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Sample records for 3-dimensional cell culture

  1. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds for Adult Mouse Neural Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gelain, Fabrizio; Bottai, Daniele; Vescovi, Angleo; Zhang, Shuguang

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical researchers have become increasingly aware of the limitations of conventional 2-dimensional tissue cell culture systems, including coated Petri dishes, multi-well plates and slides, to fully address many critical issues in cell biology, cancer biology and neurobiology, such as the 3-D microenvironment, 3-D gradient diffusion, 3-D cell migration and 3-D cell-cell contact interactions. In order to fully understand how cells behave in the 3-D body, it is important to develop a well-controlled 3-D cell culture system where every single ingredient is known. Here we report the development of a 3-D cell culture system using a designer peptide nanofiber scaffold with mouse adult neural stem cells. We attached several functional motifs, including cell adhesion, differentiation and bone marrow homing motifs, to a self-assembling peptide RADA16 (Ac-RADARADARADARADA-COHN2). These functionalized peptides undergo self-assembly into a nanofiber structure similar to Matrigel. During cell culture, the cells were fully embedded in the 3-D environment of the scaffold. Two of the peptide scaffolds containing bone marrow homing motifs significantly enhanced the neural cell survival without extra soluble growth and neurotrophic factors to the routine cell culture media. In these designer scaffolds, the cell populations with β-Tubulin+, GFAP+ and Nestin+ markers are similar to those found in cell populations cultured on Matrigel. The gene expression profiling array experiments showed selective gene expression, possibly involved in neural stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Because the synthetic peptides are intrinsically pure and a number of desired function cellular motifs are easy to incorporate, these designer peptide nanofiber scaffolds provide a promising controlled 3-D culture system for diverse tissue cells, and are useful as well for general molecular and cell biology. PMID:17205123

  2. 3 dimensional cell cultures: a comparison between manually and automatically produced alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, R; Gallert, C; Roddelkopf, T; Junginger, S; Wree, A; Thurow, K

    2016-08-01

    Cancer diseases are a common problem of the population caused by age and increased harmful environmental influences. Herein, new therapeutic strategies and compound screenings are necessary. The regular 2D cultivation has to be replaced by three dimensional cell culturing (3D) for better simulation of in vivo conditions. The 3D cultivation with alginate matrix is an appropriate method for encapsulate cells to form cancer constructs. The automated manufacturing of alginate beads might be an ultimate method for large-scaled manufacturing constructs similar to cancer tissue. The aim of this study was the integration of full automated systems for the production, cultivation and screening of 3D cell cultures. We compared the automated methods with the regular manual processes. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of antibiotics on these 3D cell culture systems. The alginate beads were formed by automated and manual procedures. The automated steps were processes by the Biomek(®) Cell Workstation (celisca, Rostock, Germany). The proliferation and toxicity were manually and automatically evaluated at day 14 and 35 of cultivation. The results visualized an accumulation and expansion of cell aggregates over the period of incubation. However, the proliferation and toxicity were faintly and partly significantly decreased on day 35 compared to day 14. The comparison of the manual and automated methods displayed similar results. We conclude that the manual production process could be replaced by the automation. Using automation, 3D cell cultures can be produced in industrial scale and improve the drug development and screening to treat serious illnesses like cancer.

  3. Adventitial Cells and Perictyes Support Chondrogenesis Through Different Mechanisms in 3-Dimensional Cultures With or Without Nanoscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Ba, Kai; Wu, Ling; Lee, Siyong; Peault, Bruno; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R; Adams, John S; Evseenko, Denis; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    In previous studies, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow and fat tissues were shown to increase proliferation and matrix production of chondrocytes (CH) in co-culture. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of pericytes (CD31(neg)CD45(neg)CD146+CD34(neg)) and adventitial cells (CD31(neg)CD45(neg)CD146(neg)CD34+) sub-populations of MSCs in supporting proliferation and matrix deposition of CH. The MSCs were derived from synovial membrane and attaching fat tissue. Then, the pericytes and adventitial cells were sorted from total MSCs and co-cultured with articular CH respectively. In pellet co-culture model, the pericytes showed more prominent effects on glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) production and Collagen II synthesis than the adventitial cells which had stronger effects on promoting CH proliferation. In addition, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to examine the expression of a group of secreted growth factors and co-culture performed on electrospun scaffolds based on Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) (P3HB4HB), to verify the trophic effects of different MSC sub-populations in 3-Dimensional (3D) environment. In conclusion, it was found that the pericytes and adventitial cells support CH in different ways; the adventitial cells more supporting the proliferation of CH, while pericytes are better in stimulating GAGs and collagen production of CH. PMID:26502642

  4. Chondroregulatory action of prolactin on proliferation and differentiation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells in 3-dimensional micromass cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor mRNAs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PRL concentration (10 ng/mL) increased chondrocyte viability and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher PRL concentrations ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL) decreased viability and increased apoptosis. -- Abstract: A recent investigation in lactating rats has provided evidence that the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) increases endochondral bone growth and bone elongation, presumably by accelerating apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and/or subsequent chondrogenic matrix mineralization. Herein, we demonstrated the direct chondroregulatory action of PRL on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in 3-dimensional micromass culture of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line. The results showed that ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor (PRLR) transcripts, and responded typically to PRL by downregulating PRLR expression. Exposure to a low PRL concentration of 10 ng/mL, comparable to the normal levels in male and non-pregnant female rats, increased chondrocyte viability, differentiation, proteoglycan accumulation, and mRNA expression of several chondrogenic differentiation markers, such as Sox9, ALP and Hspg2. In contrast, high PRL concentrations of Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL, comparable to the levels in pregnancy or lactation, decreased chondrocyte viability by inducing apoptosis, with no effect on chondrogenic marker expression. It could be concluded that chondrocytes directly but differentially responded to non-pregnant and pregnant/lactating levels of PRL, thus suggesting the stimulatory effect of PRL on chondrogenesis in young growing individuals, and supporting the hypothesis of hypertrophic chondrocyte apoptosis in the growth plate of lactating rats.

  5. High- and low-LET Radiation-induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts who participate in extended ISS missions and will be an even greater concern for future manned lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D in vitro cellular environment can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected in the first cell cycle after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference in the

  6. Reconstruction of a seminiferous tubule-like structure in a 3 dimensional culture system of re-aggregated mouse neonatal testicular cells within a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jidong; Hatakeyama, Jun; Eto, Ko; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Male gonad development is initiated by the aggregation of pre-Sertoli cells (SCs), which surround germ cells to form cords. Several attempts to reconstruct testes from dissociated testicular cells have been made; however, only very limited morphogenesis beyond seminiferous cord formation has been achieved. Therefore, we aimed to reconstruct seminiferous tubules using a 3-dimensional (D) re-aggregate culture of testicular cells, which were dissociated from 6-dpp neonatal mice, inside a collagen matrix. We performed a short-term culture (for 3 days) and a long-term culture (up to 3 wks). The addition of KnockOut Serum Replacement (KSR) promoted (1) the enlargement of SC re-aggregates; (2) the attachment of peritubular myoid (PTM) cells around the SC re-aggregates; (3) the sorting of germ cells inside, and Leydig cells outside, seminiferous cord-like structures; (4) the alignment of SC polarity inside a seminiferous cord-like structure relative to the basement membrane; (5) the differentiation of SCs (the expression of the androgen receptor); (6) the formation of a blood-testis-barrier between the SCs; (7) SC elongation and lumen formation; and (8) the proliferation of SCs and spermatogonia, as well as the differentiation of spermatogonia into primary spermatocytes. Eventually, KSR promoted the formation of seminiferous tubule-like structures, which accompanied germ cell differentiation. However, these morphogenetic events did not occur in the absence of KSR. This in vitro system presents an excellent model with which to identify the possible factors that induce these events and to analyze the mechanisms that underlie cellular interactions during testicular morphogenesis and germ cell differentiation.

  7. Translating human embryonic stem cells from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional cultures in a defined medium on laminin- and vitronectin-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Li, Jian; Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Reuveny, Shaul; Cool, Simon M; Birch, William R; Oh, Steve Kah-Weng

    2012-07-01

    While defining the environment for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) culture on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces has made rapid progress, the industrial-scale implementation of this technology will benefit from translating this knowledge into a 3-dimensional (3D) system, thus enabling better control, automation, and volumetric scale-up in bioreactors. The current study describes a system with defined conditions that are capable of supporting the long-term 2D culture of hESCs and the transposing of these conditions to 3D microcarrier (MC) cultures. Vitronectin (VN) and laminin (LN) were chosen as matrices for the long-term propagation of hESCs in a defined culture medium (STEMPRO(®)) for conventional 2D culture. Adsorption of these proteins onto 2D tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) indicated that surface density saturation of 510 and 850 ng/cm(2) for VN and LN, respectively, was attained above 20 μg/mL deposition solution concentration. Adsorption of these proteins onto spherical (97±10 μm), polystyrene MC followed a similar trend and coating surface densities of 450 and 650 ng/cm(2) for VN and LN, respectively, were used to support hESC propagation. The long-term expansion of hESCs was equally successful on TCPS and MC, with consistently high expression (>90%) of pluripotent markers (OCT-4, MAB-84, and TRA-1-60) over 20 passages and maintenance of karyotypic normality. The average fold increase in cell numbers on VN-coated MC per serial passage was 8.5±1.0, which was similar to LN-coated MC (8.5±0.9). Embryoid body differentiation assays and teratoma formation confirmed that hESCs retained the ability to differentiate into lineages of all 3 germ layers, thus demonstrating the first translation to a fully defined MC-based environment for the expansion of hESCs.

  8. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds enhance dopaminergic differentiation of mouse pluripotent stem cells in 3-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Ni, Na; Hu, Yaohua; Ren, Huixia; Luo, Chuanming; Li, Peng; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) gains more and more attention worldwide owing to its potential use for neurorestorative therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The conventional 2D cell culture on petri dishes with various animal derived substrata such as collagen gels, laminin, and Matrigel is widely used to induce dopaminergic differentiation and it may limit the efficiency in the generation of dopaminergic neurons from ESCs and prevent their application for human therapies. Here, we reported that a self-assembling peptide made from natural amino acids has a property to generate a true 3D environment for dopaminergic differentiation. Mouse ESCs (R1) and mouse iPSCs (TTF-1) embedded in RADA16-I peptide-derived nanofiber scaffolds led to a marked increase in dopaminergic differentiation compared to the laminin-coated 2D culture or Matrigel-encapsulated 3D culture. These differentiated neurons expressed specific dopaminergic markers and produced appropriate patterns of action potential firing. Consistent with the increase in the number of dopaminergic neurons differentiated from R1 or TTF-1 in the self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS), both the expression levels of genes that involve in dopaminergic differentiation and maturation and the dopamine release in SAPNS culture were significantly elevated. The results of the study suggest that SAPNS provides a promising 3D culture system for dopaminergic differentiation. PMID:24376815

  9. Effects of 3-dimensional culture conditions (collagen-chitosan nano-scaffolds) on maturation of dendritic cells and their capacity to interact with T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Daneshmandi, Saeed; Dibazar, Shaghayegh Pishkhan; Fateh, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    In the body, there is a natural three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment in which immune cells, including dendritic cells (DC), play their functions. This study evaluated the impact of using collagen-chitosan 3D nano-scaffolds in comparisons to routine 2D culture plates on DC phenotype and functions. Bone marrow-derived DC were cultured on scaffolds and plates and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or chitosan-based nanoparticles (NP) for 24 h. Thereafter, DC viability, expression of maturation markers and levels of cytokines secretion were evaluated. In another set of studies, the DC were co-cultured with allogenic T-lymphocytes in both the 2D and 3D systems and effects on DC-induction of T-lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine release were analyzed. The results indicated that CD40, CD86 and MHC II marker expression and interleukin (IL)-12, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by DC were enhanced in 3D cultures in comparison to by cells maintained in the 2D states. The data also showed that DNA/chitosan NP activated DC more than LPS in the 3D system. T-Lymphocyte proliferation was induced to a greater extent by DNA/NP-treated DC when both cell types were maintained on the scaffolds. Interestingly, while DC induction of T-lymphocyte interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-4 release was enhanced in the 3D system (relative to controls), there was a suppression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production; effects on IL-10 secretion were variable. The results here suggested that collagen-chitosan scaffolds could provide a pro-inflammatory and activator environment to perform studies to analyze effects of exogenous agents on the induction of DC maturation, NP uptake and/or cytokines release, as well as for the ability of these cells to potentially interact with other immune system cells in vitro.

  10. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration Induced by Fe-Ions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-Dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelia cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultued at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  11. M-BAND analysis of chromosome aberration induced by Fe-ions in human epithelial cells cultured in 3-dimensional matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied lowand high-LET radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137 Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  12. Regulation and 3 dimensional culture of tertiary follicle growth.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2012-09-01

    It has been revealed that multiple cohorts of tertiary follicles develop during some animal estrous cycle and the human menstrual cycle. To reach developmental competence, oocytes need the support of somatic cells. During embryogenesis, the primordial germ cells appear, travel to the gonadal rudiments, and form follicles. The female germ cells develop within the somatic cells of the ovary, granulosa cells, and theca cells. How the oocyte and follicle cells support each other has been seriously studied. The latest technologies in genes and proteins and genetic engineering have allowed us to collect a great deal of information about folliculogenesis. For example, a few web pages (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu) provide access to databases of genomes, sequences of transcriptomes, and various tools for analyzing and discovering genes important in ovarian development. Formation of the antrum (tertiary follicle) is the final phase of folliculogenesis and the transition from intraovarian to extraovian regulation. This final step coordinates with the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. On the other hand, currently, follicle physiology is under intense investigation, as little is known about how to overcome women's ovarian problems or how to develop competent oocytes from in vitro follicle culture or transplantation. In this review, some of the known roles of hormones and some of the genes involved in tertiary follicle growth and the general characteristics of tertiary follicles are summarized. In addition, in vitro culture of tertiary follicles is also discussed as a study model and an assisted reproductive technology model.

  13. Regulation and 3 dimensional culture of tertiary follicle growth.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2012-09-01

    It has been revealed that multiple cohorts of tertiary follicles develop during some animal estrous cycle and the human menstrual cycle. To reach developmental competence, oocytes need the support of somatic cells. During embryogenesis, the primordial germ cells appear, travel to the gonadal rudiments, and form follicles. The female germ cells develop within the somatic cells of the ovary, granulosa cells, and theca cells. How the oocyte and follicle cells support each other has been seriously studied. The latest technologies in genes and proteins and genetic engineering have allowed us to collect a great deal of information about folliculogenesis. For example, a few web pages (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu) provide access to databases of genomes, sequences of transcriptomes, and various tools for analyzing and discovering genes important in ovarian development. Formation of the antrum (tertiary follicle) is the final phase of folliculogenesis and the transition from intraovarian to extraovian regulation. This final step coordinates with the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. On the other hand, currently, follicle physiology is under intense investigation, as little is known about how to overcome women's ovarian problems or how to develop competent oocytes from in vitro follicle culture or transplantation. In this review, some of the known roles of hormones and some of the genes involved in tertiary follicle growth and the general characteristics of tertiary follicles are summarized. In addition, in vitro culture of tertiary follicles is also discussed as a study model and an assisted reproductive technology model. PMID:23106040

  14. Regulation and 3 dimensional culture of tertiary follicle growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    It has been revealed that multiple cohorts of tertiary follicles develop during some animal estrous cycle and the human menstrual cycle. To reach developmental competence, oocytes need the support of somatic cells. During embryogenesis, the primordial germ cells appear, travel to the gonadal rudiments, and form follicles. The female germ cells develop within the somatic cells of the ovary, granulosa cells, and theca cells. How the oocyte and follicle cells support each other has been seriously studied. The latest technologies in genes and proteins and genetic engineering have allowed us to collect a great deal of information about folliculogenesis. For example, a few web pages (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu) provide access to databases of genomes, sequences of transcriptomes, and various tools for analyzing and discovering genes important in ovarian development. Formation of the antrum (tertiary follicle) is the final phase of folliculogenesis and the transition from intraovarian to extraovian regulation. This final step coordinates with the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. On the other hand, currently, follicle physiology is under intense investigation, as little is known about how to overcome women's ovarian problems or how to develop competent oocytes from in vitro follicle culture or transplantation. In this review, some of the known roles of hormones and some of the genes involved in tertiary follicle growth and the general characteristics of tertiary follicles are summarized. In addition, in vitro culture of tertiary follicles is also discussed as a study model and an assisted reproductive technology model. PMID:23106040

  15. Cancer cells mimic in vivo spatial-temporal cell-cycle phase distribution and chemosensitivity in 3-dimensional Gelfoam® histoculture but not 2-dimensional culture as visualized with real-time FUCCI imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Uehara, Fuminaru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Zhao, Ming; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The phase of the cell cycle can determine whether a cancer cell can respond to a given drug. We previously reported monitoring of real-time cell cycle dynamics of cancer cells throughout a live tumor, intravitally in live mice, using a fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI). Approximately 90% of cancer cells in the center and 80% of total cells of an established tumor are in G0/G1 phase. Longitudinal real-time imaging demonstrated that cytotoxic agents killed only proliferating cancer cells at the surface and, in contrast, had little effect on quiescent cancer cells, which are the vast majority of an established tumor. Moreover, resistant quiescent cancer cells restarted cycling after cessation of chemotherapy. These results suggested why most drugs currently in clinical use, which target cancer cells in S/G2/M, are mostly ineffective on solid tumors. In the present report, we used FUCCI imaging and Gelfoam® collagen-sponge-gel histoculture, to demonstrate in real time, that the cell-cycle phase distribution of cancer cells in Gelfoam® and in vivo tumors is highly similar, whereby only the surface cells proliferate and interior cells are quiescent in G0/G1. This is in contrast to 2D culture where most cancer cells cycle. Similarly, the cancer cells responded similarly to toxic chemotherapy in Gelfoam® culture as in vivo, and very differently than cancer cells in 2D culture which were much more chemosensitive. Gelfoam® culture of FUCCI-expressing cancer cells offers the opportunity to image the cell cycle of cancer cells continuously and to screen for novel effective therapies to target quiescent cells, which are the majority in a tumor and which would have a strong probability to be effective in vivo. PMID:25564963

  16. Cancer cells mimic in vivo spatial-temporal cell-cycle phase distribution and chemosensitivity in 3-dimensional Gelfoam® histoculture but not 2-dimensional culture as visualized with real-time FUCCI imaging.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Uehara, Fuminaru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Zhao, Ming; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The phase of the cell cycle can determine whether a cancer cell can respond to a given drug. We previously reported monitoring of real-time cell cycle dynamics of cancer cells throughout a live tumor, intravitally in live mice, using a fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI). Approximately 90% of cancer cells in the center and 80% of total cells of an established tumor are in G0/G1 phase. Longitudinal real-time imaging demonstrated that cytotoxic agents killed only proliferating cancer cells at the surface and, in contrast, had little effect on quiescent cancer cells, which are the vast majority of an established tumor. Moreover, resistant quiescent cancer cells restarted cycling after cessation of chemotherapy. These results suggested why most drugs currently in clinical use, which target cancer cells in S/G2/M, are mostly ineffective on solid tumors. In the present report, we used FUCCI imaging and Gelfoam® collagen-sponge-gel histoculture, to demonstrate in real time, that the cell-cycle phase distribution of cancer cells in Gelfoam® and in vivo tumors is highly similar, whereby only the surface cells proliferate and interior cells are quiescent in G0/G1. This is in contrast to 2D culture where most cancer cells cycle. Similarly, the cancer cells responded similarly to toxic chemotherapy in Gelfoam® culture as in vivo, and very differently than cancer cells in 2D culture which were much more chemosensitive. Gelfoam® culture of FUCCI-expressing cancer cells offers the opportunity to image the cell cycle of cancer cells continuously and to screen for novel effective therapies to target quiescent cells, which are the majority in a tumor and which would have a strong probability to be effective in vivo. PMID:25564963

  17. Automatic fabrication of 3-dimensional tissues using cell sheet manipulator technique.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Wada, Masanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-03-01

    Automated manufacturing is a key for tissue-engineered therapeutic products to become common-place and economical. Here, we developed an automatic cell sheet stacking apparatus to fabricate 3-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs exploiting our cell sheet manipulator technique, where cell sheets harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes are stacked into a multilayered cell sheet. By optimizing the stacking conditions and cell seeding conditions, the apparatus was eventually capable of reproducibly making five-layer human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) sheets with a thickness of approximately 70-80 μm within 100 min. Histological sections and confocal topographies of the five-layer HSMM sheets revealed a stratified structure with no delamination. In cell counts using trypsinization, the live cell numbers in one-, three- and five-layer HSMM sheets were equivalent to the seeded cell numbers at 1 h after the stacking processes; however, after subsequent 5-day static cultures, the live cell numbers of the five-layered HSMM sheets decreased slightly, while one- and three-layer HSMM sheets maintained their live cell numbers. This suggests that there are thickness limitations in maintaining tissues in a static culture. We concluded that by combining our cell sheet manipulator technique and industrial robot technology we can create a secure, cost-effective manufacturing system able to produce tissue-engineered products from cell sheets. PMID:24370007

  18. Automatic fabrication of 3-dimensional tissues using cell sheet manipulator technique.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Wada, Masanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-03-01

    Automated manufacturing is a key for tissue-engineered therapeutic products to become common-place and economical. Here, we developed an automatic cell sheet stacking apparatus to fabricate 3-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs exploiting our cell sheet manipulator technique, where cell sheets harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes are stacked into a multilayered cell sheet. By optimizing the stacking conditions and cell seeding conditions, the apparatus was eventually capable of reproducibly making five-layer human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) sheets with a thickness of approximately 70-80 μm within 100 min. Histological sections and confocal topographies of the five-layer HSMM sheets revealed a stratified structure with no delamination. In cell counts using trypsinization, the live cell numbers in one-, three- and five-layer HSMM sheets were equivalent to the seeded cell numbers at 1 h after the stacking processes; however, after subsequent 5-day static cultures, the live cell numbers of the five-layered HSMM sheets decreased slightly, while one- and three-layer HSMM sheets maintained their live cell numbers. This suggests that there are thickness limitations in maintaining tissues in a static culture. We concluded that by combining our cell sheet manipulator technique and industrial robot technology we can create a secure, cost-effective manufacturing system able to produce tissue-engineered products from cell sheets.

  19. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering for fabricating 3-dimensional heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    In addition to stem cell biology, tissue engineering is an essential research field for regenerative medicine. In contrast to cell injection, bioengineered tissue transplantation minimizes cell loss and has the potential to repair tissue defects. A popular approach is scaffold-based tissue engineering, which utilizes a biodegradable polymer scaffold for seeding cells; however, new techniques of cell sheet-based tissue engineering have been developed. Cell sheets are harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes by simply lowering the temperature. Monolayer or stacked cell sheets are transplantable directly onto damaged tissues and cell sheet transplantation has already been clinically applied. Cardiac cell sheet stacking produces pulsatile heart tissue; however, lack of vasculature limits the viable tissue thickness to 3 layers. Multistep transplantation of triple-layer cardiac cell sheets cocultured with endothelial cells has been used to form thick vascularized cardiac tissue in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro functional blood vessel formation within 3-dimensional (3D) tissues has been realized by successfully imitating in vivo conditions. Triple-layer cardiac cell sheets containing endothelial cells were layered on vascular beds and the constructs were media-perfused using novel bioreactor systems. Interestingly, cocultured endothelial cells migrate into the vascular beds and form perfusable blood vessels. An in vitro multistep procedure has also enabled the fabrication of thick, vascularized heart tissues. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering has revealed great potential to fabricate 3D cardiac tissues and should contribute to future treatment of severe heart diseases and human tissue model production.

  20. Biphasic response of cell invasion to matrix stiffness in 3-dimensional biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Nadine R.; Skodzek, Kai; Hurst, Sebastian; Mainka, Astrid; Steinwachs, Julian; Schneider, Julia; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    When cells come in contact with an adhesive matrix, they begin to spread and migrate with a speed that depends on the stiffness of the extracellular matrix. On a flat surface, migration speed decreases with matrix stiffness mainly due to an increased stability of focal adhesions. In a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, cell migration is thought to be additionally impaired by the steric hindrance imposed by the surrounding matrix. For porous 3D biopolymer networks such as collagen gels, however, the effect of matrix stiffness on cell migration is difficult to separate from effects of matrix pore size and adhesive ligand density, and is therefore unknown. Here we used glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker to increase the stiffness of self-assembled collagen biopolymer networks independently of collagen concentration or pore size. Breast carcinoma cells were seeded onto the surface of 3D collagen gels, and the invasion depth was measured after 3 days of culture. Cell invasion in gels with pore sizes larger than 5 μm increased with higher gel stiffness, whereas invasion in gels with smaller pores decreased with higher gel stiffness. These data show that 3D cell invasion is enhanced by higher matrix stiffness, opposite to cell behavior in 2D, as long as the pore size does not fall below a critical value where it causes excessive steric hindrance. These findings may be important for optimizing the recellularization of soft tissue implants or for the design of 3D invasion models in cancer research. PMID:25462839

  1. 3-Dimensional culture systems for anti-cancer compound profiling and high-throughput screening reveal increases in EGFR inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity compared to monolayer culture systems.

    PubMed

    Howes, Amy L; Richardson, Robyn D; Finlay, Darren; Vuori, Kristiina

    2014-01-01

    3-dimensional (3D) culture models have the potential to bridge the gap between monolayer cell culture and in vivo studies. To benefit anti-cancer drug discovery from 3D models, new techniques are needed that enable their use in high-throughput (HT) screening amenable formats. We have established miniaturized 3D culture methods robust enough for automated HT screens. We have applied these methods to evaluate the sensitivity of normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cell lines against a panel of oncology drugs when cultured as monolayers (2D) and spheroids (3D). We have identified two classes of compounds that exhibit preferential cytotoxicity against cancer cells over normal cells when cultured as 3D spheroids: microtubule-targeting agents and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Further improving upon our 3D model, superior differentiation of EC50 values in the proof-of-concept screens was obtained by co-culturing the breast cancer cells with normal human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Further, the selective sensitivity of the cancer cells towards chemotherapeutics was observed in 3D co-culture conditions, rather than as 2D co-culture monolayers, highlighting the importance of 3D cultures. Finally, we examined the putative mechanisms that drive the differing potency displayed by EGFR inhibitors. In summary, our studies establish robust 3D culture models of human cells for HT assessment of tumor cell-selective agents. This methodology is anticipated to provide a useful tool for the study of biological differences within 2D and 3D culture conditions in HT format, and an important platform for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:25247711

  2. Molecular signatures in the prevention of radiation damage by the synergistic effect of N-acetyl cysteine and qingre liyan decoction, a traditional chinese medicine, using a 3-dimensional cell culture model of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Lambros, Maria P; Kondapalli, Lavanya; Parsa, Cyrus; Mulamalla, Hari Chandana; Orlando, Robert; Pon, Doreen; Huang, Ying; Chow, Moses S S

    2015-01-01

    Qingre Liyan decoction (QYD), a Traditional Chinese medicine, and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) have been used to prevent radiation induced mucositis. This work evaluates the protective mechanisms of QYD, NAC, and their combination (NAC-QYD) at the cellular and transcriptional level. A validated organotypic model of oral mucosal consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) cell tissue-culture of primary human keratinocytes exposed to X-ray irradiation was used. Six hours after the irradiation, the tissues were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and a TUNEL assay to assess histopathology and apoptosis, respectively. Total RNA was extracted and used for microarray gene expression profiling. The tissue-cultures treated with NAC-QYD preserved their integrity and showed no apoptosis. Microarray results revealed that the NAC-QYD caused the upregulation of genes encoding metallothioneins, HMOX1, and other components of the Nrf2 pathway, which protects against oxidative stress. DNA repair genes (XCP, GADD45G, RAD9, and XRCC1), protective genes (EGFR and PPARD), and genes of the NFκB pathway were upregulated. Finally, tissue-cultures treated prophylactically with NAC-QYD showed significant downregulation of apoptosis, cytokines and chemokines genes, and constrained damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). NAC-QYD treatment involves the protective effect of Nrf2, NFκB, and DNA repair factors.

  3. 3-dimensional spatially organized PEG-based hydrogels for an aortic valve co-culture model

    PubMed Central

    Puperi, Daniel S.; Balaoing, Liezl R.; O’Connell, Ronan W.; West, Jennifer L.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically relevant in vitro models are needed to study disease progression and to develop and screen potential therapeutic interventions for disease. Heart valve disease, in particular, has no early intervention or non-invasive treatment because there is a lack of understanding the cellular mechanisms which lead to disease. Here, we establish a novel, customizable synthetic hydrogel platform that can be used to study cell-cell interactions and the factors which contribute to valve disease. Spatially localized cell adhesive ligands bound in the scaffold promote cell growth and organization of valve interstitial cells and valve endothelial cells in 3D co-culture. Both cell types maintained phenotypes, homeostatic functions, and produced zonally localized extracellular matrix. This model extends the capabilities of in vitro research by providing a platform to perform direct contact co-culture with cells in their physiologically relevant spatial arrangement. PMID:26241755

  4. Patterned 3-dimensional metal grid electrodes as alternative electron collectors in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Julianto; Mathews, Nripan; Jennings, James R; Yang, Guangwu; Wang, Qing; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2011-11-21

    We describe the application of 3-dimensional metal grid electrodes (3D-MGEs) as electron collectors in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) as a replacement for fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes. Requirements, structure, advantages, and limitations of the metal grid electrodes are discussed. Solar conversion efficiencies of 6.2% have been achieved in 3D-MGE based solar cells, comparable to that fabricated on FTO (7.1%). The charge transport properties and collection efficiencies in these novel solar cells have been studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  5. Effect of Heat-Inactivated Clostridium sporogenes and Its Conditioned Media on 3-Dimensional Colorectal Cancer Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Madhura Satish; Hassanbhai, Ammar Mansoor; Anand, Padmaja; Luo, Kathy Qian; Teoh, Swee Hin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy continue to have limited efficacy due to tumor hypoxia. While bacterial cancer therapy has the potential to overcome this problem, it comes with the risk of toxicity and infection. To circumvent these issues, this paper investigates the anti-tumor effects of non-viable bacterial derivatives of Clostridium sporogenes. These non-viable derivatives are heat-inactivated C. sporogenes bacteria (IB) and the secreted bacterial proteins in culture media, known as conditioned media (CM). In this project, the effects of IB and CM on CT26 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells were examined on a 2-Dimensional (2D) and 3-Dimensional (3D) platform. IB significantly inhibited cell proliferation of CT26 to 6.3% of the control in 72 hours for the 2D monolayer culture. In the 3D spheroid culture, cell proliferation of HCT116 spheroids notably dropped to 26.2%. Similarly the CM also remarkably reduced the cell-proliferation of the CT26 cells to 2.4% and 20% in the 2D and 3D models, respectively. Interestingly the effect of boiled conditioned media (BCM) on the cells in the 3D model was less inhibitory than that of CM. Thus, the inhibitive effect of inactivated C. sporogenes and its conditioned media on colorectal cancer cells is established. PMID:26507312

  6. Molecular profiling of the invasive tumor microenvironment in a 3-dimensional model of colorectal cancer cells and ex vivo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Marc D; Mellone, Max; Pickard, Karen M; Sayan, Abdulkadir Emre; Mitter, Richard; Primrose, John N; Packham, Graham K; Thomas, Gareth; Mirnezami, Alexander H

    2014-01-01

    Invading colorectal cancer (CRC) cells have acquired the capacity to break free from their sister cells, infiltrate the stroma, and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). Characterizing the biology of this phenotypically distinct group of cells could substantially improve our understanding of early events during the metastatic cascade. Tumor invasion is a dynamic process facilitated by bidirectional interactions between malignant epithelium and the cancer associated stroma. In order to examine cell-specific responses at the tumor stroma-interface we have combined organotypic co-culture and laser micro-dissection techniques. Organotypic models, in which key stromal constituents such as fibroblasts are 3-dimensionally co-cultured with cancer epithelial cells, are highly manipulatable experimental tools which enable invasion and cancer-stroma interactions to be studied in near-physiological conditions. Laser microdissection (LMD) is a technique which entails the surgical dissection and extraction of the various strata within tumor tissue, with micron level precision. By combining these techniques with genomic, transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling we aim to develop a deeper understanding of the molecular characteristics of invading tumor cells and surrounding stromal tissue, and in doing so potentially reveal novel biomarkers and opportunities for drug development in CRC. PMID:24836208

  7. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D) System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP) Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Malik, Malika Amattullah; Arab, Aarthi; Hill, Matthew Thomas; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D) mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN), preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP) in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR). The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased survival rate in

  8. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D) System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP) Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Malik, Malika Amattullah; Arab, Aarthi; Hill, Matthew Thomas; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D) mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN), preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP) in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR). The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased survival rate in

  9. [Cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Cipro, Simon; Groh, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Cell or tissue cultures (both terms are interchangeable) represent a complex process by which eukaryotic cells are maintained in vitro outside their natural environment. They have a broad usage covering not only scientific field but also diagnostic one since they represent the most important way of monoclonal antibodies production which are used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Cell cultures are also used as a "cultivation medium" in virology and for establishing proliferating cells in cytodiagnostics. They are well-established and easy-to-handle models in the area of research, e.g. as a precious source of nucleic acids or proteins. This paper briefly summarizes their importance and methods as well as the pitfalls of the cultivation and new trends in this field. PMID:24624984

  10. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  11. A 3-dimensional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived model to detect developmental neurotoxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoelting, Lisa; Scheinhardt, Benjamin; Bondarenko, Olesja; Schildknecht, Stefan; Kapitza, Marion; Tanavde, Vivek; Tan, Betty; Lee, Qian Yi; Mecking, Stefan; Leist, Marcel; Kadereit, Suzanne

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been shown to accumulate in organs, cross the blood-brain barrier and placenta, and have the potential to elicit developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Here, we developed a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model that allows for testing of potential developmental neurotoxicants. Early central nervous system PAX6(+) precursor cells were generated from hESCs and differentiated further within 3-D structures. The 3-D model was characterized for neural marker expression revealing robust differentiation toward neuronal precursor cells, and gene expression profiling suggested a predominantly forebrain-like development. Altered neural gene expression due to exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations of the known developmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury, indicated that the 3-D model could detect DNT. To test for specific toxicity of NPs, chemically inert polyethylene NPs (PE-NPs) were chosen. They penetrated deep into the 3-D structures and impacted gene expression at non-cytotoxic concentrations. NOTCH pathway genes such as HES5 and NOTCH1 were reduced in expression, as well as downstream neuronal precursor genes such as NEUROD1 and ASCL1. FOXG1, a patterning marker, was also reduced. As loss of function of these genes results in severe nervous system impairments in mice, our data suggest that the 3-D hESC-derived model could be used to test for Nano-DNT.

  12. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  13. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Ortiz, Sebastian F.; Fradkin, Jamie; Eoh, Joon; Trivero, Jacqueline; Davenport, Matthew; Ginn, Brian; Mao, Hai-Quan; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Despite current advances in engineering blood vessels over 1 mm in diameter and the existing wealth of knowledge regarding capillary bed formation, studies for the development of microvasculature, the connecting bridge between them, have been extremely limited so far. Here, we evaluate the use of 3-dimensional (3D) microfibers fabricated by hydrogel electrospinning as templates for microvascular structure formation. We hypothesize that 3D microfibers improve extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition from vascular cells, enabling the formation of freestanding luminal multicellular microvasculature. Compared to 2-dimensional cultures, we demonstrate with confocal microscopy and RT-PCR that fibrin microfibers induce an increased ECM protein deposition by vascular cells, specifically endothelial colony-forming cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells. These ECM proteins comprise different layers of the vascular wall including collagen types I, III, and IV, as well as elastin, fibronectin, and laminin. We further demonstrate the achievement of multicellular microvascular structures with an organized endothelium and a robust multicellular perivascular tunica media. This, along with the increased ECM deposition, allowed for the creation of self-supporting multilayered microvasculature with a distinct circular lumen following fibrin microfiber core removal. This approach presents an advancement toward the development of human microvasculature for basic and translational studies.—Barreto-Ortiz, S. F., Fradkin, J., Eoh, J., Trivero, J., Davenport, M., Ginn, B., Mao, H.-Q., Gerecht, S. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures. PMID:25900808

  14. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Montgomery, David W.; Merkle, Carrie J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ±2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ±1.1 %) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin coated 24 well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 micron pores. Additionally AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel® to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cell cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  15. Exposure of female macaques to Western-style diet with or without chronic T in vivo alters secondary follicle function during encapsulated 3-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; McGee, Whitney K; Bishop, Cecily V; Park, Byung S; Cameron, Judy L; Zelinski, Mary B; Stouffer, Richard L

    2015-03-01

    Increased adiposity and hyperandrogenemia alter reproductive parameters in both animal models and women, but their effects on preantral follicles in the ovary remain unknown. We recently reported that Western-style diet (WSD) consumption over 1 year, with or without chronic exposure to elevated circulating T, increased the body fat percentage, elicited insulin resistance, suppressed estradiol and progesterone production, as well as altered the numbers, size, and dynamics of antral follicles in the ovary during the menstrual cycle in female macaques. Therefore, experiments were designed to compare the WSD and WSD+T effects to age-matched controls on the survival, growth, and function of isolated secondary follicles during 5 weeks of encapsulated 3-dimensional culture. Follicle survival significantly declined in the WSD and WSD+T groups compared with the control (CTRL) group. Although media progesterone levels were comparable among groups, androstenedione and estradiol levels were markedly reduced in the WSD and WSD+T groups compared with the CTRL group at week 5. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels peaked at week 3 and were lower in the WSD+T group compared with the WSD or CTRL group. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels also decreased at week 5 in the WSD+T group compared with the WSD or CTRL group. After human chorionic gonadotropin exposure, only antral follicles developed from the CTRL group yielded metaphase II oocytes. Thus, WSD with or without T exposure affects the cohort of secondary follicles in vivo, suppressing their subsequent survival, production of steroid hormones and local factors, as well as oocyte maturation in vitro.

  16. Exposure of Female Macaques to Western-Style Diet With or Without Chronic T In Vivo Alters Secondary Follicle Function During Encapsulated 3-Dimensional Culture

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Whitney K.; Bishop, Cecily V.; Park, Byung S.; Cameron, Judy L.; Zelinski, Mary B.; Stouffer, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Increased adiposity and hyperandrogenemia alter reproductive parameters in both animal models and women, but their effects on preantral follicles in the ovary remain unknown. We recently reported that Western-style diet (WSD) consumption over 1 year, with or without chronic exposure to elevated circulating T, increased the body fat percentage, elicited insulin resistance, suppressed estradiol and progesterone production, as well as altered the numbers, size, and dynamics of antral follicles in the ovary during the menstrual cycle in female macaques. Therefore, experiments were designed to compare the WSD and WSD+T effects to age-matched controls on the survival, growth, and function of isolated secondary follicles during 5 weeks of encapsulated 3-dimensional culture. Follicle survival significantly declined in the WSD and WSD+T groups compared with the control (CTRL) group. Although media progesterone levels were comparable among groups, androstenedione and estradiol levels were markedly reduced in the WSD and WSD+T groups compared with the CTRL group at week 5. Anti-Müllerian hormone levels peaked at week 3 and were lower in the WSD+T group compared with the WSD or CTRL group. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels also decreased at week 5 in the WSD+T group compared with the WSD or CTRL group. After human chorionic gonadotropin exposure, only antral follicles developed from the CTRL group yielded metaphase II oocytes. Thus, WSD with or without T exposure affects the cohort of secondary follicles in vivo, suppressing their subsequent survival, production of steroid hormones and local factors, as well as oocyte maturation in vitro. PMID:25545382

  17. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  18. Fish stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  19. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF. PMID:26643019

  20. Liver Cell Culture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Andria, B.; Bracco, A.; Cirino, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years many different liver cell culture devices, consisting of functional liver cells and artificial materials, have been developed. They have been devised for numerous different applications, such as temporary organ replacement (a bridge to liver transplantation or native liver regeneration) and as in vitro screening systems in the early stages of the drug development process, like assessing hepatotoxicity, hepatic drug metabolism, and induction/inhibition studies. Relevant literature is summarized about artificial human liver cell culture systems by scrutinizing PubMed from 2003 to 2009. Existing devices are divided in 2D configurations (e.g., static monolayer, sandwich, perfused cells, and flat plate) and 3D configurations (e.g., liver slices, spheroids, and different types of bioreactors). The essential features of an ideal liver cell culture system are discussed: different types of scaffolds, oxygenation systems, extracellular matrixes (natural and artificial), cocultures with nonparenchymal cells, and the role of shear stress problems. Finally, miniaturization and high-throughput systems are discussed. All these factors contribute in their own way to the viability and functionality of liver cells in culture. Depending on the aim for which they are designed, several good systems are available for predicting hepatotoxicity and hepatic metabolism within the general population. To predict hepatotoxicity in individual cases genomic analysis might be essential as well. PMID:26998397

  1. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  2. Culturing Uveal Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Angi, Martina; Versluis, Mieke; Kalirai, Helen

    2015-04-01

    A major challenge in cancer research is the use of appropriate models with which to study a specific biological question. Cell lines have long been used to study cellular processes and the effects of individual molecules because they are easy to use, grow rapidly, produce reproducible results and have a strong track record in research. In uveal melanoma in particular, the absence of animal models that faithfully replicate the behavior of the human disease has propagated the generation and use of numerous cell lines by individual research groups. This in itself, however, can be viewed as a problem due to the lack of standardization when characterizing these entities to determine how closely they reflect the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of this disease. The alternative is to use in vitro primary cultures of cells obtained directly from uveal melanoma patient samples, but this too has its difficulties. Primary cell cultures are difficult to use, hard to obtain and can show considerable heterogeneity. In this article, we review the following: (1) the uveal melanoma cell lines that are currently available, discussing the importance of establishing a bank of those that represent the molecular heterogeneity of uveal melanoma; (2) the methods used to isolate and perform short-term cultures of primary uveal melanoma cells, and (3) the establishment of 3D tissue culture models that bridge the gap between 2D in vitro systems and in vivo models with which to dissect cancer biology and perform therapeutic screens. PMID:27171555

  3. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  4. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  5. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  6. 2- and 3-dimensional synthetic large-scale de novo patterning by mammalian cells through phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Cachat, Elise; Liu, Weijia; Martin, Kim C.; Yuan, Xiaofei; Yin, Huabing; Hohenstein, Peter; Davies, Jamie A.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology provides an opportunity for the construction and exploration of alternative solutions to biological problems - solutions different from those chosen by natural life. To this end, synthetic biologists have built new sensory systems, cellular memories, and alternative genetic codes. There is a growing interest in applying synthetic approaches to multicellular systems, especially in relation to multicellular self-organization. Here we describe a synthetic biological system that confers large-scale de novo patterning activity on 2-D and 3-D populations of mammalian cells. Instead of using the reaction-diffusion mechanisms common in real embryos, our system uses cadherin-mediated phase separation, inspired by the known phenomenon of cadherin-based sorting. An engineered self-organizing, large-scale patterning system requiring no prior spatial cue may be a significant step towards the construction of self-assembling synthetic tissues. PMID:26857385

  7. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Agolli, Linda; Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  8. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  9. Epicardial delivery of VEGF and cardiac stem cells guided by 3-dimensional PLLA mat enhancing cardiac regeneration and angiogenesis in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jung; Kyung, Hei-Won; Katila, Pramila; Lee, Jeong-Han; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Yang, Young-Il; Lee, Seung-Jin

    2015-05-10

    Congestive heart failure is mostly resulted in a consequence of the limited myocardial regeneration capacity after acute myocardial infarction. Targeted delivery of proangiogenic factors and/or stem cells to the ischemic myocardium is a promising strategy for enhancing their local and sustained therapeutic effects. Herein, we designed an epicardial delivery system of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cardiac stem cells (CSCs) using poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) mat applied to the acutely infarcted myocardium. The fibrous VEGF-loaded PLLA mat was fabricated by an electrospinning method using PLLA solution emulsified VEGF. This mat not only allowed for sustained release of VEGF for 4weeks but boosted migration and proliferation of both endothelial cells and CSCs in vitro. Furthermore, sustained release of VEGF showed a positive effect on in vitro capillary-like network formation of endothelial cells compared with bolus treatment of VEGF. PLLA mat provided a permissive 3-dimensional (3D) substratum that led to spontaneous cardiomyogenic differentiation of CSCs in vitro. Notably, sustained stimulation by VEGF-loaded PLLA mat resulted in a substantial increase in the expression of proangiogenic mRNAs of CSCs in vitro. The epicardially implanted VEGF-loaded PLLA mat showed modest effects on angiogenesis and cardiomyogenesis in the acutely infarcted hearts. However, co-implantation of VEGF and CSCs using the PLLA mat showed meaningful therapeutic effects on angiogenesis and cardiomyogenesis compared with controls, leading to reduced cardiac remodeling and enhanced global cardiac function. Collectively, the PLLA mat allowed a smart cargo that enabled the sustained release of VEGF and the delivery of CSCs, thereby synergistically inducing angiogenesis and cardiomyogenesis in acute myocardial infarction.

  10. Novel D-A-π-A organic dyes based on 3-dimensional triarylamine and benzothiadiazole derivatives for high-performance dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongli; Chen, Huajie; Long, Jun; Wang, Guo; Tan, Songting

    2016-09-01

    Organic dyes with a 3-dimensional (3D) structure is helpful for retarding dyes aggregation and charge recombination as well as improving the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In this contribution, a novel 3D triarylamine derivative (IDTTPA) featuring an indenothiophenene unit has been designed, synthesized, and applied to develop a 3D organic dyes. Two novel D-A-π-A organic dyes (CD1 and CD2) based on IDTTPA as the electron donors, 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole derivatives as the auxiliary acceptors, and formic acid as the anchoring groups have been successfully synthesized and applied in DSSCs. The effects of the fluoro substitute groups on the photophysical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties are investigated. The results indicate that the fluoro-containing dye CD2 exhibits higher molar extinction coefficient, stronger light-capturing ability, and better photovoltaic performance than those of CD1 dye without fluoro substitute. Investigation of the DSSCs performance shows that CD2-based DSSCs exhibit a high PCE value of 7.91%, higher than that of CD1-based DSSCs (6.29%), even higher than that of the reference DSSCs based on N719 (7.49%). This works has demonstrated that this kind of 3D unit (IDTTPA) is a strong and promising electron donor unit to develop high efficiency metal-free organic dyes.

  11. Osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stromal cells on 3-dimensional mesoporous TiO2 coating with magnesium impregnation.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, Francesca; Karlsson, Johan; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann; Zavan, Barbara; Andersson, Martin; Jimbo, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic response of human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADScs) to mesoporous titania (TiO2) coatings produced with evaporation-induced self-assembly method (EISA) and loaded with magnesium. Our emphasis with the magnesium release functionality was to modulate progenitor cell osteogenic differentiation under standard culture conditions. Osteogenic properties of the coatings were assessed for stromal cells by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, colorimetric mitochondrial viability assay (MTT), colorimetric alkaline phosphates activity (ALP) assay and real time RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) it was shown that the surface expansion area (Sdr) was strongly enhanced by the presence of magnesium. From MTT results it was shown that ADSc viability was significantly increased on mesoporous surfaces compared to the non-porous one at a longer cell culture time. However, no differences were observed between the magnesium impregnated and non-impregnated surfaces. The alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed that ADSc started to differentiate into the osteogenic phenotype after 2 weeks of culturing. The gene expression profile at 2 weeks of cell growth showed that such coatings were capable to incorporate specific osteogenic markers inside their interconnected nano-pores and, at 3 weeks, ADSc differentiated into osteoblasts. Interestingly, magnesium significantly promoted the osteopontin gene expression, which is an essential gene for the early biomaterial-cell osteogenic interaction.

  12. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    PubMed

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk.

  13. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    PubMed

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk. PMID:24924388

  14. Wear Particles Derived from Metal Hip Implants Induce the Generation of Multinucleated Giant Cells in a 3-Dimensional Peripheral Tissue-Equivalent Model

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debargh K.; Potnis, Pushya A.; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1–5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which

  15. Ureaplasma infection of cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, H; McGarrity, G J

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the effects of ureaplasmas in HeLa, 3T6, and CV-1 cell cultures. The ureaplasmas studied were human Ureaplasma urealyticum T960 (serotype VIII), bovine U. diversum T95, simian strain T167-2, ovine strain 1202, canine strain D1M-C, and feline strains 382 and FT2-B. FT2-B was the only ureaplasma to grow in the cell free culture medium, Dulbecco modified Eagle-Earle medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum. The growth pattern of the ureaplasmas varied in the different cell cultures, but each strain grew in at least two of the cell cultures, suggesting a requirement for a product of the cell culture and for low concentrations of urea. When growth occurred, organisms grew to concentrations that approached, but did not equal, those observed in 10B broth. Most, but not all, ureaplasmas grew quickly, reaching peak titers 2 days after infection. Canine strain D1M-C did not grow in 3T6, but showed rapid growth in HeLa and CV-1 cells, killing both cultures, In some systems, e.g., U. urealyticum T960 and simian strain T167-2, the infection persisted, and ureaplasmas could be recovered from cell cultures four passages after infection, when studies were terminated. The cell culture ureaplasmas grew on T agar, but not on mycoplasma agar medium. Images PMID:3699891

  16. Optimization of optical and mechanical properties of real architecture for 3-dimensional tissue equivalents: Towards treatment of limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Kureshi, Alvena K; Schrader, Stefan; Shortt, Alex J; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-09-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC) deficiency can cause blindness. Transplantation of cultured human limbal epithelial cells (hLE) on human amniotic membrane (HAM) can restore vision but clinical graft manufacture can be unreliable. We have developed a reliable and robust tissue equivalent (TE) alternative to HAM, Real Architecture for 3D Tissue (RAFT). Here, we aimed to optimize the optical and mechanical properties of RAFT TE for treatment of LESC deficiency in clinical application. The RAFT TE protocol is tunable; varying collagen concentration and volume produces differing RAFT TEs. These were compared with HAM samples taken from locations proximal and distal to the placental disc. Outcomes assessed were transparency, thickness, light transmission, tensile strength, ease of handling, degradation rates and suitability as substrate for hLE culture. Proximal HAM samples were thicker and stronger with poorer optical properties than distal HAM samples. RAFT TEs produced using higher amounts of collagen were thicker and stronger with poorer optical properties than those produced using lower amounts of collagen. The 'optimal' RAFT TE was thin, transparent but still handleable and was produced using 0.6ml of 3mg/ml collagen. Degradation rates of the 'optimal' RAFT TE and HAM were similar. hLE achieved confluency on 'optimal' RAFT TEs at comparable rates to HAM and cells expressed high levels of putative stem cell marker p63α. These findings support the use of RAFT TE for hLE transplantation towards treatment of LESC deficiency. PMID:26092352

  17. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  18. Suspension culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Birch, J R; Arathoon, R

    1990-01-01

    Mammalian cell suspension culture systems are being used increasingly in the biotechnology industry. This is due to their many advantages including simplicity and homogeneity of culture. Suspension systems are very adaptable (e.g., for microcarrier, microencapsulation, or other methods of culture). Their engineering is thoroughly understood and standardized at large scale, and automation and cleaning procedures are well established. Suspension systems offer the possibility of quick implementation of production protocols due to their ability to be scaled easily once the basic culture parameters are understood. The only main disadvantage of the suspension culture systems to date is their inapplicability for the production of human vaccines from either primary cell lines or from normal human diploid cell lines (Hayflick et al., 1987 and references therein). One of the great advantages of suspension culture is the opportunity it provides to study interactions of metabolic and production phenomena in chemostat or turbidostat steady-state systems. Furthermore, in suspension culture systems from which cell number and cell mass measurements are easy to obtain, rigorous and quantitative estimations of the effects of growth conditions or perturbations of metabolic homeostasis can be made. Such studies can speed up the development of optimal processes. With our increasing understanding of factors influencing expression in mammalian cells (Cohen and Levinson, 1988; Santoro et al., 1988) and the direct application of new methods in suspension culture (Rhodes and Birch, 1988), its usefulness and importance is likely to increase in the future. In this chapter, we have described some of the potential uses of the various suspension culture systems and have covered most of the established technology and literature. Due to the rapid developments and needs in the biotechnology industry and the versatility of suspension culture systems, it is probable that many more variations on this

  19. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  20. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  1. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  2. Cell culture compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. Culture phases, cytotoxicity and protein expressions of agarose hydrogel induced Sp2/0, A549, MCF-7 cell line 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Maddaly; Kaviya, S R; Paramesh, V

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in cell cultures are occurring at a rapid pace, an important direction is culturing cells in 3D conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of agarose hydrogels in obtaining 3 dimensional aggregates of three cell lines, A549, MCF-7 and Sp2/0. The differences in culture phases, susceptibility to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity are studied. Also, the 3D aggregates of the three cell lines were reverted into 2D cultures and the protein profile differences among the 2D, 3D and revert cultures were studied. The analysis of protein profile differences using UniProt data base further augment the usefulness of agarose hydrogels for obtaining 3D cell cultures.

  4. Microtable Arrays for Culture and Isolation of Cell Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Jeng-Hao; Xu, Wei; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell microarrays with culture sites composed of individually removable microstructures or micropallets have proven benefits for isolation of cells from a mixed population. The laser energy required to selectively remove these micropallets with attached cells from the array depends on the microstructure surface area in contact with the substrate. Laser energies sufficient to release micropallets greater than 100 μm resulted in loss of cell viability. A new 3-dimensional culture site similar in appearance to a table was designed and fabricated using a simple process that relied on a differential sensitivity of two photoresists to UV-mediated photopolymerization. With this design, the larger culture area rests on four small supports to minimize the surface area in contact with the substrate. Microtables up to 250 × 250 μm were consistently released with single 10 μJ pulses to each of the 4 support structures. In contrast, microstructures with a 150 × 150 μm surface area in contact with the substrate could not be reliably released at pulse energies up to 212 μJ. Cassie-Baxter wetting is required to provide a barrier of air to localize and sequester cells to the culture sites. A second asset of the design was an increased retention of this air barrier under conditions of decreased surface tension and after prolonged culture of cells. The improved air retention was due to the hydrophobic cavity created beneath the table and above the substrate which entrapped air when an aqueous solution was added to the array. The microtables proved an efficient method for isolating colonies from the array with 100% of selected colonies competent to expand following release from the array. PMID:20644916

  5. Cell Culture, Technology: Enhancing the Culture of Diagnosing Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hudu, Shuaibu Abdullahi; Alshrari, Ahmed Subeh; Syahida, Ahmad; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2016-03-01

    Cell culture involves a complex of processes of cell isolation from their natural environment (in vivo) and subsequent growth in a controlled environmental artificial condition (in vitro). Cells from specific tissues or organs are cultured as short term or established cell lines which are widely used for research and diagnosis, most specially in the aspect of viral infection, because pathogenic viral isolation depends on the availability of permissible cell cultures. Cell culture provides the required setting for the detection and identification of numerous pathogens of humans, which is achieved via virus isolation in the cell culture as the "gold standard" for virus discovery. In this review, we summarized the views of researchers on the current role of cell culture technology in the diagnosis of human diseases. The technological advancement of recent years, starting with monoclonal antibody development to molecular techniques, provides an important approach for detecting presence of viral infection. They are also used as a baseline for establishing rapid tests for newly discovered pathogens. A combination of virus isolation in cell culture and molecular methods is still critical in identifying viruses that were previously unrecognized. Therefore, cell culture should be considered as a fundamental procedure in identifying suspected infectious viral agent. PMID:27134874

  6. Cell Culture, Technology: Enhancing the Culture of Diagnosing Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alshrari, Ahmed Subeh; Syahida, Ahmad; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture involves a complex of processes of cell isolation from their natural environment (in vivo) and subsequent growth in a controlled environmental artificial condition (in vitro). Cells from specific tissues or organs are cultured as short term or established cell lines which are widely used for research and diagnosis, most specially in the aspect of viral infection, because pathogenic viral isolation depends on the availability of permissible cell cultures. Cell culture provides the required setting for the detection and identification of numerous pathogens of humans, which is achieved via virus isolation in the cell culture as the “gold standard” for virus discovery. In this review, we summarized the views of researchers on the current role of cell culture technology in the diagnosis of human diseases. The technological advancement of recent years, starting with monoclonal antibody development to molecular techniques, provides an important approach for detecting presence of viral infection. They are also used as a baseline for establishing rapid tests for newly discovered pathogens. A combination of virus isolation in cell culture and molecular methods is still critical in identifying viruses that were previously unrecognized. Therefore, cell culture should be considered as a fundamental procedure in identifying suspected infectious viral agent. PMID:27134874

  7. Cell Culture, Technology: Enhancing the Culture of Diagnosing Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hudu, Shuaibu Abdullahi; Alshrari, Ahmed Subeh; Syahida, Ahmad; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2016-03-01

    Cell culture involves a complex of processes of cell isolation from their natural environment (in vivo) and subsequent growth in a controlled environmental artificial condition (in vitro). Cells from specific tissues or organs are cultured as short term or established cell lines which are widely used for research and diagnosis, most specially in the aspect of viral infection, because pathogenic viral isolation depends on the availability of permissible cell cultures. Cell culture provides the required setting for the detection and identification of numerous pathogens of humans, which is achieved via virus isolation in the cell culture as the "gold standard" for virus discovery. In this review, we summarized the views of researchers on the current role of cell culture technology in the diagnosis of human diseases. The technological advancement of recent years, starting with monoclonal antibody development to molecular techniques, provides an important approach for detecting presence of viral infection. They are also used as a baseline for establishing rapid tests for newly discovered pathogens. A combination of virus isolation in cell culture and molecular methods is still critical in identifying viruses that were previously unrecognized. Therefore, cell culture should be considered as a fundamental procedure in identifying suspected infectious viral agent.

  8. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  9. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  10. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  11. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  12. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  13. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18428384

  14. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18265370

  15. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This unit opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18770828

  16. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-12-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18429293

  17. Multistage carcinogenesis in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rubin, H

    2001-01-01

    Rodent fibroblasts explanted from embryos to culture undergo a period of declining growth rate in serial passages leading to crisis, followed by the appearance of variants which can multiply indefinitely. If the "immortal" cell line was established by low density passage, i.e., 3T3 cells, it has a low saturation density and is non-tumorigenic. If it was established by high density passage, it has a high saturation density and is tumorigenic. The establishment of cells goes through successive stages, including increased capacity to multiply in low serum concentration, growth to high saturation density, growth in suspension, assisted tumour formation in susceptible hosts and unassisted tumour formation. Chromosome aberrations and aneuploidy occur long before the capacity to produce tumours appears. Contrary to conventional belief, human fibroblast populations also undergo a continuous loss of capacity to multiply from the time of explantation, with only the longest surviving clone reaching the Hayflick limit. Neoplastic transformation of rodent cells is strongly favoured by maintaining them in a quiescent state at confluence for prolonged periods, which results in genetic damage to the cells. It also produces a large variety of chromosomal aberrations in human cells and extends their replicative lifespan. Individual clones are more susceptible to spontaneous transformation than their heterogeneous parental cultures. The implications of these results for tumour development in vivo are that oncogenic genetic changes may be common under stressful conditions which restrict replication, and that such changes are maximized when a rogue clone reaches a critical size that reduces stabilizing interactions with neighbouring clones. An alternative explanation, described in the Addendum, which we retrospectively favor is that the easily transformed clones are a minority in the uncloned parental population. The reason they transform before the parental population is that when

  18. Basic techniques in mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Katy; May, Kristin M

    2015-03-02

    Cultured mammalian cells are used extensively in cell biology studies. It requires a number of special skills in order to be able to preserve the structure, function, behavior, and biology of the cells in culture. This unit describes the basic skills required to maintain and preserve cell cultures: maintaining aseptic technique, preparing media with the appropriate characteristics, passaging, freezing and storage, recovering frozen stocks, and counting viable cells.

  19. Teleportation of a 3-dimensional GHZ State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Li, Peng-Fei; Song, He-Shan

    2012-05-01

    The process of teleportation of a completely unknown 3-dimensional GHZ state is considered. Three maximally entangled 3-dimensional Bell states function as quantum channel in the scheme. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional GHZ state.

  20. Dynamized preparations in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sunila, Ellanzhiyil Surendran; Kuttan, Ramadasan; Preethi, Korengath Chandran; Kuttan, Girija

    2009-06-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties. PMID:18955237

  1. 3-Dimensional ZnO/CdS nanocomposite with high mobility as an efficient electron transport layer for inverted polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Fu, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Tan, Licheng; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-04-28

    The inclusions of solution-processed ZnO electron transport layers (ETLs) of inverted polymer solar cells can lead to various surface defects, which can act as interfacial recombination centers for photogenerated charges and thereby can lead to degradation of the device performance. Three-dimensional (3D) CdS with different morphologies, such as flower-like CdS (F-CdS), branched CdS (B-CdS), and spherical CdS (S-CdS), are synthesized to modify ZnO ETLs, by effectively removing the intragap states of the ZnO nanocrystal films by forming ZnO/F-CdS, ZnO/B-CdS, and ZnO/S-CdS composite ETLs, respectively. Moreover, ZnO/CdS possesses higher electron mobility and provides a larger interface between the ETL and active layer, which is beneficial for enhancing the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the inverted organic solar cells. In particular, a device based on a ZnO/S-CdS ETL and thieno[3,4-b]-thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) active layer achieved a PCE of 8.0%, together with better long-term stability. PMID:27074904

  2. Transparent, 3-dimensional light-collected, and flexible fiber-type dye-sensitized solar cells based on highly ordered hierarchical anatase TiO2 nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jia; Zhang, Gengmin; Yin, Jianbo; Yang, Yingchao

    2014-12-01

    Two kinds of hierarchical anatase TiO2 structures are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method in this report. A new transparent, 3D light-collected, and flexible fiber-type dye-sensitized solar cell (FF-DSSC) with such hierarchical TiO2 structures is developed. The conversion efficiency of the FF-DSSC based on a TiCl4-treated TiO2 nanorod array (hierarchical structure I) exhibits about 4 times higher than that based on a HCl-treated TiO2 nanorod array, and further rises to 4.4% when the TiCl4-treated TiO2 nanorod array is treated in a mixed solution of (NH4)2TiF6 and H3BO3 three times (hierarchical structure II). The obvious enhancement in conversion efficiency can be ascribed to the dye adsorption promotion benefiting from their hierarchical structures. Beyond the attractive conversion efficiency, the new designed FF-DSSC possesses several advantages including good flexibility, excellent stability, and 3D light-collection. The conversion efficiencies of the FF-DSSCs can still keep 85%-90% even the FF-DSSCs are bent for 1000 times. The maximum power outputs of the FF-DSSCs characterized by Diffuse Illumination Mode using home-made Al reflector exhibit about 3 times higher than that done by Standard Illumination Mode due to 3D light-collections. The FF-DSSCs based on highly ordered hierarchical anatase TiO2 nanorod arrays hold great promise in future energy harvest.

  3. Probability of mediastinal involvement in non-small-cell lung cancer: a statistical definition of the clinical target volume for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Giraud, Philippe . E-mail: philippe.giraud@curie.net; De Rycke, Yann; Lavole, Armelle; Milleron, Bernard; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal irradiation (3D-CRT) of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is largely based on precise definition of the nodal clinical target volume (CTVn). A reduction of the number of nodal stations to be irradiated would facilitate tumor dose escalation. The aim of this study was to design a mathematical tool based on documented data to predict the risk of metastatic involvement for each nodal station. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the large surgical series published in the literature to identify the main pretreatment parameters that modify the risk of nodal invasion. The probability of involvement for the 17 nodal stations described by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) was computed from all these publications. Starting with the primary site of the tumor as the main characteristic, we built a probabilistic tree for each nodal station representing the risk distribution as a function of each tumor feature. Statistical analysis used the inversion of probability trees method described by Weinstein and Feinberg. Validation of the software based on 134 patients from two different populations was performed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Analysis of all of the various parameters of pretreatment staging relative to each level of the ATS map results in 20,000 different combinations. The first parameters included in the tree, depending on tumor site, were histologic classification, metastatic stage, nodal stage weighted as a function of the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic examination used (positron emission tomography scan, computed tomography scan), and tumor stage. Software is proposed to compute a predicted probability of involvement of each nodal station for any given clinical presentation. Double cross validation confirmed the methodology. A 10% cutoff point was calculated from ROC and logistic model giving the best prediction of mediastinal lymph node involvement. Conclusion

  4. Digital microfluidic three-dimensional cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electro wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidics (DMF) can be used to develop improved chemical screening platforms using 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture. Alginate hydrogels are one common method by which a 3D cell culture environment is created. This paper presents a study of alginate gelation on EWOD DMF and investigates designs to obtain uniform alginate hydrogels that can be repeatedly addressed by any desired liquids. A design which allows for gels to be retained in place during liquid delivery and removal without using any physical barriers or hydrophilic patterning of substrates is presented. A proof of concept screening platform is demonstrated by examining the effects of different concentrations of a test chemical on 3D cells in alginate hydrogels. In addition, the temporal effects of the various chemical concentrations on different hydrogel posts are demonstrated, thereby establishing the benefits of an EWOD DMF 3D cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels. PMID:25945142

  5. Digital microfluidic three-dimensional cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    George, Subin M; Moon, Hyejin

    2015-03-01

    Electro wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidics (DMF) can be used to develop improved chemical screening platforms using 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture. Alginate hydrogels are one common method by which a 3D cell culture environment is created. This paper presents a study of alginate gelation on EWOD DMF and investigates designs to obtain uniform alginate hydrogels that can be repeatedly addressed by any desired liquids. A design which allows for gels to be retained in place during liquid delivery and removal without using any physical barriers or hydrophilic patterning of substrates is presented. A proof of concept screening platform is demonstrated by examining the effects of different concentrations of a test chemical on 3D cells in alginate hydrogels. In addition, the temporal effects of the various chemical concentrations on different hydrogel posts are demonstrated, thereby establishing the benefits of an EWOD DMF 3D cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels. PMID:25945142

  6. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  7. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  8. The usefulness of three-dimensional cell culture in induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Daisuke; Kato, Kazunori; Nohara, Shigeo; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Spheroids were created from esophageal carcinoma cells using NanoCulture® Plates. •The proportion of strongly ALDH-positive cells increased in 3-D culture. •Expression of cancer stem cell-related genes was enhanced in 3-D culture. •CA-9 expression was enhanced, suggesting hypoxia had been induced in 3-D culture. •Drug resistance was increased. 3-D culture is useful for inducing cancer stem cells. -- Abstract: In recent years, research on resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in cancer treatment has come under the spotlight, and researchers have also begun investigating the relationship between resistance and cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are assumed to be present in esophageal cancer, but experimental methods for identification and culture of these cells have not yet been established. To solve this problem, we created spheroids using a NanoCulture® Plate (NCP) for 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture, which was designed as a means for experimentally reproducing the 3-D structures found in the body. We investigated the potential for induction of cancer stem cells from esophageal cancer cells. Using flow cytometry we analyzed the expression of surface antigen markers CD44, CD133, CD338 (ABCG2), CD318 (CDCP1), and CD326 (EpCAM), which are known cancer stem cell markers. None of these surface antigen markers showed enhanced expression in 3-D cultured cells. We then analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activity using the ALDEFLUOR reagent, which can identify immature cells such as stem cells and precursor cells. 3-D-cultured cells were strongly positive for ALDH enzyme activity. We also analyzed the expression of the stem cell-related genes Sox-2, Nanog, Oct3/4, and Lin28 using RT-PCR. Expression of Sox-2, Nanog, and Lin28 was enhanced. Analysis of expression of the hypoxic surface antigen marker carbonic anhydrase-9 (CA-9), which is an indicator of cancer stem cell induction and maintenance, revealed that CA-9 expression

  9. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  10. Three-dimensional co-culture process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a 3-dimensional co-culture process, more particularly to methods or co-culturing at least two types of cells in a culture environment, either in space or in unit gravity, with minimum shear stress, freedom for 3-dimensional spatial orientation of the suspended particles and localization of particles with differing or similar sedimentation properties in a similar spatial region to form 3-dimensional tissue-like structures. Several examples of multicellular 3-dimensional experiences are included. The protocol and procedure are also set forth. The process allows simultaneous culture of multiple cell types and supporting substrates in a manner which does not disrupt the 3-dimensional spatial orientation of these components. The co-cultured cells cause a mutual induction effect which mimics the natural hormonal signals and cell interactions found in the intact organism. This causes the tissues to differentiate and form higher 3-dimensional structures such as glands, junctional complexes polypoid geometries, and microvilli which represent the corresponding in-vitro structures to a greater degree than when the cell types are cultured individually or by conventional processes. This process was clearly demonstrated for the case of two epithelial derived colon cancer lines, each co-cultured with normal human fibroblasts and with microcarrier bead substrates. The results clearly demonstrate increased 3-dimensional tissue-like structure and biochemical evidence of an increased differentiation state. With the present invention a variety of cells may be co-cultured to produce tissue which has 3-dimensionality and has some of the characteristics of in-vitro tissue. The process provides enhanced 3-dimensional tissue which create a multicellular organoid differentiation model.

  11. Three-Dimensional Co-Culture Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    By the process of the present invention a variety of cells may be co-cultured to produce tissue which has 3-dimensionality and had some of the characteristics of in vivo tissue. The process provides enhanced 3-dimensional tissue which creates a multicellular organoid differentiation model.

  12. [Effects of beryllium chloride on cultured cells].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, T; Sakaguchi, S; Nakamura, I; Kagami, M

    1984-05-01

    The effects of beryllium on cultured cells were investigated. Three cell-lines (HeLa-S3, Vero, HEL-R66) were used in these experiments and they were cultured in Eagle's MEM plus 5 or 10% FBS (Fetal Bovine Serum) containing beryllium in various concentrations. HeLa cells or Vero cells were able to grow in the medium with 10 micrograms Be/ml (1.1 mM). On the other hand, the growth of HEL cells were strongly inhibited, even when cultured in the medium with 1 microgram Be/ml (1.1 X 10(-1) mM) and the number of living cells showed markedly low level as compared to that of the control samples cultured in the medium without beryllium. The cytotoxic effects of beryllium on these cells, which were cultured for three days in the medium with beryllium, were observed. None of cytotoxic effects were found on HeLa cells cultured with 0.5 micrograms/ml (5.5 X 10(-2) mM) and on Vero cells cultured with 0.05 micrograms Be/ml (5.5 X 10(-3) mM), while HEL cells received cytotoxic effects even when cultured in the medium containing 0.05 micrograms Be/ml (5.5 X 10(-3) mM), and these effects on the cells appeared strong when cultured in the medium without FBS. It was revealed from these experiments that HEL cells are very sensitive in terms of toxic effects of beryllium. Therefore, there cells can be used for the toxicological study on low level concentrations of the metal.

  13. Controlled, scalable embryonic stem cell differentiation culture.

    PubMed

    Dang, Stephen M; Gerecht-Nir, Sharon; Chen, Jinny; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Zandstra, Peter W

    2004-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are of significant interest as a renewable source of therapeutically useful cells. ES cell aggregation is important for both human and mouse embryoid body (EB) formation and the subsequent generation of ES cell derivatives. Aggregation between EBs (agglomeration), however, inhibits cell growth and differentiation in stirred or high-cell-density static cultures. We demonstrate that the agglomeration of two EBs is initiated by E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment and followed by active cell migration. We report the development of a technology capable of controlling cell-cell interactions in scalable culture by the mass encapsulation of ES cells in size-specified agarose capsules. When placed in stirred-suspension bioreactors, encapsulated ES cells can be used to produce scalable quantities of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a controlled environment.

  14. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling.

  15. Replication of cultured lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.; Bienkowski, R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have investigated the conditions necessary to support replication of lung type 2 epithelial cells in culture. Cells were isolated from mature fetal rabbit lungs (29d gestation) and cultured on feeder layers of mitotically inactivated 3T3 fibroblasts. The epithelial nature of the cells was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent staining for keratin and by polyacid dichrome stain. Ultrastructural examination during the first week showed that the cells contained myofilaments, microvilli and lamellar bodies (markers for type 2 cells). The following changes were observed after the first week: increase in cell size; loss of lamellar bodies and appearance of multivesicular bodies; increase in rough endoplasmic reticulum and golgi; increase in tonafilaments and well-defined junctions. General cell morphology was good for up to 10 wk. Cells cultured on plastic surface degenerated after 1 wk. Cell replication was assayed by autoradiography of cultures exposed to (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and by direct cell counts. The cells did not replicate during the first week; however, between 2-10 wk the cells incorporated the label and went through approximately 6 population doublings. They have demonstrated that lung alveolar epithelial cells can replicate in culture if they are maintained on an appropriate substrate. The coincidence of ability to replicate and loss of markers for differentiation may reflect the dichotomy between growth and differentiation commonly observed in developing systems.

  16. Autofluorescence of viable cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Aubin, J E

    1979-01-01

    The autofluorescence other than intrinsic protein emission of viable cultured mammalian cells has been investigated. The fluorescence was found to originate in discrete cytoplasmic vesicle-like regions and to be absent from the nucleus. Excitation and emission spectra of viable cells revealed at least two distinct fluorescent species. Comparison of cell spectra with spectra of known cellular metabolites suggested that most, if not all, of the fluorescence arises from intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and riboflavin and flavin coenzymes. Various changes in culture conditions did not affect the observed autofluorescence intensity. A multiparameter flow system (MACCS) was used to compare the fluorescence intensities of numerous cultured mammalian cells.

  17. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-03-24

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell-matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  18. Replication of human endothelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L J; Hoak, J C; Maca, R D; Fry, G L

    1973-08-01

    Investigative studies dealing with the properties and functions of endothelial cells have been hampered because there has been little or no success in the isolation, growth, and passage of individual cells in large numbers. We have developed a system whereby pure cultures of endothelial cells derived from umbilical veins can be subcultured for at least five serial passages. Many facets of endothelial function and interaction can be evaluated with the use of this new adaptive system of isolation and culture. PMID:4718112

  19. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  20. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  1. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  2. Insect cell culture in reagent bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rieffel, S.; Roest, S.; Klopp, J.; Carnal, S.; Marti, S.; Gerhartz, B.; Shrestha, B.

    2014-01-01

    Growing insect cells with high air space in culture vessel is common from the early development of suspension cell culture. We believed and followed it with the hope that it allows sufficient air for optimal cell growth. However, we missed to identify how much air exactly cells need for its growth and multiplication. Here we present the innovative method that changed the way we run insect cell culture. The method is easy to adapt, cost-effective and useful for both academic and industrial research labs. We believe this method will revolutionize the way we run insect cell culture by increasing throughput in a cost-effective way. In our study we identified:•Insect cells need to be in suspension; air space in culture vessel and type of culture vessel is of less importance. Shaking condition that introduces small air bubbles and maintains it in suspension for longer time provides better oxygen transfer in liquid. For this, high-fill volume in combination with speed and shaking diameter are important.•Commercially available insect cells are not fragile as original isolates. These cells can easily withstand higher shaking speed.•Growth condition in particular lab set-up needs to be optimized. The condition used in one lab may not be optimum for another lab due to different incubators from different vendors. PMID:26150948

  3. 3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions

    DOEpatents

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2010-03-09

    An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

  4. Advances in cell culture: anchorage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells are of great interest for various biotechnological applications. (i) They represent a formidable production means of viruses for vaccination purposes at very large scales (in 1000–6000 l reactors) using microcarriers, and in the last decade many more novel viral vaccines have been developed using this production technology. (ii) With the advent of stem cells and their use/potential use in clinics for cell therapy and regenerative medicine purposes, the development of novel culture devices and technologies for adherent cells has accelerated greatly with a view to the large-scale expansion of these cells. Presently, the really scalable systems—microcarrier/microcarrier-clump cultures using stirred-tank reactors—for the expansion of stem cells are still in their infancy. Only laboratory scale reactors of maximally 2.5 l working volume have been evaluated because thorough knowledge and basic understanding of critical issues with respect to cell expansion while retaining pluripotency and differentiation potential, and the impact of the culture environment on stem cell fate, etc., are still lacking and require further studies. This article gives an overview on critical issues common to all cell culture systems for adherent cells as well as specifics for different types of stem cells in view of small- and large-scale cell expansion and production processes. PMID:25533097

  5. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  6. Chronic rabies virus infection of cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Wiktor, T J; Clark, H F

    1972-12-01

    Exposure of both mammalian and reptilian cells in tissue culture to different strains of fixed rabies virus resulted in a carrier type of infection. No cytopathic effect was observed in either type of culture; infected cultures could be maintained by cell transfer for unlimited numbers of passages. A consistent pattern of cyclically rising and falling levels of viral infection was observed by fluorescent-antibody staining techniques and by titration of released infectious virus. Resistance to super-infection by vesicular stomatis virus and the production of an interferon-like substance by infected cells indicated that the maintenance of a carrier type of infection may be interferon-mediated. The degree of susceptibility of rabies-infected cells to immunolysis by antirabies antibody in the presence of complement was found to be correlated with the amount of virus maturation occurring by budding through the cell membrane and not with the presence of immunofluorescent antigen in the cytoplasm of infected cells.

  7. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  8. Three-dimensional cell to tissue assembly process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Lewis, Marian L. (Inventor); Cross, John H. (Inventor); Huls, Mary H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates a 3-dimensional cell to tissue and maintenance process, more particularly to methods of culturing cells in a culture environment, either in space or in a gravity field, with minimum fluid shear stress, freedom for 3-dimensional spatial orientation of the suspended particles and localization of particles with differing or similar sedimentation properties in a similar spatial region.

  9. Culture and transfection of axolotl cells.

    PubMed

    Denis, Jean-François; Sader, Fadi; Ferretti, Patrizia; Roy, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The use of cells grown in vitro has been instrumental for multiple aspects of biomedical research and especially molecular and cellular biology. The ability to grow cells from multicellular organisms like humans, squids, or salamanders is important to simplify the analyses and experimental designs to help understand the biology of these organisms. The advent of the first cell culture has allowed scientists to tease apart the cellular functions, and in many situations these experiments help understand what is happening in the whole organism. In this chapter, we describe techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of an established cell line from axolotl, a species widely used for studying epimorphic regeneration.

  10. Banks of cell cultures for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Radaeva, I F; Bogryantseva, M P; Nechaeva, E A

    2012-08-01

    Seeding and working cell banks were created and stored in cell culture collection. The banks were certified in accordance with international and national requirements. Cultures of 293, MT-4, L-68, FECH-16-1, FECH-16-2, 4647, MDCK, CHO TK(-), and CHO pE cells were recommended by Medical Immunobiological Preparation Committee for the use in the production of medical immunobiological preparations. The stock is sufficient enough for supplying standard cell material for the production of medical immunobiological preparations over few decades.

  11. Automated maintenance of embryonic stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Terstegge, Stefanie; Laufenberg, Iris; Pochert, Jörg; Schenk, Sabine; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Endl, Elmar; Brüstle, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) technology provides attractive perspectives for generating unlimited numbers of somatic cells for disease modeling and compound screening. A key prerequisite for these industrial applications are standardized and automated systems suitable for stem cell processing. Here we demonstrate that mouse and human ESC propagated by automated culture maintain their mean specific growth rates, their capacity for multi-germlayer differentiation, and the expression of the pluripotency-associated markers SSEA-1/Oct-4 and Tra-1-60/Tra-1-81/Oct-4, respectively. The feasibility of ESC culture automation may greatly facilitate the use of this versatile cell source for a variety of biomedical applications.

  12. Culture and transfection of axolotl cells.

    PubMed

    Denis, Jean-François; Sader, Fadi; Ferretti, Patrizia; Roy, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The use of cells grown in vitro has been instrumental for multiple aspects of biomedical research and especially molecular and cellular biology. The ability to grow cells from multicellular organisms like humans, squids, or salamanders is important to simplify the analyses and experimental designs to help understand the biology of these organisms. The advent of the first cell culture has allowed scientists to tease apart the cellular functions, and in many situations these experiments help understand what is happening in the whole organism. In this chapter, we describe techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of an established cell line from axolotl, a species widely used for studying epimorphic regeneration. PMID:25740487

  13. 3-dimensional fabrication of soft energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas; Walters, Peter; Rossiter, Jonathan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Anderson, Iain

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEG) provide an opportunity to harvest energy from low frequency and aperiodic sources. Because DEG are soft, deformable, high energy density generators, they can be coupled to complex structures such as the human body to harvest excess mechanical energy. However, DEG are typically constrained by a rigid frame and manufactured in a simple planar structure. This planar arrangement is unlikely to be optimal for harvesting from compliant and/or complex structures. In this paper we present a soft generator which is fabricated into a 3 Dimensional geometry. This capability will enable the 3-dimensional structure of a dielectric elastomer to be customised to the energy source, allowing efficient and/or non-invasive coupling. This paper demonstrates our first 3 dimensional generator which includes a diaphragm with a soft elastomer frame. When the generator was connected to a self-priming circuit and cyclically inflated, energy was accumulated in the system, demonstrated by an increased voltage. Our 3D generator promises a bright future for dielectric elastomers that will be customised for integration with complex and soft structures. In addition to customisable geometries, the 3D printing process may lend itself to fabricating large arrays of small generator units and for fabricating truly soft generators with excellent impedance matching to biological tissue. Thus comfortable, wearable energy harvesters are one step closer to reality.

  14. Biochemical Applications Of 3-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, Marc J.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigated the 3-dimensional fluorescence of complex mixtures of bioloquids such as human serum, serum ultrafiltrate, human urine, and human plasma low density lipoproteins. The total fluorescence of human serum can be divided into a few peaks. When comparing fluorescence topograms of sera, from normal and cancerous subjects, we found significant differences in tryptophan fluorescence. Although the total fluorescence of human urine can be resolved into 3-5 distinct peaks, some of them. do not result from single fluorescent urinary metabolites, but rather from. several species having similar spectral properties. Human plasma, low density lipoproteins possess a native fluorescence that changes when submitted to in-vitro autoxidation. The 3-dimensional fluorescence demonstrated the presence of 7 fluorophores in the lipid domain, and 6 fluorophores in the protein. dovain- The above results demonstrated that 3-dimensional fluorescence can resolve the spectral properties of complex ,lxtures much better than other methods. Moreover, other parameters than excitation and emission wavelength and intensity (for instance fluorescence lifetime, polarization, or quenchability) may be exploited to give a multidl,ensio,a1 matrix, that is unique for each sample. Consequently, 3-dimensio:Hhal fluorescence as such, or in combination with separation techniques is therefore considered to have the potential of becoming a useful new H.ethod in clinical chemistry and analytical biochemistry.

  15. Automated adherent human cell culture (mesenchymal stem cells).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robert; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Human cell culture processes developed at research laboratory scale need to be translated to large-scale production processes to achieve commercial application to a large market. To allow this transition of scale with consistent process performance and control of costs, it will be necessary to reduce manual processing and increase automation. There are a number of commercially available platforms that will reduce manual process intervention and improve process control for different culture formats. However, in many human cell-based applications, there is currently a need to remain close to the development format, usually adherent culture on cell culture plastic or matrix-coated wells or flasks due to deterioration of cell quality in other environments, such as suspension. This chapter presents an example method for adherent automated human stem cell culture using a specific automated flask handling platform, the CompacT SelecT.

  16. Isolation and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, U S

    1984-06-01

    Methods for isolation, identification and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells are now routine. In the past, methods of isolation have used proteolytic enzymes to detach cells; thereafter, traditional methods for cell passaging have used trypsin/EDTA mixtures. Cells isolated and passaged using proteolytic enzymes have been useful in establishing the field and in verifying certain endothelial properties. However, there is a growing awareness of the role of endothelial cells in processing vasoactive substances, in responding to hormones and other agonists and in cell-cell interactions with other cell types of the vascular wall, with blood cells and with cellular products. Consequently, a new requirement has arisen for cells in vitro that maintain the differentiated properties of their counterparts in vivo. The deleterious effects of trypsin and other proteolytic enzymes commonly used in cell culture on surface structures of endothelial cells such as enzymes, receptors and junctional proteins, as well as on extracellular layers such as the glycocalyx or "endothelial fuzz," have led to the development of methods that avoid use of proteolytic enzymes at both the isolation step and during subsequent subculture. This chapter describes traditional methods for isolating pulmonary endothelial cells but emphasizes newer approaches using mechanical harvest and scale-up using microcarriers. The new methods allow maintenance of long-term, large-scale cultures of cells that retain the full complement of surface properties and that maintain the cobblestone monolayer morphology and differentiated functional properties. Methods for identification of isolated cells are therefore also considered as methods for validation of cultures during their in vitro lifespan. PMID:6090112

  17. Transferring isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Wei; Koob, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new method for introducing large numbers of isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells. Direct microinjection of mitochondria into typical mammalian cells has been found to be impractical due to the large size of mitochondria relative to microinjection needles. To circumvent this problem, we inject isolated mitochondria through appropriately sized microinjection needles into rodent oocytes or single-cell embryos, which are much larger than tissue culture cells, and then withdraw a ‘mitocytoplast’ cell fragment containing the injected mitochondria using a modified holding needle. These mitocytoplasts are then fused to recipient cells through viral-mediated membrane fusion and the injected mitochondria are transferred into the cytoplasm of the tissue culture cell. Since mouse oocytes contain large numbers of mouse mitochondria that repopulate recipient mouse cells along with the injected mitochondria, we used either gerbil single-cell embryos or rat oocytes to package injected mouse mitochondria. We found that the gerbil mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not maintained in recipient rho0 mouse cells and that rat mtDNA initially replicated but was soon completely replaced by the injected mouse mtDNA, and so with both procedures mouse cells homoplasmic for the mouse mtDNA in the injected mitochondria were obtained. PMID:22753025

  18. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  19. Glycosylation of Fluorophenols by Plant Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Kondo, Yoko; Sato, Daisuke; Hamada, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Fluoroaromatic compounds are used as agrochemicals and released into environment as pollutants. Glycosylation of 2-, 3-, and 4-fluorophenols using plant cell cultures of Nicotiana tabacum was investigated to elucidate their potential to metabolize these compounds. Cultured N. tabacum cells converted 2-fluorophenol into its β-glucoside (60%) and β-gentiobioside (10%). 4-Fluorophenol was also glycosylated to its β-glucoside (32%) and β-gentiobioside (6%) by N. tabacum cells. On the other hand, N. tabacum glycosylated 3-fluorophenol to β-glucoside (17%). PMID:19564930

  20. Isolating phagosomes from tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Paul R; Rofe, Adam P

    2014-12-01

    Phagocytosis is the process by which receptors at the plasma membrane are used to engulf a particle such as a bacterium, parasite, or dead cell. Phagosomes can be isolated from tissue culture cells by various centrifugation methods, including the use of differential density gradients or sucrose step gradients, but these methods are time-consuming or otherwise difficult. We describe here a protocol that avoids centrifugation and relies instead on the uptake of magnetic beads to rapidly isolate the phagosomal compartment from tissue culture cells.

  1. [CO-CULTURE OF BOAR SPERMATOGONIAL CELLS WITH SERTOLI CELLS].

    PubMed

    Savchenkova, I P; Vasil'eva, S A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed in vitro culture conditions using co-culture of boar spermatogonial cells with Sertoli cells. Testes from 60-day-old crossbred boar were used. A spermatogonia-enriched culture was achieved by enzymatic digestion method and purification by density gradient centrifugation using a discontinuous Percoll gradient and differentiated adherence technique. Lipid drops were detected in isolated Sertoli cells by Oil Red O staining. We have found that the cultivation of boar spermatogonia in the presence of Sertoli cells (up to 35 days) leads to their differentiation as well as in vivo in testis. Association of cells in groups, formation of chains and suspension clusters of the spermatogenic cells were observed on the 10th day. Spermatogonial cellular colonies were noted at the same time. These cellular colonies were analyzed for the expression of genes: Nanog and Plzf in RT PCR. The expression of the Nanog gene in the experimental cellular clones obtained by short-term culture of spermatogonial cells in the presence of Sertoli cells was 200 times higher than the expression of this gene in the freshly isolated spermatogonial cells expression was found in freshly isolated germ cells and in cellular clones derived in vitro. We have found that, in the case of longer cultivation of these cells on Sertoli cells, in vitro process of differentiation of germ cells and formation of single mobile boar spermatozoa occurs at 30-33 days. Cellular population is heterogeneous at this stage. Spermatogenic differentiation in vitro without Sertoli cells stays on the 7th day of cultivation. The results show that co-culture of boar spermatogonia-enriched cells with Sertoli cells can induce their differentiation into spermatozoa in vitro and facilitate obtaining of porcine germ cell culture.

  2. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  3. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  4. Campylobacter jejuni non-culturable coccoid cells.

    PubMed

    Beumer, R R; de Vries, J; Rombouts, F M

    1992-01-01

    The behaviour of Campylobacter jejuni in the environment is poorly documented. Rapid loss of viability on culture media is reported. This phenomenon is associated with the development of so-called coccoid cells. It has been suggested that these cells can be infective to animals and man. Results obtained with ATP-measurements of coccoid cells and Direct Viable Count (DVC) support this hypothesis. Introduction of coccoid cells into simulated gastric, ileal and colon environments did not result in the presence of culturable cells. Oral administration to laboratory animals and volunteers caused no typical symptoms of campylobacteriosis. Until 30 days after uptake of the cells antibodies against C. jejuni could not be detected in the blood, and the presence of this microorganism in stool samples could not be demonstrated.

  5. Shock Wave Application to Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Mathes, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Shock waves nowadays are well known for their regenerative effects. Basic research findings showed that shock waves do cause a biological stimulus to target cells or tissue without any subsequent damage. Therefore, in vitro experiments are of increasing interest. Various methods of applying shock waves onto cell cultures have been described. In general, all existing models focus on how to best apply shock waves onto cells. However, this question remains: What happens to the waves after passing the cell culture? The difference of the acoustic impedance of the cell culture medium and the ambient air is that high, that more than 99% of shock waves get reflected! We therefore developed a model that mainly consists of a Plexiglas built container that allows the waves to propagate in water after passing the cell culture. This avoids cavitation effects as well as reflection of the waves that would otherwise disturb upcoming ones. With this model we are able to mimic in vivo conditions and thereby gain more and more knowledge about how the physical stimulus of shock waves gets translated into a biological cell signal (“mechanotransduction"). PMID:24747842

  6. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  7. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  8. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  9. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  10. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  11. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  12. Pinoresinol from Ipomoea cairica cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Páska, Csilla; Innocenti, Gabbriella; Ferlin, Mariagrazia; Kunvári, Mónika; László, Miklós

    2002-10-01

    Ipomoea cairica cell cultures produced a tetrahydrofuran lignan, (+)-pinoresinol, identified by UV, IR, MS and NMR methods, not yet found in the intact plant, and new in the Convolvulaceae family. Pinoresinol was found to have antioxidant and Ca2+ antagonist properties. As it could be requested for its biological activity, we examined the possibility to raise the pinoresinol yield of I. cairica cultures, as well as we continued investigations on lignans' response to optimization.

  13. Culture of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gallicchio, M A

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the luminal surface of all blood vessels in the body. The endothelial surface in adult humans is composed of approximately l-6×l0(13) cells and covers an area of 1-7 m(2). Endothelium serves many functions, including fluid and solute exchange through cell contraction, provision of an antithrombogenic surface through tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and prostacyclin release, synthesis of angiogenic factors such as adenosine, allowance of leukocyte trafficking through adhesion molecule synthesis, presentation of antigens to the immune system, maintenance of vascular tone through nitric oxide and endothelin synthesis, and metabolism of circulating molecules through the release of enzymes such as lipoprotein lipase. PMID:21340938

  14. Cellulose acetate based 3-dimensional electrospun scaffolds for skin tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Atila, Deniz; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2015-11-20

    Skin defects that are not able to regenerate by themselves are among the major problems faced. Tissue engineering approach holds promise for treating such defects. Development of tissue-mimicking-scaffolds that can promote healing process receives an increasing interest in recent years. In this study, 3-dimensional electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) pullulan (PULL) scaffolds were developed for the first time. PULL was intentionally used to obtain 3D structures with adjustable height. It was removed from the electrospun mesh to increase the porosity and biostability. Different ratios of the polymers were electrospun and analyzed with respect to degradation, porosity, and mechanical properties. It has been observed that fiber diameter, thickness and porosity of scaffolds increased with increased PULL content, on the other hand this resulted with higher degradation of scaffolds. Mechanical strength of scaffolds was improved after PULL removal suggesting their suitability as cell carriers. Cell culture studies were performed with the selected scaffold group (CA/PULL: 50/50) using mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929). In vitro cell culture tests showed that cells adhered, proliferated and populated CA/PULL (50/50) scaffolds showing that they are cytocompatible. Results suggest that uncrosslinked CA/PULL (50/50) electrospun scaffolds hold potential for skin tissue engineering applications. PMID:26344279

  15. Cellulose acetate based 3-dimensional electrospun scaffolds for skin tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Atila, Deniz; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2015-11-20

    Skin defects that are not able to regenerate by themselves are among the major problems faced. Tissue engineering approach holds promise for treating such defects. Development of tissue-mimicking-scaffolds that can promote healing process receives an increasing interest in recent years. In this study, 3-dimensional electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) pullulan (PULL) scaffolds were developed for the first time. PULL was intentionally used to obtain 3D structures with adjustable height. It was removed from the electrospun mesh to increase the porosity and biostability. Different ratios of the polymers were electrospun and analyzed with respect to degradation, porosity, and mechanical properties. It has been observed that fiber diameter, thickness and porosity of scaffolds increased with increased PULL content, on the other hand this resulted with higher degradation of scaffolds. Mechanical strength of scaffolds was improved after PULL removal suggesting their suitability as cell carriers. Cell culture studies were performed with the selected scaffold group (CA/PULL: 50/50) using mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929). In vitro cell culture tests showed that cells adhered, proliferated and populated CA/PULL (50/50) scaffolds showing that they are cytocompatible. Results suggest that uncrosslinked CA/PULL (50/50) electrospun scaffolds hold potential for skin tissue engineering applications.

  16. Projection printing of 3-dimensional tissue scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to create precise, predesigned, spatially patterned biochemical and physical microenvironments inside polymer scaffolds could provide a powerful tool in studying progenitor cell behavior and differentiation under biomimetic, three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions. The development of freeform fabrication technology has become a promising tool for the manufacturing of biological scaffolds for tissue regeneration and stem cell engineering. Freeform fabrication is a very promising technology due to the efficient and simple process for creating bona fide 3D microstructures, such as closed channels and cavities. It is also capable of encapsulating biomolecules and even living cells. This chapter describes direct projection printing of 3D tissue engineering scaffolds by using a digital micromirror-array device (DMD) in a layer-by-layer process. This simple and fast microstereolithography system consists of an ultraviolet (UV) light source, a digital micromirror masking device, imaging optics, and controlling devices. Images of UV light are projected onto the photocurable resin by creating the "dynamic photomask" design with graphic software. Multilayered scaffolds are microfabricated through a photopolymerization process. PMID:22692617

  17. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  18. [Ebola virus reproduction in cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Titenko, A M; Novozhilov, S S; Andaev, E I; Borisova, T I; Kulikova, E V

    1992-01-01

    Ebola-Zaire virus production in Vero and BGM cells was studied. The CPE developed in both cell cultures. The cell monolayer destruction by 80-90% was seen at a low multiplicity of infection in 7-8 days after virus inoculation. An overlay composition was developed for virus titration using plaque assay. The plaque production was shown to be directly proportional to the virus dose. The curve of Ebola virus production in Vero cell culture fluid was determined. At a multiplicity of infection of 0.01 PFU/cell, the maximum virus titer of 10(6.4) PFU/ml was reached in 7 days postinfection. Specific antisera were generated by inoculation of guinea pigs. Indirect immunofluorescent assay was used for testing of virus-specific antigen and antibody.

  19. Growth regulation of cultured human nevus cells.

    PubMed

    Mancianti, M L; Györfi, T; Shih, I M; Valyi-Nagy, I; Levengood, G; Menssen, H D; Halpern, A C; Elder, D E; Herlyn, M

    1993-03-01

    Cells isolated from congenital melanocytic nevi and cultured in vitro have growth characteristics that resemble their premalignant stage in situ. A serum-free, chemically defined medium has been developed that allows continuous growth of established nevus cultures for up to several months. Like primary melanoma cells, nevus cells in high-calcium-containing W489 medium require insulin for growth. In contrast to melanoma cells, nevus cells in serum-free medium require the presence of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, which enhanced intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. In contrast to the requirements of normal human melanocytes from newborn foreskin, congenital nevus cells grow with less dependency on basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nevus cultures contain bFGF-like activity, and they express bFGF mRNA. Nevic cells of compound nevi also express bFGF mRNA in situ but only in the junctional areas. These results indicate that bFGF plays an important growth regulatory role for nevus cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8440904

  20. [3-dimensional documentation of wound-healing].

    PubMed

    Körber, A; Grabbe, S; Dissemond, J

    2006-04-01

    The objective evaluation of the course of wound-healing represents a substantial parameter for the quality assurance of a modern wound management in chronic wounds. Established procedures exclusively based on a two-dimensional measurement of the wound surface with planimetry or digital photo documentation in combination with a metric statement of size. Thus so far an objective method is missing for the evaluation of the volumes of chronic wounds. By the linkage of digital photography, optical grid by means of digital scanner and an image processing software in co-operation with the company RSI we were able to do an accurate 3-dimensional documentation of chronic wounds (DigiSkin). The generated scatter-plots allow a visual, computer-assisted 3-dimensional measurement and documentation of chronic wounds. In comparison with available systems it is now possible for the first time to objectify the volume changes of a chronic wound. On the basis of a case report of a female patient with an venous leg ulcer, which has been treated with a vacuum closure therapy before and after performing a mesh-graft transplantation, we would like to describe the advantages and the resulting scientific use of this new, objective wound documentation system in the clinical employment. PMID:16575675

  1. General overview of neuronal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer; Amini, Shohreh; White, Martyn K

    2013-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a general overview of neuronal cell culture. This is a rapidly evolving area of research and we provide an outline and contextual framework for the different chapters of this book. These chapters were all contributed by scientists actively working in the field who are currently using state-of-the-art techniques to advance our understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the central nervous system. Each chapter provides detailed descriptions and experimental protocols for a variety of techniques ranging in scope from basic neuronal cell line culturing to advanced and specialized methods.

  2. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways.

  3. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  4. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  5. Isolation and Culture of Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mozzetta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are key epigenetic factors responsible for the proper spatiotemporal repression of defined transcriptional programs along the process of cell differentiation, including myogenesis. The discovery of the pivotal role played by PcG factors during myogenic differentiation relied on the possibility to culture myogenic cells in vitro. We describe here the methods currently used to isolate muscle stem cells (MuSCs) both from single myofibers and from bulk muscles by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), highlighting experimental details and critical steps. Through these techniques MuSCs can be efficiently isolated and cultured in vitro to recapitulate the different phases of myogenesis: activation, expansion, differentiation, and self-renewal. PMID:27659996

  6. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  7. Shape memory polymers for active cell culture.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kevin A; Luo, Xiaofan; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2011-07-04

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of "smart" materials that have the ability to change from a fixed, temporary shape to a pre-determined permanent shape upon the application of a stimulus such as heat(1-5). In a typical shape memory cycle, the SMP is first deformed at an elevated temperature that is higher than its transition temperature, T(trans;) [either the melting temperature (T(m;)) or the glass transition temperature (T(g;))]. The deformation is elastic in nature and mainly leads to a reduction in conformational entropy of the constituent network chains (following the rubber elasticity theory). The deformed SMP is then cooled to a temperature below its T(trans;) while maintaining the external strain or stress constant. During cooling, the material transitions to a more rigid state (semi-crystalline or glassy), which kinetically traps or "freezes" the material in this low-entropy state leading to macroscopic shape fixing. Shape recovery is triggered by continuously heating the material through T(trans;) under a stress-free (unconstrained) condition. By allowing the network chains (with regained mobility) to relax to their thermodynamically favored, maximal-entropy state, the material changes from the temporary shape to the permanent shape. Cells are capable of surveying the mechanical properties of their surrounding environment(6). The mechanisms through which mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment control cell behavior are areas of active research. Substrates of defined topography have emerged as powerful tools in the investigation of these mechanisms. Mesoscale, microscale, and nanoscale patterns of substrate topography have been shown to direct cell alignment, cell adhesion, and cell traction forces(7-14). These findings have underscored the potential for substrate topography to control and assay the mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment during cell culture, but the substrates used to date

  8. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  9. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds.

  10. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds. PMID:27114828

  11. On AGV's navigation in 3-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, Jürgen

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with position estimation and path control for Autonomous Guided Vehicles (AGV). To enable a vehicle or a mobile robot in following a continuous “virtual” path without human control, these techniques play an important role. The relationship between the vehicle's motion in 3-dimensional space and the shape of a curved surface is described. In particular, the introduction of a digital terrain model in dead reckoning is considered. Moreover, a possible nonlinear control is developed based on curvilinear path coordinates, and the proof for global stability is given. To achieve general validity, these topics are treated here independently of the cart's special mechanization (the configuration of steered wheels and driven wheels). Simulation studies are presented to illustrate the investigations.

  12. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  13. Electrical excitability of cultured adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Biales, B; Dichter, M; Tischler, A

    1976-01-01

    1. Adult human and gerbil adrenal medullary cells were maintained in dissociated cell culture and studied by micro-electrode penetration. 2. In the best recordings, chromaffin cell transmembrane potentials exceeded -50mV. 3. Chromaffin cells were capable of generating all-or-nothing over-shooting action potentials, similar to those generated by sympathetic neurones. 4. The action potentials were blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10(-6)g/ml.) but were not blocked by removal of Ca or by CoCl2 (10 mM). We conclude that the action potentials are probably generated by a Na mechanism. 5. Chromaffin cells are depolarized by the iontophoretic application of acetylcholine (ACh). This depolarization was accompanied by an increased membrane conductance and could trigger action potentials. 6. Action potentials were also found in cells in fresh slices of gerbil adrenal medullae. Images Plate 1 PMID:1034699

  14. Method of determining the number of cells in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, D.T.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a color-sensitivity method for determining the number of cells in in vitro cell culture at a sensitivity as low as about 100 or about 500 cells. It comprises lysing the cells and incubating the lysate with p-nitrophenyl phosphate at acid pH for a predetermined period of time at a temperature of from about 35{degrees} to about 38{degrees}C. and then measuring the color development at 400 to 420 nanometers and correlating the color development with cell number by comparing with a control standard of known cell number.

  15. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground

  16. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  17. Genomics in mammalian cell culture bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Diane M.; Harcum, Sarah W.; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2013-01-01

    Explicitly identifying the genome of a host organism including sequencing, mapping, and annotating its genetic code has become a priority in the field of biotechnology with aims at improving the efficiency and understanding of cell culture bioprocessing. Recombinant protein therapeutics, primarily produced in mammalian cells, constitute a $108 billion global market. The most common mammalian cell line used in biologic production processes is the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and although great improvements have been made in titer production over the past 25 years, the underlying molecular and physiological factors are not well understood. Confident understanding of CHO bioprocessing elements (e.g. cell line selection, protein production, and reproducibility of process performance and product specifications) would significantly improve with a well understood genome. This review describes mammalian cell culture use in bioprocessing, the importance of obtaining CHO cell line genetic sequences, and the current status of sequencing efforts. Furthermore, transcriptomic techniques and gene expression tools are presented, and case studies exploring genomic techniques and applications aimed to improve mammalian bioprocess performance are reviewed. Finally, future implications of genomic advances are surmised. PMID:22079893

  18. Regenerative and Immunogenic Characteristics of Cultured Nucleus Pulposus Cells from Human Cervical Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Stich, Stefan; Stolk, Meaghan; Girod, Pierre Pascal; Thomé, Claudius; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen; Seifert, Martina; Hegewald, Aldemar Andres

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based regenerative approaches have been suggested as primary or adjuvant procedures for the treatment of degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) diseases. Our aim was to evaluate the regenerative and immunogenic properties of mildly and severely degenerated cervical nucleus pulposus (NP) cells with regard to cell isolation, proliferation and differentiation, as well as to cell surface markers and co-cultures with autologous or allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) including changes in their immunogenic properties after 3-dimensional (3D)-culture. Tissue from the NP compartment of 10 patients with mild or severe grades of IVD degeneration was collected. Cells were isolated, expanded with and without basic fibroblast growth factor and cultured in 3D fibrin/poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid transplants for 21 days. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed the expression of characteristic NP markers ACAN, COL1A1 and COL2A1 in 2D- and 3D-culture with degeneration- and culture-dependent differences. In a 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester-based proliferation assay, NP cells in monolayer, regardless of their grade of degeneration, did not provoke a significant proliferation response in T cells, natural killer (NK) cells or B cells, not only with donor PBMC, but also with allogeneic PBMC. In conjunction with low inflammatory cytokine expression, analyzed by Cytometric Bead Array and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), a low immunogenicity can be assumed, facilitating possible therapeutic approaches. In 3D-culture, however, we found elevated immune cell proliferation levels, and there was a general trend to higher responses for NP cells from severely degenerated IVD tissue. This emphasizes the importance of considering the specific immunological alterations when including biomaterials in a therapeutic concept. The overall expression of Fas receptor, found on cultured NP cells, could have

  19. Development in primary cell culture of demosponges.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Salvatore; De Caro, Salvatore; Iodice, Carmine; Tommonaro, Giuseppina; Stefanov, Kamen; Popov, Simeon

    2003-01-23

    We have established primary cell culture of the marine demosponge Dysidea avara and Suberites domuncula. Microbial contamination was controlled by the use of a pool of antibiotics confirming the goodness of this procedure. Effect of pH, temperature and light was studied to establish the better growth conditions. The comparison of lipid composition of sponge and cells suggested a series of experiments to optimise the medium. A glucose dose-dependent experiment showed that the ideal glucose concentration is 1 g l(-1). Supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acid and retinol, no promotion of growth was observed, but the compounds were totally metabolised by cells. Increments from 70 to 160% in the number of cells were observed, supplementing the medium with different concentration of cholesterol. These results suggest that the analysis of the chemical composition of sponge and cells give indication on the composition of the nutrient media.

  20. Side Effects of Culture Media Antibiotics on Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Laura; Montoya, Julio; López-Gallardo, Ester; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Besides the advance in scientific knowledge and the production of different compounds, cell culture can now be used to obtain cells for regenerative medicine. To avoid microbial contamination, antibiotics were usually incorporated into culture media. However, these compounds affect cell biochemistry and may modify the differentiation potential of cultured cells. To check this possibility, we grew human adipose tissue-derived stem cells and differentiated them to adipocyte with or without antibiotics commonly used in these culture protocols, such as a penicillin-streptomycin-amphotericin mix or gentamicin. We show that these antibiotics affect cell differentiation. Therefore, antibiotics should not be used in cell culture because aseptic techniques make these compounds unnecessary.

  1. The potential of 3-dimensional construct engineered from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/fibrin hybrid scaffold seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for in vitro cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Rozlin; Mohamad Sukri, Norhamiza; Md Nazir, Noorhidayah; Ahmad Radzi, Muhammad Aa'zamuddin; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che Ahmad, Aminudin; Hashi, Abdurezak Abdulahi; Abdul Rahman, Suzanah; Sha'ban, Munirah

    2015-08-01

    Articular cartilage is well known for its simple uniqueness of avascular and aneural structure that has limited capacity to heal itself when injured. The use of three dimensional construct in tissue engineering holds great potential in regenerating cartilage defects. This study evaluated the in vitro cartilaginous tissue formation using rabbit's bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)-seeded onto poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) PLGA/fibrin and PLGA scaffolds. The in vitro cartilaginous engineered constructs were evaluated by gross inspection, histology, cell proliferation, gene expression and sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production at week 1, 2 and 3. After 3 weeks of culture, the PLGA/fibrin construct demonstrated gross features similar to the native tissue with smooth, firm and glistening appearance, superior histoarchitectural and better cartilaginous extracellular matrix compound in concert with the positive glycosaminoglycan accumulation on Alcian blue. Significantly higher cell proliferation in PLGA/fibrin construct was noted at day-7, day-14 and day-21 (p<0.05 respectively). Both constructs expressed the accumulation of collagen type II, collagen type IX, aggrecan and sox9, showed down-regulation of collagen type I as well as produced relative sGAG content with PLGA/fibrin construct exhibited better gene expression in all profiles and showed significantly higher relative sGAG content at each time point (p<0.05). This study suggested that with optimum in vitro manipulation, PLGA/fibrin when seeded with pluripotent non-committed BMSCs has the capability to differentiate into chondrogenic lineage and may serve as a prospective construct to be developed as functional tissue engineered cartilage.

  2. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  3. Gonococcal and meningococcal pathogenesis as defined by human cell, cell culture, and organ culture assays.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, D S

    1989-01-01

    Human cells, cell cultures, and organ cultures have been extremely useful for studying the events that occur when gonococci and meningococci encounter human mucosal surfaces. The specificity and selectivity of these events for human cells are striking and correlate with the adaptation of these pathogens for survival on human mucous membranes. To colonize these sites, meningococci and gonococci have developed mechanisms to damage local host defenses such as the mucociliary blanket, to attach to epithelial cells, and to invade these cells. Attachment to epithelial cells mediated by pili, and to some types of cells mediated by PIIs, serves to anchor the organism close to sources of nutrition and allows multiplication. Intracellular invasion, possibly initiated by the major porin protein, may provide additional nutritional support and protection from host defenses. Mucosal invasion may also result in access of gonococci and meningococci to the bloodstream, leading to dissemination. Images PMID:2497953

  4. Iron overload in cultured rat myocardial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Iancu, T. C.; Link, G.; Pinson, A.; Hershko, C.

    1987-03-01

    In order to characterize the nature of iron deposits associated with iron overload in heart cells, Mössbauer spectroscopy and ultrastructural studies were performed in iron loaded heart cell cultures obtained from newborn rats grown in a medium containing 20 μg iron/ml. Maximal uptake of iron after 24 hrs was about 15%. Not more than 20% of the iron in these cells was stored in ferritin and the rest was found in smaller trivalent iron aggregates. With time there was a shift from smaller to larger aggregates. In chase samples there was only a very limited spontaneous release of iron from heart cells. Desferrioxamine, an iron chelating drug, removed a major part of the smaller aggregates, but did not remove ferritin iron.

  5. Measurement of Glucose Uptake in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Norio; Ueda-Wakagi, Manabu; Sato, Takuya; Kawasaki, Kengo; Sawada, Keisuke; Kawabata, Kyuichi; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2015-12-08

    Facilitative glucose uptake transport systems are ubiquitous in animal cells and are responsible for transporting glucose across cell surface membranes. Evaluation of glucose uptake is crucial in the study of numerous diseases and metabolic disorders such as myocardial ischemia, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Detailed in this unit are laboratory methods for assessing glucose uptake into mammalian cells. The unit is divided into five sections: (1) a brief overview of glucose uptake assays in cultured cells; (2) a method for measuring glucose uptake using radiolabeled 3-O-methylglucose; (3) a method for measuring glucose uptake using radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose (2DG); (4) a microplate method for measuring 2DG-uptake using an enzymatic, fluorometric assay; and (5) a microplate-based method using a fluorescent analog of 2DG.

  6. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (Inventor); Francis, Karen (Inventor); Andrews, Angela (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  7. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  8. Ascorbic acid transport into cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, E.I.; May, V.; Eipper, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    An amidating enzyme designated peptidyl-glycine ..cap alpha..-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) has been studied in a variety of tissues and is dependent on molecular oxygen and stimulated by copper and ascorbic acid. To continue investigating the relationship among cellular ascorbic acid concentrations, amidating ability, and PAM activity, the authors studied ascorbic acid transport in three cell preparations that contain PAM and produce amidated peptides: primary cultures of rat anterior and intermediate pituitary and mouse AtT-20 tumor cells. When incubated in 50 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid all three cell preparations concentrated ascorbic acid 20- to 40-fold, producing intracellular ascorbate concentrations of 1 to 2 mM, based on experimentally determined cell volumes. All three cell preparations displayed saturable ascorbic acid uptake with half-maximal initial rates occurring between 9 and 18 ..mu..M ascorbate. Replacing NaCl in the uptake buffer with choline chloride significantly diminished ascorbate uptake in all three preparations. Ascorbic acid efflux from these cells was slow, displaying half-lives of 7 hours. Unlike systems that transport dehydroascorbic acid, the transport system for ascorbic acid in these cells was not inhibited by glucose. Thus, ascorbate is transported into pituitary cells by a sodium-dependent, active transport system.

  9. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  10. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3-dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Steigner, Michael L; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    Medical 3-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D-printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced preoperative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases and valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing perioperative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality.

  11. The 3-Dimensional Structure of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury Program CLASH (PI Postman) has provided the community with the most detailed views ever of the central regions of massive galaxy clusters. These galaxy clusters have also been observed with NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, with the ground-based Subaru telescope, and with other ground- and space-based facilities, resulting in unprecedented multi-wavelength data sets of the most massive bound structures in the universe. Fitting 3-Dimensional mass models is crucial to understanding how mass is distributed in individual clusters, investigating the properties of dark matter, and testing our cosmological model. With the exquisite data available, the time is now ideal to undertake this analysis. We propose to use algorithms that we have developed and obtain mass models for the clusters from the CLASH sample. The project would use archival gravitational lensing data, X-ray data of the cluster's hot gas and additional constraints from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) data. Specifically, we would model the 23 clusters for which both HST and Subaru data (or in one case WFI data) are publicly available, since the exquisite imaging of HST in the clusters' central regions is beautifully augmented by the wide field coverage of Subaru imaging. If the true 3-D shapes of clusters are not properly accounted for when analysing data, this can lead to inaccuracies in the mass density profiles of individual clusters - up to 50% bias in mass for the most highly triaxial systems. Our proposed project represents an independent analysis of the CLASH sample, complementary to that of the CLASH team, probing the triaxial shapes and orientations of the cluster dark matter halos and hot gas. Our findings will be relevant to the analysis of data from future missions such as JWST and Euclid, and also to ground-based surveys to be made with telescopes such as LSST.

  12. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    DOEpatents

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  13. Cytotoxicity effects of amiodarone on cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Golli-Bennour, Emna El; Bouslimi, Amel; Zouaoui, Olfa; Nouira, Safa; Achour, Abdellatif; Bacha, Hassen

    2012-07-01

    Amiodarone is a potent anti-arrhythmic drug used for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Although, the effects of amiodarone are well characterized on post-ischemic heart and cardiomyocytes, its toxicity on extra-cardiac tissues is still poorly understood. To this aim, we have monitored the cytotoxicity effects of this drug on three cultured cell lines including hepatocytes (HepG2), epithelial cells (EAhy 926) and renal cells (Vero). We have investigated the effects of amiodarone on (i) cell viabilities, (ii) heat shock protein expressions (Hsp 70) as a parameter of protective and adaptive response and (iii) oxidative damage.Our results clearly showed that amiodarone inhibits cell proliferation, induces an over-expression of Hsp 70 and generates significant amount of reactive oxygen species as measured by lipid peroxidation occurrence. However, toxicity of amiodarone was significantly higher in renal and epithelial cells than in hepatocytes. Vitamin E supplement restores the major part of cell mortalities induced by amiodarone showing that oxidative damage is the predominant toxic effect of the drug.Except its toxicity for the cardiac system, our findings demonstrated that amiodarone can target other tissues. Therefore, kidneys present a high sensibility to this drug which may limit its use with subjects suffering from renal disorders.

  14. Traditional and Modern Cell Culture in Virus Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hematian, Ali; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Mohebi, Reza; Taherikalani, Morovat; Nasrolahi, Abbas; Amraei, Mansour; Ghafourian, Sobhan

    2016-04-01

    Cell cultures are developed from tissue samples and then disaggregated by mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic methods to extract cells suitable for isolation of viruses. With the recent advances in technology, cell culture is considered a gold standard for virus isolation. This paper reviews the evolution of cell culture methods and demonstrates why cell culture is a preferred method for identification of viruses. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and modern cell culture methods for diagnosis of each type of virus are discussed. Detection of viruses by the novel cell culture methods is considered more accurate and sensitive. However, there is a need to include some more accurate methods such as molecular methods in cell culture for precise identification of viruses.

  15. Traditional and Modern Cell Culture in Virus Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hematian, Ali; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Mohebi, Reza; Taherikalani, Morovat; Nasrolahi, Abbas; Amraei, Mansour; Ghafourian, Sobhan

    2016-01-01

    Cell cultures are developed from tissue samples and then disaggregated by mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic methods to extract cells suitable for isolation of viruses. With the recent advances in technology, cell culture is considered a gold standard for virus isolation. This paper reviews the evolution of cell culture methods and demonstrates why cell culture is a preferred method for identification of viruses. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and modern cell culture methods for diagnosis of each type of virus are discussed. Detection of viruses by the novel cell culture methods is considered more accurate and sensitive. However, there is a need to include some more accurate methods such as molecular methods in cell culture for precise identification of viruses. PMID:27169004

  16. [Culture of mussel Mytiuls edulis I. mantle cells].

    PubMed

    Daugavet, M A; Blinova, M I

    2015-01-01

    To date, cell lines derived from marine invertebrates have not been available. Hence primary cell cultures serve as model systems for various experiments. In present study we established primary culture of mussel Mytilus edulis L. mantle cells. Cells were isolated by means of explant culture or enzymatic dissociation of mantle tissue. They maintained viability up to 22 months regardless of culture initiation method. In course of culturing, cells, which were transferred onto new plates, successfully attached to a new surface. Physiological activity of cultured cells was also confirmed by formation of crystals, which appeared after 4-6 months. After continuous time of culturing, mantle cells can be cryopreserved using 5 % DMSO with post-freezing survival up to 50%. These results demonstrate that M. edulis mantle cells can maintain viability and physiological activity for exceptionally long time and can be cryopreserved for further examination.

  17. Cell culture device using spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Chung-Jen; Shen, Ching-I.; Ou, Chung-Ming

    2009-07-01

    Spatial light modulator is introduced for cell culturing and related illumination experiment. Two kinds of designs were used. The first type put the cell along with the bio-medium directly on top of the analyzer of the microdisplay and set a cover glass on it to retain the medium environment, which turned the microdisplay into a bio-container. The second type introduced an optical lens system placed below the spatial light modulator to focus the light spots on specific position. Details of the advantages and drawbacks for the two different approaches are discussed, and the human melanocyte cell (HMC) is introduced to prove the feasibility of the concept. Results indicate that the second type is much more suitable than the first for precision required application.

  18. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  19. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries.

  20. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries. PMID:26179857

  1. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Ruellasa, Antonio C. O.; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this article were to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Methods Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. Results All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article’s online version for viewing and downloading using the reader’s software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader’s software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. Conclusions When submitting manuscripts, authors can

  2. Craniofacial muscle engineering using a 3-dimensional phosphate glass fibre construct.

    PubMed

    Shah, R; Sinanan, A C M; Knowles, J C; Hunt, N P; Lewis, M P

    2005-05-01

    The current technique to replace missing craniofacial skeletal muscle is the surgical transfer of local or free flaps. This is associated with donor site morbidity, possible tissue rejection and limited supply. The alternative is to engineer autologous skeletal muscle in vitro, which can then be re-implanted into the patient. A variety of biomaterials have been used to engineer skeletal muscle with limited success. This study investigated the use of phosphate-based glass fibres as a potential scaffold material for the in vitro engineering of craniofacial skeletal muscle. Human masseter (one of the muscles of mastication)--derived cell cultures were used to seed the glass fibres, which were arranged into various configurations. Growth factors and matrix components were to used to manipulate the in vitro environment. Outcome was determined with the aid of microscopy, time-lapse footage, immunofluorescence imaging and CyQUANT proliferation, creatine kinase and protein assays. A 3-dimensional mesh arrangement of the glass fibres was the best at encouraging cell attachment and proliferation. In addition, increasing the density of the seeded cells and using Matrigel and insulin-like growth factor I enhanced the formation of prototypic muscle fibres. In conclusion, phosphate-based glass fibres can support the in vitro engineering of human craniofacial muscle.

  3. Metabolomic profiling of cultured cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Scoazec, Marie; Durand, Sylvere; Chery, Alexis; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics approaches have been developed-and now begin to be implemented on a high-throughput basis-to fill-in the large gap between the genomic/transcriptomic setup of (cancer) cells and their phenotypic/behavioral traits, reflecting a significant degree of posttranscriptional regulation in gene expression as well as a robust posttranslational regulation of protein function. However, proteomic profiling assays not only fail to detect labile posttranslational modifications as well as unstable protein-to-protein interactions but also are intrinsically incapable of assessing the enzymatic activity, as opposed to the mere abundance, of a given protein. Thus, determining the abundance of theoretically all the metabolites contained in a cell/tissue/organ/organism may significantly improve the informational value of proteomic approaches. Several techniques have been developed to this aim, including high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). This approach is particularly advantageous for metabolomic profiling as it offers elevated accuracy and improved sensitivity. Here, we describe a simple procedure to determine the complete complement of intracellular metabolites in cultured malignant cells by HPLC coupled to Q-TOF HRMS. According to this method, (1) cells are collected and processed to minimize contaminations as well as fluctuations in their metabolic profile; (2) samples are separated by HPLC and analyzed on a Q-TOF spectrometer; and (3) data are extracted, normalized, and deconvoluted according to refined mathematical methods. This protocol constitutes a simple approach to determine the intracellular metabolomic profile of cultured cancer cells. With minimal variations (mostly related to sample collection and processing), this method is expected to provide reliable metabolomic data on a variety of cellular samples.

  4. Neutralization of Chlamydia trachomatis in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, L V

    1975-01-01

    Neutralization of Chlamydia trachomatis was assayed by the decrease in inclusion-forming units in baby hamster kidney cells grown in culture. Five percent fresh guinea pig sera increased neutralization titers of rabbit antisera 100- to 1,000-fold but had no effect when normal rabbit sera were tested. Neutralization of a type A or B trachoma isolate was strain specific. Neutralization by human eye secretions and sera also was demonstrated when guinea pig sera were included in the test. All of the six human sera tested showed strain specificity against types A or B, in agreement with typing by the fluorescent antibody technique. PMID:1091549

  5. Toward a cell-culture model of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, P.M.

    1984-08-01

    The spontaneous transformation of normal Chinese hamster cells into malignant cells was studied. Hamster cells when grown in culture over an extended series of subcultivations inevitably become malignant even without exposure to a carcinogen. The study of this process using flow cytometry and the implantation of cultured cells into retrievable sponges placed under the skin of a nude mouse is described. (ACR)

  6. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  7. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h.

  8. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed. PMID:24429549

  9. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed.

  10. A Novel 3-Dimensional Approach for Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Munarin, F.; Coulombe, K.L.K.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases, such as coronary artery disease and microvascular disease, are cardiovascular pathologies that cause reduced blood supply to the heart muscle. Acute and chronic ischemia cause cardiomyocytes to die, and these cells are not naturally replaced as part of the wound healing process in the heart. To promote neovascularization in the wound bed and in implanted engineered tissues, we have developed a collagen–alginate microspheres scaffold intended for local release of drugs and growth factors in order to recruit host endothelial cells to the area and provide them with geometrical cues to form new vessels. Optimization of alginate microspheres included modulation of nitrogen pressure, alginate and CaCl2 concentrations, nozzle size, and velocity of extrusion to achieve monodisperse populations of 100 μm diameter microspheres with protein release over 3 days. In vitro incorporation of fibroblasts in the bulk collagen demonstrated cellular compatibility with embedded alginate microspheres. An in vitro vessel formation assay, performed with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) immobilized in the collagen phase of the collagen–alginate microspheres scaffolds, showed that HUVECs formed networks following the 3-dimensional pattern of the microspheres even in the absence of growth factor. Implantation of acellular collagen–alginate microspheres scaffolds onto healthy rat hearts confirmed the invasion of host cells at one week. Together, these results suggest that the collagen–alginate microspheres scaffold is a viable, tunable therapeutic approach for directing neovascularization in engineered tissues and in the heart after ischemic events. PMID:26736614

  11. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in “wasteful” glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  12. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  13. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  14. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  15. Three-dimensional culture may promote cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin; Chen, Lei; Luo, Guanzheng; Dai, Bin; Wang, Xiujie; Dai, Jianwu

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells reside in stem cells niches, which maintain the balance of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In stem cell niches, cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix interactions and diffusible signals are important elements. However, another pivotal element is that localized and diffusible signals are all organized as three-dimensional (3-D) structures, which is easily neglected by in vitro cell biology research. Under 3-D culture conditions, the morphology of cells exhibited differently from cultured in traditional two-dimensional (2-D) conditions. Under 3-D culture conditions, the self-renewal and pluripotency of neural stem cells (NSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were enhanced compared with culturing under 2-D conditions. 3-D cultures could change the transcriptional profile of NSCs compared with 2-D cultures. We hypothesized that 3-D cultures could reprogram mature cells such as fibroblasts to an immature state, like the pluripotent stem cells. The primary results indicated that several ES marker genes were upregulated by 3-D cultures. Though further experiments are needed, this work may provide a method of reprogramming mature cells without gene modifications. PMID:23820263

  16. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d). PMID:24030442

  17. Density gradient electrophoresis of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Giranda, V.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ground based confirmation of the electrophoretic heterogeneity of human embryonic kidney cell cultures, the general characterization of their electrophoretic migration, and observations on the general properties of cultures derived from electrophoretic subpopulations were studied. Cell migration in a density gradient electrophoresis column and cell electrophoretic mobility was determined. The mobility and heterogeneity of cultured human embryonic kidney cells with those of fixed rat erythrocytes as model test particle was compared. Electrophoretically separated cell subpopulations with respect to size, viability, and culture characteristics were examined.

  18. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  19. Gravity, chromosomes, and organized development in aseptically cultured plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the PCR experiment are: to test the hypothesis that microgravity will in fact affect the pattern and developmental progression of embryogenically competent plant cells from one well-defined, critical stage to another; to determine the effects of microgravity in growth and differentiation of embryogenic carrot cells grown in cell culture; to determine whether microgravity or the space environment fosters an instability of the differentiated state; and to determine whether mitosis and chromosome behavior are adversely affected by microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: special embryogenically competent carrot cell cultures will be grown in cell culture chambers provided by NASDA; four cell culture chambers will be used to grow cells in liquid medium; two dishes (plant cell culture dishes) will be used to grow cells on a semi-solid agar support; progression to later embryonic stages will be induced in space via crew intervention and by media manipulation in the case of liquid grown cell cultures; progression to later stages in case of semi-solid cultures will not need crew intervention; embryo stages will be fixed at a specific interval (day 6) in flight only in the case of liquid-grown cultures; and some living cells and somatic embryos will be returned for continued post-flight development and 'grown-out.' These will derive from the semi-solid grown cultures.

  20. Cholera toxin stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, M.R.

    1982-06-01

    Addition of cholera toxin to human mammary epithelial cultures derived from reduction mammoplasties and primary carcinomas greatly stimulated cell growth and increased the number of times the cells could be successfully subcultured. Other agents known to increase intracellular cAMP levels were also growth stimulatory. The increased growth potential conferred by cholera toxin enhances the usefulness of this cell culture system.

  1. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture: A Breakthrough in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Antoni, Delphine; Burckel, Hélène; Josset, Elodie; Noel, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an important tool for biological research. Two-dimensional cell culture has been used for some time now, but growing cells in flat layers on plastic surfaces does not accurately model the in vivo state. As compared to the two-dimensional case, the three-dimensional (3D) cell culture allows biological cells to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions thanks to an artificial environment. Cells grown in a 3D model have proven to be more physiologically relevant and showed improvements in several studies of biological mechanisms like: cell number monitoring, viability, morphology, proliferation, differentiation, response to stimuli, migration and invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, angiogenesis stimulation and immune system evasion, drug metabolism, gene expression and protein synthesis, general cell function and in vivo relevance. 3D culture models succeed thanks to technological advances, including materials science, cell biology and bioreactor design. PMID:25768338

  2. To grow mouse mammary epithelial cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Normal mouse mammary epithelial cells from Balb/c mice were successfully cultivated on tissue culture plastic with lethally irradiated LA7 feeder cells. The feeder cells also promoted colony formation from single mouse mammary cells, and the fraction of cells that formed colonies was proportional to the density of feeder cells. The mouse mammary cells could be passaged at least 8-12 times as long as new feeder cells were added at each passage. The cells now in culture have doubled in number at least 30 times, but the in vitro lifespan is not yet known. The cultures of mouse cells maintained by this technique never became overgrown with fibroblasts and numerous domes formed in the cultures. PMID:6699079

  3. Cell and tissue culture of Miscanthus Sacchariflorus

    SciTech Connect

    Godovikova, V.A.; Moiseyeva, E.A.; Shumny, V.K.

    1995-11-01

    Since recent time search and introduction of new species of plants have paid attention. More perspective are perennial low maintenance landscape plants from genera Phragmites L. and Miscanthus Anderss. known as high speed growing and great amount of cellulose`s containing. Absence of seeds production and limited distribution area prevent from immediately introduction the plants of this species. The main goal of our investigation is the scientific development of the cell and tissue culture methods to get changing clones, salt and cold tolerant plants and their micropogation. At present there are collection of biovariety represented by subspecies, ecotypes and plant regenerants of two species - Miscanthus purpurascens (Anders.) and Miscanthus sacchariflorus (Maxim.). Successful results have been achieved in screening of culture media, prepared on MS base medium and contained a row of tropic components to protect the explant and callus tissue from oxidation and necrosis. Initially the callus was induced from stem segments, apical and nodular meristem of vegetative shoots of elulalia, growing in hydroponic greenhouse. Morphological and cytologic analysis of plant-regenerants have been done.

  4. 3-Dimensional Protein Structure of Influenza

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The loss of productivity due to flu is staggering. Costs range as much as $20 billio a year. High mutation rates of the flu virus have hindered development of new drugs or vaccines. The secret lies in a small molecule which is attached to the host cell's surface. Each flu virus, no matter what strain, must remove this small molecule to escape the host cell to spread infection. Using data from space and earth grown crystals, researchers from the Center of Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) are desining drugs to bind with this protein's active site. This lock and key fit reduces the spread of flu in the body by blocking its escape route. In collaboration with its corporate partner, the CMC has refined drug structure in preparation for clinical trials. Tested and approved relief is expected to reach drugstores by year 2004.

  5. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of

  6. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Molina, Jennifer R; Raphael, Robert M; Ozawa, Michael G; Stark, Daniel J; Levin, Carly S; Bronk, Lawrence F; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A; Gelovani, Juri G; Killian, T C; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies. PMID:20228788

  7. Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Based on Magnetic Cell Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool for drug discovery, tissue engineering, and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional (2D) cell growth with gene expression, signaling, and morphology that can differ from those in vivo and thus compromise clinical relevancy1–5. Here we report a three-dimensional (3D) culture of cells based on magnetic levitation in the presence of hydrogels containing gold and magnetic iron oxide (MIO) nanoparticles plus filamentous bacteriophage. This methodology allows for control of cell mass geometry and guided, multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture through spatial variance of the magnetic field. Moreover, magnetic levitation of human glioblastoma cells demonstrates similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumor xenografts. Taken together, these results suggest levitated 3D culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and allows for long-term multi-cellular studies. PMID:20228788

  8. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  9. Evaluating Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes through a Novel 3-Dimensional In Vitro System for Cartilage Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanwei; Davison, Noel; Moroni, Lorenzo; Feng, Felicia; Crist, Joshua; Salter, Erin; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize and evaluate osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes, in comparison to normal chondrocytes, through a novel 3-dimensional (3-D) culture system, poly(ethylene-glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was also used to simulate an in vitro OA model. Methods: Normal and OA chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer and analyzed for changes in cartilage-specific gene expressions due to passage number. Then, cells were encapsulated in PEGDA to evaluate phenotype and matrix production capabilities through the in vitro culture system. Characterization was conducted with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), biochemical analyses, and histological staining. 3-D encapsulated chondrocytes (human and bovine) were also treated with IL-1β to characterize how the cytokine affects gene transcription and extracellular matrix (ECM) content. Results: In 2-dimensional monolayer, anabolic genes were down-regulated significantly in both normal and OA chondrocytes. In 3-D culture, OA chondrocytes demonstrated significantly higher expressions of catabolic genes when compared to normal cells. Differentiation medium resulted in significantly more matrix production than growth medium from OA chondrocytes, indicated through histological staining. In addition, normal chondrocytes responded more significantly to exogenous administration of IL-1β than OA chondrocytes. Temporary initial stimulation of IL-1β to OA chondrocytes resulted in comparable gene expressions to untreated cells after 3 weeks of in vitro culture. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate the use of OA chondrocytes in tissue engineering and their significance for potential future cartilage regeneration research through their matrix production capabilities and the use of a hydrogel culture system. PMID:26069626

  10. Aeroponics for the culture of organisms, tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Weathers, P J; Zobel, R W

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of aeroponics are discussed. Contrast is made, where appropriate, with hydroponics and aero-hydroponics as applies to research and commercial applications of nutrient mist technology. Topics include whole plants, plant tissue cultures, cell and microbial cultures, and animal tissue cultures with regard to operational considerations (moisture, temperature, minerals, gaseous atmosphere) and design of apparati. PMID:14540802

  11. Lithographically defined 3-dimensional graphene scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Polsky, Ronen

    2015-09-01

    Interferometrically defined 3D photoresist scaffolds are formed through a series of three successive two-beam interference exposures, a post exposure bake and development. Heating the resist scaffold in a reducing atmosphere to > 1000 °C, results in the conversion of the resist structure into a carbon scaffold through pyrolysis, resulting in a 3D sp3- bonded glassy carbon scaffold which maintains the same in-plane morphology as the resist despite significant shrinkage. The carbon scaffolds are readily modified using a variety of deposition methods such as electrochemical, sputtering and CVD/ALD. Remarkably, sputtering metal into scaffolds with ~ 5 unit cells tall results in conformal coating of the scaffold with the metal. When the metal is a transition metal such as nickel, the scaffold can be re-annealed, during which time the carbon diffuses through the nickel, emerging on the exterior of the nickel as sp2-bonded carbon, termed 3D graphene. This paper details the fabrication, characterization and some potential applications for these structures.

  12. Development of Scalable Culture Systems for Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, in therapeutic applications will require the development of robust, scalable culture technologies for undifferentiated cells. Advances made in large-scale cultures of other mammalian cells will facilitate expansion of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but challenges specific to hESCs will also have to be addressed, including development of defined, humanized culture media and substrates, monitoring spontaneous differentiation and heterogeneity in the cultures, and maintaining karyotypic integrity in the cells. This review will describe our current understanding of environmental factors that regulate hESC self-renewal and efforts to provide these cues in various scalable bioreactor culture systems. PMID:20161686

  13. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis Isolated from Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are major contaminants of mammalian cell cultures. Here, the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis recovered from Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells is reported. PMID:27738034

  14. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  15. Propagation of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Dannevig, B H; Falk, K; Press, C M

    1995-01-01

    A long-term cell line supporting growth of the infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) virus has been established. The cell line (SHK-1) was developed from a culture of head kidney leucocytes from Atlantic salmon, and exhibited macrophage-like enzyme reactivities. By means of transmission experiments, ISA infectivity of cell culture medium could be demonstrated from day 5 after infection of SHK-1 cells with ISA-infective tissue homogenate. ISA infectivity of cell culture medium increased following repeated passages of virus. ISA-infected cell cultures develop cytopathic effects (CPE), making quantitation of virus possible. The development of CPE in ISA virus infected cells was inhibited by ammonium chloride, chloroquine and bafilomycin A, suggesting that infection of SHK-1 cells with ISA virus requires a low-pH step. PMID:8581019

  16. Synthesis of Antihemophilic Factor Antigen by Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Eric A.; Hoyer, Leon W.; Nachman, Ralph L.

    1973-01-01

    Antihemophilic factor (AHF, Factor VIII) antigen has been demonstrated in cultured human endothelial cells by immunofluorescence studies using monospecific rabbit antibody to human AHF. Control studies with cultured human smooth muscle cells and human fibroblasts were negative. By radioimmunoassay it was demonstrated that cultured human endothelial cells contain AHF antigen which is released into the culture medium. Cultured smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts did not have this property. Cultured endothelial cells incorporated radioactive amino acids into high molecular weight, AHF antigen-rich protein fractions prepared from the culture media, 7% of the radioactive amino acid counts incorporated into this material were precipitated by globulin prepared from rabbit anti-AHF whereas normal rabbit globulin precipitated only 1.5% of the counts. Although cultured endothelial cells actively synthesize AHF antigen, AHF procoagulant activity was not detected in the culture medium. Studies seeking a basis for the lack of procoagulant activity have not clarified this deficiency, but they have established that exogenous AHF procoagulant activity is not inactivated by the tissue culture system. Images PMID:4583980

  17. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation. PMID:26310537

  18. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-08-27

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation.

  19. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation. PMID:26310537

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  1. Biotransformation of hyoscyamine into scopolamine in transgenic tobacco cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Elisabeth; Palazón, Javier; Bonfill, Mercedes; Osuna, Lidia; Cusidó, Rosa M; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Piñol, M Teresa

    2007-04-01

    Hyoscyamine-6beta-hydroxylase (H6H) catalyses the conversion of hyoscyamine into its epoxide scopolamine, a compound with a higher added value in the pharmaceutical market than hyoscyamine. We report the establishment of tobacco cell cultures carrying the Hyoscyamus muticus h6h gene under the control of the promoter CAMV 35S. The cell cultures were derived from hairy roots obtained via genetically modified Agrobacterium rhizogenes carrying the pRi and pLAL21 plasmids. The cultures were fed with hyoscyamine, and 4 weeks later the amount of scopolamine produced was quantified by HPLC. The transgenic cell suspension cultures showed a considerable capacity for the bioconversion of hyoscyamine into scopolamine, and released it to the culture medium. Although the scale-up from shake-flask to bioreactor culture usually results in reduced productivities, our transgenic cells grown in a 5-L turbine stirred tank reactor in a batch mode significantly increased the scopolamine accumulation.

  2. Development of a high-throughput screening assay based on the 3-dimensional pannus model for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ibold, Yvonne; Frauenschuh, Simone; Kaps, Christian; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen; Goetz, Peter M

    2007-10-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) pannus model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on the interactive co-culture of cartilage and synovial fibroblasts (SFs). Besides the investigation of the pathogenesis of RA, it can be used to analyze the active profiles of antirheumatic pharmaceuticals and other bioactive substances under in vitro conditions. For a potential application in the industrial drug-screening process as a transitional step between 2-dimensional (2-D) cell-based assays and in vivo animal studies, the pannus model was developed into an in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. Using the CyBitrade mark-Disk workstation for parallel liquid handling, the main cell culture steps of cell seeding and cultivation were automated. Chondrocytes were isolated from articular cartilage and seeded directly into 96-well microplates in high-density pellets to ensure formation of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). Cell seeding was performed automatically and manually to compare both processes regarding accuracy, reproducibility, consistency, and handling time. For automated cultivation of the chondrocyte pellet cultures, a sequential program was developed using the CyBio Control software to minimize shear forces and handling time. After 14 days of cultivation, the pannus model was completed by coating the cartilage pellets with a layer of human SFs. The effects due to automation in comparison to manual handling were analyzed by optical analysis of the pellets, histological and immunohistochemical staining, and real-time PCR. Automation of this in vitro model was successfully achieved and resulted in an improved quality of the generated pannus cultures by enhancing the formation of cartilage-specific ECM. In addition, automated cell seeding and media exchange increased the efficiency due to a reduction of labor intensity and handling time.

  3. Rabbit uterine epithelial cells: Co-culture with spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Boice, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    A primary culture of rabbit uterine epithelial cells was established and their effects on sperm function were examined in vitro. Epithelial cells were isolated from uteri of estrous rabbits and cultured on floating collagen gels in phenol red-free medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum. Light microscopy and keratin staining showed that the epithelial cell population established in culture had morphological characteristics similar to that seen in the intact endometrium. Cells were cultured with {sup 3}H-leucine and uptake of label by cells and its incorporation into cellular and secretory proteins determined. When compared to cells cultured for 24-48 h, incorporation of label into cellular protein was lower at 72-96 h, but secretion increased. Estradiol 17-{beta} did not affect label uptake or incorporation, but did enhance proliferation of cells as judged by total DNA content of the cell population. Analysis of proteins in media by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography suggested that epithelial and stromal cells synthesis proteins that may be secretory in nature during 72-96 h culture. Twenty-nine to thirty-one h after initiation of epithelial cultures, 1-2 {times} 10{sup 6} sperm were co-incubated with cells and sperm viability, motility, loss of acrosome and fertilizing ability determined.

  4. Culturing Schwann Cells from Neonatal Rats by Improved Enzyme Digestion Combined with Explants-culture Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Liang, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Objective To develop an improved method for culturing Schwann cells(SCs) by using both enzyme digestion and explants-culture approaches and compared with traditional explants-culture method and general hemi-explants-culture method. Methods Bilaterally sciatic nerves and brachial plexus nerves were dissected from 3 to 5-day-old neonatal SD rats and explants-culture method,general hemi-explants-culture method,and improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method were adopted to culture SCs,respectively. SCs were digested and passaged after 7 days in culture and counted under the microscope. The purity of SCs was identified by S-100 immunofluorescence staining. Results The SCs of improved method group grew fastest and the total number of cells obtained was(1.85±0.13)×10(6);the SCs of the hemi-explants-culture method group grew slower than the improved method group and the total number of cells obtained was (1.10±0.10)×10(6);the SCs of the explants-culture method group grew slowest and the total number of cells obtained was (0.77±0.03)×10(6).The total number of cells obtained showed significant difference among the three groups(P<0.01). Immunofluorescence staining showed that the SCs purity was (95.73±1.51)% in the improved method group,(84.66±2.68)% in the hemi-explants-culture method group,and (74.50±4.23)% in the explants-culture method group(P<0.01). Conclusion The improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method can obtain sufficient amount of high-purity SCs in a short time and thus may be applied in further research on peripheral nerve regeneration.

  5. Culturing Schwann Cells from Neonatal Rats by Improved Enzyme Digestion Combined with Explants-culture Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Liang, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Objective To develop an improved method for culturing Schwann cells(SCs) by using both enzyme digestion and explants-culture approaches and compared with traditional explants-culture method and general hemi-explants-culture method. Methods Bilaterally sciatic nerves and brachial plexus nerves were dissected from 3 to 5-day-old neonatal SD rats and explants-culture method,general hemi-explants-culture method,and improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method were adopted to culture SCs,respectively. SCs were digested and passaged after 7 days in culture and counted under the microscope. The purity of SCs was identified by S-100 immunofluorescence staining. Results The SCs of improved method group grew fastest and the total number of cells obtained was(1.85±0.13)×10(6);the SCs of the hemi-explants-culture method group grew slower than the improved method group and the total number of cells obtained was (1.10±0.10)×10(6);the SCs of the explants-culture method group grew slowest and the total number of cells obtained was (0.77±0.03)×10(6).The total number of cells obtained showed significant difference among the three groups(P<0.01). Immunofluorescence staining showed that the SCs purity was (95.73±1.51)% in the improved method group,(84.66±2.68)% in the hemi-explants-culture method group,and (74.50±4.23)% in the explants-culture method group(P<0.01). Conclusion The improved enzyme digestion combined with explants-culture method can obtain sufficient amount of high-purity SCs in a short time and thus may be applied in further research on peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27594149

  6. Autophagic response to cell culture stress in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Siân; Swamy, Sushma; Hewitt, Zoe; Wood, Andrew; Weightman, Richard; Moore, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is an important conserved cellular process, both constitutively as a recycling pathway for long lived proteins and as an upregulated stress response. Recent findings suggest a fundamental role for autophagic processes in the maintenance of pluripotent stem cell function. In human embryonic stem cells (hESCS), autophagy was investigated by transfection of LC3-GFP to visualize autophagosomes and with an antibody to LC3B protein. The presence of the primary cilium (PC) in hESCs as the site of recruitment of autophagy-related proteins was also assessed. HESCs (mShef11) in vitro displayed basal autophagy which was upregulated in response to deprivation of culture medium replacement. Significantly higher levels of autophagy were exhibited on spontaneous differentiation of hESCs in vitro. The PC was confirmed to be present in hESCs and therefore may serve to coordinate autophagy function. PMID:26385182

  7. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  8. Technique for Handling Cover Slips Used in Cell Culture Systems *

    PubMed Central

    Bowne, J. G.; Jochim, Michael M.

    1964-01-01

    A stainless steel, grooved rack was designed to handle large numbers of coverslips used in cell cultures. The rack separated and held the coverslips through the washing process and subsequent manipulations. Slips washed by this method allowed consistently good cell sheets to grow with no signs of cytotoxicity to the cultures. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2. PMID:17649500

  9. Horizontally rotated cell culture system with a coaxial tubular oxygenator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a horizontally rotating bioreactor useful for carrying out cell and tissue culture. For processing of mammalian cells, the system is sterilized and fresh fluid medium, microcarrier beads, and cells are admitted to completely fill the cell culture vessel. An oxygen containing gas is admitted to the interior of the permeable membrane which prevents air bubbles from being introduced into the medium. The cylinder is rotated at a low speed within an incubator so that the circular motion of the fluid medium uniformly suspends the microbeads throughout the cylinder during the cell growth period. The unique design of this cell and tissue culture device was initially driven by two requirements imposed by its intended use for feasibility studies for three dimensional culture of living cells and tissues in space by JSC. They were compatible with microgravity and simulation of microgravity in one G. The vessels are designed to approximate the extremely quiescent low shear environment obtainable in space.

  10. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  11. A digital microfluidic platform for primary cell culture and analysis.

    PubMed

    Srigunapalan, Suthan; Eydelnant, Irwin A; Simmons, Craig A; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-01-21

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a technology that facilitates electrostatic manipulation of discrete nano- and micro-litre droplets across an array of electrodes, which provides the advantages of single sample addressability, automation, and parallelization. There has been considerable interest in recent years in using DMF for cell culture and analysis, but previous studies have used immortalized cell lines. We report here the first digital microfluidic method for primary cell culture and analysis. A new mode of "upside-down" cell culture was implemented by patterning the top plate of a device using a fluorocarbon liftoff technique. This method was useful for culturing three different primary cell types for up to one week, as well as implementing a fixation, permeabilization, and staining procedure for F-actin and nuclei. A multistep assay for monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) was performed to evaluate functionality in DMF-cultured primary cells and to demonstrate co-culture using a DMF platform. Monocytes were observed to adhere in significantly greater numbers to ECs exposed to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α than those that were not, confirming that ECs cultured in this format maintain in vivo-like properties. The ability to manipulate, maintain, and assay primary cells demonstrates a useful application for DMF in studies involving precious samples of cells from small animals or human patients.

  12. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Grist, Samantha M.; Chrostowski, Lukas; Cheung, Karen C.

    2010-01-01

    The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternative to traditional cell culture platforms, there is recent interest in integrating oxygen-sensing mechanisms with microfluidics for cell culture applications. Optical, luminescence-based oxygen sensors, in particular, show great promise in their ability to be integrated with microfluidics and cell culture systems. These sensors can be highly sensitive and do not consume oxygen or generate toxic byproducts in their sensing process. This paper presents a review of previously proposed optical oxygen sensor types, materials and formats most applicable to microfluidic cell culture, and analyzes their suitability for this and other in vitro applications. PMID:22163408

  13. Explantation of mesangial cell 'hillocks': a method for obtaining human mesangial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, E. W.; Kim, Y.; Michael, A. F.; Vernier, R. L.; van der Hem, G. K.; van der Woude, F. J.

    1992-01-01

    A simple method is presented for selective cell culture of human mesangial cells using explantation of mesangial cell hillocks. Glomeruli which had been incubated with collagenase were explanted on plastic tissue culture flasks. Three to 6 weeks after explantation, a rapidly growing multilayer of elongated mesangial cells was observed to grow over the previously established monolayer of glomerular epithelial cells, ultimately forming multiple nodular foci of mesangial cells or 'mesangial cell hillocks'. By explanting mesangial cell hillocks selectively, pure mesangial cell cultures were easily obtained. When compared with mesangial cells grown in mixed cultures from glomerular explants, the hillock-derived cells were identical in morphology, growth characteristics, cell markers and synthesis of extracellular matrix. This system provides a simple method for the isolation of human mesangial cells in culture. Images p12-a Fig. 1 p14-a p15-a p16-a Fig. 2 PMID:1576080

  14. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells. PMID:26573336

  15. Cultures of mast cell-like (MCL) cells from human pleural exudate cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, G; Sterry, W; Czarnetzki, B M

    1983-03-01

    Under special culture conditions, rat peritoneal macrophages have previously been shown to transform into mast cells. This method has been adapted here to the human species. Adherent large mononuclear cells from human pleural exudates were cultured in a medium supplemented with horse serum (30%) and fibroblast supernatants (30%). Metachromatic staining (toluidine blue, pH 3.6) of cytoplasmic granules appeared first in a small percentage of cells by days 5-6 of culture and reached a high intensity in 50% of the cells between days 12-22. Histamine levels within the cells increased by a factor of 7 during this same time period and the cell size by a factor of 3. Cultures could be maintained for about three weeks, since viability and total cell number decreased on extended culture. The data suggest that mononuclear cells in inflammatory exudates can transform into mast cell-like cells under the influence of high levels of specific conditioning factors in their microenvironment. PMID:6824794

  16. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  17. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  19. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  2. Differentiation in human amniotic fluid cell cultures: I: Collagen production.

    PubMed Central

    Priest, R E; Priest, J H; Moinuddin, J F; Keyser, A J

    1977-01-01

    The collagen produced by differentiated cells cultured from human amniotic fluid was characterized in two ways. By chain composition and by 4-hydroxyproline:3-hydroxyproline isomer ratio, the collagen synthesized by F-type (fibroblast) cells was indistinguishable from that made by cultured fetal dermal fibroblasts. The predominant cells in young amniotic fluid cultures, termed AF-type, produced collagen with a lower isomer ratio, resembling that of basement membrane collage. The chain composition, as determined by chromatography on carboxymethyl cellulose, varied for different cultures of the AF-type, but the major pattern was consistent with that of basement membrane collagen. On the basis of these characteristics, F cells are of fibroblast origin, whereas most AF cells are of a different origin either endothelial or epithelial. Other evidence (Megaw et al., 1977) suggests an epithelial origin for AF cells. PMID:881704

  3. Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells: Tissue Origin, Isolation and Culture.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Philippe; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Peyrafitte, Julie-Anne; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Gomez, Marilyn; Rage, Christine; Sensebé, Luc

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: Since the pioneering work of Alexander Friedenstein on multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a tremendous amount of work has been done to isolate, characterize and culture such cells. Assay of colony forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs), the hallmark of MSCs, is used to estimate their frequency in tissue. MSCs are adherent cells, so they are easy to isolate, and they show contact inhibition. Thus, several parameters must be taken into account for culture: cell density, number of passages, culture medium, and growth factors used. The purity of the initial material is not a limiting parameter. Similar but not identical cell populations are found in almost all mammal or human tissues. MSCs seem to be very abundant in adipose tissue but at low frequency in blood from umbilical cord or in adult tissue. The culture conditions are very similar, whatever the source of cells. Because of their favorable properties, MSCs are very promising tools for regenerative medicine.

  4. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  5. Characterization of goldfish fin cells in culture: some evidence of an epithelial cell profile.

    PubMed

    Mauger, P-E; Labbé, C; Bobe, J; Cauty, C; Leguen, I; Baffet, G; Le Bail, P-Y

    2009-03-01

    Comprehensive characterization of cultured cells in fish was little explored and cell origin is often deduced from morphological analogies with either epithelial of fibroblastic cells. This study aims to characterize cell origin in goldfish fin culture using morphological, immunochemical, and molecular approaches. Time lapse analysis revealed that cultured cell morphology changed within minutes. Therefore, cell morphology cannot predict whether cells are from fibroblastic or epithelial origin. The labeling pattern of heterologous anti-cytokeratin and anti-vimentin antibodies against goldfish epithelial cells and fibroblasts was first tested on skin sections and the corresponding labeling of the cultured cells was analyzed. No cell origin specificity could be obtained with the chosen antibodies. In the molecular approach, detection levels of three cytokeratin (CauK8-IIS, CauK49-IE and CauK50-Ie) and one vimentin transcripts were assessed on skin and fin samples. Specificity for epithelial cells of the most abundant mRNA, CauK49-Ie, was thereafter validated on skin sections by in situ hybridization. The selected markers were used afterwards to characterize fin cultures. CauK49-IE riboprobe labeled every cell in young cultures whereas no labeling was observed in older cultures. Accordingly, CauK49-IE transcript levels decreased after 15 days culture while CauK8-IIS ones increased. The use of homologous marker gave evidence that young cultured cells from goldfish fin are homogeneously of epithelial type and that cell characteristics may change over culture time.

  6. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  7. Functional activity of mitochondria in cultured neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, E Yu; Marei, M V; Podgornyi, O V; Aleksandrova, M A; Zorov, D B; Sukhikh, G T

    2006-01-01

    We studied mitochondrial transmembrane potential of neural precursor cells forming neurospheres in culture. Uneven energization of mitochondria in neurosphere cells was detected. Heterogeneity of cells by the mitochondrial potential increased with neurosphere enlargement during culturing. Decrease in the mitochondrial potential in the central cells in large spheres, presumably caused by insufficient diffusion of oxygen and nutrients, can provoke their damage and death. Population of cells with high mitochondrial potential responded to addition of the nuclear dye by a decrease in mitochondrial potential, which can indicate functioning of ABCG2 complex in these cells, characteristic of undifferentiated stem cells. These data will help to create optimum conditions for culturing of neural stem cells for the maintenance of their maximum functional and proliferative activity. PMID:16929986

  8. Establishment and characterization of Xenopus oviduct cells in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.; Tata, J.R. )

    1987-11-01

    Based on previously established procedure of Xenopus hepatocytes, the authors describe tubular oviduct cells in primary culture which continue to secrete substantial quantities of egg jelly for several days, as can be visualized microscopically. Freshly isolated cells exhibited a culture shock response, from which they recovered by the third day in culture. This recovery was characterized by (a) the diminished synthesis of heat shock proteins hsp 70 and hsp 85, (b) the cessation of the drop in number of estrogen receptor, and (c) the enhanced rate of synthesis of cellular and secreted proteins. The oviduct estrogen receptor had the same characteristics as those in other estrogen target tissues and was present in the same amount as in adult female Xenopus hepatocytes. The successful establishment and characterization of primary cultures of both liver and oviduct cells now fulfill the conditions required for investigating the basis for tissue specificity of regulation by estrogen of Xenopus egg protein gene expression in primary cell culture.

  9. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  10. Feeding Frequency Affects Cultured Rat Pituitary Cells in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Salada, T.; Cenci, R.; Krishnan, K.; Mukai, C.; Nagaoka, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we describe the results of a rat pituitary cell culture experiment done on STS-65 in which the effect of cell feeding on the release of the six anterior pituitary hormones was studied. We found complex microgravity related interactions between the frequency of cell feeding and the quantity and quality (i.e. biological activity) of some of the six hormones released in flight. Analyses of growth hormone (GH) released from cells into culture media on different mission days using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography yielded qualitatively similar results between ground and flight samples. Lack of cell feeding resulted in extensive cell clumping in flight (but not ground) cultures. Vigorous fibroblast growth occurred in both ground and flight cultures fed 4 times. These results are interpreted within the context of autocrine and or paracrine feedback interactions. Finally the payload specialist successfully prepared a fresh trypsin solution in microgravity, detached the cells from their surface and reinserted them back into the culture chamber. These cells reattached and continued to release hormone in microgravity. In summary, this experiment shows that pituitary cells are microgravity sensitive and that coupled operations routinely associated with laboratory cel1 culture can also be accomplished in low gravity.

  11. Three Dimensional Culture of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Cynthia A.; Martinez, Michele L.; Duru, Nadire; Meyers, Frederick J.; Tarantal, Alice F.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas arise from the nephron but are heterogeneous in disease biology, clinical behavior, prognosis, and response to systemic therapy. Development of patient-specific in vitro models that efficiently and faithfully reproduce the in vivo phenotype may provide a means to develop personalized therapies for this diverse carcinoma. Studies to maintain and model tumor phenotypes in vitro were conducted with emerging three-dimensional culture techniques and natural scaffolding materials. Human renal cell carcinomas were individually characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative PCR to establish the characteristics of each tumor. Isolated cells were cultured on renal extracellular matrix and compared to a novel polysaccharide scaffold to assess cell-scaffold interactions, development of organoids, and maintenance of gene expression signatures over time in culture. Renal cell carcinomas cultured on renal extracellular matrix repopulated tubules or vessel lumens in renal pyramids and medullary rays, but cells were not observed in glomeruli or outer cortical regions of the scaffold. In the polysaccharide scaffold, renal cell carcinomas formed aggregates that were loosely attached to the scaffold or free-floating within the matrix. Molecular analysis of cell-scaffold constructs including immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated that individual tumor phenotypes could be sustained for up to 21 days in culture on both scaffolds, and in comparison to outcomes in two-dimensional monolayer cultures. The use of three-dimensional scaffolds to engineer a personalized in vitro renal cell carcinoma model provides opportunities to advance understanding of this disease. PMID:26317980

  12. Purification of monolayer cell cultures of the endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Braaten, J T; Järlfors, U; Smith, D S; Mintz, D H

    1975-01-01

    Experimental use of primary cultures of endocrine pancreas is constrained by early, vigorous proliferation of fibroblastoid cells. The addition of heavy metals, sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, phenyl mercuric acetate, phenyl mercuric nitrate and sodium aurothiomalate to the culture media selectively destroys these fibroblastoid cells yielding highly enriched, morphologically intact, functionally competent endocrine cells that are capable of cell replication. This action of heavy metals appears to be due to reversible inhibition of sulfhydryl enzymes since glutathione and thioglycolate were demonstrated to completely inhibit the cytotoxic effects of the mercury and gold containing agents, respectively. Certain variables in the application of the mercurial agents to pancreatic endocrine cell cultures were defined, most notably the enhanced sensitivity of fetal vs. neonatal tissue, and in inverse relationship of cell density to effective toxicity. After removal of the heavy metal agent from the culture media, many pancreatic islets send out cytoplasmic projections, containing large numbers of oriented microtubules which serve as bridging units to adjacent endocrine cells. The sustained availability of virtually pure pancreatic endocrine cell cultures, which results from the application of mercury to the culture media will undoubtedly permit many aspects of the cell biology of the endocrine pancreas to be directly and sequentially assailed. PMID:1239830

  13. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  14. Experience in primary culture of human peritoneal mesothelial cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Su; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2012-08-31

    To compare the growth condition between different sources and different culture environments, mesothelial cells were isolated from omentum and peritoneal dialysate effluent (PDE), seeded at different densities (5 × 10⁵, 1 × 10⁵, 5 × 10⁴, 1 × 10⁴, 5 × 10³, 1 × 10³ and 5 × 10² cells/cm², respectively), supported with different fetal calf serum (FCS) concentrations (3%, 6%, 10% and 15%) and grown in dishes with and without gelatin pre-coating. Growth condition was evaluated by simple morphological observation. Cells phenotype was examined by immunofluorescent staining. The results showed that omentum-derived mesothelial cells generally showed a uniform growth pattern with good quality. Alternatively, there was a wide patient-to-patient variation in PDE-derived culture. Heterogeneous colonies composed of a mixture of large, small or abortive mesothelial colonies as well as fibroblastoid colonies were frequently observed. A minimum seeding density of 5 × 10³ cells/cm² is required for the omentum-derived mesothelial cells to grow to confluent monolayer (1-5 × 10⁴ cells/cm² for initial culture from fresh PDE). Appropriate seeding density is always associated with successful culture in omentumbased culture, but not in PDE-based culture. Mesothelial cells could grow to confluency regardless of FCS concentration and gelatin pre-coating. However, growth rate was slower in lower FCS concentrations and on dishes without gelatin coating. Most cells in culture expressed cytokeratin and vimentin, but not VWF. Alpha-smooth muscle actin frequently appeared in cytokeratin+ mesothelial cells, especially in higher FCS concentrations and in PDE-derived culture. Our data demonstrate that PDE, in contrast to omentum, provides a source of mesothelial cells with poor and unstable quality for primary culture. Healthy cell quality and sufficient seeding density seem to be the most important factors for successful culture of mesothelial cells. The frequent occurrence

  15. Optimization of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Embryonic Stem Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Mohammad; Muzaffar, Musharifa; Shah, Syed Mohmad; Kumar Singh, Manoj; Palta, Prabhat; Kumar Singla, Suresh; Manik, Radheysham; Chauhan, Manmohan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective In order to retain an undifferentiated pluripotent state, embryonic stem (ES) cells have to be cultured on feeder cell layers. However, use of feeder layers limits stem cell research, since experimental data may result from a combined ES cell and feeder cell response to various stimuli. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a buffalo ES cell line was established from in vitro derived blastocysts and characterized by the Alkaline phosphatase (AP) and immunoflourescence staining of various pluripotency markers. We examined the effect of various factors like fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and Y-27632 to support the growth and maintenance of bubaline ES cells on gelatin coated dishes, in order to establish feeder free culture systems. We also analyzed the effect of feeder-conditioned media on stem cell growth in gelatin based cultures both in the presence as well as in the absence of the growth factors. Results The results showed that Y-27632, in the presence of FGF-2 and LIF, resulted in higher colony growth and increased expression of Nanog gene. Feeder-Conditioned Medium resulted in a significant increase in growth of buffalo ES cells on gelatin coated plates, however, feeder layer based cultures produced better results than gelatin based cultures. Feeder layers from buffalo fetal fibroblast cells can support buffalo ES cells for more than two years. Conclusion We developed a feeder free culture system that can maintain buffalo ES cells in the short term, as well as feeder layer based culture that can support the long term maintenance of buffalo ES cells. PMID:26199905

  16. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient.

  17. A practical guide to hydrogels for cell culture.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Burdick, Jason A

    2016-04-28

    There is growing appreciation of the role that the extracellular environment plays in regulating cell behavior. Mechanical, structural, and compositional cues, either alone or in concert, can drastically alter cell function. Biomaterials, and particularly hydrogels, have been developed and implemented to present defined subsets of these cues for investigating countless cellular processes as a means of understanding morphogenesis, aging, and disease. Although most scientists concede that standard cell culture materials (tissue culture plastic and glass) do a poor job of recapitulating native cellular milieus, there is currently a knowledge barrier for many researchers in regard to the application of hydrogels for cell culture. Here, we introduce hydrogels to those who may be unfamiliar with procedures to culture and study cells with these systems, with a particular focus on commercially available hydrogels.

  18. Polydimethylsiloxane SlipChip for mammalian cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SlipChip for in vitro cell culture applications, multiple-treatment assays, cell co-cultures, and cytokine detection assays. The PDMS SlipChip is composed of two PDMS layers with microfluidic channels on each surface that are separated by a thin silicone fluid (Si-fluid) layer. The integration of Si-fluid enables the two PDMS layers to be slid to different positions; therefore, the channel patterns can be re-arranged for various applications. The SlipChip design significantly reduces the complexity of sample handling, transportation, and treatment processes. To apply the developed SlipChip for cell culture applications, human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were cultured to examine the biocompatibility of the developed PDMS SlipChip. Moreover, embryonic pluripotent stem cells (ES-D3) were also cultured in the device to evaluate the retention of their stemness in the device. The experimental results show that cell morphology, viability and proliferation are not affected when the cells are cultured in the SlipChip, indicating that the device is highly compatible with mammalian cell culture. In addition, the stemness of the ES-D3 cells was highly retained after they were cultured in the device, suggesting the feasibility of using the SlipChip for stem cell research. Various cell experiments, such as simultaneous triple staining of cells and co-culture of MRC-5 with A549 cells, were also performed to demonstrate the functionalities of the PDMS SlipChip. Furthermore, we used a cytokine detection assay to evaluate the effect of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) treatment on the cytokine secretion of A549 cells using the SlipChip. The developed PDMS SlipChip provides a straightforward and effective platform for various on-chip in vitro cell cultures and consequent analysis, which is promising for a number of cell biology studies and biomedical applications. PMID:26381390

  19. Synchronization of mammalian cell cultures by serum deprivation.

    PubMed

    Langan, Thomas J; Chou, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells are amenable to study the regulation of cell cycle progression in vitro by shifting them into the same phase of the cycle. Procedures to arrest cultured cells in specific phases of the cell cycle may be termed in vitro synchronization. The procedure described here was developed for the study of primary astrocytes and a glioma cell line, but is applicable to other mammalian cells. Its application allows astrocytes to reenter the cell cycle from a state of quiescence (G(0)), and then, under carefully defined experimental conditions, to move together into subsequent phases such as the G(1) and S phases. A number of methods have been established to synchronize mammalian cell cultures, which include physical separation by centrifugal elutriation and mitotic shake off or chemically induced cell cycle arrest. Yet, there are intrinsic limitations associated with these methods. In the present protocol, we describe a simple, reliable, and reversible procedure to synchronize astrocyte and glioma cultures from newborn rat brain by serum deprivation. The procedure is similar, and generally applicable, to other mammalian cells. This protocol consists essentially of two parts: (1) proliferation of astrocytes under optimal conditions in vitro until reaching desired confluence; and (2) synchronization of cultures by serum downshift and arrested in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle. This procedure has been extended to the examination of cell cycle control in astroglioma cells and astrocytes from injured adult brain. It has also been employed in precursor cloning studies in developmental biology, suggesting wide applicability.

  20. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  1. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro. PMID:24734552

  2. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro.

  3. Surface modified alginate microcapsules for 3D cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-06-01

    Culture as three dimensional cell aggregates or spheroids can offer an ideal platform for tissue engineering applications and for pharmaceutical screening. Such 3D culture models, however, may suffer from the problems such as immune response and ineffective and cumbersome culture. This paper describes a simple method for producing microcapsules with alginate cores and a thin shell of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) to encapsulate mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS) cells, generating a non-fouling surface as an effective immunoisolation barrier. We demonstrated the trapping of the alginate microcapsules in a microwell array for the continuous observation and culture of a large number of encapsulated miPS cells in parallel. miPS cells cultured in the microcapsules survived well and proliferated to form a single cell aggregate. Droplet formation of monodisperse microcapsules with controlled size combined with flow cytometry provided an efficient way to quantitatively analyze the growth of encapsulated cells in a high-throughput manner. The simple and cost-effective coating technique employed to produce the core-shell microcapsules could be used in the emerging field of cell therapy. The microwell array would provide a convenient, user friendly and high-throughput platform for long-term cell culture and monitoring.

  4. Fundamentals of microfluidic cell culture in controlled microenvironments†

    PubMed Central

    Young, Edmond W. K.; Beebe, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidics has the potential to revolutionize the way we approach cell biology research. The dimensions of microfluidic channels are well suited to the physical scale of biological cells, and the many advantages of microfluidics make it an attractive platform for new techniques in biology. One of the key benefits of microfluidics for basic biology is the ability to control parameters of the cell microenvironment at relevant length and time scales. Considerable progress has been made in the design and use of novel microfluidic devices for culturing cells and for subsequent treatment and analysis. With the recent pace of scientific discovery, it is becoming increasingly important to evaluate existing tools and techniques, and to synthesize fundamental concepts that would further improve the efficiency of biological research at the microscale. This tutorial review integrates fundamental principles from cell biology and local microenvironments with cell culture techniques and concepts in microfluidics. Culturing cells in microscale environments requires knowledge of multiple disciplines including physics, biochemistry, and engineering. We discuss basic concepts related to the physical and biochemical microenvironments of the cell, physicochemical properties of that microenvironment, cell culture techniques, and practical knowledge of microfluidic device design and operation. We also discuss the most recent advances in microfluidic cell culture and their implications on the future of the field. The goal is to guide new and interested researchers to the important areas and challenges facing the scientific community as we strive toward full integration of microfluidics with biology. PMID:20179823

  5. Microfluidic perfusion culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells under fully defined culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimitsu, Ryosuke; Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kondo, Yuki; Yamada, Rotaro; Tachikawa, Saoko; Satoh, Taku; Kurisaki, Akira; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi; Asashima, Makoto; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising cell source for drug screening. For this application, self-renewal or differentiation of the cells is required, and undefined factors in the culture conditions are not desirable. Microfluidic perfusion culture allows the production of small volume cultures with precisely controlled microenvironments, and is applicable to high-throughput cellular environment screening. Here, we developed a microfluidic perfusion culture system for hiPSCs that uses a microchamber array chip under defined extracellular matrix (ECM) and culture medium conditions. By screening various ECMs we determined that fibronectin and laminin are appropriate for microfluidic devices made out of the most popular material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). We found that the growth rate of hiPSCs under pressure-driven perfusion culture conditions was higher than under static culture conditions in the microchamber array. We applied our new system to self-renewal and differentiation cultures of hiPSCs, and immunocytochemical analysis showed that the state of the hiPSCs was successfully controlled. The effects of three antitumor drugs on hiPSCs were comparable between microchamber array and 96-well plates. We believe that our system will be a platform technology for future large-scale screening of fully defined conditions for differentiation cultures on integrated microfluidic devices.

  6. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  7. Immunodissection and culture of rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, W.S.; Sonnenburg, W.K.; Allen, M.L.; Arend, L.J.; Gerozissis, K.; Smith, W.L.

    1986-08-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody designated IgG3 (rct-30) has been prepared that reacts specifically with an antigen on the surface of all cells comprising the cortical and medullary rabbit renal collecting tubule including the arcades. Plastic culture dishes coated with IgG3 (rct-30) were used to isolate collecting tubule cells from collagenase dispersions of rabbit renal cortical cells by immunoadsorption. Typically, 10W rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT) cells were obtained from 5 g of renal cortex (2 kidneys). Between 20 and 30% of the RCCT cells were reactive with peanut lectin suggesting that RCCT cells are a mixture of principal and intercalated cells. Approximately 10X RCCT cells were obtained after 4 to 5 days in primary culture. Moreover, RCCT cells continued to proliferate after passaging with a doubling time of approx.32 h. RCCT cells passaged once and then cultured 4-5 days were found 1) to synthesize cAMP in response to arginine vasopressin (AVP), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), isoproterenol, and parathyroid hormone, but not calcitonin, prostaglandin D2, or prostaglandin I, and 2) to release PGE2 in response to bradykinin but not arginine vasopressin or isoproterenol. The results indicate that cultured RCCT cells retain many of the hormonal, histochemical, and morphological properties expected for a mixture of principal and intercalated rabbit cortical collecting tubule epithelia. RCCT cells should prove useful both for studying hormonal interactions in the cortical collecting tubule and as a starting population for isolating intercalated collecting tubule epithelia.

  8. Improved Method for Culturing Guinea-Pig Macrophage Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J.

    1982-01-01

    Proper nutrients and periodic changes in culture medium maintain cell viability for a longer period. New method uses a thioglycolate solution, instead of mineral oil, to induce macrophage cells in guinea pigs and also uses an increased percent of fetal-calf bovine serum in cultivation medium. Macrophage cells play significant roles in the body's healing and defense systems.

  9. The Multiparametric Effects of Hydrodynamic Environments on Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Sargent, Carolyn Y.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells possess the unique capacity to differentiate into many clinically relevant somatic cell types, making them a promising cell source for tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine therapies. However, in order for the therapeutic promise of stem cells to be fully realized, scalable approaches to efficiently direct differentiation must be developed. Traditionally, suspension culture systems are employed for the scale-up manufacturing of biologics via bioprocessing systems that heavily rely upon various types of bioreactors. However, in contrast to conventional bench-scale static cultures, large-scale suspension cultures impart complex hydrodynamic forces on cells and aggregates due to fluid mixing conditions. Stem cells are exquisitely sensitive to environmental perturbations, thus motivating the need for a more systematic understanding of the effects of hydrodynamic environments on stem cell expansion and differentiation. This article discusses the interdependent relationships between stem cell aggregation, metabolism, and phenotype in the context of hydrodynamic culture environments. Ultimately, an improved understanding of the multifactorial response of stem cells to mixed culture conditions will enable the design of bioreactors and bioprocessing systems for scalable directed differentiation approaches. PMID:21491967

  10. The effects of glucocorticoids on cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D; Fry, G L; Hoak, J C

    1978-04-01

    The effects of hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and prednisone on the morphology, replication, DNA synthesis, cell protein content and protein synthesis of cultured, human endothelial cells were evaluated. After culturing the cells with these glucocorticoids for 24-48 h, the cells covered a greater portion of the culture surface area. The mean surface area of the individual endothelial cell treated with glucocorticoids was 1.53 times greater than that of the untreated control endothelial cell. When compared with controls, the endothelial cover provided by the cells treated with glucocorticoids was more extensive and in many instances covered the entire culture surface. The change in morphology was associated with an increase in protein synthesis and protein content of the cells without an increase in DNA synthesis or cellular replication. Dexamethasone was approximately 10-fold more effective than hydrocortisone, while prednisone was the least effective. Aldosterone, DOCA, testosterone, progesterone, oestradiol and oestriol were ineffective. These studies indicate that glucocorticoids can alter the morphology and biochemistry of cultured endothelial cells and may have implications for the effects of steroids in the treatment of thrombocytopenic states and vascular disorders in man. PMID:646949

  11. [Cultivation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in an L-929 cell culture].

    PubMed

    Nurusheva, S M; Lebedeva, M V; Shcherbakova, N I

    1985-12-01

    N. gonorrhoeae strain b has been found to be capable of retaining its viability in medium 199 with 10% of inactivated cattle serum added and in monolayer cell culture L-929 in the above medium. The characteristics obtained in the present investigation permit simulating the mixed association of gonococci and chlamydiae in the culture system used in this work.

  12. 3D Cultures of prostate cancer cells cultured in a novel high-throughput culture platform are more resistant to chemotherapeutics compared to cells cultured in monolayer.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Karen F; Mosaad, Eman M O; Russell, Pamela J; Clements, Judith A; Doran, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Despite monolayer cultures being widely used for cancer drug development and testing, 2D cultures tend to be hypersensitive to chemotherapy and are relatively poor predictors of whether a drug will provide clinical benefit. Whilst generally more complicated, three dimensional (3D) culture systems often better recapitulate true cancer architecture and provide a more accurate drug response. As a step towards making 3D cancer cultures more accessible, we have developed a microwell platform and surface modification protocol to enable high throughput manufacture of 3D cancer aggregates. Herein we use this novel system to characterize prostate cancer cell microaggregates, including growth kinetics and drug sensitivity. Our results indicate that prostate cancer cells are viable in this system, however some non-cancerous prostate cell lines are not. This system allows us to consistently control for the presence or absence of an apoptotic core in the 3D cancer microaggregates. Similar to tumor tissues, the 3D microaggregates display poor polarity. Critically the response of 3D microaggregates to the chemotherapeutic drug, docetaxel, is more consistent with in vivo results than the equivalent 2D controls. Cumulatively, our results demonstrate that these prostate cancer microaggregates better recapitulate the morphology of prostate tumors compared to 2D and can be used for high-throughput drug testing. PMID:25380249

  13. [Results of mammalian cell culture exposure on artificial earth satellites].

    PubMed

    Sushkov, F V; Portugalov, V V; Rudneva, S V; Bobkova, N N; Iordanishvili, E K

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an exposure of cells of the Syrian hamster strain VNK-21 to space flight effects. In contrast to the cell culture kept in a thermostat at 29 degrees C, the cell culture that was maintained in thermally uncontrolled conditions developed noticeable structural and physiological changes induced by suboptimal temperatures. It was concluded that a 6-day exposure to weightlessness exerted no adverse effect on mammalian cells in vitro and produced no stable structural or physiological changes. Some changes that were detected in the cell culture--faster ageing, stable tendency to an increase of the number of cells with enlarged nuclei, an increase of the mitotic index at an early stage of cultivation--need further investigation.

  14. Developing defined culture systems for human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Valamehr, Bahram; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Ho, Chih-Ming; Wu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells hold promising potential in many therapeutics applications including regenerative medicine and drug discovery. Over the past three decades, embryonic stem cell research has illustrated that embryonic stem cells possess two important and distinct properties: the ability to continuously self-renew and the ability to differentiate into all specialized cell types. In this article, we will discuss the continuing evolution of human pluripotent stem cell culture by examining requirements needed for the maintenance of self-renewal in vitro. We will also elaborate on the future direction of the field toward generating a robust and completely defined culture system, which has brought forth collaborations amongst biologists and engineers. As human pluripotent stem cell research progresses towards identifying solutions for debilitating diseases, it will be critical to establish a defined, reproducible and scalable culture system to meet the requirements of these clinical applications. PMID:21916597

  15. Differential Cross Section Kinematics for 3-dimensional Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In support of the development of 3-dimensional transport codes, this paper derives the relevant relativistic particle kinematic theory. Formulas are given for invariant, spectral and angular distributions in both the lab (spacecraft) and center of momentum frames, for collisions involving 2, 3 and n - body final states.

  16. Controlled teleportation of a 3-dimensional bipartite quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Song, He-Shan

    2008-07-01

    A controlled teleportation scheme of an unknown 3-dimensional (3D) two-particle quantum state is proposed, where a 3D Bell state and 3D GHZ state function as the quantum channel. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional bipartite quantum state.

  17. Toxicity of oxygen radicals in cultured pulmonary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Autor, A.P.; Bonham, A.C.; Thies, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase and catalase, which catalytically remove superoxide radicals and hydrogen perioxide, respectively, each separately protected cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells from loss of membrane integrity after exposure to oxygen radicals generated either cellularly (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) or chemically (dihydroxyfumarate). Nicotinamide, a precursor of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and an inhibitor of ADP-ribose synthetase, also protected cultured endothelial cells from loss of membrane integrity in a concentration-dependent manner after exposure to dihydroxyfumarate.

  18. Preparation of cell cultures and vaccinia virus stocks.

    PubMed

    Earl, P L; Cooper, N; Wyatt, L S; Moss, B; Carroll, M W

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the maintenance of cell lines used with vaccinia virus, both in monolayer cultures and in suspension. The suspended cell culture is then used in the preparation of vaccinia virus stocks. The preparation of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) is also presented for use in the production of the highly attenuated and host range-restricted modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) strain of vaccinia virus. Additionally, support protocols are presented for the titration of standard and MVA vaccinia virus stocks.

  19. Disruption of cultured cells by nitrogen cavitation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J

    2010-11-01

    Cell disruption by nitrogen decompression from a pressurized vessel is a rapid and effective way to homogenize cells and tissues, to release intact organelles, and to prepare cell membranes. Cells are placed in a pressure vessel and large quantities of oxygen-free nitrogen are dissolved in the cells under high pressure (~5500 kilopascals [kPa], equivalent to 800 pounds per square inch [psi]). When the pressure is released suddenly, the nitrogen bubbles out of solution, rupturing the cell membrane and releasing the cell contents. Nitrogen cavitation is well suited for mammalian and plant cells and fragile bacteria, but is less effective with yeast, fungi, spores, or other cell types with tough cell walls. The chemical and physical stresses imposed by nitrogen cavitation on enzymes and subcellular compartments are minimized compared with ultrasonic and mechanical homogenizing methods. Unlike lysis methods relying on shear stresses and friction, there is no heat damage to proteins and organelles during nitrogen cavitation. Indeed, the method is accompanied by an adiabatic expansion that cools the sample instead. Also, labile cell components are protected from oxidation by the inert nitrogen gas. Furthermore, nitrogen does not alter the pH of the suspending medium. The process is fast and uniform because the same disruptive forces are applied within each cell and throughout the sample, ensuring reproducible cell-free homogenates. Finally, variable sample sizes (e.g., from ~1 mL to 1 L or more) can be accommodated with most commercial systems.

  20. Microfabricated polymeric vessel mimetics for 3-D cancer cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Ashley A.; Das, Chandan K.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pursley, Randall H.; McQueen, Philip G.; Hall, Matthew D.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling tumor growth in vitro is essential for cost-effective testing of hypotheses in preclinical cancer research. 3-D cell culture offers an improvement over monolayer culture for studying cellular processes in cancer biology because of the preservation of cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. Oxygen transport poses a major barrier to mimicking in vivo environments and is not replicated in conventional cell culture systems. We hypothesized that we can better mimic the tumor microenvironment using a bioreactor system for controlling gas exchange in cancer cell cultures with silicone hydrogel synthetic vessels. Soft-lithography techniques were used to fabricate oxygen-permeable silicone hydrogel membranes containing arrays of micropillars. These membranes were inserted into a bioreactor and surrounded by basement membrane extract (BME) within which fluorescent ovarian cancer (OVCAR8) cells were cultured. Cell clusters oxygenated by synthetic vessels showed a ∼100um drop-off to anoxia, consistent with in vivo studies of tumor nodules fed by the microvasculature. We showed oxygen tension gradients inside the clusters oxygenated by synthetic vessels had a ∼100 µm drop-off to anoxia, which is consistent with in vivo studies. Oxygen transport in the bioreactor system was characterized by experimental testing with a dissolved oxygen probe and finite element modeling of convective flow. Our study demonstrates differing growth patterns associated with controlling gas distributions to better mimic in vivo conditions. PMID:23911071

  1. Radiosensitivity of cultured insect cells: II. Diptera

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, T.M.

    1983-10-01

    The radiosensitivity of five dipteran cell lines representing three mosquito genera and one fruit fly genus were examined. These lines are: (1) ATC-10, Aedes aegypti; (2) RU-TAE-14, Toxorhynchites amboinensis; (3) RU-ASE-2A, Anopheles stephensi; (4) WR69-DM-1, Drosophila melanogaster; and (5) WR69-DM-2, Drosophila melanogaster. Population doubling times for these lines range from approximately 16 to 48 hr. Diploid chromosome numbers are six for the mosquito cells and eight for the fruit fly cells D/sub 0/ values are 5.1 and 6.5 Gy for the Drosophila cell lines and 3.6, 6.2, and 10.2 Gy for the mosquito cell lines. The results of this study demonstrate that dipteran insect cells are a few times more resistant to radiation than mammalian cells, but not nearly as radioresistant as lepidopteran cells.

  2. Carbon nanowall scaffold to control culturing of cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Sekine, Makoto; Baba, Yoshinobu; Hori, Masaru

    2014-12-01

    The effect of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) on the culturing rate and morphological control of cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) was investigated. CNWs with different densities were grown using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and subjected to post-growth plasma treatment for modification of the surface terminations. Although the surface wettability of the CNWs was not significantly dependent on the CNW densities, the cell culturing rates were significantly dependent. Morphological changes of the cells were not significantly dependent on the density of CNWs. These results indicate that plasma-induced surface morphology and chemical terminations enable nanobio applications using carbon nanomaterials.

  3. Progress in the development of shrimp cell cultures in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kasornchandra, J; Khongpradit, R; Ekpanithanpong, U; Boonyaratpalin, S

    1999-01-01

    Primary shrimp cell cultures were developed from lymphoid organ and ovaries of black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, in double-strength Leibovitz's L-15 medium supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum, 1% glucose, 5 g/L NaCl, 15% shrimp meat extract. The optimum conditions for primary culture in vitro were obtained in L-15 medium with an osmolality of approximately 730 +/- 10 mmol/kg, a temperature range of 25--28 degrees C and incubation in a normal atmosphere. However, basal medium supplemented with 0.01% cholesterol could enhance good growth and cells performance initiated from lymphoid organ. Both epithelial-like and fibroblastic- like cells were observed from those organs within 2 days incubation. Within 3 days, 80% confluent monolayers were obtained from the lymphoid organ while cultures from other tissues required 5 days. Cultures were maintained for at least 43 days. Only cells from lymphoid organ could be subcultured and confluent monolayers achieved within 10 days post-spilt. Healthy cultures of the lymphoid cells did not persist beyond the third passage. Application of these primary shrimp cell cultures for studying pathogenic viruses of shrimp in vitro will be discussed. PMID:10627677

  4. Progress in the development of shrimp cell cultures in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kasornchandra, J; Khongpradit, R; Ekpanithanpong, U; Boonyaratpalin, S

    1999-01-01

    Primary shrimp cell cultures were developed from lymphoid organ and ovaries of black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, in double-strength Leibovitz's L-15 medium supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum, 1% glucose, 5 g/L NaCl, 15% shrimp meat extract. The optimum conditions for primary culture in vitro were obtained in L-15 medium with an osmolality of approximately 730 +/- 10 mmol/kg, a temperature range of 25--28 degrees C and incubation in a normal atmosphere. However, basal medium supplemented with 0.01% cholesterol could enhance good growth and cells performance initiated from lymphoid organ. Both epithelial-like and fibroblastic- like cells were observed from those organs within 2 days incubation. Within 3 days, 80% confluent monolayers were obtained from the lymphoid organ while cultures from other tissues required 5 days. Cultures were maintained for at least 43 days. Only cells from lymphoid organ could be subcultured and confluent monolayers achieved within 10 days post-spilt. Healthy cultures of the lymphoid cells did not persist beyond the third passage. Application of these primary shrimp cell cultures for studying pathogenic viruses of shrimp in vitro will be discussed.

  5. Auxin requirements of sycamore cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Moloney, M M; Hall, J F; Robinson, G M; Elliott, M C

    1983-04-01

    Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cell suspension cultures (strain OS) require 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in their culture medium for normal growth. If the 2,4-D is omitted, rates of cell division are dramatically reduced and cell lysis may occur. Despite this ;auxin requirement,' it has been shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that the cells synthesize indol-3yl-acetic acid (IAA). Changes in free 2,4-D and IAA in the cells during a culture passage have been monitored.There is a rapid uptake of 2,4-D by the cells during the lag phase leading to a maximum concentration per cell (125 nanograms per 10(6) cells) on day 2 followed by a decline to 45 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 (middle of linear phase). The initial concentration of IAA (0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells) rises slowly to a peak of 1.4 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 then decreases rapidly to 0.2 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 15 (early declining phase) and 0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 23 (early stationary phase).

  6. Contacts between pigmented retina epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Middleton, C A; Pegrum, S M

    1976-11-01

    The behaviour of primary cultures of dissociated embryonic chick pigmented retina epithelial (PRE) cells has been investigated. Isolated PRE cells have a mean speed of locomotion of 7-16 mum/h. Collisions between the cells normally result in the development of stable contacts between the cells involved. This leads to a gradual reduction in the number of isolated cells and an increase in the number of cells incorporated into islands. Ultrastructural observations of islands of cells after 24 h in culture show that junctional complexes are present between the cells. These complexes consist of 2 components: (a) an apically situated region of focal tight junctions and/or gap junctions, and (b) a more ventrally located zonula adhaerens with associated cytoplasmic filaments forming a band running completely around the periphery of each cell. The intermembrane gap in the region of the zonula is 6-0-12-0 nm. The junctional complexes become more differentiated with time and after 48 h in culture consist of an extensive region of tight junctions and/or gap junctions and a more specialized zonula adhaerens. It is suggested that the development of junctional complexes may be responsible for the stable contacts that the cells display in culture.

  7. Guard cell protoplasts: isolation, culture, and regeneration of plants.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Guard cell protoplasts have been used extensively in short-term experiments designed to elucidate the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate stomatal movements. The utility of uard cell protoplasts for other types of longer-term signal transduction experiments is just now being realized. Because highly purified, primary isolates of guard cell protoplasts are synchronous initially, they are uniform in their responses to changes in culture conditions. Such isolates have demonstrated potential to reveal mechanisms that underlie hormonal signalling for plant cell survival, cell cycle re-entry, reprogramming of genes during dedifferentiation to an embryogenic state, and plant cell thermotolerance. Plants have been regenerated from cultured guard cell protoplasts of two species: Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, and Beta vulgaris, sugar beet. Plants genetically engineered for herbicide tolerance have been regenerated from cultured guard cell protoplasts of B. vulgaris. The method for isolating, culturing, and regenerating plants from guard cell protoplasts of N. glauca is described here. A recently developed procedure for large-scale isolation of these cells from as many as nine leaves per experiment is described. Using this protocol, yields of 1.5-2 x 10(7) per isolate may be obtained. Such yields are sufficient for standard methods of molecular, biochemical, and proteomic analysis.

  8. Production of minimally disturbed synchronous cultures of hematopoietic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Maureen; Eward, Kathryn Leigh; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Edward, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A method is describedforproducing sizable quantities of synchronously dividing, minimally disturbed mammalian cells. Cultures were grown immobilized on surfaces such that cell division within the population resulted in the continuous release of synchronous newborn cells. As judged by the quality and duration of synchronous growth, cell size distributions, and DNA compositions, newborn mouse L1210 cells grew with a very high level of synchrony without overt evidence of growth disturbances. The technology should be applicable to a variety of hematopoietic cells, as evidenced by similar results with human MOLT-4 and U937 cell lines.

  9. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Lestard, Nathalia R; Capella, Marcia A M

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells. PMID:27478480

  10. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lestard, Nathalia R.

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells. PMID:27478480

  11. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  12. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  13. Peroxidases from cell suspension cultures of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Agostini, E; de Forchetti, S M; Tigier, H A

    2000-08-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Brassica napus were obtained under different hormonal conditions, using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and kinetin as growth regulators. They were analyzed as a culture system for peroxidase production in vitro to avoid many of the problems that affect the production from field-grown roots. Total peroxidase specific activities reached a maximum at the end of exponential growth phase of the cultures. Cultures obtained with 4 mg/l of 2,4-D an without kinetin or with 1 mg/l of 2,4-D and the same amount of kinetin produced twice the total activity of root extracts and, in addition, they released peroxidases to the culture medium, which would be advantageous for the commercial production of the enzyme. Peroxidase patterns, obtained by isoelectric focusing of cell extracts and of culture medium of cell suspension cultures, differed from those of root crude extracts from field-grown plants with additional bands of higher isoelectric points. These cultures showed interesting properties and could be considered an alternative source of peroxidases for commercial production and/or to be applied as a model for physiological research. PMID:10979611

  14. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Spaulding, Glenn F.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Flechsig, Scott; Jones, Leslie; Soehnge, Holly

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) is a bioreactor system designed for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue-engineering investigations on orbiting spacecraft and in laboratories on Earth. The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear culture environment simultaneously with the "herding" of suspended cells, tissue assemblies, and air bubbles. Under development for use in the Biotechnology Facility on the International Space Station, the HFB has successfully grown large three-dimensional, tissuelike assemblies from anchorage-dependent cells and grown suspension hybridoma cells to high densities. The HFB, based on the principle of hydrodynamic focusing, provides the capability to control the movement of air bubbles and removes them from the bioreactor without degrading the low-shear culture environment or the suspended three-dimensional tissue assemblies. The HFB also provides unparalleled control over the locations of cells and tissues within its bioreactor vessel during operation and sampling.

  15. Recombinant spider silk matrices for neural stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lewicka, Michalina; Hermanson, Ola; Rising, Anna U

    2012-11-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Accordingly, NSCs hold great promise in drug screening and treatment of several common diseases. However, a major obstacle in applied stem cell research is the limitation of synthetic matrices for culturing stem cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of recombinant spider silk (4RepCT) matrices for growth of NSCs. NSCs isolated from the cerebral cortices of mid-gestation rat embryos were cultured on either 4RepCT matrices or conventional poly-L-ornithine and fibronectin (P + F) coated polystyrene plates. From 48 h of culture, no significant differences in cell proliferation or viability were detected in NSC cultures on 4RepCT compared to control matrices (polystyrene plates coated with P + F). The NSCs retained an undifferentiated state, displaying low or no staining for markers of differentiated cells. Upon stimulation NSCs grown on 4RepCT differentiated efficiently into neuronal and astrocytic cells to virtually the same degree as control cultures, but a slightly less efficient oligodendrocyte differentiation was noted. We suggest that recombinant spider silk matrices provide a functional microenvironment and represent a useful tool for the development of new strategies in neural stem cell research. PMID:22863380

  16. The effect of TRAIL molecule on cell viability in in vitro beta cell culture.

    PubMed

    Tekmen, I; Ozyurt, D; Pekçetin, C; Buldan, Z

    2007-06-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an organ-specific autoimmune disorder triggered by autoreactive T cells directed to pancreas beta-cell antigens. In this disorder, more than 90% of beta cells are destroyed. Cell death may be mediated via soluble or membrane-bound cell death ligands. One of these ligands may be tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF-alpha superfamily. In the present study, we examined whether TRAIL had cytotoxic effects on adult rat pancreas beta cell cultures and INS1-E rat insulinoma cell line cultures or not. In this study, cell destruction models were built with TRAIL concentrations of 10, 100 and 1000 ng. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was used for evaluating cell viability. It was detected that cell cultures with TRAIL added showed no differences statistically when compared with control cultures containing no toxic additions. These results showed that TRAIL did not have significant cytotoxic effects on pancreas beta cell culture and INS-1E rat insulinoma cell line cultures. Detection of the expression of TRAIL receptors and natural apoptosis inhibitor proteins will be favourable to investigate the resistance mechanisms to TRAIL-induced cell death in this cell culture system.

  17. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  18. Modeling of cell culture damage and recovery leads to increased antibody and biomass productivity in CHO cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Saeideh; Nikdel, Ali; Meshram, Mukesh; McConkey, Brendan; Ingalls, Brian; Budman, Hector; Scharer, Jeno

    2014-09-01

    The development of an efficient and productive cell-culture process requires a deep understanding of intracellular mechanisms and extracellular conditions for optimal product synthesis. Mathematical modeling provides an effective strategy to predict, control, and optimize cell performance under a range of culture conditions. In this study, a mathematical model is proposed for the investigation of cell damage of a Chinese hamster ovary cell culture secreting recombinant anti-RhD monoclonal antibody (mAb). Irreversible cell damage was found to be correlated with a reduction in pH. This irreversible damage to cellular function is described mathematically by a Tessier-based model, in which the actively growing fraction of cells is dependent on an intracellular metabolic product acting as a growth inhibitor. To further verify the model, an offline model-based optimization of mAb production in the cell culture was carried out, with the goal of minimizing cell damage and thereby enhancing productivity through intermittent refreshment of the culture medium. An experimental implementation of this model-based strategy resulted in a doubling of the yield as compared to the batch operation and the resulting biomass and productivity profiles agreed with the model predictions.

  19. Advances in culture and manipulation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, X; Villa-Diaz, L G; Krebsbach, P H

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cell biology and emerging technologies to reprogram somatic cells to a stem cell-like state are helping bring stem cell therapies for a range of human disorders closer to clinical reality. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become a promising resource for regenerative medicine and research into early development because these cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and are capable of differentiation into specialized cell types of all 3 germ layers and trophoectoderm. Human PSCs include embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generated via the reprogramming of somatic cells by the overexpression of key transcription factors. The application of hiPSCs and the finding that somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed into different cell types will likely have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. However, a major limitation for successful therapeutic application of hPSCs and their derivatives is the potential xenogeneic contamination and instability of current culture conditions. This review summarizes recent advances in hPSC culture and methods to induce controlled lineage differentiation through regulation of cell-signaling pathways and manipulation of gene expression as well as new trends in direct reprogramming of somatic cells.

  20. Automation of 3D cell culture using chemically defined hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Angres, Brigitte; Patocchi-Tenzer, Isabel; Braum, Susanne; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2014-04-01

    Drug development relies on high-throughput screening involving cell-based assays. Most of the assays are still based on cells grown in monolayer rather than in three-dimensional (3D) formats, although cells behave more in vivo-like in 3D. To exemplify the adoption of 3D techniques in drug development, this project investigated the automation of a hydrogel-based 3D cell culture system using a liquid-handling robot. The hydrogel technology used offers high flexibility of gel design due to a modular composition of a polymer network and bioactive components. The cell inert degradation of the gel at the end of the culture period guaranteed the harmless isolation of live cells for further downstream processing. Human colon carcinoma cells HCT-116 were encapsulated and grown in these dextran-based hydrogels, thereby forming 3D multicellular spheroids. Viability and DNA content of the cells were shown to be similar in automated and manually produced hydrogels. Furthermore, cell treatment with toxic Taxol concentrations (100 nM) had the same effect on HCT-116 cell viability in manually and automated hydrogel preparations. Finally, a fully automated dose-response curve with the reference compound Taxol showed the potential of this hydrogel-based 3D cell culture system in advanced drug development.

  1. Growth and immobilization of tripterygium wilfordii cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Pépin, M F; Chavarie, C; Archambault, J

    1991-12-20

    The plant Tripterygium wilfordii produces di- and triterpenes of interest for male contraception and treatment of arthritis and skin disorders. Cell line TRP4a obtained form this plant in 1981 was reported to produce these valuable compounds at yields ( approximately 0.04% of the biomass dry weight) higher than found in the plant (0.001%). In order to improve this production, studies were carried out to determine the feasibility of eliminating the troublesome component of coconut milk originally used to culture this cell line. A defined formulation suitable for growth ad maintenance has been developed. This medium consisted of Gamborg's PRL4 or B5 medium supplemented with 2 mg L(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 20 g L(-1) sucrose. Furthermore, monitoring of carbohydrate uptake revealed that T. wilfordii cells, contrary to many plant cell species, did not hydrolyze sucrose extra-cellularly before uptake. Replacement of this disaccharide by glucose or fructose increased specific growth rate from 0.15 to 0.25 day(-1). As tripdiolide is reported to be present in broth extract in significant amounts, plant cell immobilization technology offers a promising alternative to suspension cultures, especially in view to on line harvesting of the product. Surface immobilized T. wilfordii cell cultures were successfully carried out in 2-L bioreactors. Their biomass production and carbohydrate uptake were comparable to those observed for shake flask grown suspension cultures. Higher nitrate and ammonium uptake were found in immobilized cultures. PMID:18600729

  2. Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Cancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lovitt, Carrie J.; Shelper, Todd B.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2014-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are an integral part of drug discovery practices. However, modeling the complexity of cancer utilizing these cell lines on standard plastic substrata, does not accurately represent the tumor microenvironment. Research into developing advanced tumor cell culture models in a three-dimensional (3D) architecture that more prescisely characterizes the disease state have been undertaken by a number of laboratories around the world. These 3D cell culture models are particularly beneficial for investigating mechanistic processes and drug resistance in tumor cells. In addition, a range of molecular mechanisms deconstructed by studying cancer cells in 3D models suggest that tumor cells cultured in two-dimensional monolayer conditions do not respond to cancer therapeutics/compounds in a similar manner. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of utilizing 3D cell culture models in drug discovery programs; however, it is evident that further research is required for the development of more complex models that incorporate the majority of the cellular and physical properties of a tumor. PMID:24887773

  3. Imprinting of confining sites for cell cultures on thermoplastic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, C. D.; Fleenor, E. N.

    1969-01-01

    Prevention of test cell migration beyond the field of observation involves confining cells or cultures in microlagoons made in either a layer of grease or a thermoplastic substrate. Thermoplastic films or dishes are easily imprinted with specifically designed patterns of microlagoons.

  4. Cloning higher plants from aseptically cultured tissues and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of aseptic culture methods for higher plants is presented, which focuses on the existing problems that limit or prevent the full realization of cloning plants from free cells. It is shown that substantial progress in clonal multiplication has been made with explanted stem tips or lateral buds which can be stimulated to produce numerous precocious axillary branches. These branches can then be separated or subdivided and induced to root in order to yield populations of genetically and phenotypically uniorm plantlets. Similarly, undifferentiated calluses can sometimes be induced to form shoots and/or roots adventitiously. Although the cell culture techniques required to produce somatic embryos are presently rudimentary, steady advances are being made in learning how to stimulate formation of somatic or adventive embryos from totipotent cells grown in suspension cultures. It is concluded that many problems exist in the producing and growing of totipotent or morphogenetically competent cell suspensions, but the potential benefits are great.

  5. Fabricating gradient hydrogel scaffolds for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Young, Marian F; Simon, Carl G

    2011-05-01

    Optimizing cell-material interactions is critical for maximizing regeneration in tissue engineering. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods can be used to systematically screen tissue scaffolds to identify optimal biomaterial properties. Previous CHT platforms in tissue engineering have involved a two-dimensional (2D) cell culture format where cells were cultured on material surfaces. However, these platforms are inadequate to predict cellular response in a three-dimensional (3D) tissue scaffold. We have developed a simple CHT platform to screen cell-material interactions in 3D culture format that can be applied to screen hydrogel scaffolds. Herein we provide detailed instructions on a method to prepare gradients in elastic modulus of photopolymerizable hydrogels.

  6. Phenotype expression of human bone cells cultured on implant substrates.

    PubMed

    Locci, P; Becchetti, E; Pugliese, M; Rossi, L; Belcastro, S; Calvitti, M; Pietrarelli, G; Staffolani, N

    1997-09-01

    Bone cells derived from the human jaw were cultured on titanium, titanium coated with hydroxyapatite (THA) or with plasma spray (TPS) to study the behaviour of the cells anchored to implant substrates. Bone cells were cultured in MEM with the addition of [3H]-thymidine to evaluate cellular proliferation, and [3H]-glucosamine to evaluate GAG synthesis and accumulation in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Moreover, to study the degradation of GAG bone cells were cultured in the presence of NH4Cl, an amine known to inhibit lysosomal activity. Our results show that TPS is the substrate that favours both cellular proliferation and the accumulation of GAG in the ECM. PMID:9377794

  7. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  8. Microfluidic titer plate for stratified 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Israëls, Guido D; Joore, Jos; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vulto, Paul

    2013-09-21

    Human tissues and organs are inherently heterogeneous. Their functionality is determined by the interplay between different cell types, their secondary architecture, vascular system and gradients of signaling molecules and metabolites. Here we propose a stratified 3D cell culture platform, in which adjacent lanes of gels and liquids are patterned by phaseguides to capture this tissue heterogeneity. We demonstrate 3D cell culture of HepG2 hepatocytes under continuous perfusion, a rifampicin toxicity assay and co-culture with fibroblasts. 4T1 breast cancer cells are used to demonstrate invasion and aggregation models. The platform is incorporated in a microtiter plate format that renders it fully compatible with automation and high-content screening equipment. The extended functionality, ease of handling and full compatibility to standard equipment is an important step towards adoption of Organ-on-a-Chip technology for screening in an industrial setting.

  9. Hydrodynamic effects on cells in agitated tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, R. S.; Papoutsakis, E. T.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms by which hydrodynamic forces can affect cells grown on microcarrier beads in agitated cell culture reactors were investigated by analyzing the motion of microcarriers relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other, and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. It was found that harmful effects on cell cultures that have been previously attributed to shear can be better explained as the effects of turbulence (of a size scale comparable to the microcarriers or the spacing between them) or collisions. The primary mechanisms of cell damage involve direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies, collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow, and collisions against the impeller or other solid surfaces. The implications of these analytical results for the design of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  10. Bacterial Cellulose as a Substrate for Microbial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Na; Santos, Thiago M. A.; Auer, George K.; Crooks, John A.; Oliver, Piercen M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has a range of structural and physicochemical properties that make it a particularly useful material for the culture of bacteria. We studied the growth of 14 genera of bacteria on BC substrates produced by Acetobacter xylinum and compared the results to growth on the commercially available biopolymers agar, gellan, and xanthan. We demonstrate that BC produces rates of bacterial cell growth that typically exceed those on the commercial biopolymers and yields cultures with higher titers of cells at stationary phase. The morphology of the cells did not change during growth on BC. The rates of nutrient diffusion in BC being higher than those in other biopolymers is likely a primary factor that leads to higher growth rates. Collectively, our results suggest that the use of BC may open new avenues in microbiology by facilitating bacterial cell culture and isolation. PMID:24441155

  11. Radiosensitivity of cultured insect cells: I. Lepidoptera

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, T.M.

    1983-10-01

    The radiosensitivity of five lepidopteran insect cell lines representing five different genera has been investigated. These lines are: (1) TN-368, Trichoplusia ni; (2) IPLB-SF-1254, Spodoptera frugiperda; (3) IPLB-1075, Heliothis zea; (4) MRRL-CHl, clone GVl, Manduca sexta; and (5) IAL-PID2, Plodia interpunctella. The cell lines grew at different rates and had population doubling times that ranged from 19 to 52 hr. All of the lines are highly heteroploid and have approximate chromosome numbers near or above 100. The chromosomes are very small. All of the lines are extremely radioresistant; cell populations are able to recover from 260 kVp X-ray exposures up to and including 400 Gy, the highest dose examined. Cell survival curves were obtainable for only the TN-368 and IPLB-SF-1254 lines. The TN-368 cells displayed a biphasic survival response with D/sub 0/, d/sub q/, and n values of 65.7 and 130.2 Gy, 9.0 and -36.1 Gy, and 1.2 and 0.8, respectively, for the steep and shallow portions of the curve. The IPLB-SF-1254 cells had a D/sub 0/ of 63.9 Gy. D/sub q/ of 19.0 Gy, and n value of 1.4. These studies provide definitive evidence of the radioresistance of lepidopteran cells, and suggest that this radioresistance is a characteristic of lepidopteran insects.

  12. Effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.C.; Chen, K.C.; Cheng, Mei General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, MI )

    1988-09-01

    Embryonic rat cardiac muscle cells grown in the presence of various tensions of CO (5-95%) without the presence of O{sub 2} survived and exhibited reduced cell growth, which was concentration dependent. When cardiac muscle cells were grown in the presence of a mixture of CO (10-20%) and O{sub 2} (10-20%), the growth rate of these cells was comparable to that of the control cells. Cardiac myocytes continued to beat when exposed to varying tensions of CO, except in the case of 95% CO. The cells exposed to different concentrations of CO contained fewer myofibrils of different stages of differentiation compared with the control and the culture exposed to a mixture of 20% O{sub 2} and 20% CO, with cells that contained abundant, highly differentiated myofibrils. There was no significant difference in the structural organization of mitochondria between the control and the surviving experimental cells. It is evident from the present studies that O{sub 2} is required for the optimum in vitro cellular growth of cardiac muscle. Furthermore, CO in combination with O{sub 2} at a concentration of 10 or 20% can produce optimal growth of cardiac muscle cells in culture. To determine maximum labeling index during the labeling period, cells were continuously labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine for 24 h before the termination of cultures.

  13. Establishing a stem cell culture laboratory for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Elíseo Joji; Forte, Andresa; Kühn, Telma Ingrid Borges de Bellis; Janz, Felipe; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo; Alves, Adelson

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem/progenitor cells are found in different human tissues. An in vitro cell culture is needed for their isolation or for their expansion when they are not available in a sufficient quantity to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The level of complexity of these new technologies requires adequate facilities, qualified personnel with experience in cell culture techniques, assessment of quality and clear protocols for cell production. The rules for the implementation of cell therapy centers involve national and international standards of good manufacturing practices. However, such standards are not uniform, reflecting the diversity of technical and scientific development. Here standards from the United States, the European Union and Brazil are analyzed. Moreover, practical solutions encountered for the implementation of a cell therapy center appropriate for the preparation and supply of cultured cells for clinical studies are described. Development stages involved the planning and preparation of the project, the construction of the facility, standardization of laboratory procedures and development of systems to prevent cross contamination. Combining the theoretical knowledge of research centers involved in the study of cells with the practical experience of blood therapy services that manage structures for cell transplantation is presented as the best potential for synergy to meet the demands to implement cell therapy centers. PMID:23049427

  14. Noncommutative 3 Dimensional Soliton from Multi-instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, D. H.; Forgacs, P.; Moreno, E. F.; Schaposnik, F. A.; Silva, G. A.

    2004-07-01

    We extend the relation between instanton and monopole solutions of the selfduality equations in SU(2) gauge theory to noncommutative space-times. Using this approach and starting from a noncommutative multi-instanton solution we construct a U(2) monopole configuration which lives in 3 dimensional ordinary space. This configuration resembles the Wu-Yang monopole and satisfies the selfduality (Bogomol'nyi) equations for a U(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs system.

  15. Multimodality 3-Dimensional Image Integration for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures for patients with congenital and structural heart disease are becoming more complex. New imaging strategies involving integration of 3-dimensional images from rotational angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are employed to facilitate these procedures. We discuss the current use of these new 3D imaging technologies and their advantages and challenges when used to guide complex diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25114757

  16. Culturing Cells in 3D Ordered Cellular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Hui; Lin, Wang-Jung; Lin, Jing-Ying

    2011-03-01

    Constructing a well-defined 3D microenvironment for cell growth is a key step for tissue engineering and mechanobiology. We demonstrate high-throughput fabrication of gelatin-based ordered cellular solids with tunable pore size and solid fraction. This process involves generating monodisperse liquid foam with a cross-flow microfluidic device. The monodisperse liquid foam was further processed into open-cell solid foam, which was used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture. Three distinct cell types were cultured under these conditions and displayed appropriate physiological, morphological, and functional characteristics. Epithelial cells formed cyst-like structures and were polarized inside pores, myoblasts adopted a tubular structure and fused into myotubes, and fibroblasts exhibited wide varieties of morphologies depending on their location inside the scaffolds. These ordered cellular solids therefore make possible the study of pore-size effects on cells.

  17. The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Sato, G; Hayashi, I

    1976-12-01

    The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media. (Reemplazo del suero por hormonas en el medio de cultivo de células). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 120-121, 1976. The serum used in cell culture media can be replaced by a mixture of hormones and some accesory blood factors. The pituitary cell line GH3 can be grown in a medium in which serum is replaced by triiodothyronine, transferrin, parathormone, tyrotrophin releasing hormone and somatomedins. Hela and BHK cell strains can also be grown in serum free medium supplemented with hormones. Each cell type appears to have different hormonal requirements yet it may found that some hormones are required for most cell types.

  18. Nanopillar based electrochemical biosensor for monitoring microfluidic based cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharan, Rajan

    In-vitro assays using cultured cells have been widely performed for studying many aspects of cell biology and cell physiology. These assays also form the basis of cell based sensing. Presently, analysis procedures on cell cultures are done using techniques that are not integrated with the cell culture system. This approach makes continuous and real-time in-vitro measurements difficult. It is well known that the availability of continuous online measurements for extended periods of time will help provide a better understanding and will give better insight into cell physiological events. With this motivation we developed a highly sensitive, selective and stable microfluidic electrochemical glucose biosensor to make continuous glucose measurements in cell culture media. The performance of the microfluidic biosensor was enhanced by adding 3D nanopillars to the electrode surfaces. The microfluidic glucose biosensor consisted of three electrodes---Enzyme electrode, Working electrode, and Counter electrode. All these electrodes were enhanced with nanopillars and were optimized in their respective own ways to obtain an effective and stable biosensing device in cell culture media. For example, the 'Enzyme electrode' was optimized for enzyme immobilization via either a polypyrrole-based or a self-assembled-monolayer-based immobilization method, and the 'Working electrode' was modified with Prussian Blue or electropolymerized Neutral Red to reduce the working potential and also the interference from other interacting electro-active species. The complete microfluidic biosensor was tested for its ability to monitor glucose concentration changes in cell culture media. The significance of this work is multifold. First, the developed device may find applications in continuous and real-time measurements of glucose concentrations in in-vitro cell cultures. Second, the development of a microfluidic biosensor will bring technical know-how toward constructing continuous glucose

  19. Foetal hepatic progenitor cells assume a cholangiocytic cell phenotype during two-dimensional pre-culture

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Kazuya; Chikada, Hiromi; Tsuruya, Kota; Ida, Kinuyo; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Inagaki, Yutaka; Mine, Tesuya; Kamiya, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Liver consists of parenchymal hepatocytes and other cells. Liver progenitor cell (LPC) is the origin of both hepatocytes and cholangiocytic cells. The analyses of mechanism regulating differentiation of LPCs into these functional cells are important for liver regenerative therapy using progenitor cells. LPCs in adult livers were found to form cysts with cholangiocytic characteristics in 3D culture. In contrast, foetal LPCs cannot form these cholangiocytic cysts in the same culture. Thus, the transition of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic progenitor cells might occur during liver development. Primary CD45−Ter119−Dlk1+ LPCs derived from murine foetal livers formed ALBUMIN (ALB)+CYTOKERATIN (CK)19− non-cholangiocytic cysts within 3D culture. In contrast, when foetal LPCs were pre-cultured on gelatine-coated dishes, they formed ALB−CK19+ cholangiocytic cysts. When hepatocyte growth factor or oncostatin M, which are inducers of hepatocytic differentiation, was added to pre-culture, LPCs did not form cholangiocytic cysts. These results suggest that the pre-culture on gelatine-coated dishes changed the characteristics of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic cells. Furthermore, neonatal liver progenitor cells were able to form cholangiocytic cysts in 3D culture without pre-culture. It is therefore possible that the pre-culture of mid-foetal LPCs in vitro functioned as a substitute for the late-foetal maturation step in vivo. PMID:27335264

  20. Cytopathogenicity of Naegleria for cultured neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fulford, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The cytopathic activity of live Naegleria amoebae and cell-free lysates of Naegleria for B-103 rat neuroblastoma cells was investigated using a /sup 51/Cr release assay. Live amoebae and cell-free lysates of N. fowleri, N. australiensis, N. lovaniensis, and N. gruberi all induced sufficient damage to radiolabeled B-103 cells to cause a significant release of chromium. The cytotoxic activity present in the cell-free lysates of N. fowleri can be recovered in the supernatant fluid following centrifugation at 100,000xg and precipitation of the 100,000xg supernatant fluid with ammonium sulfate. Initial characterization of the cytotoxic factor indicates that it is a heat labile, pH sensitive, soluble protein. The cytotoxic activity is abolished by either extraction, unaffected by repeated freeze-thawing, and is not sensitive to inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes. Phospholipase A activity was detected in the cytotoxic ammonium sulfate precipitable material, suggesting that this enzyme activity may have a role in the cytotoxic activity of the cell-free lysates.

  1. Effects of citric acid on cultured human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Lizandra Ferrari; Fidalgo, Tatiana Kelly da Silva; Menezes, Gustavo Conde; Primo, Laura Guimarães; Costa e Silva-Filho, Fernando

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the effects of citric acid (CA) on cultured human osteoblastic (HOB) cells by evaluating cell adhesion, proliferation, and cytotoxicity. (3)H-Thymidine-labeled HOB cells were incubated in culture medium supplemented or not with 4%, 6%, 8%, or 10% CA for 1 minute. After incubation, cell morphology was evaluated by Nomarski interferential light microscopy, cell proliferation was accessed by measurements of (3)H-thymidine associated to the cells, and cell lysis was monitored by measuring the amount of (3)H-thymidine released by cells. We observed that most of the CA-treated cells presented numerous atypical vacuoles, and such cells were also highly polymorphic, exhibiting round-shaped cells. Nonetheless, CA at all concentrations assayed did not yield cytotoxicity as measured by (3)H-containing DNA release, although significant decrease in cell proliferation was observed (P > .05). Furthermore, cells which were treated with CA at the lowest concentration assayed (4%) restored normal proliferation rates 3 days after treatment.

  2. Isolation, culture and characterization of primary mouse RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Garland, Donita L; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Mouse models are powerful tools for the study of ocular diseases. Alterations in the morphology and function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are common features shared by many ocular disorders. We report a detailed protocol to collect, seed, culture and characterize RPE cells from mice. We describe a reproducible method that we previously developed to collect and culture murine RPE cells on Transwells as functional polarized monolayers. The collection of RPE cells takes ∼3 h, and the cultures mimic in vivo RPE cell features within 1 week. This protocol also describes methods to characterize the cells on Transwells within 1-2 weeks by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively), immunostaining of vibratome sections and flat mounts, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance. The RPE cell cultures are suitable to study the biology of the RPE from wild-type and genetically modified strains of mice between the ages of 10 d and 12 months. The RPE cells can also be manipulated to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the RPE pathology in the numerous mouse models of ocular disorders. Furthermore, modeling the RPE pathology in vitro represents a new approach to testing drugs that will help accelerate the development of therapies for vision-threatening disorders such as macular degeneration (MD). PMID:27281648

  3. A novel closed cell culture device for fabrication of corneal epithelial cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Moriya, Noboru; Mizutani, Manabu; Kan, Kazutoshi; Nozaki, Takayuki; Saitoh, Kazuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-11-01

    Automation technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering would need to optimize the cell sheet fabrication process, stabilize cell sheet quality and reduce biological contamination risks. Biological contamination must be avoided in clinical settings. A closed culture system provides a solution for this. In the present study, we developed a closed culture device called a cell cartridge, to be used in a closed cell culture system for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets. Rabbit limbal epithelial cells were cultured on the surface of a porous membrane with 3T3 feeder cells, which are separate from the epithelial cells in the cell cartridges and in the cell-culture inserts as a control. To fabricate the stratified cell sheets, five different thicknesses of the membranes which were welded to the cell cartridge, were examined. Multilayered corneal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated in cell cartridges that were welded to a 25 µm-thick gas-permeable membrane, which was similar to the results with the cell-culture inserts. However, stratification of corneal epithelial cell sheets did not occur with cell cartridges that were welded to 100-300 µm-thick gas-permeable membranes. The fabricated cell sheets were evaluated by histological analyses to examine the expression of corneal epithelial-specific markers. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that a putative stem cell marker, p63, a corneal epithelial differentiation maker, CK3, and a barrier function marker, Claudin-1, were expressed in the appropriate position in the cell sheets. These results suggest that the cell cartridge is effective for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets.

  4. Novel Micropatterned Cardiac Cell Cultures with Realistic Ventricular Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Badie, Nima; Bursac, Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Systematic studies of cardiac structure-function relationships to date have been hindered by the intrinsic complexity and variability of in vivo and ex vivo model systems. Thus, we set out to develop a reproducible cell culture system that can accurately replicate the realistic microstructure of native cardiac tissues. Using cell micropatterning techniques, we aligned cultured cardiomyocytes at micro- and macroscopic spatial scales to follow local directions of cardiac fibers in murine ventricular cross sections, as measured by high-resolution diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. To elucidate the roles of ventricular tissue microstructure in macroscopic impulse conduction, we optically mapped membrane potentials in micropatterned cardiac cultures with realistic tissue boundaries and natural cell orientation, cardiac cultures with realistic tissue boundaries but random cell orientation, and standard isotropic monolayers. At 2 Hz pacing, both microscopic changes in cell orientation and ventricular tissue boundaries independently and synergistically increased the spatial dispersion of conduction velocity, but not the action potential duration. The realistic variations in intramural microstructure created unique spatial signatures in micro- and macroscopic impulse propagation within ventricular cross-section cultures. This novel in vitro model system is expected to help bridge the existing gap between experimental structure-function studies in standard cardiac monolayers and intact heart tissues. PMID:19413993

  5. Polyphosphoinositides are present in plant tissue culture cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.; Massel, M.O.

    1985-11-15

    Polyphosphoinositides have been isolated from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture. This is the first report of polyphosphoinositides in plant cells. The phospholipids were identified by comigration with known standards on thin-layer plates. After overnight labeling of the cells with myo-(2-/sup 3/H) inositol, the phosphoinositides as percent recovered inositol were 93% phosphatidylinositol., 3.7% lysophosphatidylinositol, 1.7% phosphatidylinositol monophosphate, 0.8% phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate.

  6. Oxygen consumption of human heart cells in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kaori; Kagawa, Yuki; Maeyama, Erina; Ota, Hiroki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2014-09-26

    Tissue engineering in cardiovascular regenerative therapy requires the development of an efficient oxygen supply system for cell cultures. However, there are few studies which have examined human cardiomyocytes in terms of oxygen consumption and metabolism in culture. We developed an oxygen measurement system equipped with an oxygen microelectrode sensor and estimated the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) by using the oxygen concentration profiles in culture medium. The heart is largely made up of cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, and cardiac endothelial cells. Therefore, we measured the oxygen consumption of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), cardiac fibroblasts, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cell and aortic smooth muscle cells. Then we made correlations with their metabolisms. In hiPSC-CMs, the value of the OCR was 0.71±0.38pmol/h/cell, whereas the glucose consumption rate and lactate production rate were 0.77±0.32pmol/h/cell and 1.61±0.70pmol/h/cell, respectively. These values differed significantly from those of the other cells in human heart. The metabolism of the cells that constitute human heart showed the molar ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption (L/G ratio) that ranged between 1.97 and 2.2. Although the energy metabolism in adult heart in vivo is reported to be aerobic, our data demonstrated a dominance of anaerobic glycolysis in an in vitro environment. With our measuring system, we clearly showed the differences in the metabolism of cells between in vivo and in vitro monolayer culture. Our results regarding cell OCRs and metabolism may be useful for future tissue engineering of human heart.

  7. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  8. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alexander E; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G; Navarro, Samantha L; Jenkins, Michael P; Schwartz, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  9. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Alexander E.; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G.; Navarro, Samantha L.; Jenkins, Michael P.; Schwartz, Philip H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  10. Combination of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate with diethyldithiocarbamate markedly inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in 3D culture and in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HUARONG; CAO, KAJIA; MALIK, SAQUIB; ZHANG, QIUYAN; LI, DONGLI; CHANG, RICHARD; WANG, HUAQIAN; LIN, WEIPING; VAN DOREN, JEREMIAH; ZHANG, KUN; DU, ZHIYUN; ZHENG, XI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) alone or in combination on human pancreatic cancer cells cultured in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice. Pancreatic cancer cells were treated with either DDTC or TPA alone, or in combination and the number of viable cells was then determined by trypan blue ecxlusion assay and the number of apoptotic cells was determined by morphological assessment by staining the cells with propidium idiode and examining them under a fluorescence microscope. Treatment with DDTC or TPA alone inhibited the growth and promoted the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were more prominent following treatment with TPA in combination with DDTC than following treatment with either agent alone in PANC-1 cells in monolayer cultures and in 3 dimensional (3D) cultures. The potent effects of the combination treatment on PANC-1 cells were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and the decreased expression of Bcl-2 induced by DDTC, as shown by NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression assay and western blot analysis. Furthermore, treatment of nude mice with DDTC + TPA strongly inhibited the growth of PANC-1 xenograft tumors. The results of the present study indicate that the administration of TPA and DDTC in combination may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25847449

  11. Enhanced power production from microbial fuel cells with high cell density culture.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dan-Dan; Li, Bing; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Sun, De-Zhen; Si, Rong-Wei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of power production in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a high cell density culture strategy was developed. By using high cell density culture, the voltage output and power density output of the MFC were enhanced about 0.6 and 1.6 times compared to the control, respectively. Further analysis showed that riboflavin concentration in the MFC was dramatically increased from 0.1 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L by high cell density culture. Moreover, the biofilm formation on the anode surface was significantly enhanced by this new strategy. The increased accumulation of electron shuttle (riboflavin) as well as enhanced biofilm formation contributed to the improvement in anodic electrochemical activity and these factors were the underlying mechanism for MFC performance improvement by high cell density culture. This work demonstrated that high cell density culture would be a simple and practical strategy for MFC manipulation.

  12. [Dynamics of the cell cycle in human endothelial cell culture infected with influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Prochukhanova, A R; Lyublinskaya, O G; Azarenok, A A; Nazarova, A V; Zenin, V V; Zhilinskaya, I N

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle in a culture of endothelial cells EAhy 926 infected with influenza virus was investigated. Cytometric analysis of culture, synchronized using contact inhibition, has shown that the exposure to the influenza virus in cells EAhy 926 lengthened S-phase of the cell cycle. This result has been tested and proven on culture EAhy 926 treated with nocodazole. Compared with lung carcinoma cells A549, in which influenza virus provokes the arrest of G0/G1 phase of the cycle, elongation of S-phase of cycle at a similar infection of endothelial culture EAhy 926 indicates that the influenza virus differently affects the dynamics of the cell cycle according to the origin of the infected culture.

  13. Time evolution of cell size distributions in dense cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy

    2015-03-01

    Living cells in a dense system are all in contact with each other. The common assumption is that such cells stop dividing due to a lack of space. Recent experimental observations have shown, however, that cells continue dividing for a while, but other cells in the system must shrink, to allow the newborn cells to grow to a normal size. Due to these ``pressure'' effects, the average cell size dramatically decreases with time, and the dispersion in cell sizes decreases, too. The collective cell behavior becomes even more complex when the system is expanding: cells near the edges are larger and migrate faster, while cells deep inside the colony are smaller and move slower. This exciting experimental data still needs to be described theoretically, incorporating the distribution of cell sizes in the system. We propose a mathematical model for time evolution of cell size distribution both in a closed and open system. The model incorporates cell proliferation, cell growth after division, cell shrinking due to ``pressure'' from other cells, and possible cell detachment from the interface of a growing colony. This research sheds light on physical and biological mechanisms of cell response to a dense environment and on the role of mechanical stresses in determining the distribution of cell sizes in the system.

  14. Placental-derived stem cells: Culture, differentiation and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maira S; Barreto-Filho, João B

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising approach to clinical healing in several diseases. A great variety of tissues (bone marrow, adipose tissue, and placenta) are potentially sources of stem cells. Placenta-derived stem cells (p-SCs) are in between embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, sharing characteristics with both, such as non-carcinogenic status and property to differentiate in all embryonic germ layers. Moreover, their use is not ethically restricted as fetal membranes are considered medical waste after birth. In this context, the present review will be focused on the biological properties, culture and potential cell therapy uses of placental-derived stem cells. Immunophenotype characterization, mainly for surface marker expression, and basic principles of p-SC isolation and culture (mechanical separation or enzymatic digestion of the tissues, the most used culture media, cell plating conditions) will be presented. In addition, some preclinical studies that were performed in different medical areas will be cited, focusing on neurological, liver, pancreatic, heart, muscle, pulmonary, and bone diseases and also in tissue engineering field. Finally, some challenges for stem cell therapy applications will be highlighted. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the p-SCs differentiation and the achievement of pure cell populations (after differentiation) are key points that must be clarified before bringing the preclinical studies, performed at the bench, to the medical practice. PMID:26029347

  15. Metabolic measurements in cell culture and tissue constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, P.

    2008-10-01

    This paper concerns the study and use of biological cells in which there is a need for sensors and assemblies for the measurement of a diverse range of physical and chemical variables. In this field cell culture is used for basic research and for applications such as protein and drug synthesis, and in cell, tissue and organ engineering. Metabolic processes are fundamental to cell behaviour and must therefore be monitored reliably. Basic metabolic studies measure the transport of oxygen, glucose, carbon dioxide, lactic acid to, from, or within cells, whilst more advanced research requires examination of energy storage and utilisation. Assemblies are designed to incorporate bioreactor functions for cell culture together with appropriate sensing devices. Oxygen consumption by populations of cells is achieved in a flowthrough assembly that incorporates O2 micro-sensors based on either amperometry or fluorescence. Measurements in single cell are possible with intra-cellular fluorophores acting as biosensors together with optical stimulation and detection. Near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) is used for analysis within culture fluid, for example for estimation of glucose levels, as well as within cell populations, for example to study the respiratory enzymes.Â#

  16. Specimen Sample Preservation for Cell and Tissue Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, Gabrielle; Ronzana, Karolyn; Schibner, Karen; Evans, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station with its longer duration missions will pose unique challenges to microgravity life sciences research. The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is responsible for addressing these challenges and defining the science requirements necessary to conduct life science research on-board the International Space Station. Space Station will support a wide range of cell and tissue culture experiments for durations of 1 to 30 days. Space Shuttle flights to bring experimental samples back to Earth for analyses will only occur every 90 days. Therefore, samples may have to be retained for periods up to 60 days. This presents a new challenge in fresh specimen sample storage for cell biology. Fresh specimen samples are defined as samples that are preserved by means other than fixation and cryopreservation. The challenge of long-term storage of fresh specimen samples includes the need to suspend or inhibit proliferation and metabolism pending return to Earth-based laboratories. With this challenge being unique to space research, there have not been any ground based studies performed to address this issue. It was decided hy SSBRP that experiment support studies to address the following issues were needed: Fixative Solution Management; Media Storage Conditions; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Mammalian Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Plant Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Aquatic Cell/Tissue Cultures; and Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Microbial Cell/Tissue Cultures. The objective of these studies was to derive a set of conditions and recommendations that can be used in a long duration microgravity environment such as Space Station that will permit extended storage of cell and tissue culture specimens in a state consistent with zero or minimal growth, while at the same time maintaining their stability and viability.

  17. Hollow fiber clinostat for simulating microgravity in cell culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A clinostat for simulating microgravity on cell systems carried in a fiber fixedly mounted in a rotatable culture vessel is disclosed. The clinostat is rotated horizontally along its longitudinal axis to simulate microgravity or vertically as a control response. Cells are injected into the fiber and the ends of the fiber are sealed and secured to spaced end pieces of a fiber holder assembly which consists of the end pieces, a hollow fiber, a culture vessel, and a tension spring with three alignment pins. The tension spring is positioned around the culture vessel with its ends abutting the end pieces for alignment of the spring. After the fiber is secured, the spring is decompressed to maintain tension on the fiber while it is being rotated. This assures that the fiber remains aligned along the axis of rotation. The fiber assembly is placed in the culture vessel and culture medium is added. The culture vessel is then inserted into the rotatable portion of the clinostat and subjected to rotate at selected rpms. The internal diameter of the hollow fiber determines the distance the cells are from the axis of rotation.

  18. The Neural Representation of 3-Dimensional Objects in Rodent Memory Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sara N.; Barnes, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional objects are common stimuli that rodents and other animals encounter in the natural world that contribute to the associations that are the hallmark of explicit memory. Thus, the use of 3-dimensional objects for investigating the circuits that support associative and episodic memories has a long history. In rodents, the neural representation of these types of stimuli is a polymodal process and lesion data suggest that the perirhinal cortex, an area of the medial temporal lobe that receives afferent input from all sensory modalities, is particularly important for integrating sensory information across modalities to support object recognition. Not surprisingly, recent data from in vivo electrophysiological recordings have shown that principal cells within the perirhinal cortex are activated at locations of an environment that contain 3-dimensional objects. Interestingly, it appears that neural activity patterns related to object stimuli are ubiquitous across memory circuits and have now been observed in many medial temporal lobe structures as well as in the anterior cingulate cortex. This review summarizes behavioral and neurophysiological data that examine the representation of 3-dimensional objects across brain regions that are involved in memory. PMID:25205370

  19. The neural representation of 3-dimensional objects in rodent memory circuits.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sara N; Barnes, Carol A

    2015-05-15

    Three-dimensional objects are common stimuli that rodents and other animals encounter in the natural world that contribute to the associations that are the hallmark of explicit memory. Thus, the use of 3-dimensional objects for investigating the circuits that support associative and episodic memories has a long history. In rodents, the neural representation of these types of stimuli is a polymodal process and lesion data suggest that the perirhinal cortex, an area of the medial temporal lobe that receives afferent input from all sensory modalities, is particularly important for integrating sensory information across modalities to support object recognition. Not surprisingly, recent data from in vivo electrophysiological recordings have shown that principal cells within the perirhinal cortex are activated at locations of an environment that contain 3-dimensional objects. Interestingly, it appears that neural activity patterns related to object stimuli are ubiquitous across memory circuits and have now been observed in many medial temporal lobe structures as well as in the anterior cingulate cortex. This review summarizes behavioral and neurophysiological data that examine the representation of 3-dimensional objects across brain regions that are involved in memory. PMID:25205370

  20. Isolation, culture, and transplantation of muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Yoko; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Muscle satellite cells are a stem cell population required for postnatal skeletal muscle development and regeneration, accounting for 2-5% of sublaminal nuclei in muscle fibers. In adult muscle, satellite cells are normally mitotically quiescent. Following injury, however, satellite cells initiate cellular proliferation to produce myoblasts, their progenies, to mediate the regeneration of muscle. Transplantation of satellite cell-derived myoblasts has been widely studied as a possible therapy for several regenerative diseases including muscular dystrophy, heart failure, and urological dysfunction. Myoblast transplantation into dystrophic skeletal muscle, infarcted heart, and dysfunctioning urinary ducts has shown that engrafted myoblasts can differentiate into muscle fibers in the host tissues and display partial functional improvement in these diseases. Therefore, the development of efficient purification methods of quiescent satellite cells from skeletal muscle, as well as the establishment of satellite cell-derived myoblast cultures and transplantation methods for myoblasts, are essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms behind satellite cell self-renewal, activation, and differentiation. Additionally, the development of cell-based therapies for muscular dystrophy and other regenerative diseases are also dependent upon these factors. However, current prospective purification methods of quiescent satellite cells require the use of expensive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) machines. Here, we present a new method for the rapid, economical, and reliable purification of quiescent satellite cells from adult mouse skeletal muscle by enzymatic dissociation followed by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). Following isolation of pure quiescent satellite cells, these cells can be cultured to obtain large numbers of myoblasts after several passages. These freshly isolated quiescent satellite cells or ex vivo expanded myoblasts can be transplanted

  1. A microwell cell culture platform for the aggregation of pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Abigail B; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-08-01

    Cell-cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell-cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell-cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered. PMID:22320435

  2. Microcystis aeruginosa toxin: cell culture toxicity, hemolysis, and mutagenicity assays.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W O; Du Randt, W C; Prozesky, O W; Scott, W E

    1982-01-01

    Crude toxin was prepared by lyophilization and extraction of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa from four natural sources and a unicellular laboratory culture. The responses of cultures of liver (Mahlavu and PCL/PRF/5), lung (MRC-5), cervix (HeLa), ovary (CHO-K1), and kidney (BGM, MA-104, and Vero) cell lines to these preparations did not differ significantly from one another, indicating that toxicity was not specific for liver cells. The results of a trypan blue staining test showed that the toxin disrupted cell membrane permeability within a few minutes. Human, mouse, rat, sheep, and Muscovy duck erythrocytes were also lysed within a few minutes. Hemolysis was temperature dependent, and the reaction seemed to follow first-order kinetics. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, and Tetrahymena pyriformis were not significantly affected by the toxin. The toxin yielded negative results in Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity assays. Microtiter cell culture, trypan blue, and hemolysis assays for Microcystis toxin are described. The effect of the toxin on mammalian cell cultures was characterized by extensive disintegration of cells and was distinguishable from the effects of E. coli enterotoxin, toxic chemicals, and pesticides. A possible reason for the acute lethal effect of Microcystis toxin, based on cytolytic activity, is discussed. Images PMID:6808921

  3. Screening Stress Tolerance Traits in Arabidopsis Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Salamó, Imma; Boros, Bogáta; Szabados, László

    2016-01-01

    Screening for tolerance traits in plant cell cultures can combine the efficiency of microbial selection and plant genetics. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation can efficiently introduce cDNA library to cell suspension cultures generating population of randomly transformed microcolonies. Transformed cultures can subsequently be screened for tolerance to different stress conditions such as salinity, high osmotic, or oxidative stress conditions. cDNA inserts in tolerant cell lines can be easily identified by PCR amplification and homology search of the determined nucleotide sequences. The described methods have been tested and used to identify regulatory genes controlling salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. As cDNA libraries can be prepared from any plants, natural diversity can be explored by using extremophile plants as gene source. PMID:26867628

  4. Cultivation of vaccinia virus in sheep kidney cell cultures.

    PubMed

    SUBRAMANYAM, P; DIVAKARAN, S; VINODRAJ, P

    1961-01-01

    Attempts to find a suitable tissue for the preparation of cell monolayers for the cultivation of vaccinia virus and for the titration of this virus and its antibodies resulted in the use of sheep kidneys procured from freshly slaughtered healthy young sheep. The cultures are easy and economical to prepare and support the multiplication of the virus well. They can be used for the titration of the virus and its antibody and their sensitivity to virus is comparable to that of the chorio-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos. Preliminary trials indicate that the sheep kidney cell culture virus can be freeze-dried without suffering a significant loss in titre. Studies are in progress to determine the efficacy of a vaccine prepared from sheep kidney cell cultures.

  5. [In vitro cell culture technology in cosmetology research].

    PubMed

    Gojniczek, Katarzyna; Garncarczyk, Agnieszka; Pytel, Agata

    2005-01-01

    For ages the humanity has been looking for all kind of active substances, which could be used in improving the health and the appearance of our skin. People try to find out how to protect the skin from harmful, environmental factors. Every year a lot of new natural and synthetic, chemical substances are discovered. All of them potentially could be used as a cosmetic ingredient. In cosmetology research most of new xenobiotics were tested in vivo on animals. Alternative methods to in vivo tests are in vitro tests with skin cell culture system. The aim of this work was to describe two-dimensional and tree-dimensional skin cell cultures. Additionally, in this work we wanted to prove the usefulness of in vitro skin cell cultures in cosmetology research.

  6. Comparison of Genotoxic Damage in Monolayer Cell Cultures and Three-Dimensional Tissue-Like Cell Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behravesh, E.; Emami, K.; Wu, H.; Gonda, S.

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the biological risks associated with exposure to the high-energy charged particles encountered in space is essential for the success of long-term space exploration. Although prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell models developed in our laboratory and others have advanced our understanding of many aspects of genotoxicity, in vitro models are needed to assess the risk to humans from space radiation insults. Such models must be representative of the cellular interactions present in tissues and capable of quantifying I genotoxic damage. Toward this overall goal, the objectives of this study were to examine the effect of the localized microenvironment of cells, cultured as either 2-dimensional (2D) monolayers or 3-dimensional (3D) aggregates, on the rate and type of genotoxic damage resulting from exposure to iron charged particles, a significant portion of space radiation. We used rodent transgenic cell lines containing 50-70 copies of a LacI transgene to provide the enhanced sensitivity required to quantify mutational frequency and type in the 1,100-bp LacI target as well as assessment of DNA,damage to the entire 45-kbp construct. Cultured cells were exposed to high-enerir on charged particles at Brookhaven National Laboratory s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron facility for a total dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25,0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 Gy and allowed to recover for 0, 1, or 7 days, after which mutational type and frequency were evaluated. The mutational frequency was found to be higher in 3D samples than in 2D samples at all radiation doses. Mutational frequency also was higher at 7 days after irradiation than immediately after exposure. DNA sequencing of the mutant targets revealed that deletional mutations contributed an increasingly high percentage (up to 27%) of all mutations in cells as the dose was increased from 0.5 to 2 Gy. Several mutants also showed large and complex deletions in multiple locations within the Lac1 target. However, no differences in mutational type were

  7. Isolation of Lysosomes from Mammalian Tissues and Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Carmen; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Lahuerta, Marcos; Knecht, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes participate within the cells in the degradation of organelles, macromolecules, and a wide variety of substrates. In any study on specific roles of lysosomes, both under physiological and pathological conditions, it is advisable to include methods that allow their reproducible and reliable isolation. However, purification of lysosomes is a difficult task, particularly in the case of cultured cells. This is mainly because of the heterogeneity of these organelles, along with their low number and high fragility. Also, isolation methods, while disrupting plasma membranes, have to preserve the integrity of lysosomes, as the breakdown of their membranes releases enzymes that could damage all cell organelles, including themselves. The protocols described below have been routinely used in our laboratory for the specific isolation of lysosomes from rat liver, NIH/3T3, and other cultured cells, but can be adapted to other mammalian tissues or cell lines. PMID:27613045

  8. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them.

    PubMed

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-28

    As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP), were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine.

  9. Biological Effects of Culture Substrates on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yohei; Furue, Miho Kusuda

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been commonly cultured in feeder-free conditions, a number of cell culture substrates have been applied or developed. However, the functional roles of these substrates in maintaining hPSC self-renewal remain unclear. Here in this review, we summarize the types of these substrates and their effect on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) protein expression has been shown to be crucial in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. These ECM molecules interact with integrin cell-surface receptors and transmit their cellular signaling. We discuss the possible effect of integrin-mediated signaling pathways on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), which transmits ECM-integrin signaling to AKT (also known as protein kinase B), has been shown to be critical in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Also, since naïve pluripotency has been widely recognized as an alternative pluripotent state of hPSCs, we discuss the possible effects of culture substrates and integrin signaling on naïve hPSCs based on the studies of mouse embryonic stem cells. Understanding the role of culture substrates in hPSC self-renewal and differentiation enables us to control hPSC behavior precisely and to establish scalable or microfabricated culture technologies for regenerative medicine and drug development. PMID:27656216

  10. Biological Effects of Culture Substrates on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been commonly cultured in feeder-free conditions, a number of cell culture substrates have been applied or developed. However, the functional roles of these substrates in maintaining hPSC self-renewal remain unclear. Here in this review, we summarize the types of these substrates and their effect on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) protein expression has been shown to be crucial in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. These ECM molecules interact with integrin cell-surface receptors and transmit their cellular signaling. We discuss the possible effect of integrin-mediated signaling pathways on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), which transmits ECM-integrin signaling to AKT (also known as protein kinase B), has been shown to be critical in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Also, since naïve pluripotency has been widely recognized as an alternative pluripotent state of hPSCs, we discuss the possible effects of culture substrates and integrin signaling on naïve hPSCs based on the studies of mouse embryonic stem cells. Understanding the role of culture substrates in hPSC self-renewal and differentiation enables us to control hPSC behavior precisely and to establish scalable or microfabricated culture technologies for regenerative medicine and drug development. PMID:27656216

  11. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-01

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells.

  12. Identification and quantitation of morphological cell types in electrophoretically separated human embryonic kidney cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. B.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Four major cell types were identified by phase microscopy in early passage human embryonic kidney cell cultures. They are small and large epithelioid, domed, and fenestrated cells. Fibroblasts are also present in some explants. The percent of each cell type changes with passage number as any given culture grows. As a general rule, the fraction of small epithelioid cells increases, while the fraction of fenestrated cells, always small, decreases further. When fibroblasts are present, they always increase in percentage of the total cell population. Electrophoretic separation of early passage cells showed that the domed cells have the highest electrophoretic mobility, fibroblasts have an intermediate high mobility, small epithelioid cells have a low mobility, broadly distributed, and fenestrated cells have the lowest mobility. All cell types were broadly distributed among electrophoretic subfractions, which were never pure but only enriched with respect to a given cell type.

  13. Dynamic cell culture system: a new cell cultivation instrument for biological experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmunder, F. K.; Nordau, C. G.; Tschopp, A.; Huber, B.; Cogoli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype of a miniaturized cell cultivation instrument for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab is presented (Dynamic cell culture system: DCCS). The cell chamber is completely filled and has a working volume of 200 microliters. Medium exchange is achieved with a self-powered osmotic pump (flowrate 1 microliter h-1). The reservoir volume of culture medium is 230 microliters. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Hamster kidney (Hak) cells growing on Cytodex 3 microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. Growth characteristics in the DCCS, as judged by maximal cell density, glucose consumption, lactic acid secretion and pH, were similar to those in cell culture tubes.

  14. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of somatic cells primary cultures established for bovine cloning.

    PubMed

    Katska, L; Bochenek, M; Kania, G; Ryñska, B; Smorag, Z

    2002-12-01

    An important factor governing developmental rates of somatic cloned embryos is the phase of the cell cycle of donor nuclei. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the distribution of cell cycle phases in bovine cumulus and fibroblast cells cultured using routine treatment, and under cell cycle-arresting treatments. The highest percentages of cumulus cells in the G0 + G1 stage were observed in uncultured, frozen/thawed cells originating from immature oocytes (79.8 +/- 2.2%), fresh and frozen/thawed cells from in vitro matured oocytes (84.1 +/- 6.2 and 77.8 +/- 5.7%, respectively), and in cycling cells (72.7 +/- 16.3 and 78.4 +/- 11.2%, respectively for cumulus cells from immature and in vitro matured oocytes). Serum starvation of cumulus cultures markedly decreased percentages of cells in G0 + G1, and prolonged starvation significantly increased (P < 0.05) percentages of cells in G2 + M phase. Culture of cumulus cells to confluency did not increase percentages of cells in G0 + G1. Contrary to findings in cumulus cells, significantly higher percentages of cells in G0 + G1 were apparent when fibroblast cells were cultured to confluency or serum starved, and significantly increased (P < 0.01) as the starvation period was prolonged. It is concluded that for particular cell types specific strategies should be used to attain improvements in the efficiency of cloning procedures.

  15. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  16. [Culture and control of cells producing bovine leukemia virus].

    PubMed

    Granátová, M

    1987-10-01

    In the field surveys of the occurrence of enzootic bovine leucosis caused by the bovine leucosis virus (BLV), the identification of positive animals is based on the detection of specific antiviral antibodies by serological methods. The reliability of these tests (particularly their sensitivity and specificity) depends on the quality of the virus antigen. The preparation of the antigen is based on the cultivation of BLV virus in cultures of the FLS cell line. A modified procedure of preparing the BLV antigen in the FLS cell culture is described, along with the control of its production by the immunoperoxidase test. PMID:2827363

  17. Synthesis of resveratrol glycosides by cultured plant cells.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Kei; Hamada, Manabu; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Takemoto, Mai; Hamada, Hiroki

    2013-07-01

    Incubation of cultured cells of Glycine max with trans-resveratrol gave its 3-O-beta-D- and 4'-O-beta-D-glucosides. Cultured Gossypium hirsutum cells glycosylated trans-resveratrol to its 3-O-beta-D-, 4'-O-beta-D-, and 3,4'-O-beta-D-diglucosides. On the other hand, trans-resveratrol was converted into cis-resveratrol 4'-O-beta-D-glucoside, together with trans-resveratrol 3-O-beta-D-glucoside and trans-resveratrol 4'-O-beta-D-glucoside, by Eucalyptus perriniana.

  18. Human epithelial cell cultures from superficial limbal explants

    PubMed Central

    Basli, E.; Goldschmidt, P.; Pecha, F.; Chaumeil, C.; Laroche, L.; Borderie, V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To study the kinetics of growth and the phenotype of cells cultured from human limbal explants in a cholera toxin-free medium with no feeder cell layer. Methods Human organ-cultured corneas were used to prepare limbal explants (full-thickness and superficial limbal explants) and corneal stromal explants. Cell growth kinetics and phenotypes were assessed by cultivating explants in cholera toxin-free Green medium. Epithelial and progenitor cell markers were assessed by immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Reverse Transcription and Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Results The successful epithelial cell growth rates from full thickness limbal explant and superficial limbal explant tissues were 41 and 86%, respectively (p=0.0001). The mean cell area and the percentage of small cells in superficial and full-thickness explant cultures were, respectively, 317 µm2 and 429 µm2, and 8.9% and 1.7% (p<0.001). The percentage of positive cells in superficial and full-thickness limbal explant cultures as assessed by immunocytochemistry were the following: broad spectrum cytokeratins (cytokeratins 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, and 18 [MNF116]), 82%/37% (p=0.01); cytokeratin 3 (CK3), 74%/25% (p=0.009); cytokeratin 19 (CK19), 46%/25% (p=0.19); vimentin, 56%/53% (p=0.48); delta N p63α, 54%/0% (p<0.001); and ABCG2, 5%/0% (p=0.1). Flow cytometry showed a higher percentage of small cells, a higher percentage of MNF116+ cells, and stronger expression of progenitor-associated markers in superficial than in full-thickness explant cultures. For superficial limbal explant cultures, analysis of the expression profiles for various mRNAs at the end of 21 days of culture showed high levels of expression of the mRNAs encoding CK3, vimentin, and CK19. The expression of mRNA of delta N p63α and ABCG2 was weaker. Cultures obtained from full-thickness limbal explants featured no expression of mRNA of CK19, delta N p63α, and ABCG2, whereas mRNAs encoding CK3 and vimentin were detected. Human

  19. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-01

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. PMID:15580587

  20. Hepatic Differentiation and Maturation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Cultured in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Synnergren, Jane; Jensen, Janne; Björquist, Petter; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a serious and frequently occurring adverse drug reaction in the clinics and is hard to predict during preclinical studies. Today, primary hepatocytes are the most frequently used cell model for drug discovery and prediction of toxicity. However, their use is marred by high donor variability regarding drug metabolism and toxicity, and instable expression levels of liver-specific genes such as cytochromes P450. An in vitro model system based on human embryonic stem cells (hESC), with their unique properties of pluripotency and self-renewal, has potential to provide a stable and unlimited supply of human hepatocytes. Much effort has been made to direct hESC toward the hepatic lineage, mostly using 2-dimensional (2D) cultures. Although the results are encouraging, these cells lack important functionality. Here, we investigate if hepatic differentiation of hESC can be improved by using a 3-dimensional (3D) bioreactor system. Human ESCs were differentiated toward the hepatic lineage using the same cells in either the 3D or 2D system. A global transcriptional analysis identified important differences between the 2 differentiation regimes, and we identified 10 pathways, highly related to liver functions, which were significantly upregulated in cells differentiated in the bioreactor compared to 2D control cultures. The enhanced hepatic differentiation observed in the bioreactor system was also supported by immunocytochemistry. Taken together, our results suggest that hepatic differentiation of hESC is improved when using this 3D bioreactor technology as compared to 2D culture systems. PMID:22970843

  1. Testicular Sertoli cells influence the proliferation and immunogenicity of co-cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Ping; He, Lan; Pu, Dan; Lv, Xiaohong; Zhou, Wenxu; Sun, Yining; Hu, Nan

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} The proliferation of dramatic increased by co-cultured with Sertoli cells. {yields} VEGF receptor-2 expression of ECs was up-regulated by co-cultured with Sertoli cells. {yields} The MHC expression of ECs induced by INF-{gamma} and IL-6, IL-8 and sICAM induced by TNF-{alpha} decreased respectively after co-cultured with Sertoli cells. {yields} ECs co-cultured with Sertoli cells also didn't increase the stimulation index of spleen lymphocytes. -- Abstract: The major problem of the application of endothelial cells (ECs) in transplantation is the lack of proliferation and their immunogenicity. In this study, we co-cultured ECs with Sertoli cells to monitor whether Sertoli cells can influence the proliferation and immunogenicity of co-cultured ECs. Sertoli cells were isolated from adult testicular tissue. ECs were divided into the control group and the experimental group, which included three sub-groups co-cultured with 1 x 10{sup 3}, 1 x 10{sup 4} or 1 x 10{sup 5} cell/ml of Sertoli cells. The growth and proliferation of ECs were observed microscopically, and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 (KDR) was examined by Western blotting. In another experiment, ECs were divided into the control group, the single culture group and the co-culture group with the optimal concentration of Sertoli cells. After INF-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} were added to the culture medium, MHC II antigen expression was detected by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting; interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) were measured in the culture medium by ELISA. We demonstrated that 1 x 10{sup 4} cell/ml Sertoli cells promoted the proliferation of co-cultured ECs more dramatically than that in other groups (P < 0.05). Western blotting showed that 1 x 10{sup 4} cell/ml of the Sertoli cells was most effective in the up-regulation of KDR expression in the co-cultured ECs (P < 0.05). Sertoli cells

  2. Polyamines in Relation to Growth in Carrot Cell Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Kevin M.; Phillips, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Changes in polyamine metabolism were investigated in relation to growth of cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota, cv Chantenay). Changes in levels of the major amines putrescine and spermidine throughout the culture period correlated poorly with changes in fresh weight, but a closer correlation with the minor component spermine was observed. The arginine decarboxylase (ADC) inhibitor difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) strongly and specifically inhibited ADC activity in the supernatant, reduced the major amine (putrescine) by 95% and the total amine content by 80%. It had no effect on cell number and stimulated fresh weight by over 25% through increased cell expansion. Spermine content, in contrast, increased with DFMA concentration in parallel with fresh weight increases. Difluoromethylornithine strongly inhibited ornithine decarboxylase activity in the pellet, but had little effect on either polyamine levels or culture growth. It was concluded that little evidence for a correlation between free polyamines and cell number in carrot cultures could be detected, but that a possible correlation between spermine content and cell expansion was observed. PMID:16666271

  3. Polyamines in relation to growth in carrot cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Fallon, K M; Phillips, R

    1988-09-01

    Changes in polyamine metabolism were investigated in relation to growth of cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota, cv Chantenay). Changes in levels of the major amines putrescine and spermidine throughout the culture period correlated poorly with changes in fresh weight, but a closer correlation with the minor component spermine was observed. The arginine decarboxylase (ADC) inhibitor difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) strongly and specifically inhibited ADC activity in the supernatant, reduced the major amine (putrescine) by 95% and the total amine content by 80%. It had no effect on cell number and stimulated fresh weight by over 25% through increased cell expansion. Spermine content, in contrast, increased with DFMA concentration in parallel with fresh weight increases. Difluoromethylornithine strongly inhibited ornithine decarboxylase activity in the pellet, but had little effect on either polyamine levels or culture growth. It was concluded that little evidence for a correlation between free polyamines and cell number in carrot cultures could be detected, but that a possible correlation between spermine content and cell expansion was observed.

  4. Ex vivo Co-culture of Lymphoid Tissue Stromal Cells and T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Haase, Ashley T.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells within lymphoid tissues produce IL-7, which is critical for the survival and function of T cells. This protocol is to be used to isolate primary human lymphoid tissue stromal cells to study their impact on the survival of T cells in an ex vivo co-culture system.

  5. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  6. Contraction-induced cluster formation in cardiac cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Takahiro; Isomura, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2008-11-01

    The evolution of the spatial arrangement of cells in a primary culture of cardiac tissue derived from newborn rats was studied experimentally over an extended period. It was found that cells attract each other spontaneously to form a clustered structure over the timescale of several days. These clusters exhibit spontaneous rhythmic contraction and have been confirmed to consist of cardiac muscle cells. The addition of a contraction inhibitor (2,3-butanedione-2-monoxime) to the culture medium resulted in the inhibition of both the spontaneous contractions exhibited by the cells as well as the formation of clusters. Furthermore, the formation of clusters is suppressed when high concentrations of collagen are used for coating the substratum to which the cells adhere. From these experimental observations, it was deduced that the cells are mechanically stressed by the tension associated with repeated contractions and that this results in the cells becoming compact and attracting each other, finally resulting in the formation of clusters. This process can be interpreted as modulation of a cellular network by the activity associated with contraction, which could be employed to control cellular networks by modifying the dynamics associated with the contractions in cardiac tissue culture.

  7. Cytotoxicity of voriconazole on cultured human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Beom; Shin, Young Joo; Hyon, Joon Young; Wee, Won Ryang

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the toxicity of voriconazole on cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). HCECs were cultured and exposed to various concentrations of voriconazole (5.0 to 1,000 μg/ml). Cell viability was measured using a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and live/dead viability/cytotoxicity assays. Cell damage was assessed using phase-contrast microscopy after 24 h of exposure to voriconazole. To analyze the effect of voriconazole on the intercellular barrier, immunolocalization of zonula occludens 1 (ZO1) was performed. A flow cytometric assay was performed to evaluate the apoptotic and necrotic effects of voriconazole on HCECs. Cytotoxicity tests demonstrated the dose-dependent toxic effect of voriconazole on HCECs. Voriconazole concentrations of ≥100 μg/ml led to a significant reduction in cell viability. The morphological characteristics of HCECs also changed in a dose-dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of voriconazole resulted in fading staining for ZO1. Higher concentrations of voriconazole resulted in an increased number of propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells, indicating activation of the proapoptotic pathway. In conclusion, voriconazole may have a dose-dependent toxic effect on cultured HCECs. The results of this study suggest that although voriconazole concentrations of up to 50 μg/ml do not decrease cell viability, intracameral voriconazole concentrations of ≥100 μg/ml may increase the risk of corneal endothelial damage.

  8. Cell culture media impact on drug product solution stability.

    PubMed

    Purdie, Jennifer L; Kowle, Ronald L; Langland, Amie L; Patel, Chetan N; Ouyang, Anli; Olson, Donald J

    2016-07-01

    To enable subcutaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies, drug product solutions are often needed at high concentrations. A significant risk associated with high drug product concentrations is an increase in aggregate level over the shelf-life dating period. While much work has been done to understand the impact of drug product formulation on aggregation, there is limited understanding of the link between cell culture process conditions and soluble aggregate growth in drug product. During cell culture process development, soluble aggregates are often measured at harvest using cell-free material purified by Protein A chromatography. In the work reported here, cell culture media components were evaluated with respect to their impact on aggregate levels in high concentration solution drug product during accelerated stability studies. Two components, cysteine and ferric ammonium citrate, were found to impact aggregate growth rates in our current media (version 1) leading to the development of new chemically defined media and concentrated feed formulations. The new version of media and associated concentrated feeds (version 2) were evaluated across four cell lines producing recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibodies and a bispecific antibody. In all four cell lines, the version 2 media reduced aggregate growth over the course of a 12 week accelerated stability study compared with the version 1 media, although the degree to which aggregate growth decreased was cell line dependent. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:998-1008, 2016.

  9. Testing of serum atherogenicity in cell cultures: questionable data published

    PubMed Central

    Jargin, Sergei V.

    2012-01-01

    In a large series of studies was reported that culturing of smooth muscle cells with serum from atherosclerosis patients caused intracellular lipid accumulation, while serum from healthy controls had no such effect. Cultures were used for evaluation of antiatherogenic drugs. Numerous substances were reported to lower serum atherogenicity: statins, trapidil, calcium antagonists, garlic derivatives etc. On the contrary, beta-blockers, phenothiazines and oral hypoglycemics were reported to be pro-atherogenic. Known antiatherogenic agents can influence lipid metabolism and cholesterol synthesis, intestinal absorption or endothelium-related mechanisms. All these targets are absent in cell monocultures. Inflammatory factors, addressed by some antiatherogenic drugs, are also not reproduced. In vivo, relationship between cholesterol uptake by cells and atherogenesis must be inverse rather than direct: in familial hypercholesterolemia, inefficient clearance of LDL-cholesterol by cells predisposes to atherosclerosis. Accordingly, if a pharmacological agent reduces cholesterol uptake by cells in vitro, it should be expected to elevate cholesterol in vivo. Validity of clinical recommendations, based on serum atherogenicity testing in cell monocultures, is therefore questionable. These considerations pertain also to the drugs developed on the basis of the cell culture experiments. PMID:22355278

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of holoprosencephaly with ethmocephaly via 3-dimensional sonography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gui-Se-Ra; Hur, Soo Young; Shin, Jong-Chul; Kim, Soo-Pyung; Kim, Sa Jin

    2006-01-01

    We present the prenatal 3-dimensional (3D) sonographic findings in a case of holoprosencephaly with ethmocephaly at 32 weeks' gestation. The sonographic diagnosis was based on the intracranial findings of a single ventricle and bulb-shaped appearance of the thalami and facial abnormalities, including hypotelorism with proboscis. Chromosome study of the fetus revealed a normal female karyotype (46,XX). Postmortem examination confirmed the 3D sonographic findings. This case demonstrates that the use of 3D sonography improves the imaging and the understanding of the condition of the intracranial abnormalities and the facial anomalies. PMID:16788963

  11. The 3-dimensional cellular automata for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Youbin; Ren, Bin; Yang, Wencao; Shuai, Jianwei

    2014-04-01

    The HIV infection dynamics is discussed in detail with a 3-dimensional cellular automata model in this paper. The model can reproduce the three-phase development, i.e., the acute period, the asymptotic period and the AIDS period, observed in the HIV-infected patients in a clinic. We show that the 3D HIV model performs a better robustness on the model parameters than the 2D cellular automata. Furthermore, we reveal that the occurrence of a perpetual source to successively generate infectious waves to spread to the whole system drives the model from the asymptotic state to the AIDS state.

  12. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells. PMID:26938569

  13. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Paaske Utheim, Tor; Aass Utheim, Øygunn; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells. PMID:26938569

  14. A Microwell Cell Culture Platform for the Aggregation of Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Abigail B.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Cell–cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell–cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell–cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered. PMID:22320435

  15. Measurement and analysis of calcium signaling in heterogeneous cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gillian R; Jack, Andrew D; Platts, Amy; Simpson, Peter B

    2006-01-01

    High-content imaging platforms capable of studying kinetic responses at a single-cell level have elevated kinetic recording techniques from labor-intensive low-throughput experiments to potential high-throughput screening assays. We have applied this technology to the investigation of heterogeneous cell cultures derived from primary neural tissue. The neuronal cultures mature into a coupled network and display spontaneous oscillations in intracellular calcium, which can be modified by the addition of pharmacological agents. We have developed algorithms to perform Fourier analysis and quantify both the degree of synchronization and the effects of modulators on the oscillations. Functional and phenotypic experiments can be combined using this approach. We have used post-hoc immunolabeling to identify subpopulations of cells in cocultures and to dissect the calcium responses of these cells from the population response. The combination of these techniques represents a powerful tool for drug discovery.

  16. Influence of three laser wavelengths on human fibroblasts cell culture.

    PubMed

    Crisan, Bogdan; Soritau, Olga; Baciut, Mihaela; Campian, Radu; Crisan, Liana; Baciut, Grigore

    2013-02-01

    Although experimental studies in vitro and vivo have been numerous, the effect of laser wavelength irradiation on human fibroblast cell culture is poorly understood. This emphasizes the need of additional cellular and molecular research into laser influence with low energy and power. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of three different laser wavelengths on the human skin fibroblasts cell culture. We wanted to evaluate if near infrared lasers had any influence in healing of wounds by stimulating mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts. The cells were irradiated using 830-, 980- and 2,940-nm laser wavelengths. The irradiated cells were incubated and their mitochondrial activity was assessed by the MTT assay at 24, 48 and 72 h. Simultaneously, an apoptosis assay was assessed on the irradiated fibroblasts. It can be concluded that laser light of the near-infrared region (830 and 980 nm) influences fibroblasts mitochondrial activity compared to the 2,940-nm wavelength which produces apoptosis.

  17. Cultured meat from stem cells: challenges and prospects.

    PubMed

    Post, Mark J

    2012-11-01

    As one of the alternatives for livestock meat production, in vitro culturing of meat is currently studied. The generation of bio-artificial muscles from satellite cells has been ongoing for about 15 years, but has never been used for generation of meat, while it already is a great source of animal protein. In order to serve as a credible alternative to livestock meat, lab or factory grown meat should be efficiently produced and should mimic meat in all of its physical sensations, such as visual appearance, smell, texture and of course, taste. This is a formidable challenge even though all the technologies to create skeletal muscle and fat tissue have been developed and tested. The efficient culture of meat will primarily depend on culture conditions such as the source of medium and its composition. Protein synthesis by cultured skeletal muscle cells should further be maximized by finding the optimal combination of biochemical and physical conditions for the cells. Many of these variables are known, but their interactions are numerous and need to be mapped. This involves a systematic, if not systems, approach. Given the urgency of the problems that the meat industry is facing, this endeavor is worth undertaking. As an additional benefit, culturing meat may provide opportunities for production of novel and healthier products. PMID:22543115

  18. Cultured meat from stem cells: challenges and prospects.

    PubMed

    Post, Mark J

    2012-11-01

    As one of the alternatives for livestock meat production, in vitro culturing of meat is currently studied. The generation of bio-artificial muscles from satellite cells has been ongoing for about 15 years, but has never been used for generation of meat, while it already is a great source of animal protein. In order to serve as a credible alternative to livestock meat, lab or factory grown meat should be efficiently produced and should mimic meat in all of its physical sensations, such as visual appearance, smell, texture and of course, taste. This is a formidable challenge even though all the technologies to create skeletal muscle and fat tissue have been developed and tested. The efficient culture of meat will primarily depend on culture conditions such as the source of medium and its composition. Protein synthesis by cultured skeletal muscle cells should further be maximized by finding the optimal combination of biochemical and physical conditions for the cells. Many of these variables are known, but their interactions are numerous and need to be mapped. This involves a systematic, if not systems, approach. Given the urgency of the problems that the meat industry is facing, this endeavor is worth undertaking. As an additional benefit, culturing meat may provide opportunities for production of novel and healthier products.

  19. Biliary epithelial cells proliferate during oxygenated ex situ liver culture

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Congwen; Du, Yiqi; Ding, Rui; Huang, Jun; Dai, Yan; Bao, Sujin; Zhao, Lijuan; Shen, Hefang; Dong, Jing; Xu, Jianjian; Xiong, Qiru; Xu, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Biliary complications remain a major source of morbidity in liver transplant patients. Among these complications, nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) are especially common and they are frequently therapy resistant in part because biliary epithelial cells are more sensitive to warm ischemic injury than hepatocytes. It has been a challenge to maintain the physiological function of biliary epithelial cells during liver transplantation. In this work, we have examined the effect of oxygen on proliferation of biliary epithelial cells in the rat livers obtained from donation after circulatory death (DCD). Twelve rat livers from DCD were divided into two groups. Livers in the control group were isolated following a standard procedure without oxygen supply. Livers in the experimental group were isolated with a constant supply of oxygen. All livers were then connected to an ex situ liver culture system in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analogue and a marker for cell proliferation. After 6 hours of normothermic ex situ liver culture, morphology and DNA replication in hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells were assessed and compared between the two groups. We found that about 4.5% of the biliary epithelial cells in the experimental group proliferated compared with only 0.4% of cells in the control based on BrdU staining. No significant change in cell morphology was observed in those cells between the two groups. Thus, our results indicate that oxygen supply is required for maintenance of the physiological function of biliary epithelial cells during liver transplant and suggest that a constant oxygen supply during liver isolation along with ex situ liver organ culture can enhance the repair of biliary epithelial cell injury during liver transplantation. PMID:27725875

  20. Hybridoma cell behaviour in continuous culture under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Cherlet, M; Marc, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an alternative strategy to the ones proposed before (Oh et al., 1993; Øyaas et al., 1994a) to get real increases of global final antibody titer and production at hyperosmotic stress, by reducing the detrimental effect of such a stress on cell growth, and conserving the stimulating effect on antibody production. It consists of cultivating the cells in continuous culture and increasing the osmolality stepwise. In this way, the cells could progressively adapt to the higher osmolality at each step and antibody titers could be nearly doubled at 370 and 400 mOsm kg-1, compared to the standard osmolality of 335 mOsm kg-1. Surprisingly, the stimulation of antibody production was not confirmed for higher osmolalities, 425 and 450 mOsm kg- 1, despite the minor negative effect on cell growth. Intracellular IgG analysis by flow cytometry revealed at these osmolalities a significant population of non-producing cells. However, even when taking into account this non-producing population, a stimulating effect on antibody production could not be shown at these highest osmolalities. It seems to us that osmolality has a significant effect on the appearance of these non-producing cells, since they were not observed in continuous cultures at standard osmolality, of comparable duration and at an even higher dilution rate. The appearance of the non-producing cells coincides furthermore with modifications of the synthesised antibody, as shown by electrophoretic techniques. It is however not really clear if these two observations reflect actually the same phenomenon. Hyperosmolality affects the cell behaviour in continuous culture in multiple ways, independently of the growth rate, counting all at least partially for the observed stimulation of antibody production: acceleration of the amino acid, and in particular the glutamine metabolism, increase of the cell volume, increase of the intracellular pH and accumulation of cells in the G1 cell cycle phase. PMID

  1. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  2. Patterns of plasminogen activator production in cultured normal embryonic cells

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Cultured normal low-passage embryo fibroblasts, from a number of species, and two untransformed clones of a Balb/3T3 line elaborate increasing amounts of plasminogen activator (PA) as they approach confluence; the low-passage cells then lose this PA activity after reaching confluence, while the 3T3 cells retain it indefinitely. Even at their peaks, however, the PA activities of the low-passage cells remain well below those of the corresponding virally or spontaneously transformed cells. The PA increases in normal cells are probably a result of PA production rather than of adsorption of secreted PA to the cell surface, or of changes in cell-associated protease inhibitors. The elaboration of PA by normal cells is dependent upon their metabolic activity, such that the level of serum supplementation and the growth phase of the culture directly influence the level of cell-associated PA observed. In addition, there may be a component of serum which exerts a negative control on PA production and which is not an acid-labile protease inhibitor. PMID:21193

  3. Microfluidic approaches for epithelial cell layer culture and characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Thuenauer, Roland; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Römer, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, epithelial cell layers line most body cavities and form selective barriers that regulate the exchange of solutes between compartments. In order to fulfil these functions, the cells assume a polarised architecture and maintain two distinct plasma membrane domains, the apical domain facing the lumen and the basolateral domain facing other cells and the extracellular matrix. Microfluidic biochips offer the unique opportunity to establish novel in vitro models of epithelia in which the in vivo microenvironment of epithelial cells is precisely reconstituted. In addition, analytical tools to monitor biologically relevant parameters can be directly integrated on-chip. In this review we summarise recently developed biochip designs for culturing epithelial cell layers. Since endothelial cell layers, which line blood vessels, have similar barrier functions and polar organisation as epithelial cell layers, we also discuss biochips for culturing endothelial cell layers. Furthermore, we review approaches to integrate tools to analyse and manipulate epithelia and endothelia in microfluidic biochips, including methods to perform electrical impedance spectroscopy, methods to detect substances undergoing trans-epithelial transport via fluorescence, spectrophotometry, and mass spectrometry, techniques to mechanically stimulate cells via stretching and fluid flow-induced shear stress, and methods to carry out high-resolution imaging of vesicular trafficking with light microscopy. Taken together, this versatile microfluidic toolbox enables novel experimental approaches to characterise epithelial monolayers. PMID:24668405

  4. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our

  5. Sex stratified neuronal cultures to study ischemic cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Stacy L; Vest, Rebekah; Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J; Herson, Paco S

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  6. B35 neuroblastoma cells: an easily transfected, cultured cell model of central nervous system neurons.

    PubMed

    Otey, Carol A; Boukhelifa, Malika; Maness, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    A panel of neuronal cell lines was derived from tumors of the neonatal rat central nervous system (CNS) in 1974, and two of these lines are in wide use today. Both the B35 and B50 lines offer a number of advantages to researchers who study CNS neurons in culture: they are simple to grow, to differentiate, and to transfect. B50 cells have been used extensively in the study of neuronal cell death, toxicology, and differentiation, whereas B35 cells have proven useful in the molecular analysis of endocytosis and of signaling pathways, in particular those that guide axonal outgrowth and cell motility. This chapter provides protocols for growing and transfecting B35 cells, selecting stable transfectants, exploring protein function using an antisense approach, and assaying cell motility in a Transwell chamber. All of these protocols have been written for researchers who have some skill in basic cell culture techniques, but previous experience with cultured neurons is not required.

  7. Salt tolerance in cultured cells of Spartina pectinata.

    PubMed

    Warren, R S; Baird, L M; Thompson, A K

    1985-04-01

    Suspension cultures with cell doubling times of ca. 2 days were developed from the halophytic grass Spartina pectinata. Maximum rates of exponential growth measured by direct cell counts and by total culture packed-cell-volume were not significantly reduced by NaCl up to 200 mM but dropped beyond this point. In contrast, total cell production over a one week culture cycle, by both measures, was reduced in a roughly linear fashion between 0 and 500 mM NaCl. The pattern of growth in relation to NaCl is very similar to that of previously described cell suspensions derived from another halophyte, Distichlis spicata. In the field the latter is much more salt tolerant. The basis for the whole plant differences is not clear. They do not appear to reflect effectiveness of cell based salt tolerance or the presence of salt glands, which are reported here for the first time in S. pectinata and are found on the leaves of both species.

  8. Endocytic activity of Sertoli cells grown in bicameral culture chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, R.X.; Djakiew, D.; Dym, M.

    1987-07-01

    Immature rat Sertoli cells were cultured for 7 to 14 days on Millipore filters impregnated with a reconstituted basement membrane extract in dual-environment (bicameral) culture chambers. Electron microscopy of the cultured cells revealed the presence of rod-shaped mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and Sertoli-Sertoli tight junctions, typical of these cells in vivo. The endocytic activity of both the apical and basal surfaces of the Sertoli cells was examined by either adding alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M) conjugated to 20 nm gold particles to the apical chamber or by adding /sup 125/I labeled alpha 2-M to the basal chamber. During endocytosis from the apical surface of Sertoli cells, the alpha 2-M-gold particles were bound initially to coated pits and then internalized into coated vesicles within 5 minutes. After 10 minutes, the alpha 2-M-gold was found in multi-vesicular bodies (MVBs) and by 30 minutes it was present in the lysosomes. The proportion of alpha 2-M-gold found within endocytic cell organelles after 1 hour of uptake was used to estimate the approximate time that this ligand spent in each type of organelle. The alpha 2-M-gold was present in coated pits, coated vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and lysosomes for approximately 3, 11, 22, and 24 minutes, respectively. This indicates that the initial stages of endocytosis are rapid, whereas MVBs and lysosomes are relatively long-lived.

  9. Sequential cancer mutations in cultured human intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Drost, Jarno; van Jaarsveld, Richard H; Ponsioen, Bas; Zimberlin, Cheryl; van Boxtel, Ruben; Buijs, Arjan; Sachs, Norman; Overmeer, René M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Begthel, Harry; Korving, Jeroen; van de Wetering, Marc; Schwank, Gerald; Logtenberg, Meike; Cuppen, Edwin; Snippert, Hugo J; Medema, Jan Paul; Kops, Geert J P L; Clevers, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Crypt stem cells represent the cells of origin for intestinal neoplasia. Both mouse and human intestinal stem cells can be cultured in medium containing the stem-cell-niche factors WNT, R-spondin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and noggin over long time periods as epithelial organoids that remain genetically and phenotypically stable. Here we utilize CRISPR/Cas9 technology for targeted gene modification of four of the most commonly mutated colorectal cancer genes (APC, P53 (also known as TP53), KRAS and SMAD4) in cultured human intestinal stem cells. Mutant organoids can be selected by removing individual growth factors from the culture medium. Quadruple mutants grow independently of all stem-cell-niche factors and tolerate the presence of the P53 stabilizer nutlin-3. Upon xenotransplantation into mice, quadruple mutants grow as tumours with features of invasive carcinoma. Finally, combined loss of APC and P53 is sufficient for the appearance of extensive aneuploidy, a hallmark of tumour progression.

  10. Process control in cell culture technology using dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Justice, C; Brix, A; Freimark, D; Kraume, M; Pfromm, P; Eichenmueller, B; Czermak, P

    2011-01-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, mammalian and insect cells as well as plant cell cultures are gaining worldwide importance to produce biopharmaceuticals and as products themselves, for example in stem cell therapy. These highly sophisticated cell-based production processes need to be monitored and controlled to guarantee product quality and to satisfy GMP requirements. With the process analytical technology (PAT) initiative, requirements regarding process monitoring and control have changed and real-time in-line monitoring tools are now recommended. Dielectric spectroscopy (DS) can serve as a tool to satisfy some PAT requirements. DS has been used in the medical field for quite some time and it may allow real-time process monitoring of biological cell culture parameters. DS has the potential to enable process optimization, automation, cost reduction, and a more consistent product quality. Dielectric spectroscopy is reviewed here as a tool to monitor biochemical processes. Commercially available dielectric sensing systems are discussed. The potential of this technology is demonstrated through examples of current and potential future applications in research and industry for mammalian and insect cell culture.

  11. Cementum matrix formation in vivo by cultured dental follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Handa, K; Saito, M; Yamauchi, M; Kiyono, T; Sato, S; Teranaka, T; Sampath Narayanan, A

    2002-11-01

    Dental follicle is the fibrous tissue that surrounds the developing tooth germ, and it is believed to contain progenitors for cementoblasts, periodontal ligament cells, and osteoblasts. In this study, we report the presence of cementoblast progenitors in cultures of bovine dental follicle cells and demonstrate their differentiation capacity. Bovine dental follicle cells (BDFC) obtained from tooth germs by collagenase digestion were compared with bovine alveolar bone osteoblasts (BAOB) and bovine periodontal ligament cells (BPDL) in vitro and in vivo. In culture, BDFC exhibited low levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and expressed mRNA for osteopontin (OP) and type I collagen (COLI), as well as low levels of osteocalcin (OC) mRNA. In contrast, cultured BAOB exhibited high alkaline phosphatase activity levels and expressed mRNA for OC, OP, COLI, and bone sialoprotein (BSP). To elucidate the differentiation capacity of BDFC in vivo, cells were transplanted into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice and analyzed after 4 weeks. Transplanted BDFC formed fibrous tissue and cementum-like matrix, which stained positive for anti-cementum attachment protein (CAP) monoclonal antibody (3G9), and expressed mRNA for OC, OP, COLI, and BSP. On the other hand, transplanted BAOB formed bone-like matrix, but were negative for anti-CAP monoclonal antibody. The BPDL transplants formed fibrous tissue that contained a few cells expressing CAP. These results indicate that cementoblast progenitors are present in BDFC, which can provide a useful model for investigating the molecular mechanisms of cementogenesis. PMID:12477575

  12. Apple Derived Cellulose Scaffolds for 3D Mammalian Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Modulevsky, Daniel J.; Lefebvre, Cory; Haase, Kristina; Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous approaches for producing natural and synthetic 3D scaffolds that support the proliferation of mammalian cells. 3D scaffolds better represent the natural cellular microenvironment and have many potential applications in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that 3D cellulose scaffolds produced by decellularizing apple hypanthium tissue can be employed for in vitro 3D culture of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, mouse C2C12 muscle myoblasts and human HeLa epithelial cells. We show that these cells can adhere, invade and proliferate in the cellulose scaffolds. In addition, biochemical functionalization or chemical cross-linking can be employed to control the surface biochemistry and/or mechanical properties of the scaffold. The cells retain high viability even after 12 continuous weeks of culture and can achieve cell densities comparable with other natural and synthetic scaffold materials. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds are easily produced, inexpensive and originate from a renewable source. Taken together, these results demonstrate that naturally derived cellulose scaffolds offer a complementary approach to existing techniques for the in vitro culture of mammalian cells in a 3D environment. PMID:24842603

  13. Disposable Bioreactors for Plant Micropropagation and Mass Plant Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducos, Jean-Paul; Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier

    Different types of bioreactors are used at Nestlé R&D Centre - Tours for mass propagation of selected plant varieties by somatic embryogenesis and for large scale culture of plants cells to produce metabolites or recombinant proteins. Recent studies have been directed to cut down the production costs of these two processes by developing disposable cell culture systems. Vegetative propagation of elite plant varieties is achieved through somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium. A pilot scale process has recently been set up for the industrial propagation of Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee). The current production capacity is 3.0 million embryos per year. The pre-germination of the embryos was previously conducted by temporary immersion in liquid medium in 10-L glass bioreactors. An improved process has been developed using a 10-L disposable bioreactor consisting of a bag containing a rigid plastic box ('Box-in-Bag' bioreactor), insuring, amongst other advantages, a higher light transmittance to the biomass due to its horizontal design. For large scale cell culture, two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors have been developed from 10 to 100 L working volumes, validated with several plant species ('Wave and Undertow' and 'Slug Bubble' bioreactors). The advantages and the limits of these new types of bioreactor are discussed, based mainly on our own experience on coffee somatic embryogenesis and mass cell culture of soya and tobacco.

  14. Using Haworthia Cultured Cells as an Aid in Teaching Botany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majumdar, Shyamal K.; Castellano, John M.

    1977-01-01

    Callus induction from species of Haworthia can be done quickly in the laboratory with minimal equipment to study tissue dedifferentiation and cellular redifferentiation. It is shown that the cultured cell can also be used to study and evaluate the effects of various mutagens, carcinogens, and pesticides in controlled environments. (Author/MA)

  15. Mutagenicity of instant coffee on cultured Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nakasato, F; Nakayasu, M; Fujita, Y; Nagao, M; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1984-10-01

    Coffee showed mutagenic activity in cultured Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cells as assessed by using diphtheria toxin resistance as a selective marker. Most of the mutagenicity was suppressed in the presence of sodium bisulfite. The contribution of methylglyoxal to the total mutagenicity of coffee was less than 3%.

  16. Morphological characteristics of cultured fresh and thawed pericardium cells.

    PubMed

    Maslova, Olga; Fedevych, Oleg; Shuvalova, Nadiia; Deryabina, Olena; Zhovnir, Volodymyr; Novak, Miroslav; Kruzliak, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The need for selection of the optimal material for the manufacturing of cardio-patches can be resolved by the use of cryostored autologous pericardial tissue. This short communication is a concise fragment of a large-scale research and demonstrates only the efficiency of cell culturing before and after pericardial preservation in the low temperature conditions.

  17. DIVERSITY OF ARSENIC METABOLISM IN CULTURED HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diversity of arsenic metabolism in cultured human cancer cell lines.

    Arsenic has been known to cause a variety of malignancies in human. Pentavalent As (As 5+) is reduced to trivalent As (As3+) which is further methylated by arsenic methyltransferase(s) to monomethylarson...

  18. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S.; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence. PMID:27651846

  19. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence. PMID:27651846

  20. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S.; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence.

  1. Automated feature extraction for 3-dimensional point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, Lori A.; Leigh, Holly W.; Soderlund, Alexander; Clymer, Bradley; Baer, Jessica; Neuenschwander, Amy L.

    2016-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology offers the capability to rapidly capture high-resolution, 3-dimensional surface data with centimeter-level accuracy for a large variety of applications. Due to the foliage-penetrating properties of LIDAR systems, these geospatial data sets can detect ground surfaces beneath trees, enabling the production of highfidelity bare earth elevation models. Precise characterization of the ground surface allows for identification of terrain and non-terrain points within the point cloud, and facilitates further discernment between natural and man-made objects based solely on structural aspects and relative neighboring parameterizations. A framework is presented here for automated extraction of natural and man-made features that does not rely on coincident ortho-imagery or point RGB attributes. The TEXAS (Terrain EXtraction And Segmentation) algorithm is used first to generate a bare earth surface from a lidar survey, which is then used to classify points as terrain or non-terrain. Further classifications are assigned at the point level by leveraging local spatial information. Similarly classed points are then clustered together into regions to identify individual features. Descriptions of the spatial attributes of each region are generated, resulting in the identification of individual tree locations, forest extents, building footprints, and 3-dimensional building shapes, among others. Results of the fully-automated feature extraction algorithm are then compared to ground truth to assess completeness and accuracy of the methodology.

  2. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  3. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell-cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  4. A microdroplet cell culture based high frequency somatic embryogenesis system for pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nagan Udhaya; Gnanaraj, Muniraj; Sindhujaa, Vajravel; Viji, Maluventhen; Manoharan, Kumariah

    2015-09-01

    A protocol for high frequency production of somatic embryos was worked out in pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. The protocol involved sequential employment of embryogenic callus cultures, low density cell suspension cultures and a novel microdroplet cell culture system. The microdroplet cell cultures involved culture of a single cell in 10 μI of Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with phytohormones, growth factors and phospholipid precursors. By employing the microdroplet cell cultures, single cells in isolation were grown into cell clones which developed somatic embryos. Further, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, kinetin, polyethylene glycol, putrescine, spermine, spermidine, choline chloride, ethanolamine and LiCl were supplemented to the low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures to screen for their cell division and somatic embryogenesis activity. Incubation of callus or the inoculum employed for low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures with polyethylene glycol was found critical for induction of somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis at a frequency of 1.19, 3.16 and 6.51 per 10(6) cells was achieved in the callus, low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures, respectively. Advantages of employing microdroplet cell cultures for high frequency production of somatic embryos and its application in genetic transformation protocols are discussed. PMID:26548080

  5. A microdroplet cell culture based high frequency somatic embryogenesis system for pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nagan Udhaya; Gnanaraj, Muniraj; Sindhujaa, Vajravel; Viji, Maluventhen; Manoharan, Kumariah

    2015-09-01

    A protocol for high frequency production of somatic embryos was worked out in pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. The protocol involved sequential employment of embryogenic callus cultures, low density cell suspension cultures and a novel microdroplet cell culture system. The microdroplet cell cultures involved culture of a single cell in 10 μI of Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with phytohormones, growth factors and phospholipid precursors. By employing the microdroplet cell cultures, single cells in isolation were grown into cell clones which developed somatic embryos. Further, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, kinetin, polyethylene glycol, putrescine, spermine, spermidine, choline chloride, ethanolamine and LiCl were supplemented to the low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures to screen for their cell division and somatic embryogenesis activity. Incubation of callus or the inoculum employed for low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures with polyethylene glycol was found critical for induction of somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis at a frequency of 1.19, 3.16 and 6.51 per 10(6) cells was achieved in the callus, low density cell suspension cultures and microdroplet cell cultures, respectively. Advantages of employing microdroplet cell cultures for high frequency production of somatic embryos and its application in genetic transformation protocols are discussed.

  6. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  7. Electrolytic Valving Isolation for Cell Co-Culture Microenvironment with Controlled Cell Pairing Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-stromal interaction is a critical process in tumorigenesis. Conventional dish-based co-culture assays simply mix two cell types in the same dish; thus, they are deficient in controlling cell locations and precisely tracking single cell behavior from heterogeneous cell populations. Microfluidic technology can provide a good spatial temporal control of microenvironments, but the control has been typically realized by using external pumps, making long-term cultures cumbersome and bulky. In this work, we present a cell-cell interaction microfluidic platform that can accurately control co-culture microenvironment by using a novel electrolytic cell isolation scheme without using any valves or pneumatic pumps. The proposed microfluidic platform can also precisely control the number of interacting cells and pairing ratios to emulate cancer niches. More than 80% of the chambers captured the desired number of cells. The duration of cell isolation can be adjusted by electrolytic bubble generation and removal. We verified that electrolytic process has a negligible effect on cell viability and proliferation in our platform. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to incorporate electrolytic bubble generation as a cell isolation method in microfluidics. For proof of feasibility, we performed cell-cell interaction assays between prostate cancer (PC3) cells and myoblast (C2C12) cells. The preliminary results demonstrated the potential of using electrolysis for micro-environmental control during cell culture. Also, the ratio controlled cell-cell interaction assays was successfully performed showing that the cell pairing ratios of PC3 to C2C12 affected the proliferation rate of myoblast cells due to increased secretion of growth factors from prostate cancer cells. PMID:25118341

  8. Differential Effect of Culture Temperature and Specific Growth Rate on CHO Cell Behavior in Chemostat Culture

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Mauricio; Becerra, Silvana; Berrios, Julio; Osses, Nelson; Reyes, Juan; Rodríguez-Moyá, María; Gonzalez, Ramon; Altamirano, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Mild hypothermia condition in mammalian cell culture technology has been one of the main focuses of research for the development of breeding strategies to maximize productivity of these production systems. Despite the large number of studies that show positive effects of mild hypothermia on specific productivity of r-proteins, no experimental approach has addressed the indirect effect of lower temperatures on specific cell growth rate, nor how this condition possibly affects less specific productivity of r-proteins. To separately analyze the effects of mild hypothermia and specific growth rate on CHO cell metabolism and recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator productivity as a model system, high dilution rate (0.017 h−1) and low dilution rate (0.012 h−1) at two cultivation temperatures (37 and 33°C) were evaluated using chemostat culture. The results showed a positive effect on the specific productivity of r-protein with decreasing specific growth rate at 33°C. Differential effect was achieved by mild hypothermia on the specific productivity of r-protein, contrary to the evidence reported in batch culture. Interestingly, reduction of metabolism could not be associated with a decrease in culture temperature, but rather with a decrease in specific growth rate. PMID:24699760

  9. Arraying heterotypic single cells on photoactivatable cell-culturing substrates.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yukiko; Nakanishi, Jun; Shimizu, Takahiro; Nakayama, Hidekazu; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Iwai, Hideo; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Horiike, Yasuhiro; Takarada, Tohru; Maeda, Mizuo

    2008-11-18

    This article describes a photochemical method for the site-selective assembly of heterotypic cells on a glass substrate modified with a silane coupling agent having a caged functional group. Silane coupling agents having a carboxyl (COOH), amino (NH 2), hydroxyl (OH), or thiol (SH) group protected by a photocleavable 2-nitrobenzyl group were synthesized to modify the surfaces of glass coverslips. The caged substrates were first coated by the adsorption of a blocking agent, bovine serum albumin (BSA), to make the entire surface non-cell-adhesive and then irradiated at 365 nm under a standard fluorescence microscope. The photocleavage reaction on the surface was followed by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When COS7, NIH3T3, and HEK293 cells were seeded onto these substrates in a serum-free medium, the cells adhered selectively and efficiently to the irradiated regions on the caged NH 2 substrate, whereas the other caged COOH, SH, and OH substrates were nonphotoactivatable for cell adhesion. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of BSA adsorbed to the uncaged substrates revealed that this highly efficient photoactivation on the caged NH 2 substrate arose because of the following reasons: (i) upon photoactivation, BSA adsorbed in advance on the 2-nitrobenzyl groups was readsorbed onto the uncaged functional groups and (ii) BSA readsorbed onto the NH 2 groups became unable to passivate the surface against cell adhesion whereas BSA on the other groups still had normal passivating activity. It was also demonstrated that heterotypic single COS7, NIH3T3, and HEK293 cells were positioned at any desired arrangement on the caged NH 2 substrate by repeating the UV irradiation at optimized array spot sizes and cell seeding in optimized cell concentrations. The present method will be particularly useful in studying the dynamic processes of cell-cell interactions at a single-cell level.

  10. Modulation of the cancer cell transcriptome by culture media formulations and cell density

    PubMed Central

    KIM, SEUNG WOOK; KIM, SUN-JIN; LANGLEY, ROBERT R.; FIDLER, ISAIAH J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how varying the composition of cell culture formulations and growing cancer cells at different densities might affect tumor cell genotype. Specifically, we compared gene expression profiles generated by human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells cultured in different media [minimum essential medium (MEM), Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM), or Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI)-1640 medium] containing different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) or different sera (equine or bovine) that were grown at different cell densities. More than 2,000 genes were differentially modulated by at least a 2-fold difference when MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were 90% confluent and compared with cultures that were 50% confluent. Altering the concentration of serum produced an even more pronounced effect on MDA-MB-231 cancer cell gene expression in that 2,981 genes were differentially expressed in a comparison between cells cultured in 0.1% FBS and same cell density cultures that were maintained in 10% FBS. A comparison between MDA-MB-231 cancer cells that were 90% confluent in MEM, DMEM, or RPMI-1640 media, all containing 10% FBS, resulted in 8,925 differentially expressed genes. Moreover, one-quarter (25.6%) of genes from our genome-wide expression analysis were expressed at significantly different levels by cells grown in MEM, DMEM, or RPMI-1640 media. Genes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were among the genes that were differentially modulated by cells grown in different cell culture formulations and these genes were verified at the protein level. Collectively, these results underscore the importance of accurate reporting and maintenance of uniform culture conditions to ensure reproducible results. PMID:25776572

  11. Comparison of defined culture systems for feeder cell free propagation of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, Veronika; Beil, Stephen; Benvenisty, Nissim; Brehm, Jennifer; Christie, Megan; Ford, Angela; Fox, Victoria; Gokhale, Paul J.; Healy, Lyn; Holm, Frida; Hovatta, Outi; Knowles, Barbara B.; Ludwig, Tenneille E.; McKay, Ronald D. G.; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Oh, Steve K. W.; Pera, Martin F.; Rossant, Janet; Stacey, Glyn N.; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    There are many reports of defined culture systems for the propagation of human embryonic stem cells in the absence of feeder cell support, but no previous study has undertaken a multi-laboratory comparison of these diverse methodologies. In this study, five separate laboratories, each with experience in human embryonic stem cell culture, used a panel of ten embryonic stem cell lines (including WA09 as an index cell line common to all laboratories) to assess eight cell culture methods, with propagation in the presence of Knockout Serum Replacer, FGF-2, and mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cell layers serving as a positive control. The cultures were assessed for up to ten passages for attachment, death, and differentiated morphology by phase contrast microscopy, for growth by serial cell counts, and for maintenance of stem cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry. Of the eight culture systems, only the control and those based on two commercial media, mTeSR1 and STEMPRO, supported maintenance of most cell lines for ten passages. Cultures grown in the remaining media failed before this point due to lack of attachment, cell death, or overt cell differentiation. Possible explanations for relative success of the commercial formulations in this study, and the lack of success with other formulations from academic groups compared to previously published results, include: the complex combination of growth factors present in the commercial preparations; improved development, manufacture, and quality control in the commercial products; differences in epigenetic adaptation to culture in vitro between different ES cell lines grown in different laboratories. PMID:20186512

  12. Differentiation of cultured epithelial cells: Response to toxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.H.; LaMontagne, A.D.; Petito, C.T.; Rong, Xianhui )

    1989-03-01

    Cell culture systems are instrumental in elucidating regulation of normal function and mechanisms of its perturbation by toxic substances. To this end, three applications of epithelial cells cultured with 3T3 feeder layer support are described. First, treatment of the premalignant human epidermal keratinocyte line SCC-12F2 with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate suppressed cell growth and differentiation. This agent produced a biphasic growth response greatly inhibiting cell growth at 1 to 10 nM, but much less above 100 nM. Expression of the differentiated functions involucrin and transglutaminase was found to be inhibited markedly at concentrations above 10 nM. Second, 3-methylcholanthrene toxicity was surveyed in a variety of rat epithelial cell types. The two most sensitive to growth inhibition were epidermal and mammary epithelial cells, while those from bladder, prostate, thyroid, and endometrium were insensitive to growth inhibition. Finally, expression of estrogen receptors in rat endometrial cells was shown to be stimulated by the cAmP-elevating agent forskolin. Maximal stimulation of 3- to 6-fold occurred in 6 hr, compatible with a requirement for protein synthesis. Pursuit of such results will aid in understanding differences in response among cell types and species, in elucidating mechanisms of action of known toxic substances and, ultimately, in predicting toxicity of less well understood agents.

  13. Effects of vibration on differentiation of cultured PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukiko; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangwoo; Katoh, Ayako; Masuzawa, Toru; Kishida, Akio

    2011-03-01

    Different types of physiological-mechanical stress, such as shear stress in vascular endothelial cells or hydrostatic pressure in chondrocytes are well known as regulators of cell function. In this study, the effects of vibration, a type of non-physiological mechanical stimulation, on differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are reported. A nano-vibration system was designed to produce nanometer-scale vibration. The frequency and amplitude of the nano-vibrations were monitored by a capacitance displacement sensor connected to an oscilloscope. When PC12 cells exposed to nerve growth factor were subjected to vibration at 10 kHz, differentiation and elongation of their neurites were promoted earlier in the culture. Vibration promoted differentiation of PC12 cells. This approach could therefore also be promising for determining of the effects of the physical environment on cell differentiation.

  14. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cell Culture Methods and Induction of Differentiation into Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Li, Fei; Kohler, Erin E.; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.; Wary, Kishore K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The studies of stem cell behavior and differentiation in a developmental context is complex, time-consuming and expensive, and for this reason, cell culture remains a method of choice for developmental and regenerative biology and mechanistic studies. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells have the ability to differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs), and the route for differentiation appears to mimic the developmental process that occurs during the formation of an embryo. Traditional EC induction methods from embryonic stem (ES) cells rely mostly on the formation the embryoid body (EB), which employs feeder or feeder-free conditions in the presence or absence of supporting cells. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells can be cultured in feeder-layer or feeder-free conditions. Here, we describe the iPS cell culture methods and induction differentiation of these cells into ECs. We use anti-mouse Flk1 and anti-mouse VE-cadherin to isolate and characterize mouse ECs, because these antibodies are commercially available and their use has been described in the literature, including by our group. The ECs produced by this method have been used by our laboratory, and we have demonstrated their in vivo potential. We also discuss how iPS cells differ in their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells in culture. PMID:25687301

  16. Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cell Culture Methods and Induction of Differentiation into Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Li, Fei; Kohler, Erin E; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B; Wary, Kishore K

    2016-01-01

    The study of stem cell behavior and differentiation in a developmental context is complex, time-consuming, and expensive, and for this reason, cell culture remains a method of choice for developmental and regenerative biology and mechanistic studies. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells have the ability to differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs), and the route for differentiation appears to mimic the developmental process that occurs during the formation of an embryo. Traditional EC induction methods from embryonic stem (ES) cells rely mostly on the formation of embryoid body (EB), which employs feeder or feeder-free conditions in the presence or absence of supporting cells. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells can be cultured in feeder layer or feeder-free conditions. Here, we describe the iPS cell culture methods and induction differentiation of these cells into ECs. We use anti-mouse Flk1 and anti-mouse VE-cadherin to isolate and characterize mouse ECs, because these antibodies are commercially available and their use has been described in the literature, including by our group. The ECs produced by this method have been used by our laboratory, and we have demonstrated their in vivo potential. We also discuss how iPS cells differ in their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells in culture.

  17. The culture of single plant cells: a historical view.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Plant tissue culture, introduced unsuccessfully at the beginning of the twentieth century by Haberlandt, received full confirmation in the late Thirties by the works of Gautheret and Nobécourt, thanks to the discovery of auxin. A further special improvement--the free cell culture--, already fore-told by Haberlandt, was successfully achieved towards the mid-1950s by several physiologists thanks to coconut milk (cytokinin). The English physiologist Frederick Steward (who grouped an excellent American team of research during his twenty years stay at the Cornell University in Ithaca) was able to obtain complete cell differentiation from single cells cultured in vitro and demonstrate the totipotence of plant cells at any stage of development. The historical meaning of the research of Steward's team, accomplished between 1958 and 1970, rests on the concept of plant hormones as regulators of gene activity. In other terms, organogenesis was conceived as an epigenetically controlled series of events in which plant genes were "switched on" or "switched off" by special biomolecules. Steward's research paved the way for molecular plant physiology and inspired future research on the relation between cell receptors and specific hormones. PMID:12680309

  18. Chloroplast Dedifferentiation in Mechanically Isolated Asparagus Cells during Culture Initiation.

    PubMed

    Harikrishna, K; Darby, R; Draper, J

    1992-11-01

    Mechanically isolated asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) mesophyll cells dedifferentiate and divide when cultured in the dark in a medium containing sucrose. A strong correlation was observed between the onset of cell division and a loss of photosynthetic capacity. For the first 8 to 9 d of culture, there was no change in chloroplast size or morphology. However, following this period, the chloroplasts divided to form smaller proplastid-like structures. The gross chlorophyll content of the cell population did not change, suggesting that the loss of photosynthetic potential was not by senescence. Northern analysis showed that mRNA of the small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was undetectable within 1 d postisolation, which was quicker than in dark-treated plants. The mRNA of the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase decreased to low levels within 2 d of cell isolation. Both the large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein showed a gradual reduction in abundance, falling to basal levels by days 6 to 7, which coincided with the onset of rapid cell division. A similar trend was observed with chloroplast rRNA molecules, which decreased to basal levels by day 6 in culture.

  19. Plant cell tissue culture: A potential source of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Dougall, D.K.

    1987-08-01

    Higher plants produce many industrially important products. Among these are drugs and medicinal chemicals, essential oils and flavors, vegetable oils and fats, fine and specialty chemicals, and even some commodity chemicals. Although, currently, whole-plant extraction is the primary means of harvesting these materials, the advent of plant cell tissue culture could be a much more effective method of producing many types of phytochemicals. The use of immobilized plant cells in an advanced bioreactor configuration with excretion of the product into the reactor medium may represent the most straightforward way of commercializing such techniques for lower-value chemicals. Important research and development opportunities in this area include screening for plant cultures for nonmedical, lower-value chemicals; understanding and controlling plant cell physiology and biochemistry; optimizing effective immobilization methods; developing more efficient bioreactor concepts; and perfecting product extraction and purification techniques. 62 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

  1. Inositol-Containing Lipids in Suspension-Cultured Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drøbak, Bjørn K.; Ferguson, Ian B.; Dawson, Alan P.; Irvine, Robin F.

    1988-01-01

    Polar lipids were extracted from suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells and analyzed by thin layer chromatography. Four major inositol-containing compounds were found, and incorporation of [32P]orthosphosphate, [2-3H]glycerol, and myo-[2-3H]inositol was studied. Results showed that phosphatidylinositol-monophosphate is the phospholipid in these cells displaying the most rapid incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate. We suggest that the tracer is incorporated primarily into the phosphomonoester group. Two inositol-containing lipids showed chromatographic behavior similar to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate when using standard thin layer chromatography techniques. The labeling pattern of these compounds, however, reveals that it is unlikely that either of these is identical to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. Should phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate be present in suspension cultured plant cells, our data indicate chemical abundancies substantially lower than previously reported. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16666106

  2. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase from chitosan-treated Sorbus aucuparia cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gaid, Mariam M; Sircar, Debabrata; Beuerle, Till; Mitra, Adinpunya; Beerhues, Ludger

    2009-09-01

    Cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia respond to the addition of chitosan with the accumulation of the biphenyl phytoalexin aucuparin. The carbon skeleton of this inducible defense compound is formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS) from benzoyl-CoA and three molecules of malonyl-CoA. The formation of benzoyl-CoA proceeds via benzaldehyde as an intermediate. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (BD), which converts benzaldehyde into benzoic acid, was detected in cell-free extracts from S. aucuparia cell cultures. BD and BIS were induced by chitosan treatment. The preferred substrate for BD was benzaldehyde (K(m)=49 microM). Cinnamaldehyde and various hydroxybenzaldehydes were relatively poor substrates. BD activity was strictly dependent on the presence of NAD(+) as a cofactor (K(m)=67 microM).

  3. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  4. Interaction of cultured mammalian cells with [125I] diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Bonventre, P F; Saelinger, C B; Ivins, B; Woscinski, C; Amorini, M

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of cell adsorption and pinocytotic uptake of diphtheria toxin by several mammalian cell types were studied. Purified toxin iodinated by a solid-state lactoperoxidase method provided preparations of high specific activity and unaltered biological activity. Dephtheria toxin-sensitive HEp-2 cells and guinea pig macrophage cultures were compared with resistant mouse L-929 cells. At 37 C the resistant cells in monolayer adsorbed and internalized [125I] toxin to a greater extent than did the HEp-2 cell cultures; no significant differences were observed at 5 C. Ammonium chloride protection levels did not alter uptake of toxin by either L-929 OR HEp-2 cells. Biological activity of the iodinated toxin, however, was negated provided the presence of ammonium chloride was maintained. The ammonium salt appears to maintain toxin in a state amenable to antitoxin neutralization. Guinea pig macrophages internalized iodinated toxin to a level 10 times greater than the established cell lines. In spite of the increased uptake of toxin by the endocytic cells, ammonium chloride prevented expression of toxicity. In an artificial system, toxin adsorbed to polystyrene latex spheres and internalized by guinea pig macrophages during phagocytosis did express biological activity. Ammonium chloride afforded some but not total protection against toxin present in the phagocytic vacuoles. The data suggest that two mechanisms of toxin uptake by susceptible cells may be operative. Toxin taken into the cell by a pinocytotic process probably is not ordinarily of physiological significance since it is usually degraded by lysosomal enzymes before it can reach cytoplasmic constituents on which it acts. When large quantities of toxin are pinocytized, toxicity may be expressed before enzymatic degradation is complete. A more specific uptake involving direct passage of the toxin through the plasma membrane may be the mechanism leading to cell death in the majority of instances. PMID

  5. Differential radiation response of cultured endothelial cells and smooth myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.K.; Longenecker, J.P.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1982-09-01

    In vivo observations have suggested that endothelial cells are the most radiosensitive elements of the vascular wall. To test whether this represents an intrinsic differential sensitivity, the response of bovine aortic endothelial cells and smooth myocytes was investigated in confluent cell cultures exposed to single doses of gamma radiation (250, 500, 1,000 or 2,000 rad). Both cell types showed a dose-dependent decrease in attachment efficiency when dissociated and replated at six hours after radiation. However, the attachment efficiency in both cell types was similar when a 72-hour postirradiation incubation period was used prior to dissociation of the cells. Growth inhibition was significantly greater (7- to 10-fold) in endothelial cells than in myocytes when examined four days after attachment. Confluent endothelial monolayers showed a dose-dependent, progressive cell loss during the 72-hour postirradiation period (70% after 1,000 rad); the myocyte cultures showed no radiation effect on the cell numbers. In spite of the reduction in number, the endothelial cells maintained the continuity of their monolayer by compensation with an increase in mean cell size. Endothelial cells developed multiple structural lesions, including an increase in the number and size of residual and lysosomal bodies, electron-lucent cytoplasmic defects, interruptions in the plasma membrane and irregular aggregation of chromatin, causing electron-lucent nuclei. These changes increased in severity with time and dose and were most pronounced 24 to 72 hours after 1,000 rad. No significant ultrastructural alterations were detected in myocytes four days after 2,000 rad.

  6. Growing Three-Dimensional Cartilage-Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.; Prewett, Tacey L.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Process for growing three-dimensional cultures of mammalian cartilage from normal mammalian cells devised. Effected using horizontal rotating bioreactor described in companion article, "Simplified Bioreactor for Growing Mammalian Cells" (MSC-22060). Bioreactor provides quiescent environment with generous supplies of nutrient and oxygen. Initiated with noncartilage cells. Artificially grown tissue resembles that in mammalian cartilage. Potential use in developing therapies for damage to cartilage by joint and back injuries and by such inflammatory diseases as arthritis and temporal-mandibular joint disease. Also used to test nonsteroid anti-inflammation medicines.

  7. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells.

  8. Synaptogenesis of hippocampal neurons in primary cell culture.

    PubMed

    Grabrucker, Andreas; Vaida, Bianca; Bockmann, Jürgen; Boeckers, Tobias M

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal neurons in dissociated cell culture are one of the most extensively used model systems in the field of molecular and cellular neurobiology. Only limited data are however available on the normal time frame of synaptogenesis, synapse number and ultrastructure of excitatory synapses during early development in culture. Therefore, we analyzed the synaptic ultrastructure and morphology and the localization of presynaptic (Bassoon) and postsynaptic (ProSAP1/Shank2) marker proteins in cultures established from rat embryos at embryonic day 19, after 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 days in culture. First excitatory synapses were identified at day 7 with a clearly defined postsynaptic density and presynaptically localized synaptic vesicles. Mature synapses on dendritic spines were seen from day 10 onward, and the number of synapses steeply increased in the third week. Fenestrated or multiple synapses were found after 14 or 21 days, respectively. So-called dense-core vesicles, responsible for the transport of proteins to the active zone of the presynaptic specialization, were seen on cultivation day 3 and 7 and could be detected in axons and especially in the presynaptic subcompartments. The expression and localization of the presynaptic protein Bassoon and of the postsynaptic molecule ProSAP1/Shank2 was found to correlate nicely with the ultrastructural results. This regular pattern of development and maturation of excitatory synapses in hippocampal culture starting from day 7 in culture should ease the comparison of synapse number and morphology of synaptic contacts in this widely used model system.

  9. Contextualizing Hepatocyte Functionality of Cryopreserved HepaRG Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan P; Li, Linhou; Chamberlain, Erica D; Wang, Hongbing; Ferguson, Stephen S

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade HepaRG cells have emerged as a promising alternative to primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and have been featured in over 300 research publications. Most of these reports employed freshly differentiated HepaRG cells that require time-consuming culture (∼28 days) for full differentiation. Recently, a cryopreserved, predifferentiated format of HepaRG cells (termed here "cryo-HepaRG") has emerged as a new model that improves global availability and experimental flexibility; however, it is largely unknown whether HepaRG cells in this format fully retain their hepatic characteristics. Therefore, we systematically investigated the hepatocyte functionality of cryo-HepaRG cultures in context with the range of interindividual variation observed with PHH in both sandwich-culture and suspension formats. These evaluations uncovered a novel adaptation period for the cryo-HepaRG format and demonstrated the impact of extracellular matrix on cryo-HepaRG functionality. Pharmacologically important drug-metabolizing alleles were genotyped in HepaRG cells and poor metabolizer alleles for CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A5 were identified and consistent with higher frequency alleles found in individuals of Caucasian decent. We observed liver enzyme inducibility with aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and pregnane X receptor activators comparable to that of sandwich-cultured PHH. Finally, we show for the first time that cryo-HepaRG supports proper CAR cytosolic sequestration and translocation to hepatocyte nuclei in response to phenobarbital treatment. Taken together, these data reveal important considerations for the use of this cell model and demonstrate that cryo-HepaRG are suitable for metabolism and toxicology screening.

  10. The Effect of Spaceflight on Bone Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the response of bone to mechanical loading (unloading) is extremely important in defining the means of adaptation of the body to a variety of environmental conditions such as during heightened physical activity or in extended explorations of space or the sea floor. The mechanisms of the adaptive response of bone are not well defined, but undoubtedly they involve changes occurring at the cellular level of bone structure. This proposal has intended to examine the hypothesis that the loading (unloading) response of bone is mediated by specific cells through modifications of their activity cytoskeletal elements, and/or elaboration of their extracellular matrices. For this purpose, this laboratory has utilized the results of a number of previous studies defining molecular biological, biochemical, morphological, and ultrastructural events of the reproducible mineralization of a primary bone cell (osteoblast) culture system under normal loading (1G gravity level). These data and the culture system then were examined following the use of the cultures in two NASA shuttle flights, STS-59 and STS-63. The cells collected from each of the flights were compared to respective synchronous ground (1G) control cells examined as the flight samples were simultaneously analyzed and to other control cells maintained at 1G until the time of shuttle launch, at which point they were terminated and studied (defined as basal cells). Each of the cell cultures was assayed in terms of metabolic markers- gene expression; synthesis and secretion of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, including certain cytoskeletal components; assembly of collagen into macrostructural arrays- formation of mineral; and interaction of collagen and mineral crystals during calcification of the cultures. The work has utilized a combination of biochemical techniques (radiolabeling, electrophoresis, fluorography, Western and Northern Blotting, and light microscopic immunofluorescence) and structural

  11. Cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of human adipose tissue stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Seong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Ko, Young Jong; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of cell density on the proliferation activity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) over time in culture. Passage #4 (P4) and #12 (P12) AT-MSCs from two donors were plated at a density of 200 (culture condition 1, CC1) or 5000 (culture condition 2, CC2) cells cm(-2) . After 7 days of incubation, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs cultured in CC1 were thin and spindle-shaped, whereas those cultured in CC2 had extensive cell-to-cell contacts and an expanded cell volume. In addition, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs in CC1 divided more than three times, while those in CC2 divided less than once on average. Flow cytometric analysis using 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester dye showed that the fluorescence intensity of AT-MSCs was lower in CC1 than in CC2. Furthermore, expression of proliferation-associated genes, such as CDC45L, CDC20A and KIF20A, in P4 AT-MSCs was higher in CC1 than in CC2, and this difference was also observed in P12 AT-MSCs. These data demonstrated that cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of MSCs, suggesting that it is feasible to design a strategy to prepare suitable MSCs using specific culture conditions.

  12. Development of a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Torres, A; Diniz, P; Mateus, L; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2012-10-01

    The cross talk between the corpus luteum (CL) and the early embryo, potentially relevant to pregnancy establishment, is difficult to evaluate in the in vivo bovine model. In vitro co-culture of bovine luteal cells and early embryos (days 2-8 post in vitro fertilization) may allow the deciphering of this poorly understood cross talk. However, early embryos and somatic cells require different in vitro culture conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos in order to evaluate their putative steroidogenic and prostanoid interactions. The corpora lutea of the different stages of the estrous cycle (early, mid, and late) were recovered postmortem and enriched luteal cell populations were obtained. In experiments 1 and 2, the effects of CL stage, culture medium (TCM, DMEM-F12, or SOF), serum concentration (5 or 10%), atmosphere oxygen tension (5 or 20%), and refreshment of the medium on the ability of luteal cells to produce progesterone (P(4)) were evaluated. The production of P(4) was significantly increased in early CL cultures, and luteal cells adapted well to simple media (SOF), low serum concentrations (5%), and oxygen tensions (5%). In experiment 3, previous luteal cell cryopreservation did not affect the production of P(4), PGF(2α), and PGE(2) compared to fresh cell cultures. This enables the use of pools of frozen-thawed cells to decrease the variation in cell function associated with primary cell cultures. In experiment 4, mineral oil overlaying culture wells resulted in a 50-fold decrease of the P(4) quantified in the medium, but had no effect on PGF(2α) and PGE(2) quantification. In conclusion, a luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for the 5-d-long co-culture with early embryos was developed.

  13. Development of a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Torres, A; Diniz, P; Mateus, L; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2012-10-01

    The cross talk between the corpus luteum (CL) and the early embryo, potentially relevant to pregnancy establishment, is difficult to evaluate in the in vivo bovine model. In vitro co-culture of bovine luteal cells and early embryos (days 2-8 post in vitro fertilization) may allow the deciphering of this poorly understood cross talk. However, early embryos and somatic cells require different in vitro culture conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos in order to evaluate their putative steroidogenic and prostanoid interactions. The corpora lutea of the different stages of the estrous cycle (early, mid, and late) were recovered postmortem and enriched luteal cell populations were obtained. In experiments 1 and 2, the effects of CL stage, culture medium (TCM, DMEM-F12, or SOF), serum concentration (5 or 10%), atmosphere oxygen tension (5 or 20%), and refreshment of the medium on the ability of luteal cells to produce progesterone (P(4)) were evaluated. The production of P(4) was significantly increased in early CL cultures, and luteal cells adapted well to simple media (SOF), low serum concentrations (5%), and oxygen tensions (5%). In experiment 3, previous luteal cell cryopreservation did not affect the production of P(4), PGF(2α), and PGE(2) compared to fresh cell cultures. This enables the use of pools of frozen-thawed cells to decrease the variation in cell function associated with primary cell cultures. In experiment 4, mineral oil overlaying culture wells resulted in a 50-fold decrease of the P(4) quantified in the medium, but had no effect on PGF(2α) and PGE(2) quantification. In conclusion, a luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for the 5-d-long co-culture with early embryos was developed. PMID:23054443

  14. Over-pressurized bioreactors: application to microbial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marlene; Belo, Isabel; Mota, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In industrial biotechnology, microbial cultures are exposed to different local pressures inside bioreactors. Depending on the microbial species and strains, the increased pressure may have detrimental or beneficial effects on cellular growth and product formation. In this review, the effects of increased air pressure on various microbial cultures growing in bioreactors under moderate total pressure conditions (maximum, 15 bar) will be discussed. Recent data illustrating the diversity of increased air pressure effects at different levels in microbial cells cultivation will be presented, with particular attention to the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on cellular growth and product formation, and the concomitant effect of oxygen pressure on antioxidant cellular defense mechanisms.

  15. Characterization of rhamnogalacturonan I from cotton suspension culture cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Progress has been made on the project of determining the structure of pectins. From recent progress, a covalent crosslink between rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) and xyloglucan was hypothesized and a structure for RGI was proposed. The development of a method to determine the distribution of methyl esterification with pectins also progressed. The degree of methyl esterification of cotton cotyledon cell walls was compared to that of cotton suspension cultures. Cotyledon wall were found to have {approximately}55% of the galacturonic acid esterified whereas suspension culture wall were only about 14% methyl esterified. 10 refs. (SM)

  16. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment. (a) Identification. Cell and tissue...

  17. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment. (a) Identification. Cell and tissue...

  18. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment. (a) Identification. Cell and tissue...

  19. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment. (a) Identification. Cell and tissue...

  20. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment. (a) Identification. Cell and tissue...

  1. Characterizing parameters of Jatropha curcas cell cultures for microgravity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrame, Wagner A.; Pinares, Ania

    2013-06-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a tropical perennial species identified as a potential biofuel crop. The oil is of excellent quality and it has been successfully tested as biodiesel and in jet fuel mixes. However, studies on breeding and genetic improvement of jatropha are limited. Space offers a unique environment for experiments aiming at the assessment of mutations and differential gene expression of crops and in vitro cultures of plants are convenient for studies of genetic variation as affected by microgravity. However, before microgravity studies can be successfully performed, pre-flight experiments are necessary to characterize plant material and validate flight hardware environmental conditions. Such preliminary studies set the ground for subsequent spaceflight experiments. The objectives of this study were to compare the in vitro growth of cultures from three explant sources (cotyledon, leaf, and stem sections) of three jatropha accessions (Brazil, India, and Tanzania) outside and inside the petriGAP, a modified group activation pack (GAP) flight hardware to fit petri dishes. In vitro jatropha cell cultures were established in petri dishes containing a modified MS medium and maintained in a plant growth chamber at 25 ± 2 °C in the dark. Parameters evaluated were surface area of the explant tissue (A), fresh weight (FW), and dry weight (DW) for a period of 12 weeks. Growth was observed for cultures from all accessions at week 12, including subsequent plantlet regeneration. For all accessions differences in A, FW and DW were observed for inside vs. outside the PetriGAPs. Growth parameters were affected by accession (genotype), explant type, and environment. The type of explant influenced the type of cell growth and subsequent plantlet regeneration capacity. However, overall cell growth showed no abnormalities. The present study demonstrated that jatropha in vitro cell cultures are suitable for growth inside PetriGAPs for a period of 12 weeks. The parameters

  2. Microstructured multi-well plate for three-dimensional packed cell seeding and hepatocyte cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy N.; Au, Sam H.; Faris, Ronald A.; Yuen, Po Ki

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a microstructured multi-well plate for enabling three-dimensional (3D) high density seeding and culture of cells through the use of a standard laboratory centrifuge to promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. Each well has microfeatures on the bottom that are comprised of a series of ditches/open microchannels. The dimensions of the microchannels promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro. After cell seeding with a standard pipette, the microstructured multi-well plates were centrifuged to tightly pack cells inside the ditches in order to enhance cell-cell interactions and induce formation of 3D cellular structures during cell culture. Cell-cell interactions were optimized based on cell packing by considering dimensions of the ditches/open microchannels, orientation of the microstructured multi-well plate during centrifugation, cell seeding density, and the centrifugal force and time. With the optimized cell packing conditions, we demonstrated that after 7 days of cell culture, primary human hepatocytes adhered tightly together to form cord-like structures that resembled 3D tissue-like cellular architecture. Importantly, cell membrane polarity was restored without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. PMID:25379107

  3. Spaceflight effects on cultured embryonic chick bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Block, D.; Toma, C. D.; Gerstenfeld, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    A model calcifying system of primary osteoblast cell cultures derived from normal embryonic chicken calvaria has been flown aboard the shuttle, Endeavour, during the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission STS-59 (April 9-20, 1994) to characterize unloading and other spaceflight effects on the bone cells. Aliquots of cells (approximately 7 x 10(6)) grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) were mixed with microcarrier beads, inoculated into cartridge culture units of artificial hollow fiber capillaries, and carried on the shuttle. To promote cell differentiation, cartridge media were supplemented with 12.5 microg/ml ascorbate and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate for varying time periods before and during flight. Four cartridges contained cells from 17-day-old embryos grown for 5 days in the presence of ascorbate prior to launch (defined as flight cells committed to the osteoblastic lineage) and four cartridges supported cells from 14-day-old embryos grown for 10 days with ascorbate before launch (uncommitted flight cells). Eight cartridges prepared in the same manner were maintained under normal gravity throughout the flight (control cells) and four additional identical cartridges under normal gravity were terminated on the day of launch (basal cells). From shuttle launch to landing, all cartridges were contained in closed hardware units maintaining 5% CO2, 37 degrees C, and media delivery at a rate of approximately 1.5 ml/6 h. During day 3 and day 5 of flight, duplicate aliquots of conditioned media and accumulated cell products were collected in both the flight and the control hardware units. At the mission end, comparisons among flight, basal, and control samples were made in cell metabolism, gene expression for type I collagen and osteocalcin, and ultrastructure. Both committed and uncommitted flight cells were metabolically active, as measured by glucose uptake and lactate production, at approximately the

  4. Silicon substrate as a novel cell culture device for myoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tissue and organ regeneration via transplantation of cell bodies in-situ has become an interesting strategy in regenerative medicine. Developments of cell carriers to systematically deliver cell bodies in the damage site have fall shorten on effectively meet this purpose due to inappropriate release control. Thus, there is still need of novel substrate to achieve targeted cell delivery with appropriate vehicles. In the present study, silicon based photovoltaic (PV) devices are used as a cell culturing substrate for the expansion of myoblast mouse cell (C2C12 cells) that offers an atmosphere for regular cell growth in vitro. The adherence, viability and proliferation of the cells on the silicon surface were examined by direct cell counting and fluorescence microscopy. Results It was found that on the silicon surface, cells proliferated over 7 days showing normal morphology, and expressed their biological activities. Cell culture on silicon substrate reveals their attachment and proliferation over the surface of the PV device. After first day of culture, cell viability was 88% and cell survival remained above 86% as compared to the seeding day after the seventh day. Furthermore, the DAPI staining revealed that the initially scattered cells were able to eventually build a cellular monolayer on top of the silicon substrate. Conclusions This study explored the biological applications of silicon based PV devices, demonstrating its biocompatibility properties and found useful for culture of cells on porous 2-D surface. The incorporation of silicon substrate has been efficaciously revealed as a potential cell carrier or vehicle in cell growth technology, allowing for their use in cell based gene therapy, tissue engineering, and therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24885347

  5. Imaging the division process in living tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Khodjakov, Alexey; Rieder, Conly L.

    2008-01-01

    We detail some of the pitfalls encountered when following live cultured somatic cells by light microscopy during mitosis. Principle difficulties in this methodology arise from the necessity to compromise between maintaining the health of the cell while achieving the appropriate temporal and spatial resolutions required for the study. Although the quality of the data collected from fixed cells is restricted only by the quality of the imaging system and the optical properties of the specimen, the major limiting factor when viewing live cells is radiation damage induced during illumination. We discuss practical considerations for minimizing this damage, and for maintaining the general health of the cell, while it is being followed by multi-mode or multi-dimensional light microscopy. PMID:16343936

  6. Arsenite maintains germinative state in cultured human epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Reznikova, Tatiana V.; Phillips, Marjorie A.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2005-08-22

    Arsenic is a well-known carcinogen for human skin, but its mechanism of action and proximal macromolecular targets remain to be elucidated. In the present study, low micromolar concentrations of sodium arsenite maintained the proliferative potential of epidermal keratinocytes, decreasing their exit from the germinative compartment under conditions that promote differentiation of untreated cells. This effect was observed in suspension and in post-confluent surface cultures as measured by colony-forming ability and by proportion of rapidly adhering colony-forming cells. Arsenite-treated cultures exhibited elevated levels of {beta}1-integrin and {beta}-catenin, two proteins enriched in cells with high proliferative potential. Levels of phosphorylated (inactive) glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} were higher in the treated cultures, likely accounting for the increased levels of transcriptionally available {beta}-catenin. These findings suggest that arsenic could have co-carcinogenic and tumor co-promoting activities in the epidermis as a result of increasing the population and persistence of germinative cells targeted by tumor initiators and promoters. These findings also identify a critical signal transduction pathway meriting further exploration in pursuit of this phenomenon.

  7. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fenxi; Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei; Ren, Tongming; Jing, Suhua; Lin, Juntang

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  8. Heat-transfer-method-based cell culture quality assay through cell detection by surface imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Khorshid, Mehran; Somers, Veerle; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Diliën, Hanne; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Cleij, Thomas J; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    Previous work has indicated that surface imprinted polymers (SIPs) allow for highly specific cell detection through macromolecular cell imprints. The combination of SIPs with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique has led to the development of a selective, label-free, low-cost, and user-friendly cell detection assay. In this study, the breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 is used to assess the potential of the platform for monitoring the quality of a cell culture in time. For this purpose, we show that the proposed methodology is able to discriminate between the original cell line (adherent growth, ZR-75-1a) and a descendant cell line (suspension growth, ZR-75-1s). Moreover, ZR-75-1a cells were cultured for a prolonged period of time and analyzed using the heat-transfer method (HTM) at regular time intervals. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermal resistance (Rth) signal decays after a certain number of cell culture passages. This can likely be attributed to a compromised quality of the cell culture due to cross-contamination with the ZR-75-1s cell line, a finding that was confirmed by classical STR DNA profiling. The cells do not express the same functional groups on their membrane, resulting in a weaker bond between cell and imprint, enabling cell removal by mechanical friction, provided by flushing the measuring chamber with buffer solution. These findings were further confirmed by HTM and illustrate that the biomimetic sensor platform can be used as an assay for monitoring the quality of cell cultures in time.

  9. Sertoli cells promote proliferation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in co-culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenxi; Lu, Ming; Liu, Hengxing; Ren, Tongming; Miao, Yingying; Wang, Jingjing

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are a major source for cell transplantation. The proliferative ability of BMSCs is an important determinant of the efficiency of transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are "nurse" cells for development of sperm cells. Our recent study showed that Sertoli cells promoted proliferation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in co-culture. Studies by other groups also showed that Sertoli cells promoted growth of endothelial cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of Sertoli cells on proliferation of BMSCs. Our results showed that Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced proliferation of BMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, co-culture with Sertoli cells also markedly increased mRNA and/or protein expressions of Mdm2, p-Akt and Cyclin D1, and decreased p53 expression in BMSCs (P < 0.01 or < 0.05). These findings indicate that Sertoli cells have the potential to enhance proliferation of BMSCs. PMID:27319049

  10. Effect of radiofrequency radiation in cultured mammalian cells: A review.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashri; Ghosh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile phone related technologies will continue to increase in the foreseeable future worldwide. This has drawn attention to the probable interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation with different biological targets. Studies have been conducted on various organisms to evaluate the alleged ill-effect on health. We have therefore attempted to review those work limited to in vitro cultured cells where irradiation conditions were well controlled. Different investigators have studied varied endpoints like DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cellular morphology and viability to weigh the genotoxic effect of such radiation by utilizing different frequencies and dose rates under various irradiation conditions that include continuous or pulsed exposures and also amplitude- or frequency-modulated waves. Cells adapt to change in their intra and extracellular environment from different chemical and physical stimuli through organized alterations in gene or protein expression that result in the induction of stress responses. Many studies have focused on such effects for risk estimations. Though the effects of microwave radiation on cells are often not pronounced, some investigators have therefore combined radiofrequency radiation with other physical or chemical agents to observe whether the effects of such agents were augmented or not. Such reports in cultured cellular systems have also included in this review. The findings from different workers have revealed that, effects were dependent on cell type and the endpoint selection. However, contradictory findings were also observed in same cell types with same assay, in such cases the specific absorption rate (SAR) values were significant.

  11. Co-culture with mature islet cells augments the differentiation of insulin-producing cells from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Bea Jun; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Choi, Jin Myung; Jin, Sang-Man; Shim, Woo-Young; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2015-02-01

    Islet transplantation has been hampered by the shortage of islet donors available for diabetes therapy. However, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be an alternative source of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) because of their capacity for self-renewal and differentiation. We described a method to efficiently differentiate PSCs into IPCs by co-culturing mature islets with directed-differentiated pancreatic endoderm (PE) cells from mouse and human PSCs. PE cells co-cultured with islet cells or islet cell-derived conditioned medium (CM) showed increased expression levels of β-cell markers; significantly higher levels of proinsulin- and Newport Green (NG)-positive cells, which revealed the characteristics of insulin producing cells; and increased insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation. Co-culturing human PE cells with islet cells was also effective to differentiate PE cells into IPCs. Diabetic nude mice transplanted with co-cultured cells exhibited restored euglycemia, human C-peptide release, and improved glucose tolerance. Immunohistochemistry revealed that insulin+/C-peptide + cells existed in the grafted tissues. These results suggest that mature islet cells can increase the differentiation efficiency of PE cells into mature IPCs via paracrine effects.

  12. Effects of simulated microgravity on mouse Sertoli cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angela, Masini Maria; Prato, Paola; Linda, Scarabelli; Lanza, Cristina; Palmero, Silvio; Pointis, Georges; Ricci, Franco; Strollo, Felice

    With the advent of space flights questions concerning the effects of microgravity (0xG) on hu-man reproduction physiology have got priority Spermatogenesis is a complex, highly ordered process of cell division and differentiation by which spermatogonial cells give rise to mature spermatozoa. Sertoli cells play a crucial role in the development of germ cells and the regulation of spermatogenesis. In this study the influence of 0xG on Sertoli cells was evaluated. A Sertoli cell line from mouse testis (42GPA9) was analyzed for cytoskeletal (using the 3D reconstruction generated from a stack of confocal images) and SHBG changes by immunohistochemistry, for antioxidant agents by RT-PCR and for culture medium lactate concentrations by wet chemistry. Cells were cultured for 6, 24 and 48 hrs on a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine (3D-RPM); static controls (1xG) were positioned on the supporting frame. At the end of each experiment, cultured cells were either fixed in paraformaldehyde or RNA-extracted or used for culture medium lactate measurements as needed. At 0xG Sertoli cytoskeleton got disorganized, microtubules fragmented and SHBG undetectable already after 24 hrs, with alterations wors-ening further until 48 hrs; various antioxidant systems (SOD, GST, PARP, MTs) appreciably increased during the first 24 hrs but significantly decreased at 48 hrs. No changes occurred in 1xG samples. At least initially, 0xG seems to perturb antioxidant protection strategies allowing the testes to support sperm production, thus generating an aging-like state of oxidative stress. Lactate production at 0xG slightly decreased only after 24 hrs. Further experiments need to be carried out in space to investigate upon steroidogenesis and germ cell differentiation within the testis, to rule out eventually pending male infertility consequences, which would be a problem nowadays, when life expectancy increases and male fertility might become a social issue often extending into 60 years

  13. A modular suite of hardware enabling spaceflight cell culture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, Alexander; Klaus, David M.; Stodieck, Louis S.

    2004-01-01

    BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Research Partnership Center (RPC), has developed and operated various middeck payloads launched on 23 shuttle missions since 1991 in support of commercial space biotechnology projects. Modular cell culture systems are contained within the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA) suite of flight-qualified hardware, compatible with Space Shuttle, SPACEHAB, Spacelab and International Space Station (ISS) EXPRESS Rack interfaces. As part of the CGBA family, the Isothermal Containment Module (ICM) incubator provides thermal control, data acquisition and experiment manipulation capabilities, including accelerometer launch detection for automated activation and thermal profiling for culture incubation and sample preservation. The ICM can accommodate up to 8 individually controlled temperature zones. Command and telemetry capabilities allow real-time downlink of data and video permitting remote payload operation and ground control synchronization. Individual cell culture experiments can be accommodated in a variety of devices ranging from 'microgravity test tubes' or standard 100 mm Petri dishes, to complex, fed-batch bioreactors with automated culture feeding, waste removal and multiple sample draws. Up to 3 levels of containment can be achieved for chemical fixative addition, and passive gas exchange can be provided through hydrophobic membranes. Many additional options exist for designing customized hardware depending on specific science requirements.

  14. Microfluidic cell culture system with on-chip hypoxic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Takano, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masato; Futai, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated a portable microfluidic cell culture system with multi-gas (CO2 and O2) incubation which we can cultivate under hypoxia without bulky peripheral apparatus such as gas tanks, regulators, and flow controllers. The system contains a chip of 26 mm × 48 mm which is capable to diffuse CO2 and absorb O2 through a gas-permeable wall of nested media reservoir. The media was water-jacketed with aqueous solution containing 0.8 M sodium bicarbonate as CO2 supply and 1 M sodium ascorbate as oxygen scavenger. The partial CO2 pressure (pCO2) in media reservoir stabilized at least 10.2% ± 0.11% for at least 72 hours. The partial O2 pressure (pO2) in the media reservoir decreased to 4.2%. Portable on-chip hypoxic culture of SV40-T2 cells for 72 h was also demonstrated. PMID:24110727

  15. Bubble wrap for optical trapping and cell culturing

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Craig; McGloin, David

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the bubbles of bubble wrap make ideal trapping chambers for integration with low-cost optical manipulation. The interior of the bubbles is sterile and gas permeable, allowing for the bubbles to be used to store and culture cells, while the flat side of the bubble wrap is of sufficient optical quality to allow for optical trapping inside the bubbles. Through the use of a 100 W bulb to cure hanging droplets of PDMS, a low-cost optical trapping system was constructed. Effector T cells were cultured in bubble wrap for 8 days and then trapped with the PDMS droplet based optical manipulation. These techniques further demonstrate the opportunities for biophysical analysis afforded through repurposing common materials in resource-limited settings. PMID:26504627

  16. Gill cell culture systems as models for aquatic environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bury, Nic R; Schnell, Sabine; Hogstrand, Christer

    2014-03-01

    A vast number of chemicals require environmental safety assessments for market authorisation. To ensure acceptable water quality, effluents and natural waters are monitored for their potential harmful effects. Tests for market authorisation and environmental monitoring usually involve the use of large numbers of organisms and, for ethical, cost and logistic reasons, there is a drive to develop alternative methods that can predict toxicity to fish without the need to expose any animals. There is therefore a great interest in the potential to use cultured fish cells in chemical toxicity testing. This review summarises the advances made in the area and focuses in particular on a system of cultured fish gill cells grown into an epithelium that permits direct treatment with water samples.

  17. Betacyanins from plants and cell cultures of Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, W; Joy, R W; Komamine, A; Metzger, J W; Nimtz, M; Wray, V; Strack, D

    1996-07-01

    Betacyanins from cell cultures of Phytolacca americana were characterized and compared with those of the stems and ripening fruits of the plant. Whereas in fruits prebetanin (betanin 6'-O-sulphate) and its isoform predominate, in the stem and cell cultures feruloylated derivatives occur as the major components. These were rigorously identified by various spectroscopic techniques (DAD-HPLC, NMR, LC-MS and electrospray MS-MS) and carbohydrate analyses as betanidin 5-O-[(5"-O-E-feruloyl)-2'-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl] -beta-D-glucopyranoside, a new betacyanin of higher plants, and betanidin 5-O-(6'-O-E-feruloyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (lampranthin II), together with their isoforms.

  18. Monolithically integrated Helmholtz coils by 3-dimensional printing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Longguang; Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2014-06-23

    3D printing technology is of great interest for the monolithic fabrication of integrated systems; however, it is a challenge to introduce metallic components into 3D printed molds to enable broader device functionality. Here, we develop a technique for constructing a multi-axial Helmholtz coil by injecting a eutectic liquid metal Gallium Indium alloy (EGaIn) into helically shaped orthogonal cavities constructed in a 3D printed block. The tri-axial solenoids each carry up to 3.6 A of electrical current and produce magnetic field up to 70 G. Within the central section of the coil, the field variation is less than 1% and is in agreement with theory. The flow rates and critical pressures required to fill the 3D cavities with liquid metal also agree with theoretical predictions and provide scaling trends for filling the 3D printed parts. These monolithically integrated solenoids may find future applications in electronic cell culture platforms, atomic traps, and miniaturized chemical analysis systems based on nuclear magnetic resonance.

  19. Monolithically integrated Helmholtz coils by 3-dimensional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longguang; Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2014-06-01

    3D printing technology is of great interest for the monolithic fabrication of integrated systems; however, it is a challenge to introduce metallic components into 3D printed molds to enable broader device functionality. Here, we develop a technique for constructing a multi-axial Helmholtz coil by injecting a eutectic liquid metal Gallium Indium alloy (EGaIn) into helically shaped orthogonal cavities constructed in a 3D printed block. The tri-axial solenoids each carry up to 3.6 A of electrical current and produce magnetic field up to 70 G. Within the central section of the coil, the field variation is less than 1% and is in agreement with theory. The flow rates and critical pressures required to fill the 3D cavities with liquid metal also agree with theoretical predictions and provide scaling trends for filling the 3D printed parts. These monolithically integrated solenoids may find future applications in electronic cell culture platforms, atomic traps, and miniaturized chemical analysis systems based on nuclear magnetic resonance.

  20. Construction of photoenergetic mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y.; Wada, Takeyoshi; Kino, Kuniki; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    The proton motive force (PMF) is bio-energetically important for various cellular reactions to occur. We developed PMF-photogenerating mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells. An archaebacterial rhodopsin, delta-rhodopsin, which is a light-driven proton pump derived from Haloterrigena turkmenica, was expressed in the mitochondria of CHO-K1 cells. The constructed stable CHO-K1 cell lines showed suppression of cell death induced by rotenone, a pesticide that inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity involved in PMF generation through the electron transport chain. Delta-rhodopsin was also introduced into the mitochondria of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The constructed stable SH-SY5Y cell lines showed suppression of dopaminergic neuronal cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an inducer of Parkinson's disease models, which acts through inhibition of complex I activity. These results suggest that the light-activated proton pump functioned as a PMF generator in the mitochondria of mammalian cells, and suppressed cell death induced by inhibition of respiratory PMF generation. PMID:23567447

  1. Peptide Hydrogelation and Cell Encapsulation for 3D Culture of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuzhi S.; Nguyen, Thu A.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture plays an invaluable role in tumor biology by providing in vivo like microenviroment and responses to therapeutic agents. Among many established 3D scaffolds, hydrogels demonstrate a distinct property as matrics for 3D cell culture. Most of the existing pre-gel solutions are limited under physiological conditions such as undesirable pH or temperature. Here, we report a peptide hydrogel that shows superior physiological properties as an in vitro matrix for 3D cell culture. The 3D matrix can be accomplished by mixing a self-assembling peptide directly with a cell culture medium without any pH or temperature adjustment. Results of dynamic rheological studies showed that this hydrogel can be delivered multiple times via pipetting without permanently destroying the hydrogel architecture, indicating the deformability and remodeling ability of the hydrogel. Human epithelial cancer cells, MCF-7, are encapsulated homogeneously in the hydrogel matrix during hydrogelation. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture, cells residing in the hydrogel matrix grow as tumor-like clusters in 3D formation. Relevant parameters related to cell morphology, survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed using MCF-7 cells in 3D hydrogels. Interestingly, treatment of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug, can cause a significant decrease of cell viability of MCF-7 clusters in hydrogels. The responses to cisplatin were dose- and time-dependent, indicating the potential usage of hydrogels for drug testing. Results of confocal microscopy and Western blotting showed that cells isolated from hydrogels are suitable for downstream proteomic analysis. The results provided evidence that this peptide hydrogel is a promising 3D cell culture material for drug testing. PMID:23527204

  2. Method for culturing mammalian cells in a horizontally rotated bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A bio-reactor system where cell growth microcarrier beads are suspended in a zero head space fluid medium by rotation about a horizontal axis and where the fluid is continuously oxygenated from a tubular membrane which rotates on a shaft together with rotation of the culture vessel. The oxygen is continuously throughput through the membrane and disbursed into the fluid medium along the length of the membrane.

  3. Preparation of Cell Cultures and Vaccinia Virus Stocks.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Catherine A; Earl, Patricia L; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    The culturing of cell lines used with vaccinia virus, both as monolayer and in suspension, is described. The preparation of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) is presented for use in the production of the highly attenuated and host range-restricted modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) strain of vaccinia virus. Protocols for the preparation, titration, and trypsinization of vaccinia virus stocks, as well as viral DNA preparation and virus purification methods are also included.

  4. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Coyne G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and

  5. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  6. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  7. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Neuronal Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-05-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides the ability to detect and identify a broad range of analytes and their spatial distributions from a variety of sample types, including tissue sections. Here we describe an approach for probing neuropeptides from sparse cell cultures using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MSI—at single cell spatial resolution—in both MS and tandem MS modes. Cultures of Aplysia californica neurons are grown on an array of glass beads embedded in a stretchable layer of Parafilm M. As the membrane is stretched, the beads/neurons are separated physically and the separated beads/neurons analyzed via MALDI TOF MS. Compared with direct MS imaging of samples, the stretching procedure enhances analyte extraction and incorporation into the MALDI matrix, with negligible analyte spread between separated beads. MALDI tandem MSI using the stretched imaging approach yields localization maps of both parent and fragment ions from Aplysia pedal peptide, thereby confirming peptide identification. This methodology represents a flexible platform for MSI investigation of a variety of cell cultures, including functioning neuronal networks.

  8. Increasing sucrose concentrations promote phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in grapevine cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Maura; Righetti, Laura; Tassoni, Annalisa

    2011-02-15

    Vitis vinifera cell suspensions are a suitable model system to study the metabolic regulation of a large range of high valuable polyphenols that are important in understanding the physiology of the plant and for nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and medical purposes. Increasing sucrose concentrations were found to promote cell growth and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in grape cell cultures obtained from cv. Barbera immature berries. This led to an intracellular accumulation and/or release into the media of specific polyphenol families (in particular, anthocyanins, catechins and stilbenes). This effect was partially correlated with a sucrose modulation of the transcription of some key biosynthetic enzymes, such as phenylalanine ammonia lyase, chalcone synthase, chalcone-flavanone isomerase and stilbene synthase. Total catechin amounts, both endogenous and released in the media, were increased in proportion to the sugar concentration, as were anthocyanin and stilbene production. Sugar treatment notably improved the endogenous accumulation and release in the culture media of resveratroloside, a resveratrol mono-glycoside, which is the most abundant stilbene found in grape cultures, especially in cv. Barbera. We hypothesize that high sucrose concentrations (exceeding those naturally-occurring in ripe berries) could play a role in plant defense via the induction of secondary metabolites, such as stilbenes.

  9. The culture of human embryonic stem cells in microchannel perfusion bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korin, Natanel; Bransky, Avishay; Dinnar, Uri; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2007-12-01

    The culture of human Embryonic Stem (ES) cells in microchannel bioreactors can be highly beneficial for ES cell biology studies and ES tissue engineering applications. In the present study we examine the use of Human Foreskin Fibroblasts (HFF) cells as feeder cells for human ES culture in a microchannel perfusion bioreactor. PDMS microchannels (depth:130 micron) were fabricated using conventional soft-lithography techniques. The channels were sterilized, coated with a human fibronectin solution and seeded with cells. Following a period of static incubation, culture medium was perfused through the channels at various flow rates and cell growth was monitored throughout the culture process. Mass transport and fluid mechanics models were used to evaluate the culture conditions (shear stress, oxygen levels within the micro-bioreactor as a function of the medium flow rate. The conditions for successful long-term culture (>7 days) of HFF under flow were established. Experiments with human embryonic stem cells cultured in microchannels show that the conditions essential to co-culture human ES cell on HFF cells under perfusion differ from the conditions necessary for HFF cell culture. Human ES cells were found to be highly sensitive to flow and culture conditions and did not grow under flow rates which were suitable for HFF long-term culture. Successful culture of undifferentiated human ES cell colonies in a perfusion micro-bioreactor is a basic step towards utilizing microfluidic techniques to explore stem cell biology.

  10. In vitro culture of coxsackievirus group B, type 3 immune spleen cells on infected endothelial cells and biological activity of the cultured cells in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, S A; Job, L P; Woodruff, J F

    1984-01-01

    Spleen cells from male BALB/c mice infected 7 days earlier by an intraperitoneal injection of 3 X 10(4) PFU of a myocarditic strain of coxsackievirus B-3 lysed virus-infected endothelial cells in a 51Cr release assay. Cytotoxic activity in the in vivo sensitized spleen cell population could be further increased by culturing the immune spleen cells from infected mice on virus-infected or uninfected endothelial cells for 6 to 7 days in vitro. Cytotoxicity of in vitro cultured spleen cells to infected targets was mediated by T lymphocytes since reactivity was abolished by treatment of the spleen cells with anti-thy 1.2 serum and complement. Reciprocal assays with BALB/c and C57BL cells indicated that maximum cytotoxicity occurred when spleen cells were sensitized on syngeneic endothelial cells. Other experiments showed that spleen cells sensitized to coxsackievirus B-3 or encephalomyocarditis virus were selectively cytolytic to targets infected with the homologous virus. Adoptive transfer of T cells cultured in vitro on infected endothelial cells retained their ability to induce myocarditis in T-lymphocyte-deficient mice. Images PMID:6319285

  11. Computerized microfluidic cell culture using elastomeric channels and Braille displays.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Futai, Nobuyuki; Cho, Brenda S; Takayama, Shuichi

    2004-11-01

    Computer-controlled microfluidics would advance many types of cellular assays and microscale tissue engineering studies wherever spatiotemporal changes in fluidics need to be defined. However, this goal has been elusive because of the limited availability of integrated, programmable pumps and valves. This paper demonstrates how a refreshable Braille display, with its grid of 320 vertically moving pins, can power integrated pumps and valves through localized deformations of channel networks within elastic silicone rubber. The resulting computerized fluidic control is able to switch among: (i) rapid and efficient mixing between streams, (ii) multiple laminar flows with minimal mixing between streams, and (iii) segmented plug-flow of immiscible fluids within the same channel architecture. The same control method is used to precisely seed cells, compartmentalize them into distinct subpopulations through channel reconfiguration, and culture each cell subpopulation for up to 3 weeks under perfusion. These reliable microscale cell cultures showed gradients of cellular behavior from C2C12 myoblasts along channel lengths, as well as differences in cell density of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiation patterns, both programmable through different flow rates of serum-containing media. This technology will allow future microscale tissue or cell studies to be more accessible, especially for high-throughput, complex, and long-term experiments. The microfluidic actuation method described is versatile and computer programmable, yet simple, well packaged, and portable enough for personal use.

  12. Computerized microfluidic cell culture using elastomeric channels and Braille displays

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Futai, Nobuyuki; Cho, Brenda S.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    Computer-controlled microfluidics would advance many types of cellular assays and microscale tissue engineering studies wherever spatiotemporal changes in fluidics need to be defined. However, this goal has been elusive because of the limited availability of integrated, programmable pumps and valves. This paper demonstrates how a refreshable Braille display, with its grid of 320 vertically moving pins, can power integrated pumps and valves through localized deformations of channel networks within elastic silicone rubber. The resulting computerized fluidic control is able to switch among: (i) rapid and efficient mixing between streams, (ii) multiple laminar flows with minimal mixing between streams, and (iii) segmented plug-flow of immiscible fluids within the same channel architecture. The same control method is used to precisely seed cells, compartmentalize them into distinct subpopulations through channel reconfiguration, and culture each cell subpopulation for up to 3 weeks under perfusion. These reliable microscale cell cultures showed gradients of cellular behavior from C2C12 myoblasts along channel lengths, as well as differences in cell density of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiation patterns, both programmable through different flow rates of serum-containing media. This technology will allow future microscale tissue or cell studies to be more accessible, especially for high-throughput, complex, and long-term experiments. The microfluidic actuation method described is versatile and computer programmable, yet simple, well packaged, and portable enough for personal use. PMID:15514025

  13. Immunoprecipitation of membrane proteins of cultured human sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Grófová, M; Forchhammer, J; Lizonová, A; Popovic, M

    1981-01-01

    Human sarcoma associated antigens (HSAA) have previously been identified by indirect immune fluorescence in human sarcoma cells in culture using sera from patients bearing different types of sarcoma. To further characterize these HSAA, surface proteins of cultured cells were labeled with 125Iodine, [3H]-glucosamine and [35S]-methionine and solubilized. After immunoprecipitation labeled proteins were detected in immune complexes by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, which allowed comparison with antigens described by other groups. A surface protein (Mr 96 000) was precipitated with sera from sarcoma bearing patients, and two glycoproteins (Mr 115 000 and 85 000) were preferentially precipitated with antisera from rabbits immunized with membranes from two human sarcoma cell lines. At least two of these proteins were found in each of five human sarcoma cell lines studied (U-4SS, U-3930S, U-20S, B-5GT and B-6FS). None of the proteins were precipitated with three human control sera, and only occasionally a faint band was observed in immunoprecipitates from control cells (B-25F, B-41B, B-42FC, U-2S, and U-393S with the immune sera. These proteins are probably some of the antigens responsible for the immune fluorescence observed in determination of HSAA. However, purification of the proteins and competition experiments are needed before this can be finally established.

  14. Photodamage of the cells in culture sensitized with bilirubin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenkova, O. A.; Plavskaya, L. G.; Mikulich, A. V.; Leusenko, I. A.; Tretyakova, A. I.; Plavskii, V. Yu

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that exposure to radiation of LED sources of light with an emission band maximum at about 465 and 520 nm having substantially identical damaging effects on animal cells in culture, that are in a logarithmic growth phase and preincubated with pigment. Photobiological effect is caused by photodynamic processes involving singlet oxygen generated by triplet excited sensitizer. Mono-exponential type dependence of cell survival on the energy dose indicates that it is bilirubin that acts as a sensitizer but not its photoproducts. The inclusion of bilirubin in the cells, where it is primarily localized in the mitochondria cells, it is accompanied by multiple amplification photochemical stability compared to pigment molecules bound with albumin

  15. Isolation, culture and analysis of adult subependymal neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Belenguer, Germán; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Ferrón, Sacri R; Morante-Redolat, José Manuel; Fariñas, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Individual cells dissected from the subependymal neurogenic niche of the adult mouse brain proliferate in medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and/or epidermal growth factor (EGF) as mitogens, to produce multipotent clonal aggregates called neurospheres. These cultures constitute a powerful tool for the study of neural stem cells (NSCs) provided that they allow the analysis of their features and potential capacity in a controlled environment that can be modulated and monitored more accurately than in vivo. Clonogenic and population analyses under mitogen addition or withdrawal allow the quantification of the self-renewing and multilineage potency of these cells and the identification of the mechanisms involved in these properties. Here, we describe a set of procedures developed and/or modified by our group including several experimental options that can be used either independently or in combination for the ex vivo assessment of cell properties of NSCs obtained from the adult subependymal niche. PMID:27016251

  16. Methods for Efficient Elimination of Mitochondrial DNA from Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Nataliya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Kousoulas, Konstantin G.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we document that persistent mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) damage due to mitochondrial overexpression of the Y147A mutant uracil-N-glycosylase as well as mitochondrial overexpression of bacterial Exonuclease III or Herpes Simplex Virus protein UL12.5M185 can induce a complete loss of mtDNA (ρ0 phenotype) without compromising the viability of cells cultured in media supplemented with uridine and pyruvate. Furthermore, we use these observations to develop rapid, sequence-independent methods for the elimination of mtDNA, and demonstrate utility of these methods for generating ρ0 cells of human, mouse and rat origin. We also demonstrate that ρ0 cells generated by each of these three methods can serve as recipients of mtDNA in fusions with enucleated cells. PMID:27136098

  17. Preparative electrophoresis of cultured human cells: Effect of cell cycle phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.; Goolsby, C. L.; Walker, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Human epithelioid T-1E cells were cultured in suspension and subjected to density gradient electrophoresis upward in a vertical column. It is indicated that the most rapidly migrating cells were at the beginning of the cell cycle and the most slowly migrating cells were at the end of the cell cycle. The fastest migrating cells divided 24 hr later than the slowest migrating cells. Colonies developing from slowly migrating cells had twice as many cells during exponential growth as did the most rapidly migrating cells, and the numbers of cells per colony at any time was inversely related to the electrophoretic migration rate. The DNA measurements by fluorescence flow cytometry indicates that the slowest migrating cell populations are enriched in cells that have twice as much DNA as the fastest migrating cells. It is concluded that electrophoretic mobility of these cultured human cells declines steadily through the cell cycle and that the mobility is lowest at the end of G sub 2 phase and highest at the beginning of G sub 1 phase.

  18. Culturing of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Poly-3-Hydroxybutyrate Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, N V; Bonartsev, A P; Zharkova, I I; Makhina, T K; Myshkina, V L; Kharitonova, E P; Voinova, V V; Bonartseva, G A; Shaitan, K V; Belyavskii, A V

    2015-08-01

    We studied the possibility of long-term culturing of mouse mesenchymal stem cells on a porous scaffold made of biocompatible polymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate. The cells remained viable for at least 2 months and passed more than 65 population doublings in culture. Culturing on the scaffold did not change surface phenotype of cells. 3D poly-3-hydroxybutyrate scaffolds are appropriate substrate for long-term culturing of mesenchymal stem cells.

  19. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000-2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  20. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000–2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  1. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  2. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster t