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Sample records for 3-d turbulent particle

  1. Methods for Measuring the Orientation and Rotation Rate of 3D-printed Particles in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brendan C; Marcus, Guy G; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental methods are presented for measuring the rotational and translational motion of anisotropic particles in turbulent fluid flows. 3D printing technology is used to fabricate particles with slender arms connected at a common center. Shapes explored are crosses (two perpendicular rods), jacks (three perpendicular rods), triads (three rods in triangular planar symmetry), and tetrads (four arms in tetrahedral symmetry). Methods for producing on the order of 10,000 fluorescently dyed particles are described. Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four synchronized videos of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with Rλ = 91. In this relatively low-Reynolds number flow, the advected particles are small enough that they approximate ellipsoidal tracer particles. We present results of time-resolved 3D trajectories of position and orientation of the particles as well as measurements of their rotation rates. PMID:27404898

  2. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  3. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  4. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  5. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 2, 15 July--15 October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4. Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.

  6. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 1, 5 April--5 July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4.Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.

  7. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 3, October 15, 1991--January 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Many practical combustion processes which use solid particles, liquid droplets, or slurries as fuels introduce these fuels into turbulent environments. Examples include spray combustion, pulverized coal and coal slurry combustion, fluidized beds, sorbent injection, and hazardous waste incineration. The interactions of the condensed phases with turbulent environments have not been well described. Such a description is complicated by the difficulty of describing turbulence in general, even in the absence of particles or droplets. But the complications in describing the dispersion and reaction of the condensed phases in turbulent environments do not stem entirely or even primarily from the uncertainties in the description of the turbulence. Theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles and droplets are not well established, even when the characteristics of the turbulence are known. Several new theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles an droplets have proposed over the past five years. It is the purpose of this project to explore the potential of two of these theories for coupling with the other aspects of three-dimensional, reacting, turbulent, particle-laden systems to proved computational simulations that could be useful for addressing industrial problems.

  8. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude. PMID:26646289

  9. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude.

  10. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 4, January 15, 1992--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Many practical combustion processes which use solid particles, liquid droplets, or slurries as fuels introduce these fuels into turbulent environments. Examples include spray combustion, pulverized coal and coal slurry combustion, fluidized beds, sorbent injection, and hazardous waste incineration. The interactions of the condensed phases with turbulent environments have not been well described. Such a description is complicated by the difficulty of describing turbulence in general, even in the absence of particles or droplets. But the complications in describing the dispersion and reaction of the condensed phases in turbulent environments do not stem entirely or even primarily from the uncertainties in the description of the turbulence. Theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles and droplets are not well established, even when the characteristics of the turbulence are known. It is the purpose of this project to develop two different particle dispersion submodels (one each for dilute and dense phases), and couple them with existing fluid-dynamic heat transfer and reaction chemistry models to provide computational simulations capable of addressing industrial problems.

  11. Apker Prize Lecture: Using 3D Printing and Stereoscopic Imaging to Measure the Alignment and Rotation of Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a general methodology to experimentally measure the time-resolved Lagrangian orientation and solid body rotation rate of anisotropic particles with arbitrary aspect ratio from standard stereoscopic video image data. We apply these techniques to particles advected in a Rλ ~ 110 fluid flow, where turbulence is generated by two grids oscillating in phase. We use 3D printing technology to design and fabricate neutrally buoyant rods, crosses (two perpendicular rods), and jacks (three mutually perpendicular rods) with a largest dimension of 7 times the Kolmogorov length scale, which makes them good approximations to tracer particles. We have measured the mean square rotation rate, ṗiṗi , of particles spanning the full range of aspect ratios and obtained results that agree with direct numerical simulations. By measuring the full solid-body rotation of jacks, we provide a new, extensible way to directly probe the Lagrangian vorticity of a fluid. We also present direct measurements of the alignment of crosses with the direction of their solid body rotation rate vector--in agreement with direct numerical simulations. Supported by NSF grant DMR­1208990.

  12. FFT integration of instantaneous 3D pressure gradient fields measured by Lagrangian particle tracking in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; Schanz, D.; Gesemann, S.; Schröder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Pressure gradient fields in unsteady flows can be estimated through flow measurements of the material acceleration in the fluid and the assumption of the governing momentum equation. In order to derive pressure from its gradient, almost exclusively two numerical methods have been used to spatially integrate the pressure gradient until now: first, direct path integration in the spatial domain, and second, the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. Instead, we propose an alternative third method that integrates the pressure gradient field in Fourier space. Using a FFT function, the method is fast and easy to implement in programming languages for scientific computing. We demonstrate the accuracy of the integration scheme on a synthetic pressure field and apply it to an experimental example based on time-resolved material acceleration data from high-resolution Lagrangian particle tracking with the Shake-The-Box method.

  13. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite-size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Simon; Gibert, Mathieu; Bérut, Antoine; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-02-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation and the rotation of finite-size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp/η ≈ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ≈ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second-order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. This measurement technique has many additional advantages that will make it useful to address other problems such as particle collisions, dynamics of non-spherical solid objects, or even of wet granular matter.

  14. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, Mathieu; Klein, Simon; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation, and the rotation of finite size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp / η ~ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ~ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. (http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2181) This work was funded generously by the Max Planck Society and the Marie Curie Fellowship, Program PEOPLE - Call FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2008 Proposal No 237521. Support from COST Action MP0806 is kindly acknowledged.

  15. 3D View of Mars Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a 3D representation of the pits seen in the first Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM, images sent back from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Red represents the highest point and purple represents the lowest point.

    The particle in the upper left corner shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a rounded particle about one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across. It is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Multigrid calculations of 3-D turbulent viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1989-01-01

    Convergence properties of a multigrid algorithm, developed to calculate compressible viscous flows, are analyzed by a vector sequence eigenvalue estimate. The full 3-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated by an implicit multigrid scheme while a k-epsilon turbulence model is solved, uncoupled from the flow equations. Estimates of the eigenvalue structure for both single and multigrid calculations are compared in an attempt to analyze the process as well as the results of the multigrid technique. The flow through an annular turbine is used to illustrate the scheme's ability to calculate complex 3-D flows.

  17. ODTLES : a model for 3D turbulent flow based on one-dimensional turbulence modeling concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Randy; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-01-01

    This report describes an approach for extending the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model of Kerstein [6] to treat turbulent flow in three-dimensional (3D) domains. This model, here called ODTLES, can also be viewed as a new LES model. In ODTLES, 3D aspects of the flow are captured by embedding three, mutually orthogonal, one-dimensional ODT domain arrays within a coarser 3D mesh. The ODTLES model is obtained by developing a consistent approach for dynamically coupling the different ODT line sets to each other and to the large scale processes that are resolved on the 3D mesh. The model is implemented computationally and its performance is tested and evaluated by performing simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence, a standard turbulent flow benchmarking problem.

  18. 3D two-fluid simulations of turbulence in LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Dustin M.

    The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) is modeled using a modified version of the 3D Global Braginskii Solver code (GBS) for a nominal Helium plasma. The unbiased low-flow regime is explored in simulations where there is an intrinsic E x B rotation of the plasma. In the simulations this rotation is caused primarily by sheath effects with the Reynolds stress and J x B torque due to a cross-field Pederson conductivity having little effect. Explicit biasing simulations are also explored for the first time where the intrinsic rotation of the plasma is modified through boundary conditions that mimic the biasable limiter used in LAPD. Comparisons to experimental measurements in the unbiased case show strong qualitative agreement with the data, particularly the radial dependence of the density fluctuations, cross-correlation lengths, radial flux dependence outside of the cathode edge, and camera imagery. Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) turbulence at relatively large scales is the dominant driver of cross-field transport in these simulations with smaller-scale drift waves and sheath modes playing a secondary role. Plasma holes and blobs arising from KH vortices are consistent with the scale sizes and overall appearance of those in LAPD camera images. The addition of ion-neutral collisions in the unbiased simulations at previously theorized values reduces the radial particle flux due to a modest stabilizing contribution of the collisions on the KH-modes driving the turbulent transport. In the biased runs the ion-neutral collisions have a much smaller effect due to the modification of the potential from sheath terms. In biasing the plasma to increase the intrinsic rotation, simulations show the emergence of a nonlinearly saturated coherent mode of order m = 6. In addition, the plasma inside of the cathode edge becomes quiescent due to the strong influence of the wall bias in setting up the equilibrium plasma potential. Biasing in the direction opposite to the intrinsic flow reduces the

  19. Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Roytershteyn, V; Karimabadi, H; Parashar, T; Wu, P; Shay, M

    2015-05-01

    High resolution, fully kinetic, three dimensional (3D) simulation of collisionless plasma turbulence shows the development of turbulence characterized by sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales. The nonlinear evolution is initialized with a long wavelength isotropic spectrum of fluctuations having polarizations transverse to an imposed mean magnetic field. We present evidence that these current sheet structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger currents signify higher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J·E, electron, and proton temperatures, and conditional averages of these quantities based on local electric current density. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previous results from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequency solar wind observational data, are discussed. PMID:25978241

  20. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Ali M.; Kamdar, Arpeet; Castillo, Luciano; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching (RIM) channel. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/λy = 0.1. The flow over these walls was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40 000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. Flow measurements were performed in a wall-normal plane for the two cases and in wall-parallel planes at three heights for the 3D wavy wall. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels. It is shown that the 3D surface limits the dynamics of the spanwise turbulent vortical structures, leading to reduced turbulence production and turbulent stresses and, consequently, lower average drag (wall shear stress). The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D sinusoidal wall. Differences of one and two order of magnitudes are found in the turbulence levels and Reynolds shear stress at the low Reynolds number for the 2D and 3D cases. These results highlight the sensitivity of the flow to large-scale topographic modulations; in particular the levels and production of turbulent kinetic energy as well as the wall shear stress.

  1. Numerical model of sonic boom in 3D kinematic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François; Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis

    2015-10-01

    Sonic boom is one of the key issues to be considered in the development of future supersonic or hypersonic civil aircraft concepts. The classical sonic boom, typical for Concorde with an N-wave shape and a ground amplitude of the order of 100 Pa, prevents overland flight. Future concepts target carefully shaped sonic booms with low amplitude weak shocks. However, sonic boom when perceived at the ground level is influenced not only by the aircraft characteristics, but also by atmospheric propagation. In particular, the effect of atmospheric turbulence on sonic boom propagation near the ground is not well characterized. Flight tests performed as early as the 1960s demonstrated that classical sonic booms are sensitive to atmospheric turbulence. However, this sensitivity remains only partially understood. This is related to the fact that i) turbulence is a random process that requires a statistical approach, ii) standard methods used to predict sonic booms, mainly geometrical acoustics based on ray tracing, are inadequate within the turbulent planetary boundary layer. Moreover, the ray theory fails to predict the acoustical field in many areas of interest, such as caustics or shadow zones. These zones are of major interest for sonic boom acceptability (highest levels, lateral extent of zone of impact). These limitations outline the need for a numerical approach that is sufficiently efficient to perform a large number of realizations for a statistical approach, but that goes beyond the limitations of ray theory. With this in view, a 3D one-way numerical method solving a nonlinear scalar wave equation established for heterogeneous, moving and absorbing atmosphere, is used to assess the effects of a 3D kinematic turbulence on sonic boom in various configurations. First, a plane N-wave is propagated in the free field through random realizations of kinematic fluctuations. Then the case of a more realistic Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is investigated, with a mean

  2. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of the developing and developed flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching flume. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the flume half height. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels, particularly for which shows about 30% reduction. The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and the rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D wall. POD analysis was also performed to further understand distinctive features of the flow structures due to surface topography.

  3. Impulsive reconnection: 3D onset and stagnation in turbulent paradigms

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jason A; Intrator, Thomas P; Weber, Tom; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lazarian, Alexander

    2010-12-14

    Reconnection processes are ubiquitous in solar coronal loops, the earth's magnetotail, galactic jets, and laboratory configurations such as spheromaks and Z pinches. It is believed that reconnection dynamics are often closely linked to turbulence. In these phenomena, the bursty onset of reconnection is partly determined by a balance of macroscopic MHD forces. In a turbulent paradigm, it is reasonable to suppose that there exist many individual reconnection sites, each X-line being finite in axial extent and thus intrinsically three-dimensional (3D) in structure. The balance between MHD forces and flux pile-up continuously shifts as mutually tangled flux ropes merge or bounce. The spatial scale and thus the rate of reconnection are therefore intimately related to the turbulence statistics both in space and in time. We study intermittent 3D reconnection along spatially localized X-lines between two or more flux ropes. The threshold of MHD instability which in this case is the kink threshold is varied by modifying the line-tying boundary conditions. For fast inflow speed of approaching ropes, there is merging and magnetic reconnection which is a well known and expected consequence of the 2D coalescence instability. On the other hand, for slower inflow speed the flux ropes bounce. The threshold appears to be the Sweet Parker speed v{sub A}/S{sup 1/2}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed and S is the Lundquist number. Computations by collaborators at University of Wisconsin, Madison, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, and LANL complement the experiment.

  4. 3-D Flow Visualization of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Williams, Steven; Lynch, Kyle

    2009-11-01

    A recently developed 3-D flow visualization technique is used to visualize large-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer. The technique is based on the scanning of a laser light sheet through the flow field similar to that of Delo and Smits (1997). High-speeds are possible using a recently developed MHz rate pulse burst laser system, an ultra-high-speed camera capable of 500,000 fps and a galvanometric scanning mirror yielding a total acquisition time of 136 microseconds for a 220 x 220 x 68 voxel image. In these experiments, smoke is seeded into the boundary layer formed on the wall of a low-speed wind tunnel. The boundary layer is approximately 1.5'' thick at the imaging location with a free stream velocity of 24 ft/s yielding a Reynolds number of 18,000 based on boundary layer thickness. The 3-D image volume is approximately 4'' x 4'' x 4''. Preliminary results using 3-D iso-surface visualizations show a collection of elongated large-scale structures inclined in the streamwise direction. The spanwise width of the structures, which are located in the outer region, is on the order of 25 -- 50% of the boundary layer thickness.

  5. CVS Decomposition of 3D Homogeneous Turbulence Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai; Pellegrino, Giulio; Wray, A. A.; Rogallo, R. S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares the filtering used in Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) decomposition with an orthogonal wavelet basis, with the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) or Fourier filtering. Both methods are applied to a field of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of 3D forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence at microscale Reynolds number R(sub lambda) = 168. We show that, with only 3%N retained modes, CVS filtering separates the coherent vortex tubes from the incoherent background flow. The latter is structureless, has an equipartition energy spectrum, and has a Gaussian velocity probability distribution function (PDF) and an exponential vorticity PDF. On the other hand, the Fourier basis does not extract the coherent vortex tubes cleanly and leaves organized structures in the residual high wavenumber modes whose PDFs are stretched exponentials for both the velocity and the vorticity.

  6. Visualizing 3D Turbulence On Temporally Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, D. E.; Kadlec, B. J.; Yuen, D. A.; Erlebacher, G.

    2005-12-01

    Today there is an explosion in data from high-resolution computations of nonlinear phenomena in many fields, including the geo- and environmental sciences. The efficient storage and subsequent visualization of these large data sets is a trade off in storage costs versus data quality. New dynamically adaptive simulation methodologies promise significant computational cost savings and have the added benefit of producing results on adapted grids that significantly reduce storage and data manipulation costs. Yet, with these adaptive simulation methodologies come new challenges in the visualization of temporally adaptive data sets. In this work turbulence data sets from Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations (SCALES) are visualized with the open source tool ParaView, as a challenging case study. SCALES simulations use a temporally adaptive collocation grid defined by wavelet threshold filtering to resolve the most energetic coherent structures in a turbulence field. A subgrid scale model is used to account for the effect of unresolved subgrid scale modes. The results from the SCALES simulations are saved on a thresholded dyadic wavelet collocation grid, which by its nature does not include cell information. Paraview is an open source visualization package developed by KitWare(tm) that is based on the widely used VTK graphics toolkit. The efficient generation of cell information, required with current ParaView data formats, is explored using custom algorithms and VTK toolkit routines. Adaptive 3d visualizations using isosurfaces and volume visualizations are compared with non-adaptive visualizations. To explore the localized multiscale structures in the turbulent data sets the wavelet coefficients are also visualized allowing visualization of energy contained in local physical regions as well as in local wave number space.

  7. Kinetic turbulence in 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio; Kilian, Patrick; Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The features of kinetic plasma turbulence developed during non-relativistic 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection are still not fully understood. This is specially true under the influence of a strong magnetic guide field, a scenario common in space plasmas such as in the solar corona and also in laboratory experiments such as MRX or VINETA II. Therefore, we study the mechanisms and micro-instabilities leading to the development of turbulence during 3D magnetic reconnection with a fully kinetic PIC code, emphasizing the role of the guide field with an initial setup suitable for the aforementioned environments. We also clarify the relations between these processes and the generation of non-thermal populations and particle acceleration.

  8. 3D conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhille, Gautier; Bartoli, Adrien

    2016-07-01

    A growing number of studies is devoted to anisotropic particles in turbulent flows. In most cases, the particles are assumed to be rigid and their deformations are neglected. We present an adaptation of classical computer vision tools to reconstruct from two different images the 3D conformation of a fiber distorted by the turbulent fluctuations in a von Kármán flow. This technique allows us notably to characterize the fiber deformation by computing the correlation function of the orientation of the tangent vector. This function allows us to tackle the analogy between polymers and flexible fibers proposed by Brouzet et al. (Phys Rev Lett 112(7):074501, 2014). We show that this function depends on an elastic length ℓ _e which characterizes the particle flexibility, as is the case for polymers, but also on the fiber length L, contrary to polymers.

  9. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  10. Braiding, Turbulent 3D Reconnection and Impulsive Heating of the Magnetically Closed Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Hornig, G.; Yeates, A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic braiding is one of the leading theories for heating the magnetically closed corona, however, understanding of the central processes has changed dramatically in recent years. In particular, it is now recognized that braided fields allow impulsive heating via the formation of large numbers of turbulently forming and evolving reconnection regions, which are volume filling and inherently 3D, and it is no longer necessary to invoke topological discontinuities to dissipate stored energy. It has also become clear that turbulent reconnection produces structures that are inconsistent with a Taylor relaxation model, raising questions about how much stored energy is available for heating and particle acceleration. Here, we look at recent progress that has been made in dealing with this complex heating mechanism and present a new advance that greatly improves estimates of the magnetic energy available for heating and particle acceleration.

  11. Optical turbulence above mountains seen in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Els, S. G.; Vogiatzis, K.; Otárola, A.; Riddle, R.; Schöck, M.; Skidmore, W.; Travouillon, T.

    2010-07-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence is the main driver of wavefront distortions which affect optical telescope performance. Therefore, many techniques have been developed to measure the optical turbulence strength along the line of sight. Based on data collected with the MASS (Multi Aperture Scintillation Sensor), we show that a large sample of such measurements can be used to assess the average three dimensional turbulence distribution above ground. The use of, and a more sophisticated instrumental setup for, such turbulence tomography will be discussed.

  12. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-04-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated.

  13. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; Di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated. PMID:25904062

  14. Verification and Validation of the k-kL Turbulence Model in FUN3D and CFL3D Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of the k-kL turbulence model using multiple computational uid dy- namics (CFD) codes is reported herein. The k-kL model is a two-equation turbulence model based on Abdol-Hamid's closure and Menter's modi cation to Rotta's two-equation model. Rotta shows that a reliable transport equation can be formed from the turbulent length scale L, and the turbulent kinetic energy k. Rotta's equation is well suited for term-by-term mod- eling and displays useful features compared to other two-equation models. An important di erence is that this formulation leads to the inclusion of higher-order velocity derivatives in the source terms of the scale equations. This can enhance the ability of the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers to simulate unsteady ows. The present report documents the formulation of the model as implemented in the CFD codes Fun3D and CFL3D. Methodology, veri cation and validation examples are shown. Attached and sepa- rated ow cases are documented and compared with experimental data. The results show generally very good comparisons with canonical and experimental data, as well as matching results code-to-code. The results from this formulation are similar or better than results using the SST turbulence model.

  15. Ultrafine particle emissions from desktop 3D printers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Brent; Azimi, Parham; El Orch, Zeineb; Ramos, Tiffanie

    2013-11-01

    The development of low-cost desktop versions of three-dimensional (3D) printers has made these devices widely accessible for rapid prototyping and small-scale manufacturing in home and office settings. Many desktop 3D printers rely on heated thermoplastic extrusion and deposition, which is a process that has been shown to have significant aerosol emissions in industrial environments. However, we are not aware of any data on particle emissions from commercially available desktop 3D printers. Therefore, we report on measurements of size-resolved and total ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations resulting from the operation of two types of commercially available desktop 3D printers inside a commercial office space. We also estimate size-resolved (11.5 nm-116 nm) and total UFP (<100 nm) emission rates and compare them to emission rates from other desktop devices and indoor activities known to emit fine and ultrafine particles. Estimates of emission rates of total UFPs were large, ranging from ˜2.0 × 1010 # min-1 for a 3D printer utilizing a polylactic acid (PLA) feedstock to ˜1.9 × 1011 # min-1 for the same type of 3D printer utilizing a higher temperature acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic feedstock. Because most of these devices are currently sold as standalone devices without any exhaust ventilation or filtration accessories, results herein suggest caution should be used when operating in inadequately ventilated or unfiltered indoor environments. Additionally, these results suggest that more controlled experiments should be conducted to more fundamentally evaluate particle emissions from a wider arrange of desktop 3D printers.

  16. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  17. Global stability analysis of turbulent 3D wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Georgios; Sipp, Denis; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    At low Reynolds numbers, corresponding to laminar and transitional regimes, hydrodynamic stability theory has aided the understanding of the dynamics of bluff body wake-flows and the application of effective control strategies. However, flows of fundamental importance to many industries, in particular the transport industry, involve high Reynolds numbers and turbulent wakes. Despite their turbulence, such wake flows exhibit organisation which is manifested as coherent structures. Recent work has shown that the turbulent coherent structures retain the shape of the symmetry-breaking laminar instabilities and only those manifest as large-scale structures in the near wake (Rigas et al., JFM vol. 750:R5 2014, JFM vol. 778:R2 2015). Based on the findings of the persistence of the laminar instabilities at high Reynolds numbers, we investigate the global stability characteristics of a turbulent wake generated behind a bluff three-dimensional axisymmetric body. We perform a linear global stability analysis on the experimentally obtained mean flow and we recover the dynamic characteristics and spatial structure of the coherent structures, which are linked to the transitional instabilities. A detailed comparison of the predictions with the experimental measurements will be provided.

  18. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bergonzo, P.; Caylar, B.; Forcolin, G.; Haughton, I.; Hits, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Li, L.; Oh, A.; Phan, S.; Pomorski, M.; Smith, D. S.; Tyzhnevyi, V.; Wallny, R.; Whitehead, D.

    2015-06-01

    A novel device using single-crystal chemical vapour deposited diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond detector is presented. The electrodes of the device were fabricated with laser assisted phase change of diamond into a combination of diamond-like carbon, amorphous carbon and graphite. The connections to the electrodes of the device were made using a photo-lithographic process. The electrical and particle detection properties of the device were investigated. A prototype detector system consisting of the 3D device connected to a multi-channel readout was successfully tested with 120 GeV protons proving the feasibility of the 3D diamond detector concept for particle tracking applications for the first time.

  19. PEPT: An invaluable tool for 3-D particle tracking and CFD simulation verification in hydrocyclone studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Fen; Adamsen, Tom C. H.; Pisarev, Gleb I.; Hoffmann, Alex C.

    2013-05-01

    Particle tracks in a hydrocyclone generated both experimentally by positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) and numerically with Eulerian-Lagranian CFD have been studied and compared. A hydrocyclone with a cylinder-on-cone design was used in this study, the geometries used in the CFD simulations and in the experiments being identical. It is shown that it is possible to track a fast-moving particle in a hydrocyclone using PEPT with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The numerical 3-D particle trajectories were generated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence model for the fluid and Lagrangian particle tracking for the particles. The behaviors of the particles were analyzed in detail and were found to be consistent between experiments and CFD simulations. The tracks of the particles are discussed and related to the fluid flow field visualized in the CFD simulations using the cross-sectional static pressure distribution.

  20. Characteristics of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow at low to medium jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios are computed with a finite volume numerical procedure which utilizes a second-moment closure model to approximate the Reynolds stresses. A multigrid method is used to accelerate the convergence rate of the procedure. Comparison of the computations to measured data show good qualitative agreement. All trends are correctly predicted, though there is some uncertainty on the height of penetration of the jet. The evolution of the vorticity field is used to explore the jet-crossflow interaction.

  1. Phoresis-induced clustering of particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Fouxon, Itzhak; Krug, Dominik; van Reeuwijk, Maarten; Holzner, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate phoresis-induced clustering of non-inertial particles in turbulent flows. Phoretic mechanisms such as thermophoresis, chemotaxis or diffusiophroesis are known to create a particle drift with respect to the fluid. Theory, based on the framework of weakly compressible flow, predicts that particles in turbulence streaked by salinity gradients experience a diffusiophoretic drift and will thus form particle cluster. An inclined gravity current setup is used to analyse clustering due to the diffusiophoretic effect in turbulent flow experimentally. Simultaneous 3D particle tracking velocimetry and laser induced fluorescent measurements provide the full Lagrangian velocity field and the local salt concentration in the observed 3D domain. Two independent methods show consistent evidence of the theoretically predicted particle clustering in turbulence. This clustering mechanism can provide the key to the understanding of spontaneous clustering phenomena such as the formation of marine snow in the ocean.

  2. Particle Acceleration at Reconnecting 3D Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Browning, P.; Gordovskyy, M.; Dalla, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hard X-ray observations from the RHESSI spacecraft indicate that a significant fraction of solar flare energy release is in non-thermal energetic particles. A plausible acceleration mechanism for these are the strong electric fields associated with reconnection, a process that can be particularly efficient when particles become unmagnetised near to null points. This mechanism has been well studied in 2D, at X-points within reconnecting current sheets; however, 3D reconnection models show significant qualitative differences and it is not known whether these new models are efficient for particle acceleration. We place test particles in analytic model fields (eg. Craig and Fabling 1996) and numerical solutions to the the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations near reconnecting 3D nulls. We compare the behaviour of these test particles with previous results for test particle acceleration in ideal MHD models (Dalla and Browning 2005). We find that the fan model is very efficient due to an increasing "guide field" that stabilises particles against ejection from the current sheet. However, the spine model, which was the most promising in the ideal case, gives weak acceleration as the reconnection electric field is localised to a narrow cylinder about the spine axis.

  3. Two-photon single particle tracking in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Peter T. C.; Ragan, Timothy; Gratton, Enrico; Carerro, Jenny; Voss, Edward

    1997-05-01

    Transport processes are important in biology and medicine. Examples include virus docking and infection, endocytosis of extracellular protein and phagocytosis of antigenic material. Trafficking driven by molecular motors inside a complex 3D environment is a shared common theme. The complex sequence of these events are difficult to resolve with conventional techniques where the action of many cells are asynchronously averaged. Single particle tracking (SPT) was developed by Ghosh and Webb to address this problem and has proven to be a powerful technique in understanding membrane- protein interaction. Since the traditional SPT method uses wide field illumination and area detectors, it is limited to the study of 2D systems. In this presentation, we report the development of a 3D single particle tracking technique using two-photon excitation. Using a real-time feedback system, we can dynamically position the sub-femtoliter two-photon excitation volume to follow the fluorescent particle under transport by maximizing the detected fluorescent intensity. Further, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed in real time along the particle trajectory to monitor the underlying biochemical signals driving this transport process. The first application of this instrument will focus on the study of antigen endocytosis process of macrophages.

  4. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  5. 3D Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Simulation of Acoustic Waves in Turbulent Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, N. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Marlin, D.; Wilson, D. K.; Sullivan, P.; Ostashev, V.

    2003-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a three-dimensional heterogeneous moving atmosphere is accurately simulated with a numerical algorithm recently developed under the DOD Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). Sound waves within such a dynamic environment are mathematically described by a set of four, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing small-amplitude fluctuations in pressure and particle velocity. The system is rigorously derived from fundamental principles of continuum mechanics, ideal-fluid constitutive relations, and reasonable assumptions that the ambient atmospheric motion is adiabatic and divergence-free. An explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) numerical scheme is used to solve the system for both pressure and particle velocity wavefields. The atmosphere is characterized by 3D gridded models of sound speed, mass density, and the three components of the wind velocity vector. Dependent variables are stored on staggered spatial and temporal grids, and centered FD operators possess 2nd-order and 4th-order space/time accuracy. Accurate sound wave simulation is achieved provided grid intervals are chosen appropriately. The gridding must be fine enough to reduce numerical dispersion artifacts to an acceptable level and maintain stability. The algorithm is designed to execute on parallel computational platforms by utilizing a spatial domain-decomposition strategy. Currently, the algorithm has been validated on four different computational platforms, and parallel scalability of approximately 85% has been demonstrated. Comparisons with analytic solutions for uniform and vertically stratified wind models indicate that the FD algorithm generates accurate results with either a vanishing pressure or vanishing vertical-particle velocity boundary condition. Simulations are performed using a kinematic turbulence wind profile developed with the quasi-wavelet method. In addition, preliminary results are presented

  6. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  7. Simulation of 3-D Magnetic Reconnection by Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    3-D collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out for cases with various finite guide field BG in a current sheet as occurring in space and laboratory plasmas. Turbulence power spectrum of magenetic field is found in the reconnection current sheet, with a clear k-5/3 dependence. The wave properties are analyzed. The anomalous resistivity in the electron diffusion region is estimated. The Dependence of the reconnection physics on the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are also investigated.

  8. Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2000-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon "two-equation" turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for three flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those from direct numerical simulation, empirical formulae, theoretical results, and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  9. Resolution improvement by 3D particle averaging in localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Broeken, Jordi; Johnson, Hannah; Lidke, Diane S.; Liu, Sheng; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by recent developments in localization microscopy that applied averaging of identical particles in 2D for increasing the resolution even further, we discuss considerations for alignment (registration) methods for particles in general and for 3D in particular. We detail that traditional techniques for particle registration from cryo electron microscopy based on cross-correlation are not suitable, as the underlying image formation process is fundamentally different. We argue that only localizations, i.e. a set of coordinates with associated uncertainties, are recorded and not a continuous intensity distribution. We present a method that owes to this fact and that is inspired by the field of statistical pattern recognition. In particular we suggest to use an adapted version of the Bhattacharyya distance as a merit function for registration. We evaluate the method in simulations and demonstrate it on three-dimensional super-resolution data of Alexa 647 labelled to the Nup133 protein in the nuclear pore complex of Hela cells. From the simulations we find suggestions that for successful registration the localization uncertainty must be smaller than the distance between labeling sites on a particle. These suggestions are supported by theoretical considerations concerning the attainable resolution in localization microscopy and its scaling behavior as a function of labeling density and localization precision. PMID:25866640

  10. Optimizing Stellarators for Energetic Particle Confinement using BEAMS3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolgert, Peter; Drevlak, Michael; Lazerson, Sam; Gates, David; White, Roscoe

    2015-11-01

    Energetic particle (EP) loss has been called the ``Achilles heel of stellarators,'' (Helander, Rep. Prog. Phys. 77 087001 (2014)) and there is a great need for magnetic configurations with improved EP confinement. In this study we utilize a newly developed capability of the stellarator optimization code STELLOPT: the ability to optimize EP confinement via an interface with guiding center code BEAMS3D (McMillan et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56, 095019 (2014)). Using this new tool, optimizations of the W7-X experiment and ARIES-CS reactor are performed where the EP loss fraction is one of many target functions to be minimized. In W7-X, we simulate the experimental NBI system using realistic beam geometry and beam deposition physics. The goal is to find configurations with improved neutral beam deposition and energetic particle confinement. These calculations are compared to previous studies of W7-X NBI deposition. In ARIES-CS, we launch 3.5 MeV alpha particles from a near-axis flux surface using a uniform grid in toroidal and poloidal angle. As these particles are born from D-T reactions, we consider an isotropic distribution in velocity space. This research is supported by DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Mimicking Natural Laminar to Turbulent Flow Transition: A Systematic CFD Study Using PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2005-01-01

    For applied aerodynamic computations using a general purpose Navier-Stokes code, the common practice of treating laminar to turbulent flow transition over a non-slip surface is somewhat arbitrary by either treating the entire flow as turbulent or forcing the flow to undergo transition at given trip locations in the computational domain. In this study, the possibility of using the PAB3D code, standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and the Girimaji explicit algebraic stresses model to mimic natural laminar to turbulent flow transition was explored. The sensitivity of flow transition with respect to two limiters in the standard k-epsilon turbulence model was examined using a flat plate and a 6:1 aspect ratio prolate spheroid for our computations. For the flat plate, a systematic dependence of transition Reynolds number on background turbulence intensity was found. For the prolate spheroid, the transition patterns in the three-dimensional boundary layer at different flow conditions were sensitive to the free stream turbulence viscosity limit, the reference Reynolds number and the angle of attack, but not to background turbulence intensity below a certain threshold value. The computed results showed encouraging agreements with the experimental measurements at the corresponding geometry and flow conditions.

  12. 3-D Particle Simulation of Current Sheet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) instabilities of a Harris current sheet are investigated using a 3-D linearized (δf) gyrokinetic (GK) electron and fully kinetic (FK) ion (GeFi) particle simulation code. The equilibrium magnetic field consists of an asymptotic anti-parallel Bx 0 and a guide field BG. The ES simulations show the excitation of lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) at the current sheet edge. The growth rate of the 3-D LHDI is scanned through the (kx ,ky) space. The most unstable modes are found to be at k∥ = 0 for smaller ky. As ky increases, the growth rate shows two peaks at k∥ ≠ 0 , consistent with analytical GK theory. The eigenmode structure and growth rate of LHDI obtained from the GeFi simulation agree well with those obtained from the FK PIC simulation. Decreasing BG, the asymptotic βe 0, or background density can destabilize the LHDI. In the EM simulation, tearing mode instability is dominant in the cases with ky kx , there exist two unstable modes: a kink-like (LHDI) mode at the current sheet edge and a sausage-like mode at the sheet center. The results are compared with the GK eigenmode theory and the FK simulation.

  13. Vorticity, turbulence production, and turbulence induced accelerations in a rectangular jet as measured using 3-D LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 4:1 aspect ratio (50.4 x 12.7 mm) was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Measurements were performed along the major and minor axis planes and at various downstream cross-sections of the jet. The mean velocity vector and entire Reynolds stress tensor were measured and presented in a previous publication. The present work presents the vorticity vector, turbulence production, and turbulence induced acceleration vector distributions which were calculated from the previously presented data.

  14. Aspects of Turbulent Flow over 2D and 3D Bedforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, J. G.; Church, M. A.

    2004-05-01

    Sediment transport in sand bedded alluvial channels is strongly conditioned by bedforms. Understanding the turbulent flow field over bedforms is crucial to understanding flow resistance in rivers. Most of the research on flow over bedforms has focused on straight crested, two-dimensional bedforms, and the characteristics of the turbulent flow field are fairly well understood. In contrast, few studies have examined flow over 3D bedforms, which typically have irregular heights, lengths, and crestlines. This paper reports on experiments undertaken to examine how 3D dune morphology affects the turbulent flow field and, ultimately, flow resistance. An experiment was designed to examine flow over fixed bedforms 0.45 m long and 25 mm high in a 0.5 m wide and 17 m long flume. In each experimental run, discharge and dune size were held constant, but the crest shape was varied. Flow over six bedform crest shapes was examined, including a 2D crest, a saddle shaped crest, a lobe shaped crest, a regular 3D crest alignment, an irregular 3D crest alignment and a sinuous crest. Measurements of velocity were made at a sampling rate of 50 Hz using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter at 350-500 points over a dune in each morphology. Three-dimensional bedforms significantly modify the flow field over a dune. Lobe shaped configurations cause lateral and vertical divergence of momentum and turbulent energy, thereby enhancing the level of turbulence compared to a 2D bedform. Saddle shaped crestlines cause lateral and vertical convergence of momentum and turbulent energy towards a small area in the lee, thereby reducing the level of turbulence. Other bedform morphologies (regular, irregular and sinuous crests) exhibited characteristics of both lobes and saddles, but the net effect was to reduce levels of turbulence. Total drag, calculated from spatially averaged Reynolds stress profiles, can be enhanced or reduced by as much as 50 %. These results suggest that current conceptions of bedforms

  15. Analysis of thoracic aorta hemodynamics using 3D particle tracking velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Diego; Gülan, Utku; Di Stefano, Antonietta; Ponzini, Raffaele; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2014-09-22

    Parallel to the massive use of image-based computational hemodynamics to study the complex flow establishing in the human aorta, the need for suitable experimental techniques and ad hoc cases for the validation and benchmarking of numerical codes has grown more and more. Here we present a study where the 3D pulsatile flow in an anatomically realistic phantom of human ascending aorta is investigated both experimentally and computationally. The experimental study uses 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to characterize the flow field in vitro, while finite volume method is applied to numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the same domain, under the same conditions. Our findings show that there is an excellent agreement between computational and measured flow fields during the forward flow phase, while the agreement is poorer during the reverse flow phase. In conclusion, here we demonstrate that 3D PTV is very suitable for a detailed study of complex unsteady flows as in aorta and for validating computational models of aortic hemodynamics. In a future step, it will be possible to take advantage from the ability of 3D PTV to evaluate velocity fluctuations and, for this reason, to gain further knowledge on the process of transition to turbulence occurring in the thoracic aorta.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Particle Deagglomeration using Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köksoy, Çaǧatay; Ertunç, Özgür; Hüttner, Sebastian; Wachtel, Herbert; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    The effect of turbulence on powder aerosol deagglomeration was investigated. Two impinging jets were used to generate turbulence. Lactose particles, whose fully dispersed fine particle fraction (FPF) - number percentage of the particles whose diameter smaller than 5 μm- is above 90 %, were applied as aerosol powder. The particle size distribution after the dispersion unit were measured by using phase Doppler anemometer (PDA) and turbulence level were quantified at the impingement point of two jets with laser Doppler anemometer. As the turbulence level increases turbulent time and length scales decrease, and the ratio of fine particle fraction (FPF) increases from 36% to 86%.

  17. Multigrid acceleration and turbulence models for computations of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for the calculation of three-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow. Turbulence closure is achieved with either the standard k-epsilon model or a Reynolds Stress Model (RSM). Multigrid acceleration enables convergence rates which are far superior to that for a single grid method. With the k-epsilon model the rate approaches that for laminar flow, but with RSM it is somewhat slower. The increased stiffness of the system of equations in the latter may be responsible. Computed results with both turbulence models are compared with experimental data for a pair of opposed jets in crossflow. Both models yield reasonable agreement with mean flow velocity but RSM yields better prediction of the Reynolds stresses.

  18. Height-dependent transition from 3-D to 2-D turbulence in the hurricane boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, David; Zhang, Jun A.

    2013-04-01

    Here we show, from in situ aircraft measurements in the hurricane boundary layer, a height-dependent transition of the flow from 3-D to 2-D turbulence. This marks a fundamental change in the energy dynamics of the hurricane boundary layer due to the fact that in 3-D, energy flows downscale from larger to smaller scales, whereas in 2-D, it flows upscale, from smaller to larger scales. These results represent the first measurement of the 2-D upscale energy flux in the atmosphere and also the first to characterize the transition from 3-D to 2-D. It is shown that the large-scale parent vortex may gain energy directly from small scales in tropical cyclones.

  19. Inverse cascades sustained by the transfer rate of angular momentum in a 3D turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Lopez-Caballero, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    The existence of energy cascades as signatures of conserved magnitudes is one of the universal characteristics of turbulent flows. In this work we present the evidence of an inverse cascade in a fully developed 3D experimental turbulent flow where the conserved magnitude is the angular momentum. We analyze the behavior of a fluid in a closed cavity where two inhomogeneous and strongly turbulent flows collide in a thin region. The experimental volume is a closed cylinder (diameter of 20 cm) where two impellers rotate in opposite directions. A key characteristic of this setup the high stability of the propellers (the instantaneous fluctuations are below 0 . 1 %). We have performed PIV and LDA measurements of the velocity fields. Typical characteristics of the turbulent flow in this setup are: turbulence intensity 50 % , the Reλ = 900 , the Taylor microscale λT = 1 . 8 mm and the integral scale LI = 15 mm. The analysis of the data series reveal that below the injection scales an inverse cascade can be identified (-1/3 in time, -7/3 in space) that can be explained as the transfer of angular momentum between the diferent fluid layers. A. de la Torre, J. Burguete, Phys Rev Lett 99 (2007) 054101. M. Lopez-Caballero, J. Burguete, Phys Rev Lett 110 (2013) 124501.

  20. Numerical study of elastic turbulence in a 3D curvilinear micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongna; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Li, Fengchen

    2012-11-01

    Elastic turbulence is an intriguing phenomenon of viscoelastic fluid flow, and dominated by the strong nonlinear elasticity due to the existence of flexible microstructures. It implies the possibility to generate a turbulent state (so-called an elastic turbulence) in the micro-scale devices by introducing the viscoelastic fluids, which could significantly enhance the mixing efficiency therein. Several experiments have been carried out to study its characteristics and underlying physics. However, the difficulty in measuring the flow information and behaviors of the microstructures, especially in the cross section normal to the mean flow direction, limits our current understanding and controlling. In the present study, the nondimensionalization method in which the characteristic velocity is defined as the ratio of the solution viscosity to the width of the channel was adopted to simulate the elastic turbulence in the micro-scale devices. And the elastic turbulent flow was obtained numerically in the 3D curvilinear micro-channel. Therein, the characteristics of the velocity field and polymer's behavior are discussed. Moreover, the energy transfer between the kinetic energy and the polymer's elastic energy is also investigated to understand its physical mechanism. Supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science research fellowship and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology via `Energy Science in the Age of Global Warming' of Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051).

  1. Evidence of toroidally localized turbulence with applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-21

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agreesmore » qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. In conclusion, these processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.« less

  2. Evidence of Toroidally Localized Turbulence with Applied 3D Fields in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agrees qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. These processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.

  3. TIME-DEPENDENT PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF FAST CHARGED PARTICLES IN A TURBULENT MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fraschetti, F.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2011-06-20

    We present an analytic derivation of the temporal dependence of the perpendicular transport coefficient of charged particles in magnetostatic turbulence, for times smaller than the time needed for charged particles to travel the turbulence correlation length. This time window is left unexplored in most transport models. In our analysis all magnetic scales are taken to be much larger than the particle gyroradius, so that perpendicular transport is assumed to be dominated by the guiding center motion. Particle drift from the local magnetic field lines (MFLs) and magnetic field line random walk are evaluated separately for slab and three-dimensional (3D) isotropic turbulence. Contributions of wavelength scales shorter and longer than the turbulence coherence length are compared. In contrast to the slab case, particles in 3D isotropic turbulence unexpectedly diffuse from local MFLs; this result questions the common assumption that particle magnetization is independent of turbulence geometry. Extensions of this model will allow for a study of solar wind anisotropies.

  4. Insights from a 3-D temperature sensors mooring on stratified ocean turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haren, Hans; Cimatoribus, Andrea A.; Cyr, Frédéric; Gostiaux, Louis

    2016-05-01

    A unique small-scale 3-D mooring array has been designed consisting of five parallel lines, 100 m long and 4 m apart, and holding up to 550 high-resolution temperature sensors. It is built for quantitative studies on the evolution of stratified turbulence by internal wave breaking in geophysical flows at scales which go beyond that of a laboratory. Here we present measurements from above a steep slope of Mount Josephine, NE Atlantic where internal wave breaking occurs regularly. Vertical and horizontal coherence spectra show an aspect ratio of 0.25-0.5 near the buoyancy frequency, evidencing anisotropy. At higher frequencies, the transition to isotropy (aspect ratio of 1) is found within the inertial subrange. Above the continuous turbulence spectrum in this subrange, isolated peaks are visible that locally increase the spectral width, in contrast with open ocean spectra. Their energy levels are found to be proportional to the tidal energy level.

  5. The 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  6. 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  7. Field structure of collapsing wave packets in 3D strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Robinson, P. A.; Goldman, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple model is constructed for the electric fields in the collapsing wave packets found in 3D simulations of driven and damped isotropic strong Langmuir turbulence. This model, based on a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the electrostatic potential, accounts for the distribution of wave-packet shapes observed in the simulations, particularly the predominance of oblate wave packets. In contrast with predictions for undamped and undriven subsonic collapse of scalar fields, oblate vector-field wave packets do not flatten during collapse but, instead, remain approximately self-similar and rigid.

  8. 3D outflow jets originating from turbulence in the reconnection current layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    Satellite observations in the Earth's magnetosphere and in solar flares have suggested that the reconnection outflow jets are fully three dimensional, consisting of a series of narrow channels. The jet structure is important in evaluating the energy and flux transport in the reconnection process. Previous theoretical models based on fluid simulations have relied on patchy reconnection where reconnection takes place predominantly in patchy portions of the current layer. The problem of the previous models is that the gross reconnection rate is much smaller than that in the 2D reconnection case. The present study shows a large-scale 3D PIC simulation revealing that the 3D outflow jets are generated through the 3D flux ropes formed in the turbulent electron current layer around the x-line. Reconnection proceeds almost uniformly along the x-line, so that the gross reconnection rate is comparable to that in the 2D reconnection case. The flux ropes and resultant outflow channels have a typical current-aligned scale provided by the wavelength of an electron shear mode that is much larger than the typical kinetic scales. It is found that the structure of the 3D outflow jets obtained in the simulation is consistent with the bursty bulk flow observed in the Earth's magnetotail.

  9. Experimental Investigation of the Near Wall Flow Structure of a Low Reynolds Number 3-D Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. L.; Simpson, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements and hydrogen bubble flow visualization techniques were used to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over a range of low Reynolds numbers. The goals of this research were (1) an increased understanding of the flow physics in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers,(2) to observe and quantify differences between 2D and 3D TBL flow structures, and (3) to document Reynolds number effects for 3D TBLs. The LDV data have provided results detailing the turbulence structure of the 2D and 3D TBLs. These results include mean Reynolds stress distributions, flow skewing results, and U and V spectra. Effects of Reynolds number for the 3D flow were also examined. Comparison to results with the same 3D flow geometry but at a significantly higher Reynolds number provided unique insight into the structure of 3D TBLs. While the 3D mean and fluctuating velocities were found to be highly dependent on Reynolds number, a previously defined shear stress parameter was discovered to be invariant with Reynolds number. The hydrogen bubble technique was used as a flow visualization tool to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D TBLs. Both the quantitative and qualitative results displayed larger turbulent fluctuations with more highly concentrated vorticity regions for the 2D flow.

  10. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Choudhary, A.; de Supinski, B.; DeVries, M.; Hawkes, E. R.; Klasky, S.; Liao, W. K.; Ma, K. L.; Mellor-Crummey, J.; Podhorszki, N.; Sankaran, R.; Shende, S.; Yoo, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air coflow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  11. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D.

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Mellor-Crummy, J.; DeVries, M.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Ma, K. L.; Podhorski, N.; Liao, W. K.; Klasky, S.; de Supinski, B.; Choudhary, A.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-08-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air co-flow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  12. Single particle measurements of material line stretching in turbulence: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramel, Stefan; Tympel, Saskia; Toschi, Federico; Voth, Greg

    2015-11-01

    We find that particles in the shape of chiral dipoles display a preferential rotation direction in three dimensional isotropic turbulence. The particles consist of two helical ends with opposite chirality that are connected by a straight rod. They are fabricated using 3D printing and have an aspect ratio of 10 and a length in the inertial range of our flow between oscillating grids. Due to their high aspect ratio, they move like material lines. Because material lines align with the extentional eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor they experience a mean stretching in turbulence. The stretching of a chiral dipole produces a rotation about the dipole axis and so chiral dipoles experience a non-zero mean spinning rate in turbulence. These results provide a first direct experimental measurement of the rate of material line stretching in turbulence.

  13. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  14. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  15. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating. PMID:25215682

  16. 3-D PARTICLE TRANSPORT WITHIN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study trajectories of inhaled particulate matter (PM) were simulated within a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the human upper respiratory tract (URT). The airways were described by computer-reconstructed images of a silicone rubber cast of the human head, throat...

  17. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chau, C.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Costa, S.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D`Alessandro, R.; de Boer, W.; Dehning, B.; Dobos, D.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gonella, L.; Gorišek, A.; Graber, L.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; McFadden, N.; McGoldrick, G.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Oh, A.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sapinski, M.; Scaringella, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Schreiner, T.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shimchuk, G.; Smith, D. S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weilhammer, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, results towards the development of a 3D diamond sensor are presented. Conductive channels are produced inside the sensor bulk using a femtosecond laser. This electrode geometry allows full charge collection even for low quality diamond sensors. Results from testbeam show that charge is collected by these electrodes. In order to understand the channel growth parameters, with the goal of producing low resistivity channels, the conductive channels produced with a different laser setup are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  19. Dual wavelength digital holography for 3D particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grare, S.; Coëtmellec, S.,; Allano, D.; Grehan, G.; Brunel, M.; Lebrun, D.

    2015-02-01

    A multi-exposure digital in-line hologram of a moving particle field is recorded by two different wavelengths and at different times. As a result, during the reconstruction step, each hologram can be independently and accurately reconstructed for each wavelength. This procedure enables avoiding the superimposition of particles images that may be close to each other in multi-exposure holography. The feasibility is demonstrated by using a standard particle sizing reticle and shows the potential of this method for particle velocity measurement.

  20. 3D MHD SIMULATION OF FLARE SUPRA-ARCADE DOWNFLOWS IN A TURBULENT CURRENT SHEET MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Cécere, M.; Zurbriggen, E.; Costa, A.; Schneiter, M.

    2015-07-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) are sunward, generally dark, plasma density depletions originated above posteruption flare arcades. In this paper, using 3D MHD simulations we investigate whether the SAD cavities can be produced by a direct combination of the tearing mode and Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities leading to a turbulent current sheet (CS) medium or if the current sheet is merely the background where SADs are produced, triggered by an impulsive deposition of energy. We find that to give an account of the observational dark lane structures an addition of local energy, provided by a reconnection event, is required. We suggest that there may be a closed relation between characteristic SAD sizes and CS widths that must be satisfied to obtain an observable SAD.

  1. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  2. Implementation of a kappa-epsilon turbulence model to RPLUS3D code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, Tawit

    1992-01-01

    The RPLUS3D code has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) project. The code has the ability to solve three dimensional flowfields with finite rate combustion of hydrogen and air. The combustion process of the hydrogen-air system are simulated by an 18 reaction path, 8 species chemical kinetic mechanism. The code uses a Lower-Upper (LU) decomposition numerical algorithm as its basis, making it a very efficient and robust code. Except for the Jacobian matrix for the implicit chemistry source terms, there is no inversion of a matrix even though a fully implicit numerical algorithm is used. A k-epsilon turbulence model has recently been incorporated into the code. Initial validations have been conducted for a flow over a flat plate. Results of the validation studies are shown. Some difficulties in implementing the k-epsilon equations to the code are also discussed.

  3. A 3D MHD Model of the Solar Wind Driven by Turbulence Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, R.; Downs, C.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Velli, M. M.; Verdini, A.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms responsible for heating the Sun's corona and accelerating the solar wind are still actively investigated. However, it is largely accepted that photospheric motions provide the energy source and that the magnetic field must play a key role in the process. Verdini et al. (2010) presented a model for heating and accelerating the solar wind based on the turbulent dissipation of Alfven waves. We first use our time-dependent model of the solar wind to reproduce Verdini et al's solution; then we extend its application to the case when the energy equation includes thermal conduction and radiation losses, and the upper chromosphere is part of the computational domain. Finally, we show application of this formulation to our 3D MHD model of the solar corona and the solar wind.

  4. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s‑1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  5. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s-1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  6. 3-D spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  7. 3-D Spreadsheet Simulation of a Modern Particle Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  8. Decaying versus stationary turbulence in particle-laden isotropic turbulence: Heavy particle statistics modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsamie, Abouelmagd H.; Lee, Changhoon

    2013-03-01

    The current paper examines the heavy particle statistics modification by two-way interaction in particle-laden isotropic turbulence in an attempt to interpret their statistics modification using the information of modulated turbulence. Moreover, we clarify the distinctions of this modification between decaying and stationary turbulence as an extension of our previous work [A. H. Abdelsamie and C. Lee, "Decaying versus stationary turbulence in particle-laden isotropic turbulence: Turbulence modulation mechanism," Phys. Fluids 24, 015106 (2012), 10.1063/1.3678332]. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) was carried out using 1283 grid points at a Taylor micro-scale Reynolds number of Rλ ˜ 70. The effect of O(10^6) solid particles with a different Stokes number (St) was implemented as a point-force approximation in the Navier-Stokes equation. Various statistics associated with particle dispersion are investigated, and the auto-correlations models which was provided by Jung et al. ["Behavior of heavy particles in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Rev. E 77, 016307 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.016307] are extended in the current paper. DNS results reveal that the two-way coupling interaction enhances the fluid and heavy particle auto-correlation functions and the alignment between their velocity vectors for all Stokes numbers in decaying and stationary turbulence, but for different reasons. The modification mechanisms of particle dispersion statistics in stationary turbulence are different from those in decaying turbulence depending on the Stokes number, particularly for St <1.

  9. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  10. 3D reconstruction and particle acceleration properties of Coronal Shock Waves During Powerful Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Vourlidas, Angelos; Tylka, Allan J.; Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Tirole, Margot

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the physical mechanisms that produce the most energetic particles is a long-standing observational and theoretical challenge in astrophysics. Strong pressure waves have been proposed as efficient accelerators both in the solar and astrophysical contexts via various mechanisms such as diffusive-shock/shock-drift acceleration and betatron effects. In diffusive-shock acceleration, the efficacy of the process relies on shock waves being super-critical or moving several times faster than the characteristic speed of the medium they propagate through (a high Alfven Mach number) and on the orientation of the magnetic field upstream of the shock front. High-cadence, multipoint imaging using the NASA STEREO, SOHO and SDO spacecrafts now permits the 3-D reconstruction of pressure waves formed during the eruption of coronal mass ejections. Using these unprecedented capabilities, some recent studies have provided new insights on the timing and longitudinal extent of solar energetic particles, including the first derivations of the time-dependent 3-dimensional distribution of the expansion speed and Mach numbers of coronal shock waves. We will review these recent developments by focusing on particle events that occurred between 2011 and 2015. These new techniques also provide the opportunity to investigate the enigmatic long-duration gamma ray events.

  11. Numerical simulation of turbulent particle diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocksell, Todd Leslie

    Understanding particle diffusion and dispersion in multi-phase flows is important to a variety of engineering environments. In the present study, a Continuous Random Walk (CRW) model was constructed that can predict turbulent particle diffusion based on commonly available turbulence statistical correlations that may be obtained with Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (BANS) solutions. To evaluate this model, several test flows were considered including a theoretical channel flow, a wake flow, a jet flow, and a turbulent boundary layer. For the first three flows it was shown that proper correction of the Markov chain velocity fluctuations involving gradients in turbulence intensity significantly improved solution accuracy. For the turbulent boundary layer simulations, the flow is significantly more inhomogeneous (high gradients of turbulent kinetic energy and integral time-scale near the wall) and significantly more anisotropic (the root-mean-square of the velocity perturbations differs by several-fold depending on the direction). The particles were injected in the near-wall region for a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and mean particle concentration profiles are obtained without the empiricism associated with RANS methods (turbulence modeling) or uncertainties associated with experiments (near-wall resolution difficulties). These results were compared to the CRW predictions that employed the mean turbulent statistics measured from the DNS results, so that a self-consistent comparison could be made. To accurately simulate particles in wall-bounded flows with the CRW model, a modified Markov chain based on a normalized velocity fluctuation was found to be important to avoid unphysical wall-ward particle fluxes. Also, the incremental drift velocity for the Markov chain (required for inhomogeneous turbulent flows) was extended to include effects of particle inertia and virtual mass to enable simulation for a wide range of Stokes numbers. The CRW results with the finite

  12. MODELING STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS THROUGH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF 3D-MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Mueller, Wolf-Christian

    2013-09-01

    Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the active regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and several other instruments. This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves, and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ({zeta}{sub p}) of the order of the structure functions (p) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper, we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al. with the log-Poisson model used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustained by forcing, freely decaying, and a flow initially driven and later allowed to decay (case 3). The respective DNS replicate the properties seen in the plots of {zeta}{sub p} against p of ARs. We also reproduce the trends and changes observed in intermittency in flatness and correlation functions of ARs. It is suggested from this analysis that an AR in the onset phase of a flare can be treated as a forced 3D-MHD turbulent system in its simplest form and that the flaring stage is representative of decaying 3D-MHD turbulence. It is also inferred that significant changes in intermittency from the initial onset phase of a flare to its final peak flaring phase are related to the time taken by the system to reach the initial onset phase.

  13. Characterizing heterogeneity among virus particles by stochastic 3D signal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Gong, Yunye; Wang, Qiu; Zheng, Yili; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-09-01

    In single-particle cryo electron microscopy, many electron microscope images each of a single instance of a biological particle such as a virus or a ribosome are measured and the 3-D electron scattering intensity of the particle is reconstructed by computation. Because each instance of the particle is imaged separately, it should be possible to characterize the heterogeneity of the different instances of the particle as well as a nominal reconstruction of the particle. In this paper, such an algorithm is described and demonstrated on the bacteriophage Hong Kong 97. The algorithm is a statistical maximum likelihood estimator computed by an expectation maximization algorithm implemented in Matlab software.

  14. Test Particles, Test Modes and Drift Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    2008-10-15

    Strong electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by trapping or eddying of test particle trajectories produced by the ExB stochastic drift. Trapping is shown to produce non-standard statistics of trajectories: non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects and quasi-coherence. Two types of effects produced by trapping are analyzed. The first type concerns particle and energy transport and consists in very strong nonlinear modification of the diffusion coefficients. Anomalous diffusion regimes are obtained when the other components of the motion (particle collisions, plasma rotation, the motion along the confining magnetic field) do not destroy trajectory eddying. The second type of effects are evidenced by studying test modes on turbulent plasma. We show that trappyng provides the physical mechanism for the inverse cascade observed in drift turbulence.

  15. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  16. Particle-based optical pressure sensors for 3D pressure mapping.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Niladri; Xie, Yan; Chalaseni, Sandeep; Mastrangelo, Carlos H

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents particle-based optical pressure sensors for in-flow pressure sensing, especially for microfluidic environments. Three generations of pressure sensitive particles have been developed- flat planar particles, particles with integrated retroreflectors and spherical microballoon particles. The first two versions suffer from pressure measurement dependence on particles orientation in 3D space and angle of interrogation. The third generation of microspherical particles with spherical symmetry solves these problems making particle-based manometry in microfluidic environment a viable and efficient methodology. Static and dynamic pressure measurements have been performed in liquid medium for long periods of time in a pressure range of atmospheric to 40 psi. Spherical particles with radius of 12 μm and balloon-wall thickness of 0.5 μm are effective for more than 5 h in this pressure range with an error of less than 5%.

  17. Secondary reconnection, energisation and turbulence in dipolarisation fronts: results of a 3D kinetic simulation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DF) are formed by reconnection outflows interacting with the pre-existing environment. These regions are host of important energy exchanges [1], particle acceleration [2] and a complex structure and evolution [3]. Our recent work has investigated these regions via fully kinetic 3D simulations [4]. As reported recently on Nature Physics [3], based on 3D fully kinetic simulations started with a well defined x-line, we observe that in the DF reconnection transitions towards a more chaotic regime. In the fronts an instability devel- ops caused by the local gradients of the density and by the unfavourable acceleration and field line curvature. The consequence is the break up of the fronts in a fashion similar to the classical fluid Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the formation of "fingers" of plasma and embedded magnetic fields. These fingers interact and produce secondary reconnection sites. We present several different diagnostics that prove the existence of these secondary reconnection sites. Each site is surrounded by its own electron diffusion region. At the fronts the ions are generally not magnetized and considerable ion slippage is present. The discovery we present is that electrons are also slipping, forming localized diffusion regions near secondary reconnection sites [1]. The consequence of this discovery is twofold. First, the instability in the fronts has strong energetic implications. We observe that the energy transfer locally is very strong, an order of magnitude stronger than in the "X" line. However, this energy transfer is of both signs as it is natural for a wavy rippling with regions of magnetic to kinetic and regions of kinetic to magnetic energy conversion. Second, and most important for this session, is that MMS should not limit the search for electron diffusion regions to the location marked with X in all reconnection cartoons. Our simulations predict more numerous and perhaps more easily measurable electron diffusion

  18. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  19. PAB3D: Its History in the Use of Turbulence Models in the Simulation of Jet and Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Pao, S. Paul; Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2006-01-01

    This is a review paper for PAB3D s history in the implementation of turbulence models for simulating jet and nozzle flows. We describe different turbulence models used in the simulation of subsonic and supersonic jet and nozzle flows. The time-averaged simulations use modified linear or nonlinear two-equation models to account for supersonic flow as well as high temperature mixing. Two multiscale-type turbulence models are used for unsteady flow simulations. These models require modifications to the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The first scheme is a hybrid RANS/LES model utilizing the two-equation (k-epsilon) model with a RANS/LES transition function, dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) formulation. All of these models are implemented in the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code PAB3D. This paper discusses computational methods, code implementation, computed results for a wide range of nozzle configurations at various operating conditions, and comparisons with available experimental data. Very good agreement is shown between the numerical solutions and available experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

  20. Interactions of Copepods with Fractal-Grid Generated Turbulence based on Tomo-PIV and 3D-PTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhengzhong; Krizan, Daniel; Longmire, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    A copepod escapes from predation by sensing fluid motion caused by the predator. It is thought that the escape reaction is elicited by a threshold value of the maximum principal strain rate (MPSR) in the flow. The present experimental work attempts to investigate and quantify the MPSR threshold value. In the experiment, copepods interact with turbulence generated by a fractal grid in a recirculating channel. The turbulent flow is measured by time-resolved Tomo-PIV, while the copepod motion is tracked simultaneously through 3D-PTV. Escape reactions are detected based on copepod trajectories and velocity vectors, while the surrounding hydrodynamic information is retrieved from the corresponding location in the 3D instantaneous flow field. Measurements are performed at three locations downstream of the fractal grid, such that various turbulence levels can be achieved. Preliminary results show that the number of escape reactions decreases at locations with reduced turbulence levels, where shorter jump distances and smaller change of swimming orientation are exhibited. Detailed quantitative results of MPSR threshold values and the dynamics of copepod escape will be presented. Supported by NSF-IDBR Grant #0852875.

  1. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  2. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  3. Explosive Particle Dispersion in Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servidio, S.; Haynes, C. T.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Burgess, D.; Carbone, V.; Veltri, P.

    2016-08-01

    Particle dynamics are investigated in plasma turbulence, using self-consistent kinetic simulations, in two dimensions. In the steady state, the trajectories of single protons and proton pairs are studied, at different values of plasma β (ratio between kinetic and magnetic pressure). For single-particle displacements, results are consistent with fluids and magnetic field line dynamics, where particles undergo normal diffusion for very long times, with higher β 's being more diffusive. In an intermediate time range, with separations lying in the inertial range, particles experience an explosive dispersion in time, consistent with the Richardson prediction. These results, obtained for the first time with a self-consistent kinetic model, are relevant for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, where turbulence is crucial for heating, mixing, and acceleration processes.

  4. Explosive Particle Dispersion in Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Servidio, S; Haynes, C T; Matthaeus, W H; Burgess, D; Carbone, V; Veltri, P

    2016-08-26

    Particle dynamics are investigated in plasma turbulence, using self-consistent kinetic simulations, in two dimensions. In the steady state, the trajectories of single protons and proton pairs are studied, at different values of plasma β (ratio between kinetic and magnetic pressure). For single-particle displacements, results are consistent with fluids and magnetic field line dynamics, where particles undergo normal diffusion for very long times, with higher β's being more diffusive. In an intermediate time range, with separations lying in the inertial range, particles experience an explosive dispersion in time, consistent with the Richardson prediction. These results, obtained for the first time with a self-consistent kinetic model, are relevant for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, where turbulence is crucial for heating, mixing, and acceleration processes. PMID:27610862

  5. Bidirectional inward migration of particles lagging behind a Poiseuille flow in a rectangular microchannel for 3D particle focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Won; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2015-02-01

    Electrophoretic mobility of particles dispersed in an electrolyte solution induces the particles to lag behind a Poiseuille flow in a rectangular microchannel, which causes bidirectional inward migration of particles to the central axis of the channel. As a result, in the present theoretical and experimental study, three-dimensional (3D) particle focusing is clearly realized in such a manner that the particles are aligned in a single file along the axis of the channel as they are transported downstream. Theoretical prediction on the particle migration time provides an excellent assessment of the experimental results. The method proposed in the present study has potential for development of low-cost rapid manufacturing process of sheathless monolayer microchips for 3D particle focusing.

  6. Particle Acceleration and Heating by Turbulent Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker–Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  7. Particle Acceleration and Heating by Turbulent Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  8. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  9. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals. PMID:21503074

  10. Examining In-Cloud Convective Turbulence in Relation to Total Lightning and the 3D Wind Field of Severe Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momar, S. A.; Deierling, W.; Williams, J. K.; Hoffman, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Convectively induced turbulence (CIT) is commonly listed as a cause or factor in weather-related commercial aviation accidents. In-cloud CIT is generated in part by shears between convective updrafts and downdrafts. Total lightning is also dependent on a robust updraft and the resulting storm electrification. The relationship between total lightning and turbulence could prove useful in operational aviation settings with the use of future measurements from the geostationary lightning mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-R satellite. Providing nearly hemispheric coverage of total lightning, the GLM could help identify CIT in otherwise data-sparse locations. For a severe thunderstorm case on 7 June 2012 in northeast Colorado, in-cloud eddy dissipation rate estimates from the NCAR/NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm were compared with cloud electrification data from the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array and radar products from the Denver, Colorado WSR-88D. These comparisons showed that high concentrations of very high frequency (VHF) source densities emitted by lightning occurred near and downstream of the storm's convective core. Severe turbulence was also shown to occur near this area, extending near the melting level of the storm and spreading upward and outward. Additionally, increases/decreases in VHF sources and turbulence volumes occurred within a few minutes of each other; although, light turbulence was shown to increase near one storm's dissipation. This may be due to increased shear from the now downdraft dominate storm. The 3D wind field from this case, obtained by either a dual-Doppler or a Variational Doppler Radar Assimilation System (VDRAS) analysis, will also be examined to further study the relationships between total lightning and thunderstorm kinematics. If these results prove to be robust, lightning may serve as a strong indicator of the location of moderate or greater turbulence.

  11. Nondestructive optical testing of 3D disperse systems with micro- and nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukova, Alexandra G.

    2005-04-01

    Nondestructive testing and analysis of three-dimensional (3D) disperse systems (DS) with micro- and nano-particles of different nature by complex of optical compatible methods can provide further progress in on-line control of water and air. The simultaneous analysis of 3D-DS by refractometry, absorbency, fluorescence and by different types of light scattering can help to elaborate the sensing elements for specific impurity control. In our research we have investigated by complex of optical methods different 3D-DS such as: proteins, nucleoproteids, lipoproteids, liposomes, viruses, virosomes, lipid emulsions, blood substitutes, latexes, liquid crystals, biological cells with various form and size (including bacterial cells), metallic powders, clays, kimberlites, zeolites, oils, crude oils, etc., and mixtures -- proteins with nucleic acids, liposomes and viruses, liquid crystals with surfactants, mixtures of clay with bacterial cells, samples of natural and water-supply waters, etc. This experience suggests that the set of optical parameters of so called second class is unique for each 3D-DS. In another words each DS can be characterized by n-dimensional vector in n-dimensional space of optical parameters. Mixtures can be considered as polycomponent and polymodal 3D-DS (such as natural water and air). Due to the fusion of various optical data it is possible to indicate by information statistical theory the inverse physical problem on the presence of impurities in mixtures (viruses, bacteria, oil, metallic particles, etc.), and in this case polymodality of particle size distribution is not an obstacle. Bank of optical data for 3D-DS is the base for analysis by information-statistical method.

  12. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  13. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  14. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  15. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  16. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  17. Transition to Turbulence and Effect of Initial Conditions on 3D Compressible Mixing in Planar Blast-wave-driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M J; Greenough, J A

    2004-11-08

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams, 9(2), 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multi-physics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J.A. Greenough, J. Comp. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pre-transition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernova are discussed.

  18. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting 3-D Turbulent Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.

    1996-01-01

    A method Is presented for solving turbulent flow problems on three-dimensional unstructured grids. Spatial discretization Is accomplished by a cell-centered finite-volume formulation using an accurate lin- ear reconstruction scheme and upwind flux differencing. Time is advanced by an implicit backward- Euler time-stepping scheme. Flow turbulence effects are modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, which is coupled with a wall function to reduce the number of cells in the sublayer region of the boundary layer. A systematic assessment of the method is presented to devise guidelines for more strategic application of the technology to complex problems. The assessment includes the accuracy In predictions of skin-friction coefficient, law-of-the-wall behavior, and surface pressure for a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer, and for the ONERA M6 wing under a high Reynolds number, transonic, separated flow condition.

  19. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting 3-D Turbulent Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented for solving turbulent flow problems on three-dimensional unstructured grids. Spatial discretization is accomplished by a cell-centered finite-volume formulation using an accurate linear reconstruction scheme and upwind flux differencing. Time is advanced by an implicit backward-Euler time-stepping scheme. Flow turbulence effects are modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, which is coupled with a wall function to reduce the number of cells in the sublayer region of the boundary layer. A systematic assessment of the method is presented to devise guidelines for more strategic application of the technology to complex problems. The assessment includes the accuracy in predictions of skin-friction coefficient, law-of-the-wall behavior, and surface pressure for a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer, and for the ONERA M6 wing under a high Reynolds number, transonic, separated flow condition.

  20. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2008-09-07

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm{sup 3}) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  1. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, T.; Annaratone, B. M.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-09-01

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm3) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  2. Numerical solution of 2D and 3D turbulent internal flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Naixing; Xu, Yanji

    1991-08-01

    The paper describes a method for solving numerically two-dimensional or axisymmetric, and three-dimensional turbulent internal flow problems. The method is based on an implicit upwinding relaxation scheme with an arbitrarily shaped conservative control volume. The compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a two-equation turbulence model. All these equations are expressed by using a nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. The method is applied to study the compressible internal flow in modern power installations. It has been observed that predictions for two-dimensional and three-dimensional channels show very good agreement with experimental results.

  3. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  4. Summary of EASM Turbulence Models in CFL3D With Validation Test Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Explicit Algebraic Stress Model in k-omega form (EASM-ko) and in k-epsilon form (EASM-ke) in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D. These models have been actively used over the last several years in CFL3D, and have undergone some minor modifications during that time. Details of the equations and method for coding the latest versions of the models are given, and numerous validation cases are presented. This paper serves as a validation archive for these models.

  5. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2016-03-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  6. Lagrangian 3D particle tracking in high-speed flows: Shake-The-Box for multi-pulse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Schanz, Daniel; Reuther, Nico; Kähler, Christian J.; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The Shake-The-Box (STB) particle tracking technique, recently introduced for time-resolved 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) images, is applied here to data from a multi-pulse investigation of a turbulent boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradient in air at 36 m/s ( Re τ = 10,650). The multi-pulse acquisition strategy allows for the recording of four-pulse long time-resolved sequences with a time separation of a few microseconds. The experimental setup consists of a dual-imaging system and a dual-double-cavity laser emitting orthogonal polarization directions to separate the four pulses. The STB particle triangulation and tracking strategy is adapted here to cope with the limited amount of realizations available along the time sequence and to take advantage of the ghost track reduction offered by the use of two independent imaging systems. Furthermore, a correction scheme to compensate for camera vibrations is discussed, together with a method to accurately identify the position of the wall within the measurement domain. Results show that approximately 80,000 tracks can be instantaneously reconstructed within the measurement volume, enabling the evaluation of both dense velocity fields, suitable for spatial gradients evaluation, and highly spatially resolved boundary layer profiles. Turbulent boundary layer profiles obtained from ensemble averaging of the STB tracks are compared to results from 2D-PIV and long-range micro particle tracking velocimetry; the comparison shows the capability of the STB approach in delivering accurate results across a wide range of scales.

  7. Instability, turbulence, and 3D magnetic reconnection in a line-tied, zero net current screw pinch.

    PubMed

    Brookhart, Matthew I; Stemo, Aaron; Zuberbier, Amanda; Zweibel, Ellen; Forest, Cary B

    2015-04-10

    This Letter reports the first experimental investigation into a line-tied plasma with a reversed current profile. Discrete current sources create a cylindrical plasma equilibrium with an axial field and zero net current. Detailed magnetic measurements show that an internal m=1 mode with no external character grows exponentially. The nonlinear evolution of the mode drives 3D reconnection events that reorganize the plasma equilibrium. The plasma is turbulent and exhibits reconnection events on a range of scales. These data are consistent with recent simulations of coronal loops and the nanoflare coronal heating mechanism. PMID:25910129

  8. Ultra-high-speed 3D astigmatic particle tracking velocimetry: application to particle-laden supersonic impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Cierpka, C.; Kähler, C. J.; Soria, J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper demonstrates ultra-high-speed three-component, three-dimensional (3C3D) velocity measurements of micron-sized particles suspended in a supersonic impinging jet flow. Understanding the dynamics of individual particles in such flows is important for the design of particle impactors for drug delivery or cold gas dynamic spray processing. The underexpanded jet flow is produced via a converging nozzle, and micron-sized particles ( d p = 110 μm) are introduced into the gas flow. The supersonic jet impinges onto a flat surface, and the particle impact velocity and particle impact angle are studied for a range of flow conditions and impingement distances. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high-speed digital camera (Shimadzu HPV-1) capable of recording rates of up to 1 Mfps. Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is used to measure the 3D particle position (Cierpka et al., Meas Sci Technol 21(045401):13, 2010) by coding the particle depth location in the 2D images by adding a cylindrical lens to the high-speed imaging system. Based on the reconstructed 3D particle positions, the particle trajectories are obtained via a higher-order tracking scheme that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution to increase robustness and accuracy of the measurement. It is shown that the particle velocity and impingement angle are affected by the gas flow in a manner depending on the nozzle pressure ratio and stand-off distance where higher pressure ratios and stand-off distances lead to higher impact velocities and larger impact angles.

  9. 3D monolithically stacked CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for particle position and direction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Passeri, D.; Morozzi, A.; Magalotti, D.; Piperku, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we propose a 3D monolithically stacked, multi-layer detectors based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) layers which allows at the same time accurate estimation of the impact point and of the incidence angle an ionizing particle. The whole system features two fully-functional CMOS APS matrix detectors, including both sensing area and control/signal elaboration circuitry, stacked in a monolithic device by means of Through Silicon Via (TSV) connections thanks to the capabilities of the CMOS vertical scale integration (3D-IC) 130 nm Chartered/Tezzaron technology. In order to evaluate the suitability of the two layer monolithic active pixel sensor system to reconstruct particle tracks, tests with proton beams have been carried out at the INFN LABEC laboratories in Florence (Italy) with 3 MeV proton beam.

  10. Turbulent alterations to net settling rate of non-spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.; Brandt, L.; Ardekani, M.; Karp-Boss, L.; Pujara, N.

    2015-12-01

    The rate at which particles sediment out of the surface mixed layer is a major control on carbon flux in the ocean. Turbulence can change the rate at which particles escape the mixed layer but mechanisms and magnitude of effects are not well understood for aquatic particles. Here we use a 3-pronged approach to study turbulence affects on sedimentation rates of non-spherical, marine-like particles. First, we apply an orientation-based kinematic model to track particles through turbulent flow. We then use a complex numerical model that solves the dynamical equation of motion for non-spherical particles embedded in turbulent flow. Finally we use a novel 3D particle-tracking tool to measure trajectories of diatoms in a turbulent flow and test predictions from numerical models. At the time of writing, preliminary results from numerical simulations indicate turbulent-altered settling for elongated (rod-shaped) particles at size, mass, and shapes similar to those measured for marine phytoplankton.

  11. CVS Filtering of 3D Turbulent Mixing Layers Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Pellegrino, Giulio; Rogers, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) filtering has been applied to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of forced and unforced time-developing turbulent mixing layers. CVS filtering splits the turbulent flow into two orthogonal parts, one corresponding to coherent vortices and the other to incoherent background flow. We have shown that the coherent vortices can be represented by few wavelet modes and that these modes are sufficient to reproduce the vorticity probability distribution function (PDF) and the energy spectrum over the entire inertial range. The remaining incoherent background flow is homogeneous, has small amplitude, and is uncorrelated. These results are compared with those obtained for the same compression rate using large eddy simulation (LES) filtering. In contrast to the incoherent background flow of CVS filtering, the LES subgrid scales have a much larger amplitude and are correlated, which makes their statistical modeling more difficult.

  12. Resonances in the forced turbulent wake past a 3D blunt body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Diogo; Borée, Jacques; Noack, Bernd R.; Spohn, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We study the resonances of a forced turbulent wake past a flat-based bluff body using symmetric and antisymmetric actuation modes. The natural, unforced wake flow exhibits broadband dynamics superimposed on oscillatory motions linked to the reminiscent laminar Bénard-von Kármán instability in the turbulent flow. Harmonic and subharmonic resonances can be controlled by the phase relationship of periodic forcing and are linked to the symmetry properties of vortex shedding. Symmetric forcing leads to a strong subharmonic amplification of vortex shedding in the wake, but no harmonic excitation. The robustness of the subharmonic resonance is confirmed at different Reynolds numbers. Antisymmetric actuation, however, promotes a harmonic resonance with very similar wake and drag features.

  13. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  14. Blob Dynamics in 3D BOUT Simulations of Tokamak Edge Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D; D'Ippolito, D; Myra, J; Nevins, W; Xu, X

    2004-08-23

    Propagating filaments of enhanced plasma density, or blobs, observed in 3D numerical simulations of a diverted, neutral-fueled tokamak are studied. Fluctuations of vorticity, electrical potential {phi}, temperature T{sub e} and current density J{sub {parallel}} associated with the blobs have a dipole structure perpendicular to the magnetic field and propagate radially with large E {center_dot} B drift velocities (> 1 km/s). The simulation results are consistent with a 3D blob dynamics model that incorporates increased parallel plasma resistivity (from neutral cooling of the X-point region), blob disconnection from the divertor sheath, X-point closure of the current loops, and collisional physics to sustain the {phi}, T{sub e}, J{sub {parallel}} dipoles.

  15. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  16. Measurements of 3D relative locations of particles by Fourier Interferometry Imaging (FII).

    PubMed

    Briard, Paul; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Meunier-Guttin-Cluzel, Siegfried; Chen, Linghong; Cen, Kefa; Grehan, Gérard

    2011-06-20

    In a large number of physical systems formed of discrete particles, a key parameter is the relative distance between the objects, as for example in studies of spray evaporation or droplets micro-explosion. This paper is devoted to the presentation of an approach where the relative 3D location of particles in the control volume is accurately extracted from the interference patterns recorded at two different angles. No reference beam is used and only ten (2 + 8) 2D-FFT have to be computed. PMID:21716513

  17. Numerical simulation of inhaled aerosol particle deposition within 3D realistic human upper respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Fan, J. R.; Zheng, Y. Q.; Hu, G. L.; Pan, D.

    2010-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of airflow and particle deposition in the upper respiratory tract (URT) were conducted in this paper. Based on the CT (Computerized Tomography) scanned images of a 19-years-old healthy boy, a realistic geometric model of URT from oral cavity to the upper six-generation bronchial is rebuilt. To investigate airflow and particle deposition in the obtained realistic human upper respiratory tract, RNG k-ɛ turbulence model was used to describe the primary flow and particle deposition under three breathing intensity such as 15 L/min, 30 L/min and 60 L/min. The particle is tracked and analyzed in the Lagrangian frame. The velocity fields of airflow under different airflow rates were computed and discussed. In order to study the characteristics of particles movement and the effect of particles diameter on the deposition pattern, eleven kinds of sphere particles with different diameters are selected as research object. The diameters of selected particles as follows: 0.1 μm, 0.5 μm, 1 μm, 2.5 μm, 3 μm, 3.5 μm, 4 μm, 4.5 μm, 5 μm, 6.5 μm and 8 μm. The variation of inhalable particles deposition in realistic human upper respiratory tract with respiratory intensity and particle size was researched and compared. Furthermore, the more real inhalable particles with Rosin-Rammler mass distribution are used to study the effect of particles size. The deposition rate of particles with the different diameter scope in the different part of upper respiratory tract was summarized. The geometrical model based images technology promises to provide more real results of airflow field and particle deposition in the URT.

  18. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution.

  19. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution. PMID:26193484

  20. Particle-Generated Turbulence in Dispersed Homogeneous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-H.; Faeth, G. M.; Wu, J.-S.

    1998-11-01

    Homogeneous turbulence generated by uniform fluxes of monodisperse spherical particles moving through a uniform flowing gas was studied, motivated by the importance of this turbulence production mechanism for dense sprays, bubbly flows, rainstorms and the like. Measurements of phase velocities, moments, probability density functions, temporal power spectra, spatial integral scales and particle fluxes were obtained using phase-discriminating laser velocimetry and particle sampling in a counterflowing particle/air wind tunnel. Instantaneous velocity records showed that particle wake disturbances were the same as the properties of laminar-like turbulent wakes that have been observed for particle wakes at intermediate Reynolds numbers in turbulent environments. Relative turbulence intensities are proportional to the square-root of particle kinetic energy dissipation rates, in accord with simple stochastic theory. Other properties, however, exhibit complex behavior due to contributions from both particle wakes and interwake turbulence.

  1. LEWICE3D/GlennHT Particle Analysis of the Honeywell Al502 Low Pressure Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Rigby, David L.

    2015-01-01

    A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell AL502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced a rollback and another which did not rollback during testing in the Propulsion Systems Lab at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.56 ice accretion software. The flow and particle analysis used a 3D steady flow, mixing plane approach to model the transport of flow and particles through the engine. The inflow conditions for the rollback case were: airspeed, 145 ms; static pressure, 33,373 Pa; static temperature, 253.3 K. The inflow conditions for the non-roll-back case were: airspeed, 153 ms; static pressure, 34,252 Pa; static temperature, 260.1 K. Both cases were subjected to an ice particle cloud with a median volume diameter of 24 microns, an ice water content of 2.0 gm3 and a relative humidity of 100 percent. The most significant difference between the rollback and non-rollback conditions was the inflow static temperature which was 6.8 K higher for the non-rollback case.

  2. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  3. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-10-01

    Context. Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, since it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing numerical simulations have shown that α-values a few times 10-4 can be generated. Aims: The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of embedded dust particles. Here, we address, in particular, the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of embedded particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. Results: We confirm that, under realistic conditions, the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc shows turbulence within 10 to 60 au. The mean radial motion of the gas is such that it is directed inward near the midplane and outward in the surface layers. We find that large particles drift inward with the expected speed, while small particles can experience phases of outward drift. Additionally, the particles show bunching behaviour with overdensities reaching five times the average value, which is strongest for dimensionless stopping times around unity. Conclusions: Particles in a VSI-turbulent discs are concentrated in large-scale turbulent eddies and show low relative speeds that allow for growing collisions. The reached overdensities will also enable the onset of streaming instabilities, further enhancing particle growth. The outward drift for small particles at higher disk elevations enable the transport of processed high temperature material in the solar system to greater distances.

  4. 3D printing enables separation of orthogonal functions within a hydrogel particle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ritu; Clay, Nicholas E; Sen, Sanjeet; Melhem, Molly; Qin, Ellen; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional particles with distinct physiochemical phases are required by a variety of applications in biomedical engineering, such as diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. This motivates the development of a repeatable, efficient, and customizable approach to manufacturing particles with spatially segregated bioactive moieties. This study demonstrates a stereolithographic 3D printing approach for designing and fabricating large arrays of biphasic poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) gel particles. The fabrication parameters governing the physical and biochemical properties of multi-layered particles are thoroughly investigated, yielding a readily tunable approach to manufacturing customizable arrays of multifunctional particles. The advantage in spatially organizing functional epitopes is examined by loading superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in separate layers of biphasic PEGDA gel particles and examining SPION-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast and BSA-release kinetics. Particles with spatial segregation of functional moieties have demonstrably higher MR contrast and BSA release. Overall, this study will contribute significant knowledge to the preparation of multifunctional particles for use as biomedical tools. PMID:27215416

  5. Development and Characterization of Embedded Sensory Particles Using Multi-Scale 3D Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Stephen R.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for detecting fatigue cracks has been explored at NASA Langley Research Center. Microscopic NiTi shape memory alloy (sensory) particles were embedded in a 7050 aluminum alloy matrix to detect the presence of fatigue cracks. Cracks exhibit an elevated stress field near their tip inducing a martensitic phase transformation in nearby sensory particles. Detectable levels of acoustic energy are emitted upon particle phase transformation such that the existence and location of fatigue cracks can be detected. To test this concept, a fatigue crack was grown in a mode-I single-edge notch fatigue crack growth specimen containing sensory particles. As the crack approached the sensory particles, measurements of particle strain, matrix-particle debonding, and phase transformation behavior of the sensory particles were performed. Full-field deformation measurements were performed using a novel multi-scale optical 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. This information will be used in a finite element-based study to determine optimal sensory material behavior and density.

  6. 3D printing enables separation of orthogonal functions within a hydrogel particle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ritu; Clay, Nicholas E; Sen, Sanjeet; Melhem, Molly; Qin, Ellen; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional particles with distinct physiochemical phases are required by a variety of applications in biomedical engineering, such as diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. This motivates the development of a repeatable, efficient, and customizable approach to manufacturing particles with spatially segregated bioactive moieties. This study demonstrates a stereolithographic 3D printing approach for designing and fabricating large arrays of biphasic poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) gel particles. The fabrication parameters governing the physical and biochemical properties of multi-layered particles are thoroughly investigated, yielding a readily tunable approach to manufacturing customizable arrays of multifunctional particles. The advantage in spatially organizing functional epitopes is examined by loading superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in separate layers of biphasic PEGDA gel particles and examining SPION-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast and BSA-release kinetics. Particles with spatial segregation of functional moieties have demonstrably higher MR contrast and BSA release. Overall, this study will contribute significant knowledge to the preparation of multifunctional particles for use as biomedical tools.

  7. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  8. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  9. Experimental investigation of 3-D turbulent free shear flow past propellers and windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Kotb, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flowfield region near a 0.49 m (1.615 ft), 3 bladed, horizontal axis rotor was conducted in the VPI 2 m x 2 m (6 ft x 6 ft) wind tunnel. Two different modes of operations were studied - propeller and windmill. For each case, tests were run with a uniform approach flow as a base line condition, and the main test series was run with a variable mesh wire grid upstream to produce an approach flow with an essentially linear velocity gradient. The results are compared to elucidate the effects of the non-uniform approach flow. Several types of measurements are reported. First are gross quantities such as overall thrust and power. The second type of measurements are mean (in the turbulence sense) quantities obtained with a five port yawhead tube. All three components of mean velocity and static pressure were obtained. The third type of measurements were made with an x-wire anemometer and an r.m.s. meter. These measurements yield all components of the turbulence intensities and stresses at a point averaged over many passes of the rotor blades.

  10. Turbulent Convection: Is 2D a good proxy of 3D?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    Several authors have recently carried out 2D simulations of turbulent convection for both solar and massive stars. Fitting the 2D results with the MLT, they obtain that alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 specifically, 1.4 less than alpha(sub MLT) less than 1.8. The authors further suggest that this methodology could be used to calibrate the MLT used in stellar evolutionary codes. We suggest the opposite viewpoint: the 2D results show that MLT is internally inconsistent because the resulting alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 violates the MLT basic assumption that alpha(sub MLT) less than 1. When the 2D results are fitted with the CM model, alpha(sub CMT) less than 1, in accord with the basic tenet of the model. On the other hand, since both MLT and CM are local models, they should be replaced by the next generation of non-local, time dependent turbulence models which we discuss in some detail.

  11. Single particle 3D reconstruction for 2D crystal images of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Sebastian; Arheit, Marcel; Kowal, Julia; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-01

    In cases where ultra-flat cryo-preparations of well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) crystals are available, electron crystallography is a powerful method for the determination of the high-resolution structures of membrane and soluble proteins. However, crystal unbending and Fourier-filtering methods in electron crystallography three-dimensional (3D) image processing are generally limited in their performance for 2D crystals that are badly ordered or non-flat. Here we present a single particle image processing approach, which is implemented as an extension of the 2D crystallographic pipeline realized in the 2dx software package, for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of membrane proteins. The algorithm presented, addresses the low single-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 2D crystal images by exploiting neighborhood correlation between adjacent proteins in the 2D crystal. Compared with conventional single particle processing for randomly oriented particles, the computational costs are greatly reduced due to the crystal-induced limited search space, which allows a much finer search space compared to classical single particle processing. To reduce the considerable computational costs, our software features a hybrid parallelization scheme for multi-CPU clusters and computer with high-end graphic processing units (GPUs). We successfully apply the new refinement method to the structure of the potassium channel MloK1. The calculated 3D reconstruction shows more structural details and contains less noise than the map obtained by conventional Fourier-filtering based processing of the same 2D crystal images.

  12. Turbulence generation in homogeneous dilute particle- laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jeng-Horng

    Homogeneous turbulence generated by the motion of particles in dispersed multiphase flows was studied both theoretically and experimentally, motivated by applications to sprays, particle-laden jets, bubble plumes and rainstorms, among others. The experiments involved uniform fluxes of monodisperse spherical particles falling through a slow upflow of air. Particle fluxes and phase velocities were measured by sampling and phase-discriminating laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), respectively. Measured particle velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities and probability density functions (PDF's). Measured continuous-phase velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities, PDF's and the higher moments of velocity fluctuations such as skewness and kurtosis, energy spectra of velocity fluctuations and integral length scales based on streamwise velocity fluctuations. Continuous-phase velocity measurements included conditional averages for particle wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region surrounding these disturbances as well as overall flow properties. Present and earlier results in the literature provided particle Reynolds numbers of 38-990, particle volume fractions less than 0.01% and turbulence intensities (normalized by mean particle relative velocities) of 0.1-10.0%. Theory included characterization of particle wake disturbances as laminar-like turbulent wakes observed for intermediate particle Reynolds numbers in turbulent environments, characterization of the turbulent inter-wake region by analogy to grid-generated isotropic turbulence, and estimation of overall flow properties by conditional averaging of the properties of the wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region. Present measurements showed that particle wake disturbances during turbulence generation were properly characterized by the properties of laminar-like turbulent wakes. The turbulent inter-wake region was

  13. Longitudinal Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Rigidity in 3D Tumor Models Using Particle-tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  14. Is the 3-D magnetic null point with a convective electric field an efficient particle accelerator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.-N.; Büchner, J.; Otto, A.; Santos, J.; Marsch, E.; Gan, W.-Q.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: We study the particle acceleration at a magnetic null point in the solar corona, considering self-consistent magnetic fields, plasma flows and the corresponding convective electric fields. Methods: We calculate the electromagnetic fields by 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and expose charged particles to these fields within a full-orbit relativistic test-particle approach. In the 3-D MHD simulation part, the initial magnetic field configuration is set to be a potential field obtained by extrapolation from an analytic quadrupolar photospheric magnetic field with a typically observed magnitude. The configuration is chosen so that the resulting coronal magnetic field contains a null. Driven by photospheric plasma motion, the MHD simulation reveals the coronal plasma motion and the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. In a subsequent test particle experiment the particle energies and orbits (determined by the forces exerted by the convective electric field and the magnetic field around the null) are calculated in time. Results: Test particle calculations show that protons can be accelerated up to 30 keV near the null if the local plasma flow velocity is of the order of 1000 km s-1 (in solar active regions). The final parallel velocity is much higher than the perpendicular velocity so that accelerated particles escape from the null along the magnetic field lines. Stronger convection electric field during big flare explosions can accelerate protons up to 2 MeV and electrons to 3 keV. Higher initial velocities can help most protons to be strongly accelerated, but a few protons also run the risk to be decelerated. Conclusions: Through its convective electric field and due to magnetic nonuniform drifts and de-magnetization process, the 3-D null can act as an effective accelerator for protons but not for electrons. Protons are more easily de-magnetized and accelerated than electrons because of their larger Larmor radii. Notice that macroscopic MHD

  15. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  16. 3D hybrid simulations with gyrokinetic particle ions and fluid electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.; Park, W.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The previous hybrid MHD/particle model (MH3D-K code) represented energetic ions as gyrokinetic (or drift-kinetic) particles coupled to MHD equations using the pressure or current coupling scheme. A small energetic to bulk ion density ratio was assumed, n{sub h}/n{sub b} {much_lt} 1, allowing the neglect of the energetic ion perpendicular inertia in the momentum equation and the use of MHD Ohm`s law E = {minus}v{sub b} {times} B. A generalization of this model in which all ions are treated as gyrokinetic/drift-kinetic particles and fluid description is used for the electron dynamics is considered in this paper.

  17. Three-dimensional simulation of the motion of a single particle under a simulated turbulent velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Casas, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    A 3D Lagrangian particle tracking model is coupled to a 3D channel velocity field to simulate the saltation motion of a single sediment particle moving in saltation mode. The turbulent field is a high-resolution three dimensional velocity field that reproduces a by-pass transition to turbulence on a flat plate due to free-stream turbulence passing above de plate. In order to reduce computational costs, a decoupled approached is used, i.e., the turbulent flow is simulated independently from the tracking model, and then used to feed the 3D Lagrangian particle model. The simulations are carried using the point-particle approach. The particle tracking model contains three sub-models, namely, particle free-flight, a post-collision velocity and bed representation sub-models. The free-flight sub-model considers the action of the following forces: submerged weight, non-linear drag, lift, virtual mass, Magnus and Basset forces. The model also includes the effect of particle angular velocity. The post-collision velocities are obtained by applying conservation of angular and linear momentum. The complete model was validated with experimental results from literature within the sand range. Results for particle velocity time series and distribution of particle turbulent intensities are presented.

  18. A generalized Brownian motion model for turbulent relative particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2016-08-01

    There is speculation that the difficulty in obtaining an extended range with Richardson-Obukhov scaling in both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations is due to the finiteness of the flow Reynolds number Re in these situations. In this paper, a generalized Brownian motion model has been applied to describe the relative particle dispersion problem in more realistic turbulent flows and to shed some light on this issue. The fluctuating pressure forces acting on a fluid particle are taken to be a colored noise and follow a stationary process and are described by the Uhlenbeck-Ornstein model while it appears plausible to take their correlation time to have a power-law dependence on Re, thus introducing a bridge between the Lagrangian quantities and the Eulerian parameters for this problem. This ansatz is in qualitative agreement with the possibility of a connection speculated earlier by Corrsin [26] between the white-noise representation for the fluctuating pressure forces and the large-Re assumption in the Kolmogorov [4] theory for the 3D fully developed turbulence (FDT) as well as a similar argument of Monin and Yaglom [23] and a similar result of Sawford [13] and Borgas and Sawford [24]. It also provides an insight into the result that the Richardson-Obukhov scaling holds only in the infinite-Re limit and disappears otherwise. This ansatz further provides a determination of the Richardson-Obukhov constant g as a function of Re, with an asymptotic constant value in the infinite-Re limit. It is shown to lead to full agreement, in the small-Re limit as well, with the Batchelor-Townsend [27] scaling for the rate of change of the mean square interparticle separation in 3D FDT, hence validating its soundness further.

  19. Simulation of the 3D viscoelastic free surface flow by a parallel corrected particle scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Lian, Ren; Tao, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the behavior of the three-dimensional (3D) jet coiling based on the viscoelastic Oldroyd-B model is investigated by a corrected particle scheme, which is named the smoothed particle hydrodynamics with corrected symmetric kernel gradient and shifting particle technique (SPH_CS_SP) method. The accuracy and stability of SPH_CS_SP method is first tested by solving Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Green flow. Then the capacity for the SPH_CS_SP method to solve the viscoelastic fluid is verified by the polymer flow through a periodic array of cylinders. Moreover, the convergence of the SPH_CS_SP method is also investigated. Finally, the proposed method is further applied to the 3D viscoelastic jet coiling problem, and the influences of macroscopic parameters on the jet coiling are discussed. The numerical results show that the SPH_CS_SP method has higher accuracy and better stability than the traditional SPH method and other corrected SPH method, and can improve the tensile instability. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20130436 and BK20150436) and the Natural Science Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 15KJB110025).

  20. Magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites consisting of an opal matrix with embedded spinel ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Korolev, A. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kleshcheva, S. M.; Perov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites representing Mn-Zn, Ni-Zn, Co-Zn, La-Co-Zn, and Nd-Co-Zn spinel ferrite particles embedded in the interspherical spaces of opal matrices are studied. Experimental data are obtained in the temperature interval 2-300 K by measuring the magnetization at a static magnetic field strength of up to 50 kOe and the ac magnetic susceptibility at an alternating magnetic field amplitude of 4 kOe and a frequency of 80 Hz.

  1. M3D Simulations of Energetic Particle-driven MHD Mode with Unstructured Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G. Y.; Park, W.; Strauss, H. R.

    2001-10-01

    The energetic particle-driven MHD modes are studied using a multi-level extended MHD code M3D(W. Park et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999)). In a Extended-MHD model, the plasma is divided into the bulk part and the energetic particle component. The bulk plasma is treated as either a single fluid or two fluids. The energetic particles are described by gyrokinetic particles following the self-consistent electromagnetic field. The model is self-consistent, including nonlinear effects of hot particles on the MHD dynamics and the nonlinear MHD mode coupling. Previously we had shown the results of nonlinear saturation of TAEfootnote G.Y. Fu and W. Park, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1594 (1995), energetic particle stabilization of an internal kink and excitation of fishbone^2, and nonlinear saturation of fishbone in circular tokamaks (G.Y. Fu et al, 2000 Sherwood Meeting, Paper 2C2.). In this work, we extend the simulations to general geometry using unstructured mesh(H.R. Strauss and W. Park, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2676 (1998). We also use a gyrofluid model for fishbone in order to study the role of MHD nonlinearity in saturation near the marginal stability. Results of applications to tokamaks and spherical tokamaks will be presented.

  2. 3D imaging of particle-scale rotational motion in cyclically driven granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Matt; Powers, Dylan; Cooper, Eric; Losert, Wolfgang

    Recent experimental advances have enabled three-dimensional (3D) imaging of motion, structure, and failure within granular systems. 3D imaging allows researchers to directly characterize bulk behaviors that arise from particle- and meso-scale features. For instance, segregation of a bidisperse system of spheres under cyclic shear can originate from microscopic irreversibilities and the development of convective secondary flows. Rotational motion and frictional rotational coupling, meanwhile, have been less explored in such experimental 3D systems, especially under cyclic forcing. In particular, relative amounts of sliding and/or rolling between pairs of contacting grains could influence the reversibility of both trajectories, in terms of both position and orientation. In this work, we apply the Refractive Index Matched Scanning technique to a granular system that is cyclically driven and measure both translational and rotational motion of individual grains. We relate measured rotational motion to resulting shear bands and convective flows, further indicating the degree to which pairs and neighborhoods of grains collectively rotate.

  3. Turbulent saturation and transport in global 3D two-fluid simulations of the tokamak edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Barrett; Ricci, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    Based on nonlinear, global, three-dimensional two-fluid simulations, we explore the physics of turbulent saturation and transport in the tokamak scape-off layer and other magnetic geometries. We find that the global simulations can produce larger relative fluctuation amplitudes and more Bohm-like (versus Gyro-Bohm-like) transport scalings than those of non-global (flux-tube) simulations. In both the global and local simulations, small-scale primary instabilities such as driftwaves or resistive ballooning modes produce radial streamers, which grow until they are broken up by secondary modes such as the Kelvin-Helmholz instability or related modes. In a local simulation with fixed, radially constant equilibrium gradients and periodic boundaries, for example, the radial elongation of these primary-mode streamers is, in principle, unlimited. In the global simulations, however, the radial extent of the primaries is truncated by the nonlocal radial variations of the equilibrium profile gradients, typically to the geometric mean of the equilibrium profile scale-length and poloidal scale-length of the primary modes. This radial truncation can have a strongly stabilizing effect on the KH mode, leading to larger primary-mode fluctuation levels and non-Gyro-Bohm transport scaling.

  4. Noise and Turbulence Generate 3D Zombie Vortices in Stably Stratified Rotating Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Suyang; Marcus, Philip S.; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Lecoanet, Daniel; Barranco, Joseph A.

    2013-11-01

    We showed previously that a linearly stable shearing, rotating, stably stratified flow has a finite-amplitude instability creating ``zombie vortices'' that self-replicate and fill the domain. Our flows were initialized with perturbations of one or two vortices. Our motivation was to determine whether ``dead zones'' in protoplanetary disks were stable, or whether they could be de-stabilized to produce vortices necessary for the final part of star formation and for planet formation. To be more relevant to astrophysics, we choose the initial conditions to be noise or turbulence with a Kolmogorov spectrum with small kinetic energy and Mach number. In a Kolmogorov spectrum, the largest eddies determine the kinetic energy and Mach number, while the smallest determine the vorticity and Rossby number Ro ≡ ω / f , where ω is the vertical vorticity and f is the Coriolis parameter. The protoplanetary disks (which have large inertial ranges due to their large Reynolds numbers), can have large Rossby numbers, but weak Mach numbers and kinetic energies. It is important to know whether the triggering of the finite-amplitude instability that creates zombie vortices depends on threshold values of Mach number, kinetic energy, or the Rossby number. Here, we show it is the latter.

  5. Observation of 3D defect mediated dust acoustic wave turbulence with fluctuating defects and amplitude hole filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Ya-Yi; I, Lin

    2013-08-15

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct observation of defect mediated wave turbulence with fluctuating defects and low amplitude hole filaments, from a 3D self-excited plane dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma by reducing dissipation. The waveform undulation is found to be the origin for the amplitude and the phase modulations of the local dust density oscillation, the broadening of the sharp peaks in the frequency spectrum, and the fluctuating defects. The corrugated wave crest surface also causes the observed high and low density patches in the transverse (xy) plane. Low oscillation amplitude spots (holes) share the same positions with the defects. Their trajectories in the xyt space appear in the form of chaotic filaments without long term predictability, through uncertain pair generation, propagation, and pair annihilation.

  6. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems: the Transition from 2D to 3D Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Eric; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies have reproduced the patterns of zonal flow and thermal emission on the Giant Planets using deep convection models. For example, it has been shown that the fundamental differences between the winds of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, and the Gas Giants, Jupiter and Saturn, may be explained by the breakdown of the influence of rotation on convection. Here, we present results from a coupled suite of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of rotating convection which span a broad range of parameter space. We observe distinct transitions from rotationally controlled, quasi-2D dynamics to strongly 3D, non-rotating style convection. We quantify the boundary between these two regimes as a function of the Rayleigh and Ekman numbers. The transition is not determined, as long assumed, by the convective Rossby number, but instead is controlled by boundary layer dynamics. It may then be easier than previously thought for convection systems to break free from the constraints of rotation. We are presently investigating how this transition correlates with zonal flows and magnetic field generation on the Giant Planets. Funding provided by NSF Geophysics Program (EAR/IF) and NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  7. Turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Marcus, F. A.; Gentle, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak [K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)], a toroidal plasma device with a one-dimensional equilibrium with magnetic curvature and shear. Alterations on the radial electric field, through an external voltage bias, change the spectral plasma characteristics inducing a dominant frequency for negative bias values and a broad band frequency spectrum for positive bias values. When applying a negative bias, the transport is high where the waves propagate with phase velocities near the plasma flow velocity, an indication that the transport is strongly affected by a wave particle resonant interaction. On the other hand, for positive bias values, the plasma has a reversed shear flow, and we observe that the transport is almost zero in the shearless radial region, an evidence of a transport barrier in this region.

  8. Turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak

    SciTech Connect

    Toufen, D. L.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O.; Marcus, F. A.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2012-01-15

    We analyze the turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak [K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)], a toroidal plasma device with a one-dimensional equilibrium with magnetic curvature and shear. Alterations on the radial electric field, through an external voltage bias, change the spectral plasma characteristics inducing a dominant frequency for negative bias values and a broad band frequency spectrum for positive bias values. When applying a negative bias, the transport is high where the waves propagate with phase velocities near the plasma flow velocity, an indication that the transport is strongly affected by a wave particle resonant interaction. On the other hand, for positive bias values, the plasma has a reversed shear flow, and we observe that the transport is almost zero in the shearless radial region, an evidence of a transport barrier in this region.

  9. Lagrangian simulation of turbulent particle dispersion in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Soldati, A.; Casal, M.; Andreussi, P.; Banerjee, S.

    1997-06-01

    Industrial design of electrostatic precipitators is based on the transport theory developed by Deutsch (1922), which assumes that transverse turbulent mixing is effective enough to maintain the concentration profile uniform throughout the cross section (i.e., turbulent diffusivity is assumed infinite). To improve understanding of turbulent particle dispersion under the influence of electrostatic forces, a database on particle trajectories was first generated, based on the flow field from a direct numerical simulation of a plate-plate precipitator. The effect of various parameters, such as particle size, charge and particle migration velocity, on dispersion and collection efficiency was investigated. Results show that particle concentration profiles are not uniform due to finite values of turbulent diffusion coefficient. The simulations indicate that the early stages of particle collection are controlled by particle migration velocity, while final stages are controlled by turbulence diffusion mechanisms.

  10. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively placemore » injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.« less

  11. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, Lori; Disz, Terry; Papka, Mike; Heath, Daniel; Diachin, Darin; Herzog, Jim; Ryan, and Bob

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively place injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.

  12. Enhanced copper micro/nano-particle mixed paste sintered at low temperature for 3D interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y. Y.; Ng, M. Z.; Anantha, P.; Lin, Y. D.; Li, Z. G.; Gan, C. L.; Tan, C. S.

    2016-06-01

    An enhanced copper paste, formulated by copper micro- and nano-particles mixture, is reported to prevent paste cracking and obtain an improved packing density. The particle mixture of two different sizes enables reduction in porosity of the micro-paste and resolves the cracking issue in the nano-paste. In-situ temperature and resistance measurements indicate that the mixed paste has a lower densification temperature. Electrical study also shows a ˜12× lower sheet resistance of 0.27 Ω/sq. In addition, scanning electron microscope image analysis confirms a ˜50% lower porosity, which is consistent with the thermal and electrical results. The 3:1 (micro:nano, wt. %) mixed paste is found to have the strongest synergistic effect. This phenomenon is discussed further. Consequently, the mixed paste is a promising material for potential low temperature 3D interconnects fabrication.

  13. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  14. Visualizing turbulent mixing of gases and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Smith, Philip J.; Jain, Sandeep

    1995-01-01

    A physical model and interactive computer graphics techniques have been developed for the visualization of the basic physical process of stochastic dispersion and mixing from steady-state CFD calculations. The mixing of massless particles and inertial particles is visualized by transforming the vector field from a traditionally Eulerian reference frame into a Lagrangian reference frame. Groups of particles are traced through the vector field for the mean path as well as their statistical dispersion about the mean position by using added scalar information about the root mean square value of the vector field and its Lagrangian time scale. In this way, clouds of particles in a turbulent environment are traced, not just mean paths. In combustion simulations of many industrial processes, good mixing is required to achieve a sufficient degree of combustion efficiency. The ability to visualize this multiphase mixing can not only help identify poor mixing but also explain the mechanism for poor mixing. The information gained from the visualization can be used to improve the overall combustion efficiency in utility boilers or propulsion devices. We have used this technique to visualize steady-state simulations of the combustion performance in several furnace designs.

  15. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  16. Some Progress in Large-Eddy Simulation using the 3-D Vortex Particle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    This two-month visit at CTR was devoted to investigating possibilities in LES modeling in the context of the 3-D vortex particle method (=vortex element method, VEM) for unbounded flows. A dedicated code was developed for that purpose. Although O(N(sup 2)) and thus slow, it offers the advantage that it can easily be modified to try out many ideas on problems involving up to N approx. 10(exp 4) particles. Energy spectrums (which require O(N(sup 2)) operations per wavenumber) are also computed. Progress was realized in the following areas: particle redistribution schemes, relaxation schemes to maintain the solenoidal condition on the particle vorticity field, simple LES models and their VEM extension, possible new avenues in LES. Model problems that involve strong interaction between vortex tubes were computed, together with diagnostics: total vorticity, linear and angular impulse, energy and energy spectrum, enstrophy. More work is needed, however, especially regarding relaxation schemes and further validation and development of LES models for VEM. Finally, what works well will eventually have to be incorporated into the fast parallel tree code.

  17. Gravity-driven clustering of inertial particles in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongnam; Lee, Changhoon

    2014-06-01

    We report a different kind of particle clustering caused purely by gravity, discovered in our simulation of particle-laden turbulence. Clustering in a vertical strip pattern forms when strong gravity acts on heavy particles. This phenomenon is explained by the skewness of the flow velocity gradient in the gravitational direction experienced by particles, which causes horizontal convergence of particles.

  18. 3D structure determination of protein using TEM single particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chikara; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kawata, Masaaki; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Proteins play important roles in cell functions such as enzymes, cell trafficking, neurotransmission, muscle contraction and hormone secretion. However, some proteins are very difficult to be crystallized and their structures are undetermined. Several techniques have been developed to elucidate the structure of macromolecules; X-ray or electron crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and high-resolution electron microscopy. Among them, electron microscopy based single particle reconstruction (SPA) technique is a computer-aided structure determination method. This method reconstructs the 3D structure from projection images of dispersed protein. A large number of two-dimensional particle images are picked up from EM films, aligned and classified to generate 2D averages, and used to reconstruct the 3D structure by assigning the Euler angle of each 2D average. Due to the necessity of elaborate collaboration between the classical biology and the innovative information technology including parallel computing, scientists needed to break unseen barriers to get a start of this analysis. However, recent progresses in electron microscopes, mathematical algorithms, and computational abilities greatly reduced the height of barriers and expanded targets that are considered to be primarily addressable using single particle analysis. Membrane proteins are one of these targets to which the single particle analysis is successfully applied for the understanding of their 3D structures. For this purpose, we have developed various SPA methods [1-5] and applied them to different proteins [6-8].Here, we introduce reconstructed proteins, and discuss the availability of this technique. The intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs) that sever the transmembrane domains of their substrates have been identified in a range of organisms and play a variety of roles in biological conditions. I-CLiPs have been classified into three groups: serine-, aspartyl- and metalloprotease

  19. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  20. Particle entry through "Sash" groove simulated by Global 3D Electromagnetic Particle code with duskward IMF By

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Cai, D.; Nishikawa, K.; Lembege, B.

    2004-12-01

    We made our efforts to parallelize the global 3D HPF Electromagnetic particle model (EMPM) for several years and have also reported our meaningful simulation results that revealed the essential physics involved in interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere using this EMPM (Nishikawa et al., 1995; Nishikawa, 1997, 1998a, b, 2001, 2002) in our PC cluster and supercomputer(D.S. Cai et al., 2001, 2003). Sash patterns and related phenomena have been observed and reported in some satellite observations (Fujumoto et al. 1997; Maynard, 2001), and have motivated 3D MHD simulations (White and al., 1998). We also investigated it with our global 3D parallelized HPF EMPM with dawnward IMF By (K.-I. Nishikawa, 1998) and recently new simulation with dusk-ward IMF By was accomplished in the new VPP5000 supercomputer. In the new simulations performed on the new VPP5000 supercomputer of Tsukuba University, we used larger domain size, 305×205×205, smaller grid size (Δ ), 0.5R E(the radium of the Earth), more total particle number, 220,000,000 (about 8 pairs per cell). At first, we run this code until we get the so-called quasi-stationary status; After the quasi-stationary status was established, we applied a northward IMF (B z=0.2), and then wait until the IMF arrives around the magnetopuase. After the arrival of IMF, we begin to change the IMF from northward to duskward (IMF B y=-0.2). The results revealed that the groove structure at the day-side magnetopause, that causes particle entry into inner magnetosphere and the cross structure or S-structure at near magneto-tail are formed. Moreover, in contrast with MHD simulations, kinetic characteristic of this event is also analyzed self-consistently with this simulation. The new simulation provides new and more detailed insights for the observed sash event.

  1. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components.

  2. 3D quantification of brain microvessels exposed to heavy particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermüller, C.; Coats, J. S.; Obenaus, A.; Nelson, G.; Krucker, T.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-09-01

    Space radiation with high energy particles and cosmic rays presents a significant hazard to spaceflight crews. Recent reviews of the health risk to astronauts from ionizing radiation concluded to establish a level of risk which may indicate the possible performance decrements and decreased latency of late dysfunction syndromes (LDS) of the brain. A hierarchical imaging approach developed at ETH Zürich and PSI, which relies on synchrotron based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy (SRXTM), was used to visualize and analyze 3D vascular structures down to the capillary level in their precise anatomical context. Various morphological parameters, such as overall vessel volume, vessel thickness and spacing, are extracted to characterize the vascular structure within a region of interest. For a first quantification of the effect of high energy particles on the vasculature we scanned a set of 6 animals, all of same age. The animals were irradiated with 1 Gy, 2 Gy and 4 Gy of 600MeV 56Fe heavy particles simulating the space radiation environment. We found that with increasing dose the diameter of vessels and the overall vessel volume are decreased whereas the vessel spacing is increased. As these parameters reflect blood flow in three-dimensional space they can be used as indicators for the degree of vascular efficiency which can have an impact on the function and development of lung tissue or tumors.

  3. Polyribosomes are molecular 3D nanoprinters that orchestrate the assembly of vault particles.

    PubMed

    Mrazek, Jan; Toso, Daniel; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Zhang, Xing; Zhou, Z Hong; Fernandez, Beatriz Campo; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H

    2014-11-25

    Ribosomes are molecular machines that function in polyribosome complexes to translate genetic information, guide the synthesis of polypeptides, and modulate the folding of nascent proteins. Here, we report a surprising function for polyribosomes as a result of a systematic examination of the assembly of a large ribonucleoprotein complex, the vault particle. Structural and functional evidence points to a model of vault assembly whereby the polyribosome acts like a 3D nanoprinter to direct the ordered translation and assembly of the multi-subunit vault homopolymer, a process which we refer to as polyribosome templating. Structure-based mutagenesis and cell-free in vitro expression studies further demonstrated the critical importance of the polyribosome in vault assembly. Polyribosome templating prevents chaos by ensuring efficiency and order in the production of large homopolymeric protein structures in the crowded cellular environment and might explain the origin of many polyribosome-associated molecular assemblies inside the cell.

  4. 3D Plasma Equilibrium and Stability with Hot Particle Anisotropic Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Hirshman, S. P.; Merkel, P.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H. F. G.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Narushima, Y.

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic pressure free-boundary three-dimsnsional (3D) equilibrium code ANI-MEC with nested magnetic flux surfaces has been developed as an extension of the VMEC2000 code. The preconditioning algorithm included is exploited to allow the computation of equilibrium states with radial force balance error improvements exceeding 4 orders of magnitude compared with the non-conditioned results. Large off-axis energetic particle deposition has been applied in a 2-field period quasiaxisymmetric stellarator reactor at <{beta}>{approx_equal}4.5% to test the limitations of the code. The hot particle pressures are roughly uniform around the flux surfaces when p{sub parallel}>p{sub perpendicular}. The fast particle perpendicular pressures localise in the region of deposition for p{sub perpendicular}>p{sub parallel}, while the energetic particle parallel pressures concentrate on the low-field side. Two anisotropic pressure models for global fluid stability implemented in the TERPSICHORE code have been applied to the LHD Heliotron for a sequence of equilibria with fixed <{beta}{sub dia}>{approx_equal}5%(<{beta}{sub th}>{approx_equal}3.5%) varying the fast particle temperature ratio T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular}. Global magnetohydrodynamic modes are quasi-stable according to the model with rigid hot particle layers, while they become stabilised according to the fully interacting energetic particle model with increasing T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular}. As T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular} approaches 3, however, the n = 1 mode family becomes unstable. A transition from a nearly stable quasi-external ballooning-interchange structure to a weakly unstable internal kink mode takes place. The investigation of beam-driven fusion in a Heliotron system is broached. A background plasma with cold ions and warm electrons at <{beta}{sub ith}>{approx_equal}1% is examined with fixed T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular} = 10 in which the hot particle contribution to <{beta

  5. 3D Plasma Equilibrium and Stability with Hot Particle Anisotropic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Hirshman, S. P.; Merkel, P.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H. F. G.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Narushima, Y.

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic pressure free-boundary three-dimsnsional (3D) equilibrium code ANI-MEC with nested magnetic flux surfaces has been developed as an extension of the VMEC2000 code. The preconditioning algorithm included is exploited to allow the computation of equilibrium states with radial force balance error improvements exceeding 4 orders of magnitude compared with the non-conditioned results. Large off-axis energetic particle deposition has been applied in a 2-field period quasiaxisymmetric stellarator reactor at <β>≃4.5% to test the limitations of the code. The hot particle pressures are roughly uniform around the flux surfaces when p∥>p⊥. The fast particle perpendicular pressures localise in the region of deposition for p⊥>p∥, while the energetic particle parallel pressures concentrate on the low-field side. Two anisotropic pressure models for global fluid stability implemented in the TERPSICHORE code have been applied to the LHD Heliotron for a sequence of equilibria with fixed <βdia>≃5%(<βth>≃3.5%) varying the fast particle temperature ratio T∥/T⊥. Global magnetohydrodynamic modes are quasi-stable according to the model with rigid hot particle layers, while they become stabilised according to the fully interacting energetic particle model with increasing T∥/T⊥. As T∥/T⊥ approaches 3, however, the n = 1 mode family becomes unstable. A transition from a nearly stable quasi-external ballooning-interchange structure to a weakly unstable internal kink mode takes place. The investigation of beam-driven fusion in a Heliotron system is broached. A background plasma with cold ions and warm electrons at <βith>≃1% is examined with fixed T∥/T⊥ = 10 in which the hot particle contribution to <β> is increased. An equilibrium limit is reached when the hot parallel component <β∥h> exceeds 6.1%. The rigid model predicts stability, while the fully interacting model shows stabilisation for <β∥h greater than 3%.

  6. Direct measurement of particle size and 3D velocity of a gas-solid pipe flow with digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Yao, Longchao; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-20

    The 3D measurement of the particles in a gas-solid pipe flow is of great interest, but remains challenging due to curved pipe walls in various engineering applications. Because of the astigmatism induced by the pipe, concentric ellipse fringes in the hologram of spherical particles are observed in the experiments. With a theoretical analysis of the particle holography by an ABCD matrix, the in-focus particle image can be reconstructed by the modified convolution method and fractional Fourier transform. Thereafter, the particle size, 3D position, and velocity are simultaneously measured by digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). The successful application of DHPTV to the particle size and 3D velocity measurement in a glass pipe's flow can facilitate its 3D diagnostics.

  7. 2D FTLE in 3D Flows: The accuracy of using two-dimensional data for Lagrangian analysis in a three-dimensional turbulent channel simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwood, Matthew; Green, Melissa

    2012-11-01

    In experimental, three-dimensional vortex-dominated flows, common particle image velocimetry (PIV) data is often collected in only the plane of interest due to equipment constraints. For flows with significant out of plane velocities or velocity gradients, this can create large discrepancies in Lagrangian analyses that require accurate particle trajectories. A Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) analysis is one such example, and has been shown to be very powerful at examining vortex dynamics and interactions in a variety of aperiodic flows. In this work, FTLE analysis of a turbulent channel simulation was conducted using both full three-dimensional velocity data and modified planar data extracted from the same computational domain. When the out of plane velocity component is neglected the difference in FTLE fields is non-trivial. A quantitative comparison and computation of error is presented for several planes across the width of the channel to determine the efficacy of using 2D analyses on the inherently 3D flows.

  8. Remote Sensing of the 3D Wind and Turbulence Field by Coherent Doppler Lidars for Wind Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöholm, M.; Courtney, M. S.; Enevoldsen, K. M.; Lindelöw, P.; Mann, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2008-12-01

    anemometer has already recently provided some initial prospective results of this approach to measure the 3D wind and turbulence field.

  9. Effects of compressibility on turbulent relative particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, phenomenological developments are used to explore the effects of compressibility on the relative particle dispersion (RPD) in three-dimensional (3D) fully developed turbulence (FDT). The role played by the compressible FDT cascade physics underlying this process is investigated. Compressibility effects are found to lead to reduction of RPD, development of the ballistic regime and particle clustering, corroborating the laboratory experiment and numerical simulation results (Cressman J. R. et al., New J. Phys., 6 (2004) 53) on the motion of Lagrangian tracers on a surface flow that constitutes a 2D compressible subsystem. These formulations are developed from the scaling relations for compressible FDT and are validated further via an alternative dimensional/scaling development for compressible FDT similar to the one given for incompressible FDT by Batchelor and Townsend (Surveys in Mechanics (Cambridge University Press) 1956, p. 352). The rationale for spatial intermittency effects is legitimized via the nonlinear scaling dependence of RPD on the kinetic-energy dissipation rate.

  10. CAST: Effective and Efficient User Interaction for Context-Aware Selection in 3D Particle Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, Konstantinos; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present a family of three interactive Context-Aware Selection Techniques (CAST) for the analysis of large 3D particle datasets. For these datasets, spatial selection is an essential prerequisite to many other analysis tasks. Traditionally, such interactive target selection has been particularly challenging when the data subsets of interest were implicitly defined in the form of complicated structures of thousands of particles. Our new techniques SpaceCast, TraceCast, and PointCast improve usability and speed of spatial selection in point clouds through novel context-aware algorithms. They are able to infer a user's subtle selection intention from gestural input, can deal with complex situations such as partially occluded point clusters or multiple cluster layers, and can all be fine-tuned after the selection interaction has been completed. Together, they provide an effective and efficient tool set for the fast exploratory analysis of large datasets. In addition to presenting Cast, we report on a formal user study that compares our new techniques not only to each other but also to existing state-of-the-art selection methods. Our results show that Cast family members are virtually always faster than existing methods without tradeoffs in accuracy. In addition, qualitative feedback shows that PointCast and TraceCast were strongly favored by our participants for intuitiveness and efficiency.

  11. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy and 3-D reconstruction of viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3-4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced.

  12. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  13. Turbulent transport of cold and dense solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere by 3-D evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Seki, K.

    2006-12-01

    An appearance of cold and dense plasma at the geosynchronous orbit is one of the characteristic natures after a prolonged northward IMF duration. This cold dense material can contribute to the enhancement of the ring current density, which results a further declination of Dst. Therefore investigating the origin, path and fate of the cold dense plasma is important to understand how it preconditions the magnetosphere during a quiet interval before storm [Borovsky and Steinberg, 2006]. Observational evidences have shown that the cold dense material builds up during the northward IMF intervals in the flanks of the magnetosphere [e.g., Wing and Newell, 2002] which is referred to as the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). The entry process of the solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere during the northward IMF conditions has been controversial in contrast to the Dungey's reconnection model for the southward IMF cases. The major candidate processes are the double lobe reconnection model [Song et al., 1999], in which newly closed magnetic field lines on the dayside magnetopause capture the solar wind plasma, and the turbulent transport by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) driven by the fast solar wind flow. We have studied the solar wind entry process by the KHI. Matsumoto and Hoshino [2004, 2006] showed by 2- D MHD and full particle simulation studies that the strong flow turbulence is a natural consequence of the nonlinear development of the KHI through the secondary Rayleigh-Taylor instability, if there is a large density difference between the two media. The mechanism is fundamentally two-dimensional and therefore we term it the 2-D secondary instability. They also showed that the turbulent development greatly contributes to the solar wind plasma transport deep into the magnetosphere. Based on the previous 2-D studies, the 3-D nonlinear evolution of the KHI is studied by performing MHD simulation. Starting with a uniform background field configuration and a

  14. Advanced 3D Poisson solvers and particle-in-cell methods for accelerator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, David B.; McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    We seek to improve on the conventional FFT-based algorithms for solving the Poisson equation with infinite-domain (open) boundary conditions for large problems in accelerator modeling and related areas. In particular, improvements in both accuracy and performance are possible by combining several technologies: the method of local corrections (MLC); the James algorithm; and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The MLC enables the parallelization (by domain decomposition) of problems with large domains and many grid points. This improves on the FFT-based Poisson solvers typically used as it doesn't require the all-to-all communication pattern that parallel 3d FFT algorithms require, which tends to be a performance bottleneck on current (and foreseeable) parallel computers. In initial tests, good scalability up to 1000 processors has been demonstrated for our new MLC solver. An essential component of our approach is a new version of the James algorithm for infinite-domain boundary conditions for the case of three dimensions. By using a simplified version of the fast multipole method in the boundary-to-boundary potential calculation, we improve on the performance of the Hockney algorithm typically used by reducing the number of grid points by a factor of 8, and the CPU costs by a factor of 3. This is particularly important for large problems where computer memory limits are a consideration. The MLC allows for the use of adaptive mesh refinement, which reduces the number of grid points and increases the accuracy in the Poisson solution. This improves on the uniform grid methods typically used in PIC codes, particularly in beam problems where the halo is large. Also, the number of particles per cell can be controlled more closely with adaptivity than with a uniform grid. To use AMR with particles is more complicated than using uniform grids. It affects depositing particles on the non-uniform grid, reassigning particles when the adaptive grid changes and maintaining the load

  15. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  16. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  17. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  18. Monitoring an eruption fissure in 3D: video recording, particle image velocimetry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    The processes during an eruption are very complex. To get a better understanding several parameters are measured. One of the measured parameters is the velocity of particles and patterns, as ash and emitted magma, and of the volcano itself. The resulting velocity field provides insights into the dynamics of a vent. Here we test our algorithm for 3 dimensional velocity fields on videos of the second fissure eruption of Bárdarbunga 2014. There we acquired videos from lava fountains of the main fissure with 2 high speed cameras with small angles between the cameras. Additionally we test the algorithm on videos from the geyser Strokkur, where we had 3 cameras and larger angles between the cameras. The velocity is calculated by a correlation in the Fourier space of contiguous images. Considering that we only have the velocity field of the surface smaller angles result in a better resolution of the existing velocity field in the near field. For general movements also larger angles can be useful, e.g. to get the direction, height and velocity of eruption clouds. In summary, it can be stated that 3D velocimetry can be used for several application and with different setup due to the application.

  19. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  20. Surface processes on the asteroid deduced from the external 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Matsumoto, T.

    2015-10-01

    Particles on the surface of S-type Asteroid 25143 Itokawa were successfully recovered by the Hayabusa mission of JAXA (e.g., [1,2]). They are not only the first samples recovered from an asteroid, but also the second extraterrestrial regolith to have been sampled, the first being the Moon by Apollo and Luna missions. The analysis of tiny sample particles (20-200 μm) shows that the Itokawa surface material is consistent with LL chondrites suffered by space weathering as expected and brought an end to the origin of meteorites (e.g., [2-4]). In addition, the examination of Itokawa particles allow studies of surface processes on the asteroid because regolith particles can be regarded as an interface with the space environment, where the impacts of small objects and irradiation by the solar wind and galactic cosmic rays should have been recorded. External 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa regolith particles were examined. Two kinds of surface modification, formation of space-weathering rims mainly by solar wind implantation and surface abrasion by grain migration, were recognized. Spectral change of the asteroid proceeded by formation of space-weathering rims and refreshment of the regolith surfaces. External 3D shapes and surface morphologies of the regolith particles can provide information about formation and evolution history of regolith particles in relation to asteroidal surface processes. 3D shapes of Itokawa regolith particles were obtained using microtomography [3]. The surface nanomiromorpholgy of Itokawa particles were also observed using FE-SEM [5]. However, the number of particles was limited and genial feature on the surface morphology has not been understood. In this study, the surface morphology of Itokawa regolith particles was systematically investigated together with their 3D structures.

  1. Scaling Properties of Particle Density Fields Formed in Simulated Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Robert C.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of particle concentrations in fully developed 3D turbulence were carried out in order to study the nonuniform structure of the particle density field. Three steady-state turbulent fluid fields with Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers (Re(sub lambda)) of 40, 80 and 140 were generated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with pseudospectral methods. Large scale forcing was used to drive the turbulence and maintain temporal stationarity. The response of the particles to the fluid was parameterized by the particle Stokes number St, defined as the ratio of the particle's stopping time to the mean period of eddies on the Kolmogorov scale (eta). In this paper, we consider only passive particles optimally coupled to these eddies (St approx. = 1) because of their tendency to concentrate more than particles with lesser or greater St values. The trajectories of up to 70 million particles were tracked in the equilibrated turbulent flows until the particle concentration field reached a statistically stationary state. The nonuniform structure of the concentration fields was characterized by the multifractal singularity spectrum, f(alpha), derived from measures obtained after binning particles into cells ranging from 2(eta) to 15(eta) in size. We observed strong systematic variations of f(alpha) across this scale range in all three simulations and conclude that the particle concentration field is not statistically self similar across the scale range explored. However, spectra obtained at the 2(eta), 4(eta), and 8(eta) scales of each flow case were found to be qualitatively similar. This result suggests that the local structure of the particle concentration field may be flow-Independent. The singularity spectra found for 2n-sized cells were used to predict concentration distributions in good agreement with those obtained directly from the particle data. This Singularity spectrum has a shape similar to the analogous spectrum derived for the

  2. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical Characterization Of Nanoscale Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Genc, Arda; Kovarik, Libor; Gu, Meng; Cheng, Huikai; Plachinda, Pavel; Pullan, Lee; Freitag, Bert; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a tomography technique which couples scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) to resolve 3D distribution of elements in nanoscale materials. STEM imaging when combined with a symmetrically arranged XEDS detector design around the specimen overcomes many of the obstacles in 3D spectroscopic tomography of nanoscale materials and successfully elucidate the 3D chemical information in a large field of view of the TEM sample. We employed this technique to investigate 3D distribution of Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Oxygen (O) in Li(NiMn)O2 battery cathode material. For this purpose, 2D elemental maps were acquired for a range of tilt angles and reconstructed to obtain 3D elemental distribution in an isolated Li(NiMnO2) nanoparticle. The results highlight the strength of this technique in 3D chemical analysis of nanoscale materials by successfully resolving Ni, Mn and O elemental distributions in 3D and discovering the new phenomenon of Ni surface segregation in this material. Furthermore, the comparison of simultaneously acquired HAADF STEM and XEDS STEM tomography results show that XEDS STEM tomography provides additional 3D chemical information of the material especially when there is low atomic number (Z) contrast in the material of interest.

  3. Wavenumber spectrum of whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Gary, S. Peter; Narita, Y.

    2010-12-15

    The forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence is studied in low beta plasma to understand essential properties of the energy spectrum at electron scales, by using a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. This simulation demonstrates turbulence in which the energy cascade rate is greater than the dissipation rate at the electron inertial length. The PIC simulation shows that the magnetic energy spectrum of forward-cascaded whistler turbulence at electron inertial scales is anisotropic and develops a very steep power-law spectrum which is consistent with recent solar wind observations. A comparison of the simulated spectrum with that predicted by a phenomenological turbulence scaling model suggests that the energy cascade at the electron inertial scale depends on both magnetic fluctuations and electron velocity fluctuations, as well as on the whistler dispersion relation. Thus, not only kinetic Alfven turbulence but also whistler turbulence may explain recent solar wind observations of very steep magnetic spectra at short scales.

  4. Coagulation of monodisperse aerosol particles by isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, J.; Koch, D. L.

    2005-02-01

    The rate of coagulation of initially monodisperse aerosols due to isotropic turbulence is studied with particular emphasis on the effects of noncontinuum hydrodynamics and particle inertia. The prevalence of these two factors distinguishes aerosol coagulation from the coagulation of colloidal particles. The turbulent flow seen by an interacting pair of particles is modelled as a stochastically varying flow field that is a linear function of position. This approximation is valid because the 1-10 micron diameter particles for which turbulence dominates coagulation are much smaller than the smallest eddies of a typical turbulent flow field. It is shown that the finite mean-free path of the gas enhances the rate of coagulation and leads to a finite coagulation rate even in the absence of van der Waals attractions. The coupled effects of turbulent shear and Brownian motion are treated. As in the case of laminar shear flows, it is found that Brownian motion plays an important role in the coagulation process even when the Peclet number is moderately large. It is shown that particle inertia increases the coagulation rate in two ways. First, preferential concentration increases the radial distribution function on length scales intermediate between the Kolmogorov length scale and the particle diameter. Second, the greater persistence of particles' relative motion during their local interaction leads to an increase in coagulation rate with increasing particle Stokes number.

  5. Polyhedral 3D structure of human plasma very low density lipoproteins by individual particle cryo-electron tomography1[S

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yadong; Kuang, Yu-Lin; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhai, Xiaobo; Zhang, Meng; Krauss, Ronald M.; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Human VLDLs assembled in the liver and secreted into the circulation supply energy to peripheral tissues. VLDL lipolysis yields atherogenic LDLs and VLDL remnants that strongly correlate with CVD. Although the composition of VLDL particles has been well-characterized, their 3D structure is elusive because of their variations in size, heterogeneity in composition, structural flexibility, and mobility in solution. Here, we employed cryo-electron microscopy and individual-particle electron tomography to study the 3D structure of individual VLDL particles (without averaging) at both below and above their lipid phase transition temperatures. The 3D reconstructions of VLDL and VLDL bound to antibodies revealed an unexpected polyhedral shape, in contrast to the generally accepted model of a spherical emulsion-like particle. The smaller curvature of surface lipids compared with HDL may also reduce surface hydrophobicity, resulting in lower binding affinity to the hydrophobic distal end of the N-terminal β-barrel domain of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) compared with HDL. The directional binding of CETP to HDL and VLDL may explain the function of CETP in transferring TGs and cholesteryl esters between these particles. This first visualization of the 3D structure of VLDL could improve our understanding of the role of VLDL in atherogenesis. PMID:27538822

  6. Radiation induces turbulence in particle-laden fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, Rémi; Coletti, Filippo; Massot, Marc; Mani, Ali

    2014-07-15

    When a transparent fluid laden with solid particles is subject to radiative heating, non-uniformities in particle distribution result in local fluid temperature fluctuations. Under the influence of gravity, buoyancy induces vortical fluid motion which can lead to strong preferential concentration, enhancing the local heating and more non-uniformities in particle distribution. By employing direct numerical simulations this study shows that the described feedback loop can create and sustain turbulence. The velocity and length scale of the resulting turbulence is not known a priori, and is set by balance between viscous forces and buoyancy effects. When the particle response time is comparable to a viscous time scale, introduced in our analysis, the system exhibits intense fluctuations of turbulent kinetic energy and strong preferential concentration of particles.

  7. Predictive modeling of particle-laden turbulent flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Bolio, E.J.; Hrenya, C.M.

    1993-12-31

    Earlier work of Sinclair and Jackson which treats the laminar flow of gas-solid suspensions is extended to model dilute turbulent flow. The random particle motion, often exceeding the turbulent fluctuations in the gas, is obtained using a model based on kinetic theory of granular materials. A two-equation low Reynolds number turbulence model is, modified to account for the presence of the dilute particle phase. Comparisons of the model predictions with available experimental data for the mean and fluctuating velocity profiles for both phases indicate that the resulting theory captures many of the flow features observed in the pneumatic transport of large particles. The model predictions did not manifest an extreme sensitivity to the degree of inelasticity in the particle-particle collisions for the range of solid loading ratios investigated.

  8. Neutral and inertial particle acceleration in strained turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Min; Gylfason, Armann; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence influences the transport and mixing of particles. We study the dynamics of particles in turbulent flows undergoing asymmetrically expanding straining by means of direct numerical simulations. We investigate the accelerations of tracer and inertial particles. We find a good agreement between tracer acceleration variance and the prediction of rapid distortion theory. Furthermore we study how particle acceleration probability density functions depend on the strain rate, the Stokes number, and the Reynolds number. Accelerations variances of inertial particles are discussed in the context of the formal solution of the equation of particle motion, and we show that in strong straining the acceleration variance of particles with small Stokes numbers can exceed that of tracer particles.

  9. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  10. Application of Navier-Stokes code PAB3D with kappa-epsilon turbulence model to attached and separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Lakshmanan, B.; Carlson, John R.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to determine how accurately computations can predict local and average skin friction coefficients for attached and separated flows for simple experimental geometries. Algebraic and transport equation closures were used to model turbulence. To simulate anisotropic turbulence, the standard two-equation turbulence model was modified by adding nonlinear terms. The effects of both grid density and the turbulence model on the computed flow fields were also investigated and compared with available experimental data for subsonic and supersonic free-stream conditions.

  11. Stochastic Simulation of Lagrangian Particle Transport in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyuan

    This dissertation presents the development and validation of the One Dimensional Turbulence (ODT) multiphase model in the Lagrangian reference frame. ODT is a stochastic model that captures the full range of length and time scales and provides statistical information on fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport at low computational cost. The flow evolution is governed by a deterministic solution of the viscous processes and a stochastic representation of advection through stochastic domain mapping processes. The three algorithms for Lagrangian particle transport are presented within the context of the ODT approach. The Type-I and -C models consider the particle-eddy interaction as instantaneous and continuous change of the particle position and velocity, respectively. The Type-IC model combines the features of the Type-I and -C models. The models are applied to the multi-phase flows in the homogeneous decaying turbulence and turbulent round jet. Particle dispersion, dispersion coefficients, and velocity statistics are predicted and compared with experimental data. The models accurately reproduces the experimental data sets and capture particle inertial effects and trajectory crossing effect. A new adjustable particle parameter is introduced into the ODT model, and sensitivity analysis is performed to facilitate parameter estimation and selection. A novel algorithm of the two-way momentum coupling between the particle and carrier phases is developed in the ODT multiphase model. Momentum exchange between the phases is accounted for through particle source terms in the viscous diffusion. The source term is implemented in eddy events through a new kernel transformation and an iterative procedure is required for eddy selection. This model is applied to a particle-laden turbulent jet flow, and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. The effect of particle addition on the velocities of the gas phase is investigated. The development of

  12. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  13. Turbulent Particle Pair Diffusion Using Kinematic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nadeem

    2015-11-01

    Sweeping errors in Kinematic Simulations (KS) have been shown to be negligible in turbulent flows with extended inertial subranges up to at least 1 in KS may therefore be a genuine effect, challenging previous assumptions that in turbulence with generalized power-law energy spectra, E (k) ~k-p for 1 <= 3, locality would lead to, K ~σΔγ , where σΔ = [ <Δ2 > ]1/2 , Δ is the pair separation, v is the pair relative velocity, < > is the ensemble average, and γ = (1 + p) / 2 . For Kolmogorov turbulence this gives, K ~σΔ4 / 3 . A new analysis, supported by KS confirms that both local and non-local effects govern the pair diffusion process, leading to, K ~σΔγp , where now γp > γ for Kolmogorov turbulence, K ~σΔ1 . 53 . Thus non-local diffusional processes cannot be neglected, and this may have important consequences for the general theory of turbulence. The author acknowledge financial support from SABIC, #SB101011.

  14. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  15. Rotation of Nonspherical Particles in Turbulent Channel Flow.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihao; Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Andersson, Helge I; Variano, Evan A

    2015-12-11

    The effects of particle inertia, particle shape, and fluid shear on particle rotation are examined using direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow. Particles at the channel center (nearly isotropic turbulence) and near the wall (highly sheared flow) show different rotation patterns and surprisingly different effects of particle inertia. Oblate particles at the center tend to rotate orthogonally to their symmetry axes, whereas prolate particles rotate around their symmetry axes. This trend is weakened by increasing inertia so that highly inertial oblate spheroids rotate nearly isotropically about their principle axes at the channel center. Near the walls, inertia does not move the rotation of spheroids towards isotropy but, rather, reverses the trend, causing oblate spheroids to rotate strongly about their symmetry axes and prolate spheroids to rotate normal to their symmetry axes. The observed phenomena are mostly ascribed to preferential orientations of the spheroids.

  16. Particle entry through sash in the magnetopause with a dawndard IMF as simulated by a 3-D EM particle code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Yan, X.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2003-12-01

    We report a new progress in the long-term effort to represent the global interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere using a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code with the improved resolutions using the HPF Tristan code. After a quasi-steady state is established with an unmagnetized solar wind we gradually switch on a northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which causes a magnetic reconnection at the nightside cusps and the magnetosphere to be depolarized. In the case that the northward IMF is switched gradually to dawnward, there is no signature of reconnection in the near-Earth magnetotail as in the case with the southward turning. On the contrary analysis of magnetic fields in the magnetopause confirms a signature of magnetic reconnection at both the dawnside and duskside. And the plasma sheet in the near-Earth magnetotail clearly thins as in the case of southward turning. Arrival of dawnward IMF to the magnetopause creates a reconnection groove which cause particle entry into the deep region of the magnetosphere via field lines that go near the magnetopause. This deep connection is more fully recognized tailward of Earth. The flank weak-field fan joins onto the plasma sheet and the current sheet to form a geometrical feature called the cross-tail S that structurally integrates the magnetopause and the tail interior. This structure contributes to direct plasma entry between the magnetosheath to the inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet, in which the entry process heats the magnetosheath plasma to plasma sheet temperatures. These phenomena have been found by Cluster observations. Further investigation with Cluster observations will provide new insights for unsolved problems such as hot flow anomalies (HFAs), substorms, and storm-substorm relationship. 3-D movies with sash structure will be presented at the meeting.

  17. Particle acceleration by turbulent magnetohydro-dynamic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Test particles in a two dimensional, turbulent MHD simulation are found to undergo significant acceleration. The magnetic field configuration is a periodic sheet pinch which undergoes reconnection. The test particles are trapped in the reconnection region for times of order an Alfven transit time in the large electric fields that characterize the turbulent reconnection process at the relatively large magnetic Reynolds number used in the simulation. The maximum speed attained by these particles is consistent with an analytic estimate which depends on the reconnection electric field, the Alfven speed, and the ratio of Larmor period to the Alfven transit time.

  18. Slip velocity of large neutrally buoyant particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellani, G.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss possible definitions for a stochastic slip velocity that describes the relative motion between large particles and a turbulent flow. This definition is necessary because the slip velocity used in the standard drag model fails when particle size falls within the inertial subrange of ambient turbulence. We propose two definitions, selected in part due to their simplicity: they do not require filtration of the fluid phase velocity field, nor do they require the construction of conditional averages on particle locations. A key benefit of this simplicity is that the stochastic slip velocity proposed here can be calculated equally well for laboratory, field and numerical experiments. The stochastic slip velocity allows the definition of a Reynolds number that should indicate whether large particles in turbulent flow behave (a) as passive tracers; (b) as a linear filter of the velocity field; or (c) as a nonlinear filter to the velocity field. We calculate the value of stochastic slip for ellipsoidal and spherical particles (the size of the Taylor microscale) measured in laboratory homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The resulting Reynolds number is significantly higher than 1 for both particle shapes, and velocity statistics show that particle motion is a complex nonlinear function of the fluid velocity. We further investigate the nonlinear relationship by comparing the probability distribution of fluctuating velocities for particle and fluid phases.

  19. A diagonally inverted LU implicit multigrid scheme for the 3-D Navier-Stokes equations and a two equation model of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1988-01-01

    An LU implicit multigrid algorithm is developed to calculate 3-D compressible viscous flows. This scheme solves the full 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation kappa-epsilon model of turbulence. The flow equations are integrated by an efficient, diagonally inverted, LU implicit multigrid scheme while the kappa-epsilon equations are solved, uncoupled from the flow equations, by a block LU implicit algorithm. The flow equations are solved within the framework of the multigrid method using a four-grid level W-cycle, while the kappa-epsilon equations are iterated only on the finest grid. This treatment of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations proves to be an efficient method for calculating 3-D compressible viscous flows.

  20. Modeling crowd turbulence by many-particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjian; Johansson, Anders

    2007-10-01

    A recent study [D. Helbing, A. Johansson, and H. Z. Al-Abideen, Phys. Rev. E 75, 046109 (2007)] has revealed a "turbulent" state of pedestrian flows, which is characterized by sudden displacements and causes the falling and trampling of people. However, turbulent crowd motion is not reproduced well by current many-particle models due to their insufficient representation of the local interactions in areas of extreme densities. In this contribution, we extend the repulsive force term of the social force model to reproduce crowd turbulence. We perform numerical simulations of pedestrians moving through a bottleneck area with this model. The transitions from laminar to stop-and-go and turbulent flows are observed. The empirical features characterizing crowd turbulence, such as the structure function and the probability density function of velocity increments, are reproduced well; i.e., they are well compatible with an analysis of video data during the annual Muslim pilgrimage.

  1. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  2. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  3. Three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry for Turbulence Applications: Case of a Jet Flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, David; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P

    2016-01-01

    3D-PTV is a quantitative flow measurement technique that aims to track the Lagrangian paths of a set of particles in three dimensions using stereoscopic recording of image sequences. The basic components, features, constraints and optimization tips of a 3D-PTV topology consisting of a high-speed camera with a four-view splitter are described and discussed in this article. The technique is applied to the intermediate flow field (5 turbulence quantities in an Eulerian frame are estimated around ten diameters downstream of the jet origin and at various radial distances from the jet core. Lagrangian properties include trajectory, velocity and acceleration of selected particles as well as curvature of the flow path, which are obtained from the Frenet-Serret equation. Estimation of the 3D velocity and turbulence fields around the jet core axis at a cross-plane located at ten diameters downstream of the jet is compared with literature, and the power spectrum of the large-scale streamwise velocity motions is obtained at various radial distances from the jet core. PMID:26967544

  4. Three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry for Turbulence Applications: Case of a Jet Flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, David; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P

    2016-02-27

    3D-PTV is a quantitative flow measurement technique that aims to track the Lagrangian paths of a set of particles in three dimensions using stereoscopic recording of image sequences. The basic components, features, constraints and optimization tips of a 3D-PTV topology consisting of a high-speed camera with a four-view splitter are described and discussed in this article. The technique is applied to the intermediate flow field (5 turbulence quantities in an Eulerian frame are estimated around ten diameters downstream of the jet origin and at various radial distances from the jet core. Lagrangian properties include trajectory, velocity and acceleration of selected particles as well as curvature of the flow path, which are obtained from the Frenet-Serret equation. Estimation of the 3D velocity and turbulence fields around the jet core axis at a cross-plane located at ten diameters downstream of the jet is compared with literature, and the power spectrum of the large-scale streamwise velocity motions is obtained at various radial distances from the jet core.

  5. Turbulence-particle interactions under surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paskyabi, Mostafa Bakhoday

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion and transport of single inertial particles through an oscillatory turbulent aquatic environment are examined numerically by a Lagrangian particle tracking model using a series of idealised test cases. The turbulent mixing is incorporated into the Lagrangian model by the means of a stochastic scheme in which the inhomogeneous turbulent quantities are governed by a one-dimensional k- ɛ turbulence closure scheme. This vertical mixing model is further modified to include the effects of surface gravity waves including Coriolis-Stokes forcing, wave breaking, and Langmuir circulations. To simplify the complex interactions between the deterministic and the stochastic phases of flow, we assume a time-invariant turbulent flow field and exclude the hydrodynamic biases due to the effects of ambient mean current. The numerical results show that the inertial particles acquire perturbed oscillations traced out as time-varying sinking/rising orbits in the vicinity of the sea surface under linear and cnoidal waves and acquire a non-looping single arc superimposed with the high-frequency fluctuations beneath the nonlinear solitary waves. Furthermore, we briefly summarise some recipes through the course of this paper on the implementation of the stochastic particle tracking models to realistically describe the drift and suspension of inertial particles throughout the water column.

  6. Acceleration PDFs of particles in rotating turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clercx, Herman; Perlekar, Prasad; Lavezzo, Valentina; Toschi, Federico

    2012-11-01

    Particle dispersion in buoyancy-driven rotating turbulent flows has direct relevance for many industrial and environmental applications. We have used a Lattice Boltzmann Method coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking algorithm to investigate the behaviour of passive and inertial particles released in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection. The flow domain is horizontally periodic and vertically confined. Both the gravity and the rotation vector are oriented in the vertical direction. Here we present the results of the acceleration PDFs of particles in both non-rotating and strongly rotating RB convection. It is found that the bulk acceleration PDF in non-rotating RB turbulence is like in homogeneous isotropic turbulence whereas rotation introduces anisotropy similar to acceleration PDFs obtained from experiments in (isothermal) forced rotating turbulence. These results and those obtained for inertial particles will be discussed. PP and VL were financially supported by the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of NWO. This work was sponsored by NWO-NCF (SH-176).

  7. Strongly coupled turbulent gas-particle flows in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) simulations of strongly coupled (high mass loading) gas-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of exploring the fundamental physics of fully developed, wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. An adaptive spatial filter is developed that accurately decomposes the total granular energy of the particles into correlated and uncorrelated components at each location in the wall-normal direction of the flow. In this manner, Reynolds- and phase-averaged (PA) two-phase turbulence statistics up to second order are reported for both phases and for three values of the PA mean fluid velocity. As expected due to the high mass loading, in all cases the turbulence production due to mean drag dominates production due to mean shear. A multiphase LRR-IP Reynolds-stress turbulence model is developed to predict the turbulent flow statistics as a function of the wall-normal distance. Using a correlation for the vertical drift velocity developed from the EL data, the turbulence model predictions agree satisfactorily with all of one-point EL statistics for the vertical channel flows, as well as for the homogeneous cluster-induced turbulence (CIT) statistics reported previously. Funded by U.S. National Science Foundation (CBET-1437865).

  8. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  9. Calculation of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow with a multigrid method and a second-moment closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for calculating turbulent jets in crossflow. Fairly rapid convergence is obtained with the k-epsilon turbulence model, but computations with a full Reynolds stress turbulence model (RSM) are not yet very efficient. Grid dependency tests show that there are slight differences between results obtained on the two finest grid levels. Computations using the RSM are significantly different from those with k-epsilon model and compare better to experimental data. Some work is still required to improve the efficiency of the computations with the RSM.

  10. Effects of ambient turbulence on a particle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Adrian C. H.; Er, J. W.; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2015-11-01

    We investigated experimentally the effects of ambient turbulence on a particle plume. Homogeneous and isotropic turbulent ambient water was generated by a random jet array in a glass tank. Glass beads of different particle diameters were released continuously into this turbulent ambient using a submerged hourglass, forming particle plumes with a constant efflux velocity; different initial velocities were tested for each particle size. We focused on the region in which the integral length scale of the ambient eddies is larger than that of the particle plume size. Following the arguments of Hunt (1994) and the observation of Hubner (2004) on a single-phase plume, it is expected that in this region, the internal structure or Lagrangian spreading of the particle plume, will not be significantly affected, but the plume centerline would meander due to the ambient turbulence leading to an increase in the Eulerian width. In the presentation, first, we will present our preliminary experimental data which showed that this is also true for two-phase particle plumes. Second, based on this observation, we developed a theoretical framework using a stochastic approach to predict the spreading of the plume. Predictions of the model will be compared with our experimental data. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling interdisciplinary research program.

  11. 3D image reconstruction algorithms for cryo-electron-microscopy images of virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2000-11-01

    A statistical model for the object and the complete image formation process in cryo electron microscopy of viruses is presented. Using this model, maximum likelihood reconstructions of the 3D structure of viruses are computed using the expectation maximization algorithm and an example based on Cowpea mosaic virus is provided.

  12. TiO2 particles on a 3D network of single-walled nanotubes for NH3 gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yong Deok; Lee, Sooken; Seo, Jeongeun; Lee, Soobum; Ann, Doyeon; Lee, Haiwon

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) gas is one of the gases which causes damage to environment such as acidification and climate change. In this study, a gas sensor based on the three-dimensional (3D) network of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) was fabricated for the detection of NH3 gas in dry air. The sensor showed enhanced performance due to the fast gas diffusion rate and weak interactions between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate. Metal oxide particles were introduced to enhance the performance of the gas sensor. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to deposit the metal oxide in the complex structure, and good control over thickness was achieved. The hybrid gas sensor consisting of the 3D network of SWNTs with anatase TiO2 particles showed stable, repeatable, and enhanced gas sensor performance. The phase of TiO2 particles was characterized by Raman and the morphology of the TiO2 particles on the 3D network of SWNTs was analyzed by transmission electron microscope.

  13. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  14. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity.

  15. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence.

    PubMed

    van Hinsberg, M A T; Clercx, H J H; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity. PMID:27541467

  16. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  17. Nondestructive testing of 3D disperse systems with micro- and nano-particles: N-dimensional space of optical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukova, Alexandra G.

    2006-04-01

    The simultaneous analysis of 3D disperse systems (DS) with micro- and nano- particles by refractometry, absorbency, fluorescence and by different types of light scattering, can help to elaborate the sensing elements for specffic impurity control. Our research has investigated by complex of optical methods different 3D DS such as: proteins, nucleoproteids, lipoproteids, liposomes, viruses, virosomes, lipid emulsions, blood substitutes, latexes, liquid crystals, biological cells with various form and size (including bacterial cells), metallic powders, clays, kimberlites, zeolites, oils, crude oils, samples of natural and water-supply waters, etc. This experience suggests that each 3D DS can be charactensed by N-dimensional vector in N-dimensional space of optical parameters. Due to the fusion of various optical data it is possible to solve the inverse physical problem on the presence of impurity in mixtures of 3D DS by information statistical theory methods. It is important that in this case polymodality of particle size distribution is not an obstacle.

  18. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  19. 3D silicon sensors with variable electrode depth for radiation hard high resolution particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, C.; Borri, M.; Dalla Betta, G.; Haughton, I.; Hasi, J.; Kenney, C.; Povoli, M.; Mendicino, R.

    2015-04-01

    3D sensors, with electrodes micro-processed inside the silicon bulk using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, were industrialized in 2012 and were installed in the first detector upgrade at the LHC, the ATLAS IBL in 2014. They are the radiation hardest sensors ever made. A new idea is now being explored to enhance the three-dimensional nature of 3D sensors by processing collecting electrodes at different depths inside the silicon bulk. This technique uses the electric field strength to suppress the charge collection effectiveness of the regions outside the p-n electrodes' overlap. Evidence of this property is supported by test beam data of irradiated and non-irradiated devices bump-bonded with pixel readout electronics and simulations. Applications include High-Luminosity Tracking in the high multiplicity LHC forward regions. This paper will describe the technical advantages of this idea and the tracking application rationale.

  20. Development of a 3D to 1D Particle Transport Model to Predict Deposition in the Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Grandmont, Celine; Shadden, Shawn C.; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosolized particles are commonly used for therapeutic drug delivery as they can be delivered to the body systemically or be used to treat lung diseases. Recent advances in computational resources have allowed for sophisticated pulmonary simulations, however it is currently impossible to solve for airflow and particle transport for all length and time scales of the lung. Instead, multi-scale methods must be used. In our recent work, where computational methods were employed to solve for airflow and particle transport in the rat airways (Oakes et al. (2014), Annals of Biomedical Engineering 42, 899), the number of particles to exit downstream of the 3D domain was determined. In this current work, the time-dependent Lagrangian description of particles was used to numerically solve a 1D convection-diffusion model (trumpet model, Taulbee and Yu (1975), Journal of Applied Physiology, 38, 77) parameterized specifically for the lung. The expansion of the airway dimensions was determined based on data collected from our aerosol exposure experiments (Oakes et al. (2014), Journal of Applied Physiology, 116, 1561). This 3D-1D framework enables us to predict the fate of particles in the whole lung. This work was supported by the Whitaker Foundation at the IIE, a INRIA Associated Team Postdoc Grant, and a UC Presidential Fellowship.

  1. Synthesis of micro-sized shell-isolated 3D plasmonic superstructures for in situ single-particle SERS monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Liu, Baohong

    2016-04-01

    A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis.A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis and characterization of the Ag@SiO2@Au superstructures (SEM and TEM images, UV/vis and SERS spectra). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00278a

  2. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  3. Turbulence dissipation challenge: particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss application of three particle in cell (PIC) codes to the problems relevant to turbulence dissipation challenge. VPIC is a fully kinetic code extensively used to study a variety of diverse problems ranging from laboratory plasmas to astrophysics. PSC is a flexible fully kinetic code offering a variety of algorithms that can be advantageous to turbulence simulations, including high order particle shapes, dynamic load balancing, and ability to efficiently run on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Finally, HYPERS is a novel hybrid (kinetic ions+fluid electrons) code, which utilizes asynchronous time advance and a number of other advanced algorithms. We present examples drawn both from large-scale turbulence simulations and from the test problems outlined by the turbulence dissipation challenge. Special attention is paid to such issues as the small-scale intermittency of inertial range turbulence, mode content of the sub-proton range of scales, the formation of electron-scale current sheets and the role of magnetic reconnection, as well as numerical challenges of applying PIC codes to simulations of astrophysical turbulence.

  4. Charged particle dynamics in turbulent current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Vainchtein, D. L.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    We study dynamics of charged particle in current sheets with magnetic fluctuations. We use the adiabatic theory to describe the nonperturbed charged particle motion and show that magnetic field fluctuations destroy the adiabatic invariant. We demonstrate that the evolution of particle adiabatic invariant's distribution is described by a diffusion equation and derive analytical estimates of the rate of adiabatic invariant's diffusion. This rate is proportional to power density of magnetic field fluctuations. We compare analytical estimates with numerical simulations. We show that adiabatic invariant diffusion results in transient particles trapping in the current sheet. For magnetic field fluctuation amplitude a few times larger than a normal magnetic field component, more than 50% of transient particles become trapped. We discuss the possible consequences of destruction of adiabaticity of the charged particle motion on the state of the current sheets.

  5. Modeling crowd turbulence by many-particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenjian; Johansson, Anders

    2007-10-01

    A recent study [D. Helbing, A. Johansson, and H. Z. Al-Abideen, Phys. Rev. E 75, 046109 (2007)] has revealed a “turbulent” state of pedestrian flows, which is characterized by sudden displacements and causes the falling and trampling of people. However, turbulent crowd motion is not reproduced well by current many-particle models due to their insufficient representation of the local interactions in areas of extreme densities. In this contribution, we extend the repulsive force term of the social force model to reproduce crowd turbulence. We perform numerical simulations of pedestrians moving through a bottleneck area with this model. The transitions from laminar to stop-and-go and turbulent flows are observed. The empirical features characterizing crowd turbulence, such as the structure function and the probability density function of velocity increments, are reproduced well; i.e., they are well compatible with an analysis of video data during the annual Muslim pilgrimage.

  6. Simulations of energetic particles interacting with nonlinear anisotropic dynamical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusen, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate test-particle diffusion in dynamical turbulence based on a numerical approach presented before. For the turbulence we employ the nonlinear anisotropic dynamical turbulence model which takes into account wave propagation effects as well as damping effects. We compute numerically diffusion coefficients of energetic particles along and across the mean magnetic field. We focus on turbulence and particle parameters which should be relevant for the solar system and compare our findings with different interplanetary observations. We vary different parameters such as the dissipation range spectral index, the ratio of the turbulence bendover scales, and the magnetic field strength in order to explore the relevance of the different parameters. We show that the bendover scales as well as the magnetic field ratio have a strong influence on diffusion coefficients whereas the influence of the dissipation range spectral index is weak. The best agreement with solar wind observations can be found for equal bendover scales and a magnetic field ratio of δ B / B0 = 0.75.

  7. Preferential concentration of heavy particles in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Liu, Han; Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of particle-laden compressible isotropic turbulence with Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ˜ 100 are conducted by using a high-order turbulence solver, which is based on high-order compact finite difference method in the whole flow domain and localized artificial diffusivities for discontinuities. For simplicity, only one-way coupling (i.e., the influence of fluid on particles) between the carrier flow and particles is considered. The focus is on the study of the preferential concentration of heavy particles in dissipative scale of turbulence and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the effect of Stokes number (St) on the particle distribution in flow of Mach 1.01 (referred to as high-Mach-number case in this study) is investigated as a necessary supplementation for the previous studies in incompressible and weakly compressible flows. It turns out that heavy particles with Stokes number close to unity exhibit the strongest preferential concentration, which is in agreement with the observation in incompressible flow. All types of heavy particles have a tendency to accumulate in high-density regions of the background flow. While all kinds of particles dominantly collect in low-vorticity regions, intermediate and large particles (St = 1 and St = 5) are also found to collect in high-vorticity regions behind the randomly formed shocklets. Secondly, the impact of turbulent Mach number (Mt) (or the compressibility) of the carrier flow on the spatial distribution of the particles with St = 1 is discussed using the simulated compressible flows with Mt being 0.22, 0.68, and 1.01, respectively. In low-Mach-number flow, particles tend to concentrate in regions of low vorticity due to the centrifuge effect of vortices and particle concentration decreases monotonically with the increasing vorticity magnitude. As Mach number increases, the degree of particle clustering is slightly weakened in low-vorticity regions but is enhanced in high-vorticity regions, which

  8. 3D Unsteady Multiphase Simulation of Uranium Tetrafluoride Particle Fluorination in Fluidized Bed Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konan, N. A.; Neau, H.; Simonin, O.; Dupoizat, M.; Le Geaziou, T.

    This paper investigates Eulerian simulation approach of uranium hexafluoride production in fluidized bed pilot. Mass transfer is modeled by using the shrinking particle model. The model successfully predicts expected amount of uranium hexafluoride. As heat transfers with wall are neglected, temperature increases within the reactor and there is no gradient in wall-normal direction of reactor. External diffusion model of reactive gas around particle is developed. Effect of fluorine diffusion within nitrogen is found to be negligible under the simulation conditions. Moreover, inter-particle radiative heat transfer between particles of dense phase in the bed is investigated in the frame of Rosseland approximation.

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  11. TURB3D: New Rocket-Borne Multi-Sensor System to Study Three-Dimensional Structures of Mesospheric Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, B.; Lubken, F.-J.; Rapp, M.; Krein, G.; Henkel, H.; Heckl, H.-J.

    2015-09-01

    Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics (TAP) at the Rostock University in Kuhlungsborn, Germany together with the company von Hoerner and Sulger GmbH (vH&S) in Schwetzingen, Germany develop a new instrumental setup for 3-dimensional in-situ turbulence and temperature measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. The setup consists of a mother payload carrying a new generation CONE instrument and three identical daughter payloads that will be ejected from the main payload at a predefined altitude. When ejected, all the payloads measure densities of neutral air and one of the plasma species, either electrons or ions. Each payload has its own telemetry and positioning system and sends all the data directly down to the ground. The new measurements will thereby yield four simultaneously measured profiles of neutral and plasma densities, neutral air temperature, and turbulence energy dissipation rate, separated by up to some hundreds of meters. Important for turbulence studies, these measurements will infer spectra information that cover a wide range of spatial scale characteristics for MLT turbulence in both horizontal and vertical directions.

  12. Finite element solution of 3-D turbulent Navier-Stokes equations for propeller-driven slender bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Russell Hicks

    1987-12-01

    Three-dimensional turbulent flow over the aft end of a slender propeller driven body with the wake from a slender, planar appendage was calculated for 4 configurations. The finite element method in the form of the weak Galerkin formulation with the penalty method was used to solve the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The actual code was FIDAP, modified with a propeller body force and turbulence model, used for the solution. The turbulence model included an Inner Layer Integrated TKE model, and Outer Layer mixing length model, and a Planar Wake model. No separate boundary layer method was used for the body, rather modifications to the Integrated TKE model were made to account for the primary effects of the surface boundary layer on the flow. The flow was calculated at two levels of thrust and corresponding swirl, selfpropelled and 100 percent overthrust, as well as with selfpropelled thrust but no torque simulating an ideal rotor stator combination. Also, the selfpropelled case was calculated with a simplified turbulence model using only the Inner Layer and Planar Wake model. The results compared favorably with experiments.

  13. Dual-wavelength digital holography for 3D particle image velocimetry: experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Grare, S; Allano, D; Coëtmellec, S; Perret, G; Corbin, F; Brunel, M; Gréhan, G; Lebrun, D

    2016-01-20

    A multi-exposure digital in-line hologram of a particle field is recorded by two successive pulses of different wavelengths. During the reconstruction step, each recording can be independently analyzed by selecting a given wavelength. This procedure enables avoiding the superimposition of particle images that may be close to each other.

  14. Real-time visual sensing system achieving high-speed 3D particle tracking with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time visual sensing system, which is created to achieve high-speed three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking of microscopic spherical particles in aqueous solutions with nanometer resolution. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera, a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and real-time image processing programs. The CMOS camera has high photosensitivity and superior SNR. It acquires images of 128×120 pixels at a frame rate of up to 10,000 frames per second (fps) under the white light illumination from a standard 100 W halogen lamp. The real-time image stream is downloaded from the camera directly to the FPGA, wherein a 3D particle-tracking algorithm is implemented to calculate the 3D positions of the target particle in real time. Two important objectives, i.e., real-time estimation of the 3D position matches the maximum frame rate of the camera and the timing of the output data stream of the system is precisely controlled, are achieved. Two sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the system. First, the visual sensing system was used to track the motion of a 2 μm polystyrene bead, whose motion was controlled by a three-axis piezo motion stage. The ability to track long-range motion with nanometer resolution in all three axes is demonstrated. Second, it was used to measure the Brownian motion of the 2 μm polystyrene bead, which was stabilized in aqueous solution by a laser trapping system. PMID:24216655

  15. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  16. Fractal patterns in turbulent flow for laden particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, M.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Angilella, J.-R.

    2011-12-01

    We use Kinematic Simulation as a particular kind of synthetic turbulence model to study the preferential accumulation of laden particles with inertia and gravity. Particles are released as a unifrom cloud in the periodic simulation box. We allow particles to settle in synthetic flow and after some times particles concentrate in a particular sub-domain. We study the dimensional properties of these attractors as functions of drift parameter and Stokes number. The attractor's topology varies from curve(D = 1) to fractal plane.

  17. Behavior of Heavy Particles in Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Lee, Changhoon

    2010-11-01

    The motion of heavy particles in turbulent channel flow was investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We assumed that Stokes drag, Saffman lift and Magnus lift act on the motion of heavy spherical particles in turbulence. In this study, Stokes number is defined as the particle response time normalized by the wall units. The range of the Stokes number is 0.1˜50 and the diameter of a particle is 0.06˜0.3 in wall unit. Collision of particles with the wall is modelled by an elastic collision. Relevant velocity and acceleration statistics of heavy particles for the given range of Stokes number were investigated to interpret the particle accumulation near the wall. Particle accumulation at the wall is maximized when the Stokes number is around 15. And we found that Saffman lift force has a great effect on particle acceleration in the wall-normal direction near the wall. Detailed statistics including probability density function and autocorrelation of particle velocity and acceleration will be presented in the meeting.

  18. Clustering of particles in turbulence due to phoresis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lukas; Fouxon, Itzhak; Krug, Dominik; van Reeuwijk, Maarten; Holzner, Markus

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that diffusiophoretic, thermophoretic, and chemotactic phenomena in turbulence lead to clustering of particles on multifractal sets that can be described using one single framework, valid when the particle size is much smaller than the smallest length scale of turbulence l_{0}. To quantify the clustering, we derive positive pair correlations and fractal dimensions that hold for scales smaller than l_{0}. For scales larger than l_{0} the pair-correlation function is predicted to show a stretched exponential decay towards 1. In the case of inhomogeneous turbulence we find that the fractal dimension depends on the direction of inhomogeneity. By performing experiments with particles in a turbulent gravity current we demonstrate clustering induced by salinity gradients in conformity to the theory. The particle size in the experiment is comparable to l_{0}, outside the strict validity region of the theory, suggesting that the theoretical predictions transfer to this practically relevant regime. This clustering mechanism may provide the key to the understanding of a multitude of processes such as formation of marine snow in the ocean and population dynamics of chemotactic bacteria. PMID:27415361

  19. Form From Projected Shadow (FFPS): An algorithm for 3D shape analysis of sedimentary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro Ríos, Anibal; Sarocchi, Damiano; Nahmad-Molinari, Yuri; Borselli, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present a simple and effective method based on measuring the projected shadow of sedimentary particles by means of a digital image processing algorithm that enables the three principal axes of the particle to be determined from a single 2D color image. The method consists in projecting the shadow of the particle when it is resting on the maximum projection area (“c” axis pointing almost vertical, since in this configuration minimal distance from the center of mass to the floor is achieved minimizing the gravitational potential energy), by means of an oblique incident illumination system. Using HSL (hue-saturation-lightness) color space segmentation, two axes of the particle are measured directly from the maximum projected area. The length of the shadow provides the third axis of the particle. Multiple textured and colored sedimentary particles can be easily segmented from a green background and their corresponding shadows by means of a single space color transformation. This simple method enables the lengths of the three main axes of several particles to be determined at the same time without expensive equipment (the software is provided free by the authors). The axis lengths can span a broad range of sizes, and are measured with low experimental error (less than 5%).

  20. Developments in digital in-line holography enable validated measurement of 3D particle field dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert

    2013-12-01

    Digital in-line holography is an optical technique which can be applied to measure the size, three-dimensional position, and three-component velocity of disperse particle fields. This work summarizes recent developments at Sandia National Laboratories focused on improvement in measurement accuracy, experimental validation, and applications to multiphase flows. New routines are presented which reduce the uncertainty in measured position along the optical axis to a fraction of the particle diameter. Furthermore, application to liquid atomization highlights the ability to measure complex, three-dimensional structures. Finally, investigation of particles traveling at near sonic conditions prove accuracy despite significant experimental noise due to shock-waves.

  1. Charged-particle motion in multidimensional magnetic-field turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the fundamental physics of charged-particle motion in a turbulent magnetic field using a numerical simulation. The magnetic field fluctuations are taken to be static and to have a power spectrum which is Kolmogorov. The charged particles are treated as test particles. It is shown that when the field turbulence is independent of one coordinate (i.e., k lies in a plane), the motion of these particles across the magnetic field is essentially zero, as required by theory. Consequently, the only motion across the average magnetic field direction that is allowed is that due to field-line random walk. On the other hand, when a fully three-dimensional realization of the turbulence is considered, the particles readily cross the field. Transport coefficients both along and across the ambient magnetic field are computed. This scheme provides a direct computation of the Fokker-Planck coefficients based on the motions of individual particles, and allows for comparison with analytic theory.

  2. An efficient quasi-3D particle tracking-based approach for transport through fractures with application to dynamic dispersion calculation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichun; Cardenas, M Bayani

    2015-08-01

    The quantitative study of transport through fractured media has continued for many decades, but has often been constrained by observational and computational challenges. Here, we developed an efficient quasi-3D random walk particle tracking (RWPT) algorithm to simulate solute transport through natural fractures based on a 2D flow field generated from the modified local cubic law (MLCL). As a reference, we also modeled the actual breakthrough curves (BTCs) through direct simulations with the 3D advection-diffusion equation (ADE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The RWPT algorithm along with the MLCL accurately reproduced the actual BTCs calculated with the 3D ADE. The BTCs exhibited non-Fickian behavior, including early arrival and long tails. Using the spatial information of particle trajectories, we further analyzed the dynamic dispersion process through moment analysis. From this, asymptotic time scales were determined for solute dispersion to distinguish non-Fickian from Fickian regimes. This analysis illustrates the advantage and benefit of using an efficient combination of flow modeling and RWPT. PMID:26042625

  3. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3D, EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, O.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Neubert, T.

    1993-01-01

    The results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a three dimensional, electromagnetic (EM) particle code are presented. Hitherto such global simulations were done with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes while lower dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. The kinetic model combines macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equations and the Lorentz equation for particles. The preliminary results are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn to dusk asymmetries.

  4. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3-D EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    We present here our first results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a new three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code. Hitherto such global simulations were done with MHD codes while lower-dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. Our kinetic model attempts to combine the macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equation and the Lorentz equation for particles, which are ideally suited for computers. The preliminary results shown here are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn-dusk asymmetries.

  5. Fabrication of a three dimensional particle focusing microfluidic device using a 3D printer, PDMS, and glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, Robyn; Rosen, Daniel; Shirk, Kathryn

    Microfluidic devices have high importance in fields such as bioanalysis because they can manipulate volumes of fluid in the range of microliters to picoliters. Small samples can be quickly and easily tested using complex microfluidic devices. Typically, these devices are created through lithography techniques, which can be costly and time consuming. It has been shown that inexpensive microfluidic devices can be produced quickly using a 3D printer and PDMS. However, a size limitation prohibits the fabrication of precisely controlled microchannels. By using shrinking materials in combination with 3D printing of flow-focusing geometries, this limitation can be overcome. This research seeks to employ these techniques to quickly fabricate an inexpensive, working device with three dimensional particle focusing capabilities. By modifying the channel geometry, colloidal particles in a solution will be focused into a single beam when passed through this device. The ability to focus particles is necessary for a variety of biological applications which requires precise detection and characterization of particles in a sample. We would like to thank the Shippensburg University Undergraduate Research Grant Program for their generous funding.

  6. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  7. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    PubMed

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams. PMID:27526935

  8. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    PubMed

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-16

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  9. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array

    PubMed Central

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams. PMID:27526935

  10. Predictive modeling of particle-laden, turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The successful prediction of particle-laden, turbulent flows relies heavily on the representation of turbulence in the gas phase. Several types of turbulence models for single-phase gas flow have been developed which compare reasonably well with experimental data. In the present work, a low-Reynolds'' k-[epsilon], closure model is chosen to describe the Reynolds stresses associated with gas-phase turbulence. This closure scheme, which involves transport equations for the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, is valid in the turbulent core as well as the viscous sublayer. Several versions of the low-Reynolds k-[epsilon] closure are documented in the literature. However, even those models which are similar in theory often differ considerably in their quantitative and qualitative predictions, making the selection of such a model a difficult task. The purpose of this progress report is to document our findings on the performance of ten different versions of the low-Reynolds k-[epsilon] model on predicting fully developed pipe flow. The predictions are compared with the experimental data of Schildknecht, et al. (1979). With the exception of the model put forth by Hoffman (1975), the predictions of all the closures show reasonable agreement for the mean velocity profile. However, important quantitative differences exist for the turbulent kinetic energy profile. In addition, the predicted eddy viscosity profile and the wall-region profile of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate exhibit both quantitative and qualitative differences. An effort to extend the present comparisons to include experimental measurements of other researchers is recommended in order to further evaluate the performance of the models.

  11. Soot particle size modelling in 3D simulations of diesel engine combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraioli, V.; Beatrice, C.; Lazzaro, M.

    2011-12-01

    The present work is focused on multi-dimensional simulations of combustion in diesel engines. The primary objective was to test, in a diesel engine framework, a soot particle size model to represent the carbon particle formation and calculate the corresponding size distribution function. Simulations are performed by means of a parallel version of the KIVA3V numerical code, modified to adopt detailed kinetics reaction mechanisms. A skeletal reaction scheme for n-heptane autoignition has been extended, to include PAH kinetics and carbonaceous particle formation and consumption rates: the full reaction set is made up of 82 gas species and 50 species accounting for the particles, thus the complete reaction scheme comprises 132 species and 2206 reaction steps. Four different engine operative conditions, varying engine speed and load, are taken into account and experimentally tested on a single cylinder diesel engine fuelling pure n-heptane. Computed particle size distribution functions are compared with corresponding measurements at the exhaust, performed by a differential mobility spectrometer. A satisfying agreement between computed and measured combustion profiles is obtained in all the conditions. A reasonable aerosol evolution can be obtained, yet in all the cases the model exhibits the tendency to overestimate the number of particles within the range 5-160 nm. Moreover calculations predict a nucleation mode not detected by the available instrument. According to the simulations, the total number and size of the nascent particles would not depend on the operative conditions, while the features of the larger aggregates distinctly vary with the engine functioning.

  12. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and flow structure in 3-D turbulent boundary layer with imbedded longitudinal vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J.Y.; Ryou, H.S.

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer characteristics and flow structure in turbulent flows through a flat plate three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer containing built-in vortex generators have been analyzed by means of the space marching Crank-Nicolson finite difference method. The method solves the slender flow approximation of the steady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. This study used the eddy diffusivity model and standard {kappa}-{epsilon} model to predict heat transfer and flow field in the turbulent flow with imbedded longitudinal vortex. The results show boundary layer distortion due to vortices, such as strong spanwise flow divergence and boundary layer thinning. The heat transfer and skin friction show relatively good results in comparison with experimental data. The vortex core moves slightly away from the wall and grows slowly; consequently, the vortex influences the flow over a very long distance downstream. The enhancement of the heat transfer in the vicinity of the wall is due to the increasing spanwise separation of the vortices as they develop in the streamwise direction.

  13. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D anlaysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bielewski, M; Eriksson, M; Himbert, J; Simon, R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T F

    2007-11-27

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal {micro}-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 {micro}m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  14. DIFFUSION OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN TURBULENT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewski, M.; Spanier, F.; Kissmann, R.

    2012-05-10

    In this paper, we investigate the transport of energetic particles in turbulent plasmas. A numerical approach is used to simulate the effect of the background plasma on the motion of energetic protons. The background plasma is in a dynamically turbulent state found from numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations, where we use parameters typical for the heliosphere. The implications for the transport parameters (i.e., pitch-angle diffusion coefficients and mean free path) are calculated and deviations from the quasi-linear theory are discussed.

  15. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Turbulence Generated by Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Toma, Kenji; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We investigate stochastic particle acceleration in accretion flows. It is believed that magnetorotational instability (MRI) generates turbulence inside accretion flows and that cosmic rays (CRs) are accelerated by the turbulence. We calculate equations of motion for CRs in the turbulent fields generated by MRI with the shearing box approximation and without back reaction to the field. Our results show that the CRs randomly gain or lose their energy through interaction with the turbulent fields. The CRs diffuse in the configuration space anisotropically: the diffusion coefficient in the direction of the unperturbed flow is about 20 times higher than the Bohm coefficient, while those in the other directions are only a few times higher than the Bohm. The momentum distribution is isotropic and its evolution can be described by the diffusion equation in momentum space where the diffusion coefficient is a power-law function of the CR momentum. We show that the shear acceleration works efficiently for energetic particles. We also cautiously note that in the shearing box approximation, particles that cross the simulation box many times along the radial direction undergo unphysical runaway acceleration by the Lorentz transformation, which needs to be taken into account with special care.

  16. Parallel 3-D Electromagnetic Particle Code Using High Performance FORTRAN: Parallel TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Li, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; et al.

    A three-dimensional full electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC ) code, TRISTAN (Tridimensional Stanford) code, has been parallelized using High Performance Fortran (HPF) as a RPM (Real Parallel Machine). In the parallelized HPF code, the simulation domain is decomposed in one-dimension, and both the particle and field data located in each domain that we call the sub-domain are distributed on each processor. Both the particle and field data on a sub-domain are needed by the neighbor sub-domains and thus communications between the sub-domains are inevitable. Our simulation results using HPF exhibit the promising applicability of the HPF communications to a large scale scientific computing such as solar wind-magnetosphere interactions.

  17. Bacterial turbulence reduction by passive magnetic particle chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-An; I, Lin

    2013-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of the bacterial turbulence reduction in dense E. coli suspensions by increasing the coupling of passive particle additives (paramagnetic particles). Applying an external magnetic field induces magnetic dipoles for particles and causes the formation of vertical chain bundles, which are hard for bacterial flows to tilt and break. The larger effective drag coefficient of chains causes slow horizontal motion of chains, which in turn form obstacles to suppress bacterial flows through the strong correlation in coherent bacterial clusters and intercluster interaction. The interruption of the upward energy flow from individual self-propelling bacteria to the larger scale in the bacterial turbulence with multiscaled coherent flow by the chain bundle leads to more severe suppression in the low frequency (wave number) regimes of the power spectra. PMID:24125341

  18. Bacterial turbulence reduction by passive magnetic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuo-An; I, Lin

    2013-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of the bacterial turbulence reduction in dense E. coli suspensions by increasing the coupling of passive particle additives (paramagnetic particles). Applying an external magnetic field induces magnetic dipoles for particles and causes the formation of vertical chain bundles, which are hard for bacterial flows to tilt and break. The larger effective drag coefficient of chains causes slow horizontal motion of chains, which in turn form obstacles to suppress bacterial flows through the strong correlation in coherent bacterial clusters and intercluster interaction. The interruption of the upward energy flow from individual self-propelling bacteria to the larger scale in the bacterial turbulence with multiscaled coherent flow by the chain bundle leads to more severe suppression in the low frequency (wave number) regimes of the power spectra.

  19. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  20. Intermittent features of inertial particle distributions in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, F.; Picano, F.; Troiani, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Clustering is widely observed in many turbulent flows, where it results from the inability of finite inertia particles to comply with the different time scales, which characterize a turbulent field. Depending on their inertia, particles are found to be instantaneously organized in clusters, whose size depends on the Kolmogorov-Stokes number and which presumably form as a consequence of particle ejection from persistent vortical structures. In reacting flows, the abrupt acceleration of the fluid across the thin flame front due to combustion adds new and unexpected features. The particles follow such acceleration with a certain time lag which, coupled with the flame front fluctuations, gives rise to an entirely different mechanism of cluster formation. As suggested in previous studies, a possible indicator of this preferential localization is the so-called clustering index, quantifying the departure of the actual particle arrangement from the Poissonian distribution. Most of the clustering is found in the flame brush region, where it cannot be explained by the standard arguments used in cold flows. Actually, the effect is significant also for very light particles, where the simple model we propose, based on the Bray-Moss-Libby formalism, is able to account for most of the deviation from the Poissonian. When the particle inertia increases, the effect becomes larger and it is found to persist well within the region of the burned gases. The observed clustering is confirmed by a more precise analysis in terms of a generalization of the radial distribution function to inhomogeneous, anisotropic flows. The results taken from a direct numerical simulation with single step kinetics favorably compare with experiments on a premixed Bunsen turbulent flame. The present findings are expected to be of some relevance for the plenty of applications dealing with particles in presence of combustion, e.g., liquid droplet swarms for combustion temperature control, soot dynamics, or

  1. Tumbling in Turbulence: How much does particle shape effect particle motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.; Andersson, H. I.; Zhao, L.; Byron, M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural particles suspended in surface water are often non-spherical. We explore the ways in which particle shape effects particle motion, focusing specifically on how particle rotation is divided into spinning and tumbling components. This, in turn, will effect particle collision, clustering, and settling rates. We focus on idealized axisymmetric particles shaped as rods, discs, and spheroids. They are chosen so as to explain the physics of aspherical-particle motion that will be relevant for natural particles such as plankton, sediment, or aggregates (e.g. oil-mineral aggregates, clay flocs, or bio-sediment aggregates held together by TEP). Our work begins with laboratory measurements of particle motion in a turbulence tank built to mimic the flow found in rivers, estuaries, and the ocean surface mixed layer. We then proceed to direct numerical simulation of particle-flow interactions in sheared turbulence similar to that which is found in the surface water of creeks and rivers. We find that shape has only a very weak effect on particle angular velocity, which is a quantity calculated with respect the global reference frame (i.e. east/north/up). If we analyze rotation in a particle's local frame (i.e. the particle's principle axes of rotation), then particle shape has a strong effect on rotation. In the local frame, rotation is described by two components: tumbling and spinning. We find that rod-shaped particles spin more than they tumble, and we find that disc-shaped particles tumble more than they spin. Such behavior is indicative of how particles respond the the directional influence of vortex tubes in turbulence, and such response has implications for particle motion other than rotation. Understanding particle alignment is relevant for predicting particle-particle collision rates, particle-wall collision rates, and the shear-driven breakup of aggregates. We discuss these briefly in the context of what can be concluded from the rotation data discussed above.

  2. Energy loss of a heavy particle near 3D charged rotating hairy black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider a charged rotating black hole in three dimensions with a scalar charge and discuss the energy loss of a heavy particle moving near the black-hole horizon. We also study quasi-normal modes and find the dispersion relations. We find that the effect of scalar charge and electric charge increases the energy loss.

  3. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  4. Particle size distribution of cataclastic fault materials from Southern California: A 3-D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin-Ji; Sammis, Charles G.

    1994-03-01

    The particle size distributions of fault gouge from the San Andreas, the San Gabriel, and the Lopez Canyon faults in Southern California were measured using sieving and Coulter-Counter techniques over a range of particle sizes from 2 μm to 16 mm. The distributions were found to be power law (fractal) for the smaller fragments and log-normal by mass for sizes near and above the peak size. The apparent fractal dimension D of the smaller particles in gouge samples from the San Andreas fault, the San Gabriel fault and the Lopez Canyon gouge were 2.4 3.6, 2.6 2.9 and 2.4 3.0, respectively. The average D for the Lopez Canyon gouge was 2.7±0.2, which is in agreement with earlier studies of this gouge using planar 2-D sections. The fractal dimension of the finer fragments from all three faults is observed to be correlated with the peak fragment size, with finer gouges tending to have a larger D. A computer automaton is used to show that this observation may be explained as resulting from a fragmentation process which has a “grinding limit” at which particle reduction stops.

  5. Cosmic Ray and Solar Energetic Particle Observations In The 3-d Heliosphere Near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    Observations from the COSPIN High Energy Telescope during Ulysses recent fast lat- itude scan have provided the first latitudinal survey of intensities of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles near solar maximum. During the previous fast latitude scan near solar minimum, no significant solar energetic particle events were observed, but the galactic and anomalous component cosmic ray intensities showed small positive latitudinal gradients organized around a southwardly displaced heliospheric current sheet. The small size of the gradients, together with observation near the poles of 26-day intensity variations impressed by near-equatorial CIR-structures, led to the conclusion that latitudinal transport across the mean Parker spiral magnetic fields was much easier than had been expected prior to Ulysses observations. During the recently completed fast latitude scan near solar maximum, galactic cosmic rays could be ob- served only occasionally in the quiet times between frequent solar energetic particle events. When cosmic ray intensities could be observed, no measurable latitude gradi- ents were found, implying that modulation became much more spherically symmetric near solar maximum. From observations of the solar energetic particle intensities, we found that almost all large gradual events produced intensity increases both at Ulysses and at IMP-8 near Earth, regardless of the latitude or longitude of the spacecrafts relative to the initiating event in the corona. Most often the intensities at Ulysses and IMP-8 became comparable a few days after the onset of the event and remained nearly equal for the rest of the decay, which in some cases lasted as much as a full solar rota- tion. Both the cosmic ray and the solar energetic particle observations imply efficient latitudinal and cross-field transport of energetic particles even in the complex inter- planetary magnetic fields of solar maximum. Recent observations suggest that the solar polar coronal holes have

  6. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  7. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  8. Particle sedimentation in curved tubes: A 3D simulation and optimization for treatment of vestibular vertigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Squires, Todd M.; Hain, Timothy C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical disorder of the vestibular system where micron-size crystals abnormally drift into the semicircular canals of the inner ear that sense angular motion of the head. Sedimentation of these crystals causes sensation of motion after true head motion has stopped: vertigo results. The usual clinical treatment is through a series of head maneuvers designed to move the particles into a less sensitive region of the canal system. We present a three-dimensional model to simulate treatment of BPPV by determining the complete hydrodynamic motion of the particles through the course of a therapeutic maneuver while using a realistic representation of the actual geometry. Analyses of clinical maneuvers show the parameter range for which they are effective, and indicate inefficiencies in current practice. In addition, an optimization process determines the most effective head maneuver, which significantly differs from those currently in practice.

  9. 3D map of the plant photosystem II supercomplex obtained by cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Nield, J; Orlova, E V; Morris, E P; Gowen, B; van Heel, M; Barber, J

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the first 3D structure of the photosystem II (PSII) supercomplex of higher plants, constructed by single particle analysis of images obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This large multisubunit membrane protein complex functions to absorb light energy and catalyze the oxidation of water and reduction of plastoquinone. The resolution of the 3D structure is 24 A and emphasizes the dimeric nature of the supercomplex. The extrinsic proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) are readily observed as a tetrameric cluster bound to the lumenal surface. By considering higher resolution data, obtained from electron crystallography, it has been possible to relate the binding sites of the OEC proteins with the underlying intrinsic membrane subunits of the photochemical reaction center core. The model suggests that the 33 kDa OEC protein is located towards the CP47/D2 side of the reaction center but is also positioned over the C-terminal helices of the D1 protein including its CD lumenal loop. In contrast, the model predicts that the 23/17 kDa OEC proteins are positioned at the N-terminus of the D1 protein incorporating the AB lumenal loop of this protein and two other unidentified transmembrane helices. Overall the 3D model represents a significant step forward in revealing the structure of the photosynthetic OEC whose activity is required to sustain the aerobic atmosphere on our planet.

  10. Solid particle deposition during turbulent flow production operations

    SciTech Connect

    Escobedo, J.; Mansoori, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The production and transportation of petroleum fluids could be severely affected by deposition of suspended particles (i.e., asphaltene, paraffin/wax, sand, and/or diamondoid) in the production wells and/or transfer pipelines. In many instances the amount of precipitation is rather large causing complete plugging of these conduits. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of suspended particles during flow conditions. In this paper the authors present an analysis of the diffusional effects on the rate of solid particle deposition during turbulent flow conditions (crude oil production generally falls within this regime). The turbulent boundary layer theory and the concepts of mass transfer have been utilized to calculate the particle deposition rates on the walls of the flowing conduit. The developed model accounts for the eddy and Brownian diffusivities as well as for inertial effects. The analysis presented in this paper shows that rates of solid-particle deposition (during crude oil production) on the walls of the flowing channel due solely to diffusional effects are small. It is also shown that deposition rates decrease with increasing particle size. However, when the process is momentum controlled (large particle sizes) higher deposition rates are expected.

  11. A numerical investigation of cluster fall velocity in vertical particle-laden turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; National Renewable Energy Lab Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Particle clusters are known to play a key role in the multiphase dynamics as well as secondary processes such as heat transfer and catalytic conversion within vertical pipe flows. For example, vertical risers in circulating fluidized bed reactors consists of a dilute suspension of particles that ascend in the core of the flow, then condense into clusters and descend at the walls. In this work, an Euler-Lagrange strategy is used to study particle cluster dynamics in turbulent risers for a range of Archimedes numbers and density ratios. The simulations are conducted in the framework of NGA, a high-order fully conservative code tailored for turbulent flows. The particles are solved in a Lagrangian framework and the two phases are coupled using a two-step filtering process to ensure conservation, as well as convergence during mesh refinement. Normal and tangential collisions are computed via a soft-sphere model. A conservative immersed boundary method is used to represent the 3D cylindrical geometry on a Cartesian mesh. Simulation results are compared with experimental correlations in terms of cluster fall velocity and size. The role of the carrier fluid on the cluster behavior is also studied.

  12. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  13. Test particle study of minor ions in solar wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurbuchen, Th.; Bochsler, P.; Politano, H.; Pouquet, A.

    1995-01-01

    We perform a parameter study of the temporal evolution of a test particle distribution function in MHD turbulence. The turbulent fields are calculated using a pseudo-spectral method and periodic boundary conditions on a regular grid of 180(exp 3) points, appropriate for incompressible, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Initially, the kinetic and the magnetic energy are equal on the average. Both, deterministic and random initial conditions are used, in the former case with zeros of the magnetic field located at grid points, in the latter case located by interpolation between grid points. The evolution of the minor ion distribution function is studied in detail as these turbulent fields evolve, developing strong current and vorticity sheets. Using the full collisionless equation of motion for the test particles, the efficiency of nonlinear interactions can be studied. The results are compared to theoretical predictions and are then discussed in connection with the observations of the dynamical properties of solar wind minor ions derived from in situ observations.

  14. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introducesmore » a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.« less

  15. Measurement of 3D-forces on a Micro Particle in Acoustofluidic Devices Using an Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Dual, Jurg

    Here, we use a calibrated high gradient laser trap to directly measure the total time-averaged 3D force on a dielectric silica parti- cle in the regime of an ultrasonic standing wave. Acoustic radiation and acoustic streaming apply forces on an optically trapped particle within an acoustofluidic device. From measuring the induced displacements from the laser trap center in three dimen- sions the acoustic forces (0.2-50pN) can be calculated in dependence of the particle position and excitation frequency. Thus, the real pressure distributions within acoustofluidic devices can be mapped out. The three dimensional direct measurement, as pre- sented here, opens up the possibility to quantify so far inaccessible small scale phenomena such as the effects of: a.) local and global acoustic streaming, and b.) boundaries or close-by objects.

  16. Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging

    PubMed Central

    Afik, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, fluid dynamics in microfluidic devices, bacteria taxis, cellular trafficking. The 3d position can be determined using 2d imaging alone by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus fluorescent particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, and allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. The proposed algorithm, an offspring of the circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of many particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem, and overcomes the challenges of finding local maxima in the complex parameter space which results from ring clusters and noise. Several algorithmic concepts introduced here can be advantageous in other cases, particularly when dealing with noisy and sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. It is implemented in a microfluidic experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70 Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection. PMID:26329642

  17. Particle transport across the transpired turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlu, Hamdi; Louis, Jean F.

    1987-05-01

    Wind tunnel data and theoretical results are used to study the effects of surface inclination and density of particulates on deposition control by transpiration, with application to the control of deposition of small particles contributing most of the mass of the solid carryover entering turbines burning coal-derived fuel. The effects of size and injection rates on deposition are considered, and the interaction between transpiration and the inertial impaction of particles is investigated using glass particles. Turbulent Schmidt numbers obtained from tests conducted on an inclined plate with coal particles in order to determine the density effects on the particle concentration profiles were in agreement with the predictions of Tchen (1974) for the flat plate.

  18. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.; Hussein, M. E-mail: m_hussein@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2014-10-10

    A model for noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence was recently proposed. This model was already used to study the random walk of magnetic field lines. In the current article we use the same model to investigate the diffusion of energetic particles across the mean magnetic field. To compute the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, two analytical theories are used, namely, the Non-Linear Guiding Center theory and the Unified Non-Linear Transport (UNLT) theory. It is shown that the two theories provide different results for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. We also perform test-particle simulations for the aforementioned turbulence model. We show that only the UNLT theory describes perpendicular transport accurately, confirming that this is a powerful tool in diffusion theory.

  19. Statistics of particle concentration in free-surface turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, Mahesh M; Larkin, J; Goldburg, W

    2009-01-01

    Particles on the surface of an incompressible fluid maintained in a turbulent steady-state cluster into spatio-temporally complex flow structures. We experimentally study the statistics of particle concentration n(r, t) over various coarse-grained scales r' in the inertial range. Another control parameter is the Taylor Microscale Reynolds number Re{sub {lambda}}. The focus is on the steady state probability density function {Pi}(n{sub r}). Attention is also given to the variance {sigma}{sup 2}(r, t) of this PDF, since it yields information about the topology of the coagulated structures. Where possible, the results are compared and contrasted with those obtained in a recent analytical and numerical study of two-dimensional synthetic turbulence by Ducasse and Pumir. There, but not here, the dimensionless compressibility C is an important control parameter.

  20. Backwards Two-Particle Dispersion in a Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivas, Theodore

    2014-11-01

    We derive an exact equation governing two-particle backwards mean-squared dispersion for both deterministic and stochastic tracer particles in turbulent flows. For the deterministic trajectories, we probe consequences of our formula for short time and arrive at approximate expressions for the mean squared dispersion which involve second order structure functions of the velocity and acceleration fields. For the stochastic trajectories, we analytically calculate an exact t3 contribution to the squared separation and additionally compute the average dispersion using direct numerical simulation (DNS) results of incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We find that this exactly calculable term accounts for almost all of the observed behavior. We argue that this contribution also appears to describe the asymptotic Richardson-like behavior for deterministic paths and present DNS results to support this claim. Partially supported by NSF Grant No. CDI-II: CMMI 0941530 at Johns Hopkins University.

  1. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-31

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  2. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  3. Laboratory-based characterization of plutonium in soil particles using micro-XRF and 3D confocal XRF

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Patterson, Brian M.; Havrilla, George Joseph

    2015-03-29

    The investigation of plutonium (Pu) in a soil matrix is of interest in safeguards, nuclear forensics, and environmental remediation activities. The elemental composition of two plutonium contaminated soil particles was characterized nondestructively using a pair of micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) techniques including high resolution X-ray (hiRX) and 3D confocal XRF. The three dimensional elemental imaging capability of confocal XRF permitted the identification two distinct Pu particles within the samples: one external to the Ferich soil matrix and another co-located with Cu within the soil matrix. The size and morphology of the particles was assessed with X-ray transmission microscopy and micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) providing complementary morphological information. Limits of detection for a 30 μm Pu particle are <10 ng for each of the XRF techniques. Ultimately, this study highlights the capability for lab-based, nondestructive, spatially resolved characterization of heterogeneous matrices on the micrometer scale with nanogram sensitivity.

  4. Laboratory-based characterization of plutonium in soil particles using micro-XRF and 3D confocal XRF

    DOE PAGES

    McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Patterson, Brian M.; Havrilla, George Joseph

    2015-03-29

    The investigation of plutonium (Pu) in a soil matrix is of interest in safeguards, nuclear forensics, and environmental remediation activities. The elemental composition of two plutonium contaminated soil particles was characterized nondestructively using a pair of micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) techniques including high resolution X-ray (hiRX) and 3D confocal XRF. The three dimensional elemental imaging capability of confocal XRF permitted the identification two distinct Pu particles within the samples: one external to the Ferich soil matrix and another co-located with Cu within the soil matrix. The size and morphology of the particles was assessed with X-ray transmission microscopy andmore » micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) providing complementary morphological information. Limits of detection for a 30 μm Pu particle are <10 ng for each of the XRF techniques. Ultimately, this study highlights the capability for lab-based, nondestructive, spatially resolved characterization of heterogeneous matrices on the micrometer scale with nanogram sensitivity.« less

  5. Kondo effect at low electron density and high particle-hole asymmetry in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok; Horvat, Alen

    2016-09-01

    Using the perturbative scaling equations and the numerical renormalization group, we study the characteristic energy scales in the Kondo impurity problem as a function of the exchange coupling constant J and the conduction-band electron density. We discuss the relation between the energy gain (impurity binding energy) Δ E and the Kondo temperature TK. We find that the two are proportional only for large values of J , whereas in the weak-coupling limit the energy gain is quadratic in J , while the Kondo temperature is exponentially small. The exact relation between the two quantities depends on the detailed form of the density of states of the band. In the limit of low electron density the Kondo screening is affected by the strong particle-hole asymmetry due to the presence of the band-edge van Hove singularities. We consider the cases of one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) tight-binding lattices (linear chain, square lattice, cubic lattice) with inverse-square-root, step-function, and square-root onsets of the density of states that are characteristic of the respective dimensionalities. We always find two different regimes depending on whether TK is higher or lower than μ , the chemical potential measured from the bottom of the band. For 2D and 3D, we find a sigmoidal crossover between the large-J and small-J asymptotics in Δ E and a clear separation between Δ E and TK for TK<μ . For 1D, there is, in addition, a sizable intermediate-J regime where the Kondo temperature is quadratic in J due to the diverging density of states at the band edge. Furthermore, we find that in 1D the particle-hole asymmetry leads to a large decrease of TK compared to the standard result obtained by approximating the density of states to be constant (flat-band approximation), while in 3D the opposite is the case; this is due to the nontrivial interplay of the exchange and potential scattering renormalization in the presence of particle-hole asymmetry. The 2D square

  6. IMPROVED WIND AND TURBULENCE MEASUREMENTS USING A LOW-COST 3-D SONIC ANEMOMETER AT A LOW-WIND SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B

    2007-05-11

    A year of data from sonic anemometer and mechanical wind sensors was analyzed and compared at a low-wind site. Results indicate that 15-minute average and peak 1-second wind speeds (u) from the sonic agree well with data derived from a co-located cup anemometer over a wide range of speeds. Wind direction data derived from the sonic also agree closely with those from a wind vane except for very low wind speeds. Values of standard deviation of longitudinal wind speed ({sigma}{sub u}) and wind direction fluctuations ({delta}{sub {theta}}) from the sonic and mechanical sensors agree well for times with u > 2 ms{sup -1} but show significant differences with lower u values. The most significant differences are associated with the standard deviation of vertical wind fluctuations ({sigma}{sub w}): the co-located vertical propeller anemometer yields values increasingly less than those measured by the sonic anemometer as u decreases from 2.5 approaching 0 ms{sup -1}. The combination of u over-estimation and under-estimation of {sigma}{sub w} from the mechanical sensors at low wind speeds causes considerable under-estimation of the standard deviation of vertical wind angle fluctuations ({sigma}{sub {phi}}), an indicator of vertical dispersion. Calculations of {sigma}{sub {phi}} from sonic anemometer measurements are typically 5{sup o} to 10{sup o} higher when the mechanical instruments indicate that {sigma}{sub {phi}} < 5{sup o} or so. The errors in both the propeller anemometer and cup anemometer, caused by their inability to respond to higher frequency (smaller scale) turbulent fluctuations, can therefore lead to large (factors of 2 to 10 or more) errors in the vertical dispersion during stable conditions with light winds.

  7. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; de Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles confined within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogenous isotropic turbulent velocity field. Particles can freely move horizontally as fluid tracers but are vertically confined around a given horizontal plane via a simple linear restoring force. The present model may be considered as the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy or other mechanisms, are capable to maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer somewhere below the free surface of oceans or lakes. In the model varying the strength of the restoring force can control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. Whenever some confinement is present, particle trajectories deviate from fluid tracers and experience an effectively compressible velocity field. We report a quantification of this effective compressibility as well as a quantification of preferential concentration of tracer particles in terms of the correlation dimension. We found that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale, that maximizes the clustering of the particles. This work is part of the research programmes 11PR2841 and FP112 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The work was partially funded by ERC Grant No 339032.

  8. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  9. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  10. Forces on stationary particles in near-bed turbulent flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmeeckle, M.W.; Nelson, J.M.; Shreve, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    In natural flows, bed sediment particles are entrained and moved by the fluctuating forces, such as lift and drag, exerted by the overlying flow on the particles. To develop a better understanding of these forces and the relation of the forces to the local flow, the downstream and vertical components of force on near-bed fixed particles and of fluid velocity above or in front of them were measured synchronously at turbulence-resolving frequencies (200 or 500 Hz) in a laboratory flume. Measurements were made for a spherical test particle fixed at various heights above a smooth bed, above a smooth bed downstream of a downstream-facing step, and in a gravel bed of similarly sized particles as well as for a cubical test particle and 7 natural particles above a smooth bed. Horizontal force was well correlated with downstream velocity and not correlated with vertical velocity or vertical momentum flux. The standard drag formula worked well to predict the horizontal force, but the required value of the drag coefficient was significantly higher than generally used to model bed load motion. For the spheres, cubes, and natural particles, average drag coefficients were found to be 0.76, 1.36, and 0.91, respectively. For comparison, the drag coefficient for a sphere settling in still water at similar particle Reynolds numbers is only about 0.4. The variability of the horizontal force relative to its mean was strongly increased by the presence of the step and the gravel bed. Peak deviations were about 30% of the mean force for the sphere over the smooth bed, about twice the mean with the step, and 4 times it for the sphere protruding roughly half its diameter above the gravel bed. Vertical force correlated poorly with downstream velocity, vertical velocity, and vertical momentum flux whether measured over or ahead of the test particle. Typical formulas for shear-induced lift based on Bernoulli's principle poorly predict the vertical forces on near-bed particles. The

  11. Nonlinear Evolution of a 3D Inertial Alfvén Wave and Its Implication in Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation based on a pseudo-spectral method has been performed in order to study particle acceleration. A model for the acceleration of charged particles by field localization is developed for the low-β plasma. For this purpose, a fractional diffusion approach has been employed. The nonlinear interaction between a 3D inertial Alfvén wave and a slow magnetosonic wave has been examined, and the dynamical equations of these two waves in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity have been solved numerically. The nonlinear evolution of the inertial Alfvén wave in the presence of slow magnetosonic wave undergoes a filamentation instability and results in field intensity localization. The results obtained show the localization and power spectrum of inertial Alfvén wave due to nonlinear coupling. The scaling obtained after the first break point of the magnetic power spectrum has been used to calculate the formation of the thermal tail of energetic particles in the solar corona.

  12. Tightly coupled low cost 3D RISS/GPS integration using a mixture particle filter for vehicular navigation.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle's odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  13. Turbulence and wave particle interactions in solar-terrestrial plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Goldman, M. V.; Toomre, J.

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the following study areas are reported: (1) particle and wave processes in solar flares; (2) solar convection zone turbulence; and (3) solar radiation emission. To investigate the amplification of cyclotron maser radiation in solar flares, a radio frequency. (RF) heating model was developed for the corona surrounding the energy release site. Then nonlinear simulations of compressible convection display prominent penetration by plumes into regions of stable stratification at the base of the solar convection zone, leading to the excitation of internal gravity waves there. Lastly, linear saturation of electron-beam-driven Langmuir waves by ambient density fluctuations, nonlinear saturation by strong turbulence processes, and radiation emission mechanisms are examined. An additional section discusses solar magnetic fields and hydromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous media, and the effect of magnetic fields on stellar oscillation.

  14. Cascade model for particle concentration and enstrophy in fully developed turbulence with mass-loading feedback.

    PubMed

    Hogan, R C; Cuzzi, J N

    2007-05-01

    A cascade model is described based on multiplier distributions determined from three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent particle laden flows, which include two-way coupling between the phases at global mass loadings equal to unity. The governing Eulerian equations are solved using psuedospectral methods on up to 512(3) computional grid points. DNS results for particle concentration and enstrophy at Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers in the range 34-170 were used to directly determine multiplier distributions on spatial scales three times the Kolmogorov length scale. The multiplier probability distribution functions (PDFs) are well characterized by the beta distribution function. The width of the PDFs, which is a measure of intermittency, decreases with increasing mass loading within the local region where the multipliers are measured. The functional form of this dependence is not sensitive to Reynolds numbers in the range considered. A partition correlation probability is included in the cascade model to account for the observed spatial anticorrelation between particle concentration and enstrophy. Joint probability distribution functions of concentration and enstrophy generated using the cascade model are shown to be in excellent agreement with those derived directly from our 3D simulations. Probabilities predicted by the cascade model are presented at Reynolds numbers well beyond what is achievable by direct simulation. These results clearly indicate that particle mass loading significantly reduces the probabilities of high particle concentration and enstrophy relative to those resulting from unloaded runs. Particle mass density appears to reach a limit at around 100 times the gas density. This approach has promise for significant computational savings in certain applications.

  15. Digital-Particle-Image-Velocimetry (DPIV) in a scanning light-sheet: 3D starting flow around a short cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, Ch.

    1995-08-01

    Scanning-Particle-Image-Velocimetry Technique (SPIV), introduced by Brücker (1992) and Brücker and Althaus (1992), offers the quantitative investigation of three-dimensional vortical structures in unsteady flows. On principle, this technique combines classical Particle-Image-Velocimetry (PIV) with volume scanning using a scanning light-sheet. In our previous studies, single scans obtained from photographic frame series were evaluated to show the instantaneous vortical structure of the respective flow phenomena. Here, continuous video recordings are processed to capture also the temporal information for the study of the set-up of 3D effects in the cylinder wake. The flow is continuously sampled in depth by the scanning light-sheet and in each of the parallel planes frame-to-frame cross-correlation of the video images (DPIV) is applied to obtain the 2D velocity field. Because the scanning frequency and repetition rate is high in comparison with the characteristic time-scale of the flow, the evaluation provides a complete time-record of the 3D flow during the starting process. With use of the continuity concept as described by Robinson and Rockwell (1993), we obtained in addition the out-of-plane component of the velocity in spanwise direction. This in view, the described technique enabled the reconstruction of the three-dimensional time-dependent velocity and vorticity field. The visualization of the dynamical behaviour of these quantities as, e.g. by video, gave a good impression of the spanwise flow showing the “tornado-like” suction effect of the starting vortices.

  16. SU-E-T-380: Particle Microdosimetry Study Based On 3D-Cylindrical Silicon Radiaton Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola, C; Carabe-Fernandez, A; Gomez, F; Pellegrini, G; Fleta, C; Quirion, D; Lozano, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A new design of a solid-state-microdetector based on silicon 3D microfabrication and its performance to characterise Lineal energy, Specific Energy, dose, LET and other microdosimetric variables required for modelling particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is presented. Methods: A microdosimeter formed by a matrix of independent sensors with well-defined micrometric cylindrical shape and with a volume similar to those of cellular dimensions is used to measure microdosimetric variables. Each sensor measures the radiation deposited energy which, divided by the mean cord length of the sensors, provides us with the Linear Energy (y) of the radiation as well as its energy distribution, and frequencymean. Starting from the these distributions in different points of a proton beam, we generate biophysical data (e.g. Linear Energy Transfer (LET), Specific Energy (z), etc…) needed for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations radiation effect models used in particle radiotherapy treatment planning. In addition, a Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) will be used as baseline to calibrate the “y” magnitude of the microdosimeter unit-cells. Results: The experimental measurements will soon be carried out at the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine (University of Pennsylvania), which provides proton beam for clinical research proposals. The results of distributions measured of the microdosimetric variables from the first tests developed in the proton facility will be presented and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 code. Conclusion: The use of 3D microdosimeters such as the one presented here will enhance the accuracy of RBE calculations normally affected by the inherent uncertainty of monte carlo simulations due to the approximation of material composition and energy dependent physical laws involved in such calculations. The effect of such approximations will be quatified by comparison with absolute measurement of

  17. 3-D Full-kinetic Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Particle Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Wang, X.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present three-dimensional full-kinetic electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the full-kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to self-consistently investigate space charge effects, and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general mechanism of the interaction of both a horizontal and vertical dipole model embedded just below the lunar surface focussing on the ion and electron kinetic behaviour of the system. It is shown that the configurations are largely dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyro-radius of the solar wind ions. The formation of mini-magnetospheres is an electrostatic effect. Additionally, we discuss typical particle trajectories as well as complete particle distribution functions covering thermal and suprathermal energies, within the interaction region and on viable spacecraft altitudes. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board

  18. Particle Trajectory and Icing Analysis of the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Particle trajectory and ice shape calculations were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The particle trajectory and icing computations were performed using the new "block-to-block" collection efficiency method which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for three drop sizes and two drop distributions typically used in aircraft design and certification. Particle trajectory computations were made for water drop sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns. Particle trajectory and ice shape predictions were made for a 20 micron Langmuir-D distribution and for a 92 mm Super-cooled Large Droplet (SLD) distribution with and without splashing effects for a Liquid Water Content (LWC) of 0.3 g/cu m and an icing time of 30 min. The E3 fan and spinner combination proved to be an effective ice removal mechanism as they removed greater than 36 percent of the mass entering the inlet for the icing cases. The maximum free stream catch fraction for the fan and spinner combination was 0.60 while that on the elements downstream of the fan was 0.03. The non-splashing trajectory and collection efficiency results showed that as drop size increased impingement rates increased on the spinner and fan leaving less mass to impinge on downstream components. The SLD splashing case yielded more mass downstream of the fan than the SLD non-splashing case due to mass being splashed from the upstream inlet lip, spinner and fan components. The ice shapes generated downstream of the fan were either small or nonexistent due to the small available mass

  19. Four-way coupled simulations of small particles in turbulent channel flow: The effects of particle shape and Stokes number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, F.; George, W. K.; van Wachem, B. G. M.

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of particle shape and Stokes number on the behaviour of non-spherical particles in turbulent channel flow. Although there are a number of studies concerning spherical particles in turbulent flows, most important applications occurring in process, energy, and pharmaceutical industries deal with non-spherical particles. The computation employs a unique and novel four-way coupling with the Lagrangian point-particle approach. The fluid phase at low Reynolds number (Reτ = 150) is modelled by direct numerical simulation, while particles are tracked individually. Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are also taken into account. To explore the effects of particles on the flow turbulence, the statistics of the fluid flow such as the fluid velocity, the terms in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, the slip velocity between the two phases and velocity correlations are analysed considering ellipsoidal particles with different inertia and aspect ratio. The results of the simulations show that the turbulence is considerably attenuated, even in the very dilute regime. The reduction of the turbulence intensity is predominant near the turbulence kinetic energy peak in the near wall region, where particles preferentially accumulate. Moreover, the elongated shape of ellipsoids strengthens the turbulence attenuation. In simulations with ellipsoidal particles, the fluid-particle interactions strongly depend on the orientation of the ellipsoids. In the near wall region, ellipsoids tend to align predominantly within the streamwise (x) and wall-normal (y) planes and perpendicular to the span-wise direction, whereas no preferential orientation in the central region of the channel is observed. Important conclusions from this work include the effective viscosity of the flow is not affected, the direct dissipation by the particles is negligible, and the primary mechanism by which the particles affect the flow is by altering the turbulence

  20. Four-way coupled simulations of small particles in turbulent channel flow: The effects of particle shape and Stokes number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, F.; Wachem, B. G. M. van; George, W. K.

    2015-08-15

    This paper investigates the effects of particle shape and Stokes number on the behaviour of non-spherical particles in turbulent channel flow. Although there are a number of studies concerning spherical particles in turbulent flows, most important applications occurring in process, energy, and pharmaceutical industries deal with non-spherical particles. The computation employs a unique and novel four-way coupling with the Lagrangian point-particle approach. The fluid phase at low Reynolds number (Re{sub τ} = 150) is modelled by direct numerical simulation, while particles are tracked individually. Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are also taken into account. To explore the effects of particles on the flow turbulence, the statistics of the fluid flow such as the fluid velocity, the terms in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, the slip velocity between the two phases and velocity correlations are analysed considering ellipsoidal particles with different inertia and aspect ratio. The results of the simulations show that the turbulence is considerably attenuated, even in the very dilute regime. The reduction of the turbulence intensity is predominant near the turbulence kinetic energy peak in the near wall region, where particles preferentially accumulate. Moreover, the elongated shape of ellipsoids strengthens the turbulence attenuation. In simulations with ellipsoidal particles, the fluid-particle interactions strongly depend on the orientation of the ellipsoids. In the near wall region, ellipsoids tend to align predominantly within the streamwise (x) and wall-normal (y) planes and perpendicular to the span-wise direction, whereas no preferential orientation in the central region of the channel is observed. Important conclusions from this work include the effective viscosity of the flow is not affected, the direct dissipation by the particles is negligible, and the primary mechanism by which the particles affect the flow is by altering the turbulence

  1. Spatial and velocity statistics of inertial particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, J.; Biferale, L.; Cencini, M.; Lanotte, A. S.; Toschi, F.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial and velocity statistics of heavy point-like particles in incompressible, homogeneous, and isotropic three-dimensional turbulence is studied by means of direct numerical simulations at two values of the Taylor-scale Reynolds number Reλ ~ 200 and Reλ ~ 400, corresponding to resolutions of 5123 and 20483 grid points, respectively. Particles Stokes number values range from St ≈ 0.2 to 70. Stationary small-scale particle distribution is shown to display a singular -multifractal- measure, characterized by a set of generalized fractal dimensions with a strong sensitivity on the Stokes number and a possible, small Reynolds number dependency. Velocity increments between two inertial particles depend on the relative weight between smooth events - where particle velocity is approximately the same of the fluid velocity-, and caustic contributions - when two close particles have very different velocities. The latter events lead to a non-differentiable small-scale behaviour for the relative velocity. The relative weight of these two contributions changes at varying the importance of inertia. We show that moments of the velocity difference display a quasi bi-fractal-behavior and that the scaling properties of velocity increments for not too small Stokes number are in good agreement with a recent theoretical prediction made by K. Gustavsson and B. Mehlig arXiv: 1012.1789v1 [physics.flu-dyn], connecting the saturation of velocity scaling exponents with the fractal dimension of particle clustering.

  2. Transport of inertial particles in a turbulent premixed jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, F.; Picano, F.; Troiani, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    The heat release, occurring in reacting flows, induces a sudden fluid acceleration which particles follow with a certain lag, due to their finite inertia. Actually, the coupling between particle inertia and the flame front expansion strongly biases the spatial distribution of the particles, by inducing the formation of localized clouds with different dimensions downstream the thin flame front. A possible indicator of this preferential localization is the so-called Clustering Index, quantifying the departure of the actual particle distribution from the Poissonian, which would correspond to a purely random spatial arrangement. Most of the clustering is found in the flame brush region, which is spanned by the fluctuating instantaneous flame front. The effect is significant also for very light particles. In this case a simple model based on the Bray-Moss-Libby formalism is able to account for most of the deviation from the Poissonian. When the particle inertia increases, the effect is found to increases and persist well within the region of burned gases. The effect is maximum when the particle relaxation time is of the order of the flame front time scale. The evidence of this peculiar source of clustering is here provided by data from a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent premixed jet flame and confirmed by experimental data.

  3. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  4. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  5. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-11-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide.

  6. Unsteady Analysis of Particle Transport and Deposition in the Human Lung: A Hybrid 3D/0D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Daniel C.; Kunz, Robert F.; Leemhuis, Laura S.; Banks, Syreeta S.; Kriete, Andres

    2003-11-01

    Three-dimensional CFD meshes including up the sixteenth generation of branching in a human tracheo-bronchial tree have been generated from surface data extracted using novel high-resolution bio-medical imaging and rendering methods. A zero-dimensional model for the deeper generations has been coupled with the three-dimensional model at each of the truncated branches. The 0D model imposes a time-varying volume to simulate realistic breathing cycles; it also includes a simple model for particle deposition. The resulting hybrid 3D/0D model has been exercised to compute the transport and deposition rates of particles of different sizes through full breathing cycles. Results are compared to earlier steady-flow CFD results, to results obtained using one-dimensional functional models of the human lung, and to experimental and modeling results for idealized branching-duct configurations. The aim of the research is to develop a virtual human respiratory system that can be used to address issues in pulmonary health in

  7. Flow on Magnetizable Particles in Turbulent Air Streams. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The flow of magnetizable particles in a turbulent air stream in the presence of an imposed magnetic field and the phenomenon of drag reduction produced by the introduction of particles in turbulent boundary layer are investigated. The nature of the particle magnetic force is discussed and the inherent difference between electric and magnetic precipitation is considered. The incorporation of turbulent diffusion theory with an imposed magnetic migration process both with and without inertia effects is examined.

  8. A theoretical and experimental study of turbulent particle-laden jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Zhang, Q. F.; Faeth, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating velocities of both phases, particle mass fluxes, particle size distributions in turbulent particle-laden jets were measured. The following models are considered: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, where slip between the phases was neglected; (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, where slip was considered but effects of particle dispersion by turbulence were ignored; and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. The SSF model performed reasonably well with no modifications in the prescriptions for eddy properties from its original calibration. A modified k- model, incorporating direct contributions of interphase transport on turbulence properties (turbulence modulation), was developed within the framework of the SSF model.

  9. Correcting for particle counting bias error in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, R. V.; Baratuci, W.

    1985-01-01

    An ideal seeding device is proposed generating particles that exactly follow the flow out are still a major source of error, i.e., with a particle counting bias wherein the probability of measuring velocity is a function of velocity. The error in the measured mean can be as much as 25%. Many schemes have been put forward to correct for this error, but there is not universal agreement as to the acceptability of any one method. In particular it is sometimes difficult to know if the assumptions required in the analysis are fulfilled by any particular flow measurement system. To check various correction mechanisms in an ideal way and to gain some insight into how to correct with the fewest initial assumptions, a computer simulation is constructed to simulate laser anemometer measurements in a turbulent flow. That simulator and the results of its use are discussed.

  10. Dynamics of Aerosol Particles in Stationary, Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the dynamics of sub-Kolmogorov-size aerosol particles in stationary isotropic turbulence has been performed. The study combined direct numerical simulations (DNS; directed by Prof. Collins) and high-resolution experimental measurements (directed by Prof. Meng) under conditions of nearly perfect geometric and parametric overlap. The goal was to measure the accumulation of particles in low-vorticity regions of the flow that arises from the effect commonly referred to as preferential concentration. The grant technically was initiated on June 13, 2000; however, funding was not available until July 11, 2000. The grant was originally awarded to Penn State University (numerical simulations) and SUNY-Buffalo (experiments); however, Prof. Collins effort was moved to Cornell University on January 2002 when he joined that university. He completed the study there. A list of the specific tasks that were completed under this study is presented.

  11. Resonant wave-particle interactions modified by intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-08-15

    The concept of wave-particle interactions via resonance is well discussed in plasma physics. This paper shows that intrinsic Alfven waves can qualitatively modify the physics discussed in conventional linear plasma kinetic theories. It turns out that preexisting Alfven waves can affect particle motion along the ambient magnetic field and, moreover, the ensuing force field is periodic in time. As a result, the meaning of the usual Landau and cyclotron resonance conditions becomes questionable. It turns out that this effect leads us to find a new electromagnetic instability. In such a process intrinsic Alfven waves not only modify the unperturbed distribution function but also result in a different type of cyclotron resonance which is affected by the level of turbulence. This instability might enable us to better our understanding of the observed radio emission processes in the solar atmosphere.

  12. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Che, H.

    2014-06-15

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. We show that both energy dissipation and momentum transport along electric current in the current layer are locally quasi-static, but globally dynamic and irreversible. Turbulent drag dissipates both the streaming energy of the current sheet and the associated magnetic energy. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into the electron component heat conduction parallel to the magnetic field and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation that relates the turbulence-induced convective momentum transport and thermal momentum transport. Electron trapping and de-trapping drive local momentum transports, while phase mixing converts convective momentum into thermal momentum. The drag acts like a micro-macro link in the anomalous heating processes. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons, but most of the magnetic energy is dissipated and converted into the component heat of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. This heating process is decoupled from the heating of Buneman instability in the current sheets. Ion heating is weak but ions play an important role in assisting energy exchanges between waves and electrons. Cold ion fluid equations together with our electron fluid equations form a complete set of equations that describes the occurrence, growth, saturation and decay of the Buneman instability.

  13. Acceleration of energetic charged particles: Shocks, reconnection or turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    Acceleration of energetic charged charged particles, most-often with power-law energy spectra occurs everywhere is space where particle-particle collision mean free paths are significantly larger than their gyro-radii. Shocks, reconnection events and turbulence have variously been proposed as acceleration mechanisms, and each must currently be considered a viable mechanism. Shocks have the advantage that they produce naturally power-law spectra in the observed range which are not very sensitive to the parameters. They are usually also fast accelerators. I first discuss the constraints which observations place on the acceleration mechanisms and show that there are both temporal and spatial constraints. Stochastic acceleration tends to be slow, so the rate of acceleration is important. In the inner heliosphere, this rate must exceed the rate of adiabatic cooling ~ 2Vw/r, where Vw is the radial solar-wind velocity. Acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays (ACR) in the heliosheath must occur on a time scale of on year to avoid producing too many multiply charged ACR. It is shown that here, stochastic acceleration has difficulties in the inner heliosheath. Reconnection events are essentially incompressible, so the divergence of the flow velocity is nearly zero, and the Parker equation would give little acceleration. Acceleration at reconnection therefore must go beyond the Parker equation - either by invoking large pitch-angle anisotropies or by extending the equation to higher order in the flow speed relative to the particle speed. An approach to using an extension of Parker's equation is discussed. Diffusive shock acceleration at the heliospheric termination shock is also discussed. It is suggested that inclusion of upstream turbulence and shock geometry provides reasonable solutions to the perceived problems with this mechanism. Finally, observation evidence is presented which suggests, strongly, that the acceleration of the ACR occurs in the inner heliosphere, not far

  14. Particle Resolved DNS of Turbulent Oscillatory Flow Over a Layer of Fixed Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodke, Chaitanya; Urzay, Javier; Apte, Sourabh

    2014-11-01

    Particle resolved direct numerical simulations are performed using fictitious domain approach (Apte et al., JCP 2009) to investigate oscillatory turbulent flow over a layer of fixed particles representative of a sediment layer in coastal environments. Five particle Reynolds numbers in the range, ReD = 660 - 4240 are studied and results are compared against available experimental data (Keiller & Sleath, JFM 1976). Flow is characterized in terms of coherent vortex structures, Reynolds stress variation, turbulent cross-correlations and PDF distributions. The nature of the unsteady hydrodynamic forces on particles and their correlation to sweep and burst events is reported. The net lift coefficient remains positive over the cycle and is well correlated with phase averaged near-bed velocity. Maximum in the lift coefficient occurs when the strength of the horseshoe vortices is maximum. At this phase the lift fluctuations are correlated negatively with pressure and positively with velocity fluctuations in the region above the particle bed. Preliminary analysis shows non-Gaussian distribution for velocity fluctuation and follows 4th order Gram-Charlier. These detailed findings could eventually be useful in improving the existing criterion for predicting sediment incipient motion. Supported by NSF Project # 1133363 as well as Center for Turbulence Research Stanford University Summer Program 2014.

  15. Single-particle Lagrangian and structure statistics in kinematically simulated particle-laden turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Lightstone, M. F.; Tullis, S.

    2016-03-01

    Kinematic simulation (KS) is a means of generating a turbulent-like velocity field, in a manner that enforces a desired input Eulerian energy spectrum. Such models have also been applied in particle-laden flows, due to their ability to enforce spatial organization of the fluid velocity field when simulating the trajectories of individual Lagrangian particles. A critical evaluation of KS is presented; in particular, we examine its ability to reproduce single-particle Lagrangian statistics. Also the ability of KS to reproduce the preferential concentration of inertial particles is examined. Some computational results are presented, in which particles are transported alternatively by (1) turbulence generated by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and (2) KS. The effect of unsteadiness formulation in particular is examined. We find that even steady KS qualitatively reproduces the continuity effect, clustering of inertial particles, the elevated dispersion of inertial particles over fluid particles, and the intermittency of Lagrangian velocity signals, but generally not to the same extent as is seen in the DNS.

  16. Confined turbulent fluid-particle flow modeling using multiple-realization particle trajectory schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    A multiple-realization particle trajectory scheme has been developed and applied to the numerical prediction of confined turbulent fluid-particle flows. The example flows investigated include the vertical pipe upflow experimental data of Tsuji et al. and the experimental data of Leavitt for a coaxial jet flow, comprising a particle-laden central jet and a clean annular jet, into a large recirculation chamber. The results obtained from the numerical scheme agree well with the experimental data, lending confidence to the modeling approach. The multiple-realization particle trajectory turbulent flow modeling scheme is believed to be a more elegant and accurate approach to the extension of single-particle hydrodynamics to dilute multi-particle systems than the more commonly employed two-fluid modeling approach. It is also better able to incorporate additional force items such as lift, virtual mass and Bassett history terms directly into the particle equation of motion as appropriate. This makes it a suitable candidate for particle migration studies and an extension to situations involving liquid particulate phases with possible propulsion applications, such as in spray combustion, follows naturally.

  17. Decoration of Micro-/Nanoscale Noble Metal Particles on 3D Porous Nickel Using Electrodeposition Technique as Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Hang, Tao; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Li, Ming

    2015-07-29

    Micro-/nanoscale noble metal (Ag, Au, and Pt) particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte are fabricated via galvanostatic electrodeposition technique. The developed electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements including Tafel polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is clearly shown that the enlarged real surface area caused by 3D highly porous dendritic structure has greatly reinforced the electrocatalytic activity toward HER. Comparative analysis of electrodeposited Ag, Au, and Pt particle-decorated porous nickel electrodes for HER indicates that both intrinsic property and size of the noble metal particles can lead to distinct catalytic activities. Both nanoscale Au and Pt particles have further reinforcement effect toward HER, whereas microscale Ag particles exhibit the reverse effect. As an effective 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, the nanoscale Pt-particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrode demonstrates the highest catalytic activity with an extremely low overpotential of -0.045 V for hydrogen production, a considerable exchange current density of 9.47 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C, and high durability in long-term electrolysis, all of which are attributed to the intrinsic catalytic property and the extremely small size of Pt particles.

  18. Azimuthal inhomogeneity of turbulence structure and its impact on intermittent particle transport in linear magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Kasuya, N.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Yamada, T.; Miwa, Y.; Itoh, K.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation component in the turbulence regime is found to be azimuthally localized at a phase of the global coherent modes in a linear magnetized plasma PANTA. Spatial distribution of squared bicoherence is given in the azimuthal cross section as an indicator of nonlinear energy transfer function from the global coherent mode to the turbulence. Squared bicoherence is strong at a phase where the turbulence amplitude is large. As a result of the turbulence localization, time evolution of radial particle flux becomes bursty. Statistical features such as skewness and kurtosis are strongly modified by the localized turbulence component, although contribution to mean particle flux profile is small.

  19. NONRESONANT INTERACTION OF CHARGED ENERGETIC PARTICLES WITH LOW-FREQUENCY NONCOMPRESSIVE TURBULENCE: NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ragot, B. R.

    2012-10-20

    A new method for simulating the three-dimensional dynamics of charged energetic particles in very broadband noncompressive magnetic turbulence is introduced. All scales within the primary inertial range of the turbulence observed in the solar wind near 1 AU are now included for the independent computations of both the particle dynamics and the turbulent magnetic field lines (MFLs). While previous theories of resonant particle pitch-angle (PA) scattering and transport in interplanetary magnetic fields had favored interpreting the observed depletions in the electron PA distributions (PADs) around 90 Degree-Sign PA as evidence of poor scattering at low PA cosines, the computed particle dynamics reveal a very different reality. The MFL directions now vary on many scales, and the PADs are depleted around 90 Degree-Sign PA due to nonresonant filtering of the particles that propagate at too large an angle to the local magnetic field. Rather than being too weak, the scattering through 90 Degree-Sign PA is actually so strong that the particles (electrons and protons/ions) are reflected and trapped in the turbulent magnetic fields. While the low-frequency nonresonant turbulence produces ubiquitous magnetic traps that only let through particles with the most field-aligned velocities, higher-frequency near-gyroscale turbulence, when present, enhances particle transport by allowing the particles to navigate between magnetic traps. Finally, visualizing both particle trajectories and MFLs in the very same turbulence reveals a powerful tool for understanding the effects of the turbulent fields on the particle dynamics and cross-field transport. Some cross-field-line scattering, strongly amplified by MFL dispersal, results in a strong cross-field scattering of the particles. From this visualization, it also appears that near-gyroscale turbulence, previously known as gyroresonant turbulence, does not resonantly interact with the particles. The interaction between particles and

  20. Evolution of the air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone for different lengths of SF6: shock tube visualizations and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Griffond, Jerome; Souffland, Denis; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane

    2015-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a vertical shock tube (based in ISAE DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a thin nitrocellulose membrane maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid (SF6 side) of square mesh spacing hu 1.8 or 12.1 mm is expected to seed perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) while the lower grid with hl 1 mm is needed to prevent the membrane from bulging prior to the shot. The experiments were carried out for different lengths L of SF6 between the initial interface and the shock tube's end plate: 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 cm. The time resolved Schlieren image processing based on space and frequency filtering yields similar evolution for the TMZ thickness. Before reshock, the thickness grows initially fast then slows down and reaches different values (10 to 14 mm) according to L. Soon after reshock, the TMZ thickness growths rate is 21 mm/ms independently of L and hu. Numerical Schlieren images generated from 3D numerical simulations (performed at CEA DAM IDF) are analyzed as the experimental ones for L 15 and 25 cm and for hu 1.8 and 12.1 mm. The very weak experimental dependence on hu is not obtained by simulation as expected from dimensional reasoning. This discrepancy remains paradoxical.

  1. Nonlinear Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model for Two-Phase Turbulent Flows Laden with Small Heavy Particles in Circular Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukin, R. V.; Alipchenkov, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Mukina, L. S.; Strizhov, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to present an explicit algebraic Reynolds stress (nonlinear turbulent viscosity) model combined with modified k - ɛ turbulence model taking into account particles effect on turbulence for calculating the main turbulent characteristics of two-phase flows. For calculating particles distribution in space we used diffusion-inertia model (DIM). The turbulence attenuating in the presence of particles is clearly observed, investigated and compared with the experimental data. The developed model adequately described turbulence anisotropy and the influence of particles inertia and concentration on the turbulence intensity.

  2. Flow above and within granular media composed of spherical and non-spherical particles - using a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Kuhlmann, Jannis; Huhn, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    The entrainment of single grains and, hence, their erosion characteristics are dependent on fluid forcing, grain size and density, but also shape variations. To quantitatively describe and capture the hydrodynamic conditions around individual grains, researchers commonly use empirical approaches such as laboratory flume tanks. Nonetheless, it is difficult with such physical experiments to measure the flow velocities in the direct vicinity or within the pore spaces of sediments, at a sufficient resolution and in a non-invasive way. As a result, the hydrodynamic conditions in the water column, at the fluid-porous interface and within pore spaces of a granular medium of various grain shapes is not yet fully understood. For that reason, there is a strong need for numerical models, since these are capable of quantifying fluid speeds within a granular medium. A 3D-SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) numerical wave tank model was set up to provide quantitative evidence on the flow velocities in the direct vicinity and in the interior of granular beds composed of two shapes as a complementary method to the difficult task of in situ measurement. On the basis of previous successful numerical wave tank models with SPH, the model geometry was chosen in dimensions of X=2.68 [m], Y=0.48 [m], and Z=0.8 [m]. Three suites of experiments were designed with a range of particle shape models: (1) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the across-stream direction, (2) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the along-stream direction, and (3) spheres. Particle diameters ranged from 0.04 [m] to 0.08 [m]. A wave was introduced by a vertical paddle that accelerated to 0.8 [m/s] perpendicular to the granular bed. Flow measurements showed that the flow velocity values into the beds were highest when the grains were oriented across the stream direction and lowest in case when the grains were oriented parallel to the stream, indicating that the model was capable to simulate simultaneously

  3. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, T. S.; Price, D. J.; Federrath, C.

    2016-05-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small- scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of starforming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning method may be used to achieve ∇ • B = 0 to machine precision, albeit at significant computational expense.

  4. Protostellar jets and magnetised turbulence with smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are an integral component of the formation of stars. During my thesis work, I built new methods to model magnetic fields in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics which enforce the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field and reduce numerical dissipation of the magnetic field. Using these methods, we have performed simulations of isolated protostar formation, studying the production of jets and outflows of material and their effect on transporting angular momentum away from the protostar and reducing the efficiency of star formation. A major code comparison project on the small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification of magnetic fields was performed, using conditions representative of molecular clouds, the formation site of stars. The results were compared against results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and qualitative behaviour. I will outline the numerical methods developed, and present the results from our protostar and molecular cloud simulations.

  5. Nonlinear Particle Pinch in Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. W.; Gatto, R.

    2005-10-01

    Collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to have an anomalous particle pinch fundamentally unlike pinches identified previously. It arises from a nonlinear fluctuation eigenmode, placing it outside the purview of quasilinear theory. The nonlinear eigenmode develops because the nonlinearity excites a damped linear eigenmode, changing the density- potential correlation. The flux is solved from spectrum balance equations in a complete basis spanning the fluctuation space under a joint expansion in collision frequency and instability threshold parameter. The solution accounts for saturation by anisotropic energy transfer to zonal wavenumbers of the damped eigenmode. To lowest order the pinch is a convective-like flux driven by temperature gradient. It arises from the damped eigenmode energy and the real part of the correlation between damped and growing eigenmodes. The pinch is slightly smaller than the outwardly directed flux associated with the growing eigenmode, making the flux a small fraction of the quasilinear value. Work supported by US DOE.

  6. Particle deposition in low-speed, high-turbulence flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reck, Mads; Larsen, Poul S.; Ullum, Ulrik

    The experimental and numerical study considers the concentration of airborne particulate contaminants, such as spores of spoilage fungi, and their deposition on a surface, in a Petri dish, and on a warm box-shaped product placed in a food-processing environment. Field measurements by standard, active and passive samplers provide typical values of airborne concentrations and specific deposition fluxes. Velocity and turbulence data from field studies are used as input in large eddy simulations of the process, and estimates of deposition fluxes are of the same order of magnitude as those deduced from field measurements. Particle deposition is shown to be associated with near-wall coherent structures. Flow reversal, simulated by impulsive start, is shown to give higher deposition rates than steady mean flows.

  7. Universal intermittent properties of particle trajectories in highly turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Arnèodo, A; Benzi, R; Berg, J; Biferale, L; Bodenschatz, E; Busse, A; Calzavarini, E; Castaing, B; Cencini, M; Chevillard, L; Fisher, R T; Grauer, R; Homann, H; Lamb, D; Lanotte, A S; Lévèque, E; Lüthi, B; Mann, J; Mordant, N; Müller, W-C; Ott, S; Ouellette, N T; Pinton, J-F; Pope, S B; Roux, S G; Toschi, F; Xu, H; Yeung, P K

    2008-06-27

    We present a collection of eight data sets from state-of-the-art experiments and numerical simulations on turbulent velocity statistics along particle trajectories obtained in different flows with Reynolds numbers in the range R{lambda}in[120:740]. Lagrangian structure functions from all data sets are found to collapse onto each other on a wide range of time lags, pointing towards the existence of a universal behavior, within present statistical convergence, and calling for a unified theoretical description. Parisi-Frisch multifractal theory, suitably extended to the dissipative scales and to the Lagrangian domain, is found to capture the intermittency of velocity statistics over the whole three decades of temporal scales investigated here.

  8. A new particle interaction mixing model for turbulent dispersion and turbulent reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Daniel W.

    2010-03-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are an established tool applied for the simulation of turbulent mixing and turbulent reactive flows. Mixing models are required to close the molecular diffusion term in the PDF transport equation. From the nature of molecular diffusion, several requirements or design criteria can be derived for mixing models. All current models have certain shortcomings with respect to these requirements. A new mixing model is presented which fully satisfies almost all requirements. It conserves the mean of an inert scalar, reduces its scalar variance, and relaxes closely to a Gaussian scalar PDF. Multiple inert scalars without differential diffusion effects evolve independently and are kept bounded within their allowable region. Mixing is conditional on the velocity and particle scalar trajectories are continuous in time leading to a model that is local in a weak sense. Validation tests show that the model can reproduce differential diffusion effects and mixing rate dependencies due to variable initial scalar length scales or Reynolds and Schmidt number variations.

  9. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  10. Continuum theories for fluid-particle flows: Some aspects of lift forces and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mctigue, David F.; Givler, Richard C.; Nunziato, Jace W.

    1988-01-01

    A general framework is outlined for the modeling of fluid particle flows. The momentum exchange between the constituents embodies both lift and drag forces, constitutive equations for which can be made explicit with reference to known single particle analysis. Relevant results for lift are reviewed, and invariant representations are posed. The fluid and particle velocities and the particle volume fraction are then decomposed into mean and fluctuating parts to characterize turbulent motions, and the equations of motion are averaged. In addition to the Reynolds stresses, further correlations between concentration and velocity fluctuations appear. These can be identified with turbulent transport processes such as eddy diffusion of the particles. When the drag force is dominant, the classical convection dispersion model for turbulent transport of particles is recovered. When other interaction forces enter, particle segregation effects can arise. This is illustrated qualitatively by consideration of turbulent channel flow with lift effects included.

  11. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. I. IDENTICAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2013-10-10

    We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetary disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow, evolving 14 particle species with friction timescale, τ{sub p}, covering the entire range of scales in the flow. The particle Stokes numbers, St, measuring the ratio of τ{sub p} to the Kolmogorov timescale, are in the range 0.1 ∼< St ∼< 800. Using simulation results, we show that the model by Pan and Padoan gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity is found to be highly non-Gaussian. The PDF tails are well described by a 4/3 stretched exponential function for particles with τ{sub p} ≅ 1-2 T{sub L}, where T{sub L} is the Lagrangian correlation timescale, consistent with a prediction based on PP10. The PDF approaches Gaussian only for very large particles with τ{sub p} ∼> 54 T{sub L}. We split particle pairs at given distances into two types with low and high relative speeds, referred to as continuous and caustic types, respectively, and compute their contributions to the collision kernel. Although amplified by the effect of clustering, the continuous contribution vanishes in the limit of infinitesimal particle distance, where the caustic contribution dominates. The caustic kernel per unit cross section rises rapidly as St increases toward ≅ 1, reaches a maximum at τ{sub p} ≅ 2 T{sub L}, and decreases as τ{sub p}{sup -1/2} for τ{sub p} >> T{sub L}.

  12. Particle-Resolved Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Suspension Flow Using the Lattice Boltzmann Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-Ping

    2010-03-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow is of importance to many engineering applications and natural phenomena, such as aerosol and pollutant transport, interaction of cloud droplets, spay combustion, and chemical processes. In general, the dynamics of dispersed phase and that of the carrier fluid phase are closely coupled. Most previous studies utilize the point particle approach to study the effects of particles on the carrier turbulence, under the assumptions that the particle size is significantly smaller than the smallest turbulence length scale and the particle volume fraction is low. The present study focuses on the motion and hydrodynamic interactions of finite-size freely moving particles in a turbulent background flow. To simulate carrier fluid turbulence, a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann approach is applied with the multiple relaxation-time collision model, which yields a more robust viscous flow simulation method than the single-relaxation collision model. The no-slip boundary condition on the moving surface of each particle is implemented using an interpolated bounce-back scheme. The refill problem resulting from the moving boundary is handled by a non-equilibrium correction method to reduce the unphysical force fluctuations acting on the particles. The short-range lubrication force not resolved by the simulation is represented by a physical model involving particle relative location and velocity. For the carrier fluid phase, computational results are discussed in terms of the change of energy spectrum compared with the particle-free turbulence, the time evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. For the dispersed phase, the focus will be on the particle-pair statistics such as the relative velocity and radial distribution function as well as particle-particle collision rate. The effects of varying particle size, volume fraction, and particle-to-fluid density ratio will be examined. The results will be compared to those from the previous

  13. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2011-12-21

    successfully created new capabilities for the scientists to visualize their 3D data at higher accuracy and quality, enhancing their ability to evaluate the simulations and understand the modeled phenomena.

  14. Ice Particle Transport Analysis With Phase Change for the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ice Particle trajectory calculations with phase change were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The particle trajectory computations were performed using the new Glenn Ice Particle Phase Change Model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of 0.3 g/cu m. The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting and the amount of melting was relatively small with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.836. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22 percent).

  15. Mechanisms of particle clustering in Gaussian and non-Gaussian synthetic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Christopher; Andersson, Helge I

    2014-10-01

    We use synthetic turbulence simulations to study how inertial particles cluster in a turbulent flow, for a wide range of Stokes numbers. Two different types of synthetic turbulence are used: one Gaussian, where the time evolution of the velocity field is a simple phase shift, and one non-Gaussian, where convection is used to evolve the velocity field in time. In both flow types we observe significant particle clustering over a wide range of scales and Stokes numbers. The clustering found at low Stokes numbers can be attributed to the vortex centrifuge effect, where heavy particles are expelled from regions dominated by vorticity. This mechanism is much more effective in the non-Gaussian turbulence, because local flow structures are convected with the particles. The preferential sampling of regions with low vorticity is almost negligible in the Gaussian turbulence. At higher Stokes numbers, caustics are formed in a very similar manner in both Gaussian and non-Gaussian synthetic turbulence. In non-Gaussian turbulence, heavy particles cluster in regions of low fluid kinetic energy, while the opposite is true in Gaussian turbulence. Our results show that synthetic simulations cannot correctly predict how the particle clustering correlates with local fluid flow properties, without including convection.

  16. Effects of forcing time scale on the simulated turbulent flows and turbulent collision statistics of inertial particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, B.; Parishani, H.; Ayala, O.; Wang, L.-P.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study systematically the effects of forcing time scale in the large-scale stochastic forcing scheme of Eswaran and Pope ["An examination of forcing in direct numerical simulations of turbulence," Comput. Fluids 16, 257 (1988)] on the simulated flow structures and statistics of forced turbulence. Using direct numerical simulations, we find that the forcing time scale affects the flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number. Other flow statistics can be predicted using the altered flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number, except when the forcing time scale is made unrealistically large to yield a Taylor microscale flow Reynolds number of 30 and less. We then study the effects of forcing time scale on the kinematic collision statistics of inertial particles. We show that the radial distribution function and the radial relative velocity may depend on the forcing time scale when it becomes comparable to the eddy turnover time. This dependence, however, can be largely explained in terms of altered flow Reynolds number and the changing range of flow length scales present in the turbulent flow. We argue that removing this dependence is important when studying the Reynolds number dependence of the turbulent collision statistics. The results are also compared to those based on a deterministic forcing scheme to better understand the role of large-scale forcing, relative to that of the small-scale turbulence, on turbulent collision of inertial particles. To further elucidate the correlation between the altered flow structures and dynamics of inertial particles, a conditional analysis has been performed, showing that the regions of higher collision rate of inertial particles are well correlated with the regions of lower vorticity. Regions of higher concentration of pairs at contact are found to be highly correlated with the region of high energy dissipation rate.

  17. Effects of forcing time scale on the simulated turbulent flows and turbulent collision statistics of inertial particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, B.; Parishani, H.; Ayala, O.; Wang, L.-P.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we study systematically the effects of forcing time scale in the large-scale stochastic forcing scheme of Eswaran and Pope [“An examination of forcing in direct numerical simulations of turbulence,” Comput. Fluids 16, 257 (1988)] on the simulated flow structures and statistics of forced turbulence. Using direct numerical simulations, we find that the forcing time scale affects the flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number. Other flow statistics can be predicted using the altered flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number, except when the forcing time scale is made unrealistically large to yield a Taylor microscale flow Reynolds number of 30 and less. We then study the effects of forcing time scale on the kinematic collision statistics of inertial particles. We show that the radial distribution function and the radial relative velocity may depend on the forcing time scale when it becomes comparable to the eddy turnover time. This dependence, however, can be largely explained in terms of altered flow Reynolds number and the changing range of flow length scales present in the turbulent flow. We argue that removing this dependence is important when studying the Reynolds number dependence of the turbulent collision statistics. The results are also compared to those based on a deterministic forcing scheme to better understand the role of large-scale forcing, relative to that of the small-scale turbulence, on turbulent collision of inertial particles. To further elucidate the correlation between the altered flow structures and dynamics of inertial particles, a conditional analysis has been performed, showing that the regions of higher collision rate of inertial particles are well correlated with the regions of lower vorticity. Regions of higher concentration of pairs at contact are found to be highly correlated with the region of high energy dissipation rate.

  18. Characteristics of drag and lift forces of a finite-sized particle in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungwoo; Balachandar, S.

    2007-11-01

    In the problem of particle-laden flows, the prediction of drag and lift forces acting on the particle in the presence of turbulence is one of the most important issues. In order to investigate the effect of turbulence at the level of a single particle, we perform direct numerical simulations of an isolated particle subjected to free-stream turbulence, following Bagchi & Balachandar (2003). The particle Reynolds number ranges from 100 to 350. At each particle Reynolds number, the turbulent intensity is about 5-20 percent of the mean relative particle velocity and the corresponding diameter of the particle is comparable to or larger than the Kolmogorov scale. In this study, the instantaneous force is decomposed into the drag and lift forces. Then, the statistical characteristics of the forces are investigated. The present result shows that the use of the stationary sphere drag as quasi-steady force improves the estimation of the drag force as compared to the Schiller-Neumann drag correlation. In addition, the modification of wake dynamics due to turbulence and its relation to the forces acting on the particle is presented. We also investigate the case of a freely moving particle and explore its effect.

  19. Primary Accretion and Turbulent Cascades: Scale-Dependence of Particle Concentration Multiplier Probability Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Weston, B.; Shariff, K.

    2013-10-01

    Primitive bodies with 10s-100s of km diameter (or even larger) may form directly from small nebula constituents, bypassing the step-by-step “incremental growth” that faces a variety of barriers at cm, m, and even 1-10km sizes. In the scenario of Cuzzi et al (Icarus 2010 and LPSC 2012; see also Chambers Icarus 2010) the immediate precursors of 10-100km diameter asteroid formation are dense clumps of chondrule-(mm-) size objects. These predictions utilize a so-called cascade model, which is popular in turbulence studies. One of its usual assumptions is that certain statistical properties of the process (the so-called multiplier pdfs p(m)) are scale-independent within a cascade of energy from large eddy scales to smaller scales. In similar analyses, Pan et al (2011 ApJ) found discrepancies with results of Cuzzi and coworkers; one possibility was that p(m) for particle concentration is not scale-independent. To assess the situation we have analyzed recent 3D direct numerical simulations of particles in turbulence covering a much wider range of scales than analyzed by either Cuzzi and coworkers or by Pan and coworkers (see Bec et al 2010, J. Flu. Mech 646, 527). We calculated p(m) at scales ranging from 45-1024η where η is the Kolmogorov scale, for both particles with a range of stopping times spanning the optimum value, and for energy dissipation in the fluid. For comparison, the p(m) for dissipation have been observed to be scale-independent in atmospheric flows (at much larger Reynolds number) for scales of at least 30-3000η. We found that, in the numerical simulations, the multiplier distributions for both particle concentration and fluid dissipation are as expected at scales of tens of η, but both become narrower and less intermittent at larger scales. This is consistent with observations of atmospheric flows showing scale independence to >3000η if scale-free behavior is established only after some number 10 of large-scale bifurcations (at scales perhaps

  20. Full vector (3-D) inflow simulation in natural and wind farm environments using an expanded version of the SNLWIND (Veers) turbulence code

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.

    1992-11-01

    We have recently expanded the numerical turbulence simulation (SNLWIND) developed by Veers [1] to include all three components of the turbulent wind vector. We have also configured the code to simulate the characteristics of turbulent wind fields upwind and downwind of a large wind farm, as well as over uniform, flat terrain. Veers`s original method only simulates the longitudinal component of the wind in neutral flow. This paper overviews the development of spectral distribution, spatial coherence, and cross correlation models used to expired the SNLWIND code to include the three components of the turbulent wind over a range of atmospheric stabilities. These models are based on extensive measurements of the turbulence characteristics immediately upwind and downwind of a large wind farm in San Gorgonio Pass, California.

  1. Full vector (3-D) inflow simulation in natural and wind farm environments using an expanded version of the SNLWIND (Veers) turbulence code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1992-11-01

    We have recently expanded the numerical turbulence simulation (SNLWIND) developed by Veers to include all three components of the turbulent wind vector. We have also configured the code to simulate the characteristics of turbulent wind fields upwind and downwind of a large wind farm, as well as over uniform, flat terrain. Veers's original method only simulates the longitudinal component of the wind in neutral flow. This paper overviews the development of spectral distribution, spatial coherence, and cross correlation models used to expired the SNLWIND code to include the three components of the turbulent wind over a range of atmospheric stabilities. These models are based on extensive measurements of the turbulence characteristics immediately upwind and downwind of a large wind farm in San Gorgonio Pass, California.

  2. Exploring turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas: the science of THOR mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent magnetized plasmas. They are found in active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, as well as in the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Turbulent plasmas are also found in laboratory devices such as e.g. tokamaks. Our comprehension of the plasma Universe is largely based on measurements of electromagnetic radiation such as light or X-rays which originate from particles that are heated and accelerated as a result of energy dissipation in turbulent environments. Therefore it is of key importance to study and understand how plasma is energized by turbulence. Most of the energy dissipation occurs at kinetic scales, where plasma no longer behaves as a fluid and the properties of individual plasma species (electrons, protons and other ions) become important. THOR (Turbulent Heating ObserveR - http://thor.irfu.se/) is a space mission currently in Study Phase as candidate for M-class mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency. The scientific theme of the THOR mission is turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas, which ties in with ESA's Cosmic Vision science. The main focus is on turbulence and shock processes, however areas where the different fundamental processes interact, such as reconnection in turbulence or shock generated turbulence, are also of high importance. The THOR mission aims to address fundamental questions such as how plasma is heated and particles are accelerated by turbulent fluctuations at kinetic scales, how energy is partitioned among different plasma components and how dissipation operates in different regimes of turbulence. To reach the goal, a careful design of the THOR spacecraft and its payload is ongoing, together with a strong interaction with numerical simulations. Here we present the science of THOR mission and we discuss implications of THOR observations for space

  3. Numerical study of particle-vortex interaction and turbulence modulation in swirling jets.

    PubMed

    Gui, Nan; Fan, Jianren; Chen, Song

    2010-11-01

    This study carried out a direct numerical simulation of gas-solid swirling jet flow, focusing on the particle-vortex interaction and mechanisms of turbulence modulation. Two cases of flows with either a constant particle flow rate or a constant particle mass loading are simulated. The typical instantaneous particle-vortex interactions are illustrated and analyzed, as well as the spectrum representations and the projections of them. The results show that the small particles (St<1) and light-mass loadings augment the vortices of the large-scale range in the power spectrum representation by shifting the peaks of wave numbers from small to large values as they pass through the large vortices and break them into smaller scales. The large particles and heavy-mass loadings suppress greatly the large scales of vortices, transferring the turbulent kinetic energy from large to relatively smaller scales of vortices, resulting in turbulence augmentation in the large wave numbers and turbulence attenuation in the range of small wave numbers. Moreover, by comparison between the two cases, it is found that the turbulence modulation is more highly sensitive to the effect of mass loadings rather than the dynamical response property of particles. The well-known knowledge on modulation of turbulence is true under the condition of the same mass loading. However, the situation becomes very complicated when the mass loading changes. Finally, these conclusions are verified by the analysis of energy spectrum and dissipation.

  4. Study of Local Profiles Relative to the Particle Surface in a Forced Particle-Laden Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Oscar; Ayala, Orlando; Wang, Lian-Ping; Lian-Ping Wang Collaboration; Orlando Ayala Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Turbulent flows laden with solid particles, liquid droplets, or air bubbles are relevant to many engineering applications and biological and environmental processes. When the particle size is much smaller than the Kolmogorov scale of the carrier flow, the motion of the particle can be described by a point-particle model. Currently, it is not clear how to treat the interaction of a solid particle with the carrier flow when its size is comparable or larger than the Kolmogorov scale. Here we address the interaction of finite-size particles with the carrier fluid turbulence using lattice-Boltzmann-based, particle-resolving simulations. Our recent results (Comput. & Math. with Applications, DOI: 10.1016/j.camwa.2013.04.001) on forced turbulence laden with non-sedimenting solid particles at a particle-to-fluid density ratio of 5, solid volume fraction of 0.102, and particle diameter to Kolmogorov length ratio of 8.05 reveal that the enhanced viscous dissipation is related to the local flow profiles near the particle surface. Here we repeat this simulation and present more accurate local profiles by averaging over time in addition to space. We will also analyze how such profiles change with the particle volume concentration and the particle size relative to the Kolmogorov scales. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Fast particles identification in programmable form at level-0 trigger by means of the 3D-Flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, Dario B.

    1998-10-30

    The 3D-Flow Processor system is a new, technology-independent concept in very fast, real-time system architectures. Based on either an FPGA or an ASIC implementation, it can address, in a fully programmable manner, applications where commercially available processors would fail because of throughput requirements. Possible applications include filtering-algorithms (pattern recognition) from the input of multiple sensors, as well as moving any input validated by these filtering-algorithms to a single output channel. Both operations can easily be implemented on a 3D-Flow system to achieve a real-time processing system with a very short lag time. This system can be built either with off-the-shelf FPGAs or, for higher data rates, with CMOS chips containing 4 to 16 processors each. The basic building block of the system, a 3D-Flow processor, has been successfully designed in VHDL code written in ''Generic HDL'' (mostly made of reusable blocks that are synthesizable in different technologies, or FPGAs), to produce a netlist for a four-processor ASIC featuring 0.35 micron CBA (Ceil Base Array) technology at 3.3 Volts, 884 mW power dissipation at 60 MHz and 63.75 mm sq. die size. The same VHDL code has been targeted to three FPGA manufacturers (Altera EPF10K250A, ORCA-Lucent Technologies 0R3T165 and Xilinx XCV1000). A complete set of software tools, the 3D-Flow System Manager, equally applicable to ASIC or FPGA implementations, has been produced to provide full system simulation, application development, real-time monitoring, and run-time fault recovery. Today's technology can accommodate 16 processors per chip in a medium size die, at a cost per processor of less than $5 based on the current silicon die/size technology cost.

  6. Stochastic Multi-Scale Reconstruction of 3D Microstructure Consisting of Polycrystalline Grains and Second-Phase Particles from 2D Micrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaohua; Kirubanandham, Antony; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Jiao, Yang

    2016-03-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D polycrystalline microstructure of a material is crucial to its property prediction, performance optimization, and design. Here, we present a multi-scale computational scheme that allows one to stochastically reconstruct the 3D microstructure of a highly heterogeneous polycrystalline material with large variation in grain size, morphology, and spatial distribution, as well as the distribution of second-phase particles, from single-2D electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) micrograph. Specifically, the two-point correlation functions S 2 are employed to statistically characterize grain morphology, orientation, and spatial distribution and are incorporated into the simulated annealing procedure for microstructure reconstruction. During the reconstruction, the original polycrystalline microstructure is coarsened such that the large grains are reconstructed first and the smaller ones are generated later. The second-phase particles are then inserted into the reconstructed polycrystalline material based on the pair-correlation function g 2 sampled from the 2D back-scattered electron micrograph. The utility of our multi-scale scheme is demonstrated by successfully reconstructing a highly heterogeneous polycrystalline Sn-rich solder joint with Cu6Sn5 intermetallic particles. The accuracy of our reconstruction is ascertained by comparing the virtual microstructure with the actual 3D structure of the joint obtained via serial sectioning techniques.

  7. Computational and experimental analysis of particle clustering in a shearless turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter; Good, Garrett; Warhaft, Zellman; Collins, Lance

    2011-11-01

    Entrainment, the drawing in of external fluid by a turbulent flow, is ubiquitous to both industrial and natural turbulent processes. This mechanism is particularly important in atmospheric clouds, where the entrainment of dry air by turbulence can affect precipitation mechanisms. We use parametrically matched wind-tunnel experiments and direct numerical simulations with inhomogeneous particle seeding to explore particle clustering in a shearless turbulent mixing layer. We find high degrees of clustering, both visually and statistically, even for particles with negligible inertia. These particle clusters have characteristic sizes on the order of the integral lengthscale of the turbulence and are thus much larger than those resulting from particle inertia. The degree of clustering at a particular location generally decreases as the mixing layer evolves and depends on both the turbulent kinetic energy ratio in the mixing layer and the magnitude and orientation of gravity. We observe the same qualitative trends in both the experiments and the simulations. We anticipate that a better understanding of particle clustering in entraining flows will lead to, among other things, improved cloud evolution predictions and more accurate climate models.

  8. Particle deposition due to turbulent diffusion in the upper respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.

    1979-01-01

    Aerosol deposition in the upper respiratory system (trachea to segmental bronchi) is considered and the importance of turbulent diffusion as a deposition mechanism is evaluated. It is demonstrated that for large particles (diameter greater than about 5 microns), turbulent diffusion is the dominant deposition mechanism in the trachea. Conditions under which turbulent diffusion may be important in successive generations of the pulmonary system are determined. The probability of particle deposition is compared with probabilities of deposition, as determined by the equations generally used in regional deposition models. The analysis is theoretical; no new experimental data is presented.

  9. Towards a fully kinetic 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell model of streamer formation and dynamics in high-pressure electronegative gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Thoma, C.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Bruner, N.; Rambo, P. K.; Atherton, B. W.

    2011-09-15

    Streamer and leader formation in high pressure devices is dynamic process involving a broad range of physical phenomena. These include elastic and inelastic particle collisions in the gas, radiation generation, transport and absorption, and electrode interactions. Accurate modeling of these physical processes is essential for a number of applications, including high-current, laser-triggered gas switches. Towards this end, we present a new 3D implicit particle-in-cell simulation model of gas breakdown leading to streamer formation in electronegative gases. The model uses a Monte Carlo treatment for all particle interactions and includes discrete photon generation, transport, and absorption for ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation. Central to the realization of this fully kinetic particle treatment is an algorithm that manages the total particle count by species while preserving the local momentum distribution functions and conserving charge [D. R. Welch, T. C. Genoni, R. E. Clark, and D. V. Rose, J. Comput. Phys. 227, 143 (2007)]. The simulation model is fully electromagnetic, making it capable of following, for example, the evolution of a gas switch from the point of laser-induced localized breakdown of the gas between electrodes through the successive stages of streamer propagation, initial electrode current connection, and high-current conduction channel evolution, where self-magnetic field effects are likely to be important. We describe the model details and underlying assumptions used and present sample results from 3D simulations of streamer formation and propagation in SF{sub 6}.

  10. Effect of turbulence on collisions of dust particles with planetesimals in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homann, H.; Guillot, T.; Bec, J.; Ormel, C. W.; Ida, S.; Tanga, P.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Planetesimals in gaseous protoplanetary disks may grow by collecting dust particles. Hydrodynamical studies show that small particles generally avoid collisions with the planetesimals because they are entrained by the flow around them. This occurs when St, the Stokes number, defined as the ratio of the dust stopping time to the planetesimal crossing time, becomes much smaller than unity. However, these studies have been limited to the laminar case, whereas these disks are believed to be turbulent. Aims: We want to estimate the influence of gas turbulence on the dust-planetesimal collision rate and on the impact speeds. Methods: We used three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of a fixed sphere (planetesimal) facing a laminar and turbulent flow seeded with small inertial particles (dust) subject to a Stokes drag. A no-slip boundary condition on the planetesimal surface is modeled via a penalty method. Results: We find that turbulence can significantly increase the collision rate of dust particles with planetesimals. For a high turbulence case (when the amplitude of turbulent fluctuations is similar to the headwind velocity), we find that the collision probability remains equal to the geometrical rate or even higher for St ≳ 0.1, i.e., for dust sizes an order of magnitude smaller than in the laminar case. We derive expressions to calculate impact probabilities as a function of dust and planetesimal size and turbulent intensity.

  11. A self-consistent theory of collective alpha particle losses induced by Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic Alfven waves, resonantly excited by energetic ions/alpha particles, is investigated. It is shown that {alpha}-particles govern both linear instability and nonlinear saturation dynamics, while the background MHD turbulence results only in a nonlinear real frequency shift. The most efficient saturation mechanism is found to be self-induced profile modification. Expressions for the fluctuation amplitudes and the {alpha}-particle radial flux are self-consistently derived. The work represents the first self-consistent, turbulent treatment of collective {alpha}-particle losses by Alfvenic fluctuations.

  12. Giving peeps to my props: Using 3D printing to shed new light on particle transport in fractured rock.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S. D.; Du Frane, W. L.; Vericella, J. J.; Aines, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Smart tracers and smart proppants promise new methods for sensing and manipulating rock fractures. However, the correct use and interpretation of these technologies relies on accurate models of their transport. Even for less exotic particles, the factors controlling particle transport through fractures are poorly understood. In this presentation, we will describe ongoing research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory into the transport properties of particles in natural rock fractures. Using three dimensional printing techniques, we create clear-plastic reproductions of real-world fracture surfaces, thereby enabling direct observation of the particle movement. We will also discuss how particle tracking of dense particle packs can be further enhanced by using such specially tailored flow cells in combination with micro-encapsulated tracer particles. Experimental results investigating the transport behavior of smart tracers and proppants close to the neutrally buoyant limit will be presented and we will describe how data from these experiments can be used to improve large-scale models of particle transport in fractures. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Test particle study of ion transport in drift type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2013-12-15

    Ion transport regimes in drift type turbulence are determined in the frame of a realistic model for the turbulence spectrum based on numerical simulations. The model includes the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity, turbulence anisotropy, and dominant waves. The effects of the zonal flow modes are also analyzed. A semi-analytical method that is able to describe trajectory stochastic trapping or eddying is used for obtaining the transport coefficients as function of the parameters of the turbulence. Analytical approximations of the transport coefficients are derived from the results. They show the transition from Bohm to gyro-Bohm scaling as plasma size increases in very good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  14. Turbulent reconnection and associated particle heating and acceleration in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Retino, Alessandro; Le Contel, Olivier; Matthaeus, William; Breuillard, Hugo; Sahraoui, Fouad; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Burch, Jim; Moore, Tom; Fuselier, Stephen; Torbert, Roy; Mauk, Barry; Pollock, Craig; Torkar, Klaus; Ergun, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental mechanism of energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasma. Spacecraft observations and numerical studies have established that it occurs in small-scale intermittent structures such as thin current sheets that form spontaneously in turbulent plasma. This kind of turbulent reconnection leads to significant particle heating and acceleration as well as to the dissipation of turbulent energy at kinetic scales. However, the extent of its contribution to turbulent dissipation has yet to be determined. Here we present results from in situ observations made by MMS and CLUSTER in the Earth's magnetosheath. A statistical study of a large number of thin current sheets allows us to establilsh their importance for dissipation while the in-depth study of reconnecting current sheets yields valuable insight into the exact mechanisms of particle heating and acceleration.

  15. Induced velocities of grains embedded in a turbulent gas. [test particle theory application to protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voelk, H. J.; Morfill, G.; Roeser, S.; Jones, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    A theory is presented for the dynamics of dust particles in an incompressible turbulent fluid. Grain-gas coupling occurs through friction forces that are proportional to the mean grain velocity relative to the gas. This test particle theory is applied to the case of Kolmogoroff spectrum in a protostellar cloud. The mean turbulence induced grain velocity and the mean turbulent relative velocity of two grains are calculated. Whereas the former should determine the dust scale height, grain-grain collisions are influenced by the latter. For a reasonable strength of turbulence, the mean induced relative velocity of two particles turns out to be at least as large as the corresponding terminal velocity difference during gravitational settling.

  16. Bed particle entrainment and motion in turbulent open-channel flows: a high-resolution experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikora, Vladimir; Cameron, Stuart; Amir, Mohammad; Stewart, Mark; Witz, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    In spite of significant efforts of geoscientists and engineers, the exact mechanics of sediment entrainment and transport by turbulent flows remains unclear and continues to be the focus of many research groups worldwide. The talk outlines current developments in this direction at the University of Aberdeen, where an extensive experimental programme has recently been completed. The experiments were conducted in the Aberdeen Open Channel Facility (AOCF, 20 m long, 1.18 m wide) over wide ranges of flow submergence (1.9-8.0), bulk Reynolds number (4400-83000), and channel aspect ratio (9-39). The flume bed was covered by hexagonally-packed glass beads 16 mm in diameter. For entrainment experiments, selected glass particles were replaced with lighter particles (nylon and delrin). Instantaneous velocity fields before, during, and after entrainment were measured with an advanced multi-mode Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system developed by S. Cameron. This system was also used for 3D particle tracking in the entrainment experiments. The main types of experiments included: (1) multi-mode turbulence measurements with fixed-bed conditions to assess the background flow structure (10 min to 120 min duration of velocity records); (2) simultaneous measurements of fluctuating differential pressure acting on 23 fixed particles with in-built pressure sensors, synchronously with PIV; (3) measurements of waiting times for particle entrainment, employing a specially designed system (SMC-1) for automatic placement of the particles on the bed and subsequent measurement of the time before entrainment; (4) long-term direct measurements of the instantaneous drag force acting on a single particle (attached to the bed) at different protrusions, synchronously with PIV; and (5) synchronous measurements of the flow field around a particle before, at, and during entrainment, supplemented with 3D particle tracking. The key results include: (1) the refined turbulence structure of a rough

  17. GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Claude Wendell

    2014-06-10

    The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, “Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

  18. Turbulent Concentration of mm-Size Particles in the Protoplanetary Nebula: Scale-Dependent Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Hartlep, T.

    2015-01-01

    The initial accretion of primitive bodies (here, asteroids in particular) from freely-floating nebula particles remains problematic. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" (or even a mm-to-cm-size barrier) in turbulent nebulae, making the preconditions for so-called "streaming instabilities" difficult to achieve even for so-called "lucky" particles. Even if growth by sticking could somehow breach the meter size barrier, turbulent nebulae present further obstacles through the 1-10km size range. On the other hand, nonturbulent nebulae form large asteroids too quickly to explain long spreads in formation times, or the dearth of melted asteroids. Theoretical understanding of nebula turbulence is itself in flux; recent models of MRI (magnetically-driven) turbulence favor low-or- no-turbulence environments, but purely hydrodynamic turbulence is making a comeback, with two recently discovered mechanisms generating robust turbulence which do not rely on magnetic fields at all. An important clue regarding planetesimal formation is an apparent 100km diameter peak in the pre-depletion, pre-erosion mass distribution of asteroids; scenarios leading directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects of this size, which avoid the problematic m-km size range, could be called "leapfrog" scenarios. The leapfrog scenario we have studied in detail involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in turbulence, which can under certain conditions shrink inexorably on 100-1000 orbit timescales and form 10-100km diameter sandpile planetesimals. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles. Thus, while they are arcane, turbulent concentration models acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. The typical sizes of planetesimals and the rate of their formation can be

  19. The rotation and translation of non-spherical particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byron, Margaret

    The motion of particles suspended in environmental turbulence is relevant to many scientific fields, from sediment transport to biological interactions to underwater robotics. At very small scales and simple shapes, we are able to completely mathematically describe the motion of inertial particles; however, the motion of large aspherical particles is significantly more complex, and current computational models are inadequate for large or highly-resolved domains. Therefore, we seek to experimentally investigate the coupling between freely suspended particles and ambient turbulence. A better understanding of this coupling will inform not only engineering and physics, but the interactions between small aquatic organisms and their environments. In the following pages, we explore the roles of shape and buoyancy on the motion of passive particles in turbulence, and allow these particles to serve as models for meso-scale aquatic organisms. We fabricate cylindrical and spheroidal particles and suspend them in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence that is generated via randomly-actuated jet arrays. The particles are fabricated with agarose hydrogel, which is refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid (water). Both the fluid and the particle are seeded with passive tracers, allowing us to perform Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) simultaneously on the particle and fluid phase. To investigate the effects of shape, particles are fabricated at varying aspect ratios; to investigate the effects of buoyancy, particles are fabricated at varying specific gravities. Each particle type is freely suspended at a volume fraction of F=0.1%, for which four-way coupling interactions are negligible. The suspended particles are imaged together with the surrounding fluid and analyzed using stereoscopic PIV, which yields three velocity components in a two-dimensional measurement plane. Using image thresholding, the results are separated into simultaneous fluid-phase and solid-phase velocity

  20. Self consistent particles dynamics in/out of the cusp region by using back tracking technics; a global 3D PIC simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Cai, D.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale three dimensionbal PIC (particle in cell) simulations are presently used in order to analyze the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere intreraction within a full self-consistent approach, and where both electrons and ions are treated as an assembly of individual particles. This 3D kinetic approach allows us to analyze in particular the dynamics and the fine structures of the cusp region when including self consistently not only its whole neighborhood (in the terrestrial magnetosphere) but also the impact of the solar wind and the interplanetary field (IMF) features. Herein, we focuss our attention on the cusp region and in particular on the acceleration and precipitation of particles (both ions and electrons) within the cusp. In present simulations, the IMF is chosen northward, (i.e. where the X -reconnection region is just above the cusp, in the meridian plane). Back-trackings of self-consistent particles are analyzed in details in order to determine (i) which particles (just above the cusp) are precipitated deeply into the cusp, (ii) which populations are injected from the cusp into the nearby tail, (iii) where the particles suffer the largest energisation along their self-consistent trajectories, (iv) where these populations accumulate, and (v) where the most energetic particles are originally coming from. This approach allows to make a traking of particles within the scenario "solar wind-magnetosheath- cusp -nearbytail"; moreover it strongly differs from the standard test particles technics and allows to provide informations not accessible when using full MHD approach. Keywords: Tracing Particles, Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation, double cusp, test particles method, IMF, Solar wind, Magnetosphere

  1. Mixed-scale channel networks including Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnels for efficient single particle entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yunjeong; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2016-06-01

    Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic carbon mold is fabricated by pyrolyzing a polymer mold patterned by photolithography. During pyrolysis, the polymer mold shrinks by ~90%, which enables nanosized carbon molds to be produced without a complex nanofabrication process. Because of the good adhesion between the polymer mold and the Si substrate, non-uniform volume reduction occurs during pyrolysis resulting in the formation of curved carbon mold side walls. These curved side walls and the relatively low surface energy of the mold provide efficient demolding of the PDMS channel networks. In addition, the trigonal prismatic shape of the polymer is converted into to a Kingfisher-beak-shaped carbon structure due to the non-uniform volume reduction. The transformation of this mold architecture produces a PDMS Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnel that connects the microchannel and the nanochannel smoothly. The smooth reduction in the cross-sectional area of the 3D microfunnels enables efficient single microparticle trapping at the nanochannel entrance; this is beneficial for studies of cell transfection.Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic

  2. Experimental investigation of turbulence modulation in particle-laden coaxial jets by Phase Doppler Anemometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mergheni, M.A. |; Sautet, J.C.; Godard, G.; Ben Ticha, H.; Ben Nasrallah, S.

    2009-03-15

    The effect of solid particles on the flow characteristics of axisymmetric turbulent coaxial jets for two flow conditions was studied. Simultaneous measurements of size and velocity distributions of continuous and dispersed phases in a two-phase flow are presented using a Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) technique. Spherical glass particles with a particle diameter range from 102 to 212 {mu}m were used in this two-phase flow, the experimental results indicate a significant influence of the solid particles and the Re on the flow characteristics. The data show that the gas phase has lower mean velocity in the near-injector region and a higher mean velocity at the developed region. Near the injector at low Reynolds number (Re = 2839) the presence of the particles dampens the gas-phase turbulence, while at higher Reynolds number (Re = 11 893) the gas-phase turbulence and the velocity fluctuation of particle-laden jets are increased. The particle velocity at higher Reynolds number (Re = 11 893) and is lower at lower Reynolds number (Re = 2839). The slip velocity between particles and gas phase existed over the flow domain was examined. More importantly, the present experiment results suggest that, consideration of the gas characteristic length scales is insufficient to predict gas-phase turbulence modulation in gas-particle flows. (author)

  3. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  4. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  5. 'If you assume, you can make an ass out of u and me': a decade of the disector for stereological counting of particles in 3D space.

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, T M; Gundersen, H J

    1996-01-01

    The year 1984 was a watershed in stereology. It saw the introduction of highly efficient and unbiased design-based methods for counting the number of arbitrary objects in 3-dimensional (3D) space using 2D sectional images. The only requirement is that the objects be unambiguously identifiable on parallel sections or successive focal planes. The move away from the ¿assumption-based' and ¿model-based' methods applied previously has been a major scientific advance. It has led to the resolution of several problems in different biomedical areas. The basic principle which makes possible 3D counting from sections is the disector. Here, we review the disector principle and consider its impact on the counting and sizing of biological particles. From now on, there can be no excuse for applying the biased counting methods of yesteryear. Their continued use, despite the availability of unbiased alternatives, should be seen as paying homage to History rather than advancing Science. PMID:8655396

  6. Size-Selective Concentration of Chondrules and Other Small Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Size-selective concentration of particles in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula may be responsible for the initial collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodY precursors. This paper presents the main elements of this process of turbulent concentration. In the terrestrial planet region. both the characteristic size and size distribution of chondrules are explained. "Fluffier" particles would be concentrated in nebula regions which were at a lower density and/or more intensely turbulent. The spatial distribution of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a close tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the probability distributions for concentration in the protoplanetary nebula to be made. Large concentration factors (less than 10(exp 5)) are readily obtained, implying that numerous zones of particle density significantly exceeding the gas density could exist. If most of the available solids were actually in chondrule sized particles, the ensuing particle mass density would become so large that the feedback effects on gas turbulence due to mass loading could no longer be neglected. This paper describes the process, presenting its basic elements and some implications, without including the effects of mass loading.

  7. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  8. The distribution of MHD turbulence in the heliosphere and the charged particle radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence plays an important role in cross scale couplings in the heliospheric system and is central to understanding the distribution and variations of charged particle radiation. The nonlinear turbulent cascade process acts as a conduit connecting large scale fluid-like plasma motions to small scale kinetic motions, and is thus most likely an integral part of heating processes from the coronal base to the outer boundaries of the heliosphere. Turbulence also establishes key parameters that determine the transport (and perhaps also, acceleration) of energetic charged particles. In the inner heliospheric realm of solar energetic particles, turbulence can account for scattering, field line complexity, and topological trapping, and can provide other indirect effects such as turbulent transport affecting CMEs and shocks. To understand the distribution and spectra of galactic cosmic rays, one must know the diffusion tensor and therefore local turbulence properties. Turbulence is transported outward in the supersonic solar wind, while the cosmic rays diffuse and drift inwards from the interstellar medium. Thus to understand how the spectrum of galactic cosmic rays is established at any point in interplanetary space, it is necessary to have knowledge of the turbulence everywhere in the heliosphere. Here we summarize recent progress in this challenging area. Headway has been made by employing a four equation transport model with one point nonlinear modeling of locally homogeneous turbulence. The model follows turbulence energy density, correlation scale, temperature and cross helicity under the influence of specified large scale fields. The turbulence is driven by large scale shear, and in the outer heliosphere, by pickup ions. A few constants must be estimated either from theory or observations -- the MHD Karman-Taylor constants, the shear strength, a turbulence geometry factor ("mixing term"), and the Alfven ratio. The latitudinal dependence of

  9. Energetic particle transport in the presence of magnetic turbulence: influence of spectral extension and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, F.; Malara, F.; Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Valentini, F.

    2016-07-01

    The transport of energetic particles in the presence of magnetic turbulence is an important but unsolved problem of space physics and astrophysics. Here, we aim at advancing the understanding of energetic particle transport by means of a new numerical model of synthetic magnetic turbulence. The model builds up a turbulent magnetic field as a superposition of space-localized fluctuations at different spatial scales. The resulting spectrum is isotropic with an adjustable spectral index. The model allows us to reproduce a spectrum broader than four decades, and to regulate the level of intermittency through a technique based on the p-model. Adjusting the simulation parameters close to solar wind conditions at 1 au, we inject ˜1 MeV protons in the turbulence realization and compute the parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients as a function of spectral extension, turbulence level, and intermittency. While a number of previous results are recovered in the appropriate limits, including anomalous transport regimes for low turbulence levels, we find that long spectral extensions tend to reduce the diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, we find for the first time that intermittency has an influence on parallel transport but not on perpendicular transport, with the parallel diffusion coefficient increasing with the level of intermittency. We also obtain the distribution of particle inversion times for parallel velocity, a power law for more than one decade, and compare it with the pitch angle scattering times observed in the solar wind. This parametric study can be useful to interpret particle propagation properties in astrophysical systems.

  10. Endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan in Concentrated Ambient Particles Induce Rapid Increase in Blood Pressure in Controlled Human Exposures.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A; Koutrakis, Petros; Thorne, Peter S; Scott, James; Liu, Ling; Brook, Robert D; Behbod, Behrooz; Gibson, Heike; Silverman, Frances; Mittleman, Murray A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Gold, Diane R

    2015-09-01

    Short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased blood pressure (BP) in epidemiological studies. Understanding the impact of specific PM components on BP is essential in developing effective risk-reduction strategies. We investigated the association between endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan-two major biological PM components-and BP. We also examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor, a vasodilatory inflammatory marker, modified these associations. We conducted a single-blind, randomized, crossover trial of controlled human exposure to concentrated ambient particles with 50 healthy adults. Particle-associated-endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan were sampled using polycarbonate-membrane-filters. Supine resting systolic BP and diastolic BP were measured pre-, 0.5-hour post-, and 20-hour postexposure. Urine vascular endothelial growth factor concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and creatinine-corrected. Exposures to endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan for 130 minutes were associated with increases in BPs: at 0.5-hour postexposure, every doubling in endotoxin concentration was associated with 1.73 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.28, 3.18; P=0.02) and 2.07 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.74, 3.39; P=0.003); every doubling in β-1,3-d-Glucan concentration was associated with 0.80 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, -0.07, 1.67; P=0.07) and 0.88 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.09, 1.66; P=0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor rose after concentrated ambient particle endotoxin exposure and attenuated the association between endotoxin and 0.5-hour postexposure diastolic BP (Pinteraction=0.02). In healthy adults, short-term endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan exposures were associated with increased BP. Our findings suggest that the biological PM components contribute to PM-related cardiovascular outcomes, and postexposure vascular endothelial

  11. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  12. Molecularly linked 3D plasmonic nanoparticle core/satellite assemblies: SERS nanotags with single-particle Raman sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Max; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A fast, generic, and suspension-based route to highly SERS-active assemblies of noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag) with small core-satellite gaps and single-particle Raman sensitivity is presented. Rationally designed, heterobifunctional Raman reporters serve as molecular linkers for electrostatic conjugation of the small satellites to the large core.

  13. Gold Nanoplate-Based 3D Hierarchical Microparticles: A Single Particle with High Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2016-08-01

    Formation of intended nano- and microstructures with regular building blocks has attracted much attention because of their potential applications in the fields of optics, electronics, and catalysis. Herein, we report a novel strategy to spontaneously grow three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical cabbagelike microparticles (CLMPs) constructed by individual Au nanoplates. By reducing gold precursor to gold atoms, N-(3-amidino)-aniline (NAAN) itself was oxidized to form poly(N-(3-amidino)-aniline) (PNAAN), which specifically binds on Au(111) facet as a capping agent and which leads to the formation of gold nanoplates. Because of the incomplete coverage of Au(111) facet, new gold nanoplate growth sites were spontaneously generated from the crystal plane of existing Au nanoplates for the growth of other nanoplates. This process continued until the nanoplate density reached its maximum range, eventually resulting in CLMPs with well-controlled structures. This opens a new avenue to utilize the imperfection during nanoparticle (NP) growth for the construction of microstructures. The individual CLMP shows excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performance with high enhancement factor (EF) and good reproducibility as it integrates the SERS enhancement effects of individual Au nanoplate and the nanogaps formed by the uniform and hierarchical structures. PMID:27452074

  14. Turbulent transport of MeV range cyclotron heated minorities as compared to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, István; Wilkie, George J.; Kazakov, Yevgen O.; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-11-01

    We study the turbulent transport of an ion cyclotron resonance heated (ICRH), MeV range minority ion species in tokamak plasmas. Such highly energetic minorities, which can be produced in the three ion minority heating scheme (Kazakov et al (2015) Nucl. Fusion 55 032001), have been proposed to be used to experimentally study the confinement properties of fast ions without the generation of fusion alphas. We compare the turbulent transport properties of ICRH ions with that of fusion born alpha particles. Our theoretical predictions indicate that care must be taken when conclusions are drawn from experimental results: while the effect of turbulence on these particles is similar in terms of transport coefficients, differences in their distribution functions—ultimately their generation processes—make the resulting turbulent fluxes different.

  15. Decaying Whistler Turbulence at Ion Scales: Particle-In-Cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Nariyuki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation in magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless electron-ion plasma has been done to demonstrate the forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence at ion scales. Fluctuations with right-handed polarization at scales larger than ion inertial length are applied as an initial condition of the simulation, which satisfy a dispersion relation of whistler waves in cold-magnetized plasma. The particle-in-cell simulation, which includes full kinetic properties of electrons and ions in collisionless plasma, demonstrates turbulent cascade and dissipation of fluctuation energy self-consistently. Discussion will focus on properties of decaying whistler turbulence at ion scales, such as the power-law index, wavenumber anisotropy, and plasma heating. Comparison of properties of whistler turbulence at ion scales with electron scales will also be discussed.

  16. Porting the 3D Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Code GTC to the CRAY/NEC SX-6 Vector Architecture: Perspectives and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ethier; Z. Lin

    2003-09-15

    Several years of optimization on the super-scalar architecture has made it more difficult to port the current version of the 3D particle-in-cell code GTC to the CRAY/NEC SX-6 vector architecture. This paper explains the initial work that has been done to port this code to the SX-6 computer and to optimize the most time consuming parts. Early performance results are shown and compared to the same test done on the IBM SP Power 3 and Power 4 machines.

  17. Applications of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models in the San Francisco bay-delta estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Donovan, J.M.; Wong, H.F.N.

    2005-01-01

    Three applications of three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle-tracking models are currently underway by the United States Geological Survey in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary. The first application is to the San Francisco Bay and a portion of the coastal ocean. The second application is to an important, gated control channel called the Delta Cross Channel, located within the northern portion of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The third application is to a reach of the San Joaquin River near Stockton, California where a significant dissolved oxygen problem exists due, in part, to conditions associated with the deep-water ship channel for the Port of Stockton, California. This paper briefly discusses the hydrodynamic and particle tracking models being used and the three applications. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  18. Cinema particle image velocimetry investigation of turbulent jet flame stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upatnieks, Ansis

    A new cinema PIV system was developed and used to study the physical phenomena of non-premixed turbulent jet flame stabilization. The system offers an unprecedented combination of image acquisition rate (8000/s), sequence length (4000) and resolution (equivalent to 1K x 1.5K pixels) that provides finely resolved yet extraordinarily lengthy time histories of the evolution of velocity fields in laboratory-scale gas-phase turbulent flows. These measurements provide quantitative information concerning the dynamics of turbulence and combustion that is not available from conventional experimental techniques or computational simulations. For example, time histories of the interaction between turbulent vortex structures and the flame thermal boundary are observed. Gas and flame velocities are obtained simultaneously, yielding direct measurements of flame propagation velocities. The gas and flame velocities are highly correlated, suggesting strong interaction between the velocity field and the flame. The gas and propagation velocities at the flame base remain close to premixed laminar burning velocities (SL), which are three to four times smaller than the velocities in corresponding non-reacting cases. Strong reverse flow is observed upstream of the flame base, suggesting that the velocity reduction is caused by heat release-induced dilatation. These observations suggest that the dilatation velocity field plays a dominant role in stabilization by reducing incident gas velocities to levels at which laminar premixed, triple, or edge flames can be sustained.

  19. Kinetic particle simulation of turbulence in an FRC geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Daniel; Lau, Calvin; Holod, Ihor; Lin, Zhihong; Dettrick, Sean; Binderbauer, Michl; Tajima, Toshiki

    2014-10-01

    Core turbulence in a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) is studied using the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code with modified equilibrium geometry. The code solves the gyrokinetic equation for ions and the drift kinetic equation for electrons. The simulation region is an annulus which excludes plasma near the O-point to avoid breakdown of the gyrokinetic dynamics of ions. The C-2 FRC equilibrium is introduced to study similar conditions as found in the C-2 experiments, where the core is found to be relatively quiescent. In simulation, we find the C-2 plasma is stable to ion temperature gradient instabilities using realistic experimental parameters, consistent with experimental results obtained in C-2. When temperature and density gradients are enhanced beyond typical C-2 parameters, we observe a class of instabilities that appear as flute-like drift modes. These results shed light on a possible reason why transport temperature scaling in the C-2 core is radically different from that of typical turbulent transport scaling such as the Bohm-like regime. Progress is also reported on simulations of scrape off layer turbulence and electron driven turbulence.

  20. Mesoscopic turbulence and local order in Janus particles self-propelling under an ac electric field.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of mesoscopic turbulence exhibited by active particles, we experimentally study turbulent states of nonliving self-propelled particles. We realize an experimental system with dense suspensions of asymmetrical colloidal particles (Janus particles) self-propelling on a two-dimensional surface under an ac electric field. Velocity fields of the Janus particles in the crowded situation can be regarded as a sort of turbulence because it contains many vortices and their velocities change abruptly. Correlation functions of their velocity field reveal the coexistence of polar alignment and antiparallel alignment interactions, which is considered to trigger mesoscopic turbulence. Probability distributions of local order parameters for polar and nematic orders indicate the formation of local clusters with particles moving in the same direction. A broad peak in the energy spectrum of the velocity field appears at the spatial scales where the polar alignment and the cluster formation are observed. Energy is injected at the particle scale and conserved quantities such as energy could be cascading toward the larger clusters. PMID:26651697

  1. Mesoscopic turbulence and local order in Janus particles self-propelling under an ac electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of mesoscopic turbulence exhibited by active particles, we experimentally study turbulent states of nonliving self-propelled particles. We realize an experimental system with dense suspensions of asymmetrical colloidal particles (Janus particles) self-propelling on a two-dimensional surface under an ac electric field. Velocity fields of the Janus particles in the crowded situation can be regarded as a sort of turbulence because it contains many vortices and their velocities change abruptly. Correlation functions of their velocity field reveal the coexistence of polar alignment and antiparallel alignment interactions, which is considered to trigger mesoscopic turbulence. Probability distributions of local order parameters for polar and nematic orders indicate the formation of local clusters with particles moving in the same direction. A broad peak in the energy spectrum of the velocity field appears at the spatial scales where the polar alignment and the cluster formation are observed. Energy is injected at the particle scale and conserved quantities such as energy could be cascading toward the larger clusters.

  2. Laminar, turbulent, and inertial shear-thickening regimes in channel flow of neutrally buoyant particle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lashgari, Iman; Picano, Francesco; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this Letter is to characterize the flow regimes of suspensions of finite-size rigid particles in a viscous fluid at finite inertia. We explore the system behavior as a function of the particle volume fraction and the Reynolds number (the ratio of flow and particle inertia to viscous forces). Unlike single-phase flows, where a clear distinction exists between the laminar and the turbulent states, three different regimes can be identified in the presence of a particulate phase, with smooth transitions between them. At low volume fractions, the flow becomes turbulent when increasing the Reynolds number, transitioning from the laminar regime dominated by viscous forces to the turbulent regime characterized by enhanced momentum transport by turbulent eddies. At larger volume fractions, we identify a new regime characterized by an even larger increase of the wall friction. The wall friction increases with the Reynolds number (inertial effects) while the turbulent transport is weakly affected, as in a state of intense inertial shear thickening. This state may prevent the transition to a fully turbulent regime at arbitrary high speed of the flow.

  3. Large-eddy simulation of heavy particle dispersion in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Salvetti, M.V.

    2015-03-10

    Capabilities and accuracy issues in Lagrangian tracking of heavy particles in velocity fields obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows are reviewed. In particular, it is shown that, if no subgrid scale (SGS) model is added to the particle motion equations, particle preferential concentration and near-wall accumulation are significantly underestimated. Results obtained with SGS modeling for the particle motion equations based on approximate deconvolution are briefly recalled. Then, the error purely due to filtering in particle tracking in LES flow fields is singled out and analyzed. The statistical properties of filtering errors are characterized in turbulent channel flow both from an Eulerian and a Lagrangian viewpoint. Implications for stochastic SGS modeling in particle motion equations are briefly outlined.

  4. Attenuation of Gas Turbulence by a Nearly Stationary Dispersion of Fine Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, A. D.; Eaton, J. K.; Hwang, W.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulence attenuation by greater than a factor of two has been observed in many practical gas flows carrying volume fractions as small as 0.01% of dispersed particles. Particles which cause such attenuation usually are smaller than the smallest scales of the turbulence and have time constants 5 to 10 times greater than the time scale of a typical turbulent eddy. That is, strongly attenuating particles usually have Stokes numbers in the range of 5 to 10, indicating that they do not respond to the turbulent fluctuations, but instead just fall through the flow responding only to the mean flow. There are two mechanisms by which free falling particles may attenuate turbulence. First, the unresponsive particles act as a drag on the turbulent eddies, passing energy from the turbulent eddies to the small scale wakes of the particles where it is quickly dissipated by viscosity. The second mechanism is more complicated. Particles falling under gravity convert gravitational potential energy to turbulent velocity fluctuations. If the particles are large, this mechanism increases the overall turbulence level. However, with moderate size particles, the small scale turbulence generated apparently distorts the turbulent eddies leading to more rapid dissipation. Unfortunately, this conclusion is supported only by circumstantial evidence to date. The objectives of the experiment are to use microgravity to separate the two mechanisms. A region of nearly-isotropic decaying turbulence with zero mean flow will be formed in a box in the microgravity environment. Different sets of particles with Stokes numbers in the range of 2 to 20 will be dispersed in the flow. With zero gravity and no mean fluid velocity the particles will have zero mean velocity. With the large Stokes numbers, the fluctuating velocities will also be small. Therefore, the only attenuation mechanism will be the direct action of the particles on the turbulence. Control experiments will also be done in which the

  5. Mixing model with multi-particle interactions for Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the numerical study of the mixing volume model (MVM) for molecular diffusion in Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing problems. The MVM is based on the multi-particle interaction in a finite volume (mixing volume). A priori test of the MVM, based on the direct numerical simulations of planar jets, is conducted in the turbulent region and the interfacial layer between the turbulent and non-turbulent fluids. The results show that the MVM predicts well the mean effects of the molecular diffusion under various numerical and flow parameters. The number of the mixing particles should be large for predicting a value of the molecular diffusion term positively correlated to the exact value. The size of the mixing volume relative to the Kolmogorov scale η is important in the performance of the MVM. The scalar transfer across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface is well captured by the MVM especially with the small mixing volume. Furthermore, the MVM with multiple mixing particles is tested in the hybrid implicit large-eddy-simulation/Lagrangian-particle-simulation (LES-LPS) of the planar jet with the characteristic length of the mixing volume of O(100η). Despite the large mixing volume, the MVM works well and decays the scalar variance in a rate close to the reference LES. The statistics in the LPS are very robust to the number of the particles used in the simulations and the computational grid size of the LES. Both in the turbulent core region and the intermittent region, the LPS predicts a scalar field well correlated to the LES.

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The VAX/VMS/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The VAX/VMS/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  8. Particle pinch and collisionality in gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Angioni, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Fable, E.; Maslov, M.; Weisen, H.; Peeters, A. G.

    2009-06-15

    The generic problem of how, in a turbulent plasma, the experimentally relevant conditions of a particle flux very close to the null are achieved, despite the presence of strong heat fluxes, is addressed. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence in tokamaks reveal a complex dependence of the particle flux as a function of the turbulent spatial scale and of the velocity space as collisionality is increased. At experimental values of collisionality, the particle flux is found close to the null, in agreement with the experiment, due to the balance between inward and outward contributions at small and large scales, respectively. These simulations provide full theoretical support to the prediction of a peaked density profile in a future nuclear fusion reactor.

  9. Universal Scaling Laws for Dense Particle Suspensions in Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro; Picano, Francesco; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2016-09-01

    The macroscopic behavior of dense suspensions of neutrally buoyant spheres in turbulent plane channel flow is examined. We show that particles larger than the smallest turbulence scales cause the suspension to deviate from the continuum limit in which its dynamics is well described by an effective suspension viscosity. This deviation is caused by the formation of a particle layer close to the wall with significant slip velocity. By assuming two distinct transport mechanisms in the near-wall layer and the turbulence in the bulk, we define an effective wall location such that the flow in the bulk can still be accurately described by an effective suspension viscosity. We thus propose scaling laws for the mean velocity profile of the suspension flow, together with a master equation able to predict the increase in drag as a function of the particle size and volume fraction.

  10. Comparison of near-forward light scattering on oceanic turbulence and particles.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, D J; Domaradzki, J A; Stramski, D; Zaneveld, J R

    1998-07-20

    We examine and compare near-forward light scattering that is caused by turbulence and typical particulate assemblages in the ocean. The near-forward scattering by particles was calculated using Mie theory for homogeneous spheres and particle size distributions representative of natural assemblages in the ocean. Direct numerical simulations of a passive scalar with Prandtl number 7 mixed by homogeneous turbulence were used to represent temperature fluctuations and resulting inhomogeneities in the refractive index of water. Light scattering on the simulated turbulent flow was calculated using the geometrical-optics approximation. We found that the smallest temperature scales contribute the most to scattering, and that scattering on turbulence typically dominates over scattering on particles for small angles as large as 0.1 degrees . The scattering angle deviation that is due to turbulence for a light beam propagating over a 0.25-m path length in the oceanic water can be as large as 0.1 degrees . In addition, we carried out a preliminary laboratory experiment that illustrates the differences in the near-forward scattering on refractive-index inhomogeneities and particles. PMID:18285924

  11. Flow driven inward particle flux and enstrophy production constraint on relaxation in Hasegawa-Wakatani turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashourvan, Arash; Diamond, P. H.; Gürcan, Ö. D.

    2015-11-01

    The relation between the physics of turbulent transport of particles and momentum is investigated, using the Hasegawa-Wakatani model, with both a density gradient and a quasi-equilibrium shear (zonal) flow. For axisymmetric (k∥ = 0) fluctuations, pure KH instabilities, energized by the flow shear, relax the flow and drive an outward (down the density gradient) flux of particles (Γ = < ñṽx > > 0 , where Γ is the non-dimensional turbulent particle flux). However, for drift-KH instabilities of finite k∥ , flow enhanced pumping can locally drive an inward particle flux. Moreover, we use the positivity of the production of the fluctuation potential enstrophy to obtain a constraining relation between the momentum and particle transport. This constraint relation asserts that the turbulent vorticity flux Πω of a system which has a local inward particle flux (Γ < 0) must locally satisfy Πω < Γ < 0 . This can lead to the change in the sign of the Reynolds work and relaxation of the flow shear at the radial location of the occurrence of the inward flux. Ongoing work focuses on determining the dependencies of the turbulent viscosity. Supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  12. Large-Scale Eulerian-Lagrangian Simulations of Turbulent Particle-Laden Riser Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Olivier; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2011-11-01

    Turbulent gas-particle flows play fundamental roles in a wide range of technical systems. Understanding and predicting particle-laden turbulent flows is key to ensuring optimal performance and improving the design of devices such as fluidized bed reactors. In this work, a Lagrangian description of the particles is combined with state-of-the-art schemes for high-fidelity turbulence simulations in order to enable predictive numerical modeling of particle cluster formation in turbulent riser flows. The simplified riser configuration of He et al is used to answer several key questions regarding meso-scale structures in risers, in particular regarding (1) the onset of instability, especially in the limit of low volume fractions, (2) the role played by the drag model formulation (in particular the dependence of the drag law on void fraction) and (3) the collision model in the formation and dynamics of particle structures. Simulation results are compared with experimental results in terms of cluster size and shape, as well as gas and particle statistics. Then, a wall-free fully periodic configuration is considered and differences in cluster statistics are discussed.

  13. Loop heating by D.C. electric current and electromagnetic wave emissions simulated by 3-D EM particle zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J. I.; Zhao, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that a current-carrying plasma loop can be heated by magnetic pinch driven by the pressure imbalance between inside and outside the loop, using a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle code. Both electrons and ions in the loop can be heated in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, therefore the perpendicular temperature can be increased about 10 times compared with the parallel temperature. This temperature anisotropy produced by the magnetic pinch heating can induce a plasma instability, by which high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be excited. The plasma current which is enhanced by the magnetic pinch can also excite a kinetic kink instability, which can heat ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The heating mechanism of ions as well as the electromagnetic emission could be important for an understanding of the coronal loop heating and the electromagnetic wave emissions from active coronal regions.

  14. The characterization and optimization of NIO1 ion source extraction aperture using a 3D particle-in-cell code.

    PubMed

    Taccogna, F; Minelli, P; Cavenago, M; Veltri, P; Ippolito, N

    2016-02-01

    The geometry of a single aperture in the extraction grid plays a relevant role for the optimization of negative ion transport and extraction probability in a hybrid negative ion source. For this reason, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model of the extraction region around the single aperture including part of the source and part of the acceleration (up to the extraction grid (EG) middle) regions has been developed for the new aperture design prepared for negative ion optimization 1 source. Results have shown that the dimension of the flat and chamfered parts and the slope of the latter in front of the source region maximize the product of production rate and extraction probability (allowing the best EG field penetration) of surface-produced negative ions. The negative ion density in the plane yz has been reported. PMID:26932027

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The UNIX/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  16. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The UNIX/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  17. Lagrangian measurements of inertial particle accelerations in grid generated wind tunnel turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ayyalasomayajula, S; Gylfason, A; Collins, L R; Bodenschatz, E; Warhaft, Z

    2006-10-01

    We describe Lagrangian measurements of water droplets in grid generated wind tunnel turbulence at a Taylor Reynolds number of R(lambda)=250 and an average Stokes number (St) of approximately 0.1. The inertial particles are tracked by a high speed camera moving along the side of the tunnel at the mean flow speed. The standardized acceleration probability density functions of the particles have spread exponential tails that are narrower than those of a fluid particles (St approximately 0) and there is a decrease in the acceleration variance with increasing Stokes number. A simple vortex model shows that the inertial particles selectively sample the fluid field and are less likely to experience regions of the fluid undergoing the largest accelerations. Recent direct numerical simulations compare favorably with these first measurements of Lagrangian statistics of inertial particles in highly turbulent flows.

  18. Relative velocity distribution of inertial particles in turbulence: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Vincent E.; Jonker, Harm J. J.

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of relative velocities between particles provides invaluable information on the rates and characteristics of particle collisions. We show that the theoretical model of Gustavsson and Mehlig [K. Gustavsson and B. Mehlig, J. Turbul. 15, 34 (2014), 10.1080/14685248.2013.875188], within its anticipated limits of validity, can predict the joint probability density function of relative velocities and separations of identical inertial particles in isotropic turbulent flows with remarkable accuracy. We also quantify the validity range of the model. The model matches two limits (or two types) of relative motion between particles: one where pair diffusion dominates (i.e., large coherence between particle motion) and one where caustics dominate (i.e., large velocity differences between particles at small separations). By using direct numerical simulation combined with Lagrangian particle tracking, we assess the model prediction in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. We demonstrate that, when sufficient caustics are present at a given separation and the particle response time is significantly smaller than the integral time scales of the flow, the distribution exhibits the same universal power-law form dictated by the correlation dimension as predicted by the model of Gustavsson and Mehlig. In agreement with the model, no strong dependency on the Taylor-based Reynolds number is observed.

  19. Transport matrix for particles and momentum in collisional drift waves turbulence in linear plasma devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashourvan, Arash; Diamond, P. H.; Gürcan, Ö. D.

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between the physics of turbulent transport of particles and azimuthal momentum in a linear plasma device is investigated using a simple model with a background density gradient and zonal flows driven by turbulent stresses. Pure shear flow driven Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (k∥=0 ) relax the flow and drive an outward (down gradient) flux of particles. However, instabilities at finite k∥ with flow enhanced pumping can locally drive an inward particle pinch. The turbulent vorticity flux consists of a turbulent viscosity term, which acts to reduce the global vorticity gradient and the residual vorticity flux term, accelerating the zonal flows from rest. Moreover, we use the positivity of the production of fluctuation potential enstrophy to obtain a constraint relation, which tightly links the vorticity transport to the particle transport. This relation can be useful in explaining the experimentally observed correlation between the presence of E ×B flow shear and the measured inward particle flux in various magnetically confined plasma devices.

  20. GENERAL: Study on Duality of Wave and Particle of Turbulence Using CML Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-Cu

    2009-05-01

    A family of coupled map lattice (CML) models has been developed to simulate the evolutional mechanism of interactions of convection, diffusion, and dispersion in both weakly and strongly coupled cases. Not only coherent and turbulent properties as well as their relations, but also the transitional states between convection dominating, diffusion dominating and dispersion dominating are analyzed to demonstrate the essential characteristics of any state. Numerical results show that the models are capable of simulating both layered coupling and stochastic mechanism, and lead us to understand whether or not turbulence coherent structure is formed by modulation of wave packet. The duality of wave and particle characters of turbulence is illustrated in the numerical simulation; a sketch picture is given to explain the questions associated with the turbulent inverse cascade, which is the result of the mutual interactions among the physical factors of nonlinearity, dissipation and dispersion.

  1. 3D solutions of the Poisson-Vlasov equations for a charged plasma and particle-core model in a line of FODO cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, G.; Rambaldi, S.; Bazzani, A.; Comunian, M.; Pisent, A.

    2003-09-01

    We consider a charged plasma of positive ions in a periodic focusing channel of quadrupolar magnets in the presence of RF cavities. The ions are bunched into charged triaxial ellipsoids and their description requires the solution of a fully 3D Poisson-Vlasov equation. We also analyze the trajectories of test particles in the exterior of the ion bunches in order to estimate their diffusion rate. This rate is relevant for a high intensity linac (TRASCO project). A numerical PIC scheme to integrate the Poisson-Vlasov equations in a periodic focusing system in 2 and 3 space dimensions is presented. The scheme consists of a single particle symplectic integrator and a Poisson solver based on FFT plus tri-diagonal matrix inversion. In the 2D version arbitrary boundary conditions can be chosen. Since no analytical self-consistent 3D solution is known, we chose an initial Neuffer-KV distribution in phase space, whose electric field is close to the one generated by a uniformly filled ellipsoid. For a matched (periodic) beam the orbits of test particles moving in the field of an ellipsoidal bunch, whose semi-axis satisfy the envelope equations, is similar to the orbits generated by the self-consistent charge distribition obtained from the PIC simulation, even though it relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac-like distribution. After a transient the RMS radii and emittances have small amplitude oscillations. The PIC simulations for a mismatched (quasiperiodic) beam are no longer comparable with the ellipsoidal bunch model even though the qualitative behavior is the same, namely a stronger diffusion due to the increase of resonances.

  2. Fluid-particle characteristics in fully-developed cluster-induced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we present a theoretical framework for collisional fluid-particle turbulence. To identify the key mechanisms responsible for energy exchange between the two phases, an Eulerian-Lagrangian strategy is used to simulate fully-developed cluster-inudced turbulence (CIT) under a range of Reynolds numbers, where fluctuations in particle concentration generate and sustain the carrier-phase turbulence. Using a novel filtering approach, a length-scale separation between the correlated particle velocity and uncorrelated granular temperature (GT) is achieved. This separation allows us to extract the instantaneous Eulerian volume fraction, velocity and GT fields from the Lagrangian data. Direct comparisons can thus be made with the relevant terms that appear in the multiphase turbulence model. It is shown that the granular pressure is highly anisotropic, and thus additional transport equations (as opposed to a single equation for GT) are necessary in formulating a predictive multiphase turbulence model. In addition to reporting the relevant contributions to the Reynolds stresses of each phase, two-point statistics, integral length/timescales, averages conditioned on the local volume fraction, and PDFs of the key multiphase statistics are presented and discussed. The research reported in this paper is partially supported by the HPC equipment purchased through U.S. National Science Foundation MRI Grant Number CNS 1229081 and CRI Grant Number 1205413.

  3. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-09-21

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  4. A Three-Dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry System for the Evaluation of Large Eddy Simulation Turbulence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Joshua M.

    The necessity for evaluating the accuracy and characteristics of new Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence models in modern fluid mechanics research has inspired the development of a Three-Dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3DPTV) system capable of producing 3-Dimension 3-Component (3D3C) velocity vector fields. The system is based on the triangulation method of particle location and utilizes an optical system comprised of three 4008 x 2672 charge-coupled devices (CCDs), three 120mm lenses, and a water-filled prism. The tracer particles used in the system were <5microm TiO2 and were illuminated using a 532 nm Nd:YAG dual pulsed laser. The system was configured to study a backward-facing step flow in a 6" x 12" water tunnel due to this flow's consistency in separation and unsteady, turbulent characteristics. The experimental flow had a freestream velocity of 22 cm/s, a Reynolds number based on the step height of 6274, and a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of approximately 130. Data from this flow was used in a priori testing of various LES models including the Smagorinsky, Similarity, Mixed, Dynamic, Coherent Structures, and Stretched Vortex Models. The system is preferable to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for such testing in that it is capable of acquiring data at a resolution adequate for a priori testing without the computational restrictions for high Reynolds numbers. In the present configuration, the system is capable of achieving a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of 214, but with an increase to the CCD resolution of the system, a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of nearly 400 would be attainable.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  7. The causal relation between turbulent particle flux and density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Carreras, B. A.; García, L.; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Nicolau, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for detecting the causal relationship between fluctuating signals is used to investigate the relation between flux and gradient in fusion plasmas. Both a resistive pressure gradient driven turbulence model and experimental Langmuir probe data from the TJ-II stellarator are studied. It is found that the maximum influence occurs at a finite time lag (non-instantaneous response) and that quasi-periodicities exist. Furthermore, the model results show very long range radial influences, extending over most of the investigated regions, possibly related to coupling effects associated with plasma self-organization. These results clearly show that transport in fusion plasmas is not local and instantaneous, as is sometimes assumed.

  8. Particle simulation of Langmuir turbulence during ionospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. L.; Payne, G. L.; Nicholson, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    Ionospheric heating leads to strong Langmuir turbulence including modulational instability, soliton formation, and spatial collapse. The Zakharov model usually used to describe these effects contains a low-frequency ion-acoustic wave equation which cannot be rigorously justified in the ionosphere where the electron and ion temperatures are comparable. In the present work, the low-frequency physics is described by a many-ion computer simulation. While some differences are found, the results for the most part confirm the earlier, much less difficult, Zakharov calculations.

  9. Turbulence in the Solar Wind Measured with Comet Tail Test Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Howard, T. A.; Rice, D. R.

    2015-10-01

    By analyzing the motions of test particles observed remotely in the tail of Comet Encke, we demonstrate that the solar wind undergoes turbulent processing enroute from the Sun to the Earth and that the kinetic energy entrained in the large-scale turbulence is sufficient to explain the well-known anomalous heating of the solar wind. Using the heliospheric imaging (HI-1) camera on board NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, we have observed an ensemble of compact features in the comet tail as they became entrained in the solar wind near 0.4 AU. We find that the features are useful as test particles, via mean-motion analysis and a forward model of pickup dynamics. Using population analysis of the ensemble's relative motion, we find a regime of random-walk diffusion in the solar wind, followed, on larger scales, by a surprising regime of semiconfinement that we attribute to turbulent eddies in the solar wind. The entrained kinetic energy of the turbulent motions represents a sufficient energy reservoir to heat the solar wind to observed temperatures at 1 AU. We determine the Lagrangian-frame diffusion coefficient in the diffusive regime, derive upper limits for the small scale coherence length of solar wind turbulence, compare our results to existing Eulerian-frame measurements, and compare the turbulent velocity with the size of the observed eddies extrapolated to 1 AU. We conclude that the slow solar wind is fully mixed by turbulence on scales corresponding to a 1-2 hr crossing time at Earth; and that solar wind variability on timescales shorter than 1-2 hr is therefore dominated by turbulent processing rather than by direct solar effects.

  10. TURBULENCE IN THE SOLAR WIND MEASURED WITH COMET TAIL TEST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Rice, D. R.

    2015-10-20

    By analyzing the motions of test particles observed remotely in the tail of Comet Encke, we demonstrate that the solar wind undergoes turbulent processing enroute from the Sun to the Earth and that the kinetic energy entrained in the large-scale turbulence is sufficient to explain the well-known anomalous heating of the solar wind. Using the heliospheric imaging (HI-1) camera on board NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, we have observed an ensemble of compact features in the comet tail as they became entrained in the solar wind near 0.4 AU. We find that the features are useful as test particles, via mean-motion analysis and a forward model of pickup dynamics. Using population analysis of the ensemble's relative motion, we find a regime of random-walk diffusion in the solar wind, followed, on larger scales, by a surprising regime of semiconfinement that we attribute to turbulent eddies in the solar wind. The entrained kinetic energy of the turbulent motions represents a sufficient energy reservoir to heat the solar wind to observed temperatures at 1 AU. We determine the Lagrangian-frame diffusion coefficient in the diffusive regime, derive upper limits for the small scale coherence length of solar wind turbulence, compare our results to existing Eulerian-frame measurements, and compare the turbulent velocity with the size of the observed eddies extrapolated to 1 AU. We conclude that the slow solar wind is fully mixed by turbulence on scales corresponding to a 1–2 hr crossing time at Earth; and that solar wind variability on timescales shorter than 1–2 hr is therefore dominated by turbulent processing rather than by direct solar effects.

  11. Wave-Particle Interactions in the Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2012-10-01

    We present in situ satellite observations of plasmaspheric lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF emissions related with substorm subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the magnetosphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ˜10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasmoid (injection front) over the plasmasphere. As with the well-documented plasmoid-magnetic barrier problem, plasma turbulence ensures the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions were used to simulate interactions with the outer zone electrons. These emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions equatorward of the plasma sheet boundary. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms.

  12. Erosive particle kinematics in the turbulent combustion boundary layer contacting a solid wall

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1983-04-15

    Measurements and numerical modeling are applied to observe and predict the interactive influence of sub-micron gas borne particles in an erosive turbulent combustion wall boundary layer. Some of the experiments and computations discussed are directed to study of turbulent free shear layers. Others ephasize wall boundary layers. The common purpose of all of these studies is to generate information on the particle interaction mechanisms active in alteration and reduction of the turbulent transport and the consequent reduction of the erosive heat and mass transfer. Primary emphasis here is given to analysis of erosive two phase wall boundary layers encountered in solid propellant combustion situations. Examples are gun barrel, rocket nozzle, and coal-fired gas turbine combustion flow fields.

  13. Quasilinear wave-particle scattering rate in high-beta turbulent collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos de Lima, Reinaldo; Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, Alex; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete

    2015-08-01

    Collisionless or weakly collisional plasmas, like the plasma of the intracluster medium of galaxies, are subject to electromagnetic instabilities driven by temperature anisotropy, which naturally arise in the presence of turbulence. These instabilities produce anomalous collisionality via wave-particle scattering, then reducing the mean-free-path of the particles by several orders of magnitude. This reduction affects directly the transport properties of the plasma and makes its large scale dynamics to behave similar to collisional MHD. In particular, it allows the turbulence to amplify the magnetic fields via the small-scale dynamo. Using the quasilinear theory, we calculate the scattering rate of ions due to the kinetic instabilities ion-cyclotron, mirror, and firehose. Using these results we estimate the average scattering rate of ions consistent with data cubes of high-beta MHD turbulence which represent the intracluster medium.

  14. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  16. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  20. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  1. Forward and backward in time dispersion of fluid and inertial particles in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate both theoretically and numerically the Forward-In-Time (FIT) and Backward-In-Time (BIT) dispersion of fluid and inertial particle-pairs in isotropic turbulence. Fluid particles are known to separate faster BIT than FIT in three-dimensional turbulence, and we find that inertial particles do the same. However, we find that the irreversibility in the inertial particle dispersion is in general much stronger than that for fluid particles. For example, the ratio of the BIT to FIT mean-square separation can be up to an order of magnitude larger for the inertial particles than for the fluid particles. We also find that for both the inertial and fluid particles, the irreversibility becomes stronger as the scale of their separation decreases. Regarding the physical mechanism for the irreversibility, we argue that whereas the irreversibility of fluid particle-pair dispersion can be understood in terms of a directional bias arising from the energy transfer process in turbulence, inertial particles experience an additional source of irreversibility arising from the non-local contribution to their velocity dynamics, a contribution that vanishes in the limit St → 0, where St is the particle Stokes number. For each given initial (final, in the BIT case) separation, r0, there is an optimum value of St for which the dispersion irreversibility is strongest, as such particles are optimally affected by both sources of irreversibility. We derive analytical expressions for the BIT, mean-square separation of inertial particles and compare the predictions with numerical data obtained from a Reλ ≈ 582 (where Reλ is the Taylor Reynolds number) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of particle-laden isotropic turbulent flow. The small-time theory, which in the dissipation range is valid for times ≤max[Stτη, τη] (where τη is the Kolmogorov time scale), is in excellent agreement with the DNS. The theory for long-times is in good agreement with the DNS

  2. On the local acceleration and flow trajectory of jet flows from circular and semi-circular pipes via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The distinctive differences between two jet flows that share the same hydraulic diameter dh = 0.01 m and Re ~ 6000, but different (nozzle) shape are explored via 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry using OpenPTV (http://www.openptv.net). The two jets are formed from circular and semicircular pipes and released in a quiescent water tank of 40 dh height, 40 dh wide, and 200 dh long. The recirculating system is seeded with 100 μm particles, where flow measurements are performed in the intermediate flow field (14.5 < x /dh <18.5) at 550Hz for a total of ~ 30,000 frames. Analysis is focused on the spatial distribution of the local flow acceleration and curvature of the Lagrangian trajectories. The velocity and acceleration of particles are estimated by low-pass filtering their position with a moving cubic spline fitting, while the curvature is obtained from the Frenet-Serret equations. Probability density functions (p.d.f.) of these quantities are obtained at various sub-volumes containing a given streamwise velocity range, and compared between the two cases to evaluate the memory effects in the intermediate flow field.

  3. A microfluidic opto-caloric switch for sorting of particles by using 3D-hydrodynamic focusing based on SLE fabrication capabilities.

    PubMed

    Meineke, G; Hermans, M; Klos, J; Lenenbach, A; Noll, R

    2016-03-01

    In a miniaturised flow switch fluid flows are controlled by reducing the local viscosity via absorption of laser radiation. Through this, the local flow rates are increased to switch the outlet port of a fluid flow carrying the analyte. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using Selective Laser-Induced Etching (SLE). SLE allows novel 3D-hydrodynamic focusing, realising circular shaped channel cross-sections and adapting interaction volume geometries to the profile of the laser radiation for optimised absorption. The performance of the switch is validated experimentally with a dyed analyte and video image processing. The ability to sort particles like cells is demonstrated at 8 Hz using polystyrene beads having a diameter of 8 μm.

  4. Global magnetosphere-like 3D structure formation in kinetics by hot magnetized plasma flow characterized by shape of the particle distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, Vladimir

    The task was to provide an analytical elementary magnetosphere-like model in kinetics for verification of the 3D EM PIC codes created for space/aerospace and HED plasmas applications. Kinetic approach versus cold MHD approach takes into account different behavior in the EM fields of resonant and non resonant particles in the velocity phase space, which appears via shape characteristics of the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) and via the spatial dispersion effect forming the collisionless dissipation in the EM fields. The external flow is a hot collisionless plasma characterized by the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) with different shapes: Maxwellian, kappa, etc. The flow is in a “hot regime”: it can be supersonic but its velocity remains less the thermal velocity of the electrons. The “internal” part of the magnetosphere formed by trapped particles is the prescribed 3D stationary magnetization considered as a spherical “quasiparticle” with internal magnetodipole and toroidal moments represented as a broadband EM driver. We obtain after the linearization of Vlasov/Maxwell equations a self-consistent 3D large scale kinetic solution of the classic problem. Namely, we: model the “outer” part of the magnetosphere formed by external hot plasma flow of the flyby particles. Solution of the Vlasov equation expressed via a tensor of dielectric permittivity of nonmagnetized and magnetized flowing plasma. Here, we obtain the direct kinetic dissipative effect of the magnetotail formation and the opposite diamagnetic effect of the magnetosphere “dipolization”. We get MHD wave cone in flow magnetized by external guiding magnetic (GM) field. Magnetosphere in our consideration is a 3D dissipative “wave” package structure of the skinned EM fields formed by the “waves” excited at frequency bands where we obtain negative values and singularities (resonances) of squared EM refractive index of the cold plasma. The hot regime

  5. Comparison of a 3-D multi-group SN particle transport code with Monte Carlo for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kent A; Wareing, Todd A; Failla, Gregory; Horton, John L; Eifel, Patricia J; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-12-03

    A patient dose distribution was calculated by a 3D multi-group S N particle transport code for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri and compared to previously published Monte Carlo results. A Cs-137 LDR intracavitary brachytherapy CT data set was chosen from our clinical database. MCNPX version 2.5.c, was used to calculate the dose distribution. A 3D multi-group S N particle transport code, Attila version 6.1.1 was used to simulate the same patient. Each patient applicator was built in SolidWorks, a mechanical design package, and then assembled with a coordinate transformation and rotation for the patient. The SolidWorks exported applicator geometry was imported into Attila for calculation. Dose matrices were overlaid on the patient CT data set. Dose volume histograms and point doses were compared. The MCNPX calculation required 14.8 hours, whereas the Attila calculation required 22.2 minutes on a 1.8 GHz AMD Opteron CPU. Agreement between Attila and MCNPX dose calculations at the ICRU 38 points was within +/- 3%. Calculated doses to the 2 cc and 5 cc volumes of highest dose differed by not more than +/- 1.1% between the two codes. Dose and DVH overlays agreed well qualitatively. Attila can calculate dose accurately and efficiently for this Cs-137 CT-based patient geometry. Our data showed that a three-group cross-section set is adequate for Cs-137 computations. Future work is aimed at implementing an optimized version of Attila for radiotherapy calculations.

  6. Clustering instability of the spatial distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Elperin, Tov; Kleeorin, Nathan; L'vov, Victor S; Rogachevskii, Igor; Sokoloff, Dmitry

    2002-09-01

    A theory of clustering of inertial particles advected by a turbulent velocity field caused by an instability of their spatial distribution is suggested. The reason for the clustering instability is a combined effect of the particles inertia and a finite correlation time of the velocity field. The crucial parameter for the clustering instability is the size of the particles. The critical size is estimated for a strong clustering (with a finite fraction of particles in clusters) associated with the growth of the mean absolute value of the particles number density and for a weak clustering associated with the growth of the second and higher moments. A new concept of compressibility of the turbulent diffusion tensor caused by a finite correlation time of an incompressible velocity field is introduced. In this model of the velocity field, the field of Lagrangian trajectories is not divergence free. A mechanism of saturation of the clustering instability associated with the particles collisions in the clusters is suggested. Applications of the analyzed effects to the dynamics of droplets in the turbulent atmosphere are discussed. An estimated nonlinear level of the saturation of the droplets number density in clouds exceeds by the orders of magnitude their mean number density. The critical size of cloud droplets required for cluster formation is more than 20 microm.

  7. Measurements of the heat release rate integral in turbulent premixed stagnation flames with particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yung-Cheng; Kim, Munki; Han, Jeongjae; Yun, Sangwook; Yoon, Youngbin

    2008-08-15

    A new definition of turbulent consumption speed is proposed in this work that is based on the heat release rate integral, rather than the mass burning rate integral. Its detailed derivation and the assumptions involved are discussed in a general context that applies to all properly defined reaction progress variables. The major advantage of the proposed definition is that it does not require the thin-flame assumption, in contrast to previous definitions. Experimental determination of the local turbulent displacement speed, S{sub D}, and the local turbulent consumption speed, S{sub C}, is also demonstrated with the particle image velocimetry technique in three turbulent premixed stagnation flames. The turbulence intensity of these flames is of the same order of the laminar burning velocity. Based on the current data, a model equation for the local mean heat release rate is proposed. The relationship between S{sub D} and S{sub C} is discussed along with a possible modeling approach for the turbulent displacement speed. (author)

  8. Dark Matter as Fossil Turbulence---Primordial Fog Particles and WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    1996-11-01

    Most of the matter of the universe is ``dark''. Based on the Schwarz viscous and turbulence self-gravitational condensation scales, most dark matter has two forms: ``primordial fog particles'' (PFPs---now moon-mass black dwarfs in galaxy halos) which condensed when the plasma universe neutralized to an inviscid, weakly-turbulent gas about 0.3 By (billion years after the big bang); plus WIMP fluids whose weakly-interacting-massive-particles may still be condensing slowly at large scales to form halos about galaxy clusters. Recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photos show evidence of PFPs as cometary globules in planetary nebulae (see http:www-acs.ucsd.edu ir118 for illustrations). Recent HST deep field photos show red galaxies existed at only 0.75 By, also suggesting a gentle, weak-turbulence, PFP condensation scenario for the first (small red) stars, within preexisting galaxy mass PFP ``fog patches''. The generally accepted Jeans criterion permits no such condensations of protogalaxies in the plasma epoch, and requires a strongly turbulent (big blue star) initial gas condensation scenario that is inconsistent with fossil non-turbulence evidence such as ancient globular star clusters and the extreme temperature uniformity observed in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  9. Dynamics of Small Inertia-Free Spheroidal Particles in a Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge I.; Department of Energy; Process Engineering Team

    2015-11-01

    The study of small non-spherical particles suspended in turbulent fluid flows is of interest in view of the potential applications in industry and the environment. In the present work, we investigated the dynamics of inertia-free spheroidal particles suspended in fully-developed turbulent channel flow at Re τ = 180 by using the direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the Eulerian fluid phase coupled with the Lagrangian point-particle tracking. We considered inertia-free spheroidal particles with a wide range of aspect ratios from 0.01 to 50, i.e. from flat disks to long rods. Although the spheroids passively translate along with the fluid, the particle orientation and rotation strongly depend on the particle shape. The flattest disks were preferentially aligned with their symmetry axis normal to the wall, whereas the longest rods aligned parallel to the wall. Strong mean rotational spin was observed for spherical particles and this has been damped with increasing asphericity both for rod-like and disk-like spheroids. The anisotropic mean and fluctuating fluid vorticity resulted in particle spin anisotropies which exhibited a complex dependence on the particle asphericty. The Research Council of Norway, Notur and COST Action FP1005 are gratefully acknowledged.

  10. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  11. Fractal and fractional calculus to model hydrological processes with application to particle-based 2D and 3D landslide simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco; Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco

    2015-04-01

    We integrate existing soil infiltration modeling with particle based methods in order to simulate two and three-dimensional setups of triggered landslides. Commonly, the infiltration models are based on continuum schemes (e.g. Eulerian approach) by means of which it is possible to define the field of the pore pressure within a soil. By contrast, the particle based methods follow a Lagrangian scheme that allows one to identify the particle trajectories and their dynamical properties. In this work, in order to simulate the triggering mechanism, we apply the classical, fractal and fractional Richards equations and the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, adapted to the molecular dynamics technique. In our scheme the (local) positive pore pressure is simply implemented as a perturbation of the rest state of each grain. Therefore, the pore pressure function can be interpreted as a time-space dependent scalar field acting on each particle. To initialize the system we generate, using a molecular dynamics based algorithm, a mechanically stable disk (2D) or sphere (3D) packing simulating the consolidated soil. In this way, we can built the micro and macro pore structure related to different infiltration time scales. The inter-particle interactions are modeled with a Lennard-Jones like potential. The particle positions are updated in time, after and during a rainfall, with standard molecular dynamics. We analyze the sensitivity of the model with respect to the variation of some parameters such as hydraulic conductivity, cohesion, slope and friction angle, soil depth and fractional order of the generalized infiltration model. In addition, we consider both regular and random particle configurations. The results of our simulations are found to be in agreement with real landslides. In particular, the mean velocity patterns of the simulated landslides appear extremely similar to the observed ones. Moreover, it is possible to apply the method of the inverse surface displacement

  12. An industrial light-field camera applied for 3D velocity measurements in a slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkin, A. V.; Shestakov, M. V.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Modern light-field cameras have found their application in different areas like photography, surveillance and quality control in industry. A number of studies have been reported relatively low spatial resolution of 3D profiles of registered objects along the optical axis of the camera. This article describes a method for 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using an industrial light-field camera and an alternative reconstruction algorithm based on a statistical approach. This method is more accurate than triangulation when applied for tracking small registered objects like tracer particles in images. The technique was used to measure 3D velocity fields in a turbulent slot jet.

  13. Transport of and radiation production by transrelativistic and nonrelativistic particles moving through sub-Larmor-scale electromagnetic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Brett D; Ford, Alexander L; Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2015-09-01

    Plasmas with electromagnetic fields turbulent at sub-Larmor scales are a feature of a wide variety of high-energy-density environments and are essential to the description of many astrophysical and laboratory plasma phenomena. Radiation from particles, whether they are relativistic or nonrelativistic, moving through small-scale magnetic turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying information on the statistical properties of the magnetic turbulence, is also intimately related to the particle diffusive transport. We have investigated, both theoretically and numerically, the transport of nonrelativistic and trans-relativistic particles in plasmas with high-amplitude isotropic sub-Larmor-scale magnetic turbulence, and its relation to the spectra of radiation simultaneously produced by these particles. Consequently, the diffusive and radiative properties of plasmas turbulent on sub-Larmor scales may serve as a powerful tool to diagnosis laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  14. Coherent and incoherent scattering by a plume of particles advected by turbulent velocity flow.

    PubMed

    Palmer, David R

    2009-08-01

    Studies of acoustic remote sensing of the plumes that result from the injection of particulate matter in the ocean, either naturally or by dumping or dredging activities, have assumed the scattering is incoherent. These plumes are always turbulent, however. The particle density is a passive scalar that is advected by the turbulent velocity flow. The possibility exists, therefore, that the scattered waves from a significant number of particles add coherently as a result of Bragg scattering. In this paper, we investigate this possibility. We derive an expression for the ratio of the coherent intensity to the incoherent one in terms of the turbulent spectrum and the properties of the particles that make up the plume. The sonar is modeled as a high-Q, monostatic, pulsed sonar with arbitrary pulse envelope and arbitrary, but narrow, beam pattern. We apply the formalism to acoustic remote sensing of black smoker hydrothermal plumes. We find that, at most, the coherent intensity is less than 1% of the incoherent one. The implications are that Bragg scattering does not lead to a significant coherent component and in analyses of scattering from this type of plume, one can ignore the complications of turbulence altogether. PMID:19640023

  15. Coherent and incoherent scattering by a plume of particles advected by turbulent velocity flow.

    PubMed

    Palmer, David R

    2009-08-01

    Studies of acoustic remote sensing of the plumes that result from the injection of particulate matter in the ocean, either naturally or by dumping or dredging activities, have assumed the scattering is incoherent. These plumes are always turbulent, however. The particle density is a passive scalar that is advected by the turbulent velocity flow. The possibility exists, therefore, that the scattered waves from a significant number of particles add coherently as a result of Bragg scattering. In this paper, we investigate this possibility. We derive an expression for the ratio of the coherent intensity to the incoherent one in terms of the turbulent spectrum and the properties of the particles that make up the plume. The sonar is modeled as a high-Q, monostatic, pulsed sonar with arbitrary pulse envelope and arbitrary, but narrow, beam pattern. We apply the formalism to acoustic remote sensing of black smoker hydrothermal plumes. We find that, at most, the coherent intensity is less than 1% of the incoherent one. The implications are that Bragg scattering does not lead to a significant coherent component and in analyses of scattering from this type of plume, one can ignore the complications of turbulence altogether.

  16. Particle resuspension and associated coherent structures in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, David Alan

    Fundamental properties of particle resuspension from a surface solely by turbulent fluid forces was examined experimentally by observing intermittent particle resuspension and associated turbulent flow properties. Experiments were conducted in an environmental wind tunnel, where sparse beds of monodisperse Lycopodium spores (Club Moss) were placed flush with the floor of the wind tunnel, and exposed to a steady, well developed turbulent boundary layer flow. Particle bed concentration was monitored in situ throughout each experimental trial using an optical system designed to detect forward scattering from a HeNe laser beam. Simultaneous measurements of streamwise and vertical velocity were made immediately downstream of the illuminated particles using hot film anemometry. Experimental trials were conducted at three free-stream velocities (6.0, 7.5, and 9.0 m s(-1)) for a duration of 35 minutes. A Monte-Carlo particle resuspension model was developed to simulate the resuspension process associated with coherent structures of varying magnitude. Simulations were compared with experimental results to identify a probability distribution of coherent structure magnitude.

  17. Effect of Ambient Turbulence on the Drag Force of Particle at High Stokes Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Tsubokura, Makoto; Nakashima, Takuji

    2008-11-01

    Velocity of solid particle (diameter is 2 mm) free-falling in a nearly isotropic turbulent airflow has been investigated using an ingenious experimental setup to achieve high Stokes number. Turbulent intensity around the particle is large enough to have eddies of comparable size to the thickness of boundary layer (approximately 0.2 mm) that is estimated in a laminar flow. As a result of measurement, an ensemble averaged particle velocity is larger than the velocity predicted with Schiller and Naumann's drag coefficient (Muto et al., 2007). To investigate this reduction of drag force, flow aspects near the particle are observed using a numerical simulation of rotating spherical particle (periodically rotates in opposite direction) in a uniform flow. As a result, a modulation of drag force is found and it depends on period and amplitude of the rotation. A reason of the change of drag force in both experiment and numerical simulation is deduced that eddies included in an approach flow to particle, or periodic rotation of particle affect its boundary layer, and the wake of particle is suppressed.

  18. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  19. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  20. Diffusion of an instantaneous cluster of particles in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, H.; Dinar, N.

    In this work we study the diffusion of instantaneous puffs vs the diffusion of continuous plumes. The model which we use is a Lagrangian model for the motion of N particles suggested by Kaplan and Dinar (1988, J. compt. Phys. 79, 317-335). This model is based on the approach of Richardson to the relative diffusion which states that the instantaneous relative velocity of particles is a function of their instantaneous separation. Results show that the diffusion of a puff is slower than that of a continuous source. We find that the puff evolves more slowly than in the analytic model of Lee and Stone (1983, Atmospheric Environment17, 2477-2481), since in their model diffusion is influenced only by the initial conditions. The effect of the source size on the diffusion rate is studied as well.

  1. Convergence of Beer's Law for Radiation Transmission in Particle-Laden Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Ari; Rauenzahn, Rick; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Mani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Discrete random particulate media have been shown to produce significant deviations from Beer's law for radiation transmission. Though particle-resolved ray tracing models can exactly resolve the transmission, the computational expense of such approaches can be prohibitive in settings involving many particles where the radiative transfer equation must be solved at every time step. In this work we investigate the validity of projecting Lagrangian particles onto an Eulerian concentration field and using Beer's law on a local basis. We take particle distributions produced from clustering in turbulent flows and perform both particle-resolved Monte Carlo ray tracing and Beer's law computations. We show that the error in the calculated transmission decreases as the grid is refined, but that the homogenization error increases rapidly as the grid size approaches the particle diameter. This work was supported by the PSAAP2 program at Stanford University.

  2. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  3. An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle flows based on the equilibration of energy concept

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying

    2005-05-01

    Many particle-laden flows in engineering applications involve turbulent gas flows. Modeling multiphase turbulent flows is an important research topic with applications in fluidized beds and particle conveying. A predictive multiphase turbulence model can help CFD codes to be more useful for engineering applications, such as the scale-up in the design of circulating fluidized combustor and coal gasifications. In engineering applications, the particle volume fraction can vary from dilute (<10{sup -4}) to dense ({approx} 50%). It is reasonable to expect that multiphase turbulence models should at least satisfy some basic modeling and performance criteria and give reasonable predictions for the canonical problems in dilute particle-laden turbulent flows. In this research, a comparative assessment of predictions from Simonin and Ahmadi's turbulence models is performed with direct numerical simulation (DNS) for two canonical problems in particle-laden turbulent flows. Based on the comparative assessment, some criteria and the areas for model improvement are identified: (1) model for interphase TKE transfer, especially the time scale of interphase TKE transfer, and (2) correct prediction of TKE evolution with variation of particle Stokes number. Some deficiencies that are identified in the Simonin and Ahmadi models, limit the applicability. A new multiphase turbulence model, the Equilibration of Energy Model (EEM), is proposed in this work. In EEM, a multiscale interaction time scale is proposed to account for the interaction of a particle with a range of eddy sizes. EEM shows good agreement with the DNS results for particle-laden isotropic turbulence. For particle-laden homogeneous shear flows, model predictions from EEM can be further improved if the dissipation rate in fluid phase is modeled with more accuracy.

  4. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  5. Probabilistic settling in the Local Exchange Model of turbulent particle transport.

    PubMed

    McNair, James N

    2006-07-21

    The Local Exchange Model (LEM) is a stochastic diffusion model of particle transport in turbulent flowing water. It was developed mainly for application to particles of near-neutral buoyancy that are strongly influenced by turbulent eddies. Turbulence can rapidly transfer such particles to the bed, where settlement can then occur by, for example, sticking to biofilms (e.g., fine particulate organic matter, or FPOM) or attaching to the substrate behaviorally (e.g., benthic invertebrates). Previous papers on the LEM have addressed the problems of how long (time) and far (distance) a suspended particle will be transported before hitting the bed for the first time. These are the hitting-time and hitting-distance problems, respectively. Hitting distances predicted by the LEM for FPOM in natural streams tend to be much shorter than the distances at which most particles actually settle, suggesting that particles usually do not settle the first time they hit the bed. The present paper extends the LEM so it can address probabilistic settling, where a particle encountering the bed can either remain there for a positive length of time (i.e., settle) or immediately reflect back into the water column, each with positive probability. Previous results for the LEM are generalized by deducing a single set of equations governing the probability distribution and moments of a broad class of quantities that accumulate during particle trajectories terminated by hitting or settling on the bed (e.g., transport time, transport distance, cumulative energy expenditure during transport). Key properties of the settling-time and settling-distance distributions are studied numerically and compared with the observed FPOM settling-distance distribution for a natural stream. Some remaining limitations of the LEM and possible means of overcoming them are discussed.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of a solid-particles suspension in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    We decribe a framework for the large-eddy simulation of solid particles suspended and transported within an incompressible turbulent boundary layer. The underlying approach to simulate the solid-particle laden flow is Eulerian-Eulerian in which the particles are characterized by statistical descriptors. For the fluid phase, the large-eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible turbulent boundary layer employs stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work of Inoue & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech. 2011). Furthermore, a recycling method to generate turbulent inflow is implemented. For the particle phase, the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) is chosen in which the weights and abscissas of the quadrature approximation are tracked directly rather than the moments themselves. The numerical method in this framework is based on a fractional-step method with an energy-conservative fourth-order finite difference scheme on a staggered mesh. It is proposed to utilize this framework to examine transport of sand in desert sandstorms. Supported by KAUST OCRF funded CRG project on simulation of sandstorms.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with solid particle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafa; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    We present results of solid particles suspension and transport in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer flow using large-eddy simulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We adopt the Eulerian-Eulerian approach to simulating particle laden flow with a large number of particles, in which the particles are characterized by statistical descriptors. For the particulate phase, the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) is chosen in which the weights and abscissas of the quadrature approximation are tracked directly rather than the moments themselves. The underlying approach in modeling the turbulence of fluid phase utilizes the stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work proposed by Inoue & Pullin (J. Fluid Mech. 2011). The solver is verified against simple analytical solutions and the computational results are found to be in a good agreement with these. The capability of the new numerical solver will be exercised to investigate turbulent transport of sand in sandstorms. Finally, the adequacy and limitations of the solver will be discussed. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/1704-01.

  8. Beta dependence of electron heating in decaying whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Peter Gary, S.

    2012-01-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out to study electron beta dependence of decaying whistler turbulence and electron heating in a homogeneous, collisionless magnetized plasma. Initially, applied whistler fluctuations at relatively long wavelengths cascade their energy into shorter wavelengths. This cascade leads to whistler turbulence with anisotropic wavenumber spectra which are broader in directions perpendicular to the background magnetic field than in the parallel direction. Comparing the development of whistler turbulence at different electron beta values, it is found that both the wavenumber spectrum anisotropy and electron heating anisotropy decrease with increasing electron beta. This indicates that higher electron beta reduces the perpendicular energy cascade of whistler turbulence. Fluctuation energy dissipation by electron Landau damping responsible for the electron parallel heating becomes weaker at higher electron beta, which leads to more isotropic heating. It suggests that electron kinetic processes are important in determining the properties of whistler turbulence. This kinetic property is applied to discuss the generation of suprathermal strahl electron distributions in the solar wind.

  9. Field Effects of Buoyancy on a Premixed Turbulent Flame Studied by Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    2003-01-01

    Typical laboratory flames for the scientific investigation of flame/turbulence interactions are prone to buoyancy effects. Buoyancy acts on these open flame systems and provides upstream feedbacks that control the global flame properties as well as local turbulence/flame interactions. Consequently the flame structures, stabilization limits, and turbulent reaction rates are directly or indirectly coupled with buoyancy. The objective of this study is to characterize the differences between premixed turbulent flames pointing upwards (1g), pointing downwards (-1g), and in microgravity (mg). The configuration is an inverted conical flame stabilized by a small cone-shaped bluff body that we call CLEAN Flames (Cone-Stabilized Lean Flames). We use two laser diagnostics to capture the velocity and scalar fields. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measures the mean and root mean square velocities and planar imaging by the flame fronts method outlines the flame wrinkle topology. The results were obtained under typical conditions of small domestic heating systems such as water heaters, ovens, and furnaces. Significant differences between the 1g and -1g flames point to the need for including buoyancy contributions in theoretical and numerical calculations. In Earth gravity, there is a complex coupling of buoyancy with the turbulent flow and heat release in the flame. An investigation of buoyancy-free flames in microgravity will provide the key to discern gravity contributions. Data obtained in microgravity flames will provide the benchmark for interpreting and analyzing 1g and -1g flame results.

  10. Transport Analysis of Edge Turbulence in Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Roscoe; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Beyer, Peter; Garbet, Xavier

    1999-11-01

    Simulations of 3D resistive ballooning turbulence in Tore Supra have been carried out(Pl Beyer et. al., Plasma Physics Controlled Fusion, 1999). Test particle analysis of transport in this turbulence is investigated using a guiding center Monte Carlo code(R. B. White, Phys Fluids B, 845 (1900). Particular emphasis is using a flux driven case which shows avalanche like transport.

  11. Turbulence Evolution and Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chee, Ng K.

    2007-01-01

    We model the effects of self-excitation/damping and shock transmission of Alfven waves on solar-energetic-particle (SEP) acceleration at a coronal-mass-ejection (CME) driven parallel shock. SEP-excited outward upstream waves speedily bootstrap acceleration. Shock transmission further raises the SEP-excited wave intensities at high wavenumbers but lowers them at low wavenumbers through wavenumber shift. Downstream, SEP excitation of inward waves and damping of outward waves tend to slow acceleration. Nevertheless, > 2000 km/s parallel shocks at approx. 3.5 solar radii can accelerate SEPs to 100 MeV in < 5 minutes.

  12. Pitch-angle Scattering of Energetic Charged Particles in Nearly Constant Magnitude Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, J.

    2016-08-01

    We use a method developed by Roberts that optimizes the phase angles of an ensemble of plane waves with amplitudes determined from a Kolmogorov-like power spectrum, to construct magnetic field vector fluctuations having nearly constant magnitude and large variances in its components. This is a representation of the turbulent magnetic field consistent with that observed in the solar wind. Charged-particle pitch-angle diffusion coefficients are determined by integrating the equations of motion for a large number of charged particles moving under the influence of forces from our predefined magnetic field. We tested different cases by varying the kinetic energy of the particles (E p) and the turbulent magnetic field variance ({σ }B2). For each combination of E p and {σ }B2, we tested three different models: (1) the so-called