a 3D model of the environment. A procedure is proposed, in which video streams are synchronized and displayed in a 3D model, by using virtual cameras. People and cars are represented by cylinders and boxes, which are moved in the 3D model, according to their movements as shown in the video streams. The procedure was developed and tested in an experimental setup with test persons who logged their GPS coordinates as a recording of the ground truth. Results showed that it is possible to implement this procedure and to reconstruct movements of people and cars from video recordings. The procedure was also applied to a forensic case. In this work we experienced that more situational awareness was created by the 3D model, which made it easier to track people on multiple video streams. Based on all experiences from the experimental set up and the case, recommendations are formulated for use in practice.

  9. Inertial Motion-Tracking Technology for Virtual 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In the 1990s, NASA pioneered virtual reality research. The concept was present long before, but, prior to this, the technology did not exist to make a viable virtual reality system. Scientists had theories and ideas they knew that the concept had potential, but the computers of the 1970s and 1980s were not fast enough, sensors were heavy and cumbersome, and people had difficulty blending fluidly with the machines. Scientists at Ames Research Center built upon the research of previous decades and put the necessary technology behind them, making the theories of virtual reality a reality. Virtual reality systems depend on complex motion-tracking sensors to convey information between the user and the computer to give the user the feeling that he is operating in the real world. These motion-tracking sensors measure and report an object s position and orientation as it changes. A simple example of motion tracking would be the cursor on a computer screen moving in correspondence to the shifting of the mouse. Tracking in 3-D, necessary to create virtual reality, however, is much more complex. To be successful, the perspective of the virtual image seen on the computer must be an accurate representation of what is seen in the real world. As the user s head or camera moves, turns, or tilts, the computer-generated environment must change accordingly with no noticeable lag, jitter, or distortion. Historically, the lack of smooth and rapid tracking of the user s motion has thwarted the widespread use of immersive 3-D computer graphics. NASA uses virtual reality technology for a variety of purposes, mostly training of astronauts. The actual missions are costly and dangerous, so any opportunity the crews have to practice their maneuvering in accurate situations before the mission is valuable and instructive. For that purpose, NASA has funded a great deal of virtual reality research, and benefited from the results.

  10. Tracked 3D ultrasound in radio-frequency liver ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Taylor, Russell H.; Choti, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that radio frequency (RF) ablation is a simple, safe and potentially effective treatment for selected patients with liver metastases. Despite all recent therapeutic advancements, however, intra-procedural target localization and precise and consistent placement of the tissue ablator device are still unsolved problems. Various imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) have been tried as guidance modalities. Transcutaneous US imaging, due to its real-time nature, may be beneficial in many cases, but unfortunately, fails to adequately visualize the tumor in many cases. Intraoperative or laparoscopic US, on the other hand, provides improved visualization and target imaging. This paper describes a system for computer-assisted RF ablation of liver tumors, combining navigational tracking of a conventional imaging ultrasound probe to produce 3D ultrasound imaging with a tracked RF ablation device supported by a passive mechanical arm and spatially registered to the ultrasound volume.

  11. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; Di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated. PMID:25904062

  12. 3D Orbital Tracking in a Modified Two-photon Microscope: An Application to the Tracking of Intracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this video protocol is to discuss how to perform and analyze a three-dimensional fluorescent orbital particle tracking experiment using a modified two-photon microscope1. As opposed to conventional approaches (raster scan or wide field based on a stack of frames), the 3D orbital tracking allows to localize and follow with a high spatial (10 nm accuracy) and temporal resolution (50 Hz frequency response) the 3D displacement of a moving fluorescent particle on length-scales of hundreds of microns2. The method is based on a feedback algorithm that controls the hardware of a two-photon laser scanning microscope in order to perform a circular orbit around the object to be tracked: the feedback mechanism will maintain the fluorescent object in the center by controlling the displacement of the scanning beam3-5. To demonstrate the advantages of this technique, we followed a fast moving organelle, the lysosome, within a living cell6,7. Cells were plated according to standard protocols, and stained using a commercially lysosome dye. We discuss briefly the hardware configuration and in more detail the control software, to perform a 3D orbital tracking experiment inside living cells. We discuss in detail the parameters required in order to control the scanning microscope and enable the motion of the beam in a closed orbit around the particle. We conclude by demonstrating how this method can be effectively used to track the fast motion of a labeled lysosome along microtubules in 3D within a live cell. Lysosomes can move with speeds in the range of 0.4-0.5 µm/sec, typically displaying a directed motion along the microtubule network8. PMID:25350070

  13. 3D orbital tracking in a modified two-photon microscope: an application to the tracking of intracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, Andrea; Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this video protocol is to discuss how to perform and analyze a three-dimensional fluorescent orbital particle tracking experiment using a modified two-photon microscope(1). As opposed to conventional approaches (raster scan or wide field based on a stack of frames), the 3D orbital tracking allows to localize and follow with a high spatial (10 nm accuracy) and temporal resolution (50 Hz frequency response) the 3D displacement of a moving fluorescent particle on length-scales of hundreds of microns(2). The method is based on a feedback algorithm that controls the hardware of a two-photon laser scanning microscope in order to perform a circular orbit around the object to be tracked: the feedback mechanism will maintain the fluorescent object in the center by controlling the displacement of the scanning beam(3-5). To demonstrate the advantages of this technique, we followed a fast moving organelle, the lysosome, within a living cell(6,7). Cells were plated according to standard protocols, and stained using a commercially lysosome dye. We discuss briefly the hardware configuration and in more detail the control software, to perform a 3D orbital tracking experiment inside living cells. We discuss in detail the parameters required in order to control the scanning microscope and enable the motion of the beam in a closed orbit around the particle. We conclude by demonstrating how this method can be effectively used to track the fast motion of a labeled lysosome along microtubules in 3D within a live cell. Lysosomes can move with speeds in the range of 0.4-0.5 µm/sec, typically displaying a directed motion along the microtubule network(8).

  14. 3D model-based detection and tracking for space autonomous and uncooperative rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yang; Zhang, Yueqiang; Liu, Haibo

    2015-10-01

    In order to fully navigate using a vision sensor, a 3D edge model based detection and tracking technique was developed. Firstly, we proposed a target detection strategy over a sequence of several images from the 3D model to initialize the tracking. The overall purpose of such approach is to robustly match each image with the model views of the target. Thus we designed a line segment detection and matching method based on the multi-scale space technology. Experiments on real images showed that our method is highly robust under various image changes. Secondly, we proposed a method based on 3D particle filter (PF) coupled with M-estimation to track and estimate the pose of the target efficiently. In the proposed approach, a similarity observation model was designed according to a new distance function of line segments. Then, based on the tracking results of PF, the pose was optimized using M-estimation. Experiments indicated that the proposed method can effectively track and accurately estimate the pose of freely moving target in unconstrained environment.

  15. Holographic microscopy for 3D tracking of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Cho, Yong Bin; El-Kholy, Marwan; Bedrossian, Manuel; Rider, Stephanie; Lindensmith, Christian; Wallace, J. Kent

    2016-03-01

    Understanding when, how, and if bacteria swim is key to understanding critical ecological and biological processes, from carbon cycling to infection. Imaging motility by traditional light microscopy is limited by focus depth, requiring cells to be constrained in z. Holographic microscopy offers an instantaneous 3D snapshot of a large sample volume, and is therefore ideal in principle for quantifying unconstrained bacterial motility. However, resolving and tracking individual cells is difficult due to the low amplitude and phase contrast of the cells; the index of refraction of typical bacteria differs from that of water only at the second decimal place. In this work we present a combination of optical and sample-handling approaches to facilitating bacterial tracking by holographic phase imaging. The first is the design of the microscope, which is an off-axis design with the optics along a common path, which minimizes alignment issues while providing all of the advantages of off-axis holography. Second, we use anti-reflective coated etalon glass in the design of sample chambers, which reduce internal reflections. Improvement seen with the antireflective coating is seen primarily in phase imaging, and its quantification is presented here. Finally, dyes may be used to increase phase contrast according to the Kramers-Kronig relations. Results using three test strains are presented, illustrating the different types of bacterial motility characterized by an enteric organism (Escherichia coli), an environmental organism (Bacillus subtilis), and a marine organism (Vibrio alginolyticus). Data processing steps to increase the quality of the phase images and facilitate tracking are also discussed.

  16. 3D whiteboard: collaborative sketching with 3D-tracked smart phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, James; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the feasibility of a new approach for collaborative drawing in 3D, based on Android smart phones. Our approach utilizes a number of fiduciary markers, placed in the working area where they can be seen by the smart phones' cameras, in order to estimate the pose of each phone in the room. Our prototype allows two users to draw 3D objects with their smart phones by moving their phones around in 3D space. For example, 3D lines are drawn by recording the path of the phone as it is moved around in 3D space, drawing line segments on the screen along the way. Each user can see the virtual drawing space on their smart phones' displays, as if the display was a window into this space. Besides lines, our prototype application also supports 3D geometry creation, geometry transformation operations, and it shows the location of the other user's phone.

  17. Dynamic particle accumulation structure (PAS) in half-zone liquid bridge Reconstruction of particle motion by 3-D PTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, I.; Abe, Y.; Noguchi, K.; Kawamura, H.

    Three-dimensional (3-D) velocity field reconstruction of oscillatory thermocapillary convections in a half-zone liquid bridge with a radius of O (1 mm) was carried out by applying 3-D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Simultaneous observation of the particles suspended in the bridge by two CCD cameras was carried out by placing a small cubic beam splitter above a transparent top rod. The reconstruction of the 3-D trajectories and the velocity fields of the particles in the several types of oscillatory-flow regimes were conducted successfully for sufficiently long period without losing particle tracking. With this application the present authors conducted a series of experiments focusing upon the collapse and re-formation process of the PAS by mechanically disturbing fully developed PAS.

  18. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A new all-electronic Particle Image Velocimetry technique that can efficiently map high speed gas flows has been developed in-house at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Particle Image Velocimetry is an optical technique for measuring the instantaneous two component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flow field. A pulsed laser light sheet is used to illuminate the seed particles entrained in the flow field at two instances in time. One or more charged coupled device (CCD) cameras can be used to record the instantaneous positions of particles. Using the time between light sheet pulses and determining either the individual particle displacements or the average displacement of particles over a small subregion of the recorded image enables the calculation of the fluid velocity. Fuzzy logic minimizes the required operator intervention in identifying particles and computing velocity. Using two cameras that have the same view of the illumination plane yields two single exposure image frames. Two competing techniques that yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single-exposure, multiple image frame data: (1) cross-correlation and (2) particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. For the correlation technique, the correlation peak corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion must be identified. Noise on the images and particle dropout result in misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work, fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true

  19. Particle acceleration at 3D reconnecting magnetic separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare; Stevenson, Julie

    2015-04-01

    We present results of test particle orbit calculations in three different environments which model separator reconnection in three dimensions. The test particle (electron and proton) orbits are calculated using the relativistic guiding centre approximation. We investigate test particle orbits in a time-dependent (analytical) electro-magnetic field configuration [detailed in Threlfall et al. (A&A, in press); arXiv:1410.6465]. These results are also compared with orbits based upon large-scale 3D MHD simulations of both a single reconnecting magnetic separator and an observationally driven 3D model of a solar active region which contains several topological features of interest, including separators. We discuss how the test-particle orbits and the energy gain depend on the initial conditions, and how observations (for example, of solar flares) may be used to constrain model parameters.

  20. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  1. Nanoscale three-dimensional single particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Aurélie; Lamb, Don C.

    2011-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for investigating cellular processes. This review presents recent progress in 3D SPT, from image-based techniques toward more sophisticated feedback approaches. We focus mainly on the feedback technique known as orbital tracking. We present here a modified version of the original orbital tracking in which the intensities from two z-planes are simultaneously measured allowing a concomitant wide-field imaging. The system can track single particles with a precision down to 5 nm in the x-y plane and 7 nm in the axial direction. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated using single virus tracing to follow the infection pathway of Prototype Foamy Virus in living cells.Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for

  2. 3D effects on energetic particle confinement and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Don

    2010-11-01

    Understanding the confinement and stability of energetic particle (EP) populations in 3D magnetic configurations is crucial to the future of all toroidal devices. Tokamaks will have weak symmetry-breaking effects from discrete coils, heterogeneous distributions of ferritic materials and non-symmetric (ELM/RWM) control coils, while stellarators and helical RFP states have dominant 3D features by design. Significant EP issues for 3D systems include: modifications of the plasma equilibrium and potential amplification of field errors, asymmetry enhanced EP losses and their impact both on wall heat loads and the confined EP distribution, 3D modifications to the Alfvén gap and mode structure, and the stability properties of EP-destabilized Alfvén modes. 3D equilibria that resolve localized TBM (test blanket module) asymmetries have now been developed for DIII-D and ITER. Such symmetry breaking leads to enhanced EP losses and focused wall deposition. 3D effects also modify the Alfvén spectrum by increasing the number of possibilities for mode coupling and introducing new gap structures, including the helical and mirror gaps, fine scale ripple-induced gaps and continuum crossing gaps. Improved methods have recently been developed for evaluating these modes and their stability, taking into account the large number of coupled modes and finite orbit width effects. Successful Alfvén mode identifications have been made for a range of stellarators, including W7-AS, LHD, HSX and TJ-II. A comprehensive understanding of energetic particle physics with 3D effects is a necessary prerequisite for wall protection, plasma control and flexibility and for new diagnostic development possibilities in future ignited systems.

  3. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  4. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-03-19

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  5. Tracking tissue section surfaces for automated 3D confocal cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustin, Ramses; Price, Jeffrey H.

    2002-05-01

    Three-dimensional cytometry, whereby large volumes of tissue would be measured automatically, requires a computerized method for detecting the upper and lower tissue boundaries. In conventional confocal microscopy, the user interactively sets limits for axial scanning for each field-of-view. Biological specimens vary in section thickness, thereby driving the requirement for setting vertical scan limits. Limits could be set arbitrarily large to ensure the entire tissue is scanned, but automatic surface identification would eliminate storing undue numbers of empty optical sections and forms the basis for incorporating lateral microscope stage motion to collect unlimited numbers of stacks. This walk-away automation of 3D confocal scanning for biological imaging is the first sep towards practical, computerized statistical sampling from arbitrarily large tissue volumes. Preliminary results for automatic tissue surface tracking were obtained for phase-contrast microscopy by measuring focus sharpness (previously used for high-speed autofocus by our group). Measurements were taken from 5X5 fields-of-view from hamster liver sections, varying from five to twenty microns in thickness, then smoothed to lessen variations of in-focus information at each axial position. Because image sharpness (as the power of high spatial frequency components) drops across the axial boundaries of a tissue section, mathematical quantities including the full-width at half-maximum, extrema in the first derivative, and second derivative were used to locate the proximal and distal surfaces of a tissue. Results from these tests were evaluated against manual (i.e., visual) determination of section boundaries.

  6. On particle track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Gruhn, T. A.; Andrus, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide is widely used to develop charged particle tracks in polycarbonate film, particularly Lexan. The chemical nature of the etching process for this system has been determined. A method employing ultra-violet absorbance was developed for monitoring the concentration of the etch products in solution. Using this method it was possible to study the formation of the etching solution saturated in etch products. It was found that the system super-saturates to a significant extent before precipitation occurs. It was also learned that the system approaches its equilibrium state rather slowly. It is felt that both these phenomena may be due to the presence of surfactant in the solution. In light of these findings, suggestions are given regarding the preparation and maintenance of the saturated etch solution. Two additional research projects, involving automated techniques for particle track analysis and particle identification using AgCl crystals, are briefly summarized.

  7. Multiview 3-D Echocardiography Fusion with Breath-Hold Position Tracking Using an Optical Tracking System.

    PubMed

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Hareendranathan, Abhilash R; McNulty, Alexander; Biamonte, Marina; He, Allen; Noga, Michelle; Boulanger, Pierre; Becher, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in echocardiography allow real-time 3-D dynamic image acquisition of the heart. However, one of the major limitations of 3-D echocardiography is the limited field of view, which results in an acquisition insufficient to cover the whole geometry of the heart. This study proposes the novel approach of fusing multiple 3-D echocardiography images using an optical tracking system that incorporates breath-hold position tracking to infer that the heart remains at the same position during different acquisitions. In six healthy male volunteers, 18 pairs of apical/parasternal 3-D ultrasound data sets were acquired during a single breath-hold as well as in subsequent breath-holds. The proposed method yielded a field of view improvement of 35.4 ± 12.5%. To improve the quality of the fused image, a wavelet-based fusion algorithm was developed that computes pixelwise likelihood values for overlapping voxels from multiple image views. The proposed wavelet-based fusion approach yielded significant improvement in contrast (66.46 ± 21.68%), contrast-to-noise ratio (49.92 ± 28.71%), signal-to-noise ratio (57.59 ± 47.85%) and feature count (13.06 ± 7.44%) in comparison to individual views.

  8. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  9. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to the MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.

  10. Alignment of 3-D optical coherence tomography scans to correct eye movement using a particle filtering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2012-07-01

    Eye movement artifacts occurring during 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning is a well-recognized problem that may adversely affect image analysis and interpretation. A particle filtering algorithm is presented in this paper to correct motion in a 3-D dataset by considering eye movement as a target tracking problem in a dynamic system. The proposed particle filtering algorithm is an independent 3-D alignment approach, which does not rely on any reference image. 3-D OCT data is considered as a dynamic system, while the location of each A-scan is represented by the state space. A particle set is used to approximate the probability density of the state in the dynamic system. The state of the system is updated frame by frame to detect A-scan movement. The proposed method was applied on both simulated data for objective evaluation and experimental data for subjective evaluation. The sensitivity and specificity of the x-movement detection were 98.85% and 99.43%, respectively, in the simulated data. For the experimental data (74 3-D OCT images), all the images were improved after z-alignment, while 81.1% images were improved after x-alignment. The proposed algorithm is an efficient way to align 3-D OCT volume data and correct the eye movement without using references.

  11. Resolution improvement by 3D particle averaging in localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeken, Jordi; Johnson, Hannah; Lidke, Diane S.; Liu, Sheng; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P. J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by recent developments in localization microscopy that applied averaging of identical particles in 2D for increasing the resolution even further, we discuss considerations for alignment (registration) methods for particles in general and for 3D in particular. We detail that traditional techniques for particle registration from cryo electron microscopy based on cross-correlation are not suitable, as the underlying image formation process is fundamentally different. We argue that only localizations, i.e. a set of coordinates with associated uncertainties, are recorded and not a continuous intensity distribution. We present a method that owes to this fact and that is inspired by the field of statistical pattern recognition. In particular we suggest to use an adapted version of the Bhattacharyya distance as a merit function for registration. We evaluate the method in simulations and demonstrate it on 3D super-resolution data of Alexa 647 labelled to the Nup133 protein in the nuclear pore complex of Hela cells. From the simulations we find suggestions that for successful registration the localization uncertainty must be smaller than the distance between labeling sites on a particle. These suggestions are supported by theoretical considerations concerning the attainable resolution in localization microscopy and its scaling behavior as a function of labeling density and localization precision.

  12. Development of a 3D particle treecode for plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Benjamin; Christlieb, Andrew; Krasny, Robert

    2008-11-01

    In this work we present a fully 3-D Boundary Integral Treecode (BIT). We apply the method to several classic problems such as sheath formation and 3D simulations of a Penning trap. In addition, we investigate the ability of the solver to naturally capture Coloumb scattering. A key point in the investigation is to understand the effect of different types of regularizations, and how to appropriately incorporate the regularization in the BIT framework. This work builds on substantial efforts in 1- and 2-D. [1] R. Krasny and K. Lindsay, A particle method and adaptive treecode for vortex sheet motion in 3-D flow, JCP, Vol. 172, No. 2, 879-907 [2] K. Matyash, R. Schneider, R. Sydora, and F. Taccogna, Application of a Grid-Free Kinetic Model to the Collisionless Sheath, Contrib. Plasma Phys, Vol. 48, No. 1-3, 116-120 (2008) [3] K. Cartwright and A. Christlieb, Boundary Integral Corrected Particle in Cell, SIAM Journal on Sci. Comput., submitted [4] A. Christlieb, R. Krasny, B. Ong and J. Qiu, A Step Towards Addressing Temporal Multi-scale Problems in Plasma Physics, in prep.

  13. Tracking single particle rotation: Probing dynamics in four dimensions

    DOE PAGES

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Yu, Yan

    2015-04-29

    Direct visualization and tracking of small particles at high spatial and temporal resolution provides a powerful approach to probing complex dynamics and interactions in chemical and biological processes. Analysis of the rotational dynamics of particles adds a new dimension of information that is otherwise impossible to obtain with conventional 3-D particle tracking. In this review, we survey recent advances in single-particle rotational tracking, with highlights on the rotational tracking of optically anisotropic Janus particles. Furthermore, strengths and weaknesses of the various particle tracking methods, and their applications are discussed.

  14. Flare Particle Escape in 3D Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Masson, Sophie; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Among the most important, but least understood forms of space weather are the so-called Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, which can be especially hazardous to deep-space astronauts. These energetic particles are generally believed to be produced by the flare reconnection that is the primary driver of solar eruptive events (SEE). A key point is that in the standard model of SEEs, the particles should remain trapped in the coronal flare loops and in the ejected plasmoid, the CME. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. In previous 2.5D calculations we showed how the external reconnection that is an essential element of the breakout model for CME initiation could lead to the escape of flare-accelerated particles. The problem, however, is that in 2.5D this reconnection also tends to destroy the plasmoid, which disagrees with the observation that SEP events are often associated with well-defined plasmoids at 1 AU known as “magnetic clouds”. Consequently, we have extended our model to a fully 3D topology that includes a multi-polar coronal field suitable for a breakout SEE near a coronal hole region. We performed high-resolution 3D MHD numerical simulations with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS). Our results demonstrate that the model allows for the effective escape of energetic particles from deep within an ejecting well-defined plasmoid. We show how the complex interactions between the flare and breakout reconnection reproduce all the main observational features of SEEs and SEPs. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions, which will measure SEEs and SEPs near the Sun, thereby, mitigating propagation effects.This research was supported, in part, by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  15. 3D Fluorescent and Reflective Imaging of Whole Stardust Tracks in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2011-11-07

    The NASA Stardust mission returned to earth in 2006 with the cometary collector having captured over 1,000 particles in an aerogel medium at a relative velocity of 6.1 km/s. Particles captured in aerogel were heated, disaggregated and dispersed along 'tracks' or cavities in aerogel, singular tracks representing a history of one capture event. It has been our focus to chemically and morphologically characterize whole tracks in 3-dimensions, utilizing solely non-destructive methods. To this end, we have used a variety of methods: 3D Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM), synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF), and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD). In the past months we have developed two new techniques to aid in data collection. (1) We have received a new confocal microscope which has enabled autofluorescent and spectral imaging of aerogel samples. (2) We have developed a stereo-SXRF technique to chemically identify large grains in SXRF maps in 3-space. The addition of both of these methods to our analytic abilities provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms and results of track formation.

  16. 3-D Flow Field Diagnostics and Validation Studies using Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung Stephen; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of 3-D three-component velocity fields is of great importance in both ground and space experiments for understanding materials processing and fluid physics. Here, we present the investigation results of stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) for measuring 3-D velocity fields. The effort includes diagnostic technology development, experimental velocity measurement, and comparison with analytical and numerical computation. The advantages of STV stems from the system simplicity for building compact hardware and in software efficiency for continual near-real-time process monitoring. It also has illumination flexibility for observing volumetric flow fields from arbitrary directions. STV is based on stereoscopic CCD observations of particles seeded in a flow. Neural networks are used for data analysis. The developed diagnostic tool is tested with a simple directional solidification apparatus using Succinonitrile. The 3-D velocity field in the liquid phase is measured and compared with results from detailed numerical computations. Our theoretical, numerical, and experimental effort has shown STV to be a viable candidate for reliably quantifying the 3-D flow field in materials processing and fluids experiments.

  17. Micromagnetic investigation of low-symmetry 3D particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowicz, T.; Ehrmann, A.

    2017-02-01

    Investigating the anisotropies of magnetic nanoparticles is crucial for further development of magnetic data storage media, MRAM, magnetic logical circuits, or magnetic quantum cellular automata. Former theoretical and experimental examinations have revealed the possibility to gain highly symmetric nanoparticles with increased numbers of magnetic states per storage element. In a recent project, we have investigated low-symmetry T-shaped 2D and 3D particles from iron using the micromagnetic simulation software MAGPAR which is based on solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation of motion for a mesh built from tetrahedral finite elements. To examine the influence of the reduced symmetry, simulations were performed on the 3D double-T particle with the field applied in different directions in the x-y base plane, ranging from 0 to 180° in 5° steps. Additionally, the external magnetic field was rotated laterally under different angles with respect to the x-y plane, i.e. 5°, 22.5°, and 45°. Similar simulations were executed for the 2D single-T particle. Our results show the strong impact of the shape anisotropy and the respective possibility to tailor magnetic anisotropies according to the desired behaviour by modifying the nanoparticles’ form.

  18. Real Time 3D Facial Movement Tracking Using a Monocular Camera

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yanchao; Wang, Yanming; Yue, Jiguang; Hu, Zhencheng

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a robust framework for 3D facial movement tracking in real time using a monocular camera. It is designed to estimate the 3D face pose and local facial animation such as eyelid movement and mouth movement. The framework firstly utilizes the Discriminative Shape Regression method to locate the facial feature points on the 2D image and fuses the 2D data with a 3D face model using Extended Kalman Filter to yield 3D facial movement information. An alternating optimizing strategy is adopted to fit to different persons automatically. Experiments show that the proposed framework could track the 3D facial movement across various poses and illumination conditions. Given the real face scale the framework could track the eyelid with an error of 1 mm and mouth with an error of 2 mm. The tracking result is reliable for expression analysis or mental state inference. PMID:27463714

  19. Optimizing Stellarators for Energetic Particle Confinement using BEAMS3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolgert, Peter; Drevlak, Michael; Lazerson, Sam; Gates, David; White, Roscoe

    2015-11-01

    Energetic particle (EP) loss has been called the ``Achilles heel of stellarators,'' (Helander, Rep. Prog. Phys. 77 087001 (2014)) and there is a great need for magnetic configurations with improved EP confinement. In this study we utilize a newly developed capability of the stellarator optimization code STELLOPT: the ability to optimize EP confinement via an interface with guiding center code BEAMS3D (McMillan et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56, 095019 (2014)). Using this new tool, optimizations of the W7-X experiment and ARIES-CS reactor are performed where the EP loss fraction is one of many target functions to be minimized. In W7-X, we simulate the experimental NBI system using realistic beam geometry and beam deposition physics. The goal is to find configurations with improved neutral beam deposition and energetic particle confinement. These calculations are compared to previous studies of W7-X NBI deposition. In ARIES-CS, we launch 3.5 MeV alpha particles from a near-axis flux surface using a uniform grid in toroidal and poloidal angle. As these particles are born from D-T reactions, we consider an isotropic distribution in velocity space. This research is supported by DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. High resolution 3D insider detection and tracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cynthia Lee

    2003-09-01

    Vulnerability analysis studies show that one of the worst threats against a facility is that of an active insider during an emergency evacuation. When a criticality or other emergency alarm occurs, employees immediately proceed along evacuation routes to designated areas. Procedures are then implemented to account for all material, classified parts, etc. The 3-Dimensional Video Motion Detection (3DVMD) technology could be used to detect and track possible insider activities during alarm situations, as just described, as well as during normal operating conditions. The 3DVMD technology uses multiple cameras to create 3-dimensional detection volumes or zones. Movement throughout detection zones is tracked and high-level information, such as the number of people and their direction of motion, is extracted. In the described alarm scenario, deviances of evacuation procedures taken by an individual could be immediately detected and relayed to a central alarm station. The insider could be tracked and any protected items removed from the area could be flagged. The 3DVMD technology could also be used to monitor such items as machines that are used to build classified parts. During an alarm, detections could be made if items were removed from the machine. Overall, the use of 3DVMD technology during emergency evacuations would help to prevent the loss of classified items and would speed recovery from emergency situations. Further security could also be added by analyzing tracked behavior (motion) as it corresponds to predicted behavior, e.g., behavior corresponding with the execution of required procedures. This information would be valuable for detecting a possible insider not only during emergency situations, but also during times of normal operation.

  1. 3-D Particle Simulation of Current Sheet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) instabilities of a Harris current sheet are investigated using a 3-D linearized (δf) gyrokinetic (GK) electron and fully kinetic (FK) ion (GeFi) particle simulation code. The equilibrium magnetic field consists of an asymptotic anti-parallel Bx 0 and a guide field BG. The ES simulations show the excitation of lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) at the current sheet edge. The growth rate of the 3-D LHDI is scanned through the (kx ,ky) space. The most unstable modes are found to be at k∥ = 0 for smaller ky. As ky increases, the growth rate shows two peaks at k∥ ≠ 0 , consistent with analytical GK theory. The eigenmode structure and growth rate of LHDI obtained from the GeFi simulation agree well with those obtained from the FK PIC simulation. Decreasing BG, the asymptotic βe 0, or background density can destabilize the LHDI. In the EM simulation, tearing mode instability is dominant in the cases with ky kx , there exist two unstable modes: a kink-like (LHDI) mode at the current sheet edge and a sausage-like mode at the sheet center. The results are compared with the GK eigenmode theory and the FK simulation.

  2. On 3D reconstruction of bubbles in volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, A.; Sahagian, D.; Mulukutla, G.; Kiely, C.

    2007-12-01

    Bubbles in volcanic ash particles are primarily represented by the remnants of films and plateau borders from disrupting foam. Without preservation of complete bubbles, measuring bubble size distributions a challenging task, but one for which we have taken a novel approach. Concavities in ash particles retain a record of bubble sizes in the curvature of their concave surfaces that resulted from bubble fragmentation and quenching during energetic magma eruptions. We have used two methods to measure bubble fragment curvature on the basis of 3D reconstruction of ash particle surfaces. One is based on High Resolution X-Ray Tomography (HRXRT) and the second one is based on stereo images from tilting Scattered Electron Microscopy (SEM). Both methods allow the creation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) datasets of the ash particle surfaces which in turn are used to identify and measure vertical cross-sectional profiles of the individual bubble fragments ("craters"). Function fit analysis for circular or elliptical functions are applied to each bubble cross sectional profile in two orthogonal directions to reconstruct sizes of the original, complete bubbles. The method allows measurement of submicron (SEM; XUM), micron or larger (HRXRT) bubbles in ash particles. The bubble size distributions so obtained can provide valuable insights regarding magma dynamics and vesiculation that lead to explosive eruptions, as well as the processes of fragmentation in eruption columns. There are no previous systematic information/databases of vesiculation metrics for explosive silicic eruptions, but this new method can be used to produce these and thus provide better insights into prehistoric eruption styles for volcanic hazard assessment.

  3. 3D Lagrangian Model of Particle Saltation in an Open Channel Flow with Emphasis on Particle-Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    -dimensional (HR3D) velocity field can be used as a representation of near bed open-channel flows. Both approaches are used to simulate saltating sediment particles using a 3D Lagrangian particle tracking model. This tracking model is composed by generalized sub-models for particle collision with the bed, bed-roughness representation, and particle free-flight between wall collisions. We analyze the hydrodynamic forces (drag, virtual mass, lift, Basset, Magnus and buoyancy) involved in particle saltation. For validation purposes, we compare our simulation results with experimental data from Niño and García (1998) and Lee and Hsu (1994). Finally we use the logarithmic velocity profile to analyze the importance of particle-particle collision using a sub-model based on the conservation of linear and angular momentum during collision. We analyze simulation results with different particle sizes within the sand range, different flow intensities, and different particle concentrations, in terms of particle diffusion and changes in velocity, rotation and trajectory during collision. To identify the importance of particle-particle collisions, simulations with and without collision among particles were carried out.

  4. Tracking 3-D body motion for docking and robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donath, M.; Sorensen, B.; Yang, G. B.; Starr, R.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced method of tracking three-dimensional motion of bodies has been developed. This system has the potential to dynamically characterize machine and other structural motion, even in the presence of structural flexibility, thus facilitating closed loop structural motion control. The system's operation is based on the concept that the intersection of three planes defines a point. Three rotating planes of laser light, fixed and moving photovoltaic diode targets, and a pipe-lined architecture of analog and digital electronics are used to locate multiple targets whose number is only limited by available computer memory. Data collection rates are a function of the laser scan rotation speed and are currently selectable up to 480 Hz. The tested performance on a preliminary prototype designed for 0.1 in accuracy (for tracking human motion) at a 480 Hz data rate includes a worst case resolution of 0.8 mm (0.03 inches), a repeatability of plus or minus 0.635 mm (plus or minus 0.025 inches), and an absolute accuracy of plus or minus 2.0 mm (plus or minus 0.08 inches) within an eight cubic meter volume with all results applicable at the 95 percent level of confidence along each coordinate region. The full six degrees of freedom of a body can be computed by attaching three or more target detectors to the body of interest.

  5. Ultra-Wideband Time-Difference-of-Arrival High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dekome, Kent; Dusl, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a research and development effort for a prototype ultra-wideband (UWB) tracking system that is currently under development at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The system is being studied for use in tracking of lunar./Mars rovers and astronauts during early exploration missions when satellite navigation systems are not available. U IATB impulse radio (UWB-IR) technology is exploited in the design and implementation of the prototype location and tracking system. A three-dimensional (3D) proximity tracking prototype design using commercially available UWB products is proposed to implement the Time-Difference- Of-Arrival (TDOA) tracking methodology in this research effort. The TDOA tracking algorithm is utilized for location estimation in the prototype system, not only to exploit the precise time resolution possible with UWB signals, but also to eliminate the need for synchronization between the transmitter and the receiver. Simulations show that the TDOA algorithm can achieve the fine tracking resolution with low noise TDOA estimates for close-in tracking. Field tests demonstrated that this prototype UWB TDOA High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System is feasible for providing positioning-awareness information in a 3D space to a robotic control system. This 3D tracking system is developed for a robotic control system in a facility called "Moonyard" at Honeywell Defense & System in Arizona under a Space Act Agreement.

  6. Defense Additive Manufacturing: DOD Needs to Systematically Track Department-wide 3D Printing Efforts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Clip Additively Manufactured • The Navy installed a 3D printer aboard the USS Essex to demonstrate the ability to additively develop and produce...desired result and vision to have the capability on the fleet. These officials stated that the Navy plans to install 3D printers on two additional...DEFENSE ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING DOD Needs to Systematically Track Department-wide 3D Printing Efforts Report to

  7. Vision-Based 3D Motion Estimation for On-Orbit Proximity Satellite Tracking and Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    printed using the Fortus 400mc 3D rapid- prototyping printer of the NPS Space Systems Academic Group, while the internal structure is made of aluminum...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited VISION-BASED 3D ...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE VISION-BASED 3D MOTION ESTIMATION FOR ON-ORBIT PROXIMITY SATELLITE TRACKING

  8. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate.

    PubMed

    Trache, Tudor; Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values.

  9. Improving z-tracking accuracy in the two-photon single-particle tracking microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Y.-L.; Perillo, E. P.; Jiang, N.; Dunn, A. K.; Yeh, H.-C.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present a method that can improve the z-tracking accuracy of the recently invented TSUNAMI (Tracking of Single particles Using Nonlinear And Multiplexed Illumination) microscope. This method utilizes a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to determine the particle's 3D position that maximizes the likelihood of the observed time-correlated photon count distribution. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the MLE-based tracking scheme can improve the z-tracking accuracy of TSUNAMI microscope by 1.7 fold. In addition, MLE is also found to reduce the temporal correlation of the z-tracking error. Taking advantage of the smaller and less temporally correlated z-tracking error, we have precisely recovered the hybridization-melting kinetics of a DNA model system from thousands of short single-particle trajectories in silico. Our method can be generally applied to other 3D single-particle tracking techniques.

  10. Improving z-tracking accuracy in the two-photon single-particle tracking microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Liu, Y.-L.; Perillo, E. P.; Jiang, N.; Dunn, A. K. E-mail: tim.yeh@austin.utexas.edu; Yeh, H.-C. E-mail: tim.yeh@austin.utexas.edu

    2015-10-12

    Here, we present a method that can improve the z-tracking accuracy of the recently invented TSUNAMI (Tracking of Single particles Using Nonlinear And Multiplexed Illumination) microscope. This method utilizes a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to determine the particle's 3D position that maximizes the likelihood of the observed time-correlated photon count distribution. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the MLE-based tracking scheme can improve the z-tracking accuracy of TSUNAMI microscope by 1.7 fold. In addition, MLE is also found to reduce the temporal correlation of the z-tracking error. Taking advantage of the smaller and less temporally correlated z-tracking error, we have precisely recovered the hybridization-melting kinetics of a DNA model system from thousands of short single-particle trajectories in silico. Our method can be generally applied to other 3D single-particle tracking techniques.

  11. Head Tracking for 3D Audio Using a GPS-Aided MEMS IMU

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Aircraft, Directional Signals, GPS/INS Fusion , GPS/INS Integration, Head Tracking Systems, IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit), Inertial Sensors, MEMS...HEAD TRACKING FOR 3D AUDIO USING A GPS-AIDED MEMS IMU THESIS Jacque M. Joffrion, Captain, USAF AFIT/GE/ENG/05-09 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR...the United States Government. AFIT/GE/ENG/05-09 HEAD TRACKING FOR 3D AUDIO USING A GPS-AIDED MEMS IMU THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the Department

  12. 3D model-based catheter tracking for motion compensation in EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment by radio-frequency catheter ablation, performed using fluoroscopic image guidance, is gaining increasingly more importance. Two-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation can take advantage of overlay images derived from pre-operative 3-D data to add anatomical details otherwise not visible under X-ray. Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of these static overlay images for catheter navigation. We developed an approach for image-based 3-D motion compensation as a solution to this problem. A bi-plane C-arm system is used to take X-ray images of a special circumferential mapping catheter from two directions. In the first step of the method, a 3-D model of the device is reconstructed. Three-dimensional respiratory motion at the site of ablation is then estimated by tracking the reconstructed catheter model in 3-D. This step involves bi-plane fluoroscopy and 2-D/3-D registration. Phantom data and clinical data were used to assess our model-based catheter tracking method. Experiments involving a moving heart phantom yielded an average 2-D tracking error of 1.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 1.1 mm. Our evaluation of clinical data sets comprised 469 bi-plane fluoroscopy frames (938 monoplane fluoroscopy frames). We observed an average 2-D tracking error of 1.0 mm +/- 0.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 0.8 mm +/- 0.5 mm. These results demonstrate that model-based motion-compensation based on 2-D/3-D registration is both feasible and accurate.

  13. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    DOE PAGES

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to themore » MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.« less

  14. 3D-printed concentrators for tracking-integrated CPV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostoleris, Harry; Leland, Julian; Chiesa, Matteo; Stefancich, Marco

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate 3D-printed nonimaging concentrators and propose a tracking integration scheme to reduce the external tracking requirements of CPV modules. In the proposed system, internal sun tracking is achieved by rotation of the mini-concentrators inside the module by small motors. We discuss the design principles employed in the development of the system, experimentally evaluate the performance of the concentrator prototypes, and propose practical modifications that may be made to improve on-site performance of the devices.

  15. Explicit 3D continuum fracture modeling with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.

    1993-01-01

    Impact phenomena shaped our solar system. As usual for most solar system processes, the scales are far different than we can address directly in the laboratory. Impact velocities are often much higher than we can achieve, sizes are often vastly larger, and most impacts take place in an environment where the only gravitational force is the mutual pull of the impactors. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique has been applied in the past to the simulations of giant impacts. In these simulations, the colliding objects were so massive (at least a sizeable fraction of the Earth's mass) that material strength was negligible compared to gravity. This assumption can no longer be made when the bodies are much smaller. To this end, we have developed a 3D SPH code that includes a strength model to which we have added a von Mises yielding relation for stresses beyond the Hugoniot Elastic Limit. At the lower stresses associated with brittle failure, we use a rate-dependent strength based on the nucleation of incipient flaws whose number density is given by a Weibull distribution. Following Grady and Kipp and Melosh et al., we introduce a state variable D ('damage'), 0 less than D less than 1, which expresses the local reduction in strength due to crack growth under tensile loading. Unfortunately for the hydrodynamics, Grady and Kipp's model predicts which fragments are the most probable ones and not the ones that are really formed. This means, for example, that if a given laboratory experiment is modeled, the fragment distribution obtained from the Grady-Kipp theory would be equivalent to a ensemble average over many realizations of the experiment. On the other hand, the hydrodynamics itself is explicit and evolves not an ensemble average but very specific fragments. Hence, there is a clear incompatibility with the deterministic nature of the hydrodynamics equations and the statistical approach of the Grady-Kipp dynamical fracture model. We remedy these shortcomings

  16. Eulerian and Lagrangian methods for vortex tracking in 2D and 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2014-11-01

    Coherent structures are a key component of unsteady flows in shear layers. Improvement of experimental techniques has led to larger amounts of data and requires of automated procedures for vortex tracking. Many vortex criteria are Eulerian, and identify the structures by an instantaneous local swirling motion in the field, which are indicated by closed or spiral streamlines or pathlines in a reference frame. Alternatively, a Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) analysis is a Lagrangian method based on the quantities calculated along fluid particle trajectories. In the current work, vortex detection is demonstrated on data from the simulation of two cases: a 2D flow with a flat plate undergoing a 45 ° pitch-up maneuver and a 3D wall-bounded turbulence channel flow. Vortices are visualized and tracked by their centers and boundaries using Γ1, the Q criterion, and LCS saddle points. In the cases of 2D flow, saddle points trace showed a rapid acceleration of the structure which indicates the shedding from the plate. For channel flow, saddle points trace shows that average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a function of wall-normal distance as the mean velocity profile, and leads to statistical quantities of vortex dynamics. Dr. Jeff Eldredge and his research group at UCLA are gratefully acknowledged for sharing the database of simulation for the current research. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0210.

  17. Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking system applied to aquatic predator-prey interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2013-02-01

    Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking are combined to measure evolving volumetric velocity fields and organism trajectories during aquatic predator-prey interactions. The technique was used to study zebrafish foraging on both non-evasive and evasive prey species. Measurement volumes of 22.5 mm × 10.5 mm × 12 mm were reconstructed from images captured on a set of four high-speed cameras. To obtain accurate fluid velocity vectors within each volume, fish were first masked out using an automated visual hull method. Fish and prey locations were identified independently from the same image sets and tracked separately within the measurement volume. Experiments demonstrated that fish were not influenced by the infrared laser illumination or the tracer particles. Results showed that the zebrafish used different strategies, suction and ram feeding, for successful capture of non-evasive and evasive prey, respectively. The two strategies yielded different variations in fluid velocity between the fish mouth and the prey. In general, the results suggest that the local flow field, the direction of prey locomotion with respect to the predator and the relative accelerations and speeds of the predator and prey may all be significant in determining predation success.

  18. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  19. Fuzzy logic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic has proven to be a simple and robust method for process control. Instead of requiring a complex model of the system, a user defined rule base is used to control the process. In this paper the principles of fuzzy logic control are applied to Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Two frames of digitally recorded, single exposure particle imagery are used as input. The fuzzy processor uses the local particle displacement information to determine the correct particle tracks. Fuzzy PTV is an improvement over traditional PTV techniques which typically require a sequence (greater than 2) of image frames for accurately tracking particles. The fuzzy processor executes in software on a PC without the use of specialized array or fuzzy logic processors. A pair of sample input images with roughly 300 particle images each, results in more than 200 velocity vectors in under 8 seconds of processing time.

  20. 3D tracking of mating events in wild swarms of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Butail, Sachit; Manoukis, Nicholas; Diallo, Moussa; Yaro, Alpha S; Dao, Adama; Traoré, Sekou F; Ribeiro, José M; Lehmann, Tovi; Paley, Derek A

    2011-01-01

    We describe an automated tracking system that allows us to reconstruct the 3D kinematics of individual mosquitoes in swarms of Anopheles gambiae. The inputs to the tracking system are video streams recorded from a stereo camera system. The tracker uses a two-pass procedure to automatically localize and track mosquitoes within the swarm. A human-in-the-loop step verifies the estimates and connects broken tracks. The tracker performance is illustrated using footage of mating events filmed in Mali in August 2010.

  1. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taute, K. M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S. J.; Shimizu, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments.

  2. Optimal Local Searching for Fast and Robust Textureless 3D Object Tracking in Highly Cluttered Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byung-Kuk; Park, Jong-Il; Hinterstoisser, Stefan; Ilic, Slobodan

    2013-06-13

    Edge-based tracking is a fast and plausible approach for textureless 3D object tracking, but its robustness is still very challenging in highly cluttered backgrounds due to numerous local minima. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel method for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds. The proposed method is based on optimal local searching of 3D-2D correspondences between a known 3D object model and 2D scene edges in an image with heavy background clutter. In our searching scheme, searching regions are partitioned into three levels (interior, contour, and exterior) with respect to the previous object region, and confident searching directions are determined by evaluating candidates of correspondences on their region levels; thus, the correspondences are searched among likely candidates in only the confident directions instead of searching through all candidates. To ensure the confident searching direction, we also adopt the region appearance, which is efficiently modeled on a newly defined local space (called a searching bundle). Experimental results and performance evaluations demonstrate that our method fully supports fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking even in highly cluttered backgrounds.

  3. Optimal local searching for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byung-Kuk; Park, Hanhoon; Park, Jong-Il; Hinterstoisser, Stefan; Ilic, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Edge-based tracking is a fast and plausible approach for textureless 3D object tracking, but its robustness is still very challenging in highly cluttered backgrounds due to numerous local minima. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel method for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds. The proposed method is based on optimal local searching of 3D-2D correspondences between a known 3D object model and 2D scene edges in an image with heavy background clutter. In our searching scheme, searching regions are partitioned into three levels (interior, contour, and exterior) with respect to the previous object region, and confident searching directions are determined by evaluating candidates of correspondences on their region levels; thus, the correspondences are searched among likely candidates in only the confident directions instead of searching through all candidates. To ensure the confident searching direction, we also adopt the region appearance, which is efficiently modeled on a newly defined local space (called a searching bundle). Experimental results and performance evaluations demonstrate that our method fully supports fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking even in highly cluttered backgrounds.

  4. Improving segmentation of 3D touching cell nuclei using flow tracking on surface meshes.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of touching cell nuclei in 3D microscopy images is of great importance in bioimage informatics and computational biology. This paper presents a novel method for improving 3D touching cell nuclei segmentation. Given binary touching nuclei by the method in Li et al. (2007), our method herein consists of several steps: surface mesh reconstruction and curvature information estimation; direction field diffusion on surface meshes; flow tracking on surface meshes; and projection of surface mesh segmentation to volumetric images. The method is validated on both synthesised and real 3D touching cell nuclei images, demonstrating its validity and effectiveness.

  5. Detailed Evaluation of Five 3D Speckle Tracking Algorithms Using Synthetic Echocardiographic Recordings.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Martino; Heyde, Brecht; Queiros, Sandro; Cygan, Szymon; Zontak, Maria; Somphone, Oudom; Bernard, Olivier; Sermesant, Maxime; Delingette, Herve; Barbosa, Daniel; De Craene, Mathieu; ODonnell, Matthew; Dhooge, Jan

    2016-08-01

    A plethora of techniques for cardiac deformation imaging with 3D ultrasound, typically referred to as 3D speckle tracking techniques, are available from academia and industry. Although the benefits of single methods over alternative ones have been reported in separate publications, the intrinsic differences in the data and definitions used makes it hard to compare the relative performance of different solutions. To address this issue, we have recently proposed a framework to simulate realistic 3D echocardiographic recordings and used it to generate a common set of ground-truth data for 3D speckle tracking algorithms, which was made available online. The aim of this study was therefore to use the newly developed database to contrast non-commercial speckle tracking solutions from research groups with leading expertise in the field. The five techniques involved cover the most representative families of existing approaches, namely block-matching, radio-frequency tracking, optical flow and elastic image registration. The techniques were contrasted in terms of tracking and strain accuracy. The feasibility of the obtained strain measurements to diagnose pathology was also tested for ischemia and dyssynchrony.

  6. Design and Performance Evaluation on Ultra-Wideband Time-Of-Arrival 3D Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Dusl, John

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Time--of-Arrival (TOA) tracking system has been studied at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to provide the tracking capability inside the International Space Station (ISS) modules for various applications. One of applications is to locate and report the location where crew experienced possible high level of carbon-dioxide and felt upset. In order to accurately locate those places in a multipath intensive environment like ISS modules, it requires a robust real-time location system (RTLS) which can provide the required accuracy and update rate. A 3D UWB TOA tracking system with two-way ranging has been proposed and studied. The designed system will be tested in the Wireless Habitat Testbed which simulates the ISS module environment. In this presentation, we discuss the 3D TOA tracking algorithm and the performance evaluation based on different tracking baseline configurations. The simulation results show that two configurations of the tracking baseline are feasible. With 100 picoseconds standard deviation (STD) of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.2392 feet (about 7 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Twisted Rectangle while the average tracking error 0.9183 feet (about 28 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Slightly-Twisted Top Rectangle . The tracking accuracy can be further improved with the improvement of the STD of TOA estimates. With 10 picoseconds STD of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.0239 feet (less than 1 centimeter) can be achieved for configuration "Twisted Rectangle".

  7. 3-D PARTICLE TRANSPORT WITHIN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study trajectories of inhaled particulate matter (PM) were simulated within a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the human upper respiratory tract (URT). The airways were described by computer-reconstructed images of a silicone rubber cast of the human head, throat...

  8. The BaBar Level 1 Drift-Chamber Trigger Upgrade With 3D Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, X.D.; /Iowa U.

    2005-11-29

    At BABAR, the Level 1 Drift Chamber trigger is being upgraded to reduce increasing background rates while the PEP-II luminosity keeps improving. This upgrade uses the drift time information and stereo wires in the drift chamber to perform a 3D track reconstruction that effectively rejects background events spread out along the beam line.

  9. A Microscopic Optically Tracking Navigation System That Uses High-resolution 3D Computer Graphics.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Masanori; Saito, Toki; Kin, Taichi; Nakagawa, Daichi; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics (CG) are useful for preoperative planning of neurosurgical operations. However, application of 3D CG to intraoperative navigation is not widespread because existing commercial operative navigation systems do not show 3D CG in sufficient detail. We have developed a microscopic optically tracking navigation system that uses high-resolution 3D CG. This article presents the technical details of our microscopic optically tracking navigation system. Our navigation system consists of three components: the operative microscope, registration, and the image display system. An optical tracker was attached to the microscope to monitor the position and attitude of the microscope in real time; point-pair registration was used to register the operation room coordinate system, and the image coordinate system; and the image display system showed the 3D CG image in the field-of-view of the microscope. Ten neurosurgeons (seven males, two females; mean age 32.9 years) participated in an experiment to assess the accuracy of this system using a phantom model. Accuracy of our system was compared with the commercial system. The 3D CG provided by the navigation system coincided well with the operative scene under the microscope. Target registration error for our system was 2.9 ± 1.9 mm. Our navigation system provides a clear image of the operation position and the surrounding structures. Systems like this may reduce intraoperative complications.

  10. Moving Human Path Tracking Based on Video Surveillance in 3d Indoor Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Zlatanova, Sisi; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yeting; Liu, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Video surveillance systems are increasingly used for a variety of 3D indoor applications. We can analyse human behaviour, discover and avoid crowded areas, monitor human traffic and so forth. In this paper we concentrate on use of surveillance cameras to track and reconstruct the path a person has followed. For the purpose we integrated video surveillance data with a 3D indoor model of the building and develop a single human moving path tracking method. We process the surveillance videos to detected single human moving traces; then we match the depth information of 3D scenes to the constructed 3D indoor network model and define the human traces in the 3D indoor space. Finally, the single human traces extracted from multiple cameras are connected with the help of the connectivity provided by the 3D network model. Using this approach, we can reconstruct the entire walking path. The provided experiments with a single person have verified the effectiveness and robustness of the method.

  11. A full-parallax 3D display with restricted viewing zone tracking viewer's eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beppu, Naoto; Yendo, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    The Three-Dimensional (3D) vision became widely known as familiar imaging technique now. The 3D display has been put into practical use in various fields, such as entertainment and medical fields. Development of 3D display technology will play an important role in a wide range of fields. There are various ways to the method of displaying 3D image. There is one of the methods that showing 3D image method to use the ray reproduction and we focused on it. This method needs many viewpoint images when achieve a full-parallax because this method display different viewpoint image depending on the viewpoint. We proposed to reduce wasteful rays by limiting projector's ray emitted to around only viewer using a spinning mirror, and to increase effectiveness of display device to achieve a full-parallax 3D display. We propose a method by using a tracking viewer's eye, a high-speed projector, a rotating mirror that tracking viewer (a spinning mirror), a concave mirror array having the different vertical slope arranged circumferentially (a concave mirror array), a cylindrical mirror. About proposed method in simulation, we confirmed the scanning range and the locus of the movement in the horizontal direction of the ray. In addition, we confirmed the switching of the viewpoints and convergence performance in the vertical direction of rays. Therefore, we confirmed that it is possible to realize a full-parallax.

  12. Handling Motion-Blur in 3D Tracking and Rendering for Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngmin; Lepetit, Vincent; Woo, Woontack

    2012-09-01

    The contribution of this paper is two-fold. First, we show how to extend the ESM algorithm to handle motion blur in 3D object tracking. ESM is a powerful algorithm for template matching-based tracking, but it can fail under motion blur. We introduce an image formation model that explicitly consider the possibility of blur, and shows its results in a generalization of the original ESM algorithm. This allows to converge faster, more accurately and more robustly even under large amount of blur. Our second contribution is an efficient method for rendering the virtual objects under the estimated motion blur. It renders two images of the object under 3D perspective, and warps them to create many intermediate images. By fusing these images we obtain a final image for the virtual objects blurred consistently with the captured image. Because warping is much faster than 3D rendering, we can create realistically blurred images at a very low computational cost.

  13. Mesoscopic in vivo 3-D tracking of sparse cell populations using angular multiplexed optical projection tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingling; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Kumar, Sunil; Andrews, Natalie; Dallman, Margaret J; French, Paul M W; McGinty, James

    2015-04-01

    We describe an angular multiplexed imaging technique for 3-D in vivo cell tracking of sparse cell distributions and optical projection tomography (OPT) with superior time-lapse resolution and a significantly reduced light dose compared to volumetric time-lapse techniques. We demonstrate that using dual axis OPT, where two images are acquired simultaneously at different projection angles, can enable localization and tracking of features in 3-D with a time resolution equal to the camera frame rate. This is achieved with a 200x reduction in light dose compared to an equivalent volumetric time-lapse single camera OPT acquisition with 200 projection angles. We demonstrate the application of this technique to mapping the 3-D neutrophil migration pattern observed over ~25.5 minutes in a live 2 day post-fertilisation transgenic LysC:GFP zebrafish embryo following a tail wound.

  14. Surveillance, detection, and 3D infrared tracking of bullets, rockets, mortars, and artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Daniel H.; Hyman, Howard; Moore, Fritz; Squire, Mark D.

    2001-09-01

    We describe test results using the FIRST (Fast InfraRed Sniper Tracker) to detect, track, and range to bullets in flight for determining the location of the bullet launch point. The technology developed for the FIRST system can be used to provide detection and accurate 3D track data for other small threat objects including rockets, mortars, and artillery in addition to bullets. We discuss the radiometry and detection range for these objects, and discuss the trade-offs involved in design of the very fast optical system for acquisition, tracking, and ranging of these targets.

  15. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Jørgensen, Morten R.; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Roed, Bjarne; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-02-01

    Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light with a DLP projector and a CCD camera is set up on a model of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT). Methods to reconstruct 3D point clouds of simple surfaces based on phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) are demonstrated. The projector and camera are calibrated using a simple stereo vision procedure where the projector is treated as a camera. Additionally, the surface reconstructions are corrected for the non-linear projector output prior to image capture. The results are convincing and a first step toward a fully automated tracking system for measuring head motions in PET imaging.

  16. Particle-Vortex Duality from 3D Bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, Andreas; Tong, David

    2016-07-01

    We show how particle-vortex duality in d =2 +1 dimensions arises as part of an intricate web of relationships between different field theories. The starting point is "bosonization," a conjectured duality that uses flux attachment to transmute the statistics of relativistic particles. From this seed, we derive many old and new dualities. These include particle-vortex duality for bosons as well as the recently discovered counterpart for fermions.

  17. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  18. Eye Tracking to Explore the Impacts of Photorealistic 3d Representations in Pedstrian Navigation Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Weihua; Liao, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Despite the now-ubiquitous two-dimensional (2D) maps, photorealistic three-dimensional (3D) representations of cities (e.g., Google Earth) have gained much attention by scientists and public users as another option. However, there is no consistent evidence on the influences of 3D photorealism on pedestrian navigation. Whether 3D photorealism can communicate cartographic information for navigation with higher effectiveness and efficiency and lower cognitive workload compared to the traditional symbolic 2D maps remains unknown. This study aims to explore whether the photorealistic 3D representation can facilitate processes of map reading and navigation in digital environments using a lab-based eye tracking approach. Here we show the differences of symbolic 2D maps versus photorealistic 3D representations depending on users' eye-movement and navigation behaviour data. We found that the participants using the 3D representation were less effective, less efficient and were required higher cognitive workload than using the 2D map for map reading. However, participants using the 3D representation performed more efficiently in self-localization and orientation at the complex decision points. The empirical results can be helpful to improve the usability of pedestrian navigation maps in future designs.

  19. Fusing inertial sensor data in an extended Kalman filter for 3D camera tracking.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Arif Tanju; Ercan, Ali Özer

    2015-02-01

    In a setup where camera measurements are used to estimate 3D egomotion in an extended Kalman filter (EKF) framework, it is well-known that inertial sensors (i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes) are especially useful when the camera undergoes fast motion. Inertial sensor data can be fused at the EKF with the camera measurements in either the correction stage (as measurement inputs) or the prediction stage (as control inputs). In general, only one type of inertial sensor is employed in the EKF in the literature, or when both are employed they are both fused in the same stage. In this paper, we provide an extensive performance comparison of every possible combination of fusing accelerometer and gyroscope data as control or measurement inputs using the same data set collected at different motion speeds. In particular, we compare the performances of different approaches based on 3D pose errors, in addition to camera reprojection errors commonly found in the literature, which provides further insight into the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. We show using both simulated and real data that it is always better to fuse both sensors in the measurement stage and that in particular, accelerometer helps more with the 3D position tracking accuracy, whereas gyroscope helps more with the 3D orientation tracking accuracy. We also propose a simulated data generation method, which is beneficial for the design and validation of tracking algorithms involving both camera and inertial measurement unit measurements in general.

  20. Alignment of 3D Building Models and TIR Video Sequences with Line Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaszczuk, D.; Stilla, U.

    2014-11-01

    Thermal infrared imagery of urban areas became interesting for urban climate investigations and thermal building inspections. Using a flying platform such as UAV or a helicopter for the acquisition and combining the thermal data with the 3D building models via texturing delivers a valuable groundwork for large-area building inspections. However, such thermal textures are useful for further analysis if they are geometrically correctly extracted. This can be achieved with a good coregistrations between the 3D building models and thermal images, which cannot be achieved by direct georeferencing. Hence, this paper presents methodology for alignment of 3D building models and oblique TIR image sequences taken from a flying platform. In a single image line correspondences between model edges and image line segments are found using accumulator approach and based on these correspondences an optimal camera pose is calculated to ensure the best match between the projected model and the image structures. Among the sequence the linear features are tracked based on visibility prediction. The results of the proposed methodology are presented using a TIR image sequence taken from helicopter in a densely built-up urban area. The novelty of this work is given by employing the uncertainty of the 3D building models and by innovative tracking strategy based on a priori knowledge from the 3D building model and the visibility checking.

  1. Quantifying Transient 3D Dynamical Phenomena of Single mRNA Particles in Live Yeast Cell Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Christopher P.; Thompson, Michael A.; Casolari, Jason M.; Paffenroth, Randy C.; Moerner, W. E.

    2013-01-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) has been extensively used to obtain information about diffusion and directed motion in a wide range of biological applications. Recently, new methods have appeared for obtaining precise (10s of nm) spatial information in three dimensions (3D) with high temporal resolution (measurements obtained every 4ms), which promise to more accurately sense the true dynamical behavior in the natural 3D cellular environment. Despite the quantitative 3D tracking information, the range of mathematical methods for extracting information about the underlying system has been limited mostly to mean-squared displacement analysis and other techniques not accounting for complex 3D kinetic interactions. There is a great need for new analysis tools aiming to more fully extract the biological information content from in vivo SPT measurements. High-resolution SPT experimental data has enormous potential to objectively scrutinize various proposed mechanistic schemes arising from theoretical biophysics and cell biology. At the same time, methods for rigorously checking the statistical consistency of both model assumptions and estimated parameters against observed experimental data (i.e. goodness-of-fit tests) have not received great attention. We demonstrate methods enabling (1) estimation of the parameters of 3D stochastic differential equation (SDE) models of the underlying dynamics given only one trajectory; and (2) construction of hypothesis tests checking the consistency of the fitted model with the observed trajectory so that extracted parameters are not over-interpreted (the tools are applicable to linear or nonlinear SDEs calibrated from non-stationary time series data). The approach is demonstrated on high-resolution 3D trajectories of single ARG3 mRNA particles in yeast cells in order to show the power of the methods in detecting signatures of transient directed transport. The methods presented are generally relevant to a wide variety of 2D and 3D SPT

  2. Particle tracking modeling of sediment-laden jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S. N.; Lee, J. H. W.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a general model to predict the particulate transport and deposition from a sediment-laden horizontal momentum jet. A three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic particle tracking model is developed based on the governing equation of particle motion. The turbulent velocity fluctuations are modelled by a Lagrangian velocity autocorrelation function that captures the trapping of sediment particles in turbulent eddies, which result in the reduction of settling velocity. Using classical solutions of mean jet velocity, and turbulent fluctuation and dissipation rate profiles derived from computational fluid dynamics calculations of a pure jet, the equation of motion is solved numerically to track the particle movement in the jet flow field. The 3-D particle tracking model predictions of sediment deposition and concentration profiles are in excellent agreement with measured data. The computationally demanding Basset history force is shown to be negligible in the prediction of bottom deposition profiles.

  3. 3D tracking and phase-contrast imaging by twin-beams digital holographic microscope in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Finizio, A.; Paturzo, M.; Merola, F.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2012-06-01

    A compact twin-beam interferometer that can be adopted as a flexible diagnostic tool in microfluidic platforms is presented. The devise has two functionalities, as explained in the follow, and can be easily integrated in microfluidic chip. The configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, at same time, furnishes Quantitative Phase-Contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy. Experimental demonstration of its effectiveness and compatibility with biological field is given on for in vitro cells in microfluidic environment. Nowadays, several microfluidic configuration exist and many of them are commercially available, their development is due to the possibility for manipulating droplets, handling micro and nano-objects, visualize and quantify processes occurring in small volumes and, clearly, for direct applications on lab-on-a chip devices. In microfluidic research field, optical/photonics approaches are the more suitable ones because they have various advantages as to be non-contact, full-field, non-invasive and can be packaged thanks to the development of integrable optics. Moreover, phase contrast approaches, adapted to a lab-on-a-chip configurations, give the possibility to get quantitative information with remarkable lateral and vertical resolution directly in situ without the need to dye and/or kill cells. Furthermore, numerical techniques for tracking of micro-objects needs to be developed for measuring velocity fields, trajectories patterns, motility of cancer cell and so on. Here, we present a compact holographic microscope that can ensure, by the same configuration and simultaneously, accurate 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast analysis. The system, simple and solid, is based on twin laser beams coming from a single laser source. Through a easy conceptual design, we show how these two different functionalities can be accomplished by the same optical setup. The working principle, the optical setup and the mathematical

  4. 3D Continuum-Particle Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Sanith; Hornung, Richard; Garcia, Alejandro; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2001-06-01

    An adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme to model multi-scale, continuum-particle hydrodynamic flows is presented. AMAR ensures the particle description is applied exclusively in regions with high flow gradients and discontinous material interfaces, i.e. regions where the continuum flow assumptions are typically invalid. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is used to model the particle regions on the finest grid of the adaptive hierarchy. The continuum flow is modelled using the compressible flow Euler equations and is solved using a second order Godunov scheme. Coupling is achieved by conservation of fluxes across the continuum-particle grid boundaries. The AMAR data structures are supported by a C++ object oriented framework (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure - SAMRAI) which allows for efficient parallel implementation. The scheme also extends to simulations of gas mixtures. Results for test cases are compared with theory and experiment.

  5. Detecting particles flowing through interdigitated 3D microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Elena; Rollo, Enrica; Kilchenmann, Samuel; Bellati, Francesco M; Accastelli, Enrico; Guiducci, Carlotta

    2012-01-01

    Counting cells in a large microchannel remains challenging and is particularly critical for in vitro assays, such as cell adhesion assays. This paper addresses this issue, by presenting the development of interdigitated three-dimensional electrodes, which are fabricated around passivated pillarshaped silicon microstructures, to detect particles in a flow. The arrays of micropillars occupy the entire channel height and detect the passage of the particle through their gaps by monitoring changes in the electrical resistance. Impedance measurements were employed in order to characterize the electrical equivalent model of the system and to detect the passage of particles in real-time. Three different geometrical micropillar configurations were evaluated and numerical simulations that supported the experimental activity were used to characterize the sensitive volume in the channel. Moreover, the signal-to-noise-ratio related to the passage of a single particle through an array was plotted as a function of the dimension and number of micropillars.

  6. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s-1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  7. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs’ configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  8. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-22

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method.

  9. A 3D front tracking method on a CPU/GPU system

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Wurigen; Grove, John

    2011-01-21

    We describe the method to port a sequential 3D interface tracking code to a GPU with CUDA. The interface is represented as a triangular mesh. Interface geometry properties and point propagation are performed on a GPU. Interface mesh adaptation is performed on a CPU. The convergence of the method is assessed from the test problems with given velocity fields. Performance results show overall speedups from 11 to 14 for the test problems under mesh refinement. We also briefly describe our ongoing work to couple the interface tracking method with a hydro solver.

  10. 3-D Spreadsheet Simulation of a Modern Particle Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  11. Error control in the set-up of stereo camera systems for 3d animal tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, A.; Creato, C.; Del Castello, L.; Giardina, I.; Melillo, S.; Parisi, L.; Viale, M.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional tracking of animal systems is the key to the comprehension of collective behavior. Experimental data collected via a stereo camera system allow the reconstruction of the 3d trajectories of each individual in the group. Trajectories can then be used to compute some quantities of interest to better understand collective motion, such as velocities, distances between individuals and correlation functions. The reliability of the retrieved trajectories is strictly related to the accuracy of the 3d reconstruction. In this paper, we perform a careful analysis of the most significant errors affecting 3d reconstruction, showing how the accuracy depends on the camera system set-up and on the precision of the calibration parameters.

  12. Cooperative Wall-climbing Robots in 3D Environments for Surveillance and Target Tracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-08

    distribution of impeller vanes, volume of the chamber, and sealing effect , etc. Fig. 5 and 6 show some exemplary simulation results. In paper [11], we...Environments for Surveillance and Target Tracking 11 multiple nonholonomic mobile robots using Cartesian coordinates. Based on the special feature...gamma-ray or x-ray cargo inspection system. Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of the objects inside a cargo can be obtained by effectively

  13. 3D imaging of semiconductor colloid nanocrystals: on the way to nanodiagnostics of track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyk, S. I.; Eremchev, I. Y.; Gorshelev, A. A.; Naumov, A. V.; Zagorsky, D. L.; Kotova, S. P.; Volostnikov, V. G.; Vorontsov, E. N.

    2016-12-01

    The work concerns the feasibility of 3D optical diagnostic of porous media with subdifraction spatial resolution via epi-luminescence microscopy of single semiconductor colloid nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) CdSe/ZnS used as emitting labels/nanoprobes. The nanoprecise reconstruction of axial coordinate is provided by double helix technique of point spread function transformation (DH-PSF). The results of QD localization in polycarbonate track membrane (TM) is presented.

  14. Particle displacement tracking for PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1990-01-01

    A new Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) data acquisition and analysis system, which is an order of magnitude faster than any previously proposed system has been constructed and tested. The new Particle Displacement Tracing (PDT) system is an all electronic technique employing a video camera and a large memory buffer frame-grabber board. Using a simple encoding scheme, a time sequence of single exposure images are time coded into a single image and then processed to track particle displacements and determine velocity vectors. Application of the PDT technique to a counter-rotating vortex flow produced over 1100 velocity vectors in 110 seconds when processed on an 80386 PC.

  15. 3D Visualization of Monte-Carlo Simulation's of HZE Track Structure and Initial Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ions biophysics is important for space radiation risk assessment [1] and hadron-therapy [2]. The characteristic of heavy ions tracks include a very high energy deposition region close to the track (<20 nm) denoted as the track core, and an outer penumbra region consisting of individual secondary electrons (6-rays). A still open question is the radiobiological effects of 6- rays relative to the track core. Of importance is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) [3] and oxidative damage to the biomolecules and the tissue matrix, considered the most important lesions for acute and long term effects of radiation. In this work, we have simulated a 56Fe26+ ion track of 1 GeV/amu with our Monte-Carlo code RITRACKS [4]. The simulation results have been used to calculate the energy depiction and initial chemical species in a "voxelized" space, which is then visualized in 3D. Several voxels with dose >1000 Gy are found in the penumbra, some located 0.1 mm from the track core. In computational models, the DSB induction probability is calculated with radial dose [6], which may not take into account the higher RBE of electron track ends for DSB induction. Therefore, these simulations should help improve models of DSB induction and our understanding of heavy ions biophysics.

  16. 3-D Lagrangian Measurements of Suspended Particles in San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Tse, I.; Variano, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    San Francisco Bay often appears brown. Its high suspended sediment concentrations give it the potential to move and mix large amounts of sediments from one environment, such as an urban stormwater outflow, to another, such as a wetland undergoing restoration. These sediments can carry with them persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals such as PCBs, mercury, or emerging contaminants. To predict sediment fate, almost all physical models describe the transport of suspended sediment with the advection-diffusion equation, which requires knowledge of the water currents and the diffusivity of sediment. Methods for estimating diffusivity to use in the model are not typically satisfying, and there remain fundamental questions about the accuracy and applicability of the typical approximation methods. We have developed a new tool that measures 3D tracks of suspended sediment in-situ, from which we compute diffusivity directly. We present here the results of the first deployment, in San Francisco Bay near the Berkeley shore. This site has highly active sediment and is important for transfer of sediment-associated contaminants, and sediment diffusivity is sensitive to wind, waves, tides and turbulence. We investigate these relationships using our preliminary, proof-of-concept, data. It also provides the foundation for future investigations of the behavior of sediment diffusivity and particle trajectories in different environments and the underlying theory of solute diffusivity in real-world conditions. In addition, these data enable the analysis of whether sediment particles in San Francisco Bay exhibit the 'preferential clustering' observed for some inertial particles in turbulent flow.

  17. Sensor Spatial Distortion, Visual Latency, and Update Rate Effects on 3D Tracking in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Baumeler, S.; Jense, G. J.; Jacoby, R. H.; Trejo, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Several common defects that we have sought to minimize in immersing virtual environments are: static sensor spatial distortion, visual latency, and low update rates. Human performance within our environments during large amplitude 3D tracking was assessed by objective and subjective methods in the presence and absence of these defects. Results show that 1) removal of our relatively small spatial sensor distortion had minor effects on the tracking activity, 2) an Adapted Cooper-Harper controllability scale proved the most sensitive subjective indicator of the degradation of dynamic fidelity caused by increasing latency and decreasing frame rates, and 3) performance, as measured by normalized RMS tracking error or subjective impressions, was more markedly influenced by changing visual latency than by update rate.

  18. Automated 3-D tracking of centrosomes in sequences of confocal image stacks.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun S; Trivedi, Niraj; Solecki, David J

    2009-01-01

    In order to facilitate the study of neuron migration, we propose a method for 3-D detection and tracking of centrosomes in time-lapse confocal image stacks of live neuron cells. We combine Laplacian-based blob detection, adaptive thresholding, and the extraction of scale and roundness features to find centrosome-like objects in each frame. We link these detections using the joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF) tracking algorithm with a Newtonian state-space model tailored to the motion characteristics of centrosomes in live neurons. We apply our algorithm to image sequences containing multiple cells, some of which had been treated with motion-inhibiting drugs. We provide qualitative results and quantitative comparisons to manual segmentation and tracking results showing that our average motion estimates agree to within 13% of those computed manually by neurobiologists.

  19. Meanie3D - a mean-shift based, multivariate, multi-scale clustering and tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jürgen-Lorenz; Malte, Diederich; Silke, Troemel

    2014-05-01

    Project OASE is the one of 5 work groups at the HErZ (Hans Ertel Centre for Weather Research), an ongoing effort by the German weather service (DWD) to further research at Universities concerning weather prediction. The goal of project OASE is to gain an object-based perspective on convective events by identifying them early in the onset of convective initiation and follow then through the entire lifecycle. The ability to follow objects in this fashion requires new ways of object definition and tracking, which incorporate all the available data sets of interest, such as Satellite imagery, weather Radar or lightning counts. The Meanie3D algorithm provides the necessary tool for this purpose. Core features of this new approach to clustering (object identification) and tracking are the ability to identify objects using the mean-shift algorithm applied to a multitude of variables (multivariate), as well as the ability to detect objects on various scales (multi-scale) using elements of Scale-Space theory. The algorithm works in 2D as well as 3D without modifications. It is an extension of a method well known from the field of computer vision and image processing, which has been tailored to serve the needs of the meteorological community. In spite of the special application to be demonstrated here (like convective initiation), the algorithm is easily tailored to provide clustering and tracking for a wide class of data sets and problems. In this talk, the demonstration is carried out on two of the OASE group's own composite sets. One is a 2D nationwide composite of Germany including C-Band Radar (2D) and Satellite information, the other a 3D local composite of the Bonn/Jülich area containing a high-resolution 3D X-Band Radar composite.

  20. A brain-computer interface method combined with eye tracking for 3D interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui Chul; Woo, Jin Cheol; Kim, Jong Hwa; Whang, Mincheol; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2010-07-15

    With the recent increase in the number of three-dimensional (3D) applications, the need for interfaces to these applications has increased. Although the eye tracking method has been widely used as an interaction interface for hand-disabled persons, this approach cannot be used for depth directional navigation. To solve this problem, we propose a new brain computer interface (BCI) method in which the BCI and eye tracking are combined to analyze depth navigation, including selection and two-dimensional (2D) gaze direction, respectively. The proposed method is novel in the following five ways compared to previous works. First, a device to measure both the gaze direction and an electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern is proposed with the sensors needed to measure the EEG attached to a head-mounted eye tracking device. Second, the reliability of the BCI interface is verified by demonstrating that there is no difference between the real and the imaginary movements for the same work in terms of the EEG power spectrum. Third, depth control for the 3D interaction interface is implemented by an imaginary arm reaching movement. Fourth, a selection method is implemented by an imaginary hand grabbing movement. Finally, for the independent operation of gazing and the BCI, a mode selection method is proposed that measures a user's concentration by analyzing the pupil accommodation speed, which is not affected by the operation of gazing and the BCI. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed 3D interaction method using eye tracking and a BCI.

  1. Discretization errors in particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmon, G.; Mamman, N.; Feingold, M.

    2007-03-01

    High precision video tracking of microscopic particles is limited by systematic and random errors. Systematic errors are partly due to the discretization process both in position and in intensity. We study the behavior of such errors in a simple tracking algorithm designed for the case of symmetric particles. This symmetry algorithm uses interpolation to estimate the value of the intensity at arbitrary points in the image plane. We show that the discretization error is composed of two parts: (1) the error due to the discretization of the intensity, bD and (2) that due to interpolation, bI. While bD behaves asymptotically like N-1 where N is the number of intensity gray levels, bI is small when using cubic spline interpolation.

  2. Coordination of gaze and hand movements for tracking and tracing in 3D.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Constantinus C A M; Dijkstra, Tjeerd M H; Roozen, Irene J; Welten, Joke

    2009-03-01

    In this study we have investigated movements in three-dimensional space. Since most studies have investigated planar movements (like ellipses, cloverleaf shapes and "figure eights") we have compared two generalizations of the two-thirds power law to three dimensions. In particular we have tested whether the two-thirds power law could be best described by tangential velocity and curvature in a plane (compatible with the idea of planar segmentation) or whether tangential velocity and curvature should be calculated in three dimensions. We defined total curvature in three dimensions as the square root of the sum of curvature squared and torsion squared. The results demonstrate that most of the variance is explained by tangential velocity and total curvature. This indicates that all three orthogonal components of movements in 3D are equally important and that movements are truly 3D and do not reflect a concatenation of 2D planar movement segments. In addition, we have studied the coordination of eye and hand movements in 3D by measuring binocular eye movements while subjects move the finger along a curved path. The results show that the directional component and finger position almost superimpose when subjects track a target moving in 3D. However, the vergence component of gaze leads finger position by about 250msec. For drawing (tracing) the path of a visible 3D shape, the directional component of gaze leads finger position by about 225msec, and the vergence component leads finger position by about 400msec. These results are compatible with the idea that gaze leads hand position during drawing movement to assist prediction and planning of hand position in 3D space.

  3. Simultaneous 3D location and size measurement of bubbles and sand particles in a flow using interferometric particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Ouldarbi, L; Pérret, G; Lemaitre, P; Porcheron, E; Coëtmellec, S; Gréhan, G; Lebrun, D; Brunel, M

    2015-09-01

    We present a system to characterize a triphasic flow in a 3D volume (air bubbles and solid irregular particles in water) using only one CCD sensor. A cylindrical interferometric out-of-focus imaging setup is used to determine simultaneously the 3D position and the size of bubbles and irregular sand particles in a flow. The 3D position of the particles is deduced from the ellipticity of their out-of-focus image. The size of bubbles is deduced from analysis of interference fringes. The characteristics of irregular sand particles are obtained from analysis of their speckle-like pattern. Experiments are confirmed by simulations.

  4. The CT-PPS tracking system with 3D pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, F.

    2016-11-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) detector will be installed in Roman pots (RP) positioned on either side of CMS, at about 210 m from the interaction point. This detector will measure leading protons, allowing detailed studies of diffractive physics and central exclusive production in standard LHC running conditions. An essential component of the CT-PPS apparatus is the tracking system, which consists of two detector stations per arm equipped with six 3D silicon pixel-sensor modules, each read out by six PSI46dig chips. The front-end electronics has been designed to fulfill the mechanical constraints of the RP and to be compatible as much as possible with the readout chain of the CMS pixel detector. The tracking system is currently under construction and will be installed by the end of 2016. In this contribution the final design and the expected performance of the CT-PPS tracking system is presented. A summary of the studies performed, before and after irradiation, on the 3D detectors produced for CT-PPS is given.

  5. Methods for using 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking in biaxial mechanical testing of biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2015-04-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making the full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation.

  6. Experimental analysis of mechanical response of stabilized occipitocervical junction by 3D mark tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J. C.; Brèque, C.; Brémand, F.; D'Houtaud, S.; Rigoard, P.

    2010-06-01

    This study is about a biomechanical comparison of some stabilization solutions for the occipitocervical junction. Four kinds of occipito-cervical fixations are analysed in this work: lateral plates fixed by two kinds of screws, lateral plates fixed by hooks and median plate. To study mechanical rigidity of each one, tests have been performed on human skulls by applying loadings and by studying mechanical response of fixations and bone. For this experimental analysis, a specific setup has been developed to impose a load corresponding to the flexion-extension physiological movements. 3D mark tracking technique is employed to measure 3D displacement fields on the bone and on the fixations. Observations of displacement evolution on the bone according to the fixation show different rigidities given by each solution.

  7. Study of a viewer tracking system with multiview 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinn-Cherng; Wu, Chang-Shuo; Hsiao, Chuan-Heng; Yang, Ming-Chieh; Liu, Wen-Chieh; Hung, Yi-Ping

    2008-02-01

    An autostereoscopic display provides users great enjoyment of stereo visualization without uncomfortable and inconvenient drawbacks of wearing stereo glasses. However, bandwidth constraints of current multi-view 3D display severely restrict the number of views that can be simultaneously displayed without degrading resolution or increasing display cost unacceptably. An alternative to multiple view presentation is that the position of observer can be measured by using viewer-tracking sensor. It is a very important module of the viewer-tracking component for fluently rendering and accurately projecting the stereo video. In order to render stereo content with respect to user's view points and to optically project the content onto the left and right eyes of the user accurately, the real-time viewer tracking technique that allows the user to move around freely when watching the autostereoscopic display is developed in this study. It comprises the face detection by using multiple eigenspaces of various lighting conditions, fast block matching for tracking four motion parameters of the user's face region. The Edge Orientation Histogram (EOH) on Real AdaBoost to improve the performance of original AdaBoost algorithm is also applied in this study. The AdaBoost algorithm using Haar feature in OpenCV library developed by Intel to detect human face and enhance the accuracy performance with rotating image. The frame rate of viewer tracking process can achieve up to 15 Hz. Since performance of the viewer tracking autostereoscopic display is still influenced under variant environmental conditions, the accuracy, robustness and efficiency of the viewer-tracking system are evaluated in this study.

  8. Swimming Behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Studied by Holographic 3D Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Vater, Svenja M.; Weiße, Sebastian; Maleschlijski, Stojan; Lotz, Carmen; Koschitzki, Florian; Schwartz, Thomas; Obst, Ursula; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Holographic 3D tracking was applied to record and analyze the swimming behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The obtained trajectories allow to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the free swimming behavior of the bacterium. This can be classified into five distinct swimming patterns. In addition to the previously reported smooth and oscillatory swimming motions, three additional patterns are distinguished. We show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa performs helical movements which were so far only described for larger microorganisms. Occurrence of the swimming patterns was determined and transitions between the patterns were analyzed. PMID:24498187

  9. An automated tool for 3D tracking of single molecules in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardini, L.; Capitanio, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, tremendous improvements have been achieved in the precision of localization of single fluorescent molecules, allowing localization and tracking of biomolecules at the nm level. Since the behaviour of proteins and biological molecules is tightly influenced by the cell's environment, a growing number of microscopy techniques are moving from in vitro to live cell experiments. Looking at both diffusion and active transportation processes inside a cell requires three-dimensional localization over a few microns range, high SNR images and high temporal resolution (ms order of magnitude). To satisfy these requirements we developed an automated routine that allow 3D tracking of single fluorescent molecules in living cells with nanometer accuracy, by exploiting the properties of the point-spread-function of out-of-focus Quantum Dots bound to the protein of interest.

  10. A portable instrument for 3-D dynamic robot measurements using triangulation and laser tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.R.R. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Parker, G.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    The paper describes the development and validation of a 3-D measurement instrument capable of determining the static and dynamic performance of industrial robots to ISO standards. Using two laser beams to track an optical target attached to the robot end-effector, the target position coordinates may be estimated, relative to the instrument coordinate frame, to a high accuracy using triangulation principles. The effect of variations in the instrument geometry from the nominal model is evaluated through a kinematic model of the tracking head. Significant improvements of the measurement accuracy are then obtained by a simple adjustment of the main parameters. Extensive experimental test results are included to demonstrate the instrument performance. Finally typical static and dynamic measurement results for an industrial robot are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and usefulness of the instrument.

  11. Passive markers for tracking surgical instruments in real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E

    2012-03-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts.

  12. OpenPET: a novel open-type PET system for 3D dose verification in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaya, T.

    2017-01-01

    The OpenPET is the world’s first open-type 3D PET scanner for PET image-guided particle therapy such as in situ dose verification and direct tumour tracking. Even with a full-ring geometry, the OpenPET has an open gap between its two detector rings through which the treatment beam passes. Following the initial proposal of the dual-ring OpenPET (DROP), the single-ring OpenPET (SROP) was also proposed as a more efficient geometry than DROP in terms of manufacturing cost and sensitivity. A small SROP prototype was developed and feasibility of visualizing a 3D distribution of beam stopping positions inside a phantom was shown with the help of radioisotope particle beams, used as primary beams. Following these results, a full-size whole-body SROP prototype was developed.

  13. 3D reconstruction and particle acceleration properties of Coronal Shock Waves During Powerful Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Vourlidas, Angelos; Tylka, Allan J.; Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Tirole, Margot

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the physical mechanisms that produce the most energetic particles is a long-standing observational and theoretical challenge in astrophysics. Strong pressure waves have been proposed as efficient accelerators both in the solar and astrophysical contexts via various mechanisms such as diffusive-shock/shock-drift acceleration and betatron effects. In diffusive-shock acceleration, the efficacy of the process relies on shock waves being super-critical or moving several times faster than the characteristic speed of the medium they propagate through (a high Alfven Mach number) and on the orientation of the magnetic field upstream of the shock front. High-cadence, multipoint imaging using the NASA STEREO, SOHO and SDO spacecrafts now permits the 3-D reconstruction of pressure waves formed during the eruption of coronal mass ejections. Using these unprecedented capabilities, some recent studies have provided new insights on the timing and longitudinal extent of solar energetic particles, including the first derivations of the time-dependent 3-dimensional distribution of the expansion speed and Mach numbers of coronal shock waves. We will review these recent developments by focusing on particle events that occurred between 2011 and 2015. These new techniques also provide the opportunity to investigate the enigmatic long-duration gamma ray events.

  14. Adaptive Kalman snake for semi-autonomous 3D vessel tracking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Sanghoon

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust semi-autonomous algorithm for 3D vessel segmentation and tracking based on an active contour model and a Kalman filter. For each computed tomography angiography (CTA) slice, we use the active contour model to segment the vessel boundary and the Kalman filter to track position and shape variations of the vessel boundary between slices. For successful segmentation via active contour, we select an adequate number of initial points from the contour of the first slice. The points are set manually by user input for the first slice. For the remaining slices, the initial contour position is estimated autonomously based on segmentation results of the previous slice. To obtain refined segmentation results, an adaptive control spacing algorithm is introduced into the active contour model. Moreover, a block search-based initial contour estimation procedure is proposed to ensure that the initial contour of each slice can be near the vessel boundary. Experiments were performed on synthetic and real chest CTA images. Compared with the well-known Chan-Vese (CV) model, the proposed algorithm exhibited better performance in segmentation and tracking. In particular, receiver operating characteristic analysis on the synthetic and real CTA images demonstrated the time efficiency and tracking robustness of the proposed model. In terms of computational time redundancy, processing time can be effectively reduced by approximately 20%.

  15. Quantifying the 3D Odorant Concentration Field Used by Actively Tracking Blue Crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Dickman, B. D.; Jackson, J. L.; Weissburg, M. J.

    2007-11-01

    Blue crabs and other aquatic organisms locate food and mates by tracking turbulent odorant plumes. The odorant concentration fluctuates unpredictably due to turbulent transport, and many characteristics of the fluctuation pattern have been hypothesized as useful cues for orienting to the odorant source. To make a direct linkage between tracking behavior and the odorant concentration signal, we developed a measurement system based the laser induced fluorescence technique to quantify the instantaneous 3D concentration field surrounding actively tracking blue crabs. The data suggest a correlation between upstream walking speed and the concentration of the odorant signal arriving at the antennule chemosensors, which are located near the mouth region. More specifically, we note an increase in upstream walking speed when high concentration bursts arrive at the antennules location. We also test hypotheses regarding the ability of blue crabs to steer relative to the plume centerline based on the signal contrast between the chemosensors located on their leg appendages. These chemosensors are located much closer to the substrate compared to the antennules and are separated by the width of the blue crab. In this case, it appears that blue crabs use the bilateral signal comparison to track along the edge of the plume.

  16. The birth of a dinosaur footprint: Subsurface 3D motion reconstruction and discrete element simulation reveal track ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion over deformable substrates is a common occurrence in nature. Footprints represent sedimentary distortions that provide anatomical, functional, and behavioral insights into trackmaker biology. The interpretation of such evidence can be challenging, however, particularly for fossil tracks recovered at bedding planes below the originally exposed surface. Even in living animals, the complex dynamics that give rise to footprint morphology are obscured by both foot and sediment opacity, which conceals animal–substrate and substrate–substrate interactions. We used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to image and animate the hind limb skeleton of a chicken-like bird traversing a dry, granular material. Foot movement differed significantly from walking on solid ground; the longest toe penetrated to a depth of ∼5 cm, reaching an angle of 30° below horizontal before slipping backward on withdrawal. The 3D kinematic data were integrated into a validated substrate simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) to create a quantitative model of limb-induced substrate deformation. Simulation revealed that despite sediment collapse yielding poor quality tracks at the air–substrate interface, subsurface displacements maintain a high level of organization owing to grain–grain support. Splitting the substrate volume along “virtual bedding planes” exposed prints that more closely resembled the foot and could easily be mistaken for shallow tracks. DEM data elucidate how highly localized deformations associated with foot entry and exit generate specific features in the final tracks, a temporal sequence that we term “track ontogeny.” This combination of methodologies fosters a synthesis between the surface/layer-based perspective prevalent in paleontology and the particle/volume-based perspective essential for a mechanistic understanding of sediment redistribution during track formation. PMID:25489092

  17. Designing a high accuracy 3D auto stereoscopic eye tracking display, using a common LCD monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherkhani, Reza; Kia, Mohammad

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the design and building of a low cost and practical stereoscopic display that does not need to wear special glasses, and uses eye tracking to give a large degree of freedom to viewer (or viewer's) movement while displaying the minimum amount of information. The parallax barrier technique is employed to turn a LCD into an auto-stereoscopic display. The stereo image pair is screened on the usual liquid crystal display simultaneously but in different columns of pixels. Controlling of the display in red-green-blue sub pixels increases the accuracy of light projecting direction to less than 2 degrees without losing too much LCD's resolution and an eye-tracking system determines the correct angle to project the images along the viewer's eye pupils and an image processing system puts the 3D images data in correct R-G-B sub pixels. 1.6 degree of light direction controlling achieved in practice. The 3D monitor is just made by applying some simple optical materials on a usual LCD display with normal resolution. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Nonintrusive viewpoint tracking for 3D for perception in smart video conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desurmont, Xavier; Martinez-Ponte, Isabel; Meessen, Jerome; Delaigle, Jean-François

    2006-02-01

    Globalisation of people's interaction in the industrial world and ecological cost of transport make video-conference an interesting solution for collaborative work. However, the lack of immersive perception makes video-conference not appealing. TIFANIS tele-immersion system was conceived to let users interact as if they were physically together. In this paper, we focus on an important feature of the immersive system: the automatic tracking of the user's point of view in order to render correctly in his display the scene from the ther site. Viewpoint information has to be computed in a very short time and the detection system should be no intrusive, otherwise it would become cumbersome for the user, i.e. he would lose the feeling of "being there". The viewpoint detection system consists of several modules. First, an analysis module identifies and follows regions of interest (ROI) where faces are detected. We will show the cooperative approach between spatial detection and temporal tracking. Secondly, an eye detector finds the position of the eyes within faces. Then, the 3D positions of the eyes are deduced using stereoscopic images from a binocular camera. Finally, the 3D scene is rendered in real-time according to the new point of view.

  19. The role of 3D and speckle tracking echocardiography in cardiac amyloidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nucci, E M; Lisi, M; Cameli, M; Baldi, L; Puccetti, L; Mondillo, S; Favilli, R; Lunghetti, S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is a disorder characterized by amyloid fibrils deposition in cardiac interstitium; it results in a restrictive cardiomyopathy with heart failure (HF) and conduction abnormalities. The "gold standard" for diagnosis of CA is myocardial biopsy but possible sampling errors and procedural risks, limit it's use. Magnetic resonance (RMN) offers more information than traditional echocardiography and allows diagnosis of CA but often it's impossible to perform. We report the case of a man with HF and symptomatic bradyarrhythmia that required an urgent pacemaker implant. Echocardiography was strongly suggestive of CA but wasn't impossible to perform an RMN to confirm this hypothesis because the patient was implanted with a definitive pacemaker. So was performed a Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE) and a 3D echocardiography: STE allows to differentiate CA from others hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by longitudinal strain value < 12% and 3D echocardiography shows regional left ventricular dyssynchrony with a characteristic temporal pattern of dispersion of regional volume systolic change. On the basis of these results, finally was performed an endomyocardial biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis of CA. This case underlines the importance of news, noninvasive techniques such as eco 3D and STE for early diagnosis of CA, especially when RMN cannot be performed.

  20. Comparison of 2D and 3D modeled tumor motion estimation/prediction for dynamic tumor tracking during arc radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu; Ma, Xiangyu; Yan, Huagang; Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder; Li, Haiyun

    2017-03-06

    Many real-time imaging techniques have been developed to localize the target in 3D space or in 2D beam's eye view (BEV) plane for intrafraction motion tracking in radiation therapy. With tracking system latency, 3D-modeled method is expected to be more accurate even in terms of 2D BEV tracking error. No quantitative analysis, however, has been reported. In this study, we simulated co-planar arc deliveries using respiratory motion data acquired from 42 patients to quantitatively compare the accuracy between 2D BEV and 3D-modeled tracking in arc therapy and determine whether 3D information is needed for motion tracking. We used our previously developed low kV dose adaptive MV-kV imaging and motion compensation framework as a representative of 3D-modeled methods. It optimizes the balance between additional kV imaging dose and 3D tracking accuracy and solves the MLC blockage issue. With simulated Gaussian marker detection errors (zero mean and 0.39 mm standard deviation) and ~155/310/460 ms tracking system latencies, the mean percentage of time that the target moved >2 mm from the predicted 2D BEV position are 1.1%/4.0%/7.8% and 1.3%/5.8%/11.6% for 3D-modeled and 2D-only tracking, respectively. The corresponding average BEV RMS errors are 0.67/0.90/1.13 mm and 0.79/1.10/1.37 mm. Compared to the 2D method, the 3D method reduced the average RMS unresolved motion along the beam direction from ~3 mm to ~1 mm, resulting on average only <1% dosimetric advantage in the depth direction. Only for a small fraction of the patients, when tracking latency is long, the 3D-modeled method showed significant improvement of BEV tracking accuracy, indicating potential dosimetric advantage. However, if the tracking latency is short (~150 ms or less), those improvements are limited. Therefore, 2D BEV tracking has sufficient targeting accuracy for most clinical cases. The 3D technique is, however, still important in solving the MLC blockage problem during 2D BEV tracking.

  1. Robust object tracking techniques for vision-based 3D motion analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, Vladimir A.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.

    2016-04-01

    Automated and accurate spatial motion capturing of an object is necessary for a wide variety of applications including industry and science, virtual reality and movie, medicine and sports. For the most part of applications a reliability and an accuracy of the data obtained as well as convenience for a user are the main characteristics defining the quality of the motion capture system. Among the existing systems for 3D data acquisition, based on different physical principles (accelerometry, magnetometry, time-of-flight, vision-based), optical motion capture systems have a set of advantages such as high speed of acquisition, potential for high accuracy and automation based on advanced image processing algorithms. For vision-based motion capture accurate and robust object features detecting and tracking through the video sequence are the key elements along with a level of automation of capturing process. So for providing high accuracy of obtained spatial data the developed vision-based motion capture system "Mosca" is based on photogrammetric principles of 3D measurements and supports high speed image acquisition in synchronized mode. It includes from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for capturing video sequences of object motion. The original camera calibration and external orientation procedures provide the basis for high accuracy of 3D measurements. A set of algorithms as for detecting, identifying and tracking of similar targets, so for marker-less object motion capture is developed and tested. The results of algorithms' evaluation show high robustness and high reliability for various motion analysis tasks in technical and biomechanics applications.

  2. A Hidden Markov Model for 3D Catheter Tip Tracking with 2D X-ray Catheterization Sequence and 3D Rotational Angiography.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Pierre; Smal, Ihor; Ruijters, Daniel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2016-11-07

    In minimal invasive image guided catheterization procedures, physicians require information of the catheter position with respect to the patient's vasculature. However, in fluoroscopic images, visualization of the vasculature requires toxic contrast agent. Static vasculature roadmapping, which can reduce the usage of iodine contrast, is hampered by the breathing motion in abdominal catheterization. In this paper, we propose a method to track the catheter tip inside the patient's 3D vessel tree using intra-operative single-plane 2D X-ray image sequences and a peri-operative 3D rotational angiography (3DRA). The method is based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) where states of the model are the possible positions of the catheter tip inside the 3D vessel tree. The transitions from state to state model the probabilities for the catheter tip to move from one position to another. The HMM is updated following the observation scores, based on the registration between the 2D catheter centerline extracted from the 2D X-ray image, and the 2D projection of 3D vessel tree centerline extracted from the 3DRA. The method is extensively evaluated on simulated and clinical datasets acquired during liver abdominal catheterization. The evaluations show a median 3D tip tracking error of 2.3 mm with optimal settings in simulated data. The registered vessels close to the tip have a median distance error of 4.7 mm with angiographic data and optimal settings. Such accuracy is sufficient to help the physicians with an up-to-date roadmapping. The method tracks in real-time the catheter tip and enables roadmapping during catheterization procedures.

  3. Mathieu beams as versatile light moulds for 3D micro particle assemblies.

    PubMed

    Alpmann, C; Bowman, R; Woerdemann, M; Padgett, M; Denz, C

    2010-12-06

    We present tailoring of three dimensional light fields which act as light moulds for elaborate particle micro structures of variable shapes. Stereo microscopy is used for visualization of the 3D particle assemblies. The powerful method is demonstrated for the class of propagation invariant beams, where we introduce the use of Mathieu beams as light moulds with non-rotationally-symmetric structure. They offer multifarious field distributions and facilitate the creation of versatile particle structures. This general technique may find its application in micro fluidics, chemistry, biology, and medicine, to create highly efficient mixing tools, for hierarchical supramolecular organization or in 3D tissue engineering.

  4. Characterizing heterogeneity among virus particles by stochastic 3D signal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Gong, Yunye; Wang, Qiu; Zheng, Yili; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-09-01

    In single-particle cryo electron microscopy, many electron microscope images each of a single instance of a biological particle such as a virus or a ribosome are measured and the 3-D electron scattering intensity of the particle is reconstructed by computation. Because each instance of the particle is imaged separately, it should be possible to characterize the heterogeneity of the different instances of the particle as well as a nominal reconstruction of the particle. In this paper, such an algorithm is described and demonstrated on the bacteriophage Hong Kong 97. The algorithm is a statistical maximum likelihood estimator computed by an expectation maximization algorithm implemented in Matlab software.

  5. The terminal velocity of volcanic particles with shape obtained from 3D X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dioguardi, Fabio; Mele, Daniela; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Dürig, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    New experiments of falling volcanic particles were performed in order to define terminal velocity models applicable in a wide range of Reynolds number Re. Experiments were carried out with fluids of various viscosities and with particles that cover a wide range of size, density and shape. Particle shape, which strongly influences fluid drag, was measured in 3D by High-resolution X-ray microtomography, by which sphericity Φ3D and fractal dimension D3D were obtained. They are easier to measure and less operator dependent than the 2D shape parameters used in previous papers. Drag laws that make use of the new 3D parameters were obtained by fitting particle data to the experiments, and single-equation terminal velocity models were derived. They work well both at high and low Re (3 × 10- 2 < Re < 104), while earlier formulations made use of different equations at different ranges of Re. The new drag laws are well suited for the modelling of particle transportation both in the eruptive column, where coarse and fine particles are present, and also in the distal part of the umbrella region, where fine ash is involved in the large-scale domains of atmospheric circulation. A table of the typical values of Φ3D and D3D of particles from known plinian, subplinian and ash plume eruptions is presented. Graphs of terminal velocity as a function of grain size are finally proposed as tools to help volcanologists and atmosphere scientists to model particle transportation of explosive eruptions.

  6. Development of a 3D Digital Particle Image Thermometry and Velocimetry (3DDPITV) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, David; Rixon, Greg; Dabiri, Dana

    2006-11-01

    A novel 3D Digital Particle Image Thermometry and Velocimetry (3DDPITV) system has been designed and fabricated. By combining 3D Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (3DDPIV) and Digital Particle Image Thermometry (DPIT) into one system, this technique provides simultaneous temperature and velocity data in a volume of ˜1x1x0.5 in^3 using temperature sensitive liquid crystal particles as flow sensors. Two high-intensity xenon flashlamps were used as illumination sources. The imaging system consists of six CCD cameras, three allocated for measuring velocity, based on particle motion, and three for measuring temperature, based on particle color. The cameras were optically aligned using a precision grid and high-resolution translation stages. Temperature calibration was then performed using a precision thermometer and a temperature-controlled bath. Results from proof-of-concept experiments will be presented and discussed.

  7. Segmentation and tracking of adherens junctions in 3D for the analysis of epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Rodrigo; Mechery, Vinodh; Hernandez de Madrid, Beatriz; Del Signore, Steven; Dotu, Ivan; Hatini, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis generates the shape of tissues, organs and embryos and is fundamental for their proper function. It is a dynamic process that occurs at multiple spatial scales from macromolecular dynamics, to cell deformations, mitosis and apoptosis, to coordinated cell rearrangements that lead to global changes of tissue shape. Using time lapse imaging, it is possible to observe these events at a system level. However, to investigate morphogenetic events it is necessary to develop computational tools to extract quantitative information from the time lapse data. Toward this goal, we developed an image-based computational pipeline to preprocess, segment and track epithelial cells in 4D confocal microscopy data. The computational pipeline we developed, for the first time, detects the adherens junctions of epithelial cells in 3D, without the need to first detect cell nuclei. We accentuate and detect cell outlines in a series of steps, symbolically describe the cells and their connectivity, and employ this information to track the cells. We validated the performance of the pipeline for its ability to detect vertices and cell-cell contacts, track cells, and identify mitosis and apoptosis in surface epithelia of Drosophila imaginal discs. We demonstrate the utility of the pipeline to extract key quantitative features of cell behavior with which to elucidate the dynamics and biomechanical control of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. We have made our methods and data available as an open-source multiplatform software tool called TTT (http://github.com/morganrcu/TTT).

  8. Segmentation and Tracking of Adherens Junctions in 3D for the Analysis of Epithelial Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cilla, Rodrigo; Mechery, Vinodh; Hernandez de Madrid, Beatriz; Del Signore, Steven; Dotu, Ivan; Hatini, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis generates the shape of tissues, organs and embryos and is fundamental for their proper function. It is a dynamic process that occurs at multiple spatial scales from macromolecular dynamics, to cell deformations, mitosis and apoptosis, to coordinated cell rearrangements that lead to global changes of tissue shape. Using time lapse imaging, it is possible to observe these events at a system level. However, to investigate morphogenetic events it is necessary to develop computational tools to extract quantitative information from the time lapse data. Toward this goal, we developed an image-based computational pipeline to preprocess, segment and track epithelial cells in 4D confocal microscopy data. The computational pipeline we developed, for the first time, detects the adherens junctions of epithelial cells in 3D, without the need to first detect cell nuclei. We accentuate and detect cell outlines in a series of steps, symbolically describe the cells and their connectivity, and employ this information to track the cells. We validated the performance of the pipeline for its ability to detect vertices and cell-cell contacts, track cells, and identify mitosis and apoptosis in surface epithelia of Drosophila imaginal discs. We demonstrate the utility of the pipeline to extract key quantitative features of cell behavior with which to elucidate the dynamics and biomechanical control of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. We have made our methods and data available as an open-source multiplatform software tool called TTT (http://github.com/morganrcu/TTT) PMID:25884654

  9. Simulations of Coalescence and Breakup of Interfaces Using a 3D Front-tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiacai; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of complex multiphase flows with coalescing and breaking-up of interfaces are conducted using a 3D front-tracking method. Front-tracking method has been successfully used in DNS of turbulent channel bubbly flows and many other multiphase flows, but as the void fraction increases changes in the interface topology, though coalescence and breakup, become more common and have to be accounted for. Topology changes have often been identified as a challenge for front tracking, where the interface is represented using a triangular mesh, but here we present an efficient algorithm to change the topology of triangular elements of interfaces. In the current implementation we have not included any small-scale attractive forces so thin films coalesce either at prescribed times or when their thickness reaches a given value. Simulations of the collisions of two drops and comparisons with experimental results have been used to validate the algorithm but the main applications have been to flow regime transitions in gas-liquid flows in pressure driven channel flows. The evolution of flow, including flow rate, wall shear, projected interface areas, pseudo-turbulence, and the average size of the various flow structures, is examined as the topology of the interface changes through coalescence and breakup. Research supported by DOE (CASL).

  10. Investigating particle phase velocity in a 3D spouted bed by a novel fiber high speed photography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Long; Lu, Yong; Zhong, Wenqi; Chen, Xi; Ren, Bing; Jin, Baosheng

    2013-07-01

    A novel fiber high speed photography method has been developed to measure particle phase velocity in a dense gas-solid flow. The measurement system mainly includes a fiber-optic endoscope, a high speed video camera, a metal halide light source and a powerful computer with large memory. The endoscope which could be inserted into the reactors is used to form motion images of particles within the measurement window illuminated by the metal halide lamp. These images are captured by the high speed video camera and processed through a series of digital image processing algorithms, such as calibration, denoising, enhancement and binarization in order to improve the image quality. Then particles' instantaneous velocity is figured out by tracking each particle in consecutive frames. Particle phase velocity is statistically calculated according to the probability of particle velocity in each frame within a time period. This system has been applied to the investigation of particles fluidization characteristics in a 3D spouted bed. The experimental results indicate that the particle fluidization feature in the region investigated could be roughly classified into three sections by particle phase vertical velocity and the boundary between the first section and the second is the surface where particle phase velocity tends to be 0, which is in good agreement with the results published in other literature.

  11. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  12. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Particle Tracks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests ways to bring home to the introductory physics student some of the excitement of recent discoveries in particle physics. Describes particle detectors and encourages the use of the Standard Model along with real images of particle tracks to determine three-dimensional views of tracks. (MVL)

  13. High-accuracy and real-time 3D positioning, tracking system for medical imaging applications based on 3D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuan; Cheng, Teng; Xu, Xiaohai; Gao, Zeren; Li, Qianqian; Liu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xing; Song, Rui; Ju, Xiangyang; Zhang, Qingchuan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a system for positioning markers and tracking the pose of a rigid object with 6 degrees of freedom in real-time using 3D digital image correlation, with two examples for medical imaging applications. Traditional DIC method was improved to meet the requirements of the real-time by simplifying the computations of integral pixel search. Experiments were carried out and the results indicated that the new method improved the computational efficiency by about 4-10 times in comparison with the traditional DIC method. The system was aimed for orthognathic surgery navigation in order to track the maxilla segment after LeFort I osteotomy. Experiments showed noise for the static point was at the level of 10-3 mm and the measurement accuracy was 0.009 mm. The system was demonstrated on skin surface shape evaluation of a hand for finger stretching exercises, which indicated a great potential on tracking muscle and skin movements.

  14. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration in 3D Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Pair Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri; Werner, Gregory; Zhdankin, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process that converts magnetic energy into particle kinetic energy. ``Relativistic'' reconnection is of interest in astrophysical contexts because it can accelerate particles to relativistic energies high enough for synchrotron (or inverse Compton) emission to explain observed high-energy radiation. After several 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of reconnection in pair plasmas demonstrated power-law electron-energy spectra extending to high energies, a few 3D simulations surprisingly confirmed the robustness of nonthermal particle acceleration, despite fundamental differences, such as the development of the relativistic drift-kink instability (RDKI) in 3D. We present a comprehensive PIC study of 3D relativistic pair-plasma reconnection characterizing the effect of the third dimension. We investigate how reconnection dynamics and particle acceleration depend on guide magnetic field Bz and on the simulation box length Lz in the third dimension. We find that, while the RDKI does indeed grow in 3D reconnection, it does not inhibit particle acceleration, even in the absence of guide field. This work was funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  15. CISUS: an integrated 3D ultrasound system for IGT using a modular tracking API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pieper, Steve; Choti, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Kikinis, Ron; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasound has become popular in clinical/surgical applications, both as the primary image guidance modality and also in conjunction with other modalities like CT or MRI. Three dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) systems have also demonstrated usefulness in image-guided therapy (IGT). At the same time, however, current lack of open-source and open-architecture multi-modal medical visualization systems prevents 3DUS from fulfilling its potential. Several stand-alone 3DUS systems, like Stradx or In-Vivo exist today. Although these systems have been found to be useful in real clinical setting, it is difficult to augment their functionality and integrate them in versatile IGT systems. To address these limitations, a robotic/freehand 3DUS open environment (CISUS) is being integrated into the 3D Slicer, an open-source research tool developed for medical image analysis and surgical planning. In addition, the system capitalizes on generic application programming interfaces (APIs) for tracking devices and robotic control. The resulting platform-independent open-source system may serve as a valuable tool to the image guided surgery community. Other researchers could straightforwardly integrate the generic CISUS system along with other functionalities (i.e. dual view visualization, registration, real-time tracking, segmentation, etc) to rapidly create their medical/surgical applications. Our current driving clinical application is robotically assisted and freehand 3DUS-guided liver ablation, which is fully being integrated under the CISUS-3D Slicer. Initial functionality and pre-clinical feasibility are demonstrated on phantom and ex-vivo animal models.

  16. Defragmented image based autostereoscopic 3D displays with dynamic eye tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Ki-Hyuk; Yoon, Seon Kyu; Ju, Heongkyu

    2015-12-01

    We studied defragmented image based autostereoscopic 3D displays with dynamic eye tracking. Specifically, we examined the impact of parallax barrier (PB) angular orientation on their image quality. The 3D display system required fine adjustment of PB angular orientation with respect to a display panel. This was critical for both image color balancing and minimizing image resolution mismatch between horizontal and vertical directions. For evaluating uniformity of image brightness, we applied optical ray tracing simulations. The simulations took effects of PB orientation misalignment into account. The simulation results were then compared with recorded experimental data. Our optimal simulated system produced significantly enhanced image uniformity at around sweet spots in viewing zones. However this was contradicted by real experimental results. We offer quantitative treatment of illuminance uniformity of view images to estimate misalignment of PB orientation, which could account for brightness non-uniformity observed experimentally. Our study also shows that slight imperfection in the adjustment of PB orientation due to practical restrictions of adjustment accuracy can induce substantial non-uniformity of view images' brightness. We find that image brightness non-uniformity critically depends on misalignment of PB angular orientation, for example, as slight as ≤ 0.01 ° in our system. This reveals that reducing misalignment of PB angular orientation from the order of 10-2 to 10-3 degrees can greatly improve the brightness uniformity.

  17. Using an automated 3D-tracking system to record individual and shoals of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maaswinkel, Hans; Zhu, Liqun; Weng, Wei

    2013-12-05

    Like many aquatic animals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) moves in a 3D space. It is thus preferable to use a 3D recording system to study its behavior. The presented automatic video tracking system accomplishes this by using a mirror system and a calibration procedure that corrects for the considerable error introduced by the transition of light from water to air. With this system it is possible to record both single and groups of adult zebrafish. Before use, the system has to be calibrated. The system consists of three modules: Recording, Path Reconstruction, and Data Processing. The step-by-step protocols for calibration and using the three modules are presented. Depending on the experimental setup, the system can be used for testing neophobia, white aversion, social cohesion, motor impairments, novel object exploration etc. It is especially promising as a first-step tool to study the effects of drugs or mutations on basic behavioral patterns. The system provides information about vertical and horizontal distribution of the zebrafish, about the xyz-components of kinematic parameters (such as locomotion, velocity, acceleration, and turning angle) and it provides the data necessary to calculate parameters for social cohesions when testing shoals.

  18. A new method for automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D motion captured images (4D).

    PubMed

    Al-Anezi, T; Khambay, B; Peng, M J; O'Leary, E; Ju, X; Ayoub, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D image sequences. 32 subjects (16 males and 16 females) aged 18-35 years were recruited. 23 anthropometric landmarks were marked on the face of each subject with non-permanent ink using a 0.5mm pen. The subjects were asked to perform three facial animations (maximal smile, lip purse and cheek puff) from rest position. Each animation was captured by the 3D imaging system. A single operator manually digitised the landmarks on the 3D facial models and their locations were compared with those of the automatically tracked ones. To investigate the accuracy of manual digitisation, the operator re-digitised the same set of 3D images of 10 subjects (5 male and 5 female) at 1 month interval. The discrepancies in x, y and z coordinates between the 3D position of the manual digitised landmarks and that of the automatic tracked facial landmarks were within 0.17mm. The mean distance between the manually digitised and the automatically tracked landmarks using the tracking software was within 0.55 mm. The automatic tracking of facial landmarks demonstrated satisfactory accuracy which would facilitate the analysis of the dynamic motion during facial animations.

  19. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; ...

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  20. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  1. Analysis of a 3-D system function measured for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmer, Jürgen; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Gleich, Bernhard; Borgert, Jörn

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new tomographic imaging approach that can quantitatively map magnetic nanoparticle distributions in vivo. It is capable of volumetric real-time imaging at particle concentrations low enough to enable clinical applications. For image reconstruction in 3-D MPI, a system function (SF) is used, which describes the relation between the acquired MPI signal and the spatial origin of the signal. The SF depends on the instrumental configuration, the applied field sequence, and the magnetic particle characteristics. Its properties reflect the quality of the spatial encoding process. This work presents a detailed analysis of a measured SF to give experimental evidence that 3-D MPI encodes information using a set of 3-D spatial patterns or basis functions that is stored in the SF. This resembles filling 3-D k-space in magnetic resonance imaging, but is faster since all information is gathered simultaneously over a broad acquisition bandwidth. A frequency domain analysis shows that the finest structures that can be encoded with the presented SF are as small as 0.6 mm. SF simulations are performed to demonstrate that larger particle cores extend the set of basis functions towards higher resolution and that the experimentally observed spatial patterns require the existence of particles with core sizes of about 30 nm in the calibration sample. A simple formula is presented that qualitatively describes the basis functions to be expected at a certain frequency.

  2. The systematic and random errors determination using realtime 3D surface tracking system in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanphet, J.; Suriyapee, S.; Dumrongkijudom, N.; Sanghangthum, T.; Kumkhwao, J.; Wisetrintong, M.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study to determine the patient setup uncertainties in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiation therapy for left breast cancer patients using real-time 3D surface tracking system. The six breast cancer patients treated by 6 MV photon beams from TrueBeam linear accelerator were selected. The patient setup errors and motion during treatment were observed and calculated for interfraction and intrafraction motions. The systematic and random errors were calculated in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions. From 180 images tracking before and during treatment, the maximum systematic error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 0.56 mm and 0.23 mm, the maximum random error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 1.18 mm and 0.53 mm, respectively. The interfraction was more pronounce than the intrafraction, while the systematic error was less impact than random error. In conclusion the intrafraction motion error from patient setup uncertainty is about half of interfraction motion error, which is less impact due to the stability in organ movement from DIBH. The systematic reproducibility is also half of random error because of the high efficiency of modern linac machine that can reduce the systematic uncertainty effectively, while the random errors is uncontrollable.

  3. Real-time 3D motion tracking for small animal brain PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyme, A. Z.; Zhou, V. W.; Meikle, S. R.; Fulton, R. R.

    2008-05-01

    High-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of conscious, unrestrained laboratory animals presents many challenges. Some form of motion correction will normally be necessary to avoid motion artefacts in the reconstruction. The aim of the current work was to develop and evaluate a motion tracking system potentially suitable for use in small animal PET. This system is based on the commercially available stereo-optical MicronTracker S60 which we have integrated with a Siemens Focus-220 microPET scanner. We present measured performance limits of the tracker and the technical details of our implementation, including calibration and synchronization of the system. A phantom study demonstrating motion tracking and correction was also performed. The system can be calibrated with sub-millimetre accuracy, and small lightweight markers can be constructed to provide accurate 3D motion data. A marked reduction in motion artefacts was demonstrated in the phantom study. The techniques and results described here represent a step towards a practical method for rigid-body motion correction in small animal PET. There is scope to achieve further improvements in the accuracy of synchronization and pose measurements in future work.

  4. Continuous dielectrophoretic particle separation using a microfluidic device with 3D electrodes and vaulted obstacles.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yankai; Ren, Yukun; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports a microfluidic separation device combining 3D electrodes and vaulted obstacles to continuously separate particles experiencing strong positive dielectrophoresis (DEP) from particles experiencing weak positive DEP, or from particles experiencing negative DEP. The separation is achieved by first focusing the particle mixture into a narrow stream by a hydrodynamic focusing flow, and then deviating them into different outlets by AC DEP. The vaulted obstacles facilitate the separation by both increasing the non-uniformity of the electric field, and influencing the particles to move in regions strongly affected by DEP. The 3D electrodes give rise to a spatially non-uniform electric field and extend DEP effect to the channel height. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of the obstacles on electric field distribution and particle trajectories so as to optimize the obstacle height and compare with the experimental results. The performance of the device is assessed by separating 25 μm gold-coated particles from 10 μm particles in different flow rates by positive DEP and negative DEP, and also separating 25 μm gold-coated particles from yeast cells using only positive DEP. The experimental observation shows a reasonable agreement with numerical simulation results.

  5. Evaluation and comparison of current biopsy needle localization and tracking methods using 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shen, Yi; Bernard, Adeline; Cachard, Christian; Liebgott, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    This article compares four different biopsy needle localization algorithms in both 3D and 4D situations to evaluate their accuracy and execution time. The localization algorithms were: Principle component analysis (PCA), random Hough transform (RHT), parallel integral projection (PIP) and ROI-RK (ROI based RANSAC and Kalman filter). To enhance the contrast of the biopsy needle and background tissue, a line filtering pre-processing step was implemented. To make the PCA, RHT and PIP algorithms comparable with the ROI-RK method, a region of interest (ROI) strategy was added. Simulated and ex-vivo data were used to evaluate the performance of the different biopsy needle localization algorithms. The resolutions of the sectorial and cylindrical volumes were 0.3mm×0.4mm×0.6mmand0.1mm×0.1mm×0.2mm (axial×lateral×azimuthal) respectively. In so far as the simulation and experimental results show, the ROI-RK method successfully located and tracked the biopsy needle in both 3D and 4D situations. The tip localization error was within 1.5mm and the axis accuracy was within 1.6mm. To the best of our knowledge, considering both localization accuracy and execution time, the ROI-RK was the most stable and time-saving method. Normally, accuracy comes at the expense of time. However, the ROI-RK method was able to locate the biopsy needle with high accuracy in real time, which makes it a promising method for clinical applications.

  6. Confocal fluorometer for diffusion tracking in 3D engineered tissue constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, D.; Zilioli, A.; Tan, N.; Buttenschoen, K.; Chikkanna, B.; Reynolds, J.; Marsden, B.; Hughes, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of the development of a non-contacting instrument, called fScan, based on scanning confocal fluorometry for assessing the diffusion of materials through a tissue matrix. There are many areas in healthcare diagnostics and screening where it is now widely accepted that the need for new quantitative monitoring technologies is a major pinch point in patient diagnostics and in vitro testing. With the increasing need to interpret 3D responses this commonly involves the need to track the diffusion of compounds, pharma-active species and cells through a 3D matrix of tissue. Methods are available but to support the advances that are currently only promised, this monitoring needs to be real-time, non-invasive, and economical. At the moment commercial meters tend to be invasive and usually require a sample of the medium to be removed and processed prior to testing. This methodology clearly has a number of significant disadvantages. fScan combines a fiber based optical arrangement with a compact, free space optical front end that has been integrated so that the sample's diffusion can be measured without interference. This architecture is particularly important due to the "wet" nature of the samples. fScan is designed to measure constructs located within standard well plates and a 2-D motion stage locates the required sample with respect to the measurement system. Results are presented that show how the meter has been used to evaluate movements of samples through collagen constructs in situ without disturbing their kinetic characteristics. These kinetics were little understood prior to these measurements.

  7. Automated 3D motion tracking using Gabor filter bank, robust point matching, and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the robust point matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of 1) through-plane motion and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the moving least square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  8. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  9. ORBXYZ: A 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. V.; Cohen, R. H.; Ferguson, J. R.; Johnston, B. M.; Sharp, C. B.; Willmann, P. A.

    1981-06-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, was modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications.

  10. Digital holography particle image velocimetry for the measurement of 3D t-3c flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Gongxin; Wei, Runjie

    2005-10-01

    In this paper a digital in-line holographic recording and reconstruction system was set up and used in the particle image velocimetry for the 3D t-3c (the three-component (3c), velocity vector field measurements in a three-dimensional (3D), space field with time history ( t)) flow measurements that made up of the new full-flow field experimental technique—digital holographic particle image velocimetry (DHPIV). The traditional holographic film was replaced by a CCD chip that records instantaneously the interference fringes directly without the darkroom processing, and the virtual image slices in different positions were reconstructed by computation using Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral method from the digital holographic image. Also a complex field signal filter (analyzing image calculated by its intensity and phase from real and image parts in fast fourier transform (FFT)) was applied in image reconstruction to achieve the thin focus depth of image field that has a strong effect with the vertical velocity component resolution. Using the frame-straddle CCD device techniques, the 3c velocity vector was computed by 3D cross-correlation through space interrogation block matching through the reconstructed image slices with the digital complex field signal filter. Then the 3D-3c-velocity field (about 20 000 vectors), 3D-streamline and 3D-vorticiry fields, and the time evolution movies (30 field/s) for the 3D t-3c flows were displayed by the experimental measurement using this DHPIV method and techniques.

  11. Nondestructive optical testing of 3D disperse systems with micro- and nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukova, Alexandra G.

    2005-04-01

    Nondestructive testing and analysis of three-dimensional (3D) disperse systems (DS) with micro- and nano-particles of different nature by complex of optical compatible methods can provide further progress in on-line control of water and air. The simultaneous analysis of 3D-DS by refractometry, absorbency, fluorescence and by different types of light scattering can help to elaborate the sensing elements for specific impurity control. In our research we have investigated by complex of optical methods different 3D-DS such as: proteins, nucleoproteids, lipoproteids, liposomes, viruses, virosomes, lipid emulsions, blood substitutes, latexes, liquid crystals, biological cells with various form and size (including bacterial cells), metallic powders, clays, kimberlites, zeolites, oils, crude oils, etc., and mixtures -- proteins with nucleic acids, liposomes and viruses, liquid crystals with surfactants, mixtures of clay with bacterial cells, samples of natural and water-supply waters, etc. This experience suggests that the set of optical parameters of so called second class is unique for each 3D-DS. In another words each DS can be characterized by n-dimensional vector in n-dimensional space of optical parameters. Mixtures can be considered as polycomponent and polymodal 3D-DS (such as natural water and air). Due to the fusion of various optical data it is possible to indicate by information statistical theory the inverse physical problem on the presence of impurities in mixtures (viruses, bacteria, oil, metallic particles, etc.), and in this case polymodality of particle size distribution is not an obstacle. Bank of optical data for 3D-DS is the base for analysis by information-statistical method.

  12. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  13. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-13

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  14. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  15. Graphene originated 3D structures grown on the assembled nickel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paronyan, Tereza; Harutyunyan, Avetik; Honda Research Institute USA Inc. Team

    2013-03-01

    Recently, the fabrication of various morphologies of graphene originated structures became very important due to the perspective of wide range of new applications. Particularly, free standing 3D structured graphene foams could be imperative in energy related areas . Here, we present the new approach of the CVD growth of 3D graphene network by using primarily sintered Ni particle's (~40 μm size) assembles as a template-catalyst via decomposition of low rate of CH4 at 1100° C based on synthesis method described earlier. SEM and Raman spectra analysis revealed the formation of graphene structure containing a single up to few layers grown on the sintered metal particles served as a catalyst-template. After etching the metal frame without using any support polymer, 3D free-standing graphene microporous structure was formed demonstrating high BET surface area. Two probe measurements of frame resistance were ~2-8 Ω. Our approach allows controllable tune the pore size and thereby the surface area of 3D graphene network through the variation of the template-catalyst particles size.

  16. Beam particle tracking for MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanage, Anusha; MUSE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the 7 σ disagreement between the proton radius extracted from the measured muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and the proton radius extracted from the regular hydrogen Lamb shift and elastic ep scattering form factor data. So far there is no generally accepted resolution to the puzzle. The explanations for the discrepancy include new degrees of freedom beyond the Standard Model. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) will simultaneously measure ep and μp scattering at the Paul Scherrer Institute, using the πM1 beam line at 100-250 MeV/c to cover a four-momentum transfer range of Q2=0.002-0.07 (GeV/c)2. Due to the large divergence of the secondary muon beam, beam particle trajectories are needed for every event. They are measured by a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) tracking telescope consisting of three 10x10 cm2 triple-GEM chambers. Fast segmented scintillator paddles provide precise timing information. The GEM detectors, their performance in test beam times, and plans and milestones will be discussed. This work has been supported by DOE DE-SC0012589 and NSF HRD-1649909. DOE DE-SC0012589 and NSF HRD-1649909.

  17. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  18. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative velocity measurement technique for measuring instantaneous planar cross sections of a flow field. The technique offers very high precision (1%) directionally resolved velocity vector estimates, but its use has been limited by high equipment costs and complexity of operation. Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) is an all-electronic PIV data acquisition and reduction procedure which is simple, fast, and easily implemented. The procedure uses a low power, continuous wave laser and a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera to electronically record the particle images. A frame grabber board in a PC is used for data acquisition and reduction processing. PDT eliminates the need for photographic processing, system costs are moderately low, and reduced data are available within seconds of acquisition. The technique results in velocity estimate accuracies on the order of 5%. The software is fully menu-driven from the acquisition to the reduction and analysis of the data. Options are available to acquire a single image or 5- or 25-field series of images separated in time by multiples of 1/60 second. The user may process each image, specifying its boundaries to remove unwanted glare from the periphery and adjusting its background level to clearly resolve the particle images. Data reduction routines determine the particle image centroids and create time history files. PDT then identifies the velocity vectors which describe the particle movement in the flow field. Graphical data analysis routines are included which allow the user to graph the time history files and display the velocity vector maps, interpolated velocity vector grids, iso-velocity vector contours, and flow streamlines. The PDT data processing software is written in FORTRAN 77 and the data acquisition routine is written in C-Language for 80386-based IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS v3.0 or higher. Machine requirements include 4 MB RAM (3 MB Extended), a single or

  19. 3-D geometry calibration and markerless electromagnetic tracking with a mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Barrett, Johnny; Wang, Zhonghua; Litvin, Andrew; Hamadeh, Ali; Beaudet, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The design of mobile X-ray C-arm equipment with image tomography and surgical guidance capabilities involves the retrieval of repeatable gantry positioning in three-dimensional space. Geometry misrepresentations can cause degradation of the reconstruction results with the appearance of blurred edges, image artifacts, and even false structures. It may also amplify surgical instrument tracking errors leading to improper implant placement. In our prior publications we have proposed a C-arm 3D positioner calibration method comprising separate intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration steps. Following this approach, in the present paper, we extend the intrinsic geometry calibration of C-gantry beyond angular positions in the orbital plane into angular positions on a unit sphere of isocentric rotation. Our method makes deployment of markerless interventional tool guidance with use of high-resolution fluoro images and electromagnetic tracking feasible at any angular position of the tube-detector assembly. Variations of the intrinsic parameters associated with C-arm motion are measured off-line as functions of orbital and lateral angles. The proposed calibration procedure provides better accuracy, and prevents unnecessary workflow steps for surgical navigation applications. With a slight modification, the Misalignment phantom, a tool for intrinsic geometry calibration, is also utilized to obtain an accurate 'image-to-sensor' mapping. We show simulation results, image quality and navigation accuracy estimates, and feasibility data acquired with the prototype system. The experimental results show the potential of high-resolution CT imaging (voxel size below 0.5 mm) and confident navigation in an interventional surgery setting with a mobile C-arm.

  20. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2008-09-07

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm{sup 3}) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  1. A genetic algorithm particle pairing technique for 3D velocity field extraction in holographic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Meng, H.

    This research explores a novel technique, using Genetic Algorithm Particle Pairing (GAPP) to extract three-dimensional (3D) velocity fields of complex flows. It is motivated by Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV), in which intrinsic speckle noise hinders the achievement of high particle density required for conventional correlation methods in extracting 3D velocity fields, especially in regions with large velocity gradients. The GA particle pairing method maps particles recorded at the first exposure to those at the second exposure in a 3D space, providing one velocity vector for each particle pair instead of seeking statistical averaging. Hence, particle pairing can work with sparse seeding and complex 3D velocity fields. When dealing with a large number of particles from two instants, however, the accuracy of pairing results and processing speed become major concerns. Using GA's capability to search a large solution space parallelly, our algorithm can efficiently find the best mapping scenarios among a large number of possible particle pairing schemes. During GA iterations, different pairing schemes or solutions are evaluated based on fluid dynamics. Two types of evaluation functions are proposed, tested, and embedded into the GA procedures. Hence, our Genetic Algorithm Particle Pairing (GAPP) technique is characterized by robustness in velocity calculation, high spatial resolution, good parallelism in handling large data sets, and high processing speed on parallel architectures. It has been successfully tested on a simple HPIV measurement of a real trapped vortex flow as well as a series of numerical experiments. In this paper, we introduce the principle of GAPP, analyze its performance under different parameters, and evaluate its processing speed on different computer architectures.

  2. Tracking errors in 2D multiple particle tracking microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Anne; Oelschlaeger, Claude; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Tracking errors due to particles moving in and out of the focal plane are a fundamental problem of multiple particle tracking microrheology. Here, we present a new approach to treat these errors so that a statistically significant number of particle trajectories with reasonable length are received, which is important for an unbiased analysis of multiple particle tracking data from inhomogeneous fluids. Starting from Crocker and Grier’s tracking algorithm, we identify particle displacements between subsequent images as artificial jumps; if this displacement deviates more than four standard deviations from the mean value, trajectories are terminated at such positions. In a further processing step, trajectories separated by a time gap Δ {τ\\text{max}} are merged based on an adaptive search radius criterion accounting for individual particle mobility. For a series of Newtonian fluids covering the viscosity range 6-1300 mPa s, this approach yields the correct viscosity but also results in a viscosity-independent number of trajectories equal to the average number of particles in an image with a minimum length covering at least two orders of magnitude in time. This allows for an unbiased characterization of heterogeneous fluids. For a Carbopol ETD 2050 solution we recover the expected broad variation of particle mobility. Consistent with the widely accepted structural model of highly swollen microgel particles suspended in a polymer solution, we find about 2/3 of the tracers are elastically trapped.

  3. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc; Binnekamp, Dirk

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  4. Mechanism of self-propulsion in 3D-printed active granular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumakis, N.; Gnoli, A.; Maggi, C.; Puglisi, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2016-11-01

    Active granular particles can harness unbiased mechanical vibrations in the environment to generate directed motion. We provide a theoretical framework that connects the geometrical shape of a three dimensional object to its self-propulsion characteristics over a vertically vibrated plate. We find that a maximally efficient propulsion is achieved for structures having tilted flexible legs forming a characteristic angle with the vertical. Our predictions are verified by experimental observations on a class of 3D printed structures with smoothly varying geometrical features.

  5. 3D Air Filtration Modeling for Nanofiber Based Filters in the Ultrafine Particle Size Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambaer, Wannes; Zatloukal, Martin; Kimmer, Dusan

    2011-07-01

    In this work, novel 3D filtration model for nanofiber based filters has been proposed and tested. For the model validation purposes, filtration efficiency characteristics of two different polyurethane nanofiber based structures (prepared by the electrospinning process) were determined experimentally in the ultrafine particle size range (20-400 nm). It has been found that the proposed model is able to reasonably predict the measured filtration efficiency curves for both tested samples.

  6. Exploring single-molecule interactions through 3D optical trapping and tracking: From thermal noise to protein refolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley Philip

    The focus of this thesis is the development and application of a novel technique for investigating the structure and dynamics of weak interactions between and within single-molecules. This approach is designed to explore unusual features in bi-directional transitions near equilibrium. The basic idea is to infer molecular events by observing changes in the three-dimensional Brownian fluctuations of a functionalized microsphere held weakly near a reactive substrate. Experimentally, I have developed a unique optical tweezers system that combines an interference technique for accurate 3D tracking (˜1 nm vertically, and ˜2-3 nm laterally) with a continuous autofocus system which stabilizes the trap height to within 1-2 mn over hours. A number of different physical and biological systems were investigated with this instrument. Data interpretation was assisted by a multi-scale Brownian Dynamics simulation that I have developed. I have explored the 3D signatures of different molecular tethers, distinguishing between single and multiple attachments, as well as between stiff and soft linkages. As well, I have developed a technique for measuring the force-dependent compliance of molecular tethers from thermal noise fluctuations and demonstrated this with a short ssDNA oligomer. Another practical approach that I have developed for extracting information from fluctuation measurements is Inverse Brownian Dynamics, which yields the underlying potential of mean force and position dependent diffusion coefficient from the Brownian motion of a particle. I have also developed a new force calibration method that takes into account video motion blur, and that uses this information to measure bead dynamics. Perhaps most significantly, I have trade the first direct observations of the refolding of spectrin repeats under mechanical force, and investigated the force-dependent kinetics of this transition.

  7. Mapping 3D Strains with Ultrasound Speckle Tracking: Method Validation and Initial Results in Porcine Scleral Inflation.

    PubMed

    Cruz Perez, Benjamin; Pavlatos, Elias; Morris, Hugh J; Chen, Hong; Pan, Xueliang; Hart, Richard T; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a high frequency ultrasound method for measuring distributive, 3D strains in the sclera during elevations of intraocular pressure. A 3D cross-correlation based speckle-tracking algorithm was implemented to compute the 3D displacement vector and strain tensor at each tracking point. Simulated ultrasound radiofrequency data from a sclera-like structure at undeformed and deformed states with known strains were used to evaluate the accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of strain estimation. An experimental high frequency ultrasound (55 MHz) system was built to acquire 3D scans of porcine eyes inflated from 15 to 17 and then 19 mmHg. Simulations confirmed good strain estimation accuracy and SNR (e.g., the axial strains had less than 4.5% error with SNRs greater than 16.5 for strains from 0.005 to 0.05). Experimental data in porcine eyes showed increasing tensile, compressive, and shear strains in the posterior sclera during inflation, with a volume ratio close to one suggesting near-incompressibility. This study established the feasibility of using high frequency ultrasound speckle tracking for measuring 3D tissue strains and its potential to characterize physiological deformations in the posterior eye.

  8. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  9. LEWICE3D/GlennHT Particle Analysis of the Honeywell Al502 Low Pressure Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Rigby, David L.

    2015-01-01

    A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell AL502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced a rollback and another which did not rollback during testing in the Propulsion Systems Lab at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.56 ice accretion software. The flow and particle analysis used a 3D steady flow, mixing plane approach to model the transport of flow and particles through the engine. The inflow conditions for the rollback case were: airspeed, 145 ms; static pressure, 33,373 Pa; static temperature, 253.3 K. The inflow conditions for the non-roll-back case were: airspeed, 153 ms; static pressure, 34,252 Pa; static temperature, 260.1 K. Both cases were subjected to an ice particle cloud with a median volume diameter of 24 microns, an ice water content of 2.0 gm3 and a relative humidity of 100 percent. The most significant difference between the rollback and non-rollback conditions was the inflow static temperature which was 6.8 K higher for the non-rollback case.

  10. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution.

  11. TrackMate: An open and extensible platform for single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Perry, Nick; Schindelin, Johannes; Hoopes, Genevieve M; Reynolds, Gregory D; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Shorte, Spencer L; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2017-02-15

    We present TrackMate, an open source Fiji plugin for the automated, semi-automated, and manual tracking of single-particles. It offers a versatile and modular solution that works out of the box for end users, through a simple and intuitive user interface. It is also easily scriptable and adaptable, operating equally well on 1D over time, 2D over time, 3D over time, or other single and multi-channel image variants. TrackMate provides several visualization and analysis tools that aid in assessing the relevance of results. The utility of TrackMate is further enhanced through its ability to be readily customized to meet specific tracking problems. TrackMate is an extensible platform where developers can easily write their own detection, particle linking, visualization or analysis algorithms within the TrackMate environment. This evolving framework provides researchers with the opportunity to quickly develop and optimize new algorithms based on existing TrackMate modules without the need of having to write de novo user interfaces, including visualization, analysis and exporting tools. The current capabilities of TrackMate are presented in the context of three different biological problems. First, we perform Caenorhabditis-elegans lineage analysis to assess how light-induced damage during imaging impairs its early development. Our TrackMate-based lineage analysis indicates the lack of a cell-specific light-sensitive mechanism. Second, we investigate the recruitment of NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) clusters in fibroblasts after stimulation by the cytokine IL-1 and show that photodamage can generate artifacts in the shape of TrackMate characterized movements that confuse motility analysis. Finally, we validate the use of TrackMate for quantitative lifetime analysis of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in plant cells.

  12. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  13. Improvement of the size estimation of 3D tracked droplets using digital in-line holography with joint estimation reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrier, N.; Grosjean, N.; Dib, E.; Méès, L.; Fournier, C.; Marié, J.-L.

    2016-04-01

    Digital holography is a valuable tool for three-dimensional information extraction. Among existing configurations, the originally proposed set-up (i.e. Gabor, or in-line holography), is reasonably immune to variations in the experimental environment making it a method of choice for studies of fluid dynamics. Nevertheless, standard hologram reconstruction techniques, based on numerical light back-propagation are prone to artifacts such as twin images or aliases that limit both the quality and quantity of information extracted from the acquired holograms. To get round this issue, the hologram reconstruction as a parametric inverse problem has been shown to accurately estimate 3D positions and the size of seeding particles directly from the hologram. To push the bounds of accuracy on size estimation still further, we propose to fully exploit the information redundancy of a hologram video sequence using joint estimation reconstruction. Applying this approach in a bench-top experiment, we show that it led to a relative precision of 0.13% (for a 60 μm diameter droplet) for droplet size estimation, and a tracking precision of {σx}× {σy}× {σz}=0.15× 0.15× 1~\\text{pixels} .

  14. Angle only tracking with particle flow filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2011-09-01

    We show the results of numerical experiments for tracking ballistic missiles using only angle measurements. We compare the performance of an extended Kalman filter with a new nonlinear filter using particle flow to compute Bayes' rule. For certain difficult geometries, the particle flow filter is an order of magnitude more accurate than the EKF. Angle only tracking is of interest in several different sensors; for example, passive optics and radars in which range and Doppler data are spoiled by jamming.

  15. Results of a 3-D full particle simulation of quasi-perpendicular shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, I.; Fujimoto, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress of computational power enables us to perform really macro-scale three-dimensional situations with full particle codes. In this presentation, we will report results of a three-dimensional simulation of a quasi-perpendicular shock. The simulation parameters were selected to simulate a Cluster-II observational result reported by Seki et al. (2009), M_A=7.4 and beta=0.16. The realistic mass ratio mi/me=1840 was taken, and almost one ion inertia length square could be allocated to the plane perpendicular to the upstream flow axis. The result shows that both the self-reformation process and whistler emission are observed. However, the 3-D result is not a simple superposition of 2-D results. The most impressive feature is that quite complicated wave activity is found in the shock foot region. With the help of this wave activity, electron heating observed in the 3-D run is more efficient than those in the 1-D and 2-D runs with the same shock parameters. Moreover, non-thermal electrons are also produced only in the 3D run. In this paper, comparing the 3-D result with previous 1-D and 2-D simulation results, three dimensional nature of the shock transition region of quasi-perpendicular shock is discussed.

  16. 3D gravity inversion and uncertainty assessment of basement relief via Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallero, J. L. G.; Fernández-Martínez, J. L.; Bonvalot, S.; Fudym, O.

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear gravity inversion in sedimentary basins is a classical problem in applied geophysics. Although a 2D approximation is widely used, 3D models have been also proposed to better take into account the basin geometry. A common nonlinear approach to this 3D problem consists in modeling the basin as a set of right rectangular prisms with prescribed density contrast, whose depths are the unknowns. Then, the problem is iteratively solved via local optimization techniques from an initial model computed using some simplifications or being estimated using prior geophysical models. Nevertheless, this kind of approach is highly dependent on the prior information that is used, and lacks from a correct solution appraisal (nonlinear uncertainty analysis). In this paper, we use the family of global Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) optimizers for the 3D gravity inversion and model appraisal of the solution that is adopted for basement relief estimation in sedimentary basins. Synthetic and real cases are illustrated, showing that robust results are obtained. Therefore, PSO seems to be a very good alternative for 3D gravity inversion and uncertainty assessment of basement relief when used in a sampling while optimizing approach. That way important geological questions can be answered probabilistically in order to perform risk assessment in the decisions that are made.

  17. 3D printing enables separation of orthogonal functions within a hydrogel particle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ritu; Clay, Nicholas E; Sen, Sanjeet; Melhem, Molly; Qin, Ellen; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional particles with distinct physiochemical phases are required by a variety of applications in biomedical engineering, such as diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. This motivates the development of a repeatable, efficient, and customizable approach to manufacturing particles with spatially segregated bioactive moieties. This study demonstrates a stereolithographic 3D printing approach for designing and fabricating large arrays of biphasic poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) gel particles. The fabrication parameters governing the physical and biochemical properties of multi-layered particles are thoroughly investigated, yielding a readily tunable approach to manufacturing customizable arrays of multifunctional particles. The advantage in spatially organizing functional epitopes is examined by loading superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in separate layers of biphasic PEGDA gel particles and examining SPION-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast and BSA-release kinetics. Particles with spatial segregation of functional moieties have demonstrably higher MR contrast and BSA release. Overall, this study will contribute significant knowledge to the preparation of multifunctional particles for use as biomedical tools.

  18. Development and Characterization of Embedded Sensory Particles Using Multi-Scale 3D Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Stephen R.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for detecting fatigue cracks has been explored at NASA Langley Research Center. Microscopic NiTi shape memory alloy (sensory) particles were embedded in a 7050 aluminum alloy matrix to detect the presence of fatigue cracks. Cracks exhibit an elevated stress field near their tip inducing a martensitic phase transformation in nearby sensory particles. Detectable levels of acoustic energy are emitted upon particle phase transformation such that the existence and location of fatigue cracks can be detected. To test this concept, a fatigue crack was grown in a mode-I single-edge notch fatigue crack growth specimen containing sensory particles. As the crack approached the sensory particles, measurements of particle strain, matrix-particle debonding, and phase transformation behavior of the sensory particles were performed. Full-field deformation measurements were performed using a novel multi-scale optical 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. This information will be used in a finite element-based study to determine optimal sensory material behavior and density.

  19. The Interior Analysis and 3-D Reconstruction of Internally-Mixed Light-Absorbing Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Collins, S. M.; Anderson, I.; Herzing, A.

    2010-12-01

    . Finally, automated serial slicing and imaging in the FIB-SEM generated a stack of secondary electron images of the particles’ interior surfaces that allowed for the 3-D reconstruction of the particles, a process known as FIB tomography. Interior surface of light-absorbing carbonaceous particle from FIB-SEM analysis.

  20. Integrating eye tracking and motion sensor on mobile phone for interactive 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Wei; Chiang, Chen-Kuo; Lai, Shang-Hong

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an eye tracking and gaze estimation system for mobile phone. We integrate an eye detector, cornereye center and iso-center to improve pupil detection. The optical flow information is used for eye tracking. We develop a robust eye tracking system that integrates eye detection and optical-flow based image tracking. In addition, we further incorporate the orientation sensor information from the mobile phone to improve the eye tracking for accurate gaze estimation. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed eye tracking and gaze estimation system through experiments on some public video sequences as well as videos acquired directly from mobile phone.

  1. High resolution 3D confocal microscope imaging of volcanic ash particles.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Gill, Ian; Petford, Nick

    2017-07-15

    We present initial results from a novel high resolution confocal microscopy study of the 3D surface structure of volcanic ash particles from two recent explosive basaltic eruptions, Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grimsvötn (2011), in Iceland. The majority of particles imaged are less than 100μm in size and include PM10s, known to be harmful to humans if inhaled. Previous studies have mainly used 2D microscopy to examine volcanic particles. The aim of this study was to test the potential of 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy as a reliable analysis tool for these materials and if so to what degree high resolution surface and volume data could be obtained that would further aid in their classification. First results obtained using an Olympus LEXT scanning confocal microscope with a ×50 and ×100 objective lens are highly encouraging. They reveal a range of discrete particle types characterised by sharp or concave edges consistent with explosive formation and sudden rupture of magma. Initial surface area/volume ratios are given that may prove useful in subsequent modelling of damage to aircraft engines and human tissue where inhalation has occurred.

  2. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  3. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  4. Charactrisation of particle assemblies by 3D cross correlation light scattering and diffusing wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffold, Frank

    2014-08-01

    To characterize the structural and dynamic properties of soft materials and small particles, information on the relevant mesoscopic length scales is required. Such information is often obtained from traditional static and dynamic light scattering (SLS/DLS) experiments in the single scattering regime. In many dense systems, however, these powerful techniques frequently fail due to strong multiple scattering of light. Here I will discuss some experimental innovations that have emerged over the last decade. New methods such as 3D static and dynamic light scattering (3D LS) as well as diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) can cover a much extended range of experimental parameters ranging from dilute polymer solutions, colloidal suspensions to extremely opaque viscoelastic emulsions.

  5. An automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Wenrong; Bi, Lie

    2017-03-01

    Micro-particle is hard to be observed as small scale and hard to be gripped as micro-force from substrate, an automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in the guide of microscopic vision systems is proposed in the paper to grip micro-particle. First, the micro-gripper driven by electrostatic force is introduced and forces in gripping process are analyzed. Second, a micro-assembly robot composed of two microscopic vision systems is established to monitor micro-operation process and to operate micro-particle. Image features of micro-particle and micro-gripper end-effector are extracted by image feature extraction method to calculate relative position of micro-particle and micro-gripper in image space. Last, a movement control strategy in 3D space based on image Jacobian matrix is studied to control micro-gripper approach and align with micro-particle. Experimental results verified the effectiveness of proposed methods.

  6. 3D hybrid simulations with gyrokinetic particle ions and fluid electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.; Park, W.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The previous hybrid MHD/particle model (MH3D-K code) represented energetic ions as gyrokinetic (or drift-kinetic) particles coupled to MHD equations using the pressure or current coupling scheme. A small energetic to bulk ion density ratio was assumed, n{sub h}/n{sub b} {much_lt} 1, allowing the neglect of the energetic ion perpendicular inertia in the momentum equation and the use of MHD Ohm`s law E = {minus}v{sub b} {times} B. A generalization of this model in which all ions are treated as gyrokinetic/drift-kinetic particles and fluid description is used for the electron dynamics is considered in this paper.

  7. MetaTracker: integration and abstraction of 3D motion tracking data from multiple hardware systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopecky, Ken; Winer, Eliot

    2014-06-01

    Motion tracking has long been one of the primary challenges in mixed reality (MR), augmented reality (AR), and virtual reality (VR). Military and defense training can provide particularly difficult challenges for motion tracking, such as in the case of Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) and other dismounted, close quarters simulations. These simulations can take place across multiple rooms, with many fast-moving objects that need to be tracked with a high degree of accuracy and low latency. Many tracking technologies exist, such as optical, inertial, ultrasonic, and magnetic. Some tracking systems even combine these technologies to complement each other. However, there are no systems that provide a high-resolution, flexible, wide-area solution that is resistant to occlusion. While frameworks exist that simplify the use of tracking systems and other input devices, none allow data from multiple tracking systems to be combined, as if from a single system. In this paper, we introduce a method for compensating for the weaknesses of individual tracking systems by combining data from multiple sources and presenting it as a single tracking system. Individual tracked objects are identified by name, and their data is provided to simulation applications through a server program. This allows tracked objects to transition seamlessly from the area of one tracking system to another. Furthermore, it abstracts away the individual drivers, APIs, and data formats for each system, providing a simplified API that can be used to receive data from any of the available tracking systems. Finally, when single-piece tracking systems are used, those systems can themselves be tracked, allowing for real-time adjustment of the trackable area. This allows simulation operators to leverage limited resources in more effective ways, improving the quality of training.

  8. Particle filtering for passive fathometer tracking.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Seabed interface depths and fathometer amplitudes are tracked for an unknown and changing number of sub-bottom reflectors. This is achieved by incorporating conventional and adaptive fathometer processors into sequential Monte Carlo methods for a moving vertical line array. Sediment layering information and time-varying fathometer response amplitudes are tracked by using a multiple model particle filter with an uncertain number of reflectors. Results are compared to a classical particle filter where the number of reflectors is considered to be known. Reflector tracking is demonstrated for both conventional and adaptive processing applied to the drifting array data from the Boundary 2003 experiment. The layering information is successfully tracked by the multiple model particle filter even for noisy fathometer outputs.

  9. 3D Ultrasonic Needle Tracking with a 1.5D Transducer Array for Guidance of Fetal Interventions

    PubMed Central

    West, Simeon J.; Mari, Jean-Martial; Ourselin, Sebastien; David, Anna L.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound image guidance is widely used in minimally invasive procedures, including fetal surgery. In this context, maintaining visibility of medical devices is a significant challenge. Needles and catheters can readily deviate from the ultrasound imaging plane as they are inserted. When the medical device tips are not visible, they can damage critical structures, with potentially profound consequences including loss of pregnancy. In this study, we performed 3D ultrasonic tracking of a needle using a novel probe with a 1.5D array of transducer elements that was driven by a commercial ultrasound system. A fiber-optic hydrophone integrated into the needle received transmissions from the probe, and data from this sensor was processed to estimate the position of the hydrophone tip in the coordinate space of the probe. Golay coding was used to increase the signal-to-noise (SNR). The relative tracking accuracy was better than 0.4 mm in all dimensions, as evaluated using a water phantom. To obtain a preliminary indication of the clinical potential of 3D ultrasonic needle tracking, an intravascular needle insertion was performed in an in vivo pregnant sheep model. The SNR values ranged from 12 to 16 at depths of 20 to 31 mm and at an insertion angle of 49° relative to the probe surface normal. The results of this study demonstrate that 3D ultrasonic needle tracking with a fiber-optic hydrophone sensor and a 1.5D array is feasible in clinically realistic environments. PMID:28111644

  10. Simulation of the 3D viscoelastic free surface flow by a parallel corrected particle scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Lian, Ren; Tao, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the behavior of the three-dimensional (3D) jet coiling based on the viscoelastic Oldroyd-B model is investigated by a corrected particle scheme, which is named the smoothed particle hydrodynamics with corrected symmetric kernel gradient and shifting particle technique (SPH_CS_SP) method. The accuracy and stability of SPH_CS_SP method is first tested by solving Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Green flow. Then the capacity for the SPH_CS_SP method to solve the viscoelastic fluid is verified by the polymer flow through a periodic array of cylinders. Moreover, the convergence of the SPH_CS_SP method is also investigated. Finally, the proposed method is further applied to the 3D viscoelastic jet coiling problem, and the influences of macroscopic parameters on the jet coiling are discussed. The numerical results show that the SPH_CS_SP method has higher accuracy and better stability than the traditional SPH method and other corrected SPH method, and can improve the tensile instability. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20130436 and BK20150436) and the Natural Science Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 15KJB110025).

  11. Particle energization in 3D magnetic reconnection of relativistic pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Yin Lin; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Liang, Edison P.; Li Hui

    2011-05-15

    We present large scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations to examine particle energization in magnetic reconnection of relativistic electron-positron (pair) plasmas. The initial configuration is set up as a relativistic Harris equilibrium without a guide field. These simulations are large enough to accommodate a sufficient number of tearing and kink modes. Contrary to the non-relativistic limit, the linear tearing instability is faster than the linear kink instability, at least in our specific parameters. We find that the magnetic energy dissipation is first facilitated by the tearing instability and followed by the secondary kink instability. Particles are mostly energized inside the magnetic islands during the tearing stage due to the spatially varying electric fields produced by the outflows from reconnection. Secondary kink instability leads to additional particle acceleration. Accelerated particles are, however, observed to be thermalized quickly. The large amplitude of the vertical magnetic field resulting from the tearing modes by the secondary kink modes further help thermalizing the non-thermal particles generated from the secondary kink instability. Implications of these results for astrophysics are briefly discussed.

  12. The 3D Tele Motion Tracking for the Orthodontic Facial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nota, Alessandro; Marchetti, Enrico; Padricelli, Giuseppe; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability of 3D-TMT, previously used only for dynamic testing, in a static cephalometric evaluation. Material and Method. A group of 40 patients (20 males and 20 females; mean age 14.2 ± 1.2 years; 12–18 years old) was included in the study. The measurements obtained by the 3D-TMT cephalometric analysis with a conventional frontal cephalometric analysis were compared for each subject. Nine passive markers reflectors were positioned on the face skin for the detection of the profile of the patient. Through the acquisition of these points, corresponding plans for three-dimensional posterior-anterior cephalometric analysis were found. Results. The cephalometric results carried out with 3D-TMT and with traditional posterior-anterior cephalometric analysis showed the 3D-TMT system values are slightly higher than the values measured on radiographs but statistically significant; nevertheless their correlation is very high. Conclusion. The recorded values obtained using the 3D-TMT analysis were correlated to cephalometric analysis, with small but statistically significant differences. The Dahlberg errors resulted to be always lower than the mean difference between the 2D and 3D measurements. A clinician should use, during the clinical monitoring of a patient, always the same method, to avoid comparing different millimeter magnitudes. PMID:28044130

  13. Accurate and high-performance 3D position measurement of fiducial marks by stereoscopic system for railway track inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Alexey A.; Serikova, Mariya G.; Pantyushina, Ekaterina N.; Volkova, Daria A.

    2016-04-01

    Modern demands for railway track measurements require high accuracy (about 2-5 mm) of rails placement along the track to ensure smooth, safe and fast transportation. As a mean for railways geometry measurements we suggest a stereoscopic system which measures 3D position of fiducial marks arranged along the track by image processing algorithms. The system accuracy was verified during laboratory tests by comparison with precise laser tracker indications. The accuracy of +/-1.5 mm within a measurement volume 150×400×5000 mm was achieved during the tests. This confirmed that the stereoscopic system demonstrates good measurement accuracy and can be potentially used as fully automated mean for railway track inspection.

  14. Global gyrokinetic models for energetic particle driven Alfvén instabilities in 3D equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Don; Holod, Ihor

    2015-11-01

    The GTC global gyrokinetic PIC model has been adapted to 3D VMEC equilibria and provides a new method for the analysis of Alfvénic instabilities in stellarators, 3D tokamaks, and helical RFP states. The gyrokinetic orderings (k||/k⊥ << 1, ω/Ωci << 1, ρEP/L << 1) are applicable to a range of energetic particle driven instabilities that have been observed in 3D configurations. Applications of this model to stellarators have indicated that a variety of different Alfvén instabilities can be excited, depending on the toroidal mode number, fast ion average energy and fast ion density profile. Both an LHD discharge where bursting n = 1 Alfvén activity in the TAE gap was observed and a W7-X case have been examined. TAE,/EAE/GAE modes have been found in the simulations, depending on the mode family and fast ion profiles used. The dynamical evolution of the instabilities shows the field period coupling between n and n + Nfp expected for a stellarator. The development of gyrofluid reduced models that can capture relevant physics aspects of the gyrokinetic models will also be discussed. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC and the GSEP SciDAC Center.

  15. Application of 3D digital image correlation to track displacements and strains of canvas paintings exposed to relative humidity changes.

    PubMed

    Malowany, Krzysztof; Tymińska-Widmer, Ludmiła; Malesa, Marcin; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Targowski, Piotr; Rouba, Bogumiła J

    2014-03-20

    This paper introduces a methodology for tracking displacements in canvas paintings exposed to relative humidity changes. Displacements are measured by means of the 3D digital image correlation method that is followed by a postprocessing of displacement data, which allows the separation of local displacements from global displacement maps. The applicability of this methodology is tested on measurements of a model painting on canvas with introduced defects causing local inhomogeneity. The method allows the evaluation of conservation methods used for repairing canvas supports.

  16. Atmospheric Motion Vectors from INSAT-3D: Initial quality assessment and its impact on track forecast of cyclonic storm NANAUK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, S. K.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Kumar, Prashant; Kiran Kumar, A. S.; Pal, P. K.; Kaushik, Nitesh; Sangar, Ghansham

    2016-03-01

    The advanced Indian meteorological geostationary satellite INSAT-3D was launched on 26 July 2013 with an improved imager and an infrared sounder and is placed at 82°E over the Indian Ocean region. With the advancement in retrieval techniques of different atmospheric parameters and with improved imager data have enhanced the scope for better understanding of the different tropical atmospheric processes over this region. The retrieval techniques and accuracy of one such parameter, Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV) has improved significantly with the availability of improved spatial resolution data along with more options of spectral channels in the INSAT-3D imager. The present work is mainly focused on providing brief descriptions of INSAT-3D data and AMV derivation processes using these data. It also discussed the initial quality assessment of INSAT-3D AMVs for a period of six months starting from 01 February 2014 to 31 July 2014 with other independent observations: i) Meteosat-7 AMVs available over this region, ii) in-situ radiosonde wind measurements, iii) cloud tracked winds from Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and iv) numerical model analysis. It is observed from this study that the qualities of newly derived INSAT-3D AMVs are comparable with existing two versions of Meteosat-7 AMVs over this region. To demonstrate its initial application, INSAT-3D AMVs are assimilated in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and it is found that the assimilation of newly derived AMVs has helped in reduction of track forecast errors of the recent cyclonic storm NANAUK over the Arabian Sea. Though, the present study is limited to its application to one case study, however, it will provide some guidance to the operational agencies for implementation of this new AMV dataset for future applications in the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) over the south Asia region.

  17. Enhanced copper micro/nano-particle mixed paste sintered at low temperature for 3D interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y. Y.; Ng, M. Z.; Anantha, P.; Lin, Y. D.; Li, Z. G.; Gan, C. L.; Tan, C. S.

    2016-06-01

    An enhanced copper paste, formulated by copper micro- and nano-particles mixture, is reported to prevent paste cracking and obtain an improved packing density. The particle mixture of two different sizes enables reduction in porosity of the micro-paste and resolves the cracking issue in the nano-paste. In-situ temperature and resistance measurements indicate that the mixed paste has a lower densification temperature. Electrical study also shows a ˜12× lower sheet resistance of 0.27 Ω/sq. In addition, scanning electron microscope image analysis confirms a ˜50% lower porosity, which is consistent with the thermal and electrical results. The 3:1 (micro:nano, wt. %) mixed paste is found to have the strongest synergistic effect. This phenomenon is discussed further. Consequently, the mixed paste is a promising material for potential low temperature 3D interconnects fabrication.

  18. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  19. Particle tracking techniques for electrokinetic microchannel flows.

    PubMed

    Devasenathipathy, Shankar; Santiago, Juan G; Takehara, Kohsei

    2002-08-01

    We have applied particle tracking techniques to obtain spatially resolved velocity measurements in electrokinetic flow devices. Both micrometer-resolution particle image velocimetry (micro-PMV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) techniques have been used to quantify and study flow phenomena in electrokinetic systems applicable to microfluidic bioanalytical devices. To make the flow measurements quantitative, we performed a series of seed particle calibration experiments. First, we measure the electroosmotic wall mobility of a borosilicate rectangular capillary (40 by 400 microm) using current monitoring. In addition to this wall mobility characterization, we apply PTV to determine the electrophoretic mobilities of more than 1,000 fluorescent microsphere particles in aqueous buffer solutions. Particles from this calibrated particle/ buffer mixture are then introduced into two electrokinetic flow systems for particle tracking flow experiments. In these experiments, we use micro-PIV, together with an electric field prediction, to obtain electroosmotic flow bulk fluid velocity measurements. The first example flow system is a microchannel intersection where we demonstrate a detailed documentation of the similitude between the electrical fields and the velocity fields in an electrokinetic system with uniform zeta potential, zeta. In the second system, we apply micro-PIV to a microchannel system with nonuniform zeta. The latter experiment provides a simultaneous measurement of two distinct wall mobilities within the microchannel.

  20. Some Progress in Large-Eddy Simulation using the 3-D Vortex Particle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    This two-month visit at CTR was devoted to investigating possibilities in LES modeling in the context of the 3-D vortex particle method (=vortex element method, VEM) for unbounded flows. A dedicated code was developed for that purpose. Although O(N(sup 2)) and thus slow, it offers the advantage that it can easily be modified to try out many ideas on problems involving up to N approx. 10(exp 4) particles. Energy spectrums (which require O(N(sup 2)) operations per wavenumber) are also computed. Progress was realized in the following areas: particle redistribution schemes, relaxation schemes to maintain the solenoidal condition on the particle vorticity field, simple LES models and their VEM extension, possible new avenues in LES. Model problems that involve strong interaction between vortex tubes were computed, together with diagnostics: total vorticity, linear and angular impulse, energy and energy spectrum, enstrophy. More work is needed, however, especially regarding relaxation schemes and further validation and development of LES models for VEM. Finally, what works well will eventually have to be incorporated into the fast parallel tree code.

  1. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Kroc, Lukas; Zdeborova, Lenka; Krakala, Florent; Vergassola, M

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  2. 3D Visual Tracking of an Articulated Robot in Precision Automated Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Alzarok, Hamza; Fletcher, Simon; Longstaff, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    The most compelling requirements for visual tracking systems are a high detection accuracy and an adequate processing speed. However, the combination between the two requirements in real world applications is very challenging due to the fact that more accurate tracking tasks often require longer processing times, while quicker responses for the tracking system are more prone to errors, therefore a trade-off between accuracy and speed, and vice versa is required. This paper aims to achieve the two requirements together by implementing an accurate and time efficient tracking system. In this paper, an eye-to-hand visual system that has the ability to automatically track a moving target is introduced. An enhanced Circular Hough Transform (CHT) is employed for estimating the trajectory of a spherical target in three dimensions, the colour feature of the target was carefully selected by using a new colour selection process, the process relies on the use of a colour segmentation method (Delta E) with the CHT algorithm for finding the proper colour of the tracked target, the target was attached to the six degree of freedom (DOF) robot end-effector that performs a pick-and-place task. A cooperation of two Eye-to Hand cameras with their image Averaging filters are used for obtaining clear and steady images. This paper also examines a new technique for generating and controlling the observation search window in order to increase the computational speed of the tracking system, the techniques is named Controllable Region of interest based on Circular Hough Transform (CRCHT). Moreover, a new mathematical formula is introduced for updating the depth information of the vision system during the object tracking process. For more reliable and accurate tracking, a simplex optimization technique was employed for the calculation of the parameters for camera to robotic transformation matrix. The results obtained show the applicability of the proposed approach to track the moving robot

  3. 3D Visual Tracking of an Articulated Robot in Precision Automated Tasks.

    PubMed

    Alzarok, Hamza; Fletcher, Simon; Longstaff, Andrew P

    2017-01-07

    The most compelling requirements for visual tracking systems are a high detection accuracy and an adequate processing speed. However, the combination between the two requirements in real world applications is very challenging due to the fact that more accurate tracking tasks often require longer processing times, while quicker responses for the tracking system are more prone to errors, therefore a trade-off between accuracy and speed, and vice versa is required. This paper aims to achieve the two requirements together by implementing an accurate and time efficient tracking system. In this paper, an eye-to-hand visual system that has the ability to automatically track a moving target is introduced. An enhanced Circular Hough Transform (CHT) is employed for estimating the trajectory of a spherical target in three dimensions, the colour feature of the target was carefully selected by using a new colour selection process, the process relies on the use of a colour segmentation method (Delta E) with the CHT algorithm for finding the proper colour of the tracked target, the target was attached to the six degree of freedom (DOF) robot end-effector that performs a pick-and-place task. A cooperation of two Eye-to Hand cameras with their image Averaging filters are used for obtaining clear and steady images. This paper also examines a new technique for generating and controlling the observation search window in order to increase the computational speed of the tracking system, the techniques is named Controllable Region of interest based on Circular Hough Transform (CRCHT). Moreover, a new mathematical formula is introduced for updating the depth information of the vision system during the object tracking process. For more reliable and accurate tracking, a simplex optimization technique was employed for the calculation of the parameters for camera to robotic transformation matrix. The results obtained show the applicability of the proposed approach to track the moving robot

  4. 3D simulations of young core-collapse supernova remnants undergoing efficient particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2016-06-01

    Within our Galaxy, supernova remnants are believed to be the major sources of cosmic rays up to the 'knee'. However important questions remain regarding the share of the hadronic and leptonic components, and the fraction of the supernova energy channelled into these components. We address such question by the means of numerical simulations that combine a hydrodynamic treatment of the shock wave with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. Performing 3D simulations allows us to produce synthetic projected maps and spectra of the thermal and non-thermal emission, that can be compared with multi-wavelength observations (in radio, X-rays, and γ-rays). Supernovae come in different types, and although their energy budget is of the same order, their remnants have different properties, and so may contribute in different ways to the pool of Galactic cosmic-rays. Our first simulations were focused on thermonuclear supernovae, like Tycho's SNR, that usually occur in a mostly undisturbed medium. Here we present our 3D simulations of core-collapse supernovae, like the Cas A SNR, that occur in a more complex medium bearing the imprint of the wind of the progenitor star.

  5. A toolbox for ab initio 3-D reconstructions in single-particle electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Voss, Neil R; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Cheng, Anchi; Lau, Pick-Wei; Mulder, Anke; Lander, Gabriel C; Brignole, Edward J; Fellmann, Denis; Irving, Christopher; Jacovetty, Erica L; Leung, Albert; Pulokas, James; Quispe, Joel D; Winkler, Hanspeter; Yoshioka, Craig; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S

    2010-03-01

    Structure determination of a novel macromolecular complex via single-particle electron microscopy depends upon overcoming the challenge of establishing a reliable 3-D reconstruction using only 2-D images. There are a variety of strategies that deal with this issue, but not all of them are readily accessible and straightforward to use. We have developed a "toolbox" of ab initio reconstruction techniques that provide several options for calculating 3-D volumes in an easily managed and tightly controlled work-flow that adheres to standard conventions and formats. This toolbox is designed to streamline the reconstruction process by removing the necessity for bookkeeping, while facilitating transparent data transfer between different software packages. It currently includes procedures for calculating ab initio reconstructions via random or orthogonal tilt geometry, tomograms, and common lines, all of which have been tested using the 50S ribosomal subunit. Our goal is that the accessibility of multiple independent reconstruction algorithms via this toolbox will improve the ease with which models can be generated, and provide a means of evaluating the confidence and reliability of the final reconstructed map.

  6. Acoustical vortices on a Chip for 3D single particle manipulation and vorticity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier; Baudoin, Michael

    Surface acoustic waves offer most of the basic functions required for on-chip actuation of fluids at small scales: efficient flow mixing, integrated pumping, particles separation, droplet displacement, atomization, division and fusion. Nevertheless some more advanced functions such as 3D particles manipulation and vorticity control require the introduction of some specific kind of waves called acoustic vortices. These helical waves propagate spinning around a phase singularity called the dark core. On the one hand, the beam angular momentum can be transferred to the fluid and create point-wise vorticity for confined mixing, and on the other the dark core can trap individual particles in an acoustic well for single object manipulation. In this presentation, I will show how acoustical vortices on-a-chip can be synthesized with a programmable electronics and an array of transducers. I will then highlight how some of their specificities can be used for acoustical tweezing and twisting. This work is supported by ANR Project No. ANR-12-BS09-0021-01 and ANR-12- BS09-0021-02, and Rgion Nord Pas de Calais.

  7. 3D quantification of brain microvessels exposed to heavy particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermüller, C.; Coats, J. S.; Obenaus, A.; Nelson, G.; Krucker, T.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-09-01

    Space radiation with high energy particles and cosmic rays presents a significant hazard to spaceflight crews. Recent reviews of the health risk to astronauts from ionizing radiation concluded to establish a level of risk which may indicate the possible performance decrements and decreased latency of late dysfunction syndromes (LDS) of the brain. A hierarchical imaging approach developed at ETH Zürich and PSI, which relies on synchrotron based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy (SRXTM), was used to visualize and analyze 3D vascular structures down to the capillary level in their precise anatomical context. Various morphological parameters, such as overall vessel volume, vessel thickness and spacing, are extracted to characterize the vascular structure within a region of interest. For a first quantification of the effect of high energy particles on the vasculature we scanned a set of 6 animals, all of same age. The animals were irradiated with 1 Gy, 2 Gy and 4 Gy of 600MeV 56Fe heavy particles simulating the space radiation environment. We found that with increasing dose the diameter of vessels and the overall vessel volume are decreased whereas the vessel spacing is increased. As these parameters reflect blood flow in three-dimensional space they can be used as indicators for the degree of vascular efficiency which can have an impact on the function and development of lung tissue or tumors.

  8. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components.

  9. Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-in-Cell Simulations with Pic3P

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; /Brookhaven

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code Pic3P. Designed for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space charge effects, Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations self-consistently and includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects from first principles. Higher-order Finite Element methods with adaptive refinement on conformal unstructured meshes lead to highly efficient use of computational resources. Massively parallel processing with dynamic load balancing enables large-scale modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of next-generation accelerator facilities. Applications include the LCLS RF gun and the BNL polarized SRF gun.

  10. 3D shape tracking of minimally invasive medical instruments using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Francois; Kanti Mandal, Koushik; Loranger, Sebastien; Watanabe Fernandes, Eric Hideki; Kashyap, Raman; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    We propose here a new alternative to provide real-time device tracking during minimally invasive interventions using a truly-distributed strain sensor based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) in optical fibers. The guidance of minimally invasive medical instruments such as needles or catheters (ex. by adding a piezoelectric coating) has been the focus of extensive research in the past decades. Real-time tracking of instruments in medical interventions facilitates image guidance and helps the user to reach a pre-localized target more precisely. Image-guided systems using ultrasound imaging and shape sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG)-embedded optical fibers can provide retroactive feedback to the user in order to reach the targeted areas with even more precision. However, ultrasound imaging with electro-magnetic tracking cannot be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, while shape sensors based on FBG embedded in optical fibers provides discrete values of the instrument position, which requires approximations to be made to evaluate its global shape. This is why a truly-distributed strain sensor based on OFDR could enhance the tracking accuracy. In both cases, since the strain is proportional to the radius of curvature of the fiber, a strain sensor can provide the three-dimensional shape of medical instruments by simply inserting fibers inside the devices. To faithfully follow the shape of the needle in the tracking frame, 3 fibers glued in a specific geometry are used, providing 3 degrees of freedom along the fiber. Near real-time tracking of medical instruments is thus obtained offering clear advantages for clinical monitoring in remotely controlled catheter or needle guidance. We present results demonstrating the promising aspects of this approach as well the limitations of using the OFDR technique.

  11. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  12. A maximum likelihood approach to diffeomorphic speckle tracking for 3D strain estimation in echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Curiale, Ariel H; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Bosch, Johan G; Aja-Fernández, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    The strain and strain-rate measures are commonly used for the analysis and assessment of regional myocardial function. In echocardiography (EC), the strain analysis became possible using Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI). Unfortunately, this modality shows an important limitation: the angle between the myocardial movement and the ultrasound beam should be small to provide reliable measures. This constraint makes it difficult to provide strain measures of the entire myocardium. Alternative non-Doppler techniques such as Speckle Tracking (ST) can provide strain measures without angle constraints. However, the spatial resolution and the noisy appearance of speckle still make the strain estimation a challenging task in EC. Several maximum likelihood approaches have been proposed to statistically characterize the behavior of speckle, which results in a better performance of speckle tracking. However, those models do not consider common transformations to achieve the final B-mode image (e.g. interpolation). This paper proposes a new maximum likelihood approach for speckle tracking which effectively characterizes speckle of the final B-mode image. Its formulation provides a diffeomorphic scheme than can be efficiently optimized with a second-order method. The novelty of the method is threefold: First, the statistical characterization of speckle generalizes conventional speckle models (Rayleigh, Nakagami and Gamma) to a more versatile model for real data. Second, the formulation includes local correlation to increase the efficiency of frame-to-frame speckle tracking. Third, a probabilistic myocardial tissue characterization is used to automatically identify more reliable myocardial motions. The accuracy and agreement assessment was evaluated on a set of 16 synthetic image sequences for three different scenarios: normal, acute ischemia and acute dyssynchrony. The proposed method was compared to six speckle tracking methods. Results revealed that the proposed method is the most

  13. 3D environment modeling and location tracking using off-the-shelf components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Robert H.

    2016-05-01

    The remarkable popularity of smartphones over the past decade has led to a technological race for dominance in market share. This has resulted in a flood of new processors and sensors that are inexpensive, low power and high performance. These sensors include accelerometers, gyroscope, barometers and most importantly cameras. This sensor suite, coupled with multicore processors, allows a new community of researchers to build small, high performance platforms for low cost. This paper describes a system using off-the-shelf components to perform position tracking as well as environment modeling. The system relies on tracking using stereo vision and inertial navigation to determine movement of the system as well as create a model of the environment sensed by the system.

  14. Laetoli’s lost tracks: 3D generated mean shape and missing footprints

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M. R.; Reynolds, S. C.; Morse, S. A.; Budka, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Laetoli site (Tanzania) contains the oldest known hominin footprints, and their interpretation remains open to debate, despite over 35 years of research. The two hominin trackways present are parallel to one another, one of which is a composite formed by at least two individuals walking in single file. Most researchers have focused on the single, clearly discernible G1 trackway while the G2/3 trackway has been largely dismissed due to its composite nature. Here we report the use of a new technique that allows us to decouple the G2 and G3 tracks for the first time. In so doing we are able to quantify the mean footprint topology of the G3 trackway and render it useable for subsequent data analyses. By restoring the effectively ‘lost’ G3 track, we have doubled the available data on some of the rarest traces directly associated with our Pliocene ancestors. PMID:26902912

  15. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy and 3-D reconstruction of viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3-4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced.

  16. Ghost particle velocimetry: accurate 3D flow visualization using standard lab equipment.

    PubMed

    Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2013-07-26

    We describe and test a new approach to particle velocimetry, based on imaging and cross correlating the scattering speckle pattern generated on a near-field plane by flowing tracers with a size far below the diffraction limit, which allows reconstructing the velocity pattern in microfluidic channels without perturbing the flow. As a matter of fact, adding tracers is not even strictly required, provided that the sample displays sufficiently refractive-index fluctuations. For instance, phase separation in liquid mixtures in the presence of shear is suitable to be directly investigated by this "ghost particle velocimetry" technique, which just requires a microscope with standard lamp illumination equipped with a low-cost digital camera. As a further bonus, the peculiar spatial coherence properties of the illuminating source, which displays a finite longitudinal coherence length, allows for a 3D reconstruction of the profile with a resolution of few tenths of microns and makes the technique suitable to investigate turbid samples with negligible multiple scattering effects.

  17. CAST: Effective and Efficient User Interaction for Context-Aware Selection in 3D Particle Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, Konstantinos; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present a family of three interactive Context-Aware Selection Techniques (CAST) for the analysis of large 3D particle datasets. For these datasets, spatial selection is an essential prerequisite to many other analysis tasks. Traditionally, such interactive target selection has been particularly challenging when the data subsets of interest were implicitly defined in the form of complicated structures of thousands of particles. Our new techniques SpaceCast, TraceCast, and PointCast improve usability and speed of spatial selection in point clouds through novel context-aware algorithms. They are able to infer a user's subtle selection intention from gestural input, can deal with complex situations such as partially occluded point clusters or multiple cluster layers, and can all be fine-tuned after the selection interaction has been completed. Together, they provide an effective and efficient tool set for the fast exploratory analysis of large datasets. In addition to presenting Cast, we report on a formal user study that compares our new techniques not only to each other but also to existing state-of-the-art selection methods. Our results show that Cast family members are virtually always faster than existing methods without tradeoffs in accuracy. In addition, qualitative feedback shows that PointCast and TraceCast were strongly favored by our participants for intuitiveness and efficiency.

  18. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  19. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; ...

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together intomore » larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.« less

  20. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; Heiser, John; Yoo, Shinjae; Kalb, Paul

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together into larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.

  1. Particle tracking and mean residence time in barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Deguo; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    We analyze sediment particles motions in steady-state barchan dunes by tracking individual cells of a 3-D cellular automaton dune model. The overall sediment flux may be decomposed into advective and dispersive fluxes to estimate the relative contribution of the underlying physical processes to the barchan dune shape. The net lateral sediment transport from the center to the horns indicates that dispersion on the stoss slope is more efficient than avalanches on the lee slope. The combined effect of these two antagonistic dispersive processes restricts the lateral mixing of sediment particles in the central region of barchan dunes. Then, for different flow strength and dune size, we find that the mean residence time of sediment particles in barchan dunes is equal to the surface of the central longitudinal dune slices divided by the input sand flux. We infer that this central slice contains most of the relevant information about barchan dune morphodynamics. Finally, we initiate a discussion about sediment transport and memory in presence of bedforms using the advantages of the particle tracking technique.

  2. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  3. Airborne particle emission of a commercial 3D printer: the effect of filament material and printing temperature.

    PubMed

    Stabile, L; Scungio, M; Buonanno, G; Arpino, F; Ficco, G

    2017-03-01

    The knowledge of exposure to the airborne particle emitted from three-dimensional (3D) printing activities is becoming a crucial issue due to the relevant spreading of such devices in recent years. To this end, a low-cost desktop 3D printer based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) principle was used. Particle number, alveolar-deposited surface area, and mass concentrations were measured continuously during printing processes to evaluate particle emission rates (ERs) and factors. Particle number distribution measurements were also performed to characterize the size of the emitted particles. Ten different materials and different extrusion temperatures were considered in the survey. Results showed that all the investigated materials emit particles in the ultrafine range (with a mode in the 10-30-nm range), whereas no emission of super-micron particles was detected for all the materials under investigation. The emission was affected strongly by the extrusion temperature. In fact, the ERs increase as the extrusion temperature increases. Emission rates up to 1×10(12)  particles min(-1) were calculated. Such high ERs were estimated to cause large alveolar surface area dose in workers when 3D activities run. In fact, a 40-min-long 3D printing was found to cause doses up to 200 mm(2) .

  4. Visualizing and Tracking Evolving Features in 3D Unstructured and Adaptive Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, D.; Zabusky, N.

    2002-08-01

    The massive amounts of time-varying datasets being generated demand new visualization and quantification techniques. Visualization alone is not sufficient. Without proper measurement information/computations real science cannot be done. Our focus is this work was to combine visualization with quantification of the data to allow for advanced querying and searching. As part of this proposal, we have developed a feature extraction adn tracking methodology which allows researcher to identify features of interest and follow their evolution over time. The implementation is distributed and operates over data In-situ: where it is stored and when it was computed.

  5. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  6. A smart homecage system with 3D tracking for long-term behavioral experiments.

    PubMed

    Byunghun Lee; Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    A wirelessly-powered homecage system, called the EnerCage-HC, that is equipped with multi-coil wireless power transfer, closed-loop power control, optical behavioral tracking, and a graphic user interface (GUI) is presented for long-term electrophysiology experiments. The EnerCage-HC system can wirelessly power a mobile unit attached to a small animal subject and also track its behavior in real-time as it is housed inside a standard homecage. The EnerCage-HC system is equipped with one central and four overlapping slanted wire-wound coils (WWCs) with optimal geometries to form 3-and 4-coil power transmission links while operating at 13.56 MHz. Utilizing multi-coil links increases the power transfer efficiency (PTE) compared to conventional 2-coil links and also reduces the number of power amplifiers (PAs) to only one, which significantly reduces the system complexity, cost, and dissipated heat. A Microsoft Kinect installed 90 cm above the homecage localizes the animal position and orientation with 1.6 cm accuracy. An in vivo experiment was conducted on a freely behaving rat by continuously delivering 24 mW to the mobile unit for > 7 hours inside a standard homecage.

  7. Multisensor 3D tracking for counter small unmanned air vehicles (CSUAV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Juan R.; Tarplee, Kyle M.; Case, Ellen E.; Zelnio, Anne M.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2008-04-01

    A variety of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) have been developed for both military and civilian use. The typical large UAV is typically state owned, whereas small UAVs (SUAVs) may be in the form of remote controlled aircraft that are widely available. The potential threat of these SUAVs to both the military and civilian populace has led to research efforts to counter these assets via track, ID, and attack. Difficulties arise from the small size and low radar cross section when attempting to detect and track these targets with a single sensor such as radar or video cameras. In addition, clutter objects make accurate ID difficult without very high resolution data, leading to the use of an acoustic array to support this function. This paper presents a multi-sensor architecture that exploits sensor modes including EO/IR cameras, an acoustic array, and future inclusion of a radar. A sensor resource management concept is presented along with preliminary results from three of the sensors.

  8. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks.

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from ~450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of ~2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with ~1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of Emuon greater than 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  9. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Dey, B.; Aston, D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Roberts, D.; Ruckman, L.; Shtol, D.; Varner, G.S.; Va'vra, J.; Vavra, Jerry; /SLAC

    2012-07-30

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from {approx}450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of {approx}2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with {approx}1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of E{sub muon} > 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  10. Dynamic tracking of a deformable tissue based on 3D-2D MR-US image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Fenster, Aaron; Capson, David W.

    2014-03-01

    Real-time registration of pre-operative magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images with intra-operative Ultrasound (US) images can be a valuable tool in image-guided therapies and interventions. This paper presents an automatic method for dynamically tracking the deformation of a soft tissue based on registering pre-operative three-dimensional (3D) MR images to intra-operative two-dimensional (2D) US images. The registration algorithm is based on concepts in state estimation where a dynamic finite element (FE)- based linear elastic deformation model correlates the imaging data in the spatial and temporal domains. A Kalman-like filtering process estimates the unknown deformation states of the soft tissue using the deformation model and a measure of error between the predicted and the observed intra-operative imaging data. The error is computed based on an intensity-based distance metric, namely, modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND), and no segmentation or feature extraction from images is required. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by dynamically deforming 3D pre-operative MR images of a breast phantom tissue based on real-time 2D images obtained from an US probe. Experimental results on different registration scenarios showed that deformation tracking converges in a few iterations. The average target registration error on the plane of 2D US images for manually selected fiducial points was between 0.3 and 1.5 mm depending on the size of deformation.

  11. Readily Accessible Multiplane Microscopy: 3D Tracking the HIV-1 Genome in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Itano, Michelle S; Bleck, Marina; Johnson, Daniel S; Simon, Sanford M

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the associated disease AIDS are a major cause of human death worldwide with no vaccine or cure available. The trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs from sites of synthesis in the nucleus, through the cytoplasm, to sites of assembly at the plasma membrane are critical steps in HIV-1 viral replication, but are not well characterized. Here we present a broadly accessible microscopy method that captures multiple focal planes simultaneously, which allows us to image the trafficking of HIV-1 genomic RNAs with high precision. This method utilizes a customization of a commercial multichannel emission splitter that enables high-resolution 3D imaging with single-macromolecule sensitivity. We show with high temporal and spatial resolution that HIV-1 genomic RNAs are most mobile in the cytosol, and undergo confined mobility at sites along the nuclear envelope and in the nucleus and nucleolus. These provide important insights regarding the mechanism by which the HIV-1 RNA genome is transported to the sites of assembly of nascent virions.

  12. Automatic Tracking Of Markers From 3D-Measurement Of Human Body Movements During Walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Thomas; Meier, G.; Baumann, Juerg U.

    1989-04-01

    For human motion analysis, the spatio-temporal resolution of cinematographic registrations of body marker positions is still higher than the results of the best opto electronic systems available for this purpose today. So far, the need for manual digitization of several thousand marker positions per tested person has made this method unpractical for regular applications. An interactive and largely automated system for marker recognition and tracking from 16 mm film images based on progress in digital image processing has been developed and tested. Projected pictures are digitized with a high-resolution CCD-camera (1320x1035 pixel), processed, analyzed and serially evaluated with an interactive image analysis system SIGNUM IS200.

  13. Monitoring an eruption fissure in 3D: video recording, particle image velocimetry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    The processes during an eruption are very complex. To get a better understanding several parameters are measured. One of the measured parameters is the velocity of particles and patterns, as ash and emitted magma, and of the volcano itself. The resulting velocity field provides insights into the dynamics of a vent. Here we test our algorithm for 3 dimensional velocity fields on videos of the second fissure eruption of Bárdarbunga 2014. There we acquired videos from lava fountains of the main fissure with 2 high speed cameras with small angles between the cameras. Additionally we test the algorithm on videos from the geyser Strokkur, where we had 3 cameras and larger angles between the cameras. The velocity is calculated by a correlation in the Fourier space of contiguous images. Considering that we only have the velocity field of the surface smaller angles result in a better resolution of the existing velocity field in the near field. For general movements also larger angles can be useful, e.g. to get the direction, height and velocity of eruption clouds. In summary, it can be stated that 3D velocimetry can be used for several application and with different setup due to the application.

  14. DLP technology application: 3D head tracking and motion correction in medical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Wilm, Jakob; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light, such as plaster, light colored cloth. Whereas for human model scanning application, conventional methods suffer from low signal to noise ratio caused by low contrast of visible light over the human body. The proposed robust NIRSL, as implemented with the near infrared light, is capable of recovering those dark surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan. The proposed sensing system, by utilizing the new near-infrared capable high speed LightCrafter DLP projector, is robust to motion, provides accurate and high resolution three-dimensional point cloud, making our system more efficient and robust for human model reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our system is effective and efficient to scan real human models with various dark hair, jeans and shoes, robust to human body motion and produces accurate and high resolution 3D point cloud.

  15. Python algorithms in particle tracking microrheology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Particle tracking passive microrheology relates recorded trajectories of microbeads, embedded in soft samples, to the local mechanical properties of the sample. The method requires intensive numerical data processing and tools allowing control of the calculation errors. Results We report the development of a software package collecting functions and scripts written in Python for automated and manual data processing, to extract viscoelastic information about the sample using recorded particle trajectories. The resulting program package analyzes the fundamental diffusion characteristics of particle trajectories and calculates the frequency dependent complex shear modulus using methods published in the literature. In order to increase conversion accuracy, segmentwise, double step, range-adaptive fitting and dynamic sampling algorithms are introduced to interpolate the data in a splinelike manner. Conclusions The presented set of algorithms allows for flexible data processing for particle tracking microrheology. The package presents improved algorithms for mean square displacement estimation, controlling effects of frame loss during recording, and a novel numerical conversion method using segmentwise interpolation, decreasing the conversion error from about 100% to the order of 1%. PMID:23186362

  16. Three-dimensional single-particle tracking in live cells: news from the third dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, A.; Gorelashvili, M.; Schüller, V.; Wehnekamp, F.; Arcizet, D.; Katayama, Y.; Lamb, D. C.; Heinrich, D.

    2013-07-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) is of growing importance in the biophysical community. It is used to investigate processes such as drug and gene delivery, viral uptake, intracellular trafficking or membrane-bound protein mobility. Traditionally, SPT is performed in two dimensions (2D) because of its technical simplicity. However, life occurs in three dimensions (3D) and many methods have been recently developed to track particles in 3D. Now, is the third dimension worth the effort? Here we investigate the differences between the 2D and 3D analyses of intracellular transport with the 3D development of a time-resolved mean square displacement (MSD) analysis introduced previously. The 3D trajectories, and the 2D projections, of fluorescent nanoparticles were obtained with an orbital tracking microscope in two different cell types: in Dictyostelium discoideum ameba and in adherent, more flattened HuH-7 human cells. As expected from the different 3D organization of both cells’ cytoskeletons, a third of the active transport was lost upon projection in the ameba whereas the identification of the active phases was barely affected in the HuH-7 cells. In both cell types, we found intracellular diffusion to be anisotropic and the diffusion coefficient values derived from the 2D analysis were therefore biased.

  17. Near-field waveguide trapping and tracking of particles using fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.; Brox, Petter; Helle, Øystein; Tinguely, Jean-Claude; Hellesø, Olav G.

    2014-02-01

    The evanescent field from an optical waveguide is used for near-field trapping and transporting of fluorescent microspheres. Out-of-focus fluorescence imaging is used to track the trapped particle in 3-D with nanometer precision (<100 nm). A prior calibration is done to determine the relationship between the z-coordinate and the radius of the outermost diffraction ring in the image of the sphere. This gives precise information about how much the particle moves up and down during propulsion along the waveguide. Results are presented for trapping and tracking a 1 μm fluorescent particle on a strip waveguide.

  18. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical Characterization Of Nanoscale Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Genc, Arda; Kovarik, Libor; Gu, Meng; Cheng, Huikai; Plachinda, Pavel; Pullan, Lee; Freitag, Bert; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a tomography technique which couples scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) to resolve 3D distribution of elements in nanoscale materials. STEM imaging when combined with a symmetrically arranged XEDS detector design around the specimen overcomes many of the obstacles in 3D spectroscopic tomography of nanoscale materials and successfully elucidate the 3D chemical information in a large field of view of the TEM sample. We employed this technique to investigate 3D distribution of Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Oxygen (O) in Li(NiMn)O2 battery cathode material. For this purpose, 2D elemental maps were acquired for a range of tilt angles and reconstructed to obtain 3D elemental distribution in an isolated Li(NiMnO2) nanoparticle. The results highlight the strength of this technique in 3D chemical analysis of nanoscale materials by successfully resolving Ni, Mn and O elemental distributions in 3D and discovering the new phenomenon of Ni surface segregation in this material. Furthermore, the comparison of simultaneously acquired HAADF STEM and XEDS STEM tomography results show that XEDS STEM tomography provides additional 3D chemical information of the material especially when there is low atomic number (Z) contrast in the material of interest.

  19. Lie algebraic methods for particle tracking calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.R.; Dragt, A.J.

    1983-08-01

    A study of the nonlinear stability of an accelerator or storage ring lattice typically includes particle tracking simulations. Such simulations trace rays through linear and nonlinear lattice elements by numerically evaluating linear matrix or impulsive nonlinear transformations. Using the mathematical tools of Lie groups and algebras, one may construct a formalism which makes explicit use of Hamilton's equations and which allows the description of groups of linear and nonlinear lattice elements by a single transformation. Such a transformation will be exactly canonical and will describe finite length linear and nonlinear elements through third (octupole) order. It is presently possible to include effects such as fringing fields and potentially possible to extend the formalism to include nonlinearities of higher order, multipole errors, and magnet misalignments. We outline this Lie algebraic formalism and its use in particle tracking calculations. A computer code, MARYLIE, has been constructed on the basis of this formalism. We describe the use of this program for tracking and provide examples of its application. 6 references, 3 figures.

  20. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    PubMed Central

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance. PMID:27375314

  1. Three-dimensional textural and compositional analysis of particle tracks and fragmentation history in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, D. S.; Greenberg, M.; Rivers, M. L.; Newville, M.

    2009-11-01

    We report analyses of aerogel tracks using (1 synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (XRCMT), (2) laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM), and (3) synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) of particles and their paths resulting from simulated hypervelocity impacts (1-2), and a single ~1 mm aerogel track from the Stardust cometary sample collector (1-3). Large aerogel pieces can be imaged sequentially, resulting in high spatial resolution images spanning many tomographic fields of view (‘lambda-tomography’). We report calculations of energy deposited, and tests on aromatic hydrocarbons showing no alteration in tomography experiments. Imaging at resolutions from ~17 to ~1 micron/pixel edge (XRCMT) and to <100 nm/ pixel edge (LCSM) illustrates track geometry and interaction of particles with aerogel, including rifling, particle fragmentation, and final particle location. We present a 3-D deconvolution method using an estimated point-spread function for aerogel, allowing basic corrections of LCSM data for axial distortion. LCSM allows rapid, comprehensive, non-destructive, high information return analysis of tracks in aerogel keystones, prior to destructive grain extraction. SRXRF with LCSM allows spatial correlation of grain size, chemical, and mineralogical data. If optical methods are precluded in future aerogel capture missions, XRCMT is a viable 3D imaging technique. Combinations of these methods allow for complete, nondestructive, quantitative 3-D analysis of captured materials at high spatial resolution. This data is fundamental to understanding the hypervelocity particle-aerogel interaction histories of Stardust grains.

  2. Three-dimensional textural and compositional analysis of particle tracks and fragmentation history in aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, Denton S.; Greenberg, Michael; Rivers, Mark L.; Newville, Matthew

    2010-05-04

    We report analyses of aerogel tracks using (1) synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (XRCMT), (2) laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM), and (3) synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) of particles and their paths resulting from simulated hypervelocity impacts (1-2), and a single {approx}1 mm aerogel track from the Stardust cometary sample collector (1-3). Large aerogel pieces can be imaged sequentially, resulting in high spatial resolution images spanning many tomographic fields of view ('lambda-tomography'). We report calculations of energy deposited, and tests on aromatic hydrocarbons showing no alteration in tomography experiments. Imaging at resolutions from -17 to -1 micron/pixel edge (XRCMT) and to <100 nm/pixel edge (LCSM) illustrates track geometry and interaction of particles with aerogel, including rifling, particle fragmentation, and final particle location. We present a 3-D deconvolution method using an estimated point-spread function for aerogel, allowing basic corrections of LCSM data for axial distortion. LCSM allows rapid, comprehensive, non-destructive, high information return analysis of tracks in aerogel keystones, prior to destructive grain extraction. SRXRF with LCSM allows spatial correlation of grain size, chemical, and mineralogical data. If optical methods are precluded in future aerogel capture missions, XRCMT is a viable 3D imaging technique. Combinations of these methods allow for complete, nondestructive, quantitative 3-D analysis of captured materials at high spatial resolution. This data is fundamental to understanding the hypervelocity particle-aerogel interaction histories of Stardust grains.

  3. A 3D-printed polymer micro-gripper with self-defined electrical tracks and thermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alblalaihid, Khalid; Overton, James; Lawes, Simon; Kinnell, Peter

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a simple fabrication process that allows for isolated metal tracks to be easily defined on the surface of 3D printed micro-scale polymer components. The process makes use of a standard low cost conformal sputter coating system to quickly deposit thin film metal layers on to the surface of 3D printed polymer micro parts. The key novelty lies in the inclusion of inbuilt masking features, on the surface of the polymer parts, to ensure that the conformal metal layer can be effectively broken to create electrically isolated metal features. The presented process is extremely flexible, and it is envisaged that it may be applied to a wide range of sensor and actuator applications. To demonstrate the process a polymer micro-scale gripper with an inbuilt thermal actuator is designed and fabricated. In this work the design methodology for creating the micro-gripper is presented, illustrating how the rapid and flexible manufacturing process allows for fast cycle time design iterations to be performed. In addition the compatibility of this approach with traditional design and analysis techniques such as basic finite element simulation is also demonstrated with simulation results in reasonable agreement with experimental performance data for the micro-gripper.

  4. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 2, 15 July--15 October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4. Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.

  5. Nonrigid Registration of 2-D and 3-D Dynamic Cell Nuclei Images for Improved Classification of Subcellular Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun M.; Spector, David L.; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The observed motion of subcellular particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences of live cells is generally a superposition of the motion and deformation of the cell and the motion of the particles. Decoupling the two types of movements to enable accurate classification of the particle motion requires the application of registration algorithms. We have developed an intensity-based approach for nonrigid registration of multi-channel microscopy image sequences of cell nuclei. First, based on 3-D synthetic images we demonstrate that cell nucleus deformations change the observed motion types of particles and that our approach allows to recover the original motion. Second, we have successfully applied our approach to register 2-D and 3-D real microscopy image sequences. A quantitative experimental comparison with previous approaches for nonrigid registration of cell microscopy has also been performed. PMID:20840894

  6. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  7. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1992-08-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  8. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  9. Collider ring particle loss tracking with SSCTRK

    SciTech Connect

    Garavaglia, T.; Kauffmann, S.K.; Stiening, R.

    1990-04-01

    The SSCTRK numerical simulation tracking code has been used to study the benefit of increasing the SSC dipole magnet aperture from 4 to 5 cm. This study has been carried out for both hypothetical highly corrected and plausibly corrected machines, the former having no systematic multipole errors and chromaticity identically zero. The choice of tune values, phase advance per cell, random multipole errors, systematic multipole errors and chromaticity (for the plausibly corrected machines), closed orbit error, the criterion for particle loss, etc. are set forth in detail. Runs of 10{sup 5} turns and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} turns are presented together with the approximate dynamic apertures they yield from their particle loss patterns.

  10. A quantitative study of 3D-scanning frequency and Δd of tracking points on the tooth surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Liang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Micro-movement of human jaws in the resting state might influence the accuracy of direct three-dimensional (3D) measurement. Providing a reference for sampling frequency settings of intraoral scanning systems to overcome this influence is important. In this study, we measured micro-movement, or change in distance (∆d), as the change in position of a single tracking point from one sampling time point to another in five human subjects. ∆d of tracking points on incisors at 7 sampling frequencies was judged against the clinical accuracy requirement to select proper sampling frequency settings. The curve equation was then fit quantitatively between ∆d median and the sampling frequency to predict the trend of ∆d with increasing f. The difference of ∆d among the subjects and the difference between upper and lower incisor feature points of the same subject were analyzed by a non-parametric test (α = 0.05). Significant differences of incisor feature points were noted among different subjects and between upper and lower jaws of the same subject (P < 0.01). Overall, ∆d decreased with increasing frequency. When the frequency was 60 Hz, ∆d nearly reached the clinical accuracy requirement. Frequencies higher than 60 Hz did not significantly decrease Δd further. PMID:26400112

  11. Orbital Single Particle Tracking on a commercial confocal microscope using piezoelectric stage feedback

    PubMed Central

    Lanzanò, Luca; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Single Particle Tracking (SPT) is a technique used to locate fluorescent particles with nanometer precision. In the orbital tracking method the position of a particle is obtained analyzing the distribution of intensity along a circular orbit scanned around the particle. In combination with an active feedback this method allows tracking of particles in 2D and 3D with millisecond temporal resolution. Here we describe a SPT setup based on a feedback approach implemented with minimal modification of a commercially available confocal laser scanning microscope, the Zeiss LSM 510, in combination with an external piezoelectric stage scanner. The commercial microscope offers the advantage of a user-friendly software interface and pre-calibrated hardware components. The use of an external piezo-scanner allows the addition of feedback into the system but also represents a limitation in terms of its mechanical response. We describe in detail this implementation of the orbital tracking method and discuss advantages and limitations. As an example of application to live cell experiments we perform the 3D tracking of acidic vesicles in live polarized epithelial cells. PMID:25419461

  12. Optimization of astigmatic particle tracking velocimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2014-09-01

    Astigmatic particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) has been developed in the last years to measure the three-dimensional displacement of tracer particles using a single-camera view. The measurement principle relies on an astigmatic optical system that provides aberrated particle images with a characteristic elliptical shape univocally related to the corresponding particle depth position. Because of the precision of this method, this concept is well established for measuring and controlling the distance between a CD/DVD and the reading head. The optical arrangement of an APTV system essentially consists of a primary stigmatic optics (e.g., a microscope, or a camera objective) and an astigmatic optics, typically a cylindrical lens placed in front of the camera sensor. This paper focuses on the uncertainty of APTV in the depth direction. First, an approximated analytical model is derived and experimentally validated. From the model, a set of three non-dimensional parameters that are the most significant in the optimization of the APTV performance are identified. Finally, the effect of different parameter settings and calibration approaches are studied systematically using numerical Monte Carlo simulations. The results allow for the derivation of general criteria to minimize the overall error in APTV measurements and provide the basis for reliable uncertainty estimation for a wide range of applications.

  13. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  14. Filtered sub-grid constitutive models for fluidized gas-particle flows constructed from 3-D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Milioli, Fernando E.; Ozarkar, Shailesh; Li, Tingwen; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2016-10-01

    The accuracy of fluidized-bed CFD predictions using the two-fluid model can be improved significantly, even when using coarse grids, by replacing the microscopic kinetic-theory-based closures with coarse-grained constitutive models. These coarse-grained constitutive relationships, called filtered models, account for the unresolved gas-particle structures (clusters and bubbles) via sub-grid corrections. Following the previous 2-D approaches of Igci et al. [AIChE J., 54(6), 1431-1448, 2008] and Milioli et al. [AIChE J., 59(9), 3265-3275, 2013], new filtered models are constructed from highly-resolved 3-D simulations of gas-particle flows. Although qualitatively similar to the older 2-D models, the new 3-D relationships exhibit noticeable quantitative and functional differences. In particular, the filtered stresses are strongly dependent on the gas-particle slip velocity. Closures for the filtered inter-phase drag, gas- and solids-phase pressures and viscosities are reported. A new model for solids stress anisotropy is also presented. These new filtered 3-D constitutive relationships are better suited to practical coarse-grid 3-D simulations of large, commercial-scale devices.

  15. Spherical 3D photonic crystal with conducting nanoshell and particle core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio-Lara, A.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Pérez-Careta, E.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Tecpoyotl-Torres, Margarita; Vázquez-Buenos Aires, O.

    2009-06-01

    We discuss a structured 3D Dielectric Photonic Crystal with both a metallic core and a metallic shell. We discuss the role of each one, the stack, the core as well as the cavity formed between the core and the shell. The low frequency metallic core features becomes much more significant as it gets smaller and get diluted by the cavity.

  16. 3D image reconstruction algorithms for cryo-electron-microscopy images of virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2000-11-01

    A statistical model for the object and the complete image formation process in cryo electron microscopy of viruses is presented. Using this model, maximum likelihood reconstructions of the 3D structure of viruses are computed using the expectation maximization algorithm and an example based on Cowpea mosaic virus is provided.

  17. T4 virus-based toolkit for the direct synthesis and 3D organization of metal quantum particles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Gao, Faming; Li, Na

    2010-12-27

    One of the challenges in building superstructures based on small metal particles is producing stable interparticle separation. Herein, we present a novel assembly method based on the use of the T4 bacteriophage capsid as a scaffold for the construction of 3D monodisperse metal-particle arrays. The highly regular and symmetrical protein surface of the T4 capsid allows the site-directed adsorption and subsequent reduction of metal ions, thus permitting the growth of metal particles in situ to enable them to exist at a quantum size with a high degree of monodispersity. Both these characteristics contribute to a great improvement in the electrocatalytic activity of the patterned noble-metal particles. Organized magnetic particles as small as 2-4 nm still maintain an observable ferromagnetic behavior, which makes them promising for a variety of possible biomedical applications.

  18. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenerlöw, B.; Höglund, E.; Carlsson, J.

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons ( 60Co) or 125 keV/μm nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome.

  19. Development of a 3D to 1D Particle Transport Model to Predict Deposition in the Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Grandmont, Celine; Shadden, Shawn C.; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosolized particles are commonly used for therapeutic drug delivery as they can be delivered to the body systemically or be used to treat lung diseases. Recent advances in computational resources have allowed for sophisticated pulmonary simulations, however it is currently impossible to solve for airflow and particle transport for all length and time scales of the lung. Instead, multi-scale methods must be used. In our recent work, where computational methods were employed to solve for airflow and particle transport in the rat airways (Oakes et al. (2014), Annals of Biomedical Engineering 42, 899), the number of particles to exit downstream of the 3D domain was determined. In this current work, the time-dependent Lagrangian description of particles was used to numerically solve a 1D convection-diffusion model (trumpet model, Taulbee and Yu (1975), Journal of Applied Physiology, 38, 77) parameterized specifically for the lung. The expansion of the airway dimensions was determined based on data collected from our aerosol exposure experiments (Oakes et al. (2014), Journal of Applied Physiology, 116, 1561). This 3D-1D framework enables us to predict the fate of particles in the whole lung. This work was supported by the Whitaker Foundation at the IIE, a INRIA Associated Team Postdoc Grant, and a UC Presidential Fellowship.

  20. 4Pi fluorescence detection and 3D particle localization with a single objective

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzbauer, J.; McGorty, R.; Huang, B.

    2013-01-01

    Coherent detection through two opposing objectives (4Pi configuration) improves the precision of three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization substantially along the axial direction, but suffers from instrument complexity and maintenance difficulty. To address these issues, we have realized 4Pi fluorescence detection by sandwiching the sample between the objective and a mirror, and create interference of direct incidence and mirror-reflected signal at the camera with a spatial light modulator. Multifocal imaging using this single-objective mirror interference scheme offers improvement in the axial localization similar to the traditional 4Pi method. We have also devised several PSF engineering schemes to enable 3D localization with a single emitter image, offering better axial precision than normal single-objective localization methods such as astigmatic imaging. PMID:24105517

  1. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  2. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  3. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  4. Electromagnetic 2D/3D Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal anomalies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lembège, Bertrand; Divin, Andrey; Markidis, Stefano; Amaya, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    We present the first 2D/3D fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies. The simulations are performed using the implicit electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code iPIC3D [Markidis, Lapenta & Rizwan-uddin, 2010]. Multiscale physics is resolved for all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) in the code, recently updated with a set of open boundary conditions designed for solar wind-body interactions. We use a dipole to model the crustal anomaly. The dipole center is located outside the computational domain and the boundary representing the lunar surface is modeled as a particle-absorbing plane. Photo-emission from the lunar surface is at this point not included, but will be in future work. We study the behaviour of the dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD simulations [Harnett & Winglee, 2000, 2002, 2003] and spacecraft observations [Kurata et al., 2005; Halekas et al., 2008; Wieser et al., 2010]. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Finally we will present preliminary results on the interaction of the solar wind with weaker magnetic anomalies in which highly non-adiabatic interactions are expected.

  5. Recent improvements to the ASTRA particle tracking code

    SciTech Connect

    Flottmann, Klaus; Lidia, Steven; Piot, Philippe

    2003-05-19

    The Astra simulation code has been successfully used in the design of linac and rf photoinjector systems utilizing beams with azimuthal symmetry. We present recently implemented changes to Astra that allow tracking of beams in beamlines without the assumption of any symmetry. The changes especially include a 3D mesh space charge algorithm and the possibility to import 3D electromagnetic fieldmaps from eigensolver programs.

  6. Simulation of suspension flow of finite-size spherical particles in a 3D square channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2008-11-01

    Suspension flow of finite-size particles in a turbulent gas is of importance to many engineering applications and natural phenomena. As a first step, the present work focuses on the motion and hydrodynamic interaction of finite-size particles in the absence of background carrier-fluid turbulence. The major challenge for an accurate simulation is twofold: an efficient implementation of no-slip boundary conditions on the moving particle surface and an accurate representation of short-range lubrication effects that typically are not resolved numerically. A Navier-Stokes based hybrid approach (i.e., Physalis) developed by Prosperetti and co-workers is employed to solve the suspension flows of a pair of finite-size, freely-moving particles at finite particle Reynolds numbers. A lubrication force representation, designed by Ladd, involving particle relative location and velocity, is incorporated to capture the short-range interactions between particles. The accuracy of the representation and its compatibility with the flow simulation will be examined. A mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) approach is also used to simulate the same problem for cross validation. Specific implementation issues will be addressed. Comparison with available numerical data will also be discussed.

  7. Developments in digital in-line holography enable validated measurement of 3D particle field dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert

    2013-12-01

    Digital in-line holography is an optical technique which can be applied to measure the size, three-dimensional position, and three-component velocity of disperse particle fields. This work summarizes recent developments at Sandia National Laboratories focused on improvement in measurement accuracy, experimental validation, and applications to multiphase flows. New routines are presented which reduce the uncertainty in measured position along the optical axis to a fraction of the particle diameter. Furthermore, application to liquid atomization highlights the ability to measure complex, three-dimensional structures. Finally, investigation of particles traveling at near sonic conditions prove accuracy despite significant experimental noise due to shock-waves.

  8. On charged particle tracks in cellulose nitrate and Lexan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Henke, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were performed aimed at developing plastic nuclear track detectors into quantitative tools for recording and measuring multicharged, heavy particles. Accurate track etch rate measurements as a function of LET were performed for cellulose nitrate and Lexan plastic detectors. This was done using a variety of incident charged particle types and energies. The effect of aging of latent tracks in Lexan in different gaseous atmospheres was investigated. Range distributions of high energy N-14 particle bevatron beams in nuclear emulsion were measured. Investigation of charge resolution and Bragg peak measurements were carried out using plastic nuclear track detectors.

  9. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-21

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required

  10. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  11. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    PubMed

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-16

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  12. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  13. Design of a 3D Digital Liquid Crystal Particle Thermometry and Velocimetry (3DDLCPT/V) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, Rob; Rixon, Greg; Dabiri, Dana

    2007-11-01

    A novel 3D Digital Liquid Crystal Particle Thermometry and Velocimetry (3DDLCPT/V) system has been designed and fabricated. By combining 3D Defocusing Particle Image Velocimetry (3DDPIV) and Digital Particle Image Thermometry (DPIT) into one system, this technique provides simultaneous temperature and velocity data using temperature-sensitive liquid crystal particles (LCP) as flow sensors. A custom water-filled prism corrects for astigmatism caused by off-axis imaging. New optics equations are derived to account for multi-surface refractions. This redesign also maximizes the use of the CCD area to more efficiently image the volume of interest. Six CCD cameras comprise the imaging system, with three allocated for velocity measurements and three for temperature measurements. The cameras are optically aligned to sub-pixel accuracy using a precision grid and high-resolution translation stages. Two high-intensity custom-designed xenon flashlamps provide illumination. Temperature calibration of the LCP is then performed. These results and proof-of-concept experiments will be discussed in detail.

  14. Fabrication of a three dimensional particle focusing microfluidic device using a 3D printer, PDMS, and glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, Robyn; Rosen, Daniel; Shirk, Kathryn

    Microfluidic devices have high importance in fields such as bioanalysis because they can manipulate volumes of fluid in the range of microliters to picoliters. Small samples can be quickly and easily tested using complex microfluidic devices. Typically, these devices are created through lithography techniques, which can be costly and time consuming. It has been shown that inexpensive microfluidic devices can be produced quickly using a 3D printer and PDMS. However, a size limitation prohibits the fabrication of precisely controlled microchannels. By using shrinking materials in combination with 3D printing of flow-focusing geometries, this limitation can be overcome. This research seeks to employ these techniques to quickly fabricate an inexpensive, working device with three dimensional particle focusing capabilities. By modifying the channel geometry, colloidal particles in a solution will be focused into a single beam when passed through this device. The ability to focus particles is necessary for a variety of biological applications which requires precise detection and characterization of particles in a sample. We would like to thank the Shippensburg University Undergraduate Research Grant Program for their generous funding.

  15. Time dependence of Fe/O ratio within a 3D solar energetic particle propagation model including drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.; Zelina, P.; Laitinen, T.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The intensity profiles of iron and oxygen in Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events often display differences that result in a decreasing Fe/O ratio over time. The physical mechanisms behind this behaviour are not fully understood, but these observational signatures provide important tests of physical modelling efforts. Aims: In this paper we study the propagation of iron and oxygen SEP ions using a 3D model of propagation which includes the effect of guiding centre drift in a Parker spiral magnetic field. We derive time intensity profiles for a variety of observer locations and study the temporal evolution of the Fe/O ratio. Methods: We use a 3D full orbit test particle model which includes scattering. The configuration of the interplanetary magnetic field is a unipolar Parker spiral. Particles are released instantaneously from a compact region at two solar radii and allowed to propagate in 3D. Results: Both Fe and O experience significant transport across the magnetic field due to gradient and curvature drifts. We find that Fe ions drift more than O ions due to their larger mass-to-charge ratio, so that an observer that is not magnetically well connected to the source region will observe Fe arriving before O, for particles within the same range in energy per nucleon. As a result, for the majority of observer locations, the Fe/O ratio displays a decrease in time. Conclusions: We conclude that propagation effects associated with drifts produce a decay over time of the Fe/O ratio, qualitatively reproducing that observed in SEP event profiles.

  16. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D anlaysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bielewski, M; Eriksson, M; Himbert, J; Simon, R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T F

    2007-11-27

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal {micro}-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 {micro}m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  17. Crosstalk minimization in autostereoscopic multiveiw 3D display by eye tracking and fusion (overlapping) of viewing zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Seon-Kyu; Yoon, Ki-Hyuk

    2012-06-01

    An autostereoscopic 3D display provides the binocular perception without eye glasses, but induces the low 3D effect and dizziness due to the crosstalk effect. The crosstalk related problems give the deterioration of 3D effect, clearness, and reality of 3D image. A novel method of reducing the crosstalk is designed and tested; the method is based on the fusion of viewing zones and the real time eye position. It is shown experimentally that the crosstalk is effectively reduced at any position around the optimal viewing distance.

  18. Development of a 3-D Defocusing Liquid Crystal Particle Thermometry and Velocimetry (3DDLCPTV) System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    yTL Y-coordinate of the top left vertex of an image equilateral triangle in the CCD coordinate system yTR Y-coordinate of the top right vertex of an...By using the above figures to generate equations for the positions of the particle images on the CCD (xTR, xTL, xB, yTR, yTL , and yB) as a...particles in the combined image. Likewise, ytr, ytl , and yb represent the y-coordinates. As is obvious in the above equations, rather than

  19. Advanced 3D electromagnetic and particle-in-cell modeling on structured/unstructured hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.B.; Pasik, M.F.; Kiefer, M.L.; Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    New techniques have been recently developed that allow unstructured, free meshes to be embedded into standard 3-dimensional, rectilinear, finite-difference time-domain grids. The resulting hybrid-grid modeling capability allows the higher resolution and fidelity of modeling afforded by free meshes to be combined with the simplicity and efficiency of rectilinear techniques. Integration of these new methods into the full-featured, general-purpose QUICKSILVER electromagnetic, Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code provides new modeling capability for a wide variety of electromagnetic and plasma physics problems. To completely exploit the integration of this technology into QUICKSILVER for applications requiring the self-consistent treatment of charged particles, this project has extended existing PIC methods for operation on these hybrid unstructured/rectilinear meshes. Several technical issues had to be addressed in order to accomplish this goal, including the location of particles on the unstructured mesh, adequate conservation of charge, and the proper handling of particles in the transition region between structured and unstructured portions of the hybrid grid.

  20. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  1. Particle sedimentation in curved tubes: A 3D simulation and optimization for treatment of vestibular vertigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Squires, Todd M.; Hain, Timothy C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical disorder of the vestibular system where micron-size crystals abnormally drift into the semicircular canals of the inner ear that sense angular motion of the head. Sedimentation of these crystals causes sensation of motion after true head motion has stopped: vertigo results. The usual clinical treatment is through a series of head maneuvers designed to move the particles into a less sensitive region of the canal system. We present a three-dimensional model to simulate treatment of BPPV by determining the complete hydrodynamic motion of the particles through the course of a therapeutic maneuver while using a realistic representation of the actual geometry. Analyses of clinical maneuvers show the parameter range for which they are effective, and indicate inefficiencies in current practice. In addition, an optimization process determines the most effective head maneuver, which significantly differs from those currently in practice.

  2. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  3. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  4. On the comparison of visual discomfort generated by S3D and 2D content based on eye-tracking features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsun, Iana; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    The changing of TV systems from 2D to 3D mode is the next expected step in the telecommunication world. Some works have already been done to perform this progress technically, but interaction of the third dimension with humans is not yet clear. Previously, it was found that any increased load of visual system can create visual fatigue, like prolonged TV watching, computer work or video gaming. But watching S3D can cause another nature of visual fatigue, since all S3D technologies creates illusion of the third dimension based on characteristics of binocular vision. In this work we propose to evaluate and compare the visual fatigue from watching 2D and S3D content. This work shows the difference in accumulation of visual fatigue and its assessment for two types of content. In order to perform this comparison eye-tracking experiments using six commercially available movies were conducted. Healthy naive participants took part into the test and gave their answers feeling the subjective evaluation. It was found that watching stereo 3D content induce stronger feeling of visual fatigue than conventional 2D, and the nature of video has an important effect on its increase. Visual characteristics obtained by using eye-tracking were investigated regarding their relation with visual fatigue.

  5. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Werz, T.; Baumann, M.; Wolfram, U.; Krill, C.E.

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction.

  6. Particle tracking microrheology of purified gastrointestinal mucins.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, Pantelis; Pudney, Paul D A; Thornton, David J; Waigh, Thomas A

    2014-04-01

    The rheological characteristics of gastric and duodenal mucin solutions, the building blocks of the mucus layer that covers the epithelia of the two organs, were investigated using particle tracking microrheology. We used biochemically well characterized purified porcine mucins (MUC5AC and MUC2) as models for human mucins, to probe their viscoelasticity as a function of mucin concentration and pH. Furthermore, we used both reducing (dithiothreitol, DTT) and chaotropic agents (guanidinium chloride and urea) to probe the mesoscopic forces that mediate the integrity of the polymer network. At neutral pH both gastric and duodenal mucins formed self-assembled semi-dilute networks above a certain critical mucin concentration (c*) with the viscosity (η) scaling as η∼c(0.53±0.08) for MUC5AC and η∼c(0.53±0.06) for MUC2, where c is the mucin concentration. Above an even higher mucin concentration threshold (ce , the entanglement concentration) reptation occurs and there is a dramatic increase in the viscosity scaling, η∼c(3.92±0.38) for MUC5AC and η∼c(5.1±0.8) for MUC2. The dynamics of the self-assembled comb polymers is examined in terms of a scaling model for flexible polyelectrolyte combs. Both duodenum and gastric mucin are found to be pH switchable gels, gelation occurring at low pHs. There is a hundred-fold increase in the elastic shear modulus once the pH is decreased. The addition of DTT, guanidinium chloride and urea disassembles both the semi-dilute and gel structures causing a large increase in the compliance (decrease in their shear moduli). Addition of the polyphenol EGCG has a reverse effect on mucin viscoelasticity, that is, it triggers a sol-gel transition in semi-dilute mucin solutions at neutral pH.

  7. Particle orbit tracking on a parallel computer: Hypertrack

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, B.; Bourianoff, G.; Pilat, F. ); Talman, R. )

    1991-05-01

    A program has been written which performs particle orbit tracking on the Intel iPSC/860 distributed memory parallel computer. The tracking is performed using a thin element approach. A brief description of the structure and performance of the code is presented, along with applications of the code to the analysis of accelerator lattices for the SSC. The concept of ensemble tracking'', i.e. the tracking of ensemble averages of noninteracting particles, such as the emittance, is presented. Preliminary results of such studies will be presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Simulated 2D vs. 3D Shock Waves: Implications for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Frank C.

    2005-08-01

    We have given a rigorous derivation of a theorem showing that charged particles in an arbitrary electromagnetic field with at least one ignorable spatial coordinate remain forever tied to a given magnetic-field line. Such a situation contrasts the significant motions normal to the magnetic field that are expected in most real three-dimensional systems. While the significance of the theorem was not widely appreciated until recently, it has important consequences for a number of problems and is of particular relevance for the acceleration of cosmic rays by shocks.

  9. A single particle plasmon resonance study of 3D conical nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian; Gollmer, Dominik A; Horrer, Andreas; Fulmes, Julia; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P James; Kern, Dieter P; Fleischer, Monika

    2013-09-07

    Metallic nanocones are well-suited optical antennas for near-field microscopy and spectroscopy, exhibiting a number of different plasmonic modes. A major challenge in using nanocones for many applications is maximizing the signal at the tip while minimizing the background from the base. It is shown that nanocone plasmon resonance properties can be shifted over a wide range of wavelengths by variation of the substrate, material, size and shape, enabling potential control over specific modes and field distributions. The individual resonances are identified and studied by correlated single particle dark field scattering and scanning electron microscopy in combination with numerical simulations.

  10. A Hierarchical Multiscale Particle Computational Method for Simulation of Nanoscale Flows on 3D Unstructured Grids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-14

    Navier - Stokes type of solvers. In the case of transitional and free-molecular regimes (Kn > 0.01), analysis and simulations are carried out with... equation of motion, given by r (t + dt) = r (t) + v (t) AT . Tracing the motion of the particle on the unstructured grid is carried out using the...AC In the above equation the acoustic number is .4 c = a/n , where a is the speed of sound, and a. = JjkTo I m is the speed of sound at a

  11. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  12. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment with Adaptive Mesh and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999] approaches. In this report, we develop a method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation, which is based on a multiscale adaptive mesh, particle and algorithm refinement. This method employs the fluid description for electrons whereas for ions the drift-kinetic and particle approaches are used. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999.

  13. Particle acceleration in 3D single current sheets formed in the solar corona and heliosphere: PIC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Siversky, T.

    2015-09-01

    Acceleration of protons and electrons in a reconnecting current sheet (RCS) is investigated with the test particle and particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches in a 3D magnetic topology. PIC simulations confirm a spatial separation of electrons and protons with respect to the midplane depending on the guiding field. Simulation reveals that the separation occurs in magnetic topologies with strong guiding fields and lasts as long as the particles are kept dragged into a current sheet. This separation produces a polarisation electric field induced by the plasma feedback to a presence of accelerated particles, which shape can change from symmetric towards the midplane (for weak guiding field) to fully asymmetric (for strong guiding field). Particles are found accelerated at a midplane of any current sheets present in the heliosphere to the energies up to hundred keV for electrons and hundred MeV for protons. The maximum energy gained by particles during their motion inside the current sheet is defined by its magnetic field topology (the ratio of magnetic field components), the side and location from the X-nullpoint, where the particles enter a current sheet. In strong magnetic fields of the solar corona with weaker guiding fields, electrons are found circulating about the midplane to large distances where proton are getting accelerated, creating about the current sheet midplane clouds of high energy electrons, which can be the source of hard X-ray emission in the coronal sources of flares. These electrons are ejected into the same footpoint as protons after the latter reach the energy sufficicent to break from a current sheet. In a weaker magnetic field of the heliosphere the bounced electrons with lower energies cannot reach the midplane turning instead at some distance D before the current sheet midplane by 180 degrees from their initial motion. Also the beams of accelerated transit and bounced particles are found to generate turbulent electric fields in a form of Langmuir

  14. Space Charge Models for Particle Tracking on Long Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P; Potts III, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    In order to efficiently track charged particles over long times, most tracking codes use either analytic charge distributions or particle-in-cell (PIC) methods based on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). While useful for theoretical studies, analytic distribution models do not allow accurate simulation of real machines. PIC calculations can utilize realistic space charge distributions, but these methods suffer from the presence of discretization errors. We examine the situation for particle tracking with space charge over long times, and consider possible ideas to improve the accuracy of such calculations.

  15. 3D Wind Reconstruction and Turbulence Estimation in the Boundary Layer from Doppler Lidar Measurements using Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottner, L.; Baehr, C.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent phenomena in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are characterized by small spatial and temporal scales which make them difficult to observe and to model.New remote sensing instruments, like Doppler Lidar, give access to fine and high-frequency observations of wind in the ABL. This study suggests to use a method of nonlinear estimation based on these observations to reconstruct 3D wind in a hemispheric volume, and to estimate atmospheric turbulent parameters. The wind observations are associated to particle systems which are driven by a local turbulence model. The particles have both fluid and stochastic properties. Therefore, spatial averages and covariances may be deduced from the particles. Among the innovative aspects, we point out the absence of the common hypothesis of stationary-ergodic turbulence and the non-use of particle model closure hypothesis. Every time observations are available, 3D wind is reconstructed and turbulent parameters such as turbulent kinectic energy, dissipation rate, and Turbulent Intensity (TI) are provided. This study presents some results obtained using real wind measurements provided by a five lines of sight Lidar. Compared with classical methods (e.g. eddy covariance) our technic renders equivalent long time results. Moreover it provides finer and real time turbulence estimations. To assess this new method, we suggest computing independently TI using different observation types. First anemometer data are used to have TI reference.Then raw and filtered Lidar observations have also been compared. The TI obtained from raw data is significantly higher than the reference one, whereas the TI estimated with the new algorithm has the same order.In this study we have presented a new class of algorithm to reconstruct local random media. It offers a new way to understand turbulence in the ABL, in both stable or convective conditions. Later, it could be used to refine turbulence parametrization in meteorological meso-scale models.

  16. Automatic three-dimensional tracking of particles with high-numerical-aperture digital lensless holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, John F; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2012-02-15

    We present an automatic procedure for 3D tracking of micrometer-sized particles with high-NA digital lensless holographic microscopy. The method uses a two-feature approach to search for the best focal planes and to distinguish particles from artifacts or other elements on the reconstructed stream of the holograms. A set of reconstructed images is axially projected onto a single image. From the projected image, the centers of mass of all the reconstructed elements are identified. Starting from the centers of mass, the morphology of the profile of the maximum intensity along the reconstruction direction allows for the distinguishing of particles from others elements. The method is tested with modeled holograms and applied to automatically track micrometer-sized bubbles in a sample of 4 mm3 of soda.

  17. Unstructured grids in 3D and 4D for a time-dependent interface in front tracking with improved accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J. W.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Front tracking traces the dynamic evolution of an interface separating differnt materials or fluid components. In this paper, they describe three types of the grid generation methods used in the front tracking method. One is the unstructured surface grid. The second is a structured grid-based reconstruction method. The third is a time-space grid, also grid based, for a conservative tracking algorithm with improved accuracy.

  18. Investigation of Parametric Excitation of Whistler Waves Using 3D Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Rose, David; Paraschiv, Ioana

    2016-10-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that a parametric interaction between quasi-electrostatic lower oblique resonance (LOR) and lower frequency (ω < ωLH) ion acoustic or extremely low frequency (ELF) waves can produce electromagnetic whistler waves in a cold magnetized plasma. It was also demonstrated theoretically that this interaction can more efficiently generate electromagnetic whistler waves than by direct excitation by a conventional loop antenna, operating at a single frequency. For the purpose of numerically validating the above result, a series of particle-in-cell simulations were carried out. We first demonstrate the ability to accurately model whistler wave excitation producing the familiar resonant surfaces which comprise the LOR using a modeled loop antenna. Next we demonstrate the ability to generate ion acoustic waves as well as ELF waves, both of which are shown to agree with the expected linear dispersion relations. Finally, we investigate the existence of any nonlinear interaction which indicates the desired parametric excitation and attempt to analyze the efficiency of this method of excitation and radiated power going into the whistler part of the VLF wave spectrum.

  19. Detailed Measurement of Wall Strain with 3D Speckle Tracking in the Aortic Root: A Case of Bionic Support for Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Sebastian; Karatolios, Konstantinos; Wittek, Andreas; Blasé, Christopher; Ramaswamy, Anette; Mirow, Nikolas; Moosdorf, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) wall motion tracking (WMT) based on ultrasound imaging enables estimation of aortic wall motion and deformation. It provides insights into changes in vascular compliance and vessel wall properties essential for understanding the pathogenesis and progression of aortic diseases. In this report, we employed the novel 3D WMT analysis on the ascending aorta aneurysm (AA) to estimate local aortic wall motion and strain in case of a patient scheduled for replacement of the aortic root. Although progression of the diameter indicates surgical therapy, at present we addressed the question for optimal surgical time point. According to the data, AA in our case has enlarged diameter and subsequent reduced circumferential wall strain, but area tracking data reveals almost normal elastic properties. Virtual remodeling of the aortic root opens a play list for different loading conditions to determine optimal surgical intervention in time. PMID:28018834

  20. Optical tracking of nanoscale particles in microscale environments

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, P. P.; Liddle, J. A.; Stavis, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The trajectories of nanoscale particles through microscale environments record useful information about both the particles and the environments. Optical microscopes provide efficient access to this information through measurements of light in the far field from nanoparticles. Such measurements necessarily involve trade-offs in tracking capabilities. This article presents a measurement framework, based on information theory, that facilitates a more systematic understanding of such trade-offs to rationally design tracking systems for diverse applications. This framework includes the degrees of freedom of optical microscopes, which determine the limitations of tracking measurements in theory. In the laboratory, tracking systems are assemblies of sources and sensors, optics and stages, and nanoparticle emitters. The combined characteristics of such systems determine the limitations of tracking measurements in practice. This article reviews this tracking hardware with a focus on the essential functions of nanoparticles as optical emitters and microenvironmental probes. Within these theoretical and practical limitations, experimentalists have implemented a variety of tracking systems with different capabilities. This article reviews a selection of apparatuses and techniques for tracking multiple and single particles by tuning illumination and detection, and by using feedback and confinement to improve the measurements. Prior information is also useful in many tracking systems and measurements, which apply across a broad spectrum of science and technology. In the context of the framework and review of apparatuses and techniques, this article reviews a selection of applications, with particle diffusion serving as a prelude to tracking measurements in biological, fluid, and material systems, fabrication and assembly processes, and engineered devices. In so doing, this review identifies trends and gaps in particle tracking that might influence future research. PMID:27213022

  1. Laboratory-based characterization of plutonium in soil particles using micro-XRF and 3D confocal XRF

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Patterson, Brian M.; Havrilla, George Joseph

    2015-03-29

    The investigation of plutonium (Pu) in a soil matrix is of interest in safeguards, nuclear forensics, and environmental remediation activities. The elemental composition of two plutonium contaminated soil particles was characterized nondestructively using a pair of micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) techniques including high resolution X-ray (hiRX) and 3D confocal XRF. The three dimensional elemental imaging capability of confocal XRF permitted the identification two distinct Pu particles within the samples: one external to the Ferich soil matrix and another co-located with Cu within the soil matrix. The size and morphology of the particles was assessed with X-ray transmission microscopy and micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) providing complementary morphological information. Limits of detection for a 30 μm Pu particle are <10 ng for each of the XRF techniques. Ultimately, this study highlights the capability for lab-based, nondestructive, spatially resolved characterization of heterogeneous matrices on the micrometer scale with nanogram sensitivity.

  2. Laboratory-based characterization of plutonium in soil particles using micro-XRF and 3D confocal XRF

    DOE PAGES

    McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Patterson, Brian M.; ...

    2015-03-29

    The investigation of plutonium (Pu) in a soil matrix is of interest in safeguards, nuclear forensics, and environmental remediation activities. The elemental composition of two plutonium contaminated soil particles was characterized nondestructively using a pair of micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) techniques including high resolution X-ray (hiRX) and 3D confocal XRF. The three dimensional elemental imaging capability of confocal XRF permitted the identification two distinct Pu particles within the samples: one external to the Ferich soil matrix and another co-located with Cu within the soil matrix. The size and morphology of the particles was assessed with X-ray transmission microscopy andmore » micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) providing complementary morphological information. Limits of detection for a 30 μm Pu particle are <10 ng for each of the XRF techniques. Ultimately, this study highlights the capability for lab-based, nondestructive, spatially resolved characterization of heterogeneous matrices on the micrometer scale with nanogram sensitivity.« less

  3. Real-Time, Multiple, Pan/Tilt/Zoom, Computer Vision Tracking, and 3D Position Estimating System for Unmanned Aerial System Metrology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-18

    area of 3D point estimation of flapping- wing UASs. The benefits of designing and developing such a system is instrumental in researching various...are many benefits to us- ing SIFT in tracking. It detects features that are invariant to image scale and rotation, and are shown to provide robust...provided to estimate background motion for optical flow background subtraction. The experiments with the static background showed minute benefit in

  4. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  5. Parallel computing of a digital hologram and particle searching for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Sato, Kazuho; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Yamamoto, Keisuke

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a parallel algorithm for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry. The algorithm is used in (1) numerical reconstruction of a particle image computer using a digital hologram, and (2) searching for particles. The numerical reconstruction from the digital hologram makes use of the Fresnel diffraction equation and the FFT (fast Fourier transform),whereas the particle search algorithm looks for local maximum graduation in a reconstruction field represented by a 3D matrix. To achieve high performance computing for both calculations (reconstruction and particle search), two memory partitions are allocated to the 3D matrix. In this matrix, the reconstruction part consists of horizontally placed 2D memory partitions on the x-y plane for the FFT, whereas, the particle search part consists of vertically placed 2D memory partitions set along the z axes.Consequently, the scalability can be obtained for the proportion of processor elements,where the benchmarks are carried out for parallel computation by a SGI Altix machine.

  6. Accuracy of real-time single- and multi-beat 3-d speckle tracking echocardiography in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hjertaas, Johannes Just; Fosså, Henrik; Dybdahl, Grete Lunestad; Grüner, Renate; Lunde, Per; Matre, Knut

    2013-06-01

    With little data published on the accuracy of cardiac 3-D strain measurements, we investigated the agreement between 3-D echocardiography and sonomicrometry in an in vitro model with a polyvinyl alcohol phantom. A cardiac scanner with a 3-D probe was used to acquire recordings at 15 different stroke volumes at a heart rate of 60 beats/min, and eight different stroke volumes at a heart rate of 120 beats/min. Sonomicrometry was used as a reference, monitoring longitudinal, circumferential and radial lengths. Both single- and multi-beat acquisitions were recorded. Strain values were compared with sonomicrometer strain using linear correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman analysis. Multi-beat acquisition showed good agreement, whereas real-time images showed less agreement. The best correlation was obtained for a heart rate 60 of beats/min at a volume rate 36.6 volumes/s.

  7. Particle filtering for tracking of GLUT4 vesicles in TIRF microscpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangping; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Wenglong; Yan, Dandan; Chen, Yongli

    2009-10-01

    GLUT4 is responsible for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into fat cells and description of the dynamic behavior of it can give insight in some working mechanisms and structures of these cells. Quantitative analysis of the dynamical process requires tracking of hundreds of GLUT4 vesicles characterized as bright spots in noisy image sequences. In this paper, a 3D tracking algorithm built in Bayesian probabilistic framework is put forward, combined with the unique features of the TIRF microscopy. A brightness-correction procedure is firstly applied to ensure that the intensity of a vesicle is constant along time and is only affected by spatial factors. Then, tracking is formalized as a state estimation problem and a developed particle filter integrated by a sub-optimizer that steers the particles towards a region with high likelihood is used. Once each tracked vesicle is located in image plane, the depth information of a granule can be indirectly inferred according to the exponential relationship between its intensity and its vertical position. The experimental results indicate that the vesicles are tracked well under different motion styles. More, the algorithm provides the depth information of the tracked vesicle.

  8. Cross-Platform Graphical User Interface with fast 3-D Rendering for Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David; Luetkemeyer, Kelly; Cary, John

    1999-11-01

    The Graphical User Interface (GUI) for XOOPIC (X11-based Object-Oriented Particle-in-Cell) is being ported to Qt, a cross-platform C++ windowing toolkit, thus permitting the code to run on PC's running both Windows 95/98/NT and Linux, as well as all commercial Unix platforms. All 3-D graphics will be handled through OpenGL, the cross-platform standard for fast 3-D rendering. The use of object-oriented design (OOD) techniques keeps the GUI/physics interface clean, and minimizes the impact of GUI development on the physics code. OOD also improves the maintainability and extensibility of large scientific simulation codes, while allowing for cross-platform portability and ready interchange of individual algorithms or entire physics kernels. Planned new GUI features include interactive modifications of the simulation parameters, including generation of a slowly-varying mesh and automatic updating of a corresponding input file. Improved modeling of high-power microwave tubes is one of the primary applications being targeted by this project.

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2D and 3D motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories, and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and sub-millimeter accuracy. Method We examined the accuracy and precision of 2D and 3D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially-available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. Results Overall mean error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3 vs. 6 mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2D and 3D data. Conclusion Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve sub-millimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes. PMID:24686484

  12. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2-d and 3-d motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and submillimeter accuracy. METHOD The authors examined the accuracy and precision of 2-D and 3-D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. RESULTS Overall root-mean-square error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3- vs. 6-mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2-D and 3-D data. CONCLUSION Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve submillimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes.

  13. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  14. Three-dimensional simulation and auto-stereoscopic 3D display of the battlefield environment based on the particle system algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jiwei; Sang, Xinzhu; Xing, Shujun; Cui, Huilong; Yan, Binbin; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    The army's combat training is very important now, and the simulation of the real battlefield environment is of great significance. Two-dimensional information has been unable to meet the demand at present. With the development of virtual reality technology, three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the battlefield environment is possible. In the simulation of 3D battlefield environment, in addition to the terrain, combat personnel and the combat tool ,the simulation of explosions, fire, smoke and other effects is also very important, since these effects can enhance senses of realism and immersion of the 3D scene. However, these special effects are irregular objects, which make it difficult to simulate with the general geometry. Therefore, the simulation of irregular objects is always a hot and difficult research topic in computer graphics. Here, the particle system algorithm is used for simulating irregular objects. We design the simulation of the explosion, fire, smoke based on the particle system and applied it to the battlefield 3D scene. Besides, the battlefield 3D scene simulation with the glasses-free 3D display is carried out with an algorithm based on GPU 4K super-multiview 3D video real-time transformation method. At the same time, with the human-computer interaction function, we ultimately realized glasses-free 3D display of the simulated more realistic and immersed 3D battlefield environment.

  15. SU-E-T-380: Particle Microdosimetry Study Based On 3D-Cylindrical Silicon Radiaton Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola, C; Carabe-Fernandez, A; Gomez, F; Pellegrini, G; Fleta, C; Quirion, D; Lozano, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A new design of a solid-state-microdetector based on silicon 3D microfabrication and its performance to characterise Lineal energy, Specific Energy, dose, LET and other microdosimetric variables required for modelling particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is presented. Methods: A microdosimeter formed by a matrix of independent sensors with well-defined micrometric cylindrical shape and with a volume similar to those of cellular dimensions is used to measure microdosimetric variables. Each sensor measures the radiation deposited energy which, divided by the mean cord length of the sensors, provides us with the Linear Energy (y) of the radiation as well as its energy distribution, and frequencymean. Starting from the these distributions in different points of a proton beam, we generate biophysical data (e.g. Linear Energy Transfer (LET), Specific Energy (z), etc…) needed for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations radiation effect models used in particle radiotherapy treatment planning. In addition, a Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) will be used as baseline to calibrate the “y” magnitude of the microdosimeter unit-cells. Results: The experimental measurements will soon be carried out at the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine (University of Pennsylvania), which provides proton beam for clinical research proposals. The results of distributions measured of the microdosimetric variables from the first tests developed in the proton facility will be presented and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 code. Conclusion: The use of 3D microdosimeters such as the one presented here will enhance the accuracy of RBE calculations normally affected by the inherent uncertainty of monte carlo simulations due to the approximation of material composition and energy dependent physical laws involved in such calculations. The effect of such approximations will be quatified by comparison with absolute measurement of

  16. Tightly coupled low cost 3D RISS/GPS integration using a mixture particle filter for vehicular navigation.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle's odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  17. Tightly Coupled Low Cost 3D RISS/GPS Integration Using a Mixture Particle Filter for Vehicular Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle’s odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  18. 3-D Full-kinetic Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Particle Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Wang, X.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present three-dimensional full-kinetic electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the full-kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to self-consistently investigate space charge effects, and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general mechanism of the interaction of both a horizontal and vertical dipole model embedded just below the lunar surface focussing on the ion and electron kinetic behaviour of the system. It is shown that the configurations are largely dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyro-radius of the solar wind ions. The formation of mini-magnetospheres is an electrostatic effect. Additionally, we discuss typical particle trajectories as well as complete particle distribution functions covering thermal and suprathermal energies, within the interaction region and on viable spacecraft altitudes. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board

  19. Particle Trajectory and Icing Analysis of the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Particle trajectory and ice shape calculations were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The particle trajectory and icing computations were performed using the new "block-to-block" collection efficiency method which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for three drop sizes and two drop distributions typically used in aircraft design and certification. Particle trajectory computations were made for water drop sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns. Particle trajectory and ice shape predictions were made for a 20 micron Langmuir-D distribution and for a 92 mm Super-cooled Large Droplet (SLD) distribution with and without splashing effects for a Liquid Water Content (LWC) of 0.3 g/cu m and an icing time of 30 min. The E3 fan and spinner combination proved to be an effective ice removal mechanism as they removed greater than 36 percent of the mass entering the inlet for the icing cases. The maximum free stream catch fraction for the fan and spinner combination was 0.60 while that on the elements downstream of the fan was 0.03. The non-splashing trajectory and collection efficiency results showed that as drop size increased impingement rates increased on the spinner and fan leaving less mass to impinge on downstream components. The SLD splashing case yielded more mass downstream of the fan than the SLD non-splashing case due to mass being splashed from the upstream inlet lip, spinner and fan components. The ice shapes generated downstream of the fan were either small or nonexistent due to the small available mass

  20. Development of multi-spectral three-dimensional micro particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin

    2016-08-01

    The color-coded 3D micro particle tracking velocimetry system (CC3DμPTV) is a volumetric velocimetry technique that uses the defocusing digital particle image velocimetry (DDPIV) approach to reconstruct the 3D location of the particle. It is suited for microscopic flow visualization because of the single camera configuration. However, several factors limit the performance of the system. In this study, the limitation of the CC3DμPTV is discussed in detail and a new concept of a multi-camera 3D μ-PTV system is proposed to improve the performance of the original CC3DμPTV system. The system utilizes two dichroic beam splitters to separate the incoming light into 3 spectral ranges, and image with three monochrome image sensors. The use of a color-matched light source, off-center individual pinhole and monochrome image sensors allow the system to achieve better sensitivity and optical resolution. The use of coherent lasers light sources with high-speed cameras improves the velocity measurement dynamic range. The performance of the proposed multi-spectral system is first evaluated with a simulation model based on the finite element method (FEM). The performance is also compared numerically with the CC3DμPTV system. The test results show significant improvements on the signal to noise ratio and optical resolution. Originally presented in 11th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry, Santa Barbara, California, September 14-16, 2015.

  1. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  2. Experimental evaluations of the accuracy of 3D and 4D planning in robotic tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Mark K. H.; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Ng, Sherry C. Y.; Tong, Anthony S. M.; Tam, Eric K. W.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Due to the complexity of 4D target tracking radiotherapy, the accuracy of this treatment strategy should be experimentally validated against established standard 3D technique. This work compared the accuracy of 3D and 4D dose calculations in respiration tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Using the 4D planning module of the CyberKnife treatment planning system, treatment plans for a moving target and a static off-target cord structure were created on different four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) datasets of a thorax phantom moving in different ranges. The 4D planning system used B-splines deformable image registrations (DIR) to accumulate dose distributions calculated on different breathing geometries, each corresponding to a static 3D-CT image of the 4D-CT dataset, onto a reference image to compose a 4D dose distribution. For each motion, 4D optimization was performed to generate a 4D treatment plan of the moving target. For comparison with standard 3D planning, each 4D plan was copied to the reference end-exhale images and a standard 3D dose calculation was followed. Treatment plans of the off-target structure were first obtained by standard 3D optimization on the end-exhale images. Subsequently, they were applied to recalculate the 4D dose distributions using DIRs. All dose distributions that were initially obtained using the ray-tracing algorithm with equivalent path-length heterogeneity correction (3D{sub EPL} and 4D{sub EPL}) were recalculated by a Monte Carlo algorithm (3D{sub MC} and 4D{sub MC}) to further investigate the effects of dose calculation algorithms. The calculated 3D{sub EPL}, 3D{sub MC}, 4D{sub EPL}, and 4D{sub MC} dose distributions were compared to measurements by Gafchromic EBT2 films in the axial and coronal planes of the moving target object, and the coronal plane for the static off-target object based on the {gamma} metric at 5%/3mm criteria ({gamma}{sub 5%/3mm}). Treatment plans were considered

  3. Longitudinal, label-free, quantitative tracking of cell death and viability in a 3D tumor model with OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yookyung; Klein, Oliver J.; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models are highly useful tools for studying tumor growth and treatment response of malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Existing viability and treatment assessment assays, however, face shortcomings when applied to these large, complex, and heterogeneous culture systems. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, label-free, optical imaging technique that can visualize live cells and tissues over time with subcellular resolution and millimeters of optical penetration depth. Here, we show that OCT is capable of carrying out high-content, longitudinal assays of 3D culture treatment response. We demonstrate the usage and capability of OCT for the dynamic monitoring of individual and combination therapeutic regimens in vitro, including both chemotherapy drugs and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. OCT was validated against the standard LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Assay in small tumor spheroid cultures, showing excellent correlation with existing standards. Importantly, OCT was shown to be capable of evaluating 3D spheroid treatment response even when traditional viability assays failed. OCT 3D viability imaging revealed synergy between PDT and the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic carboplatin that evolved over time. We believe the efficacy and accuracy of OCT in vitro drug screening will greatly contribute to the field of cancer treatment and therapy evaluation.

  4. Longitudinal, label-free, quantitative tracking of cell death and viability in a 3D tumor model with OCT

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yookyung; Klein, Oliver J.; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models are highly useful tools for studying tumor growth and treatment response of malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Existing viability and treatment assessment assays, however, face shortcomings when applied to these large, complex, and heterogeneous culture systems. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, label-free, optical imaging technique that can visualize live cells and tissues over time with subcellular resolution and millimeters of optical penetration depth. Here, we show that OCT is capable of carrying out high-content, longitudinal assays of 3D culture treatment response. We demonstrate the usage and capability of OCT for the dynamic monitoring of individual and combination therapeutic regimens in vitro, including both chemotherapy drugs and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. OCT was validated against the standard LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Assay in small tumor spheroid cultures, showing excellent correlation with existing standards. Importantly, OCT was shown to be capable of evaluating 3D spheroid treatment response even when traditional viability assays failed. OCT 3D viability imaging revealed synergy between PDT and the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic carboplatin that evolved over time. We believe the efficacy and accuracy of OCT in vitro drug screening will greatly contribute to the field of cancer treatment and therapy evaluation. PMID:27248849

  5. Application of MPP to particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Chang, L. )

    1993-12-25

    The SSC requires massive simulation to support the design, commissioning, and operation of the accelerator complex. To this end, the laboratory has made a significant commitment to MPP for this application. A 64 node IPSC/860 was acquired in January of 1991 and has been used extensively in tracking studies of various accelerators of the SSC injector chain. This talk will detail the accomplishments to date and lessons learned.

  6. Quantification of Coupled Stiffness and Fiber Orientation Remodeling in Hypertensive Rat Right-Ventricular Myocardium Using 3D Ultrasound Speckle Tracking with Biaxial Testing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Sebastiani, Andrea; Yap, Choon Hwai; Simon, Marc A.; Kim, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical and structural changes of right ventricular (RV) in response to pulmonary hypertension (PH) are inadequately understood. While current standard biaxial testing provides information on the mechanical behavior of RV tissues using surface markers, it is unable to fully assess structural and mechanical properties across the full tissue thickness. In this study, the mechanical and structural properties of normotensive and pulmonary hypertension right ventricular (PHRV) myocardium through its full thickness were examined using mechanical testing combined with 3D ultrasound speckle tracking (3D-UST). RV pressure overload was induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by pulmonary artery (PA) banding. The second Piola–Kirchhoff stress tensors and Green-Lagrangian strain tensors were computed in the RV myocardium using the biaxial testing combined with 3D-UST. A previously established non-linear curve-fitting algorithm was applied to fit experimental data to a Strain Energy Function (SEF) for computation of myofiber orientation. The fiber orientations obtained by the biaxial testing with 3D-UST compared well with the fiber orientations computed from the histology. In addition, the re-orientation of myofiber in the right ventricular free wall (RVFW) along longitudinal direction (apex-to-outflow-tract direction) was noticeable in response to PH. For normotensive RVFW samples, the average fiber orientation angles obtained by 3D-UST with biaxial test spiraled from 20° at the endo-cardium to -42° at the epi-cardium (Δ = 62°). For PHRV samples, the average fiber orientation angles obtained by 3D-UST with biaxial test had much less spiral across tissue thickness: 3° at endo-cardium to -7° at epi-cardium (Δ = 10°, P<0.005 compared to normotensive). PMID:27780271

  7. Use of MV and kV imager correlation for maintaining continuous real-time 3D internal marker tracking during beam interruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Riaz, N.; Dieterich, Sonja; Suh, Yelin; Xing, L.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of onboard kV imaging together with a MV electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on linear accelerators (LINAC) can provide an easy to implement real-time 3D organ position monitoring solution for treatment delivery. Currently, real-time MV-kV tracking has only been demonstrated by simultaneous imagining by both MV and kV imaging devices. However, modalities such as step-and-shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), which inherently contain MV beam interruptions, can lead to loss of target information necessary for 3D localization. Additionally, continuous kV imaging throughout the treatment delivery can lead to high levels of imaging dose to the patient. This work demonstrates for the first time how full 3D target tracking can be maintained even in the presence of such beam interruption, or MV/kV beam interleave, by use of a relatively simple correlation model together with MV-kV tracking. A moving correlation model was constructed using both present and prior positions of the marker in the available MV or kV image to compute the position of the marker on the interrupted imager. A commercially available radiotherapy system, equipped with both MV and kV imaging devices, was used to deliver typical SS-IMRT lung treatment plans to a 4D phantom containing internally embedded metallic markers. To simulate actual lung tumor motion, previous recorded 4D lung patient motion data were used. Lung tumor motion data of five separate patients were inputted into the 4D phantom, and typical SS-IMRT lung plans were delivered to simulate actual clinical deliveries. Application of the correlation model to SS-IMRT lung treatment deliveries was found to be an effective solution for maintaining continuous 3D tracking during 'step' beam interruptions. For deliveries involving five or more gantry angles with 50 or more fields per plan, the positional errors were found to have <=1 mm root mean squared error (RMSE) in all three spatial directions. In addition to increasing the robustness of

  8. 3D visualisation of the stochastic patterns of the radial dose in nano-volumes by a Monte Carlo simulation of HZE ion track structure.

    PubMed

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2011-02-01

    The description of energy deposition by high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei is of importance for space radiation risk assessment and due to their use in hadrontherapy. Such ions deposit a large fraction of their energy within the so-called core of the track and a smaller proportion in the penumbra (or track periphery). We study the stochastic patterns of the radial dependence of energy deposition using Monte Carlo track structure codes RITRACKS and RETRACKS, that were used to simulate HZE tracks and calculate energy deposition in voxels of 40 nm. The simulation of a (56)Fe(26+) ion of 1 GeV u(-1) revealed zones of high-energy deposition which maybe found as far as a few millimetres away from the track core in some simulations. The calculation also showed that ∼43 % of the energy was deposited in the penumbra. These 3D stochastic simulations combined with a visualisation interface are a powerful tool for biophysicists which may be used to study radiation-induced biological effects such as double strand breaks and oxidative damage and the subsequent cellular and tissue damage processing and signalling.

  9. Real-time target tracking of soft tissues in 3D ultrasound images based on robust visual information and mechanical simulation.

    PubMed

    Royer, Lucas; Krupa, Alexandre; Dardenne, Guillaume; Le Bras, Anthony; Marchand, Eric; Marchal, Maud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time approach that allows tracking deformable structures in 3D ultrasound sequences. Our method consists in obtaining the target displacements by combining robust dense motion estimation and mechanical model simulation. We perform evaluation of our method through simulated data, phantom data, and real-data. Results demonstrate that this novel approach has the advantage of providing correct motion estimation regarding different ultrasound shortcomings including speckle noise, large shadows and ultrasound gain variation. Furthermore, we show the good performance of our method with respect to state-of-the-art techniques by testing on the 3D databases provided by MICCAI CLUST'14 and CLUST'15 challenges.

  10. Tracking time interval changes of pulmonary nodules on follow-up 3D CT images via image-based risk score of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Moriyama, N.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present a computer-aided follow-up (CAF) scheme to support physicians to track interval changes of pulmonary nodules on three dimensional (3D) CT images and to decide the treatment strategies without making any under or over treatment. Our scheme involves analyzing CT histograms to evaluate the volumetric distribution of CT values within pulmonary nodules. A variational Bayesian mixture modeling framework translates the image-derived features into an image-based risk score for predicting the patient recurrence-free survival. Through applying our scheme to follow-up 3D CT images of pulmonary nodules, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of the CAF scheme which can provide the trajectories that can characterize time interval changes of pulmonary nodules.

  11. Three Dimensional Particle Tracking in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megson, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Superfluid helium is a macroscopic quantum state which exhibits exotic physical properties, such as flow without friction and ballistic heat transport. Superfluid flow is irrotational except about line-like topological phase defects with quantized circulation, known as quatized vortices. The presence of these vortices and their dynamics is the dominating factor of turbulence in superfluid flows. One commonly studied regime of superfluid turbulence is thermal counterflow, where a local heat flux drives the formation and growth of a tangle of vortices. This talk will present experimental studies of counterflow turbulence performed using a multi-camera three-dimensional imaging apparatus with micron-sized ice tracer particles as well as fluorescent nanoparticles. In particular, we will discuss the measurement of three-dimensional velocties and their autocorrelations. Additionally, we are developing new techniques for optical studies of bulk superfluid helium, with particular focus on characterizing tracer particles and particle dispersal mechanisms. Funding from NSF DMR-1407472.

  12. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  13. Modeling oceanic multiphase flow by using Lagrangian particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    While the density of seawater is basically determined by its temperature, salinity and pressure, the effective density becomes higher when the water mass contains suspended sediment. On the other hands, effective density declines when water mass contains fine scale materials of lower density such as bubbles and ice crystals. Such density anomaly induced by small scale materials suspended in water masses sometimes plays important roles in the sub-mesoscale ocean physics. To simulate these small scale oceanic multiphase flow, a new modeling framework using an online Lagrangian particle tracking method is developed. A Lagrangian particle tracking method has substantial advantages such as an explicit treatment of buoyancy force acting on each individual particle, no numerical diffusion and dissipation, high dynamic range and an ability to track the history and each individual particle. However, its numerical cost causes difficulty when we try to simulate a large number of particles. In the present study we implement a numerically efficient particle tracking scheme using linked-list data structure, which is coupled with a nonhydrostatic dynamical core. This newly developed model successfully reproduces characteristics of some interesting small scale multiphase processes, for example hyperpycnal flow (a sediment-rich river water plume trapped at ocean floor) and grease ice cover (a slurry mixture of frazil ice crystals and seawater).

  14. Luminescent sensors for tracking spatial particle distributions in an explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Diez-y-Riega, Helena; Eilers, Hergen; Svingala, Forrest R.; Daniels, Amber; Lightstone, James M.

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed and tested thermally sensitive particles that, when seeded into an explosive event, flow with the expanding post-detonation fireball and provide ex-situ measurements of this thermal environment. This current work presents the development and testing of tracking particles that are used in concert with the thermally sensitive particles to encode the initial positions of materials recovered for ex-situ analysis. These tracking sensors consist of fully-crystallized (c) rare-earth-doped yttria particles such as c-Dy:Y2O3, c-Sm:Y2O3, and c-Er,Yb:Y2O3. The temperature sensors consist of mixtures of precursor (p) and fully crystallized materials such as p-Eu:Y2O3/c-Tb:Y2O3 or p-Eu:ZrO2. Three mixtures containing one of the tracking sensors and one of the temperature sensing mixtures are placed at different locations within the chamber. Post-detonation, the tracking particles in the debris are excited by 355 nm light, resulting in different color luminescence, and allowing for potential visual inspection of the particle distribution originating from the different locations. Meanwhile, the temperature is determined from spectral changes of the precursor sensor materials or by comparison of the precursor sensor materials with the Tb:Y2O3 intensity reference.

  15. Sandia Simple Particle Tracking (Sandia SPT) v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, Stephen M.

    2015-06-15

    Sandia SPT is designed as software to accompany a book chapter being published a methods chapter which provides an introduction on how to label and track individual proteins. The Sandia Simple Particle Tracking code uses techniques common to the image processing community, where its value is that it facilitates implementing the methods described in the book chapter by providing the necessary open-source code. The code performs single particle spot detection (or segmentation and localization) followed by tracking (or connecting the detected particles into trajectories). The book chapter, which along with the headers in each file, constitutes the documentation for the code is: Anthony, S.M.; Carroll-Portillo, A.; Timlon, J.A., Dynamics and Interactions of Individual Proteins in the Membrane of Living Cells. In Anup K. Singh (Ed.) Single Cell Protein Analysis Methods in Molecular Biology. Springer

  16. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  17. Decoration of Micro-/Nanoscale Noble Metal Particles on 3D Porous Nickel Using Electrodeposition Technique as Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Hang, Tao; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Li, Ming

    2015-07-29

    Micro-/nanoscale noble metal (Ag, Au, and Pt) particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte are fabricated via galvanostatic electrodeposition technique. The developed electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements including Tafel polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is clearly shown that the enlarged real surface area caused by 3D highly porous dendritic structure has greatly reinforced the electrocatalytic activity toward HER. Comparative analysis of electrodeposited Ag, Au, and Pt particle-decorated porous nickel electrodes for HER indicates that both intrinsic property and size of the noble metal particles can lead to distinct catalytic activities. Both nanoscale Au and Pt particles have further reinforcement effect toward HER, whereas microscale Ag particles exhibit the reverse effect. As an effective 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, the nanoscale Pt-particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrode demonstrates the highest catalytic activity with an extremely low overpotential of -0.045 V for hydrogen production, a considerable exchange current density of 9.47 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C, and high durability in long-term electrolysis, all of which are attributed to the intrinsic catalytic property and the extremely small size of Pt particles.

  18. Exploring dynamics in living cells by tracking single particles.

    PubMed

    Levi, Valeria; Gratton, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    In the last years, significant advances in microscopy techniques and the introduction of a novel technology to label living cells with genetically encoded fluorescent proteins revolutionized the field of Cell Biology. Our understanding on cell dynamics built from snapshots on fixed specimens has evolved thanks to our actual capability to monitor in real time the evolution of processes in living cells. Among these new tools, single particle tracking techniques were developed to observe and follow individual particles. Hence, we are starting to unravel the mechanisms driving the motion of a wide variety of cellular components ranging from organelles to protein molecules by following their way through the cell. In this review, we introduce the single particle tracking technology to new users. We briefly describe the instrumentation and explain some of the algorithms commonly used to locate and track particles. Also, we present some common tools used to analyze trajectories and illustrate with some examples the applications of single particle tracking to study dynamics in living cells.

  19. Implementation of a 3D version of ponderomotive guiding center solver in particle-in-cell code OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Anton; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven accelerators gained an increased attention over the past decades. Typical modeling techniques for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are based on particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC simulations, however, are very computationally expensive due to the disparity of the relevant scales ranging from the laser wavelength, in the micrometer range, to the acceleration length, currently beyond the ten centimeter range. To minimize the gap between these despair scales the ponderomotive guiding center (PGC) algorithm is a promising approach. By describing the evolution of the laser pulse envelope separately, only the scales larger than the plasma wavelength are required to be resolved in the PGC algorithm, leading to speedups in several orders of magnitude. Previous work was limited to two dimensions. Here we present the implementation of the 3D version of a PGC solver into the massively parallel, fully relativistic PIC code OSIRIS. We extended the solver to include periodic boundary conditions and parallelization in all spatial dimensions. We present benchmarks for distributed and shared memory parallelization. We also discuss the stability of the PGC solver.

  20. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-11-03

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories.

  1. Collective Bacterial Dynamics Revealed Using a Three-Dimensional Population-Scale Defocused Particle Tracking Technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingming; Roberts, John W.; Kim, Sue; Koch, Donald L.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2006-01-01

    An ability to monitor bacterial locomotion and collective dynamics is crucial to our understanding of a number of well-characterized phenotypes including biofilm formation, chemotaxis, and virulence. Here, we report the tracking of multiple swimming Escherichia coli cells in three spatial dimensions and at single-cell resolution using a novel three-dimensional (3D) defocused particle tracking (DPT) method. The 3D trajectories were generated for wild-type Escherichia coli strain RP437 as well as for isogenic derivatives that display smooth swimming due to a cheA deletion (strain RP9535) or incessant tumbling behavior due to a cheZ deletion (strain RP1616). The 3D DPT method successfully differentiated these three modes of locomotion and allowed direct calculation of the diffusion coefficient for each strain. As expected, we found that the smooth swimmer diffused more readily than the wild type, and both the smooth swimmer and the wild-type cells exhibited diffusion coefficients that were at least two orders of magnitude larger than that of the tumbler. Finally, we found that the diffusion coefficient increased with increasing cell density, a phenomenon that can be attributed to the hydrodynamic disturbances caused by neighboring bacteria. PMID:16820497

  2. Characterization of hydrogel microstructure using laser tweezers particle tracking and confocal reflection imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarchyk, M. A.; Botvinick, E. L.; Putnam, A. J.

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used as extracellular matrix mimetics for applications in tissue engineering and increasingly as cell culture platforms with which to study the influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on cell function in 3D. In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanical properties to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk mechanical properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Here we have utilized a laser tracking system, based on passive optical microrheology instrumentation, to characterize the microstructure of viscoelastic fibrin clots. Trajectories and mean square displacements were observed as bioinert PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) microspheres (1, 2 or 4.7 µm in diameter) diffused within confined pores created by the protein phase of fibrin hydrogels. Complementary confocal reflection imaging revealed microstructures comprised of a highly heterogeneous fibrin network with a wide range of pore sizes. As the protein concentration of fibrin gels was increased, our quantitative laser tracking measurements showed a corresponding decrease in particle mean square displacements with greater resolution and sensitivity than conventional imaging techniques. This platform-independent method will enable a more complete understanding of how changes in substrate mechanical properties simultaneously influence other microenvironmental parameters in 3D cultures.

  3. Characterization of hydrogel microstructure using laser tweezers particle tracking and confocal reflection imaging.

    PubMed

    Kotlarchyk, M A; Botvinick, E L; Putnam, A J

    2010-05-19

    Hydrogels are commonly used as extracellular matrix mimetics for applications in tissue engineering and increasingly as cell culture platforms with which to study the influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on cell function in 3D. In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanical properties to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk mechanical properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Here we have utilized a laser tracking system, based on passive optical microrheology instrumentation, to characterize the microstructure of viscoelastic fibrin clots. Trajectories and mean square displacements were observed as bioinert PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) microspheres (1, 2 or 4.7 μm in diameter) diffused within confined pores created by the protein phase of fibrin hydrogels. Complementary confocal reflection imaging revealed microstructures comprised of a highly heterogeneous fibrin network with a wide range of pore sizes. As the protein concentration of fibrin gels was increased, our quantitative laser tracking measurements showed a corresponding decrease in particle mean square displacements with greater resolution and sensitivity than conventional imaging techniques. This platform-independent method will enable a more complete understanding of how changes in substrate mechanical properties simultaneously influence other microenvironmental parameters in 3D cultures.

  4. 3-D diffusion tensor axonal tracking shows distinct SMA and pre-SMA projections to the human striatum.

    PubMed

    Lehéricy, Stéphane; Ducros, Mathieu; Krainik, Alexandre; Francois, Chantal; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Ugurbil, Kamil; Kim, Dae-Shik

    2004-12-01

    Studies in non-human primates have shown that medial premotor projections to the striatum are characterized as a set of distinct circuits conveying different type of information. This study assesses the anatomical projections from the supplementary motor area (SMA), pre-SMA and motor cortex (MC) to the human striatum using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) axonal tracking. Eight right-handed volunteers were studied at 1.5 T using DTI axonal tracking. A connectivity matrix was computed, which tested for connections between cortical areas (MC, SMA and pre-SMA) and subcortical areas (posterior, middle and anterior putamen and the head of the caudate nucleus) in each hemisphere. Pre-SMA projections to the striatum were located rostral to SMA projections to the striatum. The SMA and the MC were similarly connected to the posterior and middle putamen and not to the anterior striatum. These data show that the MC and SMA have connections with similar parts of the sensorimotor compartment of the human striatum, whereas the pre-SMA sends connections to more rostral parts of the striatum, including the associative compartment.

  5. Positron emission tracking of individual particles in particle-laden rimming flow

    SciTech Connect

    Denissenko, P. Thomas, P. J.; Guyez, E.; Parker, D. J.; Seville, J. P. K.

    2014-05-15

    The motion of a single tracer particle in particle-laden rimming flows is investigated experimentally by means of Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT). Semi-dilute suspensions, with a volume fraction of 8% of heavy particles are considered. The trajectory of the tracer particle is monitored for several thousand cylinder revolutions and related to the optically recorded drift of the large-scale granular segregation bands developing in the cylinder. Results of the data analysis provide first insights into the relation between behaviour of individual particles and the spatiotemporal dynamics displayed by the macroscopic particle-segregation patterns.

  6. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  7. Evaluation of a digital optical ionizing radiation particle track detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.R.

    1987-06-01

    An ionizing radiation particle track detector is outlined which can, in principle, determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of all the secondary electrons produced by the passage of ionizing radiation through a low-pressure (0.1 to 10 kPa) gas. The electrons in the particle track are excited by the presence of a high-frequency AC electric field, and two digital cameras image the optical radiation produced in electronic excitation collisions of the surroundings gas by the electrons. The specific requirements of the detector for neutron dosimetry and microdosimetry are outlined (i.e., operating conditions of the digital cameras, high voltage fields, gas mixtures, etc.) along with an estimate of the resolution and sensitivity achievable with this technique. The proposed detector is shown to compare favorable with other methods for obtaining the details of the track structure, particularly in the quality of the information obtainable about the particle track and the comparative simplicity and adaptability of the detector for measuring the secondary electron track structure for many forms of ionizing radiation over a wide range of energies.

  8. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  9. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture,more » physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.« less

  10. SimTrack: A compact c++ library for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yun

    2015-06-24

    SimTrack is a compact c++ library of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  11. Flow above and within granular media composed of spherical and non-spherical particles - using a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Kuhlmann, Jannis; Huhn, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    The entrainment of single grains and, hence, their erosion characteristics are dependent on fluid forcing, grain size and density, but also shape variations. To quantitatively describe and capture the hydrodynamic conditions around individual grains, researchers commonly use empirical approaches such as laboratory flume tanks. Nonetheless, it is difficult with such physical experiments to measure the flow velocities in the direct vicinity or within the pore spaces of sediments, at a sufficient resolution and in a non-invasive way. As a result, the hydrodynamic conditions in the water column, at the fluid-porous interface and within pore spaces of a granular medium of various grain shapes is not yet fully understood. For that reason, there is a strong need for numerical models, since these are capable of quantifying fluid speeds within a granular medium. A 3D-SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) numerical wave tank model was set up to provide quantitative evidence on the flow velocities in the direct vicinity and in the interior of granular beds composed of two shapes as a complementary method to the difficult task of in situ measurement. On the basis of previous successful numerical wave tank models with SPH, the model geometry was chosen in dimensions of X=2.68 [m], Y=0.48 [m], and Z=0.8 [m]. Three suites of experiments were designed with a range of particle shape models: (1) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the across-stream direction, (2) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the along-stream direction, and (3) spheres. Particle diameters ranged from 0.04 [m] to 0.08 [m]. A wave was introduced by a vertical paddle that accelerated to 0.8 [m/s] perpendicular to the granular bed. Flow measurements showed that the flow velocity values into the beds were highest when the grains were oriented across the stream direction and lowest in case when the grains were oriented parallel to the stream, indicating that the model was capable to simulate simultaneously

  12. 3D-localization microscopy and tracking of FoF1-ATP synthases in living bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Anja; Renz, Marc; Klütsch, Diana; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Börsch, Michael

    2015-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthases are membrane-embedded protein machines that catalyze the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. Using photoactivation-based localization microscopy (PALM) in TIR-illumination as well as structured illumination microscopy (SIM), we explore the spatial distribution and track single FoF1-ATP synthases in living E. coli cells under physiological conditions at different temperatures. For quantitative diffusion analysis by mean-squared-displacement measurements, the limited size of the observation area in the membrane with its significant membrane curvature has to be considered. Therefore, we applied a 'sliding observation window' approach (M. Renz et al., Proc. SPIE 8225, 2012) and obtained the one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of FoF1-ATP synthase diffusing on the long axis in living E. coli cells.

  13. A comprehensive method for magnetic sensor calibration: a precise system for 3-D tracking of the tongue movements.

    PubMed

    Farajidavar, Aydin; Block, Jacob M; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic localization has been used in a variety of applications, including the medical field. Small magnetic tracers are often modeled as dipoles and localization has been achieved by solving well-defined dipole equations. However, in practice, the precise calculation of the tracer location not only depends on solving the highly nonlinear dipole equations through numerical algorithms but also on the precision of the magnetic sensor, accuracy of the tracer magnetization, and the earth magnetic field (EMF) measurements. We have developed and implemented a comprehensive calibration method that addresses all of the aforementioned factors. We evaluated this method in a bench-top setting by moving the tracer along controlled trajectories. We also conducted several experiments to track the tongue movement in a human subject.

  14. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  15. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biopysical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-08-02

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.

  16. Errors in particle tracking velocimetry with high-speed cameras.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J; Liu, Bin

    2011-05-01

    Velocity errors in particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) are studied. When using high-speed video cameras, the velocity error may increase at a high camera frame rate. This increase in velocity error is due to particle-position uncertainty, which is one of the two sources of velocity errors studied here. The other source of error is particle acceleration, which has the opposite trend of diminishing at higher frame rates. Both kinds of errors can propagate into quantities calculated from velocity, such as the kinetic temperature of particles or correlation functions. As demonstrated in a dusty plasma experiment, the kinetic temperature of particles has no unique value when measured using PTV, but depends on the sampling time interval or frame rate. It is also shown that an artifact appears in an autocorrelation function computed from particle positions and velocities, and it becomes more severe when a small sampling-time interval is used. Schemes to reduce these errors are demonstrated.

  17. In Situ Particle Tracking around kW Sized Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownstein, Ian; Dabiri, John

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory studies of model wind turbines are typically unable to match both the Reynolds number (Re) and tip speed ratio (TSR) of full-scale wind turbines. In order to match both relevant parameters, a quantitative flow visualization method was developed to take in situ measurements of the flow around full-scale wind turbines. The apparatus constructed was able to seed an approximately 9mx9mx5m volume in the wake of the turbine using artificial snow. Quantitative results were obtained by tracking the evolution of the snow using particle tracking algorithms. As a step toward full 3D-PTV measurements, results will be presented in which a 2D measurement is taken with a single camera positioned at the base of the turbine looking upward. The resulting tracking is therefore integrated in the span-wise direction. This method is demonstrated through a comparative study of a five-bladed VAWT producing power in different wind conditions at the Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE) in Lancaster, CA. Future work to expand this method to 3D-PTV is also discussed.

  18. Single particle tracking through highly scattering media with multiplexed two-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perillo, Evan; Liu, Yen-Liang; Liu, Cong; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2015-03-01

    3D single-particle tracking (SPT) has been a pivotal tool to furthering our understanding of dynamic cellular processes in complex biological systems, with a molecular localization accuracy (10-100 nm) often better than the diffraction limit of light. However, current SPT techniques utilize either CCDs or a confocal detection scheme which not only suffer from poor temporal resolution but also limit tracking to a depth less than one scattering mean free path in the sample (typically <15μm). In this report we highlight our novel design for a spatiotemporally multiplexed two-photon microscope which is able to reach sub-diffraction-limit tracking accuracy and sub-millisecond temporal resolution, but with a dramatically extended SPT range of up to 200 μm through dense cell samples. We have validated our microscope by tracking (1) fluorescent nanoparticles in a prescribed motion inside gelatin gel (with 1% intralipid) and (2) labeled single EGFR complexes inside skin cancer spheroids (at least 8 layers of cells thick) for ~10 minutes. Furthermore we discuss future capabilities of our multiplexed two-photon microscope design, specifically to the extension of (1) simultaneous multicolor tracking (i.e. spatiotemporal co-localization analysis) and (2) FRET studies (i.e. lifetime analysis). The high resolution, high depth penetration, and multicolor features of this microscope make it well poised to study a variety of molecular scale dynamics in the cell, especially related to cellular trafficking studies with in vitro tumor models and in vivo.

  19. Three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry for Turbulence Applications: Case of a Jet Flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, David; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P

    2016-02-27

    3D-PTV is a quantitative flow measurement technique that aims to track the Lagrangian paths of a set of particles in three dimensions using stereoscopic recording of image sequences. The basic components, features, constraints and optimization tips of a 3D-PTV topology consisting of a high-speed camera with a four-view splitter are described and discussed in this article. The technique is applied to the intermediate flow field (5 particles as well as curvature of the flow path, which are obtained from the Frenet-Serret equation. Estimation of the 3D velocity and turbulence fields around the jet core axis at a cross-plane located at ten diameters downstream of the jet is compared with literature, and the power spectrum of the large-scale streamwise velocity motions is obtained at various radial distances from the jet core.

  20. The constant displacement scheme for tracking particles in heterogeneous aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, X.H.; Gomez-Hernandez, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation of mass transport by particle tracking or random walk in highly heterogeneous media may be inefficient from a computational point of view if the traditional constant time step scheme is used. A new scheme which adjusts automatically the time step for each particle according to the local pore velocity, so that each particle always travels a constant distance, is shown to be computationally faster for the same degree of accuracy than the constant time step method. Using the constant displacement scheme, transport calculations in a 2-D aquifer model, with nature log-transmissivity variance of 4, can be 8.6 times faster than using the constant time step scheme.

  1. A Preliminary Comparison of Three Dimensional Particle Tracking and Sizing using Plenoptic Imaging and Digital In-line Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Munz, Elise Dahnke; Farias, Paul Abraham; Thurow, Brian S

    2015-12-01

    Digital in-line holography and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a preliminary comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with digital in-line holography. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. This includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. For the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1-2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. On the other hand, plenotpic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration. Furthermore, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments. Additional work is needed to better quantify sources of uncertainty, particularly in the plenoptic experiments, as well as develop data processing methodologies optimized for the plenoptic measurement.

  2. Comparison of three-dimensional particle tracking and sizing using plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Elise M.; Thurow, Brian S.; Guildenbecher, Daniel R.

    2016-08-08

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with DIH. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and DIH successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. Furthermore, this includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. For the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1–2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. In contrast, plenoptic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration and, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments.

  3. Comparison of three-dimensional particle tracking and sizing using plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography

    DOE PAGES

    Hall, Elise M.; Thurow, Brian S.; Guildenbecher, Daniel R.

    2016-08-08

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with DIH. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and DIH successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. Furthermore, this includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. Formore » the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1–2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. In contrast, plenoptic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration and, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments.« less

  4. Comparison of three-dimensional particle tracking and sizing using plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography.

    PubMed

    Hall, Elise M; Thurow, Brian S; Guildenbecher, Daniel R

    2016-08-10

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with DIH. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and DIH successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. This includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. For the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1-2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. In contrast, plenoptic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration and, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments.

  5. Object tracking by co-trained classifiers and particle filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Li, Shanqing; Liu, Keyan; Wang, Lei

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an online object tracking method, in which co-training and particle filters algorithms cooperate and complement each other for robust and effective tracking. Under framework of particle filters, the semi-supervised cotraining algorithm is adopted to construct, on-line update, and mutually boost two complementary object classifiers, which consequently improves discriminant ability of particles and its adaptability to appearance variants caused by illumination changing, pose verying, camera shaking, and occlusion. Meanwhile, to make sampling procedure more efficient, knowledge from coarse confidence maps and spatial-temporal constraints are introduced by importance sampling. It improves not only the accuracy and efficiency of sampling procedure, but also provides more reliable training samples for co-training. Experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our method.

  6. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  7. Combining 3D tracking and surgical instrumentation to determine the stiffness of spinal motion segments: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Reutlinger, C; Gédet, P; Büchler, P; Kowal, J; Rudolph, T; Burger, J; Scheffler, K; Hasler, C

    2011-04-01

    The spine is a complex structure that provides motion in three directions: flexion and extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. So far, the investigation of the mechanical and kinematic behavior of the basic unit of the spine, a motion segment, is predominantly a domain of in vitro experiments on spinal loading simulators. Most existing approaches to measure spinal stiffness intraoperatively in an in vivo environment use a distractor. However, these concepts usually assume a planar loading and motion. The objective of our study was to develop and validate an apparatus, that allows to perform intraoperative in vivo measurements to determine both the applied force and the resulting motion in three dimensional space. The proposed setup combines force measurement with an instrumented distractor and motion tracking with an optoelectronic system. As the orientation of the applied force and the three dimensional motion is known, not only force-displacement, but also moment-angle relations could be determined. The validation was performed using three cadaveric lumbar ovine spines. The lateral bending stiffness of two motion segments per specimen was determined with the proposed concept and compared with the stiffness acquired on a spinal loading simulator which was considered to be gold standard. The mean values of the stiffness computed with the proposed concept were within a range of ±15% compared to data obtained with the spinal loading simulator under applied loads of less than 5 Nm.

  8. A 3D front-tracking approach for simulation of a two-phase fluid with insoluble surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, Wellington C.; Roma, Alexandre M.; Pivello, Márcio R.; Villar, Millena M.; da Silveira-Neto, Aristeu

    2015-01-01

    Surface active agents play a significant role in interfacial dynamics of multiphase systems.While the understanding of their behavior is crucial to many important practical applications, realistic mathematical modeling and computer simulation represent an extraordinary task. By employing a front-tracking method with Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement capabilities in concert with a finite volume scheme for solving an advection-diffusion equation constrained to a moving and deforming interface, the numerical challenges posed by the full three-dimensional computer simulation of transient, incompressible two-phase flows with an insoluble surfactant are efficiently and accurately tackled in the present work. The individual numerical components forming the resulting methodology are here combined and applied for the first time. Verification tests to check the accuracy and the simulation of the deformation of a droplet in simple shear flow in the presence of an insoluble surfactant are performed, the results being compared to laboratory experiments as well as to other numerical data. In all the cases considered, the methodology presents excellent conservation properties for the total surfactant mass (even to machine precision under certain circumstances).

  9. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  10. Tracking Down the Causes of Recent Induced and Natural Intraplate Earthquakes with 3D Seismological Analyses in Northwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uta, P.; Brandes, C.; Boennemann, C.; Plenefisch, T.; Winsemann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Northwest Germany is a typical low strain intraplate region with a low seismic activity. Nevertheless, 58 well documented earthquakes with magnitudes of 0.5 - 4.3 affected the area in the last 40 years. Most of the epicenters were located in the vicinity of active natural gas fields and some inside. Accordingly, the earthquakes were interpreted as a consequence of hydrocarbon recovery (e.g. Dahm et al. 2007, Bischoff et al. 2013) and classified as induced events in the bulletins of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). The two major ones have magnitudes of 4.3 and 4.0. They are the strongest earthquakes ever recorded in Northern Germany. Consequently, these events raise the question whether the ongoing extraction itself can cause them or if other natural tectonic processes like glacial isostatic adjustment may considerably contribute to their initiation. Recent studies of Brandes et al. (2012) imply that lithospheric stress changes due to post glacial isostatic adjustment might be also a potential natural cause for earthquakes in Central Europe. In order to better analyse the earthquakes and to test this latter hypothesis we performed a relocalization of the events with the NonLinLoc (Lomax et al. 2000) program package and two differently scaled 3D P-wave velocity models. Depending on the station coverage for a distinct event, either a fine gridded local model (88 x 73 x 15 km, WEG-model, made available by the industry) or a coarse regional model (1600 x 1600 x 45 km, data from CRUST1.0, Laske et al. 2013) and for some cases a combination of both models was used for the relocalization. The results confirm the trend of the older routine analysis: The majority of the events are located at the margins of the natural gas fields, some of them are now located closer to them. Focal depths mostly vary between 3.5 km and 10 km. However, for some of the events, especially for the older events with relatively bad station coverage, the error bars

  11. Genetic algorithm tracking technique for particle image velocimetry and comparison with other tracking models

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, C.; Hassan, Y.A.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.; Schmidl, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a nonintrusive measurement technique, which can be used to study the structure of various fluid flows. PIV is a very efficient measurement technique since it can obtain both qualitative and quantitative spatial information about the flow field being studied. This information can be further processed into information such as vorticity and pathlines. Other flow measurement techniques (Laser Doppler Velocimetry, Hot Wire Anemometry, etc...) only provide quantitative information at a single point. A study on the performance of the Sub-Grid Genetic Tracking Algorithm for use in Particle Image Velocimetry was performed. A comparison with other tracking routines as the Cross Correlation, Spring Model and Neural Network tracking techniques was conducted. All four algorithms were used to track with synthetic data, and the results are compared with those obtained from a Large Eddy simulation computational fluid dynamics program. The simulated vectors were compared with the results from the four tracking techniques, to determine the yield and reliability of each tracking algorithm.

  12. Near-surface snow particle dynamics from particle tracking velocimetry and turbulence measurements during alpine blowing snow storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamit, Nikolas O.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2016-12-01

    Many blowing snow conceptual and predictive models have been based on simplified two-phase flow dynamics derived from time-averaged observations of bulk flow conditions in blowing snow storms. Measurements from the first outdoor application of particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) of near-surface blowing snow yield new information on mechanisms for blowing snow initiation, entrainment, and rebound, whilst also confirming some findings from wind tunnel observations. Blowing snow particle movement is influenced by complex surface flow dynamics, including saltation development from creep that has not previously been measured for snow. Comparisons with 3-D atmospheric turbulence measurements show that blowing snow particle motion immediately above the snow surface responds strongly to high-frequency turbulent motions. Momentum exchange from wind to the dense near-surface particle-laden flow appears significant and makes an important contribution to blowing snow mass flux and saltation initiation dynamics. The more complete and accurate description of near-surface snow particle motions observable using PTV may prove useful for improving blowing snow model realism and accuracy.

  13. Ice Particle Transport Analysis With Phase Change for the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ice Particle trajectory calculations with phase change were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The particle trajectory computations were performed using the new Glenn Ice Particle Phase Change Model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of 0.3 g/cu m. The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting and the amount of melting was relatively small with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.836. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22 percent).

  14. Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry: A New Approach to Volumetric PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Dan; Boomsma, Aaron; Lai, Wing; Pothos, Stamatios; Fluid Mechanics Research Instruments Team

    2016-11-01

    Volumetric velocity fields are useful in a wide variety of fluid mechanics applications. Several types of three-dimensional imaging methods have been used in the past to varying degrees of success, for example, 3D PTV (Maas et al., 1993), DDPIV (Peireira et al., 2006), Tomographic PIV (Elsinga, 2006), and V3V (Troolin and Longmire, 2009), among others. Each of these techniques has shown advantages and disadvantages in different areas. With the advent of higher resolution and lower noise cameras with higher stability levels, new techniques are emerging that combine the advantages of the existing techniques. This talk describes a new technique called Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry (TAPTV), in which segmented triangulation and diameter tolerance are used to achieve three-dimensional particle tracking with extremely high particle densities (on the order of ppp = 0.2 or higher) without the drawbacks normally associated with ghost particles (for example in TomoPIV). The results are highly spatially-resolved data with very fast processing times. A detailed explanation of the technique as well as plots, movies, and experimental considerations will be discussed.

  15. Tracking single fluorescent particles in three dimensions via extremum seeking

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Trevor T.; Gan, Eric L.; Pan, Jane; Andersson, Sean B.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to track single fluorescent particles in three-dimensions with sub-diffraction limit precision as well as sub-millisecond temporal resolution has enabled the understanding of many biophysical phenomena at the nanometer scale. While there are several techniques for achieving this, most require complicated experimental setups that are expensive to implement. These methods can offer superb performance but their complexity may be overwhelming to the end-user whose aim is only to understand the feature being imaged. In this work, we describe a method for tracking a single fluorescent particle using a standard confocal or multi-photon microscope configuration. It relies only on the assumption that the relative position of the measurement point and the particle can be actuated and that the point spread function has a global maximum that coincides with the particle’s position. The method uses intensity feedback to calculate real-time position commands that “seek” the extremum of the point spread function as the particle moves through its environment. We demonstrate the method by tracking a diffusing quantum dot in a hydrogel on a standard epifluorescent confocal microscope. PMID:27699104

  16. Simultaneous Single-Particle Superlocalization and Rotational Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yan; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning

    2013-01-30

    Superlocalization of single molecules and nanoparticles has become an essential procedure to bring new insights into nanoscale structures and dynamics of biological systems. In the present study, superlocalization is combined with the newly introduced differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy-based single-particle orientation and rotational tracking. The new technique overcomes the difficulty in localization of the antisymmetric DIC point spread function by using a dual-modality microscope configuration for simultaneous rotational tracking and localization of single gold nanorods with nanometer-scale precision. The new imaging setup has been applied to study the steric hindrance induced by relatively large cargos in the microtubule gliding assay and to track nanocargos in the crowded cellular environment. This technique has great potential in the study of biological processes where both localization and rotational information are required.

  17. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yan

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  18. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  19. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biophysical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-10-01

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Three supplementary movies and an experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02254d

  20. Static and Dynamic Errors in Particle Tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Thierry; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2005-01-01

    Particle tracking techniques are often used to assess the local mechanical properties of cells and biological fluids. The extracted trajectories are exploited to compute the mean-squared displacement that characterizes the dynamics of the probe particles. Limited spatial resolution and statistical uncertainty are the limiting factors that alter the accuracy of the mean-squared displacement estimation. We precisely quantified the effect of localization errors in the determination of the mean-squared displacement by separating the sources of these errors into two separate contributions. A “static error” arises in the position measurements of immobilized particles. A “dynamic error” comes from the particle motion during the finite exposure time that is required for visualization. We calculated the propagation of these errors on the mean-squared displacement. We examined the impact of our error analysis on theoretical model fluids used in biorheology. These theoretical predictions were verified for purely viscous fluids using simulations and a multiple-particle tracking technique performed with video microscopy. We showed that the static contribution can be confidently corrected in dynamics studies by using static experiments performed at a similar noise-to-signal ratio. This groundwork allowed us to achieve higher resolution in the mean-squared displacement, and thus to increase the accuracy of microrheology studies. PMID:15533928

  1. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    System ( CMS ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...www.erdc.usace.army.mil/Missions/WaterResources/CIRP.aspx Coastal Inlets Research Program Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) The...System ( CMS ), which provides coupled wave and current forcing for PTM simulations. CMS -PTM is implemented in the Surface-water Modeling System, a

  2. Three-Dimensional Rotation, Twist and Torsion Analyses Using Real-Time 3D Speckle Tracking Imaging: Feasibility, Reproducibility, and Normal Ranges in Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei; Gao, Jun; He, Lin; Yang, Yali; Yin, Ping; Xie, Mingxing; Ge, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The specific aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reproducibility and maturational changes of LV rotation, twist and torsion variables by real-time 3D speckle-tracking echocardiography (RT3DSTE) in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 347 consecutive healthy subjects (181 males/156 females, mean age 7.12 ± 5.3 years, and range from birth to 18-years) using RT 3D echocardiography (3DE). The LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements were made off-line using TomTec software. Manual landmark selection and endocardial border editing were performed in 3 planes (apical “2”-, “4”-, and “3”- chamber views) and semi-automated tracking yielded LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements. LV rotation, twist and torsion analysis by RT 3DSTE were feasible in 307 out of 347 subjects (88.5%). Results There was no correlation between rotation or twist and age, height, weight, BSA or heart rate, respectively. However, there was statistically significant, but very modest correlation between LV torsion and age (R2 = 0.036, P< 0.001). The normal ranges were defined for rotation and twist in this cohort, and for torsion for each age group. The intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities for apical and basal rotation, twist and torsion ranged from 7.3% ± 3.8% to 12.3% ± 8.8% and from 8.8% ± 4.6% to 15.7% ± 10.1%, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that analysis of LV rotation, twist and torsion by this new RT3D STE is feasible and reproducible in pediatric population. There is no maturational change in rotation and twist, but torsion decreases with age in this cohort. Further refinement is warranted to validate the utility of this new methodology in more sensitive and quantitative evaluation of congenital and acquired heart diseases in children. PMID:27427968

  3. Evaluation of embolic deflection device using optical particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-29

    Trans-aortic valve replacement is a new endovascular procedure which has started to be used routinely in cardiac interventional suites. During such procedures a stent-like device containing new aortic valves is placed over the damaged ones, possibly causing calcifications to be dislodged and released in arteries leading to stroke. To prevent such events, new devices are being developed to provide distal protection to the brain supplying arteries. Currently there is a need to evaluate such device efficacy in a repeatable manner. We are proposing and investigating such a method based on particle optical tracking. We simulated such protective devices using two porous screens (150 and 200 μm pore size) which were placed in an arterial bifurcation phantom connected to a clinically relevant flow loop. A mask was acquired and gold embolic particles (100-300μm) were injected at a steady rate using a motorized injector. Optical images with 2 ms exposure were acquired at 30 fps. Images were subtracted, thresholded and filtered using a 5×5 median filter. ROI's were drawn over the main and bifurcating arteries and a particle counting algorithm was used to estimate particle flow rates in each artery for each run. The unprotected and the two protected cases were evaluated. Before filter placement, the particle flow rate was 60 and 40 %, respectively, of the main artery. After the filter placement, the particle flow rate in the protected branch was 4% and 8% of the particle flow rate in the main artery. We present a method to assess the efficacy of such devices using an optical particle tracking and counting technique.

  4. A new experiment to measure shocked particle drag using multi-pulse particle image velocimetry and particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Adam A.; Orlicz, Gregory C.; Prestridge, Katherine P.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the measurement capabilities for a new horizontal shock tube facility designed to measure the displacements, velocities and accelerations of shock-accelerated particles just after shock passage. Eight-frame particle image accelerometry and particle tracking velocimetry accelerometry diagnostics are implemented, along with a shadowgraphy system for measuring the shock location during experiments. We demonstrate the driving conditions of the facility using a unique membraneless pneumatic driver and particle seeding system that can accommodate both solid and liquid particles in the carrier phase. Measurements of two types of solid particles show unsteady drag forces higher than those for steady drag.

  5. Three-dimensional single particle tracking in dense dust clouds by stereoscopy of fluorescent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Himpel, Michael; Killer, Carsten; Buttenschoen, Birger; Melzer, Andre

    2012-12-15

    In dense dust clouds of a dusty plasma single particle trajectories are impossible to follow due to occlusion of particles and ambiguities in particle correspondences. By stereoscopic imaging of fluorescent tracer particles, we were able to reconstruct 3D single particle trajectories within dense dust clouds. Several measurements are shown that justify to regard the tracer particles as suitable representatives for the whole dust system. A first analysis of dust density waves in dense clouds already shows that these waves exhibit three-dimensional dynamics at larger wave amplitudes that cannot be resolved by 2D imaging techniques: a broad velocity distribution perpendicular to the oscillation plane due to dust-dust collisions is seen, while the velocity distribution in the oscillation direction is bimodal and shifted due to the bulk wave propagation.

  6. A Framework for Sediment Particle Tracking via Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakiris, Achilleas; Papanicolaou, Thanos; Abban, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The study of sedimentary and morphodynamic processes in riverine environments has recently been shifting from the traditional Eulerian, static perspective to a Lagrangian perspective, which considers the movement characteristics of the individual transported particles, such as their travel and resting distance and time. The Lagrangian framework, in turn allows to better study processes such as bedload particle diffusion, erosion and deposition within a river reach, to more accurately predict bedload fluxes especially through the use of stochastic Discrete Particle models. A technology that goes hand-in-hand with this Lagrangian perspective is Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID), which has been recently applied for tracking the movement of tagged sediment particles within the river continuum. RFID allows the wireless, bidirectional exchange of information between a base station, known as the reader, with a typically large number of transponders (or tags) via an (excitation) antenna. RFID allows essentially the unique, wireless detection and identification of a transponder over a distance. The goal of this study is to further enhance the utility of RFID in riverine applications by developing a framework that allows extracting the 3D location of RFID tagged sediment particles in nearly real-time. To address the goal of this coupled theoretical and experimental study, a semi-theoretical approach based on antenna inductive coupling was combined with experimental measurements for developing a relationship that provides an estimate of the distance between a tagged particle and the antenna using the Return Signal Strength Indication (RSSI). The RSSI quantifies the magnetic energy transmitted from the transponder to the antenna. The RFID system used in this study was a passive, Low-Frequency (LF) system, which ensured that the LF radio waves could penetrate through the river bed material. The RSSI of the signal transmitted from each transponder was measured with an

  7. Three-Dimensional Localization of Single Molecules for Super-Resolution Imaging and Single-Particle Tracking.

    PubMed

    von Diezmann, Alex; Shechtman, Yoav; Moerner, W E

    2017-02-02

    Single-molecule super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking are two imaging modalities that illuminate the properties of cells and materials on spatial scales down to tens of nanometers or with dynamical information about nanoscale particle motion in the millisecond range, respectively. These methods generally use wide-field microscopes and two-dimensional camera detectors to localize molecules to much higher precision than the diffraction limit. Given the limited total photons available from each single-molecule label, both modalities require careful mathematical analysis and image processing. Much more information can be obtained about the system under study by extending to three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization: without this capability, visualization of structures or motions extending in the axial direction can easily be missed or confused, compromising scientific understanding. A variety of methods for obtaining both 3D super-resolution images and 3D tracking information have been devised, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. These include imaging of multiple focal planes, point-spread-function engineering, and interferometric detection. These methods may be compared based on their ability to provide accurate and precise position information on single-molecule emitters with limited photons. To successfully apply and further develop these methods, it is essential to consider many practical concerns, including the effects of optical aberrations, field dependence in the imaging system, fluorophore labeling density, and registration between different color channels. Selected examples of 3D super-resolution imaging and tracking are described for illustration from a variety of biological contexts and with a variety of methods, demonstrating the power of 3D localization for understanding complex systems.

  8. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  9. Motion-compensated speckle tracking via particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixin; Yagi, Shin-ichi; Bian, Hongyu

    2015-07-01

    Recently, an improved motion compensation method that uses the sum of absolute differences (SAD) has been applied to frame persistence utilized in conventional ultrasonic imaging because of its high accuracy and relative simplicity in implementation. However, high time consumption is still a significant drawback of this space-domain method. To seek for a more accelerated motion compensation method and verify if it is possible to eliminate conventional traversal correlation, motion-compensated speckle tracking between two temporally adjacent B-mode frames based on particle filtering is discussed. The optimal initial density of particles, the least number of iterations, and the optimal transition radius of the second iteration are analyzed from simulation results for the sake of evaluating the proposed method quantitatively. The speckle tracking results obtained using the optimized parameters indicate that the proposed method is capable of tracking the micromotion of speckle throughout the region of interest (ROI) that is superposed with global motion. The computational cost of the proposed method is reduced by 25% compared with that of the previous algorithm and further improvement is necessary.

  10. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite-size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Simon; Gibert, Mathieu; Bérut, Antoine; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-02-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation and the rotation of finite-size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp/η ≈ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ≈ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second-order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. This measurement technique has many additional advantages that will make it useful to address other problems such as particle collisions, dynamics of non-spherical solid objects, or even of wet granular matter.

  11. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV kV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wiersma, R. D.; Mao, W.; Luxton, G.; Xing, L.

    2008-12-01

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for the study. A custom built phantom with multiple ball bearings was used to calibrate the stereoscopic MV-kV imaging system to provide the transformation parameters from imaging pixels to 3D world coordinates. The accuracy of the fiducial tracking system was examined using a 4D motion phantom capable of moving in accordance with a pre-programmed trajectory. Overall, spatial accuracy of MV-kV fiducial tracking during the arc delivery process for normal adult breathing amplitude and period was found to be better than 1 mm. For fast motion, the results depended on the imaging frame rates. The RMS error ranged from ~0.5 mm for the normal adult breathing pattern to ~1.5 mm for more extreme cases with a low imaging frame rate of 3.4 Hz. In general, highly accurate real

  12. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV-kV imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wiersma, R D; Mao, W; Luxton, G; Xing, L

    2008-12-21

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for the study. A custom built phantom with multiple ball bearings was used to calibrate the stereoscopic MV-kV imaging system to provide the transformation parameters from imaging pixels to 3D world coordinates. The accuracy of the fiducial tracking system was examined using a 4D motion phantom capable of moving in accordance with a pre-programmed trajectory. Overall, spatial accuracy of MV-kV fiducial tracking during the arc delivery process for normal adult breathing amplitude and period was found to be better than 1 mm. For fast motion, the results depended on the imaging frame rates. The RMS error ranged from approximately 0.5 mm for the normal adult breathing pattern to approximately 1.5 mm for more extreme cases with a low imaging frame rate of 3.4 Hz. In general

  13. Fast particles identification in programmable form at level-0 trigger by means of the 3D-Flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, Dario B.

    1998-10-30

    The 3D-Flow Processor system is a new, technology-independent concept in very fast, real-time system architectures. Based on either an FPGA or an ASIC implementation, it can address, in a fully programmable manner, applications where commercially available processors would fail because of throughput requirements. Possible applications include filtering-algorithms (pattern recognition) from the input of multiple sensors, as well as moving any input validated by these filtering-algorithms to a single output channel. Both operations can easily be implemented on a 3D-Flow system to achieve a real-time processing system with a very short lag time. This system can be built either with off-the-shelf FPGAs or, for higher data rates, with CMOS chips containing 4 to 16 processors each. The basic building block of the system, a 3D-Flow processor, has been successfully designed in VHDL code written in ''Generic HDL'' (mostly made of reusable blocks that are synthesizable in different technologies, or FPGAs), to produce a netlist for a four-processor ASIC featuring 0.35 micron CBA (Ceil Base Array) technology at 3.3 Volts, 884 mW power dissipation at 60 MHz and 63.75 mm sq. die size. The same VHDL code has been targeted to three FPGA manufacturers (Altera EPF10K250A, ORCA-Lucent Technologies 0R3T165 and Xilinx XCV1000). A complete set of software tools, the 3D-Flow System Manager, equally applicable to ASIC or FPGA implementations, has been produced to provide full system simulation, application development, real-time monitoring, and run-time fault recovery. Today's technology can accommodate 16 processors per chip in a medium size die, at a cost per processor of less than $5 based on the current silicon die/size technology cost.

  14. Quantitative 3D shape description of dust particles from treated seeds by means of X-ray micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Devarrewaere, Wouter; Foqué, Dieter; Heimbach, Udo; Cantre, Dennis; Nicolai, Bart; Nuyttens, David; Verboven, Pieter

    2015-06-16

    Crop seeds are often treated with pesticides before planting. Pesticide-laden dust particles can be abraded from the seed coating during planting and expelled into the environment, damaging nontarget organisms. Drift of these dust particles depends on their size, shape and density. In this work, we used X-ray micro-CT to examine the size, shape (sphericity) and porosity of dust particles from treated seeds of various crops. The dust properties quantified in this work were very variable in different crops. This variability may be a result of seed morphology, seed batch, treatment composition, treatment technology, seed cleaning or an interaction of these factors. The intraparticle porosity of seed treatment dust particles varied from 0.02 to 0.51 according to the crop and generally increased with particle size. Calculated settling velocities demonstrated that accounting for particle shape and porosity is important in drift studies. For example, the settling velocity of dust particles with an equivalent diameter of 200 μm may vary between 0.1 and 1.2 m s(-1), depending on their shape and density. Our analysis shows that in a wind velocity of 5 m s(-1), such particles ejected at 1 m height may travel between 4 and 50 m from the source before settling. Although micro-CT is a valuable tool to characterize dust particles, the current image processing methodology limits the number of particles that can be analyzed.

  15. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L; Binnekamp, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  16. Apparatus and method for tracking a molecule or particle in three dimensions

    DOEpatents

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Lessard, Guillaume

    2009-03-03

    An apparatus and method were used to track the movement of fluorescent particles in three dimensions. Control software was used with the apparatus to implement a tracking algorithm for tracking the motion of the individual particles in glycerol/water mixtures. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the tracking algorithms in combination with the apparatus may be used for tracking the motion of single fluorescent or fluorescently labeled biomolecules in three dimensions.

  17. Geoacoustic and source tracking using particle filtering: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2010-07-01

    A particle filtering (PF) approach is presented for performing sequential geoacoustic inversion of a complex ocean acoustic environment using a moving acoustic source. This approach treats both the environmental parameters [e.g., water column sound speed profile (SSP), water depth, sediment and bottom parameters] at the source location and the source parameters (e.g., source depth, range and speed) as unknown random variables that evolve as the source moves. This allows real-time updating of the environment and accurate tracking of the moving source. As a sequential Monte Carlo technique that operates on nonlinear systems with non-Gaussian probability densities, the PF is an ideal algorithm to perform tracking of environmental and source parameters, and their uncertainties via the evolving posterior probability densities. The approach is demonstrated on both simulated data in a shallow water environment with a sloping bottom and experimental data collected during the SWellEx-96 experiment.

  18. Distributed Particle Filter for Target Tracking: With Reduced Sensor Communications

    PubMed Central

    Ghirmai, Tadesse

    2016-01-01

    For efficient and accurate estimation of the location of objects, a network of sensors can be used to detect and track targets in a distributed manner. In nonlinear and/or non-Gaussian dynamic models, distributed particle filtering methods are commonly applied to develop target tracking algorithms. An important consideration in developing a distributed particle filtering algorithm in wireless sensor networks is reducing the size of data exchanged among the sensors because of power and bandwidth constraints. In this paper, we propose a distributed particle filtering algorithm with the objective of reducing the overhead data that is communicated among the sensors. In our algorithm, the sensors exchange information to collaboratively compute the global likelihood function that encompasses the contribution of the measurements towards building the global posterior density of the unknown location parameters. Each sensor, using its own measurement, computes its local likelihood function and approximates it using a Gaussian function. The sensors then propagate only the mean and the covariance of their approximated likelihood functions to other sensors, reducing the communication overhead. The global likelihood function is computed collaboratively from the parameters of the local likelihood functions using an average consensus filter or a forward-backward propagation information exchange strategy. PMID:27618057

  19. An Assessment of the Meteorological Conditions Leading to the NOAA WP-3D Engine Compressor Stalls of February 9, 2007, Due to Sea Salt Aerosol Particle Fouling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-25

    As discussed in Section 4.1, COAMPS -OS® simulations of the F8 and F9 storms placed the boundary layer at ~1800–2000 m and 1500–1800 m, respectively...of well-mixed return at 1 to 1.2 km. This is not surprising, as F8 was a more powerful storm . Indeed, the COAMPS ® boundary layer height for this...as this airborne research did. In this particular case, the WP- 3D flight track took it through the dry slot of an occluding storm system which had

  20. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, Mathieu; Klein, Simon; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation, and the rotation of finite size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp / η ~ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ~ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. (http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2181) This work was funded generously by the Max Planck Society and the Marie Curie Fellowship, Program PEOPLE - Call FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2008 Proposal No 237521. Support from COST Action MP0806 is kindly acknowledged.

  1. An analysis of particle track effects on solid mammalian tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (Q) at extreme values of linear energy transfer (LET) have been determined on the basis of experiments with single-cell systems and specific tissue responses. In typical single-cell systems, each heavy particle (Ar or Fe) passes through a single cell or no cell. In experiments on animal tissues, however, each heavy particle passes through several cells, and the LET can exceed 200 keV micrometers-1 in every cell. In most laboratory animal tissue systems, however, only a small portion of the hit cells are capable of expressing the end-point being measured, such as cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The following question was therefore addressed: do RBEs and Q factors derived from single-cell experiments properly account for the damage at high LET when multiple cells are hit by HZE tracks? A review is offered in which measured radiation effects and known tissue properties are combined to estimate on the one hand, the number of cells at risk, p3n, per track, where n is the number of cells per track based on tissue and organ geometry, and p3 is the probability that a cell in the track is capable of expressing the experimental end-point. On the other hand, the tissue and single-cell responses are compared by determining the ratio RBE in tissue/RBE in corresponding single cells. Experimental data from the literature indicate that tissue RBEs at very high LET (Fe and Ar ions) are higher than corresponding single-cell RBEs, especially in tissues in which p3n is high.

  2. An Automated Pipeline for Dendrite Spine Detection and Tracking of 3D Optical Microscopy Neuron Images of In Vivo Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaobo; Dy, Jennifer G.; Zhang, Yong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2009-01-01

    The variations in dendritic branch morphology and spine density provide insightful information about the brain function and possible treatment to neurodegenerative disease, for example investigating structural plasticity during the course of Alzheimer's disease. Most automated image processing methods aiming at analyzing these problems are developed for in vitro data. However, in vivo neuron images provide real time information and direct observation of the dynamics of a disease process in a live animal model. This paper presents an automated approach for detecting spines and tracking spine evolution over time with in vivo image data in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. We propose an automated pipeline starting with curvilinear structure detection to determine the medial axis of the dendritic backbone and spines connected to the backbone. We, then, propose the adaptive local binary fitting (aLBF) energy level set model to accurately locate the boundary of dendritic structures using the central line of curvilinear structure as initialization. To track the growth or loss of spines, we present a maximum likelihood based technique to find the graph homomorphism between two image graph structures at different time points. We employ dynamic programming to search for the optimum solution. The pipeline enables us to extract dynamically changing information from real time in vivo data. We validate our proposed approach by comparing with manual results generated by neurologists. In addition, we discuss the performance of 3D based segmentation and conclude that our method is more accurate in identifying weak spines. Experiments show that our approach can quickly and accurately detect and quantify spines of in vivo neuron images and is able to identify spine elimination and formation. PMID:19434521

  3. Particle tracking code of simulating global RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K.

    1991-09-01

    It is well known in the control community'' that a good feedback controller design is deeply rooted in the physics of the system. For example, when accelerating the beam we must keep several parameters under control so that the beam travels within the confined space. Important parameters include the frequency and phase of the rf signal, the dipole field, and the cavity voltage. Because errors in these parameters will progressively mislead the beam from its projected path in the tube, feedback loops are used to correct the behavior. Since the feedback loop feeds energy to the system, it changes the overall behavior of the system and may drive it to instability. Various types of controllers are used to stabilize the feedback loop. Integrating the beam physics with the feedback controllers allows us to carefully analyze the beam behavior. This will not only guarantee optimal performance but will also significantly enhance the ability of the beam control engineer to deal effectively with the interaction of various feedback loops. Motivated by this theme, we developed a simple one-particle tracking code to simulate particle behavior with feedback controllers. In order to achieve our fundamental objective, we can ask some key questions: What are the input and output parameters How can they be applied to the practical machine How can one interface the rf system dynamics such as the transfer characteristics of the rf cavities and phasing between the cavities Answers to these questions can be found by considering a simple case of a single cavity with one particle, tracking it turn-by-turn with appropriate initial conditions, then introducing constraints on crucial parameters. Critical parameters are rf frequency, phase, and amplitude once the dipole field has been given. These are arranged in the tracking code so that we can interface the feedback system controlling them.

  4. Towards a fully kinetic 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell model of streamer formation and dynamics in high-pressure electronegative gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Thoma, C.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Bruner, N.; Rambo, P. K.; Atherton, B. W.

    2011-09-01

    Streamer and leader formation in high pressure devices is dynamic process involving a broad range of physical phenomena. These include elastic and inelastic particle collisions in the gas, radiation generation, transport and absorption, and electrode interactions. Accurate modeling of these physical processes is essential for a number of applications, including high-current, laser-triggered gas switches. Towards this end, we present a new 3D implicit particle-in-cell simulation model of gas breakdown leading to streamer formation in electronegative gases. The model uses a Monte Carlo treatment for all particle interactions and includes discrete photon generation, transport, and absorption for ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation. Central to the realization of this fully kinetic particle treatment is an algorithm that manages the total particle count by species while preserving the local momentum distribution functions and conserving charge [D. R. Welch, T. C. Genoni, R. E. Clark, and D. V. Rose, J. Comput. Phys. 227, 143 (2007)]. The simulation model is fully electromagnetic, making it capable of following, for example, the evolution of a gas switch from the point of laser-induced localized breakdown of the gas between electrodes through the successive stages of streamer propagation, initial electrode current connection, and high-current conduction channel evolution, where self-magnetic field effects are likely to be important. We describe the model details and underlying assumptions used and present sample results from 3D simulations of streamer formation and propagation in SF6.

  5. Tri-track: free software for large-scale particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Vallotton, Pascal; Olivier, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    The ability to correctly track objects in time-lapse sequences is important in many applications of microscopy. Individual object motions typically display a level of dynamic regularity reflecting the existence of an underlying physics or biology. Best results are obtained when this local information is exploited. Additionally, if the particle number is known to be approximately constant, a large number of tracking scenarios may be rejected on the basis that they are not compatible with a known maximum particle velocity. This represents information of a global nature, which should ideally be exploited too. Some time ago, we devised an efficient algorithm that exploited both types of information. The tracking task was reduced to a max-flow min-cost problem instance through a novel graph structure that comprised vertices representing objects from three consecutive image frames. The algorithm is explained here for the first time. A user-friendly implementation is provided, and the specific relaxation mechanism responsible for the method's effectiveness is uncovered. The software is particularly competitive for complex dynamics such as dense antiparallel flows, or in situations where object displacements are considerable. As an application, we characterize a remarkable vortex structure formed by bacteria engaged in interstitial motility.

  6. Modeling reactive transport with particle tracking and kernel estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater reactive transport models are useful to assess and quantify the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface media and are an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth Systems. Particle Tracking Method (PTM) provides a computationally efficient and adaptable approach to solve the solute transport partial differential equation. On a molecular level, chemical reactions are the result of collisions, combinations, and/or decay of different species. For a well-mixed system, the chem- ical reactions are controlled by the classical thermodynamic rate coefficient. Each of these actions occurs with some probability that is a function of solute concentrations. PTM is based on considering that each particle actually represents a group of molecules. To properly simulate this system, an infinite number of particles is required, which is computationally unfeasible. On the other hand, a finite number of particles lead to a poor-mixed system which is limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect to actually model incomplete mix- ing in naturally occurring porous media. In this work, we demonstrate that this effect in most cases should be attributed to a defficient estimation of the concentrations and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing processes in porous media. To illustrate this, we show that a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations can approach the well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. KDEs provide weighting functions of each particle mass that expands its region of influence, hence providing a wider region for chemical reactions with time. Simulation results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve state-of-the-art simulations of chemical reactions and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative conceptual models and not on a limited number of particles.

  7. Sequential bearings-only-tracking initiation with particle filtering method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Hao, Chengpeng

    2013-01-01

    The tracking initiation problem is examined in the context of autonomous bearings-only-tracking (BOT) of a single appearing/disappearing target in the presence of clutter measurements. In general, this problem suffers from a combinatorial explosion in the number of potential tracks resulted from the uncertainty in the linkage between the target and the measurement (a.k.a the data association problem). In addition, the nonlinear measurements lead to a non-Gaussian posterior probability density function (pdf) in the optimal Bayesian sequential estimation framework. The consequence of this nonlinear/non-Gaussian context is the absence of a closed-form solution. This paper models the linkage uncertainty and the nonlinear/non-Gaussian estimation problem jointly with solid Bayesian formalism. A particle filtering (PF) algorithm is derived for estimating the model's parameters in a sequential manner. Numerical results show that the proposed solution provides a significant benefit over the most commonly used methods, IPDA and IMMPDA. The posterior Cramér-Rao bounds are also involved for performance evaluation.

  8. Sequential Bearings-Only-Tracking Initiation with Particle Filtering Method

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Chengpeng

    2013-01-01

    The tracking initiation problem is examined in the context of autonomous bearings-only-tracking (BOT) of a single appearing/disappearing target in the presence of clutter measurements. In general, this problem suffers from a combinatorial explosion in the number of potential tracks resulted from the uncertainty in the linkage between the target and the measurement (a.k.a the data association problem). In addition, the nonlinear measurements lead to a non-Gaussian posterior probability density function (pdf) in the optimal Bayesian sequential estimation framework. The consequence of this nonlinear/non-Gaussian context is the absence of a closed-form solution. This paper models the linkage uncertainty and the nonlinear/non-Gaussian estimation problem jointly with solid Bayesian formalism. A particle filtering (PF) algorithm is derived for estimating the model's parameters in a sequential manner. Numerical results show that the proposed solution provides a significant benefit over the most commonly used methods, IPDA and IMMPDA. The posterior Cramér-Rao bounds are also involved for performance evaluation. PMID:24453865

  9. Microdosimetric structure of HZE particle tracks in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    Heavy nuclei of the primary galactic radiation in space can have the same linear energy transfer yet greatly different lateral distribution patterns of the energy in the microstructure of tissue. Track structure thus presents itself as a new dosimetric parameter for HZE particles which is at present incompletely understood in its radiobiological significance. The theory of track structure distinguishes two regions: core and penumbra. The core is a narrow region with a radius far below 1 micron in tissue where energy deposition occurs mainly through excitations and collective oscillations of electrons. Energy density in the core accounts for slightly more than half the total LET. The penumbra surrounding the core extends laterally several to many microns depending on the energy of the primary. Energy density in the penumbra decreases steeply with the square of increasing radius. The relationships are illustrated with nuclear emulsion micrographs and plots of energy density profiles. The implications of the findings for a dosimetric system for HZE particles are discussed.

  10. Particle tracking microrheology of gel-forming amyloid fibril networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, A. M.; Donald, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Microrheology is a technique that is increasingly used to investigate the local viscoelastic properties of complex fluids non-invasively, by tracking the motion of micron-sized probe spheres. In this work, passive Particle Tracking Microrheology (PTM) is used to study network formation in the milk protein β -lactoglobulin at 80 ° C and p H 2. In these conditions the protein aggregates to form thread-like structures known as amyloid fibrils, which can further aggregate into elastic networks. Using PTM, gels were observed to form at significantly lower concentrations than determined by bulk rheometry, where the oscillatory shear forces may disrupt either fibril or network formation. During incubation, the Mean Square Displacement (MSD) of the probe particles exhibited time-cure superposition, allowing the critical relaxation exponent to be calculated as ˜ 0.63 , consistent with other biopolymer gels. Combined with the gel-like appearance of the complex modulus at long incubation times, this confirms that a true gel is forming, with physical or chemical crosslinks forming between the fibrils, refining the conclusions of other workers in the field.

  11. Shake-The-Box: Lagrangian particle tracking at high particle image densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Daniel; Gesemann, Sebastian; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    A Lagrangian tracking method is introduced, which uses a prediction of the particle distribution for the subsequent time-step as a mean to seize the temporal domain. Errors introduced by the prediction process are corrected by an image matching technique (`shaking' the particle in space), followed by an iterative triangulation of particles newly entering the measurement domain. The scheme was termed `Shake-The-Box' and previously characterized as `4D-PTV' due to the strong interaction with the temporal dimension. Trajectories of tracer particles are identified at high spatial accuracy due to a nearly complete suppression of ghost particles; a temporal filtering scheme further improves on accuracy and allows for the extraction of local velocity and acceleration as derivatives of a continuous function. Exploiting the temporal information enables the processing of densely seeded flows (beyond 0.1 particles per pixel, ppp), which were previously reserved for tomographic PIV evaluations. While TOMO-PIV uses statistical means to evaluate the flow (building an `anonymous' voxel space with subsequent spatial averaging of the velocity information using correlation), the Shake-The-Box approach is able to identify and track individual particles at numbers of tens or even hundreds of thousands per time-step. The method is outlined in detail, followed by descriptions of applications to synthetic and experimental data. The synthetic data evaluation reveals that STB is able to capture virtually all true particles, while effectively suppressing the formation of ghost particles. For the examined four-camera set-up particle image densities N I up to 0.125 ppp could be processed. For noise-free images, the attained accuracy is very high. The addition of synthetic noise reduces usable particle image density ( N I ≤ 0.075 ppp for highly noisy images) and accuracy (still being significantly higher compared to tomographic reconstruction). The solutions remain virtually free of ghost

  12. Mixed-scale channel networks including Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnels for efficient single particle entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yunjeong; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2016-06-01

    Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic carbon mold is fabricated by pyrolyzing a polymer mold patterned by photolithography. During pyrolysis, the polymer mold shrinks by ~90%, which enables nanosized carbon molds to be produced without a complex nanofabrication process. Because of the good adhesion between the polymer mold and the Si substrate, non-uniform volume reduction occurs during pyrolysis resulting in the formation of curved carbon mold side walls. These curved side walls and the relatively low surface energy of the mold provide efficient demolding of the PDMS channel networks. In addition, the trigonal prismatic shape of the polymer is converted into to a Kingfisher-beak-shaped carbon structure due to the non-uniform volume reduction. The transformation of this mold architecture produces a PDMS Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnel that connects the microchannel and the nanochannel smoothly. The smooth reduction in the cross-sectional area of the 3D microfunnels enables efficient single microparticle trapping at the nanochannel entrance; this is beneficial for studies of cell transfection.Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic

  13. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  14. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  15. Optimization of detector positioning in the radioactive particle tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Olivier; Dubé, David; Chaouki, Jamal; Bertrand, François

    2014-07-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique is a non-intrusive experimental velocimetry and tomography technique extensively applied to the study of hydrodynamics in a great variety of systems. In this technique, arrays of scintillation detector are used to track the motion of a single radioactive tracer particle emitting isotropic γ-rays. This work describes and applies an optimization strategy developed to find an optimal set of positions for the scintillation detectors used in the RPT technique. This strategy employs the overall resolution of the detectors as the objective function and a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm to solve the optimization problem. More precisely, NOMAD, a C++ implementation of the MADS algorithm is used. First, the optimization strategy is validated using simple cases with known optimal detector configurations. Next, it is applied to a three-dimensional axisymmetric system (i.e. a vertical cylinder, which could represent a fluidized bed, bubble column, riser or else). The results obtained using the optimization strategy are in agreement with what was previously recommended by Roy et al. (2002) for a similar system. Finally, the optimization strategy is used for a system consisting of a partially filled cylindrical tumbler. The application of insights gained by the optimization strategy is shown to lead to a significant reduction in the error made when reconstructing the position of a tracer particle. The results of this work show that the optimization strategy developed is sensitive to both the type of objective function used and the experimental conditions. The limitations and drawbacks of the optimization strategy are also discussed.

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of 3D Mouse Behaviors and Motor Function in the Open-Field after Spinal Cord Injury Using Markerless Motion Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Alison L.; Lai, Po-Lun; Fisher, Lesley C.; Basso, D. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study’s goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz). Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal’s silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal’s front Center of Volume (CoV) height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005) and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01) were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative measurement

  17. Endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan in Concentrated Ambient Particles Induce Rapid Increase in Blood Pressure in Controlled Human Exposures.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A; Koutrakis, Petros; Thorne, Peter S; Scott, James; Liu, Ling; Brook, Robert D; Behbod, Behrooz; Gibson, Heike; Silverman, Frances; Mittleman, Murray A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Gold, Diane R

    2015-09-01

    Short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased blood pressure (BP) in epidemiological studies. Understanding the impact of specific PM components on BP is essential in developing effective risk-reduction strategies. We investigated the association between endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan-two major biological PM components-and BP. We also examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor, a vasodilatory inflammatory marker, modified these associations. We conducted a single-blind, randomized, crossover trial of controlled human exposure to concentrated ambient particles with 50 healthy adults. Particle-associated-endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan were sampled using polycarbonate-membrane-filters. Supine resting systolic BP and diastolic BP were measured pre-, 0.5-hour post-, and 20-hour postexposure. Urine vascular endothelial growth factor concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and creatinine-corrected. Exposures to endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan for 130 minutes were associated with increases in BPs: at 0.5-hour postexposure, every doubling in endotoxin concentration was associated with 1.73 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.28, 3.18; P=0.02) and 2.07 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.74, 3.39; P=0.003); every doubling in β-1,3-d-Glucan concentration was associated with 0.80 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, -0.07, 1.67; P=0.07) and 0.88 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.09, 1.66; P=0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor rose after concentrated ambient particle endotoxin exposure and attenuated the association between endotoxin and 0.5-hour postexposure diastolic BP (Pinteraction=0.02). In healthy adults, short-term endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan exposures were associated with increased BP. Our findings suggest that the biological PM components contribute to PM-related cardiovascular outcomes, and postexposure vascular endothelial

  18. Ultrasonic tracking of shear waves using a particle filter

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Atul N.; Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper discusses an application of particle filtering for estimating shear wave velocity in tissue using ultrasound elastography data. Shear wave velocity estimates are of significant clinical value as they help differentiate stiffer areas from softer areas which is an indicator of potential pathology. Methods: Radio-frequency ultrasound echo signals are used for tracking axial displacements and obtaining the time-to-peak displacement at different lateral locations. These time-to-peak data are usually very noisy and cannot be used directly for computing velocity. In this paper, the denoising problem is tackled using a hidden Markov model with the hidden states being the unknown (noiseless) time-to-peak values. A particle filter is then used for smoothing out the time-to-peak curve to obtain a fit that is optimal in a minimum mean squared error sense. Results: Simulation results from synthetic data and finite element modeling suggest that the particle filter provides lower mean squared reconstruction error with smaller variance as compared to standard filtering methods, while preserving sharp boundary detail. Results from phantom experiments show that the shear wave velocity estimates in the stiff regions of the phantoms were within 20% of those obtained from a commercial ultrasound scanner and agree with estimates obtained using a standard method using least-squares fit. Estimates of area obtained from the particle filtered shear wave velocity maps were within 10% of those obtained from B-mode ultrasound images. Conclusions: The particle filtering approach can be used for producing visually appealing SWV reconstructions by effectively delineating various areas of the phantom with good image quality properties comparable to existing techniques. PMID:26520761

  19. Left Atrial Deformation Analysis in Patients with Corrected Tetralogy of Fallot by 3D Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography (from the MAGYAR-Path Study)

    PubMed Central

    Havasi, Kálmán; Domsik, Péter; Kalapos, Anita; McGhie, Jackie S.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Forster, Tamás; Nemes, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography coupled with speckle-tracking echocardiographic (STE) capability is a novel methodology which has been demontrated to be useful for the assessment of left atrial (LA) volumes and functional