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Sample records for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

  1. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  2. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Yong, J H E; McGowan, T; Redmond-Misner, R; Beca, J; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Hoch, J S

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption.

  3. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Yong, J.H.E.; McGowan, T.; Redmond-Misner, R.; Beca, J.; Warde, P.; Gutierrez, E.; Hoch, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. Methods An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. Results From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Conclusions Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption. PMID:27330359

  4. Comparison of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional conformal treatment plans in gastric cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adas, Yasemin Guzle; Andrieu, Meltem Nalca; Hicsonmez, Ayse; Atakul, Tugba; Dirican, Bahar; Aktas, Caner; Yilmaz, Sercan; Akyurek, Serap; Gokce, Saban Cakir; Ergocen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative chemoradiotherapy is accepted as standard treatment for stage IB-IV, M0 gastric cancer. Radiotherapy (RT) planning of gastric cancer is important because of the low radiation tolerance of surrounding critical organs. The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric aspects of 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) treatment plans, with the twin aims of evaluating the adequacy of 2D planning fields on coverage of planning target volume (PTV) and 3D conformal plans for both covering PTV and reducing the normal tissue doses. Thirty-six patients with stage II-IV gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using 3DRT. For each patient, a second 2D treatment plan was generated. The two techniques were compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. 3DRT provides more adequate coverage of the target volume. Comparative DVHs for the left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses with the 3D technique. 3DRT produced better dose distributions and reduced radiation doses to left kidney and spinal cord compared to the 2D technique. For this reason it can be predicted that 3DRT will result in better tumor control and less normal tissue complications.

  5. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Gastric Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Tomotherapy (registered) and Conventional Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Skinner, Matthew; Schultz, Brenda; Cardoso, Marlene; Bell, Chris; Ung, Yee C.

    2010-07-01

    Some patients with gastric cancer benefit from post-operative chemo-radiotherapy, but adequately irradiating the planning target volume (PTV) whilst avoiding organs at risk (OAR) can be difficult. We evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (TT). TT, 2 and 5-field (F) CRT and IMRT treatment plans with the same PTV coverage were generated for 5 patients and compared. Median values are reported. The volume of left/right kidney receiving at least 20Gy (V20) was 57/51% and 51/60% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 28/14% for TT and 27/19% for IMRT. The volume of liver receiving at least 30Gy (V30) was 45% and 62% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 37% for TT and 35% for IMRT. With TT, 98% of the PTV received 95-105% of the prescribed dose, compared with 45%, 34% and 28% for 2F-CRT, 5F-CRT and IMRT respectively. Using conventional metrics, conventional IMRT can achieve comparable PTV coverage and OAR sparing to TT, but at the expense of PTV dose heterogeneity. Both irradiate large volumes of normal tissue to low doses. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the clinical impact of these technologies.

  6. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for pancreatic malignancies: Dosimetric comparison with sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nabavizadeh, Nima Simeonova, Anna O.; Waller, Joseph G.; Romer, Jeanna L.; Monaco, Debra L.; Elliott, David A.; Tanyi, James A.; Fuss, Martin; Thomas, Charles R.; Holland, John M.

    2014-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) is an iteration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), both of which deliver highly conformal dose distributions. Studies have shown the superiority of VMAT and IMRT in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing. This is the first study examining the benefits of VMAT in pancreatic cancer for doses more than 55.8 Gy. A planning study comparing 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT was performed in 20 patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatments were planned for a 25-fraction delivery of 45 Gy to a large field followed by a reduced-volume 8-fraction external beam boost to 59.4 Gy in total. OARs and PTV doses, conformality index (CI) deviations from 1.0, monitor units (MUs) delivered, and isodose volumes were compared. IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 for the large-field and the boost plans were equivalent (large field: 0.032 and 0.046, respectively; boost: 0.042 and 0.037, respectively; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Both IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 were statistically superior to 3D-CRT (large field: 0.217, boost: 0.177; p < 0.05 for all comparisons). VMAT showed reduction of the mean dose to the boost PTV (VMAT: 61.4 Gy, IMRT: 62.4 Gy, and 3D-CRT: 62.3 Gy; p < 0.05). The mean number of MUs per fraction was significantly lower for VMAT for both the large-field and the boost plans. VMAT delivery time was less than 3 minutes compared with 8 minutes for IMRT. Although no statistically significant dose reduction to the OARs was identified when comparing VMAT with IMRT, VMAT showed a reduction in the volumes of the 100% isodose line for the large-field plans. Dose escalation to 59.4 Gy in pancreatic cancer is dosimetrically feasible with shorter treatment times, fewer MUs delivered, and comparable CIs for VMAT when compared with IMRT.

  7. Patient-Reported Outcomes After 3-Dimensional Conformal, Intensity-Modulated, or Proton Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Phillip J.; Paly, Jonathan J.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Sanda, Martin G.; Sandler, Howard. M.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Talcott, James A.; Coen, John J.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Shipley, William U.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies have suggested differing toxicity patterns for patients with prostate cancer who receive treatment with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or proton beam therapy (PBT). METHODS The authors reviewed patient-reported outcomes data collected prospectively using validated instruments that assessed bowel and urinary quality of life (QOL) for patients with localized prostate cancer who received 3DCRT (n = 123), IMRT (n = 153) or PBT (n = 95). Clinically meaningful differences in mean QOL scores were defined as those exceeding half the standard deviation of the baseline mean value. Changes from baseline were compared within groups at the first post-treatment follow-up (2–3 months from the start of treatment) and at 12 months and 24 months. RESULTS At the first post-treatment follow-up, patients who received 3DCRT and IMRT, but not those who received PBT, reported a clinically meaningful decrement in bowel QOL. At 12 months and 24 months, all 3 cohorts reported clinically meaningful decrements in bowel QOL. Patients who received IMRT reported clinically meaningful decrements in the domains of urinary irritation/obstruction and incontinence at the first post-treatment follow-up. At 12 months, patients who received PBT, but not those who received IMRT or 3DCRT, reported a clinically meaningful decrement in the urinary irritation/ obstruction domain. At 24 months, none of the 3 cohorts reported clinically meaningful changes in urinary QOL. CONCLUSIONS Patients who received 3DCRT, IMRT, or PBT reported distinct patterns of treatment-related QOL. Although the timing of toxicity varied between the cohorts, patients reported similar modest QOL decrements in the bowel domain and minimal QOL decrements in the urinary domains at 24 months. Prospective randomized trials are needed to further examine these differences. PMID:23436283

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jo, In Young; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2017-01-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with early left-sided breast cancer. Twenty left breast cancer patients treated with whole breast radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in this study, and the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were generated for each patient. To evaluate the dose delivered to the skin, 2 mm thickness skin (2-mm skin) and 3 mm thickness skin (3-mm skin) were contoured and a dosimetric comparison between the 2 plans was performed. The target volume coverage was better in IMRT than in 3D-CRT. The mean dose was 50.8 Gy for 3D-CRT and 51.1 Gy for IMRT. V40Gy was 99.4% for 3D-CRT and 99.9% for IMRT. In the case of skin, the mean dose was higher in 3D-CRT than in IMRT (mean dose of 2-mm skin: 32.8 Gy and 24.2 Gy; mean dose of 3-mm skin: 37.2 Gy and 27.8 Gy, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). These results indicated that the skin-sparing effect is more prominent in IMRT compared to 3D-CRT without compromising the target volume coverage.

  9. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Steven H.; Wang Lu; Myles, Bevan; Thall, Peter F.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need

  10. Dosimetric study of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer and comparison with 3-dimensional conformal technique for definitive radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Falk, Alexander T.; Auberdiac, Pierre; Cartier, Lysian; Vallard, Alexis; Ollier, Edouard; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Khodri, Moustapha; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: For patients with cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) improves target coverage and allows dose escalation while reducing the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). In this study, we compared dosimetric parameters among 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), “step-and-shoot” IMRT, and volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in a series of patients with cervical cancer receiving definitive radiotherapy. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) from December 2008 to March 2010 at our department were selected for this study. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated following the guidelines of the Gyn IMRT consortium that included cervix, uterus, parametrial tissues, and the pelvic nodes including presacral. The median age was 57 years (range: 30 to 85 years). All 10 patients had squamous cell carcinoma with Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB-IIIB. All patients were treated by VMAT. OAR doses were significantly reduced for plans with intensity-modulated technique compared with 3D-CRT except for the dose to the vagina. Between the 2 intensity-modulated techniques, significant difference was observed for the mean dose to the small intestine, to the benefit of VMAT (p < 0.001). There was no improvement in terms of OARs sparing for VMAT although there was a tendency for a slightly decreased average dose to the rectum: − 0.65 Gy but not significant (p = 0.07). The intensity modulation techniques have many advantages in terms of quality indexes, and particularly OAR sparing, compared with 3D-CRT. Following the ongoing technologic developments in modern radiotherapy, it is essential to evaluate the intensity-modulated techniques on prospective studies of a larger scale.

  11. Dosimetric comparison of 3-dimensional conformal and field-in-field radiotherapy techniques for the adjuvant treatment of early stage endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Acar, Hilal; Buyukyoruk, Ahmet; Cobanoglu, Gokcen; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Yavas, Ozlem; Celik, Cetin

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare field-in-field radiotherapy (FIF) with conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in terms of dosimetric benefits for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Ten consecutive early stage endometrial cancer patients who underwent adjuvant external beam radiotherapy were included in the study. For each patient, two different treatment plans were created. FIF and CRT plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the organ at risk (OAR) volumes including rectum, bladder, bowel, bilateral femurs and bone marrow, the dose homogeneity index, and the monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique significantly reduced the maximum dose of the PTV, rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow (p values were: <0.001, 0.031, 0.003, <0.001, 0.001, 0.001 and <0.001 respectively). When the OAR volumes irradiated with >30 and >45 Gy were compared, the results were in favor of the FIF technique. The volumes of rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow receiving more than the prescription dose of 45 Gy were significantly reduced with FIF technique (p values were 0.016, 0.039, 0.01, 0.04, 0.037 and 0.01 respectively). The dose homogeneity index (DHI) was significantly improved with FIF technique (p < 0.001). FIF allowed more homogeneous dose distribution in the PTV and reduced the doses received by OAR. Considering the lower maximum doses in the OAR and PTV, FIF technique seems to be more advantageous than CRT during adjuvant radiotherapy for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A planning comparison of 3-dimensional conformal multiple static field, conformal arc, and volumetric modulated arc therapy for the delivery of stereotactic body radiotherapy for early stage lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, Mike; Roa, Wilson; Drodge, Suzanne; Ghosh, Sunita; Murray, Brad; Scrimger, Rufus; Gabos, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare dosimetric variables as well as treatment times of multiple static fields (MSFs), conformal arcs (CAs), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques for the treatment of early stage lung cancer using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Treatments of 23 patients previously treated with MSF of 48 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) in 4 fractions were replanned using CA and VMAT techniques. Dosimetric parameters of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915 trial were evaluated, along with the van't Riet conformation number (CN), monitor units (MUs), and actual and calculated treatment times. Paired t-tests for noninferiority were used to compare the 3 techniques. CA had significant dosimetric improvements over MSF for the ratio of the prescription isodose volume to PTV (R{sub 100%}, p < 0.0001), the maximum dose 2 cm away from the PTV (D{sub 2} {sub cm}, p = 0.005), and van't Riet CN (p < 0.0001). CA was not statistically inferior to MSF for the 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R{sub 50%}, p = 0.05). VMAT was significantly better than CA for R{sub 100%} (p < 0.0001), R{sub 50%} (p < 0.0001), D{sub 2} {sub cm} (p = 0.006), and CN (p < 0.0001). CA plans had significantly shorter treatment times than those of VMAT (p < 0.0001). Both CA and VMAT planning showed significant dosimetric improvements and shorter treatment times over those of MSF. VMAT showed the most favorable dosimetry of all 3 techniques; however, the dosimetric effect of tumor motion was not evaluated. CA plans were significantly faster to treat, and minimize the interplay of tumor motion and dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion effects. Given these results, CA has become the treatment technique of choice at our facility.

  13. [Dosimetric evaluation of conformal radiotherapy: conformity factor].

    PubMed

    Oozeer, R; Chauvet, B; Garcia, R; Berger, C; Felix-Faure, C; Reboul, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) is to treat the Planning Target Volume (PTV) to the prescribed dose while reducing doses to normal tissues and critical structures, in order to increase local control and reduce toxicity. The evaluation tools used for optimizing treatment techniques are three-dimensional visualization of dose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). These tools, however, do not fully quantify the conformity of dose distributions to the PTV. Specific tools were introduced to measure this conformity for a given dose level. We have extended those definitions to different dose levels, using a conformity index (CI). CI is based on the relative volumes of PTV and outside the PTV receiving more than a given dose. This parameter has been evaluated by a clinical study including 82 patients treated for lung cancer and 82 patients treated for prostate cancer. The CI was low for lung dosimetric studies (0.35 at the prescribed dose 66 Gy) due to build-up around the GTV and to spinal cord sparing. For prostate dosimetric studies, the CI was higher (0.57 at the prescribed dose 70 Gy). The CI has been used to compare treatment plans for lung 3DCRT (2 vs 3 beams) and prostate 3DCRT (4 vs 7 beams). The variation of CI with dose can be used to optimize dose prescription.

  14. A customized bolus produced using a 3-dimensional printer for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Wook; Shin, Hun-Joo; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Boluses are used in high-energy radiotherapy in order to overcome the skin sparing effect. In practice though, commonly used flat boluses fail to make a perfect contact with the irregular surface of the patient's skin, resulting in air gaps. Hence, we fabricated a customized bolus using a 3-dimensional (3D) printer and evaluated its feasibility for radiotherapy. We designed two kinds of bolus for production on a 3D printer, one of which was the 3D printed flat bolus for the Blue water phantom and the other was a 3D printed customized bolus for the RANDO phantom. The 3D printed flat bolus was fabricated to verify its physical quality. The resulting 3D printed flat bolus was evaluated by assessing dosimetric parameters such as D1.5 cm, D5 cm, and D10 cm. The 3D printed customized bolus was then fabricated, and its quality and clinical feasibility were evaluated by visual inspection and by assessing dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90%. The dosimetric parameters of the resulting 3D printed flat bolus showed that it was a useful dose escalating material, equivalent to a commercially available flat bolus. Analysis of the dosimetric parameters of the 3D printed customized bolus demonstrated that it is provided good dose escalation and good contact with the irregular surface of the RANDO phantom. A customized bolus produced using a 3D printer could potentially replace commercially available flat boluses.

  15. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  16. A Customized Bolus Produced Using a 3-Dimensional Printer for Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Wook; Shin, Hun-Joo; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Boluses are used in high-energy radiotherapy in order to overcome the skin sparing effect. In practice though, commonly used flat boluses fail to make a perfect contact with the irregular surface of the patient’s skin, resulting in air gaps. Hence, we fabricated a customized bolus using a 3-dimensional (3D) printer and evaluated its feasibility for radiotherapy. Methods We designed two kinds of bolus for production on a 3D printer, one of which was the 3D printed flat bolus for the Blue water phantom and the other was a 3D printed customized bolus for the RANDO phantom. The 3D printed flat bolus was fabricated to verify its physical quality. The resulting 3D printed flat bolus was evaluated by assessing dosimetric parameters such as D1.5 cm, D5 cm, and D10 cm. The 3D printed customized bolus was then fabricated, and its quality and clinical feasibility were evaluated by visual inspection and by assessing dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90%. Results The dosimetric parameters of the resulting 3D printed flat bolus showed that it was a useful dose escalating material, equivalent to a commercially available flat bolus. Analysis of the dosimetric parameters of the 3D printed customized bolus demonstrated that it is provided good dose escalation and good contact with the irregular surface of the RANDO phantom. Conclusions A customized bolus produced using a 3D printer could potentially replace commercially available flat boluses. PMID:25337700

  17. [Conformal radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Alieva, S B; Tkachev, S I; Kaledin, R R; Galdiyants, R A; Zaderenko, I A; Rotobelskaya, L E

    2015-01-01

    The paper is aimed at the determination of the efficiency of various technologies of conformal radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx treated with conformal radiotherapy. 3D-CRT was performed for 28 patients, IMRT--22 patients, RapidArc--6 patients. Dosimetric parameters were determined for planned volumes and organs at risk. TD on high-risk areas was 70Gy, intermediate-risk zones 60-66Gy and low-risk areas 50-56 Gy. There were determined session duration of exposure and the number of monitor units to evaluate the efficiency of treatment. Average (Dmean), maximum (Dmax) and the minimum (Dmin) dose for RapidArc, IMRT and 3D-CRT on PTV amounted to 70.2 Gy, 69.1 Gy and 70.7 Gy; 76.2 Gy, 76.1 Gy and 77Gr; 48.8, 54.4 and 46,6Gr respectively. Compared with IMRT and 3R-CRT RapidArc reduce Dmean in the brainstem and optic nerves by 14.1% and 23%; 12.2% and 25% respectively. The average number of MU (monitor unit) with RapidArc, IMRT and 3D-CRT was 357, 1386 and 870. The average session time of irradiation was: with RapidArc, IMRT and 3D-CRT--300, 900 and 480 seconds. Compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT average treatment time and the number of monitor units in RapidArc were reduced by 74%, 42% and 67%, 47%. Thus RapidArc and IMRT technologies allow getting a better dose distribution in the irradiated volume, compared with 3 D-CRT on homogeneity and conformity. RapidArc technique reduces the pressure on the critical organs, diminishes exposure to the session and a number of MU.

  18. Factors Influencing Conformity Index in Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sinead M. Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O.; Armstrong, John

    2010-04-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  19. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sinead M; Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O; Armstrong, John

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors. Copyright 2010 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Planned 3-dimensional low-volume conformal irradiation of a local prostatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Wachter, S; Gerstner, N; Dieckmann, K; Stampfer, M; Hawliczek, R; Pötter, R

    1997-05-01

    Recent data have shown a significant reduction of acute side effects by means of a three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy of carcinoma of the prostate compared to treatment techniques used before. Theoretically, an optimized field coverage of the planning target volume should result in a reduction of treated bladder and rectum volumes. We studied the effects of individualized blocks on treatment volumes, planning target volumes, irradiated bladder and rectum volumes on basis of three-dimensional treatment planning by means of beam's-eye-view technique. We compared dose-volume-histograms of 2 different planning models, a (fictitious) open 4-field-box-technique and a technique with conformal blocked fields designed from the beam's-eye-view display (prescribed dose 66 Gy, daily single fraction 2 Gy). Plans of 115 patients with localized prostate cancer treated from January 1994 to February 1996 were analyzed. Using individualized fields treatment volume (covered by the 90%-isodose) was reduced by 23% on the average in comparison to the planning model without blocks. The averaged difference of treated volume and planning target volume, as a grade of efficiency of conformation, was reduced by 38% (496 cm3 303 cm3) using individualized blocks. 23% of the treated bladder volume and 13% of the treated rectum volume had been saved on the average. Nevertheless, at least 11.5% of the bladder volume and 27.6% of the contoured rectum volume were treated with the prescribed dose (55 Gy = 100%). The comparison of dose-volume-histogram-data showed that especially high dose volumes of organs at risk had been saved by means of individualized blocks created from the beam's-eye-view. The blocks did not affect the dose distribution of the planning target volume adversely. Consequently the impact of these data on the extent of side effects and local tumor control has to be proven.

  1. Technique for comprehensive head and neck irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Walter, Alexander S.; Hoene, Ted A.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the technical and logistical complexities of matching photon and proton treatment modalities, we developed and implemented a technique of comprehensive head and neck radiation using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal proton therapy. A monoisocentric technique was used with a 30-cm snout. Cervical lymphatics were treated with 3 fields: a posterior-anterior field with a midline block and a right and a left posterior oblique field. The matchline of the 3 cervical nodal fields with the primary tumor site fields was staggered by 0.5 cm. Comparative intensity-modulated photon plans were later developed for 12 previously treated patients to provide equivalent target coverage, while matching or improving on the proton plans' sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Dosimetry to OARs was evaluated and compared by treatment modality. Comprehensive head and neck irradiation using proton therapy yielded treatment plans with significant dose avoidance of the oral cavity and midline neck structures. When compared with the generated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, the proton treatment plans yielded statistically significant reductions in the mean and integral radiation dose to the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, and the maximally spared parotid gland. There was no significant difference in mean dose to the lesser-spared parotid gland by treatment modality or in mean or integral dose to the spared submandibular glands. A technique for cervical nodal irradiation using 3D conformal proton therapy with uniform scanning was developed and clinically implemented. Use of proton therapy for cervical nodal irradiation resulted in large volume of dose avoidance to the oral cavity and low dose exposure to midline structures of the larynx and the esophagus, with lower mean and integral dose to assessed OARs when compared with competing IMRT plans.

  2. Rectal planning risk volume correlation with acute and late toxicity in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dias, R S; Giordani, A J; Souhami, L; Segreto, R A; Segreto, H R C

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate rectum motion during 3-Dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in prostate cancer patients, to derive a planning volume at risk (PRV) and to correlate the PRV dose-volume histograms (DVH) with treatment complications.This study was conducted in two phases. Initially, the PRV was defined prospectively in 50 consecutive prostate cancer patients (Group 1) who received a radical course of 3-D CRT. Then, the obtained PRV was used in the radiotherapy planning of these same 50 patients plus another 59 prostate cancer patients (Group 2) previously treated between 2004 and 2008. All these patients' data, including the rectum and PRV DVHs, were correlated to acute and late complications, according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v4.0.The largest displacement occurred in the anterior axis. Long-term gastrointestinal (GI) complications grade ≥ 2 were seen in 9.2% of the cases. Factors that influenced acute GI reactions were: doses at 25% (p 5 0.011) and 40% (p 5 0.005) of the rectum volume and at 40% of the PRV (p 5 0.012). The dose at 25% of the rectum volume (p 5 0.033) and acute complications ≥ grade 2 (p 5 0.018) were prognostic factors for long-term complications. The PRV DVH did not correlate with late toxicity. The rectum showed a significant inter-fraction motion during 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. PRV dose correlated with acute gastrointestinal complications and may be a useful tool to predict and reduce their occurrence.

  3. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  4. [Conformal radiotherapy for vertebral bone metastasis].

    PubMed

    Faivre, J C; Py, J F; Vogin, G; Martinage, G; Salleron, J; Royer, P; Grandgirard, N; Pasquier, D; Thureau, S

    2016-10-01

    Analgesic external beam radiation therapy is a standard of care for patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases and/or prevention of bone complications. In case of fracture risk, radiation therapy is performed after surgery in a consolidation of an analgesic purpose and stabilizing osteosynthesis. Radiotherapy is mandatory after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. Spinal cord compression - the only emergency in radiation therapy - is indicated postoperatively either exclusively for non surgical indication. Analgesic re-irradiation is possible in the case of insufficient response or recurrent pain after radiotherapy. Metabolic radiation, bisphosphonates or denosumab do not dissuade external radiation therapy for pain relief. Systemic oncological treatments can be suspended with a period of wash out given the risk of radiosensitization or recall phenomenon. Better yet, the intensity modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy can be part of a curative strategy for oligometastatic patients and suggest new treatment prospects.

  5. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  6. [Conformal radiotherapy of prostatic cancer: a general review].

    PubMed

    Chauvet, B; Oozeer, R; Bey, P; Pontvert, D; Bolla, M

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in radiotherapeutic management of localized prostate cancer is reviewed. Clinical aspects--including dose-effect beyond 70 Gy, relative role of conformal radiation therapy techniques and of early hormonal treatment--are discussed as well as technical components--including patient immobilization, organ motion, prostate contouring, beam arrangement, 3-D treatment planning and portal imaging. The local control and biological relapse-free survival rates appear to be improved by high dose conformal radiotherapy from 20 to 30% for patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse. A benefit of overall survival is expected but not yet demonstrated. Late reactions, especially the rectal toxicity, remain moderate despite the dose escalation. However, conformal radiotherapy demands a high precision at all steps of the procedure.

  7. A novel conformal arc technique for postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie

    2009-12-01

    Conventional whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) exposes most of the contents of the true pelvis to the prescribed dose. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) provides more conformal dose distribution and better sparing of critical structures for WPRT. However, IMRT is more complicated in planning and delivery, requiring more expensive equipment and time-consuming quality assurance. We explore and evaluate a novel conformal arc radiotherapeutic technique for postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer in this study. This technique involves 2-axis conformal arc therapy (2A-CAT) with 180-degree rotation around 2 isocenters each in 2 separate dose-shaping structures. Dosimetric comparison with 3D-CRT and IMRT for 10 endometrial cancer patients undergoing postoperative WPRT was performed to evaluate this new 2A-CAT technique. The mean conformity indices were 0.83, 0.61, and 0.88 for 2A-CAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. The mean homogeneity indices were 1.15, 1.08, and 1.10. The mean doses to bowel, rectum, bladder, and pelvic bone marrow were, respectively, 1.19, 3.39, 4.65, and 1.64 Gy lower with 2A-CAT than with 3D-CRT (P < 0.05), whereas a little higher than with IMRT. The mean dose to normal tissue was 1.87 Gy higher with 2A-CAT than with IMRT (P = 0.00). In postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer, 2A-CAT significantly improves the dose conformity and sparing of bowel, rectum, and bladder compared with 3D-CRT. Despite dose uniformity and conformity being still inferior to those of IMRT, its simplicity and extensive availability combined with further improvement warrant it as a potential shortcut alternative to IMRT.

  8. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity.

    PubMed

    Hädinger, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Wulf, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3% +/- 2.3% (lung), 95.0% +/- 4.5% (liver), and 92.1% +/- 5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73 +/- 0.09 (lung), 0.77 +/- 0.10 (liver), and 0.70 +/- 0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Beg, Muhammad S.; Das, Prajnan; Meyer, Jeffrey

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  10. Integral dose in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, R; Xu, S; Jiang, W; Xie, C; Wang, J

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs), normal tissue and the whole body in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy for whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in postoperative endometrial cancer patients. We selected 10 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans of 6MV-3DCRT, 18MV-3DCRT, 6MV-IMRT, 18MV-IMRT and helical tomotherapy were developed for each patient. The integral doses to OARs, normal tissue and the whole body were compared. Compared with 3DCRT, both IMRT and helical tomotherapy significantly improved dose conformity and the integral doses to OARs (8.8-29.9%, P<0.05). Compared with 6MV-3DCRT, IMRT resulted in 13.2 and 11.0% lower integral doses to normal tissue and the whole body, respectively (P=0.00), whereas no significant difference was found with helical tomotherapy. Compared directly with IMRT, helical tomotherapy reduced the integral doses to the rectum and bladder. However, the integral doses to normal tissue were 13.9 and 17.1% higher than 6MV-IMRT and 18MV-IMRT plans, respectively (P=0.00); the integral doses to pelvic bones also slightly increased with helical tomotherapy. The use of 18MV resulted in 5.8 and 2.7% lower integral doses to normal tissue and 4.8 and 2.1% lower integral doses to the whole body in the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, respectively (P=0.00). Results show that IMRT and helical tomotherapy offer better conformity and lower integral doses to OARs for postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancers compared with 3DCRT. The integral doses to normal tissue and the whole body were significantly lower with IMRT, whereas no significant difference was found with helical tomotherapy compared with 6MV-3DCRT. Compared directly with IMRT, helical tomotherapy further reduced the integral doses to the rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue. The use of 18MV improved the

  11. Optimizing of the tangential technique and supraclavicular fields in 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Azarmahd, Nazli; Babazade, Shadi; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Radiotherapy plays an essential role in the management of breast cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is applied based on 3D image information of anatomy of patients. In 3D-CRT for breast cancer one of the common techniques is tangential technique. In this project, various parameters of tangential and supraclavicular fields are optimized. This project has been done on computed tomography images of 100 patients in Isfahan Milad Hospital. All patients have been simulated and all the important organs have been contoured by radiation oncologist. Two techniques in supraclavicular region are evaluated including: 1-A single field (Anterior Posterior [AP]) with a dose of 200 cGy per fraction with 6 MV energy. This is a common technique. 2-Two parallel opposed fields (AP-Posterior Anterior [PA]). The dose of AP was 150 cGy with 6 MV energy and PA 50 cGy with 18 MV. In the second part of the project, the tangential fields has been optimized with change of normalization point in five points: (1) Isocenter (Confluence of rotation gantry axis and collimator axis) (2) Middle of thickest part of breast or middle of inter field distance (IFD) (3) Border between the lung and chest wall (4) Physician's choice (5) Between IFD and isocenter. Dose distributions have been compared for all patients in different methods of supraclavicular and tangential field. In parallel opposed fields average lung dose was 4% more than a single field and the maximum received heart dose was 21.5% less than a single field. The average dose of planning tumor volume (PTV) in method 2 is 2% more than method 1. In general AP-PA method because of a better coverage of PTV is suggested. In optimization of the tangential field all methods have similar coverage of PTV. Each method has spatial advantages and disadvantages. If it is important for the physician to reduce the dose received by the lung and heart, fifth method is suggested since in this method average and maximum received dose

  12. Intensity-Modulated vs. Conformal Radiotherapy of Parotid Gland Tumors: Potential Impact on Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lamers-Kuijper, E. Schwarz, M.; Rasch, C.; Mijnheer, B.

    2007-01-01

    In 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy of parotid gland tumors, little effort is made to avoid the auditory system or the oral cavity. Damage may occur when the ear is located inside the treatment field. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate an intensity-modulation radiotherapy (IMRT) class solution, and to compare this technique to a 3D conformal approach with respect to hearing loss. Twenty patients with parotid gland cancer were retrospectively planned with 2 different techniques using the original planning target volume (PTV). First, a conventional technique using a wedged beam pair was applied, yielding a dose distribution conformal to the shape of the PTV. Next, an IMRT technique using a fluence map optimization with predefined constraints was designed. A dose of 66 Gy in the PTV was given at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measures (ICRU) dose prescription point. Dose-volume histograms of the PTV and organs at risk (OARs), such as auditory system, oral cavity, and spinal cord, were compared. The dose in the OARs was lower in the IMRT plans. The mean volume of the middle ear receiving a dose higher than 50 Gy decreased from 66.5% to 33.4%. The mean dose in the oral cavity decreased from 19.4 Gy to 16.6 Gy. The auditory system can be spared if the distance between the inner ear and the PTV is 0.6 cm or larger, and if the overlap between the middle ear and the PTV is smaller than 10%. The maximum dose in the spinal cord was below 40 Gy in all treatment plans. The mean volume of the PTV receiving less than 95% of the prescribed dose increased in the IMRT plan slightly from 3.3% to 4.3 % (p = 0.01). The mean volume receiving more than 107% increased from 0.9% to 2.5% (p = 0.02). It can be concluded that the auditory system, as well as the oral cavity, can be spared with IMRT, but at the cost of a slightly larger dose inhomogeneity in the PTV. The IMRT technique can therefore, in most cases, be recommended as the treatment

  13. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm{sup 3}), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  14. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-03-02

    Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours (PTV range 416-4549 cm(3)) were selected. For each patient, 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated and the Conformity Index (CI), organ at risk (OAR) doses and monitor unit (MU) were evaluated. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare dose delivered to both target and OARs. The mean number of fields for 3DCRT and IMRT were 6.3 ± 2.1, 7.2 ± 1.8. The mean number of arcs for VMAT was 3.7 ± 1.1. The mean conformity index of VMAT (0.98 ± 0.14) was similar to that of IMRT (1.03 ± 0.13), both of which were significantly better than 3DCRT (1.35 ± 0.20; p = 0.005). The mean dose to lung was significantly higher for 3DCRT (11.9Gy ± 7.9) compared to IMRT (9.4Gy ± 5.4, p = 0.014) and VMAT (8.9Gy ± 4.5, p = 0.017). For the 3 females, the low dose regions in the ipsilateral breast for VMAT were generally less with VMAT. IMRT plans required 1427 ± 532 MU per fraction which was almost 4-fold higher than 3DCRT (313 ± 112, P = 0.005). Compared to IMRT, VMAT plans required 60 % less MU (570 ± 285, P = 0.005). For inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours, VMAT delivered equivalent target coverage when compared to IMRT but required 60 % less MU. Both VMAT and IMRT were superior to 3DCRT in terms of better PTV coverage and sparing of lung tissue.

  15. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kurishima, Koichi; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of high-dose conformal radiotherapy to the involved field for patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between May 1999 and April 2006, a total of 100 consecutive patients with inoperable Stage IIIA or IIIB NSCLC with a performance score of 0 to 2 and treatment by radical radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy were included. Up to August 2002, 33 patients underwent conventional radiotherapy of 56 Gy to 66 Gy using anteroposterior opposite ports to the primary tumor and elective lymph nodes (conventional group). After September 2002, the remaining 67 patients underwent high-dose radiotherapy of 66 Gy to 84 Gy to the involved volume with three-dimensional (3-D) conformal radiotherapy (conformal group). Results: The median survival was 13.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-18.5 months) in the conventional group and 17.3 months (95% CI, 10.7- 24.0 months) in the conformal group. The overall survival at 3 years were 9.1% (95% CI, -0.7-18.9%) in the conventional group and 31.0% (95% CI, 18.9-43.1%) in the conformal group; the conformal group had a significantly better overall survival (p < 0.05). The radiotherapy method (hazard ratio = 0.55, p < 0.05) and performance status (hazard ratio = 1.48, p < 0.05) were shown to be statistically significant independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Based on the practical experience reported here, 3-D conformal radiotherapy allowed dose escalation without excessive toxicity, and may improve overall survival rates for patients with Stage III NSCLC.

  16. Biological dose volume histograms during conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Abatzoglou, Ioannis; Touloupidis, Stavros; Manavis, Ioannis

    2007-01-15

    Radiobiological data suggest that prostate cancer has a low {alpha}/{beta} ratio. Large radiotherapy fractions may, therefore, prove more efficacious than standard radiotherapy, while radiotherapy acceleration should further improve control rates. This study describes the radiobiology of a conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy scheme for the treatment of high risk prostate cancer. Anteroposterior fields to the pelvis deliver a daily dose of 2.7 Gy, while lateral fields confined to the prostate and seminal vesicles deliver an additional daily dose of 0.7 Gy. Radiotherapy is accomplished within 19 days (15 fractions). Dose volume histograms, calculated for tissue specific {alpha}/{beta} ratios and time factors, predict a high biological dose to the prostate and seminal vesicles (77-93 Gy). The biological dose to normal pelvic tissues is maintained at standard levels. Radiobiological dosimetry suggests that, using hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy, high biological radiation dose can be given to the prostate without overdosing normal tissues.

  17. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Neville, Bridget A.; Chen, Aileen B.; Schrag, Deborah

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  18. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Schupak, Karen; Burman, Chandra; Chui, C.-S.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2003-12-31

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility and potential benefit of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Five consecutive patients with confirmed histopathologically GBM were entered into the study. These patients were planned and treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) using our standard plan of 3 noncoplanar wedged fields. They were then replanned with the IMRT method that included a simultaneous boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV). The dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DHVs) for the planning treatment volume (PTV), GTV, and the relevant critical structures, as obtained with 3DCRT and IMRT, respectively, were compared. In both the 3DCRT and IMRT plans, 59.4 Gy was delivered to the GTV plus a margin of 2.5 cm, with doses to critical structures below the tolerance threshold. However, with the simultaneous boost in IMRT, a higher tumor dose of {approx}70 Gy could be delivered to the GTV, while still maintaining the uninvolved brain at dose levels of the 3DCRT technique. In addition, our experience indicated that IMRT planning is less labor intensive and time consuming than 3DCRT planning. Our study shows that IMRT planning is feasible and efficient for radiotherapy of GBM. In particular, IMRT can deliver a simultaneous boost to the GTV while better sparing the normal brain and other critical structures.

  19. A conformal boundary for space-times based on light-like geodesics: The 3-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, A.; Ibort, A.; Lafuente, J.; Low, R.

    2017-02-01

    A new causal boundary, which we will term the l-boundary, inspired by the geometry of the space of light rays and invariant by conformal diffeomorphisms for space-times of any dimension m ≥3 , proposed by one of the authors [R. J. Low, The Space of Null Geodesics (and a New Causal Boundary), Lecture Notes in Physics 692 (Springer, 2006), pp. 35-50] is analyzed in detail for space-times of dimension 3. Under some natural assumptions, it is shown that the completed space-time becomes a smooth manifold with boundary and its relation with Geroch-Kronheimer-Penrose causal boundary is discussed. A number of examples illustrating the properties of this new causal boundary as well as a discussion on the obtained results will be provided.

  20. Comparative treatment planning on localized prostate carcinoma conformal photon- versus proton-based radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Bogner, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar; Auberger, Thomas; Pötter, Richard

    2005-07-01

    To assess the potential benefit of proton-beam therapy in comparison to 3-D conformal photon therapy and photon- based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in prostate carcinoma for various stages of disease. In five patients a 3-D conformal proton-based (two lateral beams) irradiation technique was compared with 3-D conformal photon-beam radiotherapy (four-field box) and IMRT (seven beams). For each patient different target volumes (CTVs) were defined according to early, intermediate and advanced stages of disease: CTV I consisted of the prostate gland, CTV II encompassed prostate and basis of seminal vesicles, and CTV III the prostate and seminal vesicles. Corresponding planning target volumes PTV I-III were defined by uniformly adding a margin of 5 mm to CTV I-III. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the different PTVs and various organs at risk (OARs), i.e., rectal wall, bladder, both femoral heads. In addition, maximum and mean doses were derived for the various structures and irradiated non-target tissue volumes were compared for PTV I-III and the different irradiation techniques. Finally, dose conformity and target dose homogeneity were assessed. With photon- and proton-based radiotherapy techniques similar dose distributions were determined for PTV I-III: mean and maximum PTV dose values were between 99-104% and 102-107% of the normalized total doses (70 Gy), respectively. Conformity indices varied from 1.4 to 1.5 for the photon techniques, whereas for proton-beam radiotherapy values ranged from 1.1 to 1.4. Both the 3-D conformal and the IMRT photon treatment technique resulted in increased mean doses (approximately 40-80%) for OARs when compared to protons. With both photon techniques non-target tissue volumes were irradiated to higher doses (mean dose difference > or = 70%) compared to proton-beam radiotherapy. Differences occurred mainly at the low and medium dose levels, whereas in high dose levels similar values were obtained. In

  1. Vulvar cancer in a patient with Fanconi's anemia, treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harper, Jennifer L; Jenrette, Joseph M; Goddu, S Murty; Lal, Asheesh; Smith, Tim

    2004-06-01

    Fanconi's anemia (FA) is rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by aplastic anemia, congenital anomalies, and cancer susceptibility. FA patients have deficiencies in DNA repair pathways that cause cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation and cross-link agents such as mitomycin C and diepoxybutane (DEB). If these patients survive until early adulthood, they are at high risk for developing solid tumors, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, esophagus, and vulva. Treatment of these solid tumors with radiotherapy is complicated by the increased risk of normal tissue toxicity. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy is a technique that uses CT images to more accurately target tumors and maximize the dose to the tumor volume while limiting the dose to normal tissue. This report describes application of 3D conformal radiotherapy techniques to the treatment of vulvar cancer in a patient with FA in an attempt to limit the normal tissue volume exposed to radiation. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Towards multidimensional radiotherapy (MD-CRT): biological imaging and biological conformality.

    PubMed

    Ling, C C; Humm, J; Larson, S; Amols, H; Fuks, Z; Leibel, S; Koutcher, J A

    2000-06-01

    The goals of this study were to survey and summarize the advances in imaging that have potential applications in radiation oncology, and to explore the concept of integrating physical and biological conformality in multidimensional conformal radiotherapy (MD-CRT). The advances in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) have greatly improved the physical conformality of treatment planning and delivery. The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has provided the "dose painting" or "dose sculpting" ability to further customize the delivered dose distribution. The improved capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, and of positron emission tomography, are beginning to provide physiological and functional information about the tumor and its surroundings. In addition, molecular imaging promises to reveal tumor biology at the genotype and phenotype level. These developments converge to provide significant opportunities for enhancing the success of radiotherapy. The ability of IMRT to deliver nonuniform dose patterns by design brings to fore the question of how to "dose paint" and "dose sculpt", leading to the suggestion that "biological" images may be of assistance. In contrast to the conventional radiological images that primarily provide anatomical information, biological images reveal metabolic, functional, physiological, genotypic, and phenotypic data. Important for radiotherapy, the new and noninvasive imaging methods may yield three-dimensional radiobiological information. Studies are urgently needed to identify genotypes and phenotypes that affect radiosensitivity, and to devise methods to image them noninvasively. Incremental to the concept of gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (GTV, CTV, and PTV), we propose the concept of "biological target volume" (BTV) and hypothesize that BTV can be derived from biological images and that their use may incrementally improve target delineation and dose delivery. We

  3. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution. PMID:27358592

  4. Potential for improved intelligence quotient using volumetric modulated arc therapy compared with conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation for whole-ventricular radiation in children.

    PubMed

    Qi, X Sharon; Stinauer, Michelle; Rogers, Brion; Madden, Jennifer R; Wilkening, Greta N; Liu, Arthur K

    2012-12-01

    To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential for Improved Intelligence Quotient Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Compared With Conventional 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation for Whole-Ventricular Radiation in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon; Stinauer, Michelle; Rogers, Brion; Madden, Jennifer R.; Wilkening, Greta N.; Liu, Arthur K.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of localized intracranial germinoma. We modeled the effect of the dosimetric differences on intelligence quotient (IQ). Method and Materials: Ten children with intracranial germinomas were used for planning. The prescription doses were 23.4 Gy to the ventricles followed by 21.6 Gy to the tumor located in the pineal region. For each child, a 3D-CRT and full arc VMAT was generated. Coverage of the target was assessed by computing a conformity index and heterogeneity index. We also generated VMAT plans with explicit temporal lobe sparing and with smaller ventricular margin expansions. Mean dose to the temporal lobe was used to estimate IQ 5 years after completion of radiation, using a patient age of 10 years. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plan, VMAT improved conformality (conformity index 1.10 vs 1.85), with slightly higher heterogeneity (heterogeneity index 1.09 vs 1.06). The averaged mean doses for left and right temporal lobes were 31.3 and 31.7 Gy, respectively, for VMAT plans and 37.7 and 37.6 Gy for 3D-CRT plans. This difference in mean temporal lobe dose resulted in an estimated IQ difference of 3.1 points at 5 years after radiation therapy. When the temporal lobes were explicitly included in the VMAT optimization, the mean temporal lobe dose was reduced 5.6-5.7 Gy, resulting in an estimated IQ difference of an additional 3 points. Reducing the ventricular margin from 1.5 cm to 0.5 cm decreased mean temporal lobe dose 11.4-13.1 Gy, corresponding to an estimated increase in IQ of 7 points. Conclusion: For treatment of children with intracranial pure germinomas, VMAT compared with 3D-CRT provides increased conformality and reduces doses to normal tissue. This may result in improvements in IQ in these children.

  6. Long-term cosmetic outcomes and toxicities of proton beam therapy compared with photon-based 3-dimensional conformal accelerated partial-breast irradiation: a phase 1 trial.

    PubMed

    Galland-Girodet, Sigolène; Pashtan, Itai; MacDonald, Shannon M; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Hirsch, Ariel E; Kachnic, Lisa A; Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L; Powell, Simon N; Recht, Abram; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2014-11-01

    To present long-term outcomes of a prospective feasibility trial using either protons or 3-dimensional conformal photon-based (accelerated partial-breast irradiation [APBI]) techniques. From October 2003 to April 2006, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were treated with APBI (32 Gy in 8 fractions given twice daily) on a prospective clinical trial: 19 with proton beam therapy (PBT) and 79 with photons or mixed photons/electrons. Median follow-up was 82.5 months (range, 2-104 months). Toxicity and patient satisfaction evaluations were performed at each visit. At 7 years, the physician rating of overall cosmesis was good or excellent for 62% of PBT patients, compared with 94% for photon patients (P=.03). Skin toxicities were more common for the PBT group: telangiectasia, 69% and 16% (P=.0013); pigmentation changes, 54% and 22% (P=.02); and other late skin toxicities, 62% and 18% (P=.029) for PBT and photons, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidences of breast pain, edema, fibrosis, fat necrosis, skin desquamation, and rib pain or fracture. Patient-reported cosmetic outcomes at 7 years were good or excellent for 92% and 96% of PBT and photon patients, respectively (P=.95). Overall patient satisfaction was 93% for the entire cohort. The 7-year local failure rate for all patients was 6%, with 3 local recurrences in the PBT group (7-year rate, 11%) and 2 in photon-treated patients (4%) (P=.22). Local failure rates of 3-dimensional APBI and PBT were similar in this study. However, PBT, as delivered in this study, led to higher rates of long-term telangiectasia, skin color changes, and skin toxicities. We recommend the use of multiple fields and treatment of all fields per treatment session or the use of scanning techniques to minimize skin toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term Cosmetic Outcomes and Toxicities of Proton Beam Therapy Compared With Photon-Based 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: A Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Galland-Girodet, Sigolène; Pashtan, Itai; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Powell, Simon N.; Recht, Abram; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To present long-term outcomes of a prospective feasibility trial using either protons or 3-dimensional conformal photon-based (accelerated partial-breast irradiation [APBI]) techniques. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 to April 2006, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were treated with APBI (32 Gy in 8 fractions given twice daily) on a prospective clinical trial: 19 with proton beam therapy (PBT) and 79 with photons or mixed photons/electrons. Median follow-up was 82.5 months (range, 2-104 months). Toxicity and patient satisfaction evaluations were performed at each visit. Results: At 7 years, the physician rating of overall cosmesis was good or excellent for 62% of PBT patients, compared with 94% for photon patients (P=.03). Skin toxicities were more common for the PBT group: telangiectasia, 69% and 16% (P=.0013); pigmentation changes, 54% and 22% (P=.02); and other late skin toxicities, 62% and 18% (P=.029) for PBT and photons, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidences of breast pain, edema, fibrosis, fat necrosis, skin desquamation, and rib pain or fracture. Patient-reported cosmetic outcomes at 7 years were good or excellent for 92% and 96% of PBT and photon patients, respectively (P=.95). Overall patient satisfaction was 93% for the entire cohort. The 7-year local failure rate for all patients was 6%, with 3 local recurrences in the PBT group (7-year rate, 11%) and 2 in photon-treated patients (4%) (P=.22). Conclusions: Local failure rates of 3-dimensional APBI and PBT were similar in this study. However, PBT, as delivered in this study, led to higher rates of long-term telangiectasia, skin color changes, and skin toxicities. We recommend the use of multiple fields and treatment of all fields per treatment session or the use of scanning techniques to minimize skin toxicity.

  8. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Primary Kidney Cancer: A 3-Dimensional Conformal Technique Associated With Low Rates of Early Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Thompson, Ann; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Kolsky, Michal Schneider; Devereux, Thomas; Lim, Andrew; Siva, Shankar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe our 3-dimensional conformal planning approaches and report early toxicities with stereotactic body radiation therapy for the management of primary renal cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of a phase 1 trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary inoperable renal cell carcinoma. A dose of 42 Gy/3 fractions was prescribed to targets ≥5 cm, whereas for <5 cm 26 Gy/1 fraction was used. All patients underwent a planning 4-dimensional CT to generate a planning target volume (PTV) from a 5-mm isotropic expansion of the internal target volume. Planning required a minimum of 8 fields prescribing to the minimum isodose surrounding the PTV. Intermediate dose spillage at 50% of the prescription dose (R50%) was measured to describe the dose gradient. Early toxicity (<6 months) was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (v4.0). Results: From July 2012 to August 2013 a total of 20 patients (median age, 77 years) were recruited into a prospective clinical trial. Eleven patients underwent fractionated treatment and 9 patients a single fraction. For PTV targets <100 cm{sup 3} the median number of beams used was 8 (2 noncoplanar) to achieve an average R50% of 3.7. For PTV targets >100 cm{sup 3} the median beam number used was 10 (4 noncoplanar) for an average R50% value of 4.3. The R50% was inversely proportional to decreasing PTV volume (r=−0.62, P=.003) and increasing total beams used (r=−0.51, P=.022). Twelve of 20 patients (60%) suffered grade ≤2 early toxicity, whereas 8 of 20 patients (40%) were asymptomatic. Nausea, chest wall pain, and fatigue were the most common toxicities reported. Conclusion: A 3-dimensional conformal planning technique of 8-10 beams can be used to deliver highly tolerable stereotactic ablation to primary kidney targets with minimal early toxicities. Ongoing follow-up is currently in place to assess long-term toxicities and cancer control.

  9. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Xu, Shouping; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie; Xie, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p = 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  10. Bilateral glomus tumor treated with PET-CT based conformal radiotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Oznur; Topkan, Erkan; Pehlivan, Berrin

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Glomus tumors are benign, slow growing tumors originating from paraganglionic tissue, mostly located at the carotid bifurcation, jugular foramen, cervical portion vagus nerve, and middle ear cavity. Radiotherapy is treatment of choice for patients with intracranial extension, and patients with bilateral and multiple tumors, or patients who are inoperable. Case presentation We present a 53-year-old female patient with a glomus tumor treated with positron emission tomography computed tomography planning and 3D conformal radiotherapy, and the patient has remained free of disease progression 2 years after. Conclusion It is suggested that radiotherapy is a good treatment modality in patients with glomus tumor, and metabolic imaging and treatment planning with positron emission tomography computed tomography is superior to other imaging modalities. PMID:19918426

  11. Normal tissue dose conformality measures to guide radiotherapy fractionation decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Myerson, Robert J.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To determine conditions under which hypofractionation could be favorable for a normal tissue--even if tumor [{alpha}/{beta}] exceeds the normal tissue's [{alpha}/{beta}]. Methods: The hypofractionation sufficiency condition (HSC) for an organ is defined as a dose conformality constraint such that, if satisfied, a family of tumor control probability isoeffective fractionation schemes will show decreasing normal tissue complication probability with decreasing number of fractions. Results: In the extended equivalent uniform dose (EUD) model [obtained by replacing dose with linear quadratic (LQ) 2 Gy equivalent dose], the HSC for a normal organ is proven to be satisfied if a suitably weighted average of the relative dose [hypofractionation sufficiency index (HSI)] is less than the ratio of normal tissue to tumor [{alpha}/{beta}]. The HSI is determined solely by dose distribution and the normal tissue volume factor, ''a.'' If the HSC is satisfied for every normal tissue of concern, then there is a therapeutic gain with hypofractionation. The corresponding multifractionation sufficiency condition (therapeutic gain with increasing number of fractions) and multifractionation sufficiency index (MSI) are also derived. A sample clinical case is presented. Conclusions: Within the context of the LQ/EUD models, conformality measures (HSI and MSI) can be used to inform fractionation decisions.

  12. [Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after initial radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-jie; Wang, Lü-hua; Lü, Ji-ma; Zhao, Lu-jun; Xiao, Ze-fen; Zhang, Hong-xing; Feng, Qin-fu; Zhang, Zhong; Yin, Wei-bo

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, therapeutic effects and normal tissue complications of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for locoregionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after initial radiotherapy. Between August 1999 and August 2003, 27 such patients were treated with 3DCRT after initial radiotherapy. This series consisted of 25 men and 2 women with a median age of 64 years. Radiotherapy was delivered at 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week, to a median dose of 50 Gy. Treatment results and normal tissue complications were assessed with WHO and RTOG/EORTC criteria. Based upon a median follow-up time of 20.6 months, 25 patients (92.6%) completed the planned 3DCRT treatment. Their clinical symptom relief rate was 79.1%, and the response rate was 59.3% with a complete remission rate of 14.8% (4/27), partial remission rate of 44.4% (12/27). The overall 1- and 2-year survival (OS) rates were 73.8% and 25.4% with a median survival time (MST) of 20 months. The 1- and 2-year local progression free survival (LPFS) rates were both 88.8%. Grade 2 and grade 3 acute radiation pneumonitis developed in 7.4% (2/27) and 11.1% (3/27). Grade 2 late radiation pneumonitis developed in 11.1% (3/27). 3DCRT is feasible and advisable for locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer, giving a good immediate tumor response and acceptable normal tissue complications.

  13. Fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for large benign skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose to assess the safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for large skull base meningiomas. Methods and Materials Fifty-two patients with large skull base meningiomas aged 34-74 years (median age 56 years) were treated with FSRT between June 2004 and August 2009. All patients received FSRT for residual or progressive meningiomas more than 4 centimeters in greatest dimension. The median GTV was 35.4 cm3 (range 24.1-94.9 cm3), and the median PTV was 47.6 cm3 (range 33.5-142.7 cm3). Treatment volumes were achieved with 5-8 noncoplanar beams shaped using a micromultileaf collimator (MLC). Treatment was delivered in 30 daily fractions over 6 weeks to a total dose of 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. Outcome was assessed prospectively. Results At a median follow-up of 42 months (range 9-72 months) the 3-year and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 96% and 93%, respectively, and survival was 100%. Three patients required further debulking surgery for progressive disease. Hypopituitarism was the most commonly reported late complication, with a new hormone pituitary deficit occurring in 10 (19%) of patients. Clinically significant late neurological toxicity was observed in 3 (5.5%) patients consisting of worsening of pre-existing cranial deficits. Conclusion FSRT as a high-precision technique of localized RT is suitable for the treatment of large skull base meningiomas. The local control is comparable to that reported following conventional external beam RT. Longer follow-up is required to assess long term efficacy and toxicity, particularly in terms of potential reduction of treatment-related late toxicity. PMID:21486436

  14. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V{sub 20/30}, and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V{sub 20/30} of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V{sub 20} of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future.

  15. Treatment-Related Morbidity in Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With and Without Image Guidance Using Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jasmeet; Greer, Peter B.; White, Martin A.; Parker, Joel; Patterson, Jackie; Tang, Colin I.; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Christopher; Denham, James W.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of rectal and urinary dysfunctional symptoms using image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with fiducials and magnetic resonance planning for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation stages of IGRT between September 2008 and March 2010, 367 consecutive patients were treated with prostatic irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with and without IGRT (non-IGRT). In November 2010, these men were asked to report their bowel and bladder symptoms using a postal questionnaire. The proportions of patients with moderate to severe symptoms in these groups were compared using logistic regression models adjusted for tumor and treatment characteristic variables. Results: Of the 282 respondents, the 154 selected for IGRT had higher stage tumors, received higher prescribed doses, and had larger volumes of rectum receiving high dosage than did the 128 selected for non-IGRT. The follow-up duration was 8 to 26 months. Compared with the non-IGRT group, improvement was noted in all dysfunctional rectal symptoms using IGRT. In multivariable analyses, IGRT improved rectal pain (odds ratio [OR] 0.07 [0.009-0.7], P=.02), urgency (OR 0.27 [0.11-0.63], P=<.01), diarrhea (OR 0.009 [0.02-0.35], P<.01), and change in bowel habits (OR 0.18 [0.06-0.52], P<.010). No correlation was observed between rectal symptom levels and dose-volume histogram data. Urinary dysfunctional symptoms were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions: In comparison with men selected for non-IGRT, a significant reduction of bowel dysfunctional symptoms was confirmed in men selected for IGRT, even though they had larger volumes of rectum treated to higher doses.

  16. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Racquel E.; Sheets, Nathan C.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Nutting, Chris; Hall, Emma; Chera, Bhishamjit S.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  17. Impact of Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy/5-Fluorouracil on Quality of Life of Patients Managed for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Michala; Halkett, Georgia; Borg, Martin; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Kneebone, Andrew; Spry, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly Multiplication-Sign 3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m{sup 2}/d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. Results: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were -3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

  18. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Bora; Beyzadeoğlu, Murat; Sager, Ömer; Dinçoğlan, Ferrat; Demiral, Selçuk; Gamsız, Hakan; Sürenkök, Serdar; Oysul, Kaan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy) and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy) and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles. PMID:25207069

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Sugie, Chikao; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.

  20. Development of a MicroCT-Based Image-Guided Conformal Radiotherapy System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hu; Rodriguez, Manuel; van den Haak, Fred; Nelson, Geoffrey; Jogani, Rahil; Xu, Jiali; Zhu, Xinzhi; Xian, Yongjiang; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean W.; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The need for clinically-relevant radiation therapy technology for the treatment of preclinical models of disease has spurred the development of a variety of dedicated platforms for small animal irradiation. Our group has taken the approach of adding the ability to deliver conformal radiotherapy to an existing 120 kVp micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner. Methods A GE eXplore RS120 microCT scanner was modified by the addition of a two-dimensional subject translation stage and a variable aperture collimator. Quality assurance protocols for these devices, including measurement of translation stage positioning accuracy, collimator aperture accuracy, and collimator alignment with the x-ray beam, were devised. Use of this system for image-guided radiotherapy was assessed by irradiation of a solid water phantom as well as of two mice bearing spontaneous MYC-induced lung tumors. Radiation damage was assessed ex vivo by immunohistochemical detection of γH2AX foci. Results The positioning error of the translation stage was found to be less than 0.05 mm, while after alignment of the collimator with the x-ray axis through adjustment of its displacement and rotation, the collimator aperture error was less than 0.1 mm measured at isocenter. CT image-guided treatment of a solid water phantom demonstrated target localization accuracy to within 0.1 mm. γH2AX foci were detected within irradiated lung tumors in mice, with contralateral lung tissue displaying background staining. Conclusions Addition of radiotherapy functionality to a microCT scanner is an effective means of introducing image-guided radiation treatments into the preclinical setting. This approach has been shown to facilitate small animal conformal radiotherapy while leveraging existing technology. PMID:20395069

  1. The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Kara Lynne; Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Wazer, David E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were

  2. Five-year outcomes, cosmesis, and toxicity with 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Núria; Sanz, Xavier; Dengra, Josefa; Foro, Palmira; Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna; Quera, Jaume; Fernández-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Óscar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan; Algara, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Núria; Sanz, Xavier; Dengra, Josefa; Foro, Palmira; Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna; Quera, Jaume; Fernández-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Óscar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan; Algara, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with

  4. A prognostic scoring system for locoregional control in nasopharyngeal carcinoma following conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.H.; Tsai, S.Y.; Horng, C.-F.; Yen, K.L.; Jian, James J.; Chan, Kwan-Yee; Lin, C.-Y.; Terng, S.-D.; Tsou, M.-H.; Chu, N.-M.; Chen, H.-H.; Hsieh, C.-I.; Tan, T.-D.; Chen, P.-L.; Chung, Y.L.; Huang, Andrew T. |

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: This study established a prognostic scoring system for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), which estimates the probability of locoregional (LR) control following definitive conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with nondisseminated NPC at initial presentation (n = 630) were enrolled in this study. All patients had magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck and were treated with conformal radiotherapy. Among them, 93% had concurrent chemotherapy, and 76% had postradiation chemotherapy. The extent of the primary tumor, age at diagnosis, primary tumor size, tumor and nodal classification, histology, and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level before treatment were included in the analysis for building a prognostic scoring system. The end point for this study was LR control. Results: The prognostic score was defined as the number of adverse prognostic factors present at diagnosis. Four factors had similarly independent prognostic effects (hazard ratio, 2.0-2.6): age >40 years, histologic WHO type I-II, serum LDH level {>=}410 U/L, and involvement of two or more sites of the following anatomic structures, i.e., sphenoid floor, clivus marrow, clivus cortex, prevertebral muscles, and petrous bone. The score predicted the 5-year probability of LR control as follows: 0 (15% of the patients), 100%; 1 (42% of the patients), 93%; 2 (29% of the patients), 83%; 3 or higher (13% of the patients), 71%. Conclusion: This scoring system is useful in the decision-making for individual patients and the design of clinical trials to improve LR control for advanced-stage NPC.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2015-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published findings supporting the safety and efficacy of IMRT for lung cancer. PMID:25771415

  6. Reducing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast with a mobile, conformal shield during breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Macklis, R M; Crownover, R L; Crowe, J; Willoughby, T; Sohn, J

    1999-08-01

    During a standard course of breast radiotherapy, the contralateral breast generally receives approximately 2.5 to 6.0 Gy of scattered radiation. Although most studies have not found an overall increase in metachronous contralateral breast cancers in patients undergoing radiotherapy, a cohort of younger women may be genetically more susceptible to radiation-induced breast cancers and may thus be adversely affected by the scattered radiation. We are attempting to develop a simple, convenient, effective mechanism for minimizing the scattered radiation to the contralateral breast during the process of clinical breast radiotherapy. We therefore designed a conformal, platform-based breast shield consisting of 2.5 cm of molded lead in a mobile counterweighted polystyrene casing. This shield was intended to serve as a physical barrier to prevent both low and high energy scattered photons from the medial and lateral tangential fields. We conducted a prospective trial of 20 women, each woman serving as her own control. Each woman received breast radiotherapy with and without shield, and an array of thermoluminescent dosimeters was positioned across the contralateral breast to evaluate the in vivo dosimetry and the impact of the breast shield on surface absorption of scattered radiation. We found that the use of the breast shield reduced the median dose of scattered radiation by approximately 60% (p < 0.0001). This represented a median dose reduction of approximately 300 cGy at the nipple. The shield was easily positioned and added < 1 min to daily setup time. We conclude that the use of this sort of surface barrier shielding technique was feasible, effective, and practical for clinical use. The degree of scatter reduction accomplished through the use of this breast shield may be biologically significant, especially for those patients with biologic or epidemiologic risk factors that may predispose them to the development of radiogenic breast cancers.

  7. Conventional and conformal technique of external beam radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutrikah, N.; Winarno, H.; Amalia, T.; Djakaria, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare conventional and conformal techniques of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of the dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on cervical cancer patients who underwent EBRT before brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The prescribed dose distribution, tumor response, and acute side effects of EBRT using conventional and conformal techniques were investigated. In total, 51 patients who underwent EBRT using conventional techniques (25 cases using Cobalt-60 and 26 cases using a linear accelerator (LINAC)) and 29 patients who underwent EBRT using conformal techniques were included in the study. The distribution of the prescribed dose in the target had an impact on the patient’s final response to EBRT. The complete response rate of patients to conformal techniques was significantly greater (58%) than that of patients to conventional techniques (42%). No severe acute local side effects were seen in any of the patients (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grades 3-4). The distribution of the dose and volume to the gastrointestinal tract affected the proportion of mild acute side effects (RTOG grades 1-2). The urinary bladder was significantly greater using conventional techniques (Cobalt-60/LINAC) than using conformal techniques at 72% and 78% compared to 28% and 22%, respectively. The use of conformal techniques in pelvic radiation therapy is suggested in radiotherapy centers with CT simulators and 3D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (RTPSs) to decrease some uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. The use of AP/PA pelvic radiation techniques with Cobalt-60 should be limited in body thicknesses equal to or less than 18 cm. When using conformal techniques, delineation should be applied in the small bowel, as it is considered a critical organ according to RTOG

  8. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassam, Zahra |; Lockwood, Gina |; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James |; Swallow, Carol ||; Oza, Amit |; Siu, Lillian |; Knox, Jennifer J. |; Wong, Rebecca |; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John |; Moore, Malcolm |; Ringash, Jolie |. E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.cag

    2006-07-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study.

  9. Toxicity of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Tokita, Mari; MacAusland, Stephanie G.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Price, Lori Lyn; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence and severity of late normal tissue toxicity using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Treatment planning and delivery were in strict accordance with the technique and specified dose-volume constraints of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 protocol. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading schema. The cosmetic outcome was scored using the Harvard criteria. Univariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the correlation of dosimetric variables with outcome. Results: At a median follow-up of 15 months, moderate-to-severe late toxicity developed in 10% of patients. The most pronounced late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis: 25% Grade 2-4 and 8.3% Grade 3-4. The modified planning tumor volume/whole breast volume ratio, ratio of the volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, and 80% of the prescription dose to the whole breast volume, and maximal dose within the breast correlated with the development of fibrosis (p = .10, p = .03, p = .04, p = .06, p = .09, and p = .046, respectively). The overall cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in 81.7%, fair in 11.7%, and poor in 6.7%. The presence of subcutaneous fibrosis, modified planning tumor volume/whole breast volume ratio, ratio of the volume of breast tissue receiving 5% and 20% of the prescription dose to the whole breast volume, and pathologic specimen volume correlated with the risk of a fair/poor cosmetic outcome (p < .001, p = .02, p = .05, p = .04, p = .01, respectively). Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technique for accelerated partial breast irradiation as specified in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project

  10. Short-term clinical effect of conformal radiotherapy combined with tegafur gimeracil oteracil potassium in treating recurrent esophagus cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuyan; Shen, Yuzhen; Yan, Hua; Liu, Yan; Tan, Haihua; Li, Jianzhe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To observe clinical effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with recurrent esophagus cancer. Methods: One hundred and twelve senile patients who suffered from esophagus cancer were selected and randomly divided into two groups, namely, observation group (56 cases) and control group (56 cases). The observation group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy and the control group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy only. Results: All patients completed the treatment, with good compliance. Effective rate of the observation group was 82.1%, which was significantly higher than the control group (67.9%), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Main toxic and side effects of patients of two groups were radiation esophagitis, gastrointestinal reaction, hematologic toxicities and radiative skin reaction. Differences of incidence rates of all types of toxic and side effects were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The one-year and two-year survival rates of patients of the observation group were 80.4% and 53.6%, respectively, while the control group was 55.4% and 30.4%; differences between two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy has definite curative effect in treating patients with recurrent esophagus cancer and can improve survival rate of patients, without increasing adverse reaction. PMID:27882010

  11. Short-term clinical effect of conformal radiotherapy combined with tegafur gimeracil oteracil potassium in treating recurrent esophagus cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuyan; Shen, Yuzhen; Yan, Hua; Liu, Yan; Tan, Haihua; Li, Jianzhe

    2016-01-01

    To observe clinical effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with recurrent esophagus cancer. One hundred and twelve senile patients who suffered from esophagus cancer were selected and randomly divided into two groups, namely, observation group (56 cases) and control group (56 cases). The observation group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy and the control group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy only. All patients completed the treatment, with good compliance. Effective rate of the observation group was 82.1%, which was significantly higher than the control group (67.9%), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Main toxic and side effects of patients of two groups were radiation esophagitis, gastrointestinal reaction, hematologic toxicities and radiative skin reaction. Differences of incidence rates of all types of toxic and side effects were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The one-year and two-year survival rates of patients of the observation group were 80.4% and 53.6%, respectively, while the control group was 55.4% and 30.4%; differences between two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy has definite curative effect in treating patients with recurrent esophagus cancer and can improve survival rate of patients, without increasing adverse reaction.

  12. The Risk of Early and Late Lung Sequelae After Conformal Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, Zsuzsanna . E-mail: kahan@onko.szote.u-szeged.hu; Csenki, Melinda; Varga, Zoltan; Szil, Elemer; Cserhati, Adrienn; Balogh, Attila; Gyulai, Zsofia; Mandi, Yvette; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzo, Laszlo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To study the risks of early and late radiogenic lung damage in breast cancer patients after conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Radiogenic lung sequelae were assessed prospectively in 119 patients by means of clinical signs, radiologic abnormalities, and the mean density change (MDC) of the irradiated lung on CT. Results: Significant positive associations were detected between the development of lung abnormalities 3 months or 1 year after the radiotherapy and the age of the patient, the ipsilateral mean lung dose (MLD), the radiation dose to 25% of the ipsilateral lung (D{sub 25%}) and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}). The irradiation of the axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes favored the development of pneumonitis but not that of fibrosis. No relation was found between the preradiotherapy plasma TGF-{beta} level and the presence of radiogenic lung damage. At both time points, MDC was strongly related to age. Significant positive associations were demonstrated between the risks of pneumonitis or fibrosis and the age of the patient, MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy}. A synergistic effect of MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy} with age in patients older than 59 years is suggested. Conclusion: Our analyses indicate that the risks of early and late radiogenic lung sequelae are strongly related to the age of the patient, the volume of the irradiated lung, and the dose to it.

  13. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  14. Postoperative External Beam Radiotherapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Outcomes and Morbidity With Conformal Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L. Lobo, Mark J.; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Ahamad, Anesa; Evans, Douglas B.; Clayman, Gary; Sherman, Steven I.; Garden, Adam S.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer with postoperative conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 131 consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who underwent EBRT between January 1996 and December 2005. Histologic diagnoses included 104 papillary, 21 follicular, and six mixed papillary-follicular types. American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution was Stage III in 2 patients, Stage IVa-IVc in 128, and not assessable in 1. Thirty-four patients (26%) had high-risk histologic types and 76 (58%) had recurrent disease. Extraglandular disease spread was seen in 126 patients (96%), microscopically positive surgical margins were seen in 62 patients (47%), and gross residual disease was seen in 15 patients (11%). Median EBRT dose was 60 Gy (range, 38-72 Gy). Fifty-seven patients (44%) were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 56-66 Gy). Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 0-134 months). Results: Kaplan-Meier estimates of locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival at 4 years were 79%, 76%, and 73%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, high-risk histologic features and gross residual disease predicted for inferior locoregional relapse-free survival, whereas high-risk histologic features, M1 disease, and gross residual disease predicted for inferior disease-specific and overall survival. The IMRT did not impact on survival outcomes, but was associated with less frequent severe late morbidity (12% vs. 2%). Conclusions: Postoperative conformal EBRT provides durable locoregional disease control for patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer if disease is reduced to microscopic burden. Patients with gross disease face significantly worse outcomes. The IMRT may significantly reduce chronic radiation morbidity, but

  15. Treatment Planning Study to Determine Potential Benefit of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Conformal Radiotherapy for Unresectable Hepatic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Craig, Tim; Taremi, Mojgan; Wu Xia; Dawson, Laura A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with conformal RT (CRT) for hypofractionated isotoxicity liver RT and explore dose escalation using IMRT for the same/improved nominal risk of liver toxicity in a treatment planning study. Methods and Materials: A total of 26 CRT plans were evaluated. Prescription doses (24-54 Gy within six fractions) were individualized on the basis of the effective liver volume irradiated maintaining {<=}5% risk of radiation-induced liver disease. The dose constraints included bowel (0.5 cm{sup 3}) and stomach (0.5 cm{sup 3}) to {<=}30 Gy, spinal cord to {<=}25 Gy, and planning target volume (PTV) to {<=}140% of the prescribed dose. Two groups were evaluated: (1) PTV overlapping or directly adjacent to serial functioning normal tissues (n = 14), and (2) the liver as the dose-limiting normal tissue (n = 12). IMRT plans using direct machine parameter optimization maintained the CRT plan beam arrangements, an estimated radiation-induced liver disease risk of 5%, and underwent dose escalation, if all normal tissue constraints were maintained. Results: IMRT improved PTV coverage in 19 of 26 plans (73%). Dose escalation was feasible in 9 cases by an average of 3.8 Gy (range, 0.6-13.2) in six fractions. Three of seven plans without improved PTV coverage had small gross tumor volumes ({<=}105 cm{sup 3}) already receiving 54 Gy, the maximal prescription dose allowed. In the remaining cases, the PTV range was 9.6-689 cm{sup 3}; two had overlapped organs at risk; and one had four targets. IMRT did not improve these plans owing to poor target coverage (n = 2) and nonliver (n = 2) dose limits. Conclusion: Direct machine parameter optimization IMRT improved PTV coverage while maintaining normal tissue tolerances in most CRT liver plans. Dose escalation was possible in a minority of patients.

  16. Comparison of conformal radiation therapy techniques within the dynamic radiotherapy project `Dynarad'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lind, Bengt K.; Van Dijk, Jan; Koedooder, Kees; DeNeve, Wilfried; DeWagter, Carlos; Planskoy, Beate; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude; Proimos, Basil; Kappas, Constantin; Danciu, Claudia; Benassi, Marcello; Chierego, Giorgio; Brahme, Anders

    2000-09-01

    The objective of the dynamic radiotherapy project `Dynarad' within the European Community has been to compare and grade treatment techniques that are currently applied or being developed at the participating institutions. Cervical cancer was selected as the tumour site on the grounds that the involved organs at risk, mainly the rectum and the bladder, are very close to the tumour and partly located inside the internal target volume. In this work, a solid phantom simulating the pelvic anatomy was used by institutions in Belgium, France, Greece, Holland, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The results were evaluated using both biological and physical criteria. The main purpose of this parallel evaluation is to test the value of biological and physical evaluations in comparing treatment techniques. It is demonstrated that the biological objective functions allow a much higher conformality and a more clinically relevant scoring of the outcome. Often external beam treatment techniques have to be combined with intracavitary therapy to give clinically acceptable results. However, recent developments can reduce or even eliminate this need by delivering more conformal dose distributions using intensity modulated external dose delivery. In these cases the reliability of the patient set-up procedure becomes critical for the effectiveness of the treatment.

  17. Comparison of conformal radiation therapy techniques within the dynamic radiotherapy project 'Dynarad'.

    PubMed

    Mavroidis, P; Lind, B K; Van Dijk, J; Koedooder, K; De Neve, W; De Wagter, C; Planskoy, B; Rosenwald, J C; Proimos, B; Kappas, C; Claudia, D; Benassi, M; Chierego, G; Brahme, A

    2000-09-01

    The objective of the dynamic radiotherapy project 'Dynarad' within the European Community has been to compare and grade treatment techniques that are currently applied or being developed at the participating institutions. Cervical cancer was selected as the tumour site on the grounds that the involved organs at risk, mainly the rectum and the bladder, are very close to the tumour and partly located inside the internal target volume. In this work, a solid phantom simulating the pelvic anatomy was used by institutions in Belgium, France, Greece, Holland, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The results were evaluated using both biological and physical criteria. The main purpose of this parallel evaluation is to test the value of biological and physical evaluations in comparing treatment techniques. It is demonstrated that the biological objective functions allow a much higher conformality and a more clinically relevant scoring of the outcome. Often external beam treatment techniques have to be combined with intracavitary therapy to give clinically acceptable results. However, recent developments can reduce or even eliminate this need by delivering more conformal dose distributions using intensity modulated external dose delivery. In these cases the reliability of the patient set-up procedure becomes critical for the effectiveness of the treatment.

  18. Comparison of intensity-modulated tomotherapy with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoo, V S; Oldham, M; Adams, E J; Bedford, J L; Webb, S; Brada, M

    1999-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers the potential to more closely conform dose distributions to the target, and spare organs at risk (OAR). Its clinical value is still being defined. The present study aims to compare IMRT with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for patients with medium size convex-shaped brain tumors. Five patients planned with SCRT were replanned with the IMRT-tomotherapy method using the Peacock system (Nomos Corporation). The planning target volume (PTV) and relevant OAR were assessed, and compared relative to SCRT plans using dose statistics, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) stereotactic radiosurgery criteria. The median and mean PTV were 78 cm3 and 85 cm3 respectively (range 62-119 cm3). The differences in PTV doses for the whole group (Peacock-SCRT +/-1 SD) were 2%+/-1.8 (minimum PTV), and 0.1%+/-1.9 (maximum PTV). The PTV homogeneity achieved by Peacock was 12.1%+/-1.7 compared to 13.9%+/-1.3 with SCRT. Using RTOG guidelines, Peacock plans provided acceptable PTV coverage for all 5/5 plans compared to minor coverage deviations in 4/5 SCRT plans; acceptable homogeneity index for both plans (Peacock = 1.1 vs. SCRT = 1.2); and comparable conformity index (1.4 each). As a consequence of the transaxial method of arc delivery, the optic nerves received mean and maximum doses that were 11.1 to 11.6%, and 10.3 to 15.2% higher respectively with Peacock plan. The maximum optic lens, and brainstem dose were 3.1 to 4.8% higher, and 0.6% lower respectively with Peacock plan. However, all doses remained below the tolerance threshold (5 Gy for lens, and 50 Gy for optic nerves) and were clinically acceptable. The Peacock method provided improved PTV coverage, albeit small, in this group of convex tumors. Although the OAR doses were higher using the Peacock plans, all doses remained within the clinically defined threshold and were clinically acceptable. Further improvements may be

  19. Effect of Concurrent High-Dose Cisplatin Chemotherapy and Conformal Radiotherapy on Cervical Esophageal Cancer Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Lockwood, Gina; Brierley, James; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Wong, Rebecca; Bayley, Andrew; Ringash, Jolie

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a change in treatment policy to conformal, elective nodal radiotherapy and concurrent high-dose cisplatin improved survival for cervical esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All cervical esophageal cancer patients treated between 1997 and 2005 were restaged (1983 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria). Patients treated before 2001 (previous cohort [PC]) were compared with those treated from 2001 onward (recent cohort [RC]). The PC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was 54 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks, with 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1-4 and either mitomycin C (10 mg/m{sup 2}) or cisplatin (75 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. The RC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was conformal radiotherapy, 70 Gy in 35 fractions within 7 weeks, to the primary tumor and elective nodes, with high-dose cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 22, and 43. Results: The median follow-up was 3.1 years (PC, 8.1 and RC, 2.3). Of 71 patients (25 women and 46 men), 21 of 29 in the PC and 29 of 42 in the RC were treated curatively (curative subgroup, n = 50). Between the two groups, no differences in overall survival or locoregional relapse-free survival were seen. The overall survival rate at 2 and 5 years was 35% (range, 24-47%) and 21% (range, 12-32%) in the whole group and 46% (range 32-60%) and 28% (range, 15-42%) in the curative group, respectively. In the curative group, no statistically significant prognostic factors were found. Trends toward better locoregional relapse-free survival were seen in women (2-year rate, 73% vs. for men, 36%; p = 0.08) and in patients aged >64 years (2-year rate, 68% vs. age {<=}64 years, 34%; p = 0.10). Conclusion: No survival improvement could be demonstrated after changing the treatment policy to high-dose cisplatin-based, conventionally fractionated conformal chemoradiotherapy. Female gender and older age might predict for better outcomes.

  20. Three-dimensional conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose planning in stereotactic radiotherapy: Application of standard quality parameters for plan evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Grosu, Anca-Ligia . E-mail: anca-ligia.grosu@lrz.tum.de; Kneschaurek, Peter

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique into clinical practice is becoming routine, but still lacks a generally accepted method for plan evaluation. We present a comparison of the dose distribution of conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy plans with IMRT plans for cranial lesions in stereotactic radiotherapy. The primary aim of this study was to judge the quality of the treatment plans. The next purpose was to assess the usefulness of several quality factors for plan evaluation. Methods and Materials: Five patients, who were treated in our department, were analyzed. Four had meningioma and one had pituitary adenoma. For each case, 10 different plans were created and analyzed: 2 conventional conformal three-dimensional plans and 8 IMRT plans, using the 'step and shoot' delivery method. The first conventional plan was an individually designed beam arrangement and was used for patient treatment. The second plan was a standard plan with the same beam arrangement for all patients. Beam arrangements from the conformal plans were the base for the inversely planned IMRT. To evaluate the plans, the following factors were investigated: minimal and maximal dose to the planning target volume, homogeneity index, coverage index, conformity index, and tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities. These quantities were incorporated into scoring factors and assigned to each plan. Results: The greatest homogeneity was reached in the conformal plans and IMRT plans with high planning target volume priority in the optimization process. This consequently led to a better probability of tumor control. Better protection of organs at risk and thereby lower normal tissue complication probabilities were achieved in the IMRT plans with increased weighting of the organs at risk. Conclusion: These results show the efficiency, as well as some limitations, of the IMRT techniques. The use of different quality factors allowed us

  1. Dose Distribution Analysis in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Dynamic Conformal Multiple Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo Sanuki, Naoko; Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Sudo, Yasunobu; Iwashita, Hideo; Ooka, Yoshikazu; Aoki, Yosuke; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: We have used dynamic conformal multiple arc therapy (DCMAT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) since 2001. We investigated the consistency of DCMAT for SBRT using dose-volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients with peripheral lung tumors underwent SBRT. The median tumor diameter was 2.4 cm (range, 0.9-5.9). Treatment planning was performed using a superposition algorithm. The prescribed 50 Gy dose was divided into five fractions. The prescribed dose was defined as 80% of the maximal dose in the planning target volume (PTV), and the leaf margins were modified to ensure the PTV was included in the 80% isodose surface. The dose-volume histogram analysis was used to assess the PTV and normal lung volume. Results: The median dose covering 95% of the PTV was 50.27 Gy (range, 46.14-52.67), essentially consistent with the prescribed dose. The median homogeneity and conformity index was 1.41 (range, 1.31-1.53) and 1.73 (range, 1.41-2.21), respectively. The median volume of lung receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 4.2% (range, 1.4-10.2%). A linear correlation was found between the tumor diameter and V{sub 20}, and an even stronger correlation was found between the PTV/(normal lung volume) and V{sub 20}. The estimated V{sub 20} was 7.1% (range, 3.9-10.4%) for a 5-cm-diameter tumor, assumed to be the maximal size limitation for SBRT. Conclusion: SBRT with DCMAT achieved high conformity and delivered adequate doses within the PTV. The median dose covering 95% of the PTV was consistent with the prescribed dose. V{sub 20} can be estimated using the tumor diameter and normal lung volume. DCMAT was thus both a feasible and a reproducible method of SBRT delivery.

  2. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  3. Skin-sparing helical tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal radiotherapy for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: in vivo skin dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; Mackenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin(V50) (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin(V40) and skin(V30) (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients receiving adjuvant breast RT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Intensity modulated radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients: Is it better than three dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cure rate of early Hodgkin Lymphoma are high and avoidance of late toxicities is of paramount importance. This comparative study aims to assess the normal tissue sparing capability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in terms of dose-volume parameters and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for different organs at risk in supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods Ten HL patients were actually treated with 3D-CRT and all treatments were then re-planned with IMRT. Dose-volume parameters for thyroid, oesophagus, heart, coronary arteries, lung, spinal cord and breast were evaluated. Dose-volume histograms generated by TPS were analyzed to predict the NTCP for the considered organs at risk, according to different endpoints. Results Regarding dose-volume parameters no statistically significant differences were recorded for heart and origin of coronary arteries. We recorded statistically significant lower V30 with IMRT for oesophagus (6.42 vs 0.33, p = 0.02) and lungs (4.7 vs 0.1 p = 0.014 for the left lung and 2.59 vs 0.1 p = 0.017 for the right lung) and lower V20 for spinal cord (17.8 vs 7.2 p = 0.02). Moreover the maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT (30.2 vs 19.9, p <0.001). Higher V10 with IMRT for thyroid (64.8 vs 95, p = 0.0019) and V5 for lungs (30.3 vs 44.8, p = 0.03, for right lung and 28.9 vs 48.1, p = 0.001 for left lung) were found, respectively. Higher V5 and V10 for breasts were found with IMRT (V5: 4.14 vs 20.6, p = 0.018 for left breast and 3.3 vs 17, p = 0.059 for right breast; V10: 2.5 vs 13.6 p = 0.035 for left breast and 1.7 vs 11, p = 0.07 for the right breast.) As for the NTCP, our data point out that IMRT is not always likely to significantly increase the NTCP to OARs. Conclusions In HL male patients IMRT seems feasible and accurate while for women HL patients IMRT should be

  5. A dynamic compensation strategy to correct patient-positioning errors in conformal prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lauve, A. D.; Siebers, J. V.; Crimaldi, A. J.; Hagan, M. P.; Keall, P. J.

    2006-06-15

    Traditionally, pretreatment detected patient-positioning errors have been corrected by repositioning the couch to align the patient to the treatment beam. We investigated an alternative strategy: aligning the beam to the patient by repositioning the dynamic multileaf collimator and adjusting the beam weights, termed dynamic compensation. The purpose of this study was to determine the geometric range of positioning errors for which the dynamic compensation method is valid in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Patient-positioning errors were introduced by shifting the patient reference frame with respect to the treatment isocenter. Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements with magnitudes of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 5400 errors. Dynamic compensation was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target position and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation plans were then compared with the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose, 3.6 Gy, were deemed significant. Compared with the original treatment plans, dynamic compensation produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses. These differences increased with the magnitudes of the initial patient-positioning errors. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D{sub 95} and D{sub mean} were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose, and D{sub 5} was not decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 5400 simulated positioning errors. D{sub 5} was increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in only three of the

  6. A dynamic compensation strategy to correct patient-positioning errors in conformal prostate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lauve, A D; Siebers, J V; Crimaldi, A J; Hagan, M P; Kealla, P J

    2006-06-01

    Traditionally, pretreatment detected patient-positioning errors have been corrected by repositioning the couch to align the patient to the treatment beam. We investigated an alternative strategy: aligning the beam to the patient by repositioning the dynamic multileaf collimator and adjusting the beam weights, termed dynamic compensation. The purpose of this study was to determine the geometric range of positioning errors for which the dynamic compensation method is valid in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Patient-positioning errors were introduced by shifting the patient reference frame with respect to the treatment isocenter. Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements with magnitudes of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 5400 errors. Dynamic compensation was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target position and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation plans were then compared with the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose, 3.6 Gy, were deemed significant. Compared with the original treatment plans, dynamic compensation produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses. These differences increased with the magnitudes of the initial patient-positioning errors. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D95 and Dmean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose, and D5 was not decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 5400 simulated positioning errors. D5 was increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in only three of the 5400 positioning errors

  7. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or

  8. Four-dimensional multislice computed tomography for determination of respiratory lung tumor motion in conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leter, Edward M. . E-mail: emleter@hotmail.com; Cademartiri, Filippo; Levendag, Peter C.; Flohr, Thomas; Stam, Henk; Nowak, Peter J.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: We used four-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) to determine respiratory lung-tumor motion and compared this strategy to common clinical practice in conformal radiotherapy treatment-planning imaging. Methods and Materials: The entire lung volume of 10 consecutive patients with 14 lung metastases were scanned by a 16-slice MSCT. During the scans, patients were instructed to breathe through a spirometer that was connected to a laptop computer. For each patient, 10 stacks of 1.5-mm slices, equally distributed throughout the respiratory cycle, were reconstructed from the acquired MSCT data. The lung tumors were manually contoured in each data set. For each patient, the tumor-volume contours of all data sets were copied to 1 data set, which allowed determination of the volume that encompassed all 10 lung-tumor positions (i.e., the tumor-traversed volume [TTV]) during the respiratory cycle. The TTV was compared with the 10 tumor volumes contoured for each patient, to which an empiric respiratory-motion margin was added. The latter target volumes were designated internal-motion included tumor volume (IMITV). Results: The TTV measurements were significantly smaller than the reference IMITV measurements (5.2 {+-} 10.2 cm{sup 3} and 10.1 {+-} 13.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively). All 10 IMITVs for 2 of the 4 tumors in 1 subject completely encompassed the TTV. All 10 IMITVs for 3 tumors in 2 patients did not show overlap with up to 35% of the corresponding TTV. The 10 IMITVs for the remaining tumors either completely encompassed the corresponding TTV or did not show overlap with up to 26% of the corresponding TTV. Conclusions: We found that individualized determination of respiratory lung-tumor motion by four-dimensional respiratory-gated MSCT represents a better and simple strategy to incorporate periodic physiologic motion compared with a generalized approach. The former strategy can, therefore, improve common and state-of-the-art clinical practice

  9. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    SciTech Connect

    Komisopoulos, Georgios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  10. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks.

    PubMed

    Komisopoulos, Georgios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, Georgios C; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p+), the overall probability of injury (pI), the overall probability of control/benefit (pB), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D¯¯). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D¯¯ diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p+ index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of pB are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of pI are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (DB¯¯) for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8Gy

  11. Long-Term Results of Conformal Radiotherapy for Progressive Airway Amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Grillone, Gregory A.; Bohrs, Harry K.; Lee, Richard; Sakai, Osamu; Berk, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of conformal external beam radiotherapy (RT) for local control of progressive airway amyloidosis. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of patients with biopsy-proven progressive airway amyloidosis treated with conformal RT between 2000 and 2006 at Boston Medical Center. The patients were evaluated for performance status and pulmonary function, with computed tomography and endoscopy after RT compared with the pretreatment studies. Local control was defined as the lack of progression of airway wall thickening on computed tomography imaging and stable endobronchial deposits by endoscopy. Results: A total of 10 symptomatic airway amyloidosis patients (3 laryngeal and 7 tracheobronchial) received RT to a median total dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions within 2 weeks. At a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 1.5-10.3), 8 of the 10 patients had local control. The remaining 2 patients underwent repeat RT 6 and 8.4 months after initial RT, 1 for persistent bronchial obstruction and 1 for progression of subglottic amyloid disease with subsequent disease control. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved at a median of 18 months after RT compared with the baseline values, from a median score of 2 to a median of 1 (p = .035). Airflow (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) measurements increased compared with the baseline values at each follow-up evaluation, reaching a 10.7% increase (p = .087) at the last testing (median duration, 64.8 months). Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 esophagitis, occurring in 40% of patients. No late toxicity was observed. Conclusions: RT prevented progressive amyloid deposition in 8 of 10 patients, resulting in a marginally increased forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and improved functional capacity, without late morbidity.

  12. Multiple two-dimensional versus three-dimensional PTV definition in treatment planning for conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stroom, J C; Korevaar, G A; Koper, P C; Visser, A G; Heijmen, B J

    1998-06-01

    To demonstrate the need for a fully three-dimensional (3D) computerized expansion of the gross tumour volume (GTV) or clinical target volume (CTV), as delineated by the radiation oncologist on CT slices, to obtain the proper planning target volume (PTV) for treatment planning according to the ICRU-50 recommendations. For 10 prostate cancer patients two PTVs have been determined by expansion of the GTV with a 1.5 cm margin, i.e. a 3D PTV and a multiple 2D PTV. The former was obtained by automatically adding the margin while accounting in 3D for GTV contour differences in neighbouring slices. The latter was generated by automatically adding the 1.5 cm margin to the GTV in each CT slice separately; the resulting PTV is a computer simulation of the PTV that a radiation oncologist would obtain with (the still common) manual contouring in CT slices. For each patient the two PTVs were compared to assess the deviations of the multiple 2D PTV from the 3D PTV. For both PTVs conformal plans were designed using a three-field technique with fixed block margins. For each patient dose-volume histograms and tumour control probabilities (TCPs) of the (correct) 3D PTV were calculated, both for the plan designed for this PTV and for the treatment plan based on the (deviating) 2D PTV. Depending on the shape of the GTV, multiple 2D PTV generation could locally result in a 1 cm underestimation of the GTV-to-PTV margin. The deviations occurred predominantly in the cranio-caudal direction at locations where the GTV contour shape varies significantly from slice to slice. This could lead to serious underdosage and to a TCP decrease of up to 15%. A full 3D GTV-to-PTV expansion should be applied in conformal radiotherapy to avoid underdosage.

  13. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. Results The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. Conclusions This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT. PMID:26229621

  14. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  15. Commissioning of a conformal irradiation system for heavy-ion radiotherapy using a layer-stacking method

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Minohara, Shinichi; Komori, Masataka; Torikoshi, Masami; Asakura, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Noritoshi; Uno, Takayuki; Takei, Yuka

    2006-08-15

    The commissioning of conformal radiotherapy system using heavy-ion beams at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is described in detail. The system at HIMAC was upgraded for a clinical trial using a new technique: large spot uniform scanning with conformal layer stacking. The system was developed to localize the irradiation dose to the target volume more effectively than with the old system. With the present passive irradiation method using a ridge filter, a scatterer, a pair of wobbler magnets, and a multileaf collimator, the width of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in the radiation field could not be changed. With dynamic control of the beam-modifying devices during irradiation, a more conformal radiotherapy could be achieved. In order to safely perform treatments with this conformal therapy, the moving devices should be watched during irradiation and the synchronousness among the devices should be verified. This system, which has to be safe for patient irradiations, was constructed and tested for safety and for the quality of the dose localization realized. Through these commissioning tests, we were successfully able to prepare the conformal technique using layer stacking for patients. Subsequent to commissioning the technique has been applied to patients in clinical trials.

  16. Electron Conformal Radiotherapy for Post-Mastectomy Irradiation: A Bolus-Free, Multi-Energy, Multi-Segmented Field Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    that compared to customized electron bolu s radiotherapy for post-mastectomy irradiation, ECT with multi-energy, multi-segmente d treatment fields has...PTV dos e homogeneity was quite good . Use of the treatment plan modification techniques improved dose sparin g for the non-target portion of the...phantom . For the patient treatment plans, the algorithm provided acceptable results for PTV conformality and dose homogeneity, in comparison to the bolus

  17. Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes After Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Mueller, Tobias; Jess, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Several retrospective analyses have suggested that obese men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have outcomes inferior to those of normal-weight men. However, a recently presented analysis for the first time challenged this association between body mass index (BMI) and treatment failure. It is therefore important to provide further data on this issue. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 564 men treated with risk-adapted conformal EBRT at a single institution. Low-risk patients received EBRT alone, and the other patients received EBRT plus endocrine treatment. In addition, high-risk patients were treated to higher EBRT doses (74 Gy). A rectal balloon catheter for internal immobilization, which can be identified on portal images, was used in 261 patients (46%). Thus, localization did not rely on bony landmarks alone in these cases. Results: The median BMI was 26, and 15% of patients had BMI {>=}30. Neither univariate nor multivariate analyses detected any significant impact of BMI on biochemical relapse, prostate cancer-specific survival, or overall survival. The 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 21% and prostate cancerspecific survival 96%. Conclusions: The present analysis of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients suggests that efforts to reduce prostate movement and geographic miss might result in comparable outcomes in obese and normal-weight patients.

  18. Longitudinal Study of Intestinal Symptoms and Fecal Continence in Patients With Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Keller, Monika; Astner, Sabrina T.; Heinrich, Christine; Scholz, Christian; Pehl, Christian; Kerndl, Simone; Prause, Nina; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the intestinal symptoms and fecal continence in patients who had undergone conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 men who had undergone definitive CRT for prostate cancer were evaluated. The patients were assessed before, during (treatment Weeks 4 and 6), and 2, 12, and 24 months after CRT completion. The intestinal symptoms and fecal continence were evaluated with comprehensive standardized questionnaires. Results: The intestinal symptoms were mostly intermittent, with only a small minority of patients affected daily. Defecation pain, fecal urge, and rectal mucous discharge increased significantly during therapy. Defecation pain and rectal mucous discharge had returned to baseline levels within 8 weeks and 1 year after CRT, respectively. However, fecal urge remained significantly elevated for {<=}1 year and then returned toward the pretreatment values. The prevalence of rectal bleeding was significantly elevated 2 years after CRT. Fecal continence deteriorated during CRT and remained impaired at 1 year after treatment. Incontinence was mostly minor, occurring less than once per week and predominantly affecting incontinence for gas. Conclusion: Intestinal symptoms and fecal incontinence increased during prostate CRT. Except for rectal bleeding, the intestinal symptoms, including fecal incontinence, returned to baseline levels within 1-2 years after CRT. Thus, the rate of long-term late radiation-related intestinal toxicity was low.

  19. Five-year results of a prospective clinical trial investigating accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy after lumpectomy for early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Horst, Kathleen C; Fasola, Carolina; Ikeda, Debra; Daniel, Bruce; Ognibene, Grant; Goffinet, Don R; Dirbas, Frederick M

    2016-08-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is emerging as an alternative to whole-breast irradiation. This study presents the results of a prospective trial evaluating 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver APBI for early-stage breast cancer. Patients with unifocal stage 0-II breast cancer measuring ≤2.5 cm without lymph node involvement were eligible. After lumpectomy, 3D-CRT APBI was delivered to the lumpectomy cavity + margin (34-38.5 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 days). 141 patients with 143 breast cancers (2 bilateral) were treated with 3D-CRT APBI. Median age was 60. Median tumor size was 1.1 cm. At a median follow up of 60 months (range, 5-113), the 5-year and 8-year cumulative incidence rate of a true recurrence is 0.9%. The 5-year and 8-year cumulative incidence rates of an elsewhere failure are 2.4% and 4.4%, respectively. The 5-year and 8-year overall survival is 100% and 94%, respectively. Among the 62 patients with follow up >5 years, 95% had excellent/good cosmetic results. Our experience with 3D-CRT APBI demonstrates excellent cosmesis and local control. Longer follow up will be necessary to evaluate long-term efficacy and toxicity of 3D-CRT APBI. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT00185744. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy after therapeutic groin lymphadenectomy for patients with melanoma: a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gerard; Foote, Matthew; Brown, Simon; Burmeister, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Radiotherapy after lymph node dissection is recommended in high-risk melanoma cases. The aim of this study is to assess whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers advantages over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the groin nodal basin. Fifteen consecutively treated patients (5 3DCRT and 10 IMRT) were selected. Optimized theoretical plans using the other modality were created - enabling direct comparisons of 3DCRT and IMRT. Target volume and organs at risk constraints were assessed as achieved or as having minor (≤5%) or major (>5%) deviations. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the dose received from each patient plan (3DCRT vs. IMRT), whereas the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare clinical plans with theoretical plans. Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical data. Target coverage was achievable in most patients (major deviations - 1 IMRT and 3 3DCRT). Conformity index improved with IMRT - median 0.65, range 0.48-0.81, versus median 0.44, range 0.29-0.60 for 3DCRT; P value less than 0.001. All 3DCRT plans had major deviations for femoral head/neck constraints. Twelve and 13 IMRT plans achieved the high (V42<5%) and low (V36<35%) constraints; P value less than 0.001. IMRT delivered statistically significant lower doses to small bowel volumes up to 40 ml. There were no differences in beam numbers used nor dosimetric endpoints measured when clinical plans were compared with theoretical plans. IMRT appears to allow superior conformity of dose to the target volume while relatively sparing the adjacent the bowel and femoral head/neck. This may reduce toxicity while maintaining control rates.

  1. Comparison of heart and coronary artery doses associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for distal esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kole, Thomas P; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason; Yorke, Ellen D; Goodman, Karyn A

    2012-08-01

    To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D-CRT. Long-term studies are necessary to determine how this

  2. Comparison of Heart and Coronary Artery Doses Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Thomas P.; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Conclusions: Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D

  3. A strategy to correct for intrafraction target translation in conformal prostate radiotherapy: simulation results.

    PubMed

    Keall, P J; Lauve, A D; Hagan, M P; Siebers, J V

    2007-06-01

    internal motion shifts. Dose increases for adjacent organs at risk were rare. D33 of the rectum and D20 of the bladder were increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in 9 and 1 instances of the 3600 sampled internal motion shifts, respectively. Dmean of the right femoral head increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in 651 (18%) internal motion shifts, predominantly due to the projection of the lateral beams through the femoral head for anterior prostate motion. However, D2 was not increased by more than 5% for any of the internal motion shifts. These data demonstrate the robustness of the proposed dynamic compensation strategy for correction of internal motion in conformal prostate radiotherapy, with minimal deviation from the original treatment plans even for errors exceeding those commonly encountered in the clinic. The compensation strategy could be performed automatically with appropriate enhancements to available delivery software.

  4. On the Use of Hyperpolarized Helium MRI for Conformal Avoidance Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, C.W.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Fain, S.B.; Bentzen, S.M.; Mehta, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to illustrate the feasibility of using hyperpolarized helium magnetic resonance imaging (HPH-MRI) to obtain functional information that may assist in improving conformal avoidance of ventilating lung tissue during thoracic radiotherapy. HPH-MRI images were obtained from a volunteer patient and were first fused with a proton density-weighted (PD{sub w}) MRI to provide corresponding anatomic detail; they were then fused with the treatment planning computed tomography scan of a patient from our treatment planning database who possessed equivalent thoracic dimensions. An optimized treatment plan was then generated using the TomoTherapy treatment planning system, designating the HPH-enhancing regions as ventilation volume (VV). A dose-volume histogram compares the dosimetry of the lungs as a paired organ, the VV, and the lungs minus the VV. The clinical consequences of these changes was estimated using a bio-effect model, the parallel architecture model, or the local damage (f{sub dam}) model. Model parameters were chosen from published studies linking the incidence of grade 3+ pneumonitis, with the dose and volume irradiated. For two hypothetical treatment plans of 60 Gy in 30 fractions delivered to a right upper-lobe lung mass, one using and one ignoring the VV as an avoidance structure, the mean normalized total dose (NTD{sub mean}) values for the lung subvolumes were: lungs = 12.5 Gy{sub 3}vs. 13.52 Gy{sub 3}, VV = 9.94 Gy{sub 3}vs. 13.95 Gy{sub 3}, and lungs minus VV = 16.69 Gy{sub 3}vs. 19.16 Gy{sub 3}. Using the f{sub dam} values generated from these plans, one would predict a reduction of the incidence of grade 3+ radiation pneumonitis from 12%-4% when compared with a conventionally optimized plan. The use of HPH-MRI to identify ventilated lung subvolumes is feasible and has the potential to be incorporated into conformal avoidance treatment planning paradigms. A prospective clinical study evaluating this imaging technique is being developed.

  5. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System and Head and Neck Lesions, Using a Conformal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy System (Peacock™ System)

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Mario; Bernardo, Antonio; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Yakoob, Richard; Al-Ghazi, Matthew; Kuo, Jeffrey; Ammirati, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate single-fraction or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of central nervous system (CNS) and head and neck lesions using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a commercially available system (Peacock™, Nomos Corporation, Sewickley, PA). This system allows tomotherapeutic delivery of intensity-modulated radiation, that is, the slice-by-slice treatment of the volume of interest with an intensity-modulated beam, making the delivery of highly conformal radiation to the target possible in both single or multiple fractions mode. During an 18-month period, 43 (21 males and 22 females) patients were treated, using a removable cranial screw-fixation device. Ages ranged from 10 to 77 years (mean, 52.2; median, 53.5). Intra- and extra-axial lesions, including head and neck malignancies and spine metastases, were treated. Clinical target volume ranged from 0.77 to 195 cm3 (mean, 47.8; median, 29.90). The dose distribution was normalized to the maximum and was prescribed, in most cases, at the 80% or 90% isodose line (range, 65 to 96%; median, 85%; mean, 83.4%) and ranged from 14 to 80 Gy (mean, 48; median, 50). The number of fractions ranged from 1 to 40 (mean, 23; median, 25). In all but one patient, 90% of the prescription isodose line covered 100% of the clinical target volume. The heterogeneity index (the ratio between the maximum radiation dose and the prescribed dose) ranged between 1.0 and 1.50, whereas the conformity index (the ratio between the volume encompassed by the prescription isodose line and the clinical target volume) ranged between 1.0 and 4.5. There were no complications related to the radiation treatment. With a median follow-up of 6 months, more than 70% of our patients showed decreased lesion size. Stereotactic IMRT of CNS and head and neck lesions can be delivered safely and accurately. The Peacock system delivers stereotactic radiation in single or multiple fractions and has no volume limitations

  6. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Efstathiou, Jason; Liao Kaijun; Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83-1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83-1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14-1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  7. Hypofractionated Conformal Radiotherapy (HCRT) for primary and metastatic lung cancers with small dimension : efficacy and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mirri, Maria Alessandra; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Benassi, Marcello; d'Angelo, Annelisa; Pinzi, Valentina; Caterino, Mauro; Rinaldi, Massimo; Ceribelli, Anna; Strigari, Lidia

    2009-01-01

    : To report on the clinical outcome of hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy (HCRT) for medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) or limited pulmonary metastases or = 4 months were considered suitable for analysis. Local response was evaluated with CT imaging 4 months after the end of HCRT and every 3 months thereafter. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. : Local response to the treatment was complete response, partial response, no change, and progressive disease as seen in 29%, 43%, 14%, and 7% of tumors, respectively. LRFS at 1 year and 3 years was 76% and 63%, respectively. Lung toxicities > or = grade 2 were observed in 4/40 patients, but no grade 4. Pericardial effusion occurred in one patient. In stage I NSCLC patients (n = 15) with a median follow-up of 25 months, the 1-year LRFS and OS rates were 88% and 81%, respectively, and the 3-year rates 72% and 61%, respectively. : HCRT is an effective and low-toxic treatment for medically inoperable early-stage lung cancers and pulmonary metastases for all clinicians lacking the aid of a dedicated stereotactic system.

  8. Recurrence patterns of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after 3D conformal (chemo)-radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To establish recurrence patterns among locally advanced head and neck non-nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with radical (chemo-) radiotherapy and to correlate the sites of loco-regional recurrence with radiotherapy doses and target volumes Method 151 locally advanced HNSCC patients were treated between 2004-2005 using radical three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients with prior surgery to the primary tumour site were excluded. The sites of locoregional relapses were correlated with radiotherapy plans by the radiologist and a planning dosimetrist. Results Median age was 59 years (range:34-89). 35 patients had stage III disease, 116 patients had stage IV A/B. 36 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 42 with induction chemotherapy, 63 with induction and concomitant chemoradiotherapy and 10 concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 38 months (range 3-62). 3-year cause specific survival was 66.8%. 125 of 151 (82.8%) achieved a complete response to treatment. Amongst these 125 there were 20 local-regional recurrence, comprising 8 local, 5 regional and 7 simultaneous local and regional; synchronous distant metastases occurred in 7 of the 20. 9 patients developed distant metastases in the absence of locoregional failure. For the 14 local recurrences with planning data available, 12 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 1 was out-of-field. Of the 11 regional failures with planning data available, 7 were in-field, 1 was marginal and 3 were out-of-field recurrences. Conclusion The majority of failures following non-surgical treatment for locally advanced HNSCC were loco-regional, within the radiotherapy target volume. Improving locoregional control remains a high priority. PMID:21609453

  9. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001), and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001). HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001). For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  10. Dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam modulator micromultileaf in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carosi, Alessandra; Ingrosso, Gianluca; Ponti, Elisabetta; Tolu, Barbara; Murgia, Alessandra; di Cristino, Daniela; Santoni, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam Modulator in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer. We compared treatment plans developed with 2 different Elekta multileaf collimators (MLC): Beam Modulator micro-MLC (mMLC) (4-mm leaf width at the isocenter) and standard MLC (10-mm leaf width at the isocenter). The comparison was performed for 15 patients with localized prostate cancer in 3DCRT and IMRT delivery; a total of 60 treatment plans were processed. The dose-volume histograms were used to provide the quantitative comparison between plans. In particular, we analyzed differences between rectum and bladder sparing in terms of a set of appropriate Vx (percentage of organ at risk [OAR] volume receiving the x dose) and differences between target conformity and coverage in terms of coverage factor and conformation number. Our analysis demonstrates that in 3DCRT there is an advantage in the use of Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC in terms of organ sparing; in particular, a significant decrease in rectal V60 and V50 (p = 0.001) and in bladder V70 and V65 (p = 0.007 and 0.002, respectively) was found. Moreover, a better target dose conformity was obtained (p = 0.002). IMRT plans comparison demonstrated no significant differences between the use of the 4 or 10-mm MLCs. Our analysis shows that in 3DCRT the use of the Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC gives a gain in target conformity and in OARs dose sparing whereas in IMRT plans there is no advantage.

  11. Dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam Modulator micromultileaf in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carosi, Alessandra Ingrosso, Gianluca; Ponti, Elisabetta; Tolu, Barbara; Murgia, Alessandra; Cristino, Daniela di; Santoni, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam Modulator in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer. We compared treatment plans developed with 2 different Elekta multileaf collimators (MLC): Beam Modulator micro-MLC (mMLC) (4-mm leaf width at the isocenter) and standard MLC (10-mm leaf width at the isocenter). The comparison was performed for 15 patients with localized prostate cancer in 3DCRT and IMRT delivery; a total of 60 treatment plans were processed. The dose-volume histograms were used to provide the quantitative comparison between plans. In particular, we analyzed differences between rectum and bladder sparing in terms of a set of appropriate Vx (percentage of organ at risk [OAR] volume receiving the x dose) and differences between target conformity and coverage in terms of coverage factor and conformation number. Our analysis demonstrates that in 3DCRT there is an advantage in the use of Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC in terms of organ sparing; in particular, a significant decrease in rectal V{sub 60} and V{sub 50} (p = 0.001) and in bladder V{sub 70} and V{sub 65} (p = 0.007 and 0.002, respectively) was found. Moreover, a better target dose conformity was obtained (p = 0.002). IMRT plans comparison demonstrated no significant differences between the use of the 4 or 10-mm MLCs. Our analysis shows that in 3DCRT the use of the Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC gives a gain in target conformity and in OARs dose sparing whereas in IMRT plans there is no advantage.

  12. Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Erika L.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh; Slopsema, Roelf

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

  13. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35{sup o}/couch, 312{sup o}. Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  14. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Ingrid de; Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  15. Comparative study of convolution, superposition, and fast superposition algorithms in conventional radiotherapy, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques for various sites, done on CMS XIO planning system

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, Narayana P.; Raju, Alluri Krishnam; Sresty, NVNM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetry results that are obtained by using Convolution, Superposition and Fast Superposition algorithms in Conventional Radiotherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for different sites, and to study the suitability of algorithms with respect to site and technique. For each of the Conventional, 3D-CRT, and IMRT techniques, four different sites, namely, Lung, Esophagus, Prostate, and Hypopharynx were analyzed. Treatment plans were created using 6MV Photon beam quality using the CMS XiO (Computerized Medical System, St.Louis, MO) treatment planning system. The maximum percentage of variation recorded between algorithms was 3.7% in case of Ca.Lung, for the IMRT Technique. Statistical analysis was performed by comparing the mean relative difference, Conformity Index, and Homogeneity Index for target structures. The fast superposition algorithm showed excellent results for lung and esophagus cases for all techniques. For the prostate, the superposition algorithm showed better results in all techniques. In the conventional case of the hypopharynx, the convolution algorithm was good. In case of Ca. Lung, Ca Prostate, Ca Esophagus, and Ca Hypopharynx, OARs got more doses with the superposition algorithm; this progressively decreased for fast superposition and convolution algorithms, respectively. According to this study the dosimetric results using different algorithms led to significant variation and therefore care had to be taken while evaluating treatment plans. The choice of a dose calculation algorithm may in certain cases even influence clinical results. PMID:20126561

  16. Factors Influencing Neurocognitive Outcomes in Young Patients With Benign and Low-Grade Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh; Mallick, Indranil; Dutta, Debnarayan

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To present the effect of radiotherapy doses to different volumes of normal structures on neurocognitive outcomes in young patients with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients (median age, 13 years) with residual/progressive brain tumors (10 craniopharyngioma, 8 cerebellar astrocytoma, 6 optic pathway glioma and 4 cerebral low-grade glioma) were treated with SCRT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks. Prospective neuropsychological assessments were done at baseline before RT and at subsequent follow-up examinations. The change in intelligence quotient (IQ) scores was correlated with various factors, including dose-volume to normal structures. Results: Although the overall mean full-scale IQ (FSIQ) at baseline before RT remained unchanged at 2-year follow-up after SCRT, one third of patients did show a >10% decline in FSIQ as compared with baseline. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that patients aged <15 years had a significantly higher chance of developing a >10% drop in FSIQ than older patients (53% vs. 10%, p = 0.03). Dosimetric comparison in patients showing a >10% decline vs. patients showing a <10% decline in IQ revealed that patients receiving >43.2 Gy to >13% of volume of the left temporal lobe were the ones to show a significant drop in FSIQ (p = 0.048). Radiotherapy doses to other normal structures, including supratentorial brain, right temporal lobe, and frontal lobes, did not reveal any significant correlation. Conclusion: Our prospectively collected dosimetric data show younger age and radiotherapy doses to left temporal lobe to be predictors of neurocognitive decline, and may well be used as possible dose constraints for high-precision radiotherapy planning.

  17. Conformal radiotherapy, reduced boost volume, hyperfractionated radiotherapy, and online quality control in standard-risk medulloblastoma without chemotherapy: Results of the French M-SFOP 98 protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Carrie, Christian . E-mail: carrie@lyon.fnclcc.fr; Muracciole, Xavier; Gomez, Frederic

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Between December 1998 and October 2001, patients <19 years old were treated for standard-risk medulloblastoma according to the Medulloblastome-Societe Francaise d'Oncologie Pediatrique 1998 (M-SFOP 98) protocol. Patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy (36 Gy in 36 fractions) to the craniospinal axis, a boost with conformal therapy restricted to the tumor bed (to a total dose of 68 Gy in 68 fractions), and no chemotherapy. Records of craniospinal irradiation were reviewed before treatment start. Results: A total of 48 patients were considered assessable. With a median follow-up of 45.7 months, the overall survival and progression-free survival rate at 3 years was 89% and 81%, respectively. Fourteen major deviations were detected and eight were corrected. No relapses occurred in the frontal region and none occurred in the posterior fossa outside the boost volume. Nine patients were available for volume calculation without reduction of the volume irradiated. We observed a reduction in the subtentorial volume irradiated to >60 Gy, but a slight increase in the volume irradiated to 40 Gy. No decrease in intelligence was observed in the 22 children tested during the first 2 years. Conclusion: This hyperfractionated radiotherapy protocol with a reduced boost volume and without chemotherapy was not associated with early relapses in children. Moreover, intellectual function seemed to be preserved. These results are promising.

  18. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  19. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients.

  20. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-03-15

    A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation.

  1. Malignancies of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Long-Term Outcome With Conventional or Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Nuyts, Sandra; Geussens, Yasmyne; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Fossion, Eric; Hermans, Robert; Bogaert, Walter van den

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term clinical outcome and toxicity of conventional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between January 1976 and February 2003, 127 patients with histologically proven cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 119) or nasal cavity (n = 8) were treated with preoperative (n = 61), postoperative (n = 51), or primary (n = 15) radiotherapy, using conventional (n = 74) or three-dimensional conformal (n = 53) techniques. No elective neck irradiation of the cervical lymph nodes was performed in N0 patients. Results: Median follow-up was 5.6 years (range, 3-307 months) for all patients, and 7.3 years (range, 47-307 months) for patients still alive at the close-out date. The actuarial 5-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 53%, 54%, and 37%, respectively. Only 6 (5%) of all 127 patients and 4 (3%) of 122 originally N0 patients developed a regional failure in the neck. Distant metastasis occurred in 20% of patients. Both primary tumor extent and lymph node involvement were the most important prognostic factors, together with squamous cell carcinoma histology. Conclusion: Local failure remains the dominant cause of poor outcome for patients with sinonasal cancer, despite aggressive local treatment with combined surgery and radiotherapy in operable patients. Distant metastasis and certainly regional relapse were much less common sites of failure. Overall survival remains poor, suggesting the need for more efficacious local and possibly systemic therapy.

  2. Impact of CT and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography image fusion for conformal radiotherapy in esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Touboul, Emmanuel; Lerouge, Delphine; Deniaud-Alexandre, Elisabeth; Grahek, Dany; Foulquier, Jean-Noël; Petegnief, Yolande; Grès, Benoît; El Balaa, Hanna; Kerrou, Kaldoun; Montravers, Françoise; Keraudy, Katia; Tiret, Emmanuel; Gendre, Jean-Pierre; Grange, Jean-Didier; Houry, Sidney; Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2005-10-01

    To study the impact of fused (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images on conformal radiotherapy planning for esophageal carcinoma patients. Thirty-four esophageal carcinoma patients were referred for concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy with radical intent. Each patient underwent CT and FDG-hybrid PET for simulation treatment in the same treatment position. PET images were coregistered using five fiducial markers. Target delineation was initially performed on CT images, and the corresponding PET data were subsequently used as an overlay to CT data to define the target volume. (18)F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose-PET identified previously undetected distant metastatic disease in 2 patients, making them ineligible for curative conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was decreased by CT and FDG image fusion in 12 patients (35%) and increased in 7 patients (21%). The GTV reduction was > or =25% in 4 patients owing to a reduction in the length of the esophageal tumor. The GTV increase was > or =25% with FDG-PET in 2 patients owing to the detection of occult mediastinal lymph node involvement in 1 patient and an increased length of the esophageal tumor in 1 patient. Modifications of the GTV affected the planning treatment volume in 18 patients. Modifications of the delineation of the GTV and displacement of the isocenter of the planning treatment volume by FDG-PET also affected the percentage of total lung volume receiving >20 Gy in 25 patients (74%), with a dose reduction in 12 patients and dose increase in 13. In our study, CT and FDG-PET image fusion appeared to have an impact on treatment planning and management of esophageal carcinoma. The affect on treatment outcome remains to be demonstrated.

  3. A critical evaluation of secondary cancer risk models applied to Monte Carlo dose distributions of 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional conformal and hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, A.; Bochud, F.; Moeckli, R.

    2014-08-01

    The comparison of radiotherapy techniques regarding secondary cancer risk has yielded contradictory results possibly stemming from the many different approaches used to estimate risk. The purpose of this study was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different available risk models applied to detailed whole-body dose distributions computed by Monte Carlo for various breast radiotherapy techniques including conventional open tangents, 3D conformal wedged tangents and hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). First, organ-specific linear risk models developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII committee were applied to mean doses for remote organs only and all solid organs. Then, different general non-linear risk models were applied to the whole body dose distribution. Finally, organ-specific non-linear risk models for the lung and breast were used to assess the secondary cancer risk for these two specific organs. A total of 32 different calculated absolute risks resulted in a broad range of values (between 0.1% and 48.5%) underlying the large uncertainties in absolute risk calculation. The ratio of risk between two techniques has often been proposed as a more robust assessment of risk than the absolute risk. We found that the ratio of risk between two techniques could also vary substantially considering the different approaches to risk estimation. Sometimes the ratio of risk between two techniques would range between values smaller and larger than one, which then translates into inconsistent results on the potential higher risk of one technique compared to another. We found however that the hybrid IMRT technique resulted in a systematic reduction of risk compared to the other techniques investigated even though the magnitude of this reduction varied substantially with the different approaches investigated. Based on the epidemiological data available, a reasonable

  4. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). Methods A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. Results The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. Conclusion The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction. PMID:24495815

  5. Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, Francois Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre

    2008-04-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage.

  6. Individualized margins in 3D conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer: analysis of physiological movements and their dosimetric impacts.

    PubMed

    Germain, François; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, André

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage.

  7. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Xu Hongde; Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua; Liu Jianren

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  8. Low-dose-rate californium-252 neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy combined with conformal radiotherapy for treatment of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xu, Hong-De; Pan, Song-Dan; Lin, Shan; Yue, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2012-07-01

    To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ((252)Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors ≤4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then (252)Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, (252)Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For (252)Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. The mean ± SD patient age was 54.7 ± 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean ± SD time to CR was 23.5 ± 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean ± SD follow-up period was 27.6 ± 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Low-dose-rate (252)Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Conkiss: Conformal Kidneys Sparing 3D Noncoplanar Radiotherapy Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer As an Alternative to IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Sebestyen, Zsolt; Kovacs, Peter; Gulyban, Akos; Farkas, Robert; Bellyei, Szabolcs; Liposits, Gabor; Szigeti, Andras; Esik, Olga; Derczy, Katalin; Mangel, Laszlo

    2011-04-01

    When treating pancreatic cancer using standard (ST) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) beam arrangements, the kidneys often receive a higher dose than their probable tolerance limit. Our aim was to elaborate a new planning method that-similarly to IMRT-effectively spares the kidneys without compromising the target coverage. Conformal kidneys sparing (CONKISS) 5-field, noncoplanar plans were compared with ST plans for 23 consecutive patients retrospectively. Optimal beam arrangements were used consisting of a left- and right-wedged beam-pair and an anteroposterior beam inclined in the caudal direction. The wedge direction determination (WEDDE) algorithm was developed to adjust the adequate direction of wedges. The aimed organs at risk (OARs) mean dose limits were: kidney <12 Gy, liver <25 Gy, small bowels <30 Gy, and spinal cord maximum <45 Gy. Conformity and homogeneity indexes with z-test were used to evaluate and compare the different planning approaches. The mean dose to the kidneys decreased significantly (p < 0.05): left kidney 7.7 vs. 10.7 Gy, right kidney 9.1 vs. 11.7 Gy. Meanwhile the mean dose to the liver increased significantly (18.1 vs. 15.0 Gy). The changes in the conformity, homogeneity, and in the doses to other OARs were not significant. The CONKISS method balances the load among the OARs and significantly reduces the dose to the kidneys, without any significant change in the conformity and homogeneity. Using 3D-CRT the CONKISS method can be a smart alternative to IMRT to enhance the possibility of dose escalation.

  10. Quality of Life and Survival Outcome for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-A Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, F.-M. Chien, C.-Y.; Tsai, W.-L.; Chen, H.-C.; Hsu, H.-C.; Lui, C.-C.; Huang, T.-L.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes of quality of life (QoL) and survival outcomes for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Two hundred and three newly diagnosed NPC patients, who were curatively treated by 3D-CRT (n = 93) or IMRT (n = 110) between March 2002 and July 2004, were analyzed. The distributions of clinical stage according to American Joint Committee on Cancer 1997 were I: 15 (7.4%), II: 78 (38.4%), III: 74 (36.5%), and IV: 36 (17.7%). QoL was longitudinally assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires at the five time points: before RT, during RT (36 Gy), and 3 months, 12 months, and 24 months after RT. Results: The 3-year locoregional control, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rates were 84.8%, 76.7%, and 81.7% for the 3D-CRT group, respectively, compared with 84.2%, 82.6%, and 85.4% for the IMRT group (p value > 0.05). A general trend of maximal deterioration in most QoL scales was observed during RT, followed by a gradual recovery thereafter. There was no significant difference in most scales between the two groups at each time point. The exception was that patients treated by IMRT had a both statistically and clinically significant improvement in global QoL, fatigue, taste/smell, dry mouth, and feeling ill at the time point of 3 months after RT. Conclusions: The potential advantage of IMRT over 3D-CRT in treating NPC patients might occur in QoL outcome during the recovery phase of acute toxicity.

  11. A Retrospective Comparison of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for the Reirradiation of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yazici, Gozde; Yildiz, Ferah; Gurkaynak, Murat; Zorlu, Faruk; Yildiz, Demet; Hosal, Sefik; Gullu, Ibrahim; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We assessed therapeutic outcomes of reirradiation with robotic stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LRNPC) patients and compared those results with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with or without brachytherapy (BRT). Methods and Materials: Treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively in 51 LRNPC patients receiving either robotic SBRT (24 patients) or CRT with or without BRT (27 patients) in our department. CRT was delivered with a 6-MV linear accelerator, and a median total reirradiation dose of 57 Gy in 2 Gy/day was given. Robotic SBRT was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Patients in the SBRT arm received 30 Gy over 5 consecutive days. We calculated actuarial local control and cancer-specific survival rates for the comparison of treatment outcomes in SBRT and CRT arms. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 was used for toxicity evaluation. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months for all patients. Two-year actuarial local control rates were 82% and 80% for SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.6). Two-year cancer-specific survival rates were 64% and 47% for the SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.4). Serious late toxicities (Grade 3 and above) were observed in 21% of patients in the SBRT arm, whereas 48% of patients had serious toxicity in the CRT arm (p = 0.04). Fatal complications occurred in three patients (12.5%) of the SBRT arm, and four patients (14.8%) of the CRT arm (p = 0.8). T stage at recurrence was the only independent predictor for local control and survival. Conclusion: Our robotic SBRT protocol seems to be feasible and less toxic in terms of late effects compared with CRT arm for the reirradiation of LRNPC patients.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D

  13. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Boehling, Nicholas S.; Grosshans, David R.; Bluett, Jaques B.; Palmer, Matthew T.; Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  14. A comparison of liver protection among 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The analysis was designed to compare dosimetric parameters among 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and RapidArc (RA) to identify which can achieve the lowest risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Twenty patients with HCC were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and RA were calculated for total dose of 50 Gy/25f. The percentage of the normal liver volume receiving >40, >30, >20, >10, and >5 Gy (V40, V30, V20, V10 and V5) were evaluated to determine liver toxicity. V5, V10, V20, V30 and Dmean of liver were compared as predicting parameters for RILD. Other parameters included the conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and hot spot (V110%) for the planned target volume (PTV) as well as the monitor units (MUs) for plan efficiency, the mean dose (Dmean) for the organs at risk (OARs) and the maximal dose at 1% volume (D1%) for the spinal cord. Results The Dmean of IMRT was higher than 3DCRT (p = 0.045). For V5, there was a significant difference: RA > IMRT >3DCRT (p <0.05). 3DCRT had a lower V10 and higher V20, V30 values for liver than RA (p <0.05). RA and IMRT achieved significantly better CI and lower V110% values than 3DCRT (p <0.05). RA had better HI, lower MUs and shorter delivery time than 3DCRT or IMRT (p <0.05). Conclusion For right lobe tumors, RapidArc may have the lowest risk of RILD with the lowest V20 and V30 compared with 3DCRT or IMRT. For diameters of tumors >8 cm in our study, the value of Dmean for 3DCRT was lower than IMRT or RapidArc. This may indicate that 3DCRT is more suitable for larger tumors. PMID:24502643

  15. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  16. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  17. Constituent components of out-of-field scatter dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy: a comparison with 6-MV and implications for carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Jeremy D; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-11-01

    To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite reducing internal/patient scatter. Out

  18. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 and 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4

  19. Predictive parameters in hypofractionated whole-breast 3D conformal radiotherapy according to the Ontario Canadian trial

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Grazia; Terlizzi, Angela; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Perri, Francesco; De Chiara, Vincenzo; Turi, Barbara; Silvano, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the possible role of dosimetric parameters according Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) model as predictive of late toxicity and cosmesis in hypofractionated whole-breast three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis on 215 consecutive early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (according the Ontario Canadian trial), with a 6 years median follow-up was conducted. To assess the impact of 10%–20% dose hotspots on different percent values of planning target volume (PTV) of the breast, we retrospectively employed the NTCP model of Lyman. PTV breast (PTVbr), V110 were identified. For statistical analysis the χ2 and paired t-test were used to find a correlation between late skin and subcutaneous toxicity and cosmetic outcome with dosimetrical parameters Multivariate analysis was performed with the aim to assess independently the impact of dosimetric and clinical parameters on late toxicity and cosmesis using Pearson’s covariance. Results Late skin toxicity was recorded in 47/215 (22%); and G3 toxicity occurred in 11 patients (5%). Cosmesis with excellent–good score was found in 172 patients (80%) while fair–poor score was found in 43 patients (20%). In univariate χ2 analysis the V110 >10% of the PTV breast significantly correlated with higher toxicity (P<0.005, OR 9.60 [CI 3.89–23.72]). Cosmesis related to V110 >10% and PTV breast volume over 1,300 cc was significant at multivariate analysis (P<0.005, OR 6.07 [CI 2.36–15.59]). Conclusion To safely use one of the most important whole-breast hypofractionated radiotherapy schedules, we found some predictive paramaters on the basis of NTCP model by Lyman. These parameters may be useful in selection of elegible patients. PMID:28392704

  20. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively.

  1. Integral Dose and Radiation-Induced Secondary Malignancies: Comparison between Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    D’Arienzo, Marco; Masciullo, Stefano G.; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Osti, Mattia F.; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED) on the target (BED = 76Gy10). Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR) was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002), secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001). This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged. PMID:23202843

  2. Integral dose and radiation-induced secondary malignancies: comparison between stereotactic body radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, Marco; Masciullo, Stefano G; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Osti, Mattia F; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo M

    2012-11-19

    The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10 Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED) on the target (BED = 76 Gy(10)). Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3 Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR) was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002), secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001). This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  3. Predictive parameters in hypofractionated whole-breast 3D conformal radiotherapy according to the Ontario Canadian trial.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Grazia; Terlizzi, Angela; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Perri, Francesco; De Chiara, Vincenzo; Turi, Barbara; Silvano, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the possible role of dosimetric parameters according Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) model as predictive of late toxicity and cosmesis in hypofractionated whole-breast three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis on 215 consecutive early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (according the Ontario Canadian trial), with a 6 years median follow-up was conducted. To assess the impact of 10%-20% dose hotspots on different percent values of planning target volume (PTV) of the breast, we retrospectively employed the NTCP model of Lyman. PTV breast (PTVbr), V110 were identified. For statistical analysis the χ(2) and paired t-test were used to find a correlation between late skin and subcutaneous toxicity and cosmetic outcome with dosimetrical parameters Multivariate analysis was performed with the aim to assess independently the impact of dosimetric and clinical parameters on late toxicity and cosmesis using Pearson's covariance. Late skin toxicity was recorded in 47/215 (22%); and G3 toxicity occurred in 11 patients (5%). Cosmesis with excellent-good score was found in 172 patients (80%) while fair-poor score was found in 43 patients (20%). In univariate χ(2) analysis the V110 >10% of the PTV breast significantly correlated with higher toxicity (P<0.005, OR 9.60 [CI 3.89-23.72]). Cosmesis related to V110 >10% and PTV breast volume over 1,300 cc was significant at multivariate analysis (P<0.005, OR 6.07 [CI 2.36-15.59]). To safely use one of the most important whole-breast hypofractionated radiotherapy schedules, we found some predictive paramaters on the basis of NTCP model by Lyman. These parameters may be useful in selection of elegible patients.

  4. Three dimensional conformal photon radiotherapy at a moderate dose level of 66 Gy for prostate carcinoma: early results.

    PubMed

    Wachter, S; Gerstner, N; Goldner, G; Dieckmann, K; Colotto, A; Pötter, R

    1999-06-01

    The therapeutic outcome and toxicity of 3-D conformal photon external beam therapy of prostate cancer is well documented in the literature. Progress is still in work for optimization of treatment strategies by risk-adapted dose escalation studies to improve local tumor control without increase of radiation side effects. We present our experience of 291 patients treated between January 1994 and August 1997 with a 3-D planned four-field box technique and a central dose of 66 Gy. Biochemical response of patients with radiotherapy alone (group 1, n = 72 pts.) has been analyzed in detail. Acute radiation side effects are given for all patients (n = 291), late radiation side effects are given for patients treated between Jan 1994 and Jan 1996 with a median follow-up of 22 months (n = 115 pts.). We have observed a biochemical response (nadir PSA < 1 after 12 months, < 2 after 6 months) for patients treated with radiotherapy alone without hormone manipulation in 67%. Incidence of late rectal and bladder morbidity (grade 2 and 3) was 9.4% and 4%, respectively. Compared to other reports our results indicate a high rate of local tumor control (early biochemical response) and a low rate of late morbidity. Nevertheless, we will start a risk-adapted dose escalation study up to 74 Gy for unfavorable subgroups (G2-3, Gleason Score > 7, PSA > 10) to improve treatment outcome.

  5. Phase II Study of Vinorelbine and Estramustine in Combination With Conformational Radiotherapy for Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, Joan; Nogue, Miguel; Sole, Josep M.; Foro, Palmira; Domenech, Montserrat; Suarez, Marta; Gallardo, Enrique; Garcia, Dario; Ferrer, Ferran; Gelabert-Mas, Antoni; Gayo, Javier; Fabregat, Xavier

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with three-dimensional conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients received estramustine, 600 mg/m{sup 2} daily, and vinorelbine, 25 mg/m{sup 2}, on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for three cycles in combination with 8 weeks of 3D-CRT (total dose of 70.2 gray [Gy] at 1.8-Gy fractions or 70 Gy at 2.0-Gy fractions). Additionally, patients received luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for 3 years. Results: All patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. Progression-free survival at 5 years was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52-86). All patients who relapsed had only biochemical relapse. The most frequent severe toxicities were cystitis (16% of patients), leucopenia (10% of patients), diarrhea (10% of patients), neutropenia (8% of patients), and proctitis (8% of patients). Six patients (12%) did not complete study treatment due to the patient's decision (n = 1) and to adverse events such as hepatotoxicity, proctitis, paralytic ileus, and acute myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with 3D-CRT is a safe and effective regimen for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial is needed to determine whether the results of this regimen are an improvement over the results obtained with radiotherapy and androgen ablation.

  6. Acute and Late Toxicity in a Randomized Trial of Conventional Versus Hypofractionated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Fowler, Jack; Gomellini, Sara; Arcangeli, Stefano; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Benassi, Marcello; Strigari, Lidia

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity between hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation schedules in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated (62 Gy in 20 fractions within 5 weeks, 4 fractions/wk) or conventionally fractionated (80 Gy in 40 fractions within 8 weeks) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients had undergone a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation, with radiotherapy starting 2 months after initiation of the total androgen deprivation. Results: The median follow-up was 32 and 35 months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. For the patients developing acute toxicity, no difference between the two fractionation groups was found in either severity or duration of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Also, no difference was found in the incidence and severity of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity between the two treatment schedules, with a 3-year rate of Grade 2 or greater toxicity of 17% and 16% for the hypofractionation arm and 14% and 11% for the conventional fractionation arm, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was found only in the conventional fractionation group. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the hypofractionation regimen used in our study is safe, with only a slight, nonsignificant increase in tolerable and temporary acute toxicity compared with the conventional fractionation schedule. The severity and frequency of late complications was equivalent between the two treatment groups.

  7. Hypofractionated breast cancer radiotherapy. Helical tomotherapy in supine position or classic 3D-conformal radiotherapy in prone position: which is better?

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Fabrizio; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Iadanza, Luciano; Cutillo, Luisa; Muto, Matteo; Toledo, Diego; Ravo, Vincenzo; Falivene, Sara; Muto, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    We propose a comparative dosimetric study of whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) in supine position and 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in prone position. Twelve patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy were retrospectively selected from October to December 2012. Specific dose-volume parameters were selected for the study. The target coverage was adequate in all patients for both techniques. Significant differences in lung dose distribution were observed: maximum dose (mean value over the 12 plans) was 23.41 Gy in HT plans and 6.65 Gy in 3D-CRT; V20 (i.e. the lung volume receiving 20 Gy) was 0.31% in HT plans and 0.0% in 3D-CRT plans. The mean dose to the heart was 5.57 Gy and 0.93 Gy, respectively. The differences between the two techniques were significant (p<0.05) only for some parameters. We noted better results in the prone position, but with HT, dose constraints were mentioned for the whole set of considered organs.

  8. Dosimetric impact of different CT datasets for stereotactic treatment planning using 3D conformal radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Oechsner, Markus; Odersky, Leonhard; Berndt, Johannes; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Wilkens, Jan Jakob; Duma, Marciana Nona

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) by using four differently generated CT datasets for dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung and liver tumors. Additionally, dose differences between 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans calculated on these CT datasets were determined. Twenty SBRT patients, ten lung cases and ten liver cases, were retrospectively selected for this study. Treatment plans were optimized on average intensity projection (AIP) CTs using 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Afterwards, the plans were copied to the planning CTs (PCT), maximum intensity projection (MIP) and mid-ventilation (MidV) CT datasets and dose was recalculated keeping all beam parameters and monitor units unchanged. Ipsilateral lung and liver volumes and dosimetric parameters for PTV (Dmean, D2, D98, D95), ipsilateral lung and liver (Dmean, V30, V20, V10) were determined and statistically analysed using Wilcoxon test. Significant but small mean differences were found for PTV dose between the CTs (lung SBRT: ≤2.5 %; liver SBRT: ≤1.6 %). MIPs achieved the smallest lung and the largest liver volumes. OAR mean doses in MIP plans were distinctly smaller than in the other CT datasets. Furthermore, overlapping of tumors with the diaphragm results in underestimated ipsilateral lung dose in MIP plans. Best agreement was found between AIP and MidV (lung SBRT). Overall, differences in liver SBRT were smaller than in lung SBRT and VMAT plans achieved slightly smaller differences than 3D-CRT plans. Only small differences were found for PTV parameters between the four CT datasets. Larger differences occurred for the doses to organs at risk (ipsilateral lung, liver) especially for MIP plans. No relevant differences were observed between 3D-CRT or VMAT plans. MIP CTs are not appropriate for OAR dose

  9. Clinical observational study of conformal radiotherapy combined with topotecan chemotherapy in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, P; Zhang, Z H; Li, L; Du, X L; Shan, C P; Sheng, X G

    2015-04-22

    This retrospective study aimed to observe the cura-tive effect and adverse reactions of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with topotecan chemotherapy in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma. The chemoradiotherapy group (N = 22) received 15 mv X-rays with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy/f/d radiation, 5 times per week. The total dose was 45 to 65 Gy; the median dose was 52.5 Gy. Topotecan chemotherapy (2.0 mg/m(2)) was administered after the first week of radiotherapy on days 1, 8, and 15; it was repeated every 28 days. The only che-motherapy group (N = 20) received topotecan chemotherapy (4.0 mg/m(2)) in the first week, and the dose was administered on days 1, 8, and 15; it was repeated every 28 days. The median follow-up times were 18.5 months (2 to 37.7) and 10.8 months (1.5 to 29.6) in the chemoradiotherapy and in the only chemotherapy groups, respectively. The total response rates were 42.1% (8/19) and 11.1% (2/18), respectively. The clinical benefit rates were 68.4% (13/19) and 22.2% (4/18), respectively, with significant difference (P < 0.05). The median disease progression-free periods were 9.8 and 6.6 months, respectively, with significant difference (P < 0.001). The median survival times were 19.7 and 12.5 months, respective-ly, with significant difference (P < 0.05). The degrees of digestive tract reaction rates were 26.3% (5/19) and 16.7% (3/18), whereas the hematology toxicity rates were 21.1% (4/19) and 22.2% (4/18), respectively, with no significant difference (P > 0.05). As three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with topotecan che-motherapy had good curative effect on platinum-resistant recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, with mild adverse reactions, this tech-nique can be used as a remedial measure.

  10. Hypofractionated Dose Escalated 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Outcomes from a Mono-Institutional Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesco; Arcangeli, Stefano; Pignatelli, Antonietta; Castagna, Roberta; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Based on a radiobiological assumption of a low alpha/beta (α/β) ratio for prostate cancer, hypofractionated radiotherapy has increasingly gained traction in the clinical practice and recent guidelines have confirmed the non-inferiority of this approach. Nevertheless, the largest studies that have used hypofractionation so far, employed image-guided radiation therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (IGRT/IMRT) facilities that might have overcome the radiobiological advantages, which remain to be fully confirmed. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the feasibility of a hypofractionated schedule delivered with 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy to prostate and seminal vesicles in combination with hormonal therapy. The study included 97 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa), irrespective of risk class, treated with a schedule of 62 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (4 fractions of 3.1 Gy each per week). According to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) prognostic classification, patients were divided into a favourable group (19%), intermediate group (41%) and unfavourable group (40%). Early and late toxicities were scored using the radiation toxicity grading/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria. Additionally, the international prostate symptom index (IPSS) for benign prostate hypertrophy was used to evaluate obstructive urinary symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Hormonal therapy (HT) was administrated in 92% of patients. After a median follow-up of 39 months (range=25-52), maximum ≥G2 late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 8% and 11% patients, respectively. The corresponding figures for acute toxicities were 24% and 15%. Patients with higher IPSS score before enrolment had significantly worse urinary function after treatment. Only 2% of patients died from PCa. Biochemical non-evidence of disease

  11. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy Reduces Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: Results of a Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Godoi Bernardes da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), biochemical or clinical failure (BCF), and overall mortality (OM) in men with localized prostate cancer treated with conformal high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, Embase, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing conformal HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: Five randomized, controlled trials (2508 patients) that met the study criteria were identified. Pooled results from these randomized, controlled trials showed a significant reduction in the incidence of PCSM and BCF rates at 5 years in patients treated with HDRT (p = 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively), with an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of PCSM and BCF at 5 years of 1.7% and 12.6%, respectively. Two trials evaluated PCSM with 10 years of follow up. The pooled results from these trials showed a statistical benefit for HDRT in terms of PCSM (p = 0.03). In the subgroup analysis, trials that used androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) showed an ARR for BCF of 12.9% (number needed to treat = 7.7, p < 0.00001), whereas trials without ADT had an ARR of 13.6% (number needed to treat = 7, p < 0.00001). There was no difference in the OM rate at 5 and 10 years (p = 0.99 and p = 0.11, respectively) between the groups receiving HDRT and CDRT. Conclusions: This meta-analysis is the first study to show that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing disease progression and prostate cancer-specific death in trials that used conformational technique to increase the total dose. Despite the limitations of our study in evaluating the role of ADT and HDRT, our data show no benefit for HDRT arms in terms of BCF in trials with or without ADT.

  12. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  14. Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy on the High-Dose Arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 Prostate Cancer Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Yan, Yan; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Bosch, Walter R.; Winter, Kathryn; Galvin, James M.; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Morton, Gerard C.; Parliament, Matthew B.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To give a preliminary report of clinical and treatment factors associated with toxicity in men receiving high-dose radiation therapy (RT) on a phase 3 dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: The trial was initiated with 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and amended after 1 year to allow intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 55.8 Gy to a planning target volume that included the prostate and seminal vesicles, then 23.4 Gy to prostate only. The IMRT patients were treated to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to 79.2 Gy. Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late morbidity scores were used for acute and late effects. Results: Of 763 patients randomized to the 79.2-Gy arm of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol, 748 were eligible and evaluable: 491 and 257 were treated with 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. For both bladder and rectum, the volumes receiving 65, 70, and 75 Gy were significantly lower with IMRT (all P<.0001). For grade (G) 2+ acute gastrointestinal/genitourinary (GI/GU) toxicity, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant decrease in G2+ acute collective GI/GU toxicity for IMRT. There were no significant differences with 3D-CRT or IMRT for acute or late G2+ or 3+ GU toxicities. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in late G2+ GI toxicity for IMRT (P=.039). On multivariate analysis, IMRT showed a 26% reduction in G2+ late GI toxicity (P=.099). Acute G2+ toxicity was associated with late G3+ toxicity (P=.005). With dose–volume histogram data in the multivariate analysis, RT modality was not significant, whereas white race (P=.001) and rectal V70 ≥15% were associated with G2+ rectal toxicity (P=.034). Conclusions: Intensity modulated RT is associated with a significant reduction in acute G2+ GI/GU toxicity. There is a trend for a

  15. NRG Oncology-Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 1014: 1-Year Toxicity Report From a Phase 2 Study of Repeat Breast-Preserving Surgery and 3-Dimensional Conformal Partial-Breast Reirradiation for In-Breast Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Douglas W; Winter, Kathryn A; Kuerer, Henry M; Haffty, Bruce G; Cuttino, Laurie W; Todor, Dorin A; Simone, Nicole L; Hayes, Shelly B; Woodward, Wendy A; McCormick, Beryl; Cohen, Randi J; Sahijdak, Walter M; Canaday, Daniel J; Brown, Doris R; Currey, Adam D; Fisher, Christine M; Jagsi, Reshma; White, Julia

    2017-08-01

    To determine the associated toxicity, tolerance, and safety of partial-breast reirradiation. Eligibility criteria included in-breast recurrence occurring >1 year after whole-breast irradiation, <3 cm, unifocal, and resected with negative margins. Partial-breast reirradiation was targeted to the surgical cavity plus 1.5 cm; a prescription dose of 45 Gy in 1.5 Gy twice daily for 30 treatments was used. The primary objective was to evaluate the rate of grade ≥3 treatment-related skin, fibrosis, and/or breast pain adverse events (AEs), occurring ≤1 year from re-treatment completion. A rate of ≥13% for these AEs in a cohort of 55 patients was determined to be unacceptable (86% power, 1-sided α = 0.07). Between 2010 and 2013, 65 patients were accrued, and the first 55 eligible and with 1 year follow-up were analyzed. Median age was 68 years. Twenty-two patients had ductal carcinoma in situ, and 33 had invasive disease: 19 ≤1 cm, 13 >1 to ≤2 cm, and 1 >2 cm. All patients were clinically node negative. Systemic therapy was delivered in 51%. All treatment plans underwent quality review for contouring accuracy and dosimetric compliance. All treatment plans scored acceptable for tumor volume contouring and tumor volume dose-volume analysis. Only 4 (7%) scored unacceptable for organs at risk contouring and organs at risk dose-volume analysis. Treatment-related skin, fibrosis, and/or breast pain AEs were recorded as grade 1 in 64% and grade 2 in 7%, with only 1 (<2%) grade ≥3 and identified as grade 3 fibrosis of deep connective tissue. Partial-breast reirradiation with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy after second lumpectomy for patients experiencing in-breast failures after whole-breast irradiation is safe and feasible, with acceptable treatment quality achieved. Skin, fibrosis, and breast pain toxicity was acceptable, and grade 3 toxicity was rare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral breast irradiation using a mono iso-center technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Basu, Saumen; Bhuiyan, Md Anisuzzaman; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Haque, Kh Anamul; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Un Nabi, Md Rashid; Das, K. J. Maria

    2017-06-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the synchronous bilateral breast irradiation radiotherapy technique using a single isocenter. Materials and Methods: Six patients of synchronous bilateral breast were treated with single isocenter technique from February 2011 to June 2016. All the patients underwent a CT-simulation using appropriate positioning device. Target volumes and critical structures like heart, lung, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated slice by slice in the CT data. An isocenter was placed above the sternum on the skin and both medial tangential and lateral tangential of the breast / chest wall were created using asymmetrical jaws to avoid the beam divergence through the lung and heart. The field weighting were adjusted manually to obtain a homogenous dose distribution. The planning objectives were to deliver uniform doses around the target and keep the doses to the organ at risk within the permissible limit. The beam energy of 6 MV or combination of 6 MV and 15 MV photons were used in the tangential fields according to the tangential separation. Boluses were used for all the mastectomy patients to increase the doses on the chest wall. In addition to that enhanced dynamic wedge and field in field technique were also used to obtain a homogenous distribution around the target volume and reduce the hot spots. The isocenter was just kept on the skin, such that the beam junctions will be overlapped only on the air just above the sternum. Acute toxicity during the treatment and late toxicity were recorded during the patient's follow-up. Results: During the radiotherapy treatment follow-up there were no acute skin reactions in the field junctions, but one patient had grade 1 esophagitis and two patients had grade 2 skin reactions in the chest wall. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months (range: 8 - 49 months), no patients had a local recurrence, but one patients with triple negative disease had a distant metastases in brain and died

  17. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Hsu, I.-C.; Pickett, Barby; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sandler, Howard M.; Roach, Mack

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or

  18. Improving a scissor-action couch for conformal arc radiotherapy and radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaile; Yu, Cedric X; Ma, Lijun

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a method to improve the setup accuracy of a Varian Clinac 6/100 couch for delivering conformal arc therapy using a tertiary micro multileaf collimator (MLC) system. Several immobilization devices have been developed to improve the mechanical stability and isocenter alignment of the couch: turn-knob harnesses, double-track alignment plates, and a drop-in rod that attaches the couch to the concrete floor. These add-on components minimize the intercomponent motion of the couch's scissor elevator, which allows consistent treatment setup. The accuracy of our isocenter couch alignment is an improvement over the above devices, within 1 mm of their accuracy. The couch has been used with over 15 patients and with over 50 modulated conformal arc treatment deliveries at our institution.

  19. Interfraction and respiratory organ motion during conformal radiotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wysocka, Barbara; Kassam, Zahra; Lockwood, Gina; Brierley, James; Dawson, Laura A; Buckley, Carol Ann; Jaffray, David; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Wong, Rebecca; Ringash, Jolie

    2010-05-01

    To quantify the interfraction and breathing organ motion during adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer and assess organ stability in different breathing states. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and serial study CT scans in free breathing, voluntary inhale and exhale were performed in weeks 1, 3, and 5 of radiotherapy for 22 resected gastric patients. All data sets were fused to register the vertebral bodies. The regions of interest (kidneys, stomach, liver, pancreas, celiac axis, and porta hepatis) or points of interest (POIs; left dome of diaphragm, splenic hilum) were identified. For each region of interest, a POI was automatically placed at the center of mass. The interfraction displacement and breathing amplitude were assessed in the craniocaudal (CC), anteroposterior (AP), and right-left (RL) directions. Comparison of the serial free-breathing CT scans with the planning CT scan showed a median displacement of all POIs of 5.6, 2.2, and 1.8 mm in the CC, AP, and RL directions, respectively. Comparison of the serial inhale scans with the first inhale scan showed a displacement of 4.9, 2.6, and 1.8 mm in the CC, AP, and RL directions, respectively. The comparable values for the exhale scans were 5.1, 2.0, and 1.8 mm. The displacements of the organs were similar in the free breathing, inhale, and exhale states. The median respiratory amplitude in the CC, AP, and RL direction was 14, 4.8, and 1.7 mm, respectively. The median interfraction displacement of the POIs relative to the vertebral bodies was about 6 mm in the CC direction and 2 mm in the other directions. The planning target volume margins need to account for these shifts. Individual assessment of respiratory motion is recommended to identify patients with unusually large respiratory amplitude.

  20. Interfraction and Respiratory Organ Motion During Conformal Radiotherapy in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocka, Barbara; Kassam, Zahra; Lockwood, Gina; Brierley, James; Dawson, Laura A.; Buckley, Carol Ann; Jaffray, David; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Wong, Rebecca; Ringash, Jolie

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction and breathing organ motion during adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer and assess organ stability in different breathing states. Methods and Materials: A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and serial study CT scans in free breathing, voluntary inhale and exhale were performed in weeks 1, 3, and 5 of radiotherapy for 22 resected gastric patients. All data sets were fused to register the vertebral bodies. The regions of interest (kidneys, stomach, liver, pancreas, celiac axis, and porta hepatis) or points of interest (POIs; left dome of diaphragm, splenic hilum) were identified. For each region of interest, a POI was automatically placed at the center of mass. The interfraction displacement and breathing amplitude were assessed in the craniocaudal (CC), anteroposterior (AP), and right-left (RL) directions. Results: Comparison of the serial free-breathing CT scans with the planning CT scan showed a median displacement of all POIs of 5.6, 2.2, and 1.8 mm in the CC, AP, and RL directions, respectively. Comparison of the serial inhale scans with the first inhale scan showed a displacement of 4.9, 2.6, and 1.8 mm in the CC, AP, and RL directions, respectively. The comparable values for the exhale scans were 5.1, 2.0, and 1.8 mm. The displacements of the organs were similar in the free breathing, inhale, and exhale states. The median respiratory amplitude in the CC, AP, and RL direction was 14, 4.8, and 1.7 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The median interfraction displacement of the POIs relative to the vertebral bodies was about 6 mm in the CC direction and 2 mm in the other directions. The planning target volume margins need to account for these shifts. Individual assessment of respiratory motion is recommended to identify patients with unusually large respiratory amplitude.

  1. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy With Flattening Filter-Free Beams Compared With Static Gantry IMRT and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore; Banerjee, Sushovan; Chaudhary, Suresh; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Munshi, Anusheel; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Mancosu, Pietro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving {>=}95% or at most 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving {>=}5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%-30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 {+-} 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 {+-} 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 {+-} 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 {+-} 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 {+-} 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving {>=}20 Gy ranged from 23.6% {+-} 9.1% to 21.1% {+-} 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% {+-} 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 {+-} 139, 322 {+-} 20, and 387 {+-} 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a {approx}20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different

  2. Outcome After Conformal Salvage Radiotherapy in Patients With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Riegel, Martina G.; Thamm, Reinhard; Astner, Sabrina T.; Lewerenz, Carolin; Zimmermann, Frank; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to improve our understanding of the role of salvage radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse after radical prostatectomy with regard to biochemical control, rate of distant metastasis, and survival. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 men treated with conformal prostate bed SRT (median, 64.8 Gy) at a single institution (median follow-up, 70 months). The majority had intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Fifty-four percent underwent a resection with positive margins (R1 resection). The median time interval between surgery and SRT was 22 months. Results: After SRT, 66% of patients reached a PSA nadir of less than 0.2 ng/mL. However, the 5-year biochemical no evidence of disease rate was 35%. Seminal vesicle involvement was predictive for a significantly lower biochemical no evidence of disease rate. All patients with a preoperative PSA level greater than 50 ng/mL relapsed biochemically within 2 years. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 18%, the 5-year prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 90%, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 88%. Significantly more distant metastases developed in patients with a PSA nadir greater than 0.05 ng/mL after SRT, and they had significantly inferior prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates. Resection status (R1 vs. R0) was not predictive for any of the endpoints. Conclusions: Men with postoperative PSA relapse can undergo salvage treatment by prostate bed radiotherapy, but durable PSA control is maintained only in about one-third of the patients. Despite a high biochemical failure rate after SRT, prostate cancer-specific survival does not decrease rapidly.

  3. Reduced late rectal mucosal changes after prostate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with endorectal balloon as observed in repeated endoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Emile van . E-mail: E.vanLin@rther.umcn.nl; Kristinsson, Jon; Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Jong, Dirk J. de; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Leer, Jan Willem; Visser, Andries G.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the rectal wall (Rwall) spatial dose distribution, toxicity, and mucosal changes after prostate cancer radiotherapy with or without an endorectal balloon (ERB). Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients with ERB and 24 without ERB (No-ERB) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to a dose of 67.5 Gy. The Rwall was divided into 16 mucosal areas and Rwall dose surface maps were constructed. After 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years a rectosigmoidoscopy was performed, and each mucosal area was scored on telangiectasia, congestion, ulceration, stricture, and necrosis. Late rectal toxicity was correlated with the endoscopic findings. Results: The ERB significantly reduced the Rwall volume exposed to doses >40 Gy. Late rectal toxicity (grade {>=}1, including excess of bowel movements and slight rectal discharge) was reduced significantly in the ERB group. A total of 146 endoscopies and 2,336 mucosal areas were analyzed. Telangiectases were most frequently seen and appeared after 6 months. At 1 and 2 years, significantly less high-grade telangiectasia (T 2-3) was observed in the ERB group at the lateral and posterior part of the Rwall. In mucosal areas exposed to doses >40 Gy, less high-grade telangiectases (T 2-3) were seen in the ERB group compared with the No-ERB group. Conclusions: An ERB reduced the Rwall volume exposed to doses >40 Gy, resulting in reduction of late rectal mucosal changes and reduced late rectal toxicity. Although further analysis is needed, these data suggest an ERB-induced increased tolerance for late Rwall damage.

  4. Role of Systemic Therapy in the Development of Lung Sequelae After Conformal Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Cserhati, Adrienn; Kelemen, Gyoengyi; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzo, Laszlo; Kahan, Zsuzsanna

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the risk of radiogenic lung damage in breast cancer patients after conformal radiotherapy and different forms of systemic treatment. Methods and Materials: In 328 patients receiving sequential taxane-based chemotherapy, concomitant hormone therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors), or no adjuvant systemic therapy, symptomatic and asymptomatic lung sequelae were prospectively evaluated via the detection of visible CT abnormalities, 3 months or 1 year after the completion of the radiotherapy. Results: Significant positive associations were detected between the development of both pneumonitis and fibrosis of Grade 1 and patient age, ipsilateral mean lung dose, volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy, and irradiation of the regional lymph nodes. In multivariate analysis, age and mean lung dose proved to be independent predictors of early (odds ratio [OR] = 1.035, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.011-1.061 and OR = 1.113, 95% CI 1.049-1.181, respectively) and late (OR = 1.074, 95% CI 1.042-1.107 and OR = 1.207, 95% CI 1.124-1.295, respectively) radiogenic lung damage, whereas the role of systemic therapy was significant in the development of Grade 1 lung fibrosis (p = 0.01). Among the various forms of systemic therapy, tamoxifen increased the risk of late lung sequelae (OR = 2.442, 95% CI 1.120-5.326, p = 0.025). No interaction was demonstrated between the administration of systemic therapy and the other above-mentioned parameters as regards the risk of radiogenic lung damage. Conclusions: Our analyses demonstrate the independent role of concomitant tamoxifen therapy in the development of radiogenic lung fibrosis but do not suggest such an effect for the other modes of systemic treatment.

  5. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yasushi Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  6. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer After 76 Gy Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy vs. 70 Gy Conformal Radiotherapy in a Prospective and Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene Dehnad, Human; Kruger, Arto Boeken; Moorselaar, Jeroen van; Heide, Uulke van; Battermann, Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QoL) after 70 Gy conformal radiotherapy with QoL after 76 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were treated with 70 Gy three-field conformal radiotherapy, and 92 patients received 76 Gy IMRT with fiducial markers for position verification. Quality of life was measured by RAND-36, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30(+3)), and the prostate-specific EORTC QLQ-PR25, before radiotherapy (baseline) and 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Quality of life changes in time (baseline vs. 1 month and baseline vs. 6 months) of {>=}10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Differences between the treatment groups for QoL changes over time occurred in several QoL domains. The 76-Gy group revealed no significant deterioration in QoL compared with the 70-Gy group. The IMRT 76-Gy group even demonstrated a significantly better change in QoL from baseline to 1 month in several domains. The conformal 70-Gy group revealed temporary deterioration in pain, role functioning, and urinary symptoms; for the IMRT 76-Gy group a better QoL in terms of change in health existed after 1 month, which persisted after 6 months. For both treatment groups temporary deterioration in physical role restriction occurred after 1 month, and an improvement in emotional role restriction occurred after 6 months. Sexual activity was reduced after treatment for both groups and remained decreased after 6 months. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and accurate position verification seem to provide a possibility to increase the radiation dose for prostate cancer without deterioration in QoL.

  8. SU-E-T-562: Motion Tracking Optimization for Conformal Arc Radiotherapy Plans: A QUASAR Phantom Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z; Wang, I; Yao, R; Podgorsak, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to use plan parameters optimization (Dose rate, collimator angle, couch angle, initial starting phase) to improve the performance of conformal arc radiotherapy plans with motion tracking by increasing the plan performance score (PPS). Methods: Two types of 3D conformal arc plans were created based on QUASAR respiratory motion phantom with spherical and cylindrical targets. Sinusoidal model was applied to the MLC leaves to generate motion tracking plans. A MATLAB program was developed to calculate PPS of each plan (ranges from 0–1) and optimize plan parameters. We first selected the dose rate for motion tracking plans and then used simulated annealing algorithm to search for the combination of the other parameters that resulted in the plan of the maximal PPS. The optimized motion tracking plan was delivered by Varian Truebeam Linac. In-room cameras and stopwatch were used for starting phase selection and synchronization between phantom motion and plan delivery. Gaf-EBT2 dosimetry films were used to measure the dose delivered to the target in QUASAR phantom. Dose profiles and Truebeam trajectory log files were used for plan delivery performance evaluation. Results: For spherical target, the maximal PPS (PPSsph) of the optimized plan was 0.79: (Dose rate: 500MU/min, Collimator: 90°, Couch: +10°, starting phase: 0.83π). For cylindrical target, the maximal PPScyl was 0.75 (Dose rate: 300MU/min, Collimator: 87°, starting phase: 0.97π) with couch at 0°. Differences of dose profiles between motion tracking plans (with the maximal and the minimal PPS) and 3D conformal plans were as follows: PPSsph=0.79: %ΔFWHM: 8.9%, %Dmax: 3.1%; PPSsph=0.52: %ΔFWHM: 10.4%, %Dmax: 6.1%. PPScyl=0.75: %ΔFWHM: 4.7%, %Dmax: 3.6%; PPScyl=0.42: %ΔFWHM: 12.5%, %Dmax: 9.6%. Conclusion: By achieving high plan performance score through parameters optimization, we can improve target dose conformity of motion tracking plan by decreasing total MLC leaf travel distance

  9. Routine EPID in-vivo dosimetry in a reference point for conformal radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Azario, Luigi; Greco, Francesca; Cilla, Savino; Piermattei, Angelo

    2015-04-01

    In-vivo dosimetry (IVD) in external beam radiotherapy is used to detect major clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose. Moreover, a detailed analysis of its results, when routinely reported and discussed by the radiotherapy staff, can limit the likelihood of error transmission to many treatments. A first experience of routine EPID-based IVD in a reference point has been performed in our department for 3D-CRT treatments over a three-year period. More than 14 000 images were acquired and 1287 treatment plans were verified. The IVD checks were obtained three times in the first week and then weekly. Tolerance levels of ±5% for pelvic-abdomen, head-neck and breast irradiations and ±6% for lung treatments were adopted for the in-vivo measured dose per fraction. A statistical analysis of the IVD results was performed grouping the data by: anatomical regions, treatment units, open and wedged fields and gantry angles. About 10% of the checked doses per fraction showed dosimetric discrepancies out of the tolerance levels. The causes of the discrepancies were 70% delivery or planning errors, 20% morphological changes and 10% procedural limitations. 41 cases (3.2%) have required special investigations because their in-vivo doses per fraction, averaged over the first three sessions, were out of the tolerance levels and in 19 cases (1.5%) the deviations gave rise to an intervention. Statistically significant differences of average variations between planned and delivered doses were observed for: (i) 30° wedged 10 MV fields with respect to those of other wedged or open 10 MV fields delivered by two linacs, due to the incorrect TPS implementation of that wedge transmission factor; (ii) anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior beams with respect to the other gantry orientations for one linac, due to the beam attenuation introduced by the treatment couch; (iii) lateral fields with respect to medial fields of breast irradiations for all linacs, due

  10. Routine EPID in-vivo dosimetry in a reference point for conformal radiotherapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Azario, Luigi; Greco, Francesca; Cilla, Savino; Piermattei, Angelo

    2015-04-21

    In-vivo dosimetry (IVD) in external beam radiotherapy is used to detect major clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose. Moreover, a detailed analysis of its results, when routinely reported and discussed by the radiotherapy staff, can limit the likelihood of error transmission to many treatments. A first experience of routine EPID-based IVD in a reference point has been performed in our department for 3D-CRT treatments over a three-year period. More than 14,000 images were acquired and 1287 treatment plans were verified. The IVD checks were obtained three times in the first week and then weekly. Tolerance levels of ± 5% for pelvic-abdomen, head-neck and breast irradiations and ± 6% for lung treatments were adopted for the in-vivo measured dose per fraction. A statistical analysis of the IVD results was performed grouping the data by: anatomical regions, treatment units, open and wedged fields and gantry angles. About 10% of the checked doses per fraction showed dosimetric discrepancies out of the tolerance levels. The causes of the discrepancies were 70% delivery or planning errors, 20% morphological changes and 10% procedural limitations. 41 cases (3.2%) have required special investigations because their in-vivo doses per fraction, averaged over the first three sessions, were out of the tolerance levels and in 19 cases (1.5%) the deviations gave rise to an intervention. Statistically significant differences of average variations between planned and delivered doses were observed for: (i) 30° wedged 10 MV fields with respect to those of other wedged or open 10 MV fields delivered by two linacs, due to the incorrect TPS implementation of that wedge transmission factor; (ii) anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior beams with respect to the other gantry orientations for one linac, due to the beam attenuation introduced by the treatment couch; (iii) lateral fields with respect to medial fields of breast irradiations for all linacs, due to

  11. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. PMID:26929456

  12. Sexual Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der . E-mail: g.vanderwielen@erasmusmc.nl; Putten, Wim van; Incrocci, Luca

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide information about sexual function (SF) after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer while taking important factors into account that influence SF. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a total of 268 patients from a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy agreed to participate in an additional part of the trial that evaluated SF. Results: At baseline 28% of patients had erectile dysfunction (ED). After 1 year, 27% of the pretreatment potent patients had developed ED. After 2 years this percentage had increased to 36%. After 3 years it almost stabilized at 38%. Satisfaction with sexual life was significantly correlated with ED. After 2 years one third of the pre-treatment potent patients still had considerable to very much sexual desire and found sex (very) important. No significant differences were found between the two dose-arms. Potency aids were used on a regular base by 14% of the patients. Conclusion: By taking adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), HT during follow-up and potency aids into account, we found a lower percentage of ED after 3D-CRT than reported in previous prospective studies. A large group of patients still had sexual desire, considered sex important and 14% used potency aids after 3D-CRT.

  13. Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavita, Rita; Massetti, Michela; Abraha, Iosief; Lupattelli, Marco; Mearini, Luigi; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Farneti, Alessia; Palumbo, Isabella; Porena, Massimo; Aristei, Cynthia

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Results: Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values {>=}10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.

  14. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  15. Commissioning of a novel microCT/RT system for small animal conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Manuel; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul; Graves, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to commission a 120 kVp photon beam produced by a micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner for use in irradiating mice to therapeutic doses. A variable-aperture collimator has been integrated with a microCT scanner to allow the delivery of beams with pseudocircular profiles of arbitrary width between 0.1 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate at the isocenter of the system was measured using ion chamber and gafchromic EBT film as 1.56–2.13 Gy min−1 at the water surface for field diameters between 0.2 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate decreases approximately 10% per every 5 mm depth in water for field diameters between 0.5 and 1.0 cm. The flatness, symmetry and penumbra of the beam are 3.6%, 1.0% and 0.5 mm, respectively. These parameters are sufficient to accurately conform the radiation dose delivered to target organs on mice. The irradiated field size is affected principally by the divergence of the beam. In general, the beam has appropriate dosimetric characteristics to accurately deliver the dose to organs inside the mice’s bodies. Using multiple beams delivered from a variety of angular directions, targets as small as 2 mm may be irradiated while sparing surrounding tissue. This microCT/RT system is a feasible tool to irradiate mice using treatment planning and delivery methods analogous to those applied to humans. PMID:19478377

  16. Palliative radiotherapy for thoracic spine metastases: Dosimetric advantage of three-dimensional conformal plans

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the dosimetric advantages of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for thoracic spine metastases and compare it with conventional two-dimensional (2D) plans. Radiation therapy (RT) planning data of 10 patients with mid-to-low thoracic spine metastases were analyzed. Computed tomography simulation was performed and the planning target volume (PTV), heart, esophagus, lung and spinal cord were contoured. The 3DCRT plan comprised one posteroanterior (PA) field and two posterior oblique fields. The 2D plans used a single PA field or opposed anteroposterior (AP)/PA fields. The prescription dose of radiation was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. All comparisons of the maximum or mean doses to the organs at risk or the PTV, between two of the three RT plans, demonstrated statistically significant differences (P<0.05), with the exception of the mean esophageal doses between the single PA vs. AP/PA (P=0.285) plans. The mean heart doses were 15.0±3.1 Gy in single PA, 17.3±4.3 Gy in AP/PA and 8.5±1.7 Gy using 3DCRT. The median reduction rates using 3DCRT were 38.9% compared with single PA (range, 29.4–58.5%) or 47.5% relative to AP/PA (range, 34.5–67.1%). The mean esophageal doses were 17.9±2.3 Gy in single PA, 18.2±2.2 Gy in AP/PA and 15.3±1.9 Gy in 3DCRT. The median reduction rate using 3DCRT was 12.8% compared with single PA or 15.6% relative to AP/PA. Compared with the single PA or AP/PA 2D plan, 3DCRT reduced the median dose by 13.7 or 1.9% of the maximum spinal cord dose, respectively, and 14.7 or 2.9% of the maximum PTV dose, respectively. The mean lung doses were 2.7±0.7 Gy in single PA, 2.6±0.7 Gy in AP/PA and 5.1±1.0 Gy in 3DCRT. In conclusion, 3DCRT for mid-to-low thoracic spine metastases demonstrated significant dosimetric advantages by reducing the unnecessary irradiation of critical organs, particularly the heart, and by achieving a homogeneous target dose. PMID:26171058

  17. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Based Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio Suwa, Kazuhiro; Kishi, Kazushi; Shimono, Chigusa; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods and Materials: Patients with HCC with PVTT in the first branch and/or main trunk were selected for this study. The optimal beam directions for 3D-CRT were explored using a Tc-99m-galactosyl human serum albumin SPECT image for guidance. The SPECT image was classified as either wedge type or localized type. The clinical target volume to a total dose of 45 or 50 Gy per 18-20 fractions included the main tumor and PVTT in the wedge type and PVTT alone in the localized type. Results: Twenty-six patients were enrolled: 18 with wedge type and 8 with localized type. Mean tumor size was 7.1 cm (range, 4.4-12.3 cm). Clinical target volumes of wedge type vs. localized type were 111.2 cm{sup 3} vs. 48.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.010), respectively. Mean dose to normal liver and mean dose to functional liver were 1185 cGy and 988 cGy (p = 0.001) in wedge type and 1046 cGy and 1043 cGy (p = 0.658) in localized type, respectively. Despite an incidence of Child-Pugh B and C of 57.7%, no patients experienced radiation-induced liver disease. The progression of PVTT was inhibited, with an incidence of 92.2%; survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 44% and 30%, respectively. Conclusion: Single photon emission computed tomography-based 3D-CRT enables irradiation of both the main tumor and PVTT with low toxicity and promising survival.

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Joong-Won Kim, Tae Hyun; Koh, Dong Wook; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Chang-Min

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) influences hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) exacerbation in patients with HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Of the 48 HCC patients with HBV who underwent 3D-CRT to the liver, 16 underwent lamivudine therapy before and during 3D-CRT (Group 1) and 32 did not receive antiviral therapy before 3D-CRT (Group 2). To analyze spontaneous HBV reactivation, we included a control group of 43 HCC patients who did not receive any specific treatment for HCC or CHB. Results: The cumulative rate of radiation-induced liver disease for Groups 1 and 2 was 12.5% (2 of 16) and 21.8% (7 of 32), respectively (p > 0.05). The cumulative rate of HBV reactivation was significantly greater in Group 2 (21.8%, 7 of 32) than in Group 1 (0%, 0/16) or the control group (2.3%, 1 of 43; p < 0.05 each). The cumulative rate of CHB exacerbation, however, did not differ significantly between Groups 2 (12.5%, 4 of 32) and 1 (0%, 0 of 16) or the control group (2.3%, 1 of 43; p > 0.05 each). The CHB exacerbations in the 4 Group 2 patients had radiation-induced liver disease features but were differentiated by serum HBV DNA changes. Two of these patients required antiviral therapy and effectively recovered with lamivudine therapy. Conclusions: In patients with HBV-related HCC undergoing 3D-CRT, HBV reactivation and consequent CHB exacerbation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radiation-induced liver disease, and antiviral therapy might be considered for the prevention of liver function deterioration after RT.

  19. SU-E-T-348: Verification MU Calculation for Conformal Radiotherapy with Multileaf Collimator Using Report AAPM TG 114

    SciTech Connect

    Adrada, A; Tello, Z; Medina, L; Garrigo, E; Venencia, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an open source independent MU dose calculation software for 3D conformal radiotherapy with multileaf high and low resolution according to the report of AAPM TG 11 Methods: Treatment plans were done using Iplan v4.5 BrainLAB TPS. A 6MV photon beam produced by Primus and Novalis linear accelerators equipped with an Optifocus MLC and HDMLC, respectively. TPS dose calculation algorithms were pencil beam and Monte Carlo. 1082 treatments plans were selected for the study. The algorithm was written in free and open source CodeBlocks C++ platform. Treatment plans were imported by the software using RTP format. Equivalent size field is obtained from the positions of the leaves; the effective depth of calculation can be introduced by TPS's dosimetry report or automatically calculated starting from SSD. The inverse square law is calculated by the 3D coordinates of the isocenter and normalization point of the treatment plan. The dosimetric parameters TPR, Sc, Sp and WF are linearly interpolated. Results: 1082 plans of both machines were analyzed. The average uncertainty between the TPS and the independent calculation was −0.43% ± 2.42% [−7.90%, 7.50%]. Specifically for the Primus the variation obtained was −0.85% ± 2.53% and for the Novalis 0.00% ± 2.23%. Data show that 94.8% of the cases the uncertainty was less than or equal to 5%, while 98.9% is less than or equal to 6%. Conclusion: The developed software is appropriate for use in calculation of UM. This software can be obtained upon request.

  20. Major Late Toxicities After Conformal Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma-Patient- and Treatment-Related Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Anne W.M. Ng, W.T.; Hung, W.M.; Choi, C.W.; Tung, Raymond; Ling, Y.H.; Cheng, Peter T.C.; Yau, T.K.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Leung, Samuel K.C.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the factors affecting late toxicity for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2003, 422 patients were treated with a conformal technique with 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 70 Gy. Conventional fractionation (5 fractions weekly) was used in 232 patients and accelerated fractionation (6 fractions weekly) in 190 patients. One hundred seventy-one patients were treated with the basic radiotherapy course alone (Group 1), 55 patients had an additional boost of 5 Gy in 2 fractions (Group 2), and 196 patients underwent concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy (Group 3). Results: The 5-year overall toxicity rate was significantly greater in Group 3 than in Group 1 (37% vs. 27%, p = 0.009). Although the overall rate in Group 2 was not elevated (28% vs. 27%, p = 0.697), a significant increase in temporal lobe necrosis was observed (4.8% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Multivariate analyses showed that age and concurrent chemotherapy were significant factors. The hazard ratio of overall toxicity attributed to chemotherapy was 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 1.32-2.99, p = 0.001). The mean radiation dose to the cochlea was another significant factor affecting deafness, with a hazard ratio of 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05, p = 0.005) per 1-Gy increase. The cochlea that received >50 Gy had a significantly greater deaf rate (Group 1, 18% vs. 7%; and Group 3, 22% vs. 14%). Conclusion: The therapeutic margin for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is extremely narrow, and a significant increase in brain necrosis could result from dose escalation. The significant factors affecting the risk of deafness included age, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and greater radiation dose to the cochlea.

  1. Conformal Therapy Improves the Therapeutic Index of Patients with Anal Canal Cancer Treated with Combined Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vuong, Te . E-mail: te.vuong@muhc.mcgill.ca; Kopek, Neil; Ducruet, Thierry; Portelance, Lorraine; Faria, Sergio; Bahoric, Boris; Devic, Slobodan

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with anal canal cancer, in terms of local control (LC), freedom from relapse (FFR), and overall survival (OS) rates, and to estimate long-term toxicity data. Methods and Materials: Sixty historical patients, treated with conventional radiation techniques (C-RT), were used as controls, and 62 consecutive patients were treated with 3D-CRT. Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 54 Gy in 30 fractions delivered continuously, compared with 45-58.9 Gy (median dose, 54 Gy) in a split course in patients treated with C-RT. Chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil with either mitomycin-C or cis-platinum given concurrently with radiation. Survival curves were performed using the Kaplan-Meier model, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis of risk factors. Results: No differences in stage and age distribution were observed between the two groups. Patients treated with 3D-CRT and C-RT had an actuarial 5-year LC rate of 85.1% and 61.1%, respectively (p = 0.0056); the FFR rate was 70.2% and 46.1% (p = 0.0166), and the OS rate was 80.7% and 53.9% (p = 0.0171). In multivariate analysis, factors of significance for LC were nodal (N) status (p < 0.001); for OS, 3D-CRT (p = 0.038), N status (p 0.011), and T status (p = 0.012); and for FFR, 3D-CRT (p = 0.024) and N status (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The use of 3D-CRT allows patients with anal canal cancer to complete radiation and chemotherapy without interruption for toxicity, with significant improvements in LC, FFR, and OS.

  2. Comparison of Rapid Arc and Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Plans Using Unified Dosimetry Index and the Impact of Conformity Index on Unified Dosimetry Index Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Jayapalan; Shetty, Jayarama; Rao, Suresh; Hegde, Sanath; Shambhavi, C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of conformity index in the unified dosimetry index (UDI) score for two different planning techniques namely intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Rapid Arc. Rapid Arc and IMRT plans of 57 patients were evaluated and compared using UDI score which incorporates four indices. To determine the impact of conformity index on the IMRT and Rapid Arc plans, UDI at conformity index one of all plan (UDIunit_CI) score was calculated by assuming conformity index is equal to one. Mean and standard deviations of all indices were calculated. Rapid Arc technique plans of different treatment sites of all patients scored lesser UDI than IMRT plans, and the conformity index of Rapid Arc plan was significantly better than IMRT plan. The average dose gradient, homogeneity, coverage, and conformity index of all sites with Rapid Arc plans were 0.212 ± 0.05, 1.123 ± 0.03, 0.959 ± 0.03, and 1.056 ± 0.09; with IMRT plans were 0.190 ± 0.05, 1.113 ± 0.04, 0.950 ± 0.04, and 1.172 ± 0.16, respectively. UDI score value with actual conformity index of Rapid Arc and IMRT plans differed significantly (P < 0.001). However, UDIunit_CI score values with assumed conformity index equal to one did not differ significantly (P = 0.528). In the comparison of IMRT and Rapid Arc plans using the UDI score, the impact of conformity index was significant.

  3. Comparison of Rapid Arc and Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Plans Using Unified Dosimetry Index and the Impact of Conformity Index on Unified Dosimetry Index Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jayapalan; Shetty, Jayarama; Rao, Suresh; Hegde, Sanath; Shambhavi, C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of conformity index in the unified dosimetry index (UDI) score for two different planning techniques namely intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Rapid Arc. Rapid Arc and IMRT plans of 57 patients were evaluated and compared using UDI score which incorporates four indices. To determine the impact of conformity index on the IMRT and Rapid Arc plans, UDI at conformity index one of all plan (UDIunit_CI) score was calculated by assuming conformity index is equal to one. Mean and standard deviations of all indices were calculated. Rapid Arc technique plans of different treatment sites of all patients scored lesser UDI than IMRT plans, and the conformity index of Rapid Arc plan was significantly better than IMRT plan. The average dose gradient, homogeneity, coverage, and conformity index of all sites with Rapid Arc plans were 0.212 ± 0.05, 1.123 ± 0.03, 0.959 ± 0.03, and 1.056 ± 0.09; with IMRT plans were 0.190 ± 0.05, 1.113 ± 0.04, 0.950 ± 0.04, and 1.172 ± 0.16, respectively. UDI score value with actual conformity index of Rapid Arc and IMRT plans differed significantly (P < 0.001). However, UDIunit_CI score values with assumed conformity index equal to one did not differ significantly (P = 0.528). In the comparison of IMRT and Rapid Arc plans using the UDI score, the impact of conformity index was significant. PMID:28405103

  4. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy in the Management of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: Long-Term Functional Outcome and Tumor Control at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Batra, Sachin; Karkar, Siddharth; Kapoor, Sumit; Weiss, Stephanie; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Danielle

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM) treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCR). Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients with CSMs (16 men [30.2%], 37 women [69.8%], aged 53 {+-} 13.0 years [mean {+-} SD]) were treated by FCR. In 28 patients (52.8%) FCR was performed as first-line treatment and in 25 patients (47.2%) as adjuvant treatment. All patients received FCR with a dose of 52.9 {+-} 1.8 Gy in 29.4 {+-} 1.0 fractions over 6 weeks. Dose per fraction was 1.9 {+-} 0.1 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered stereotactically in 47 cases (88.7%) and conformally in 6 (11.3%) Results: The median follow-up was 6.9 years (range, 3-19 years). According to Sekhar's classification, 19 patients (35.8%) were Grade 1-2, 30 patients (56.6%) were Grade 3-4, and 4 patients (7.6%) were Grade 5. Pretreatment tumor volume was determined in 46 patients, and tumor volume was 12.6 {+-} 8.2 cm{sup 3}. In these patients, the distance between tumor and optic apparatus was 1.62 {+-} 1.2 mm. Actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival rates were 98.1% and 95.8%, respectively. Clinical improvement was observed in 31 patients (58.5%), and 20 patients (37.7%) remained unchanged. Radiologic response was observed in 18 patients (30.2%), and 35 patients (66.0%) showed stable lesions. Two patients (3.8%) showed tumor progression during follow-up. Transient morbidity was observed in 3 patients (5.7%) and permanent morbidity in 1 (1.9%). Conclusion: Fractionated conformal radiotherapy affords satisfactory long-term tumor control and low treatment morbidity.

  5. Dose-volumetric parameters predicting radiation-induced hepatic toxicity in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Dae Yong . E-mail: radiopia@ncc.re.kr; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Seong Hoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Kim, Hyun Beom; Lee, Woo Jin; Park, Sang Jae; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Chang-Min

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volumetric parameters associated with the risk of radiation-induced hepatic toxicity (RIHT) in hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 hepatocellular carcinoma patients underwent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (total dose range, 44-58.5 Gy; median, 54). RIHT was scored within 4 months of completing three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The dose-volume parameters analyzed were the gross tumor volume; normal liver volume; total liver volume; radiation dose; mean dose to the normal liver; percentage of the normal liver volume receiving {>=}20, {>=}25, {>=}30, {>=}35, and {>=}40 Gy; percentage of the total liver volume receiving {>=}20, {>=}25, {>=}30, {>=}35, and {>=}40 Gy; and the normal tissue complication probability. Results: Of the 105 patients, Grade 1 RIHT was observed in 21 (20.0%), Grade 2 in 7 (6.7%), Grade 3 in 5 (4.8%), and Grade 4 in 1 (1.0%) patient. No fatal Grade 5 RIHT developed. On multivariate analysis for predicting Grade 2 or worse RIHT, the total liver volume receiving {>=}30 Gy was the only significant parameter (p < 0.001). Grade 2 or worse RIHT was observed in only 2 (2.4%) of 85 patients with a total liver volume receiving 30 Gy of {<=}60% and in 11 (55.0%) of 20 patients with >60% (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The total liver volume receiving {>=}30 Gy appears to be a useful dose-volumetric parameter for predicting the risk of RIHT. This volume should be limited to {<=}60% whenever possible to minimize the risk of Grade 2 or worse RIHT.

  6. Therapeutic effects and prognostic factors in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, De-Hua; Liu, Li; Chen, Long-Hua

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) on the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Between 1998 and 2001, 94 patients with HCC received 3D- CRT combined with TACE. A total 63 patients had a Okuda stage I lesion and 31 patients had stage II. The median tumor size was 10.7 cm (range 3.0-18 cm), and liver cirrhosis was present in all the patients. There were 43 cases of class A and 51 class B. TACE was performed using lipiodol, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, doxorubicin hydrochloride and mitomycin, followed by gelatin sponge cubes. Fifty- nine patients received TACE only one time, while the others 2 to 3 times. 3D-CRT was started 3-4 wk after TACE. All patients were irradiated with a stereotactic body frame and received 4-8 Gy single high-dose radiation for 8-12 times at the isocenter during a period of 17-26 d (median 22 d). RESULTS: The median follow-up was 37 mo (range 10-48 mo) after diagnosis. The response rate was 90.5%. The overall survival rate at 1-, 2-, and 3- year was 93.6%, 53.8% and 26.0% respectively, with the median survival of 25 mo. On univariate analysis, age (P = 0.026), Child-Pugh classification for cirrhosis of liver ( P = 0.010), Okuda stage (P = 0.026), tumor size (P = 0.000), tumor type (P = 0.029), albuminemia (P = 0.035), and radiation dose (P = 0.000) proved to be significant factors for survival. On multivariate analysis, age (P = 0.024), radiation dose (P = 0.001), and tumor size (P = 0.000) were the significant factors. CONCLUSION: 3D-CRT combined with TACE is an effective and feasible approach for HCC. Age, radiation dose and tumor size were found to be significant prognostic factors for survival of patients with HCC treated by 3D-CRT combined with TACE. Further study for HCC is needed to improve the treatment efficacy. PMID:15259062

  7. SU-E-T-63: Carotid Sparing Tomohelical Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for T1N0 Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y; Oh, D; Noh, J; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric benefit and treatment efficiency of carotid-sparing TomoHelical (TH) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for early glottic cancer. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed for 10 patients with early-stage (T1N0M0) glottic squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), carotid artery (CA), and spinal cord (SP) were delineated for each CT data set. Two-field 3DCRT (2F-3DCRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (3F-IMRT), TomoHelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TH-3DCRT plans were generated, with a total prescribed dose of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV for each patient. In order to evaluate plan quality, dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the PTV, V35, V50, and V63 for the CAs and in terms of the maximum dose for the SP. Additionally, treatment planning and delivery times were compared to evaluate treatment efficiency. Results: The CIs for 3F-IMRT (0.650±0.05), TH-IMRT (0.643±0.03), and TH-3DCRT (0.631±0.03) were much better than that for 2F-3DCRT (0.318±0.03). The HIs for TH-IMRT (1.053±0.01) and TH-3DCRT (1.055±0.01) were slightly better than those for 2F-3DCRT (1.062±0.01) and 3F-IMRT (1.091±0.007). 2F-3DCRT showed poor CA sparing in terms of the V35, V50, and V63 compared to 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant dose difference between 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p>0.05). The maximum dose to the SP with all plans was below 45 Gy. The treatment planning times for 2F-3DCRT (5.9±0.66 min) and TH-3DCRT (7.32±0.94 min) were much lower than those for 3F-IMRT (45.51±2.76 min) and TH-IMRT (35.58±4.41 min), whereas the delivery times with all plans was below 3 minutes. Conclusion: TH-3DCRT showed excellent carotid sparing capability, comparable to that with TH-IMRT, with high treatment efficiency and short planning and

  8. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop.

    PubMed

    Tai, K-H; Duchesne, G; Turner, S; Kneebone, A; See, A; Gogna, K; Berry, M

    2004-12-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer.

  9. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Santana, Marco Antônio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Lopes, Maurício Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; da Silva, João Luis Fernandes; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. PMID:27403017

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  11. Conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning of external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer: The impact of tumor regression.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, Linda; van der Heide, Uulke A; Ketelaars, Martijn; de Kort, Gerard A P; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the impact of tumor regression on the dose within cervical tumors and surrounding organs, comparing conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and the need for repeated treatment planning during irradiation. Fourteen patients with cervical cancer underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before treatment and once during treatment, after about 30 Gy. Target volumes and critical organs were delineated. First conventional, conformal, and IMRT plans were generated. To evaluate the impact of tumor regression, we calculated dose-volume histograms for these plans, using the delineations of the intratreatment MR images. Second conformal and IMRT plans were made based on the delineations of the intratreatment MR images. First and second plans were compared. The average volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (43 Gy) by the conventional, conformal, and IMRT plans was, respectively, for the bowel 626 cc, 427 cc, and 232 cc; for the rectum 101 cc, 90 cc, and 60 cc; and for the bladder 89 cc, 70 cc, and 58 cc. The volumes of critical organs at this dose level were significantly reduced using IMRT compared with conventional and conformal planning (p < 0.02 in all cases). After having delivered about 30 Gy external beam radiation therapy, the primary gross tumor volumes decreased on average by 46% (range, 6.1-100%). The target volumes on the intratreatment MR images remained sufficiently covered by the 95% isodose. Second IMRT plans significantly diminished the treated bowel volume, if the primary gross tumor volumes decreased >30 cc. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is superior in sparing of critical organs compared with conventional and conformal treatment, with adequate coverage of the target volumes. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy remains superior after 30 Gy external beam radiation therapy, despite tumor regression and internal organ motion. Repeated IMRT planning can improve the sparing of the bowel and rectum in

  12. [Clinical experience in image-guided ultra-conformal hypofractionated radiotherapy in case of metastatic diseases at the University of Pécs].

    PubMed

    László, Zoltán; Boronkai, Árpád; Lõcsei, Zoltán; Kalincsák, Judit; Szappanos, Szabolcs; Farkas, Róbert; Al Farhat, Yousuf; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Sebestyén, Klára; Kovács, Péter; Csapó, László; Mangel, László

    2015-06-01

    With the development of radiation therapy technology, the utilization of more accurate patient fixation, inclusion of PET/CT image fusion into treatment planning, 3D image-guided radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated dynamic arc irradiation, the application of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be extended to specified extracranial target volumes, and so even to the treatment of various metastases. Between October 2012 and August 2014 in our institute we performed extracranial, hypofractionated, image-többguided radiotherapy with RapidArc system for six cases, and 3D conformal multifield technique for one patient with Novalis TX system in case of different few-numbered and slow-growing metastases. For the precise definition of the target volumes we employed PET/CT during the treatment planning procedure. Octreotid scan was applied in one carcinoid tumour patient. Considering the localisation of the metastases and the predictable motion of the organs, we applied 5 to 20 mm safety margin during the contouring procedure. The average treatment volume was 312 cm3. With 2.5-3 Gy fraction doses we delivered 39-45 Gy total dose, and the treatment duration was 2.5 to 3 weeks. The image guidance was carried out via ExacTrac, and kV-Cone Beam CT equipment based on an online protocol, therefore localisation differences were corrected before every single treatment. The patients tolerated the treatments well without major (Gr>2) side effects. Total or near total regression of the metastases was observed at subsequent control examinations in all cases (the median follow-up time was 5 months). According to our first experience, extracranial, imageguided hypofractionated radiotherapy is well-tolerated by patients and can be effectively applied in the treatment of slow-growing and few-numbered metastases.

  13. Addition of magnetic resonance imaging to computed tomography-based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for postoperative treatment of astrocytomas: Changes in tumor volume and isocenter shift.

    PubMed

    Bagri, Puneet Kumar; Kapoor, Akhil; Singh, Daleep; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Narayan, Satya; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is the current gold standard treatment in astrocytomas. Computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning leads to either missing of the tumor volume or underdosing. The aim of this prospective study was to study the changes in tumor volume on addition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to CT-based three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning of astrocytomas. Twenty-five consecutive patients of astrocytoma (WHO grades I-IV) for postoperative three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy were included in this prospective study. Postoperative tumor volumes were contoured on CT-based images and recontoured on CT-MRI images after automated MRI co-registration on treatment planning system Eclipse 8.9.15 as per ICRU-50 report. Tumor volumes were compared with each other. The MRI-based mean and median tumor volume was 24.24 cc ± 13.489 and 18.72 cc (range 5.6-46.48 cc), respectively, while for CT it was 19.4 cc ± 11.218 and 16.24 cc (range: 5.1-38.72 cc), respectively. The mean and median isocenter shift between CT and MRI was 4.05 mm and 4.39 mm (range 0.92-6.32 mm), respectively. There is a linear relationship between MRI and CT volume with a good correlation coefficient of R (2) = 0.989, and MRI-based tumor volume was 1.208 times as compared to CT volume. Statistical analysis using paired sample t-test for the difference in CT and MRI tumor volume was highly significant (P < 0.001). Addition of MRI to the CT-based three-dimensional radiation treatment planning reduces the chances of geographical miss or tumor under dosing. Thus, MRI should be an integral part of three-dimensional planning of astrocytomas.

  14. Addition of magnetic resonance imaging to computed tomography-based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for postoperative treatment of astrocytomas: Changes in tumor volume and isocenter shift

    PubMed Central

    Bagri, Puneet Kumar; Kapoor, Akhil; Singh, Daleep; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Narayan, Satya; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Postoperative radiotherapy is the current gold standard treatment in astrocytomas. Computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning leads to either missing of the tumor volume or underdosing. The aim of this prospective study was to study the changes in tumor volume on addition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to CT-based three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning of astrocytomas. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients of astrocytoma (WHO grades I-IV) for postoperative three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy were included in this prospective study. Postoperative tumor volumes were contoured on CT-based images and recontoured on CT-MRI images after automated MRI co-registration on treatment planning system Eclipse 8.9.15 as per ICRU-50 report. Tumor volumes were compared with each other. Result: The MRI-based mean and median tumor volume was 24.24 cc ± 13.489 and 18.72 cc (range 5.6–46.48 cc), respectively, while for CT it was 19.4 cc ± 11.218 and 16.24 cc (range: 5.1-38.72 cc), respectively. The mean and median isocenter shift between CT and MRI was 4.05 mm and 4.39 mm (range 0.92–6.32 mm), respectively. There is a linear relationship between MRI and CT volume with a good correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.989, and MRI-based tumor volume was 1.208 times as compared to CT volume. Statistical analysis using paired sample t-test for the difference in CT and MRI tumor volume was highly significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Addition of MRI to the CT-based three-dimensional radiation treatment planning reduces the chances of geographical miss or tumor under dosing. Thus, MRI should be an integral part of three-dimensional planning of astrocytomas. PMID:25839014

  15. Neuropsychological status in children and young adults with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with focal stereotactic conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh . E-mail: rjalali@medscape.com; Goswami, Savita; Sarin, Rajiv; More, Niteen; Siddha, Manish; Kamble, Rashmi

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To present prospective neuropsychological data at baseline and follow-up in children and young adults with benign and low-grade gliomas treated with focal stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients (age 4-25 years) with residual/progressive benign and low-grade brain tumors considered suitable for SCRT underwent detailed and in-depth neuropsychological and cognitive testing at baseline before SCRT. The test battery included measurement of age-adjusted intelligence quotients (IQs) and cognitive parameters of visual, spatial, visuomotor, and attention concentrations. Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale for patients >16 years old. Patients were treated with high-precision conformal radiotherapy under stereotactic guidance to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All neuropsychological assessments were repeated at 6 and 24 months after SCRT completion and compared with the baseline values. Results: The baseline mean full-scale IQ before starting RT for patients <16 years was 82 (range, 33-105). For those >16 years, the corresponding value was 72 (range, 64-129). Of 20 evaluable patients, 14 (70%) had less than average IQs at baseline, even before starting radiotherapy. The verbal IQ, performance IQ, and full-scale IQ, as well as other cognitive scores, did not change significantly at the 6- and 24-month follow-up assessments for all patients. The memory quotient in older children and young adults was maintained at 6 and 24 months after SCRT, with a mean value of 93 and 100, respectively, compared with a mean baseline value of 81 before RT. The mean anxiety score in children measured by the C1 and C2 components of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) was 48 and 40, respectively, which improved significantly to mean values of 30 and 26, respectively, at the 24-month follow-up assessment (p = 0.005). The mean depression score in

  16. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C.; Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, Keith J.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest but

  17. Dummy run and conformity indices in the ongoing EORTC low-grade glioma trial 22033-26033: First evaluation of quality of radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Musat, Elena; Roelofs, Erik; Bar-Deroma, Raquel; Fenton, Paul; Gulyban, Akos; Collette, Laurence; Stupp, Roger; Weber, Damien C; Bernard Davis, J; Aird, Edwin; Baumert, Brigitta G

    2010-05-01

    Early assessment of radiotherapy (RT) quality in the ongoing EORTC trial comparing primary temozolomide versus RT in low-grade gliomas. RT plans provided for dummy cases were evaluated and compared against expert plans. We analysed: (1) tumour and organs-at-risk delineation, (2) geometric and dosimetric characteristics, (3) planning parameters, compliance with dose prescription and Dmax for OAR (4) indices: RTOG conformity index (CI), coverage factor (CF), tissue protection factor (PF); conformity number (CN = PF x CF); dose homogeneity in PTV (U). Forty-one RT plans were evaluated. Only two (5%) centres were requested to repeat CTV-PTV delineations. Three (7%) plans had a significant under-dosage and dose homogeneity in one deviated > 10%. Dose distribution was good with mean values of 1.5, 1, 0.68, and 0.68 (ideal values = 1) for CI, CF, PF, and CN, respectively. CI and CN strongly correlated with PF and they correlated with PTV. Planning with more beams seems to increase PTV(Dmin), improving CF. U correlated with PTV(Dmax). Preliminary results of the dummy run procedure indicate that most centres conformed to protocol requirements. To quantify plan quality we recommend systematic calculation of U and either CI or CN, both of which measure the amount of irradiated normal brain tissue. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis/inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis: evaluation by comparison with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Kenji; Nishimura, Hideki; Ejima, Yasuo; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Uezono, Haruka; Ishihara, Takeaki; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Yamaguchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Koji; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Forty-three patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT)/inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis (IVCTT) treated with SBRT (27 with CyberKnife (CK) and 16 with TrueBeam (TB)) from April 2013 to December 2014, and 54 treated with 3DCRT from June 2008 to March 2013 were evaluated. Dosimetric parameters, response to radiotherapy (RT) and survival outcomes were compared in total SBRT vs. 3DCRT, CK vs. 3DCRT and TB vs. 3DCRT, respectively. The median biologically effective dose 10 (BED10) values in total SBRT, CK, TB and 3DCRT were 73.4 Gy10, 75.0 Gy10, 60.5 Gy10 and 58.5 Gy10, respectively (P < 0.001 in total SBRT vs. 3DCRT, P < 0.001 in CK vs. 3DCRT, P = 0.004 in TB vs. 3DCRT). The tumor response rates were 67%, 70%, 62% and 46%, respectively (P = 0.04, P = 0.04, P = 0.25). The 1-year overall survival rates were 49.3%, 56.7%, 38.1% and 29.3%, respectively (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.30), and the 1-year local progression rates were 20.4%, 21.9%, 18.8% and 43.6%, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.04, P = 0.10). The use of SBRT made it possible to achieve a higher BED10 compared with the use of 3DCRT. Improvements in local control and survival were achieved in the CK group and the total SBRT group. Our results suggest that SBRT may have the potential to be the standard RT technique for the treatment of PVTT/IVCTT. PMID:27053259

  19. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hans T. Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives {>=}45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans.

  20. Late toxicity and patient self-assessment of breast appearance/satisfaction on RTOG 0319: a phase 2 trial of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy-accelerated partial breast irradiation following lumpectomy for stages I and II breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chafe, Susan; Moughan, Jennifer; McCormick, Beryl; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Arthur, Douglas W; Petersen, Ivy; White, Julia; Vicini, Frank A

    2013-08-01

    Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ≤3 cm, negative margins, and ≤3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chafe, Susan; Moughan, Jennifer; McCormick, Beryl; Wong, John; Pass, Helen; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Arthur, Douglas W.; Petersen, Ivy; White, Julia; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ≤3 cm, negative margins, and ≤3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  2. SU-E-T-346: Effect of Jaw Position On Dose to Critical Structures in 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, N; Han, E; Liang, X; Morrill, S; Zhang, X; Hardee, M; Penagaricano, J; Ratanatharathorn, V

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional conformal therapy remains a valid and widely used modality for pancreatic radiotherapy treatment. It usually meets dose constraints on critical structures. However, careful positioning of collimation jaws can reduce dose to the critical structures. Here we investigate the dosimetric effect of jaw position in MLC-based 3-D conformal treatment planning on critical structures. Methods: We retrospectively selected seven pancreatic cancer patients treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy. We started with treatment plans (Varian Truebeam LINAC, Eclipse TPS, AAA, 18MV) having both x and y jaws aligned with the farthest extent of the block outline (8mm around PTV). Then we subsequently moved either both x-jaws or all x and y jaws outwards upto 3 cm in 1 cm increments and investigated their effect on average and maximum dose to neighboring critical structures keeping the same coverage to treatment volume. Results: Lateral displacement of both x-jaws by 1cm each increased kidney and spleen mean dose by as much as 1.7% and 1.3% respectively and superior inferior displacement increased liver, right kidney, stomach and spleen dose by as much as 2.1%, 2%, 5.2% and 1.6% respectively. Displacement of all x and y-jaws away by 1cm increased the mean dose to liver, right kidney, left kidney, bowels, cord, stomach and spleen by as much as 4.9%, 5.9%, 2.1%, 2.8%, 7.4%, 10.4% and 4.2% respectively. Percentage increase in mean dose due to 2 and 3cm jaw displacement increased almost linearly with the displaced distance. Changes in maximum dose were much smaller (mostly negligible) than the changes in mean dose. Conclusion: Collimation jaw position affects dose mostly to critical structures adjacent to it. Though treatment plans with MLCs conforming the block margin usually meet dose constraints to critical structures, keeping jaws all the way in, to the edge of the block reduces dose to the critical structures during radiation treatment.

  3. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soyfer, Viacheslav Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  4. The use of radiochromic EBT2 film for the quality assurance and dosimetric verification of 3D conformal radiotherapy using Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL flatbed scanner.

    PubMed

    Sim, G S; Wong, J H D; Ng, K H

    2013-07-08

    Radiochromic and radiographic films are widely used for radiation dosimetry due to the advantage of high spatial resolution and two-dimensional dose measurement. Different types of scanners, including various models of flatbed scanners, have been used as part of the dosimetry readout procedure. This paper focuses on the characterization of the EBT2 film response in combination with a Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL scanner and the subsequent use in the dosimetric verification of a 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment. The film reproducibility and scanner uniformity of the Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL was studied. A three-field 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment was planned on an anthropomorphic phantom and EBT2 film measurements were carried out to verify the treatment. The interfilm reproducibility was found to be 0.25%. Over a period of three months, the films darkened by 1%. The scanner reproducibility was ± 2% and a nonuniformity was ±1.9% along the direction perpendicular to the scan direction. EBT2 measurements showed an underdose of 6.2% at high-dose region compared to TPS predicted dose. This may be due to the inability of the treatment planning system to predict the correct dose distribution in the presence of tissue inhomogeneities and the uncertainty of the scanner reproducibility and uniformity. The use of EBT2 film in conjunction with the axial CT image of the anthropomorphic phantom allows the evaluation of the anatomical location of dose discrepancies between the EBT2 measured dose distribution and TPS predicted dose distribution.

  5. Is intensity-modulated radiotherapy better than conventional radiation treatment and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for mediastinal masses in patients with Hodgkin's disease, and is there a role for beam orientation optimization and dose constraints assigned to virtual volumes?

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, Theodore . E-mail: girinsky@igr.fr; Pichenot, Charlotte; Beaudre, Anne; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of beam orientation optimization and the role of virtual volumes (VVs) aimed at protecting adjacent organs at risk (OARs), and to compare various intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) setups with conventional treatment with anterior and posterior fields and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with mediastinal masses in Hodgkin's disease were treated with combined modality therapy (three to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine [ABVD] before radiation treatment). Contouring and treatment planning were performed with Somavision and CadPlan Helios (Varian Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The gross tumor volume was determined according to the prechemotherapy length and the postchemotherapy width of the mediastinal tumor mass. A 10-mm isotropic margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). Because dose constraints assigned to OARs led to unsatisfactory PTV coverage, VVs were designed for each patient to protect adjacent OARs. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the PTV, delivered according to guidelines from International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report No. 50. Five different IMRT treatment plans were compared with conventional treatment and 3D-CRT. Results: Beam orientation was important with respect to the amount of irradiated normal tissues. The best compromise in terms of PTV coverage and protection of normal tissues was obtained with five equally spaced beams (5FEQ IMRT plan) using dose constraints assigned to VVs. When IMRT treatment plans were compared with conventional treatment and 3D-CRT, dose conformation with IMRT was significantly better, with greater protection of the heart, coronary arteries, esophagus, and spinal cord. The lungs and breasts in women received a slightly higher radiation dose with IMRT compared with conventional treatments. The greater volume of normal tissue receiving low radiation doses could be a cause for

  6. Prospective assessment of activities of daily living using modified Barthel's Index in children and young adults with low-grade gliomas treated with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Rakesh; Dutta, Debnarayan; Kamble, Rashmi; Gupta, Tejpal; Munshi, Anusheel; Sarin, Rajiv; Dinshaw, Ketayun

    2008-12-01

    To report prospective evaluations of activities of daily living (ADL) in young patients with low-grade gliomas treated with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Between April 2001 and February 2008, 38 children and young adults (age 5-25 years, median 12.5 years) with low-grade gliomas with residual/progressive disease and treated with SCRT were accrued in a prospective protocol. Patients underwent baseline and follow-up ADL assessments by the modified Barthel's battery, which comprises domains of personal hygiene, bathing self, feeding, toilet, stair climbing, dressing, bowel control, bladder control, ambulation, and chair-bed transfer. The patient population consisted of 38 patients (male 29, female 9) with a diagnosis of residual or progressive low-grade glioma (pilocytic astrocytoma in 27, fibrillary astrocytoma in 5, ependymoma in 4, and oligodendroglioma and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in 1 each). Three patients were visually handicapped. Mean of total modified Barthel's ADL score (Barthel' Index, BI) at baseline before staring SCRT was 94.5 (standard deviation 14.8, range 45-100). At 2-year and 3-year follow-up, mean BI was 97.1 and 99, respectively. At baseline pre-radiotherapy assessment, patients with impaired visual function and with low performance status (Karnofsky performance score, KPS < 70) had significantly lower BI than those with normal vision (P radiotherapy baseline BI of three patients, who eventually developed local recurrence, was only 64 (SD 32.1) as compared with a baseline score of 97.18 seen in patients whose tumor remained controlled at follow-up (P

  7. High-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine and carboplatin chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing the radiotherapy dose can result in improved local control for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and can thereby improve survival. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy can expose tumors to a high dose of radiation in a short period of time, but the optimal treatment regimen remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine (NVB) and carboplatin (CBP) chemotherapy for the treatment of local advanced NSCLC. Methods Untreated patients with unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC or patients with a recurrence of NSCLC received accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The total dose was greater than or equal to 60 Gy. The accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy was conducted once daily at 3 Gy/fraction with 5 fractions per week, and the radiotherapy was completed in 5 weeks. In addition to radiotherapy, the patients also received at least 1 cycle of a concurrent two-drug chemotherapy regimen of NVB and CBP. Results A total of 26 patients (19 previously untreated cases and 7 cases of recurrent disease) received 60Gy-75Gy radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. All of the patients underwent evaluations for toxicity and preliminary therapeutic efficacy. There were no treatment-related deaths within the entire patient group. The major acute adverse reactions were radiation esophagitis (88.5%) and radiation pneumonitis (42.3%). The percentages of grade III acute radiation esophagitis and grade III radiation pneumonitis were 15.4% and 7.7%, respectively. Hematological toxicities were common and did not significantly affect the implementation of chemoradiotherapy after supportive treatment. Two patients received high dose of 75 Gy had grade III late esophageal toxicity, and none had grade IV and above. Grade III and above late lung toxicity did not occur

  8. High-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine and carboplatin chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-E; Lin, Qiang; Meng, Fan-Jie; Chen, Xue-Ji; Ren, Xiao-Cang; Cao, Bin; Wang, Na; Zong, Jie; Peng, Yu; Ku, Ya-Jun; Chen, Yan

    2013-08-11

    Increasing the radiotherapy dose can result in improved local control for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and can thereby improve survival. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy can expose tumors to a high dose of radiation in a short period of time, but the optimal treatment regimen remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing high-dose accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (at 3 Gy/fraction) with concurrent vinorelbine (NVB) and carboplatin (CBP) chemotherapy for the treatment of local advanced NSCLC. Untreated patients with unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC or patients with a recurrence of NSCLC received accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The total dose was greater than or equal to 60 Gy. The accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy was conducted once daily at 3 Gy/fraction with 5 fractions per week, and the radiotherapy was completed in 5 weeks. In addition to radiotherapy, the patients also received at least 1 cycle of a concurrent two-drug chemotherapy regimen of NVB and CBP. A total of 26 patients (19 previously untreated cases and 7 cases of recurrent disease) received 60Gy-75Gy radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. All of the patients underwent evaluations for toxicity and preliminary therapeutic efficacy. There were no treatment-related deaths within the entire patient group. The major acute adverse reactions were radiation esophagitis (88.5%) and radiation pneumonitis (42.3%). The percentages of grade III acute radiation esophagitis and grade III radiation pneumonitis were 15.4% and 7.7%, respectively. Hematological toxicities were common and did not significantly affect the implementation of chemoradiotherapy after supportive treatment. Two patients received high dose of 75 Gy had grade III late esophageal toxicity, and none had grade IV and above. Grade III and above late lung toxicity did not occur. High-dose accelerated

  9. Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Edward E.; Zhou Hu; Chatterjee, Raja; Keall, Paul J.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Contag, Christopher H.; Boyer, Arthur L.

    2007-11-15

    Treatment of small animals with radiation has in general been limited to planar fields shaped with lead blocks, complicating spatial localization of dose and treatment of deep-seated targets. In order to advance laboratory radiotherapy toward what is accomplished in the clinic, we have constructed a variable aperture collimator for use in shaping the beam of microCT scanner. This unit can image small animal subjects at high resolution, and is capable of delivering therapeutic doses in reasonable exposure times. The proposed collimator consists of two stages, each containing six trapezoidal brass blocks that move along a frame in a manner similar to a camera iris producing a hexagonal aperture of variable size. The two stages are offset by 30 deg. and adjusted for the divergence of the x-ray beam so as to produce a dodecagonal profile at isocenter. Slotted rotating driving plates are used to apply force to pins in the collimator blocks and effect collimator motion. This device has been investigated through both simulation and measurement. The collimator aperture size varied from 0 to 8.5 cm as the driving plate angle increased from 0 to 41 deg. . The torque required to adjust the collimator varied from 0.5 to 5 N{center_dot}m, increasing with increasing driving plate angle. The transmission profiles produced by the scanner at isocenter exhibited a penumbra of approximately 10% of the collimator aperture width. Misalignment between the collimator assembly and the x-ray source could be identified on the transmission images and corrected by adjustment of the collimator location. This variable aperture collimator technology is therefore a feasible and flexible solution for adjustable shaping of radiation beams for use in small animal radiotherapy as well as other applications in which beam shaping is desired.

  10. Phase I Study of Conformal Radiotherapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine With Erlotinib for Unresected Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Margolis, Jeffrey; Jury, Robert P.; Balaraman, Savitha; Cotant, Matthew B.; Ballouz, Samer; Boxwala, Iqbal G.; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael A.; Nadeau, Laura; Hardy-Carlson, Maria; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the recommended dose of radiotherapy when combined with full-dose gemcitabine and erlotinib for unresected pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresected pancreatic cancer (Zubrod performance status 0-2) were eligible for the present study. Gemcitabine was given weekly for 7 weeks (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) with erlotinib daily for 8 weeks (100 mg). A final toxicity assessment was performed in Week 9. Radiotherapy (starting at 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions, 5 d/wk) was given to the gross tumor plus a 1-cm margin starting with the first dose of gemcitabine. A standard 3 plus 3 dose escalation (an additional 4 Gy within 2 days for each dose level) was used, except for the starting dose level, which was scheduled to contain 6 patients. In general, Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, except for Grade 3 anorexia or Grade 3 fatigue alone. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated (10 men and 10 women). Nausea, vomiting, and infection were significantly associated with the radiation dose (p = .01, p = .03, and p = .03, respectively). Of the 20 patients, 5 did not complete treatment and were not evaluable for dose-escalation purposes (3 who developed progressive disease during treatment and 2 who electively discontinued it). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in none of 6 patients at 30 Gy, 2 of 6 at 34 Gy, and 1 of 3 patients at 38 Gy. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that the recommended Phase II dose is 30 Gy in 15 fractions.

  11. A phase II trial of accelerated radiotherapy using weekly stereotactic conformal boost for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme: RTOG 0023

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, Robert; Choucair, Ali; Gillin, Michael; Chakravarti, Arnab; Schultz, Christopher; Souhami, Luis; Chen, Allan; Pham, Huong; Mehta, Minesh

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: This phase II trial was performed to assess the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of dose-intense accelerated radiation therapy using weekly fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) boost for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed GBM with postoperative enhancing tumor plus tumor cavity diameter <60 mm were enrolled. A 50-Gy dose of standard radiation therapy (RT) was given in daily 2-Gy fractions. In addition, patients received four FSRT treatments, once weekly, during Weeks 3 to 6. FSRT dosing of either 5 Gy or 7 Gy per fraction was given for a cumulative dose of 70 or 78 Gy in 29 (25 standard RT + 4 FSRT) treatments over 6 weeks. After the RT course, carmustine (BCNU) at 80 mg/m{sup 2} was given for 3 days, every 8 weeks, for 6 cycles. Results: A total of 76 patients were analyzed. Toxicity included: 3 Grade 4 chemotherapy, 3 acute Grade 4 radiotherapy, and 1 Grade 3 late. The median survival time was 12.5 months. No survival difference is seen when compared with the RTOG historical database. Patients with gross total resection (41%) had a median survival time of 16.6 months vs. 12.0 months for historic controls with gross total resection (p = 0.14). Conclusion: This first, multi-institutional FSRT boost trial for GBM was feasible and well tolerated. There is no significant survival benefit using this dose-intense RT regimen. Subset analysis revealed a trend toward improved outcome for GTR patients suggesting that patients with minimal disease burden may benefit from this form of accelerated RT.

  12. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z; Shang, Q; Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice.

  13. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma after external beam irradiation: a prospective phase I-II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai-Liang; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Qian, Hao; Wang, Li-Juan; Yang, Huan-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Shen

    2003-12-01

    To observe in a clinical trial the feasibility, tolerance, and efficacy of reirradiation by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Between June 1999 and March 2001, 23 lung carcinoma patients with locoregional recurrence after EBRT were enrolled in this study. Of the 23 patients, 21 were men and 2 were women (median age 68 years, range 43-79). At the first course of RT, 9 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 7 adenocarcinoma, and 7 small cell carcinoma. The interval between the first course of RT and recurrence varied from 6 to 42 months (median 13). The median dose of the first course of RT was 66 Gy (range 30-78). Reirradiation was carried out using 3D-CRT and only covered the radiographic lesions. The median dose of reirradiation was 51 Gy (range 46-60), which was delivered by a conventionally fractionated schedule (i.e., 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/wk). The toxicity was assessed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up time was 15 months (range 2-37). Acute radiation esophagitis occurred in 9% of patients (Grade 1-2). Acute radiation pneumonitis developed in 22% of patients (Grade 1-2). No cases of acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity had been recorded at last follow-up. Pulmonary fibrosis was observed in 26% of patients (Grade 2-3); no other severe late complications have been observed. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 59% and 21%, respectively. The locoregional progression-free rate at 1 and 2 years was 51% and 42%, respectively. Reirradiation using 3D-CRT was tolerated by this group of recurrent lung carcinoma patients without severe complications. The 2-year outcome was encouraging. Reirradiation with 3D-CRT can be considered an option for the management of locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma.

  14. Dosimetric Comparison of Involved-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Photon Radiotherapy and Breast-Sparing Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Female Pediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Hoene, Ted; Xiao, Lu; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey; Chang, Andrew L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the potential reduction in breast dose for young girls with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) treated with breast-sparing proton therapy (BS-PT) as compared with three-dimensional conformal involved-field photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The Clarian Health Cancer Registry was queried for female pediatric patients with the diagnosis of HL who received radiotherapy at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center during 2006-2009. The original CT simulation images were obtained, and 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans delivering 21 Gy or cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 14 fractions were created for each patient. Dose-volume histogram data were collected for both 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans and compared by paired t test for correlated samples. Results: The cancer registry provided 10 female patients with Ann Arbor Stage II HL, aged 10-18 years at the time of treatment. Both mean and maximum breast dose were significantly less with BS-PT compared with 3D-CRT: 0.95 CGE vs. 4.70 Gy (p < 0.001) and 21.07 CGE vs. 23.11 Gy (p < 0.001), respectively. The volume of breast receiving 1.0 Gy/CGE and 5.0 Gy/CGE was also significantly less with BS-PT, 194 cm{sup 3} and 93 cm{sup 3}, respectively, compared with 790 cm{sup 3} and 360 cm{sup 3} with 3D-CRT (p = 0.009, 0.013). Conclusion: Breast-sparing proton therapy has the potential to reduce unnecessary breast dose in young girls with HL by as much as 80% relative to involved-field 3D-CRT.

  15. Risk factors for acute esophagitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiong; Liu, H. Helen . E-mail: hliu@mdanderson.org; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors for acute esophagitis (AE) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy (CCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed for 215 NSCLC patients treated with CCT and 3D-CRT during 2000-2003, 127 of whom also had induction chemotherapy (ICT). Carboplatin and paclitaxel were the most commonly used agents for both ICT and CCT. The median prescription dose of radiotherapy was 63.5 Gy in 35 fractions. AE was graded during each treatment week and 1-month follow-up visits. The factors related to clinical and disease characteristics, CCT and 3D-CRT treatments, and treatment planning were reviewed and analyzed for their association with Grade {>=}3 AE using univariate and multivariate logistic tests. Results: The rate of any grade AE was 93.0% and of Grade {>=}3 was 20.5%. Univariate analyses showed that none of the clinical factors was significantly associated with Grade {>=}3 AE. However, the mean radiation dose to the esophagus, the absolute esophageal volume treated above 15 Gy (aV15) through aV45 Gy, and the relative esophagus volume treated above 10 Gy (rV10) through rV45 Gy were significant risk factors for Grade {>=}3 AE. Only rV20 was retained as the single risk factor in multivariate analyses. Conclusions: The risk of AE in the NSCLC patients treated with CCT and 3D-CRT was primarily determined by dosimetric factors. These factors should be carefully considered during treatment planning to minimize the incidence of AE.

  16. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    SciTech Connect

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade {>=}2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade {>=}2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade {>=}2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  17. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improves lymph node coverage and dose to critical structures compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in clinically localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang-Chesebro, Alice . E-mail: awang@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Xia Ping; Coleman, Joy; Akazawa, Clayton C.; Roach, Mack

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify gains in lymph node coverage and critical structure dose reduction for whole-pelvis (WP) and extended-field (EF) radiotherapy in prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for the first treatment phase of 45 Gy in the concurrent treatment of lymph nodes and prostate. Methods and Materials: From January to August 2005, 35 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with pelvic IMRT; 7 had nodes defined up to L5-S1 (Group 1), and 28 had nodes defined above L5-S1 (Group 2). Each patient had 2 plans retrospectively generated: 1 WP 3DCRT plan using bony landmarks, and 1 EF 3DCRT plan to cover the vascular defined volumes. Dose-volume histograms for the lymph nodes, rectum, bladder, small bowel, and penile bulb were compared by group. Results: For Group 1, WP 3DCRT missed 25% of pelvic nodes with the prescribed dose 45 Gy and missed 18% with the 95% prescribed dose 42.75 Gy, whereas WP IMRT achieved V{sub 45Gy} = 98% and V{sub 42.75Gy} = 100%. Compared with WP 3DCRT, IMRT reduced bladder V{sub 45Gy} by 78%, rectum V{sub 45Gy} by 48%, and small bowel V{sub 45Gy} by 232 cm{sup 3}. EF 3DCRT achieved 95% coverage of nodes for all patients at high cost to critical structures. For Group 2, IMRT decreased bladder V{sub 45Gy} by 90%, rectum V{sub 45Gy} by 54% and small bowel V{sub 45Gy} by 455 cm{sup 3} compared with EF 3DCRT. Conclusion: In this study WP 3DCRT missed a significant percentage of pelvic nodes. Although EF 3DCRT achieved 95% pelvic nodal coverage, it increased critical structure doses. IMRT improved pelvic nodal coverage while decreasing dose to bladder, rectum, small bowel, and penile bulb. For patients with extended node involvement, IMRT especially decreases small bowel dose.

  18. Impact of computed tomography and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose coincidence detection emission tomography image fusion for optimization of conformal radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deniaud-Alexandre, Elisabeth; Touboul, Emmanuel . E-mail: emmanuel.touboul@tnn.aphp.fr; Lerouge, Delphine; Grahek, Dany; Foulquier, Jean-Noel; Petegnief, Yolande; Gres, Benoit; El Balaa, Hanna; Keraudy, Katia; Kerrou, Kaldoun; Montravers, Francoise; Milleron, Bernard; Lebeau, Bernard; Talbot, Jean-Noel

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To report a retrospective study concerning the impact of fused {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 patients consecutively treated for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer were studied. Each patient underwent CT and FDG-hybrid PET for simulation treatment in the same treatment position. Images were coregistered using five fiducial markers. Target volume delineation was initially performed on the CT images, and the corresponding FDG-PET data were subsequently used as an overlay to the CT data to define the target volume. Results: {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose-PET identified previously undetected distant metastatic disease in 8 patients, making them ineligible for curative conformal radiotherapy (1 patient presented with some positive uptake corresponding to concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis). Another patient was ineligible for curative treatment because the fused PET-CT images demonstrated excessively extensive intrathoracic disease. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was decreased by CT-PET image fusion in 21 patients (23%) and was increased in 24 patients (26%). The GTV reduction was {>=}25% in 7 patients because CT-PET image fusion reduced the pulmonary GTV in 6 patients (3 patients with atelectasis) and the mediastinal nodal GTV in 1 patient. The GTV increase was {>=}25% in 14 patients owing to an increase in the pulmonary GTV in 11 patients (4 patients with atelectasis) and detection of occult mediastinal lymph node involvement in 3 patients. Of 81 patients receiving a total dose of {>=}60 Gy at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point, after CT-PET image fusion, the percentage of total lung volume receiving >20 Gy increased in 15 cases and decreased in 22. The percentage of total heart volume receiving >36 Gy increased in 8

  19. Impact of computed tomography and 18F-deoxyglucose coincidence detection emission tomography image fusion for optimization of conformal radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Deniaud-Alexandre, Elisabeth; Touboul, Emmanuel; Lerouge, Delphine; Grahek, Dany; Foulquier, Jean-Noël; Petegnief, Yolande; Grès, Benoît; El Balaa, Hanna; Keraudy, Katia; Kerrou, Kaldoun; Montravers, Françoise; Milleron, Bernard; Lebeau, Bernard; Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2005-12-01

    To report a retrospective study concerning the impact of fused 18F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. A total of 101 patients consecutively treated for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer were studied. Each patient underwent CT and FDG-hybrid PET for simulation treatment in the same treatment position. Images were coregistered using five fiducial markers. Target volume delineation was initially performed on the CT images, and the corresponding FDG-PET data were subsequently used as an overlay to the CT data to define the target volume. 18F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose-PET identified previously undetected distant metastatic disease in 8 patients, making them ineligible for curative conformal radiotherapy (1 patient presented with some positive uptake corresponding to concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis). Another patient was ineligible for curative treatment because the fused PET-CT images demonstrated excessively extensive intrathoracic disease. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was decreased by CT-PET image fusion in 21 patients (23%) and was increased in 24 patients (26%). The GTV reduction was > or = 25% in 7 patients because CT-PET image fusion reduced the pulmonary GTV in 6 patients (3 patients with atelectasis) and the mediastinal nodal GTV in 1 patient. The GTV increase was > or = 25% in 14 patients owing to an increase in the pulmonary GTV in 11 patients (4 patients with atelectasis) and detection of occult mediastinal lymph node involvement in 3 patients. Of 81 patients receiving a total dose of > or = 60 Gy at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point, after CT-PET image fusion, the percentage of total lung volume receiving >20 Gy increased in 15 cases and decreased in 22. The percentage of total heart volume receiving >36 Gy increased in 8 patients and decreased in 14. The spinal cord

  20. Influence of increased target dose inhomogeneity on margins for breathing motion compensation in conformal stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Meyer, Juergen; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Background Breathing motion should be considered for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumors. Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) offers detailed information of tumor motion. The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the presence of breathing induced target motion and to calculate margins for motion compensation. Methods Based on 4D-CT examinations, the probability density function of pulmonary tumors was generated for ten patients. The time-accumulated dose to the tumor was calculated using one-dimensional (1D) convolution simulations of a 'static' dose distribution and target probability density function (PDF). In analogy to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), different degrees of dose inhomogeneity were allowed in the target volume: minimum doses of 100% were prescribed to the edge of the target and maximum doses varied between 102% (P102) and 150% (P150). The dose loss due to breathing motion was quantified and margins were added until this loss was completely compensated. Results With the time-weighted mean tumor position as the isocentre, a close correlation with a quadratic relationship between the standard deviation of the PDF and the margin size was observed. Increased dose inhomogeneity in the target volume required smaller margins for motion compensation: margins of 2.5 mm, 2.4 mm and 1.3 mm were sufficient for compensation of 11.5 mm motion range and standard deviation of 3.9 mm in P105, P125 and P150, respectively. This effect of smaller margins for increased dose inhomogeneity was observed for all patients. Optimal sparing of the organ-at-risk surrounding the target was achieved for dose prescriptions P105 to P118. The internal target volume concept over-compensated breathing motion with higher than planned doses to the target and increased doses to the surrounding normal tissue. Conclusion Treatment planning with inhomogeneous dose distributions in the target volume required

  1. Three-dimensional intrafractional internal target motions in accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kimiko; Yoshimura, Michio; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Inoue, Minoru; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke; Nakata, Manabu; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated three-dimensional intrafractional target motion, divided into respiratory-induced motion and baseline drift, in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Paired fluoroscopic images were acquired simultaneously using orthogonal kV X-ray imaging systems at pre- and post-treatment for 23 patients who underwent APBI with external beam radiotherapy. The internal target motion was calculated from the surgical clips placed around the tumour cavity. The peak-to-peak respiratory-induced motions ranged from 0.6 to 1.5mm in all directions. A systematic baseline drift of 1.5mm towards the posterior direction and a random baseline drift of 0.3mm in the lateral-medial and cranial-caudal directions were observed. The baseline for an outer tumour cavity drifted towards the lateral and posterior directions, and that for an upper tumour cavity drifted towards the cranial direction. Moderate correlations were observed between the posterior baseline drift and the patients' physical characteristics. The posterior margin for intrafractional uncertainties was larger than 5mm in patients with greater fat thickness due to the baseline drift. The magnitude of the intrafractional motion was not uniform according to the direction, patients' physical characteristics, or tumour cavity location due to the baseline drift. Therefore, the intrafractional systematic movement should be properly managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Later Outcomes and Alpha/Beta Estimate From Hypofractionated Conformal Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Versus Standard Fractionation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, Felix; Fowler, Jack; Leborgne, Jose H.; Mezzera, Julieta

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Now that the follow-up time has exceeded 5 years, an estimate of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio can be presented. The additional late outcomes in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer using a hypofractionated vs. a standard fractionation regimen are reported from this prospective nonrandomized contemporary comparison. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 nonrandomized patients chose hypofractionation delivered in 20 fractions of 3 Gy or 3.15 Gy (mean 3.06 Gy) for localized prostate cancer within a median overall time of 32 days (range, 29-49) using four fractions weekly. A total of 160 comparable patients were contemporarily treated within a median of 55 days (range 49-66). The median follow-up was 66 months (range, 24-95) for the hypofractionated arm and 63 months (range, 36-92) for the standard arm. The percentage of patients in the low-, medium-, and high-risk groups was 36%, 46%, and 18% in the hypofractionated arm and 44%, 50%, and 6% in standard arm (2 Gy), respectively. Results: The 5-year actuarial biochemical absence of disease (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL) and disease-free survival rate was the same at 89% in both arms, making the {alpha}/{beta} calculation unambiguous. The point ratio of {alpha}/{beta} was 1.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.7-5.1 Gy). The 95% confidence interval was determined entirely by the binomial confidence limits in the numbers of patients. Rectal reactions of grade 3 and 4 occurred in 1 of 114 (hypofractionated) and 2 of 160 (standard) patients. Conclusions: The presented three-dimensional conformal regimen was acceptable, and the {alpha}/{beta} value was 1.8, in agreement with other very recent low meta-analyses (reviewed in the '' section).

  3. Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer Using Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil Before and After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil: A Multicenter Study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Trevor; Joon, Daryl Lim; Willis, David; Jayamoham, Jayasingham; Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; Di Iulio, Juliana; Milner, Alvin; Mann, G. Bruce; Michael, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The INT0116 study has established postoperative chemoradiotherapy as the standard of care for completely resected gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the optimal chemoradiation regimen remains to be defined. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate an alternative chemoradiation regimen that combines more current systemic treatment with modern techniques of radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had undergone an R0 resection were eligible. Adjuvant therapy consisted of one cycle of epirubicin, cisplatin, and 5-FU (ECF), followed by radiotherapy with concurrent infusional 5-FU, and then two additional cycles of ECF. Radiotherapy was delivered using precisely defined, multiple-field, three-dimensional conformal techniques. Results: A total of 54 assessable patients were enrolled from 19 institutions. The proportion of patients commencing Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of ECF chemotherapy were 100%, 81%, and 67% respectively. In all, 94% of patients who received radiotherapy completed treatment as planned. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 66% of patients with 7.4% developing febrile neutropenia. Most neutropenic episodes (83%) occurred in the post-radiotherapy period during cycles 2 and 3 of ECF. Grade 3/4 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 28% of patients. In all, 35% of radiotherapy treatment plans contained protocol deviations that were satisfactorily amended before commencement of treatment. At median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was estimated at 61.6%. Conclusions: This adjuvant regimen using ECF before and after three-dimensional conformal chemoradiation is feasible and can be safely delivered in a cooperative group setting. A regimen similar to this is currently being compared with the INT0116 regimen in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, randomized Phase III trial.

  4. A precision 3D conformal treatment technique in rats: application to whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Suk W; Cramer, Christina K; Miles, Devin A; Reinsvold, Michael H; Joo, Kyeung M; Kirsch, David G; Oldham, Mark

    2017-08-24

    To develop and validate 3D conformal hippocampal sparing whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) for Wistar rats utilizing precision 3D printed immobilization and micro-blocks. This technique paves the way for future pre-clinical studies investigating brain treatments that reduce neurotoxicity. A novel pre-clinical treatment planning and delivery process was developed to enable precision 3D conformal treatment and hippocampal avoidance capability for the Xrad 225cx small animal irradiator. A range of conformal avoidance plans were evaluated consisting of equi-angularly spaced co-planar axial beams, with plans containing 2, 4, 7, and 8 fields. The hippocampal sparing and coverage of these plans were investigated through Monte Carlo dose calculation (SmART-Plan Xrad 225cx planning system). Treatment delivery was implemented through a novel process where hippocampal block shapes were computer-generated from an MRI rat atlas which was registered to on-board cone-beam-CT of the rat in treatment position. The blocks were 3D-printed with a tungsten-doped filament at lateral resolution of 80μm. Precision immobilization was achieved utilizing a 3D-printed support system which enabled angled positioning of the rat head in supine position and bite-block to improve coverage of the central diencephalon. Treatment delivery was verified on rodent-morphic Presage(®) 3D dosimeters optically scanned at 0.2mm isotropic resolution. Biological verification of hippocampal avoidance was performed with immunohistologic staining. All simulated plans spared the hippocampus while delivering high dose to the brain (22.5-26.2Gy mean dose to brain at mean hippocampal dose of 7Gy). No significant improvement in hippocampal sparing was observed by adding beams beyond 4 fields. Dosimetric sparing of hippocampal region of the 4-field plan was verified with the Presage(®) dosimeter (mean dose = 9.6Gy, D100% = 7.1Gy). Simulation and dosimeter match at distance-to-agreement of 2mm and dose

  5. Clinical outcome of protocol based image (MRI) guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pötter, Richard; Georg, Petra; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Grimm, Magdalena; Berger, Daniel; Nesvacil, Nicole; Georg, Dietmar; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Reinthaller, Alexander; Sturdza, Alina; Kirisits, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background To analyse the overall clinical outcome and benefits by applying protocol based image guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± chemotherapy (ChT). Methods Treatment schedule was EBRT with 45–50.4 Gy ± concomitant cisplatin chemotherapy plus 4 × 7 Gy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients were treated in the “protocol period” (2001–2008) with the prospective application of the High Risk CTV concept (D90) and dose volume constraints for organs at risk including biological modelling. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of dose escalation in large tumours (prescribed D90 > 85 Gy), often with inserting additional interstitial needles. Dose volume constraints (D2cc) were 70–75 Gy for rectum and sigmoid and 90 Gy for bladder. Late morbidity was prospectively scored, using LENT/SOMA Score. Disease outcome and treatment related late morbidity were evaluated and compared using actuarial analysis. Findings One hundred and fifty-six consecutive patients (median age 58 years) with cervix cancer FIGO stages IB–IVA were treated with definitive radiotherapy in curative intent. Histology was squamous cell cancer in 134 patients (86%), tumour size was >5 cm in 103 patients (66%), lymph node involvement in 75 patients (48%). Median follow-up was 42 months for all patients. Interstitial techniques were used in addition to intracavitary brachytherapy in 69/156 (44%) patients. Total prescribed mean dose (D90) was 93 ± 13 Gy, D2cc 86 ± 17 Gy for bladder, 65 ± 9 Gy for rectum and 64 ± 9 Gy for sigmoid. Complete remission was achieved in 151/156 patients (97%). Overall local control at 3 years was 95%; 98% for tumours 2–5 cm, and 92% for tumours >5 cm (p = 0.04), 100% for IB, 96% for IIB, 86% for IIIB. Cancer specific survival at 3 years was overall 74%, 83% for tumours 2–5 cm, 70% for tumours >5 cm, 83% for IB, 84% for IIB, 52% for IIIB. Overall

  6. Analysis of FET-PET imaging for target volume definition in patients with gliomas treated with conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Giesel, Frederik L; Hoffmann, Christoph; Burger, Ute; Rief, Harald; Welzel, Thomas; Haberkorn, Uwe; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2013-12-01

    Modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity-modulated RT, or particle irradiation allow local dose escalation with simultaneous sparing of critical organs. Several trials are currently investigating their benefit in glioma reirradiation and boost irradiation. Target volume definition is of critical importance especially when steep dose gradient techniques are employed. In this manuscript we investigate the impact of O-(2-(F-18)fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine-positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FET-PET/CT) on target volume definition in low and high grade glioma patients undergoing either first or re-irradiation with particles. We investigated volumetric size and uniformity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- vs. FET-PET/CT-derived gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) of 41 glioma patients. Clinical cases are presented to demonstrate potential benefits of integrating FET-PET/CT-planning into daily routine. Integrating FET-uptake into the delineation of GTVs yields larger volumes. Combined modality-derived PTVs are significantly enlarged in high grade glioma patients and in case of primary RT. The congruence of MRI and FET signals for the identification of glioma GTVs is poor with mean uniformity indices of 0.39. MRI-based PTVs miss 17% of FET-PET/CT-based GTVs. Non significant alterations were detected in low grade glioma patients and in those undergoing reirradiation. Target volume definition for malignant gliomas during initial RT may yield significantly differing results depending upon the imaging modality, which the contouring process is based upon. The integration of both MRI and FET-PET/CT may help to improve GTV coverage by avoiding larger incongruences between physical and biological imaging techniques. In low grade gliomas and in cases of reirradiation, more studies are needed in order to investigate a potential benefit of FET-PET/CT for planning of RT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  7. [Conformational radiotherapy for bladder cancer: limits to precision and potential advantages of the utilization of proton beams].

    PubMed

    Miralbell, R

    1999-01-01

    Studies have been conducted and are ongoing to determine the utility of radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) as an alternative to surgery and for organ preservation in infiltrating cancer of the bladder. There are data that suggest that a higher dose of radiation can increase the probability of achieving local tumor control. However, a higher dose can only by utilized with greater precision in order to reduce radiation to the surrounding normal tissues. The variability and unpredictability of the bladder makes precision in irradiation difficult. Immobilization of the bladder with a balloon has been attempted but reproducibility was scanty. A 2 cm safety margin around the tumor appears to be the most appropriate method to ensure delivery of radiation to the target. High energy proton beams possess characteristic (fine trajectory and dose can be significantly reduced once the energy beam has reached a specific depth) that enhance precision in the treatment of an important number of tumors such as bladder cancer. In this study it is shown that proton radiation therapy permits a better dose distribution than with photons (25 MV x-rays) in a specific case of bladder cancer. In comparison to photon radiation therapy, this theroretical optimization permits administering a 10% higher dose with proton beams while reducing the dose to the neighbouring organs. This advantage can even be more important if we consider the 2 cm safety margin around the tumor. However, clinical studies are warranted to evaluate the potential benefits of a greater precision with high dose external radiation using proton beams or enhanced photon radiation therapy.

  8. Phase II Trial of Cetuximab and Conformal Radiotherapy Only in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer with Concurrent Tissue Sampling Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Rembielak, Agata I; Jain, Pooja; Jackson, Andrew S; Green, Melanie M; Santorelli, Gillian R; Whitfield, Gillian A; Crellin, Adrian; Garcia-Alonso, Angel; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Cullen, James; Taylor, M Ben; Swindell, Ric; West, Catharine M; Valle, Juan; Saleem, Azeem; Price, Patricia M

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data have indicated the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agent cetuximab (Erbitux) as a radiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer, but this has not been specifically addressed in a clinical study. We report the results of an original study initiated in 2007, where cetuximab was tested with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced pancreatic cancer in a phase II trial (PACER). Patients (n = 21) received cetuximab loading dose (400 mg/m(2)) and weekly dose (250 mg/m(2)) during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Toxicity and disease response end point data were prospectively assessed. A feasibility study of on-trial patient blood and skin sampling was incorporated. Treatment was well tolerated, and toxicity was low; most patients (71%) experienced acute toxicities of grade 2 or less. Six months posttreatment, stable local disease was achieved in 90% of evaluable patients, but only 33% were free from metastatic progression. Median overall survival was 7.5 months, and actuarial survival was 33% at 1 year and 11% at 3 years, reflecting swift metastatic progression in some patients but good long-term control of localized disease in others. High-grade acneiform rash (P = .0027), posttreatment stable disease (P = .0059), and pretreatment cancer antigen 19.9 (CA19.9) level (P = .0042) associated with extended survival. Patient skin and blood samples yielded sufficient RNA and good quality protein, respectively. The results indicate that cetuximab inhibits EGFR-mediated radioresistance to achieve excellent local control with minimal toxicity but does not sufficiently control metastatic progression in all patients. Translational studies of patient tissue samples may yield molecular information that may enable individual treatment response prediction.

  9. Highly Conformal Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques Can Underdose the Cranial Clinical Target Volume if Leptomeningeal Extension through Skull Base Exit Foramina is not Contoured.

    PubMed

    Noble, D J; Ajithkumar, T; Lambert, J; Gleeson, I; Williams, M V; Jefferies, S J

    2017-07-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) remains a crucial treatment for patients with medulloblastoma. There is uncertainty about how to manage meningeal surfaces and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that follows cranial nerves exiting skull base foramina. The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and dose coverage of posterior cranial fossa foramina with both photon and proton therapy. We analysed the radiotherapy plans of seven patients treated with CSI for medulloblastoma and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours and three with ependymoma (total n = 10). Four had been treated with a field-based technique and six with TomoTherapy™. The internal acoustic meatus (IAM), jugular foramen (JF) and hypoglossal canal (HC) were contoured and added to the original treatment clinical target volume (Plan_CTV) to create a Test_CTV. This was grown to a test planning target volume (Test_PTV) for comparison with a Plan_PTV. Using Plan_CTV and Plan_PTV, proton plans were generated for all 10 cases. The following dosimetry data were recorded: conformity (dice similarity coefficient) and homogeneity index (D2 - D98/D50) as well as median and maximum dose (D2%) to Plan_PTV, V95% and minimum dose (D99.9%) to Plan_CTV and Test_CTV and Plan_PTV and Test_PTV, V95% and minimum dose (D98%) to foramina PTVs. Proton and TomoTherapy™ plans were more conformal (0.87, 0.86) and homogeneous (0.07, 0.04) than field-photon plans (0.79, 0.17). However, field-photon plans covered the IAM, JF and HC PTVs better than proton plans (P = 0.002, 0.004, 0.003, respectively). TomoTherapy™ plans covered the IAM and JF better than proton plans (P = 0.000, 0.002, respectively) but the result for the HC was not significant. Adding foramen CTVs/PTVs made no difference for field plans. The mean Dmin dropped 3.4% from Plan_PTV to Test_PTV for TomoTherapy™ (not significant) and 14.8% for protons (P = 0.001). Highly conformal CSI techniques may underdose meninges and CSF in the dural reflections of

  10. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of helical tomotherapy, forward-planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy and two-phase conformal plans for radical radiotherapy treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S; Willis, N; Locks, S M; Mott, J H; Kelly, C G

    2011-12-01

    The usual radical radiotherapy treatment prescribed for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is 70 Gy (in 2 Gy per fraction equivalent) administered to the high-risk target volume (TV). This can be planned using either a forward-planned photon-electron junction technique (2P) or a single-phase (1P) forward-planned technique developed in-house. Alternatively, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques, including helical tomotherapy (HT), allow image-guided inversely planned treatments. This study was designed to compare these three planning techniques with regards to TV coverage and the dose received by organs at risk. We compared the dose-volume histograms and conformity indices (CI) of the three planning processes in five patients with HNSCC. The tumour control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and uncomplicated tumour control probability (UCP) were calculated for each of the 15 plans. In addition, we explored the radiobiological rationality of a dose-escalation strategy. The CI for the high-risk clinical TV (CTV1) in the 5 patients were 0.78, 0.76, 0.82, 0.72 and 0.81 when HT was used; 0.58, 0.56, 0.47, 0.35 and 0.60 for the single-phase forward-planned technique and 0.46, 0.36, 0.29, 0.22 and 0.49 for the two-phase technique. The TCP for CTV1 with HT were 79.2%, 85.2%, 81.1%, 83.0% and 53.0%; for single-phase forward-planned technique, 76.5%, 86.9%, 73.4%, 81.8% and 31.8% and for the two-phase technique, 38.2%, 86.2%, 42.7%, 0.0% and 3.4%. Dose escalation using HT confirmed the radiobiological advantage in terms of TCP. TCP for the single-phase plans was comparable to that of HT plans, whereas that for the two-phase technique was lower. Centres that cannot provide IMRT for the radical treatment of all patients could implement the single-phase technique as standard to attain comparable TCP. However, IMRT produced better UCP, thereby enabling the exploration of dose escalation.

  11. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy : Risk-modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Hillemanns, Peter; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters.

  12. Direct tumor in vivo dosimetry in highly-conformal radiotherapy: A feasibility study of implantable MOSFETs for hypofractionated extracranial treatments using the Cyberknife system

    SciTech Connect

    Scalchi, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cavedon, Carlo; Francescon, Paolo; Colombo, Federico

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In highly-conformal radiotherapy, due to the complexity of both beam configurations and dose distributions, traditional in vivo dosimetry is unpractical or even impossible. The ideal dosimeter would be implanted inside the planning treatment volume so that it can directly measure the total delivered dose during each fraction with no additional uncertainty due to calculation models. The aim of this work is to verify if implantable metal oxide semiconductors field effect transistors (MOSFETs) can achieve a sufficient degree of dosimetric accuracy when used inside extracranial targets undergoing radiotherapy treatments using the Cyberknife system. Methods: Based on the preliminary findings of this study, new prototypes for high dose fractionations were developed to reduce the time dependence for long treatment delivery times. These dosimeters were recently cleared and are marketed as DVS-HFT. Multiple measurements were performed using both Virtual Water and water phantoms to characterize implantable MOSFETs under the Cyberknife beams, and included the reference-dosimetry consistency, the dependence of the response on the collimator size, on the daily delivered dose, and the time irradiation modality. Finally a Cyberknife prostate treatment simulation using a body phantom was conducted, and both MOSFET and ionization readings were compared to Monte Carlo calculations. The feasibility analysis was conducted based on the ratios of the absorbed dose divided by the dose reading, named as ''further calibration factor'' (FCF). Results: The average FCFs resulted to be 0.98 for the collimator dependence test, and about 1.00 for the reference-dosimetry test, the dose-dependence test, and the time-dependence test. The average FCF of the prostate treatment simulation test was 0.99. Conclusions: The obtained results are well within DVS specifications, that is, the factory calibration is still valid for such kind of treatments using the Cyberknife system, with no need of

  13. Teleportation of a 3-dimensional GHZ State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Li, Peng-Fei; Song, He-Shan

    2012-05-01

    The process of teleportation of a completely unknown 3-dimensional GHZ state is considered. Three maximally entangled 3-dimensional Bell states function as quantum channel in the scheme. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional GHZ state.

  14. Predictors of Long-Term Toxicity Using Three-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Grills, Inga S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Ye Hong; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We analyzed variables associated with long-term toxicity using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients treated with 3D-CRT accelerated partial breast irradiation were evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 scale. Cosmesis was scored using Harvard criteria. Multiple dosimetric and volumetric parameters were analyzed for their association with worst and last (W/L) toxicity outcomes. Results: Sixty-two patients had a minimum of 36 months of toxicity follow-up (median follow-up, 4.8 years). The W/L incidence of poor-fair cosmesis, any telangiectasia, and grade {>=}2 induration, volume reduction, and pain were 16.4%/11.5%, 24.2%/14.5%, 16.1%/9.7%, 17.7%/12.9%, and 11.3%/3.2%, respectively. Only the incidence of any telangiectasia was found to be predicted by any dosimetric parameter, with the absolute breast volume receiving 5% to 50% of the prescription dose (192.5 cGy-1925 cGy) being significant. No associations with maximum dose, volumes of lumpectomy cavity, breast, modified planning target volume, and PTV, dose homogeneity index, number of fields, and photon energy used were identified with any of the aforementioned toxicities. Non-upper outer quadrant location was associated with grade {>=}2 volume reduction (p = 0.02 W/p = 0.04 L). A small cavity-to-skin distance was associated with a grade {>=}2 induration (p = 0.03 W/p = 0.01 L), a borderline significant association with grade {>=}2 volume reduction (p = 0.06 W/p = 0.06 L) and poor-fair cosmesis (p = 0.08 W/p = 0.09 L), with threshold distances ranging from 5 to 8 mm. Conclusions: No dose--volume relationships associated with long-term toxicity were identified in this large patient cohort with extended follow-up. Cosmetic results were good-to-excellent in 88% of patients at 5 years.

  15. Reduced dose to small bowel with the prone position and a belly board versus the supine position in neoadjuvant 3D conformal radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    White, Rohen; Foroudi, Farshad; Sia, Joseph; Marr, Mary Ann; Lim Joon, Daryl

    2017-06-01

    No consensus exists regarding the optimal treatment setup for neoadjuvant radiotherapy of rectal cancer using a 3D conformal (3D CRT) technique. Positioning the patient prone with a belly board aims to reduce the amount of small bowel irradiated. Twenty-five patients with locally advanced rectal cancer underwent computed tomography (CT) planning for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Patients were simulated prone with a belly board and then in the supine position. Questionnaires rating the comfort of each position were completed. 3D CRT plans were generated for both positions to a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. Dose-volume parameters in 5 Gy increments for small bowel, large bowel and bladder wall were compared. Small bowel V5 Gy, V10 Gy, V15 Gy and V20 Gy values were significantly higher in the supine position (398, 366, 245, 151 cm(3) for supine vs. 243, 213, 161, 122 cm(3) for prone respectively; P < 0.001, <0.001, <0.001 and 0.025). Large bowel V5 Gy, V10 Gy and V15 Gy values were significantly higher in the supine position (266, 209, 147 cm(3) supine, 175, 139, 108 cm(3) prone respectively; P = 0.001, <0.001, 0.003). There was a significant difference in comfort scores favouring the supine position (P = 0.015). A significant increase in small and large bowel dose was seen in the supine plans. Treatment in the prone position with a belly board may reduce toxicity when using a 3D CRT technique. Whilst both setup positions were tolerable the supine was more comfortable. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  16. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Five-year results of a prospective phase II clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mózsa, Emöke; Mészáros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Fröhlich, Georgina; Stelczer, Gábor; Sulyok, Zoltán; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to report the 5-year results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2011, 44 patients with low-risk, stage I-II breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery. Postoperative APBI was given by means of 3D-CRT using three to five non-coplanar fields. The total dose of APBI was 36.9 Gy (nine fractions of 4.1 Gy b.i.d.). The mean follow-up time was 58.2 months for surviving patients. Survival results, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. One (2.3%) local recurrence was observed, for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.7%. Neither regional nor distant failure was observed. Two patients died of internal disease. The 5-year disease-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival rates were 96.3, 100, and 95.1%, respectively. Acute side effects included grade 1 (G1) erythema in 75%, G1 parenchymal induration in 46%, and G1 pain in 46% of patients. No G2 or higher acute side effect occurred. Late side effects included G1, G2, and G3 fibrosis in 44, 7, and 2% of patients, respectively, G1 skin pigmentation in 12%, and G1 pain in 2%. Asymptomatic fat necrosis occurred in 14%. Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 86% of cases by the patients themselves and 84% by the physicians. The 5-year local tumor control, toxicity profile, and cosmetic results of APBI delivered with external beam 3D-CRT are encouraging and comparable to other APBI series.

  17. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy for Management of Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas: Long-Term Outcomes of Tumor Control and Visual Function at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Kapoor, Sumit; Kharkar, Siddharth; Batra, Sachin; Jackson, Juan F.; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Miller, Neil R.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the long-term outcomes of patients treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCRT) for presumed optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2002, 9 patients with a presumed ONSM were treated with FCRT at our institution. The indications for FCRT were significant visual dysfunction at presentation, progression of visual dysfunction during a period of observation, tumor growth documented by sequential imaging, or a combination of these findings. In 2 patients, FCRT was performed as adjuvant therapy, and in 7, it was the initial and primary treatment. Results: Of the 9 patients, 6 were women and 3 were men, with a mean age of 47 years. All 9 patients had evidence of optic nerve dysfunction in the affected eye, characterized by reduced visual acuity, a visual field defect, and a relative afferent pupillary defect. In addition, 2 patients had proptosis and 1 had diplopia. The mean follow-up period was 98 {+-} 31.7 months (median, 90; range, 61-151). After FCRT, the visual function improved in the 7 patients who had undergone FCRT as the primary treatment. However, 2 patients who were blind in their affected eye at FCRT remained blind. In 4 of the 7 patients with improvement, the improvement was documented within 1-3 months after FCRT. The tumor control rate was 100%. Proptosis and diplopia also regressed in 100% of patients. At 2 years after FCRT, 1 patient had developed radiation retinopathy. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that FCRT is a safe and effective treatment of ONSMs, affording satisfactory long-term tumor control, good functional outcome, and low treatment morbidity. FCRT should be considered the treatment of choice for patients with presumed ONSMs for whom the treatment has been deemed appropriate.

  18. On-line estimations of delivered radiation doses in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatments of carcinoma uterine cervix patients in linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Putha, Suman Kumar; Saxena, P. U.; Banerjee, S.; Srinivas, Challapalli; Vadhiraja, B. M.; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Joan, Mary; Pai, K. Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of radiation fluence through patient's body has a correlation to the planned target dose. A method to estimate the delivered dose to target volumes was standardized using a beam level 0.6 cc ionization chamber (IC) positioned at electronic portal imaging device (EPID) plane from the measured transit signal (St) in patients with cancer of uterine cervix treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The IC with buildup cap was mounted on linear accelerator EPID frame with fixed source to chamber distance of 146.3 cm, using a locally fabricated mount. Sts were obtained for different water phantom thicknesses and radiation field sizes which were then used to generate a calibration table against calculated midplane doses at isocenter (Diso,TPS), derived from the treatment planning system. A code was developed using MATLAB software which was used to estimate the in vivo dose at isocenter (Diso,Transit) from the measured Sts. A locally fabricated pelvic phantom validated the estimations of Diso,Transit before implementing this method on actual patients. On-line dose estimations were made (3 times during treatment for each patient) in 24 patients. The Diso,Transit agreement with Diso,TPS in phantom was within 1.7% and the mean percentage deviation with standard deviation is −1.37% ±2.03% (n = 72) observed in patients. Estimated in vivo dose at isocenter with this method provides a good agreement with planned ones which can be implemented as part of quality assurance in pelvic sites treated with simple techniques, for example, 3DCRT where there is a need for documentation of planned dose delivery. PMID:28144114

  19. Can We Spare the Pancreas and Other Abdominal Organs at Risk? A Comparison of Conformal Radiotherapy, Helical Tomotherapy and Proton Beam Therapy in Pediatric Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Jouglar, Emmanuel; Wagner, Antoine; Delpon, Grégory; Campion, Loïc; Meingan, Philippe; Bernier, Valérie; Demoor-Goldschmidt, Charlotte; Mahé, Marc-André; Lacornerie, Thomas; Supiot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Late abdominal irradiation toxicity during childhood included renal damage, hepatic toxicity and secondary diabetes mellitus. We compared the potential of conformal radiotherapy (CRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and proton beam therapy (PBT) to spare the abdominal organs at risk (pancreas, kidneys and liver- OAR) in children undergoing abdominal irradiation. Methods We selected children with abdominal tumors who received more than 10 Gy to the abdomen. Treatment plans were calculated in order to keep the dose to abdominal OAR as low as possible while maintaining the same planned target volume (PTV) coverage. Dosimetric values were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results The dose distribution of 20 clinical cases with a median age of 8 years (range 1–14) were calculated with different doses to the PTV: 5 medulloblastomas (36 Gy), 3 left-sided and 2 right-sided nephroblastomas (14.4 Gy to the tumor + 10.8 Gy boost to para-aortic lymphnodes), 1 left-sided and 4 right-sided or midline neuroblastomas (21 Gy) and 5 Hodgkin lymphomas (19.8 Gy to the para-aortic lymphnodes and spleen). HT significantly reduced the mean dose to the whole pancreas (WP), the pancreatic tail (PT) and to the ipsilateral kidney compared to CRT. PBT reduced the mean dose to the WP and PT compared to both CRT and HT especially in midline and right-sided tumors. PBT decreased the mean dose to the ispilateral kidney but also to the contralateral kidney and the liver compared to CRT. Low dose to normal tissue was similar or increased with HT whereas integral dose and the volume of normal tissue receiving at least 5 and 10 Gy were reduced with PBT compared to CRT and HT. Conclusion In children undergoing abdominal irradiation therapy, proton beam therapy reduces the dose to abdominal OAR while sparing normal tissue by limiting low dose irradiation. PMID:27764132

  20. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio . E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Fucilli, Fulvio I.M.; Castagna, Roberta; Bambace, Santa; Pili, Giorgio; Tramacere, Francesco; Russo, Donatella; Francavilla, Maria Carmen

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 {+-} 4.82 Gy (51.53 {+-} 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia.

  1. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. . E-mail: patel@humonc.wisc.edu; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD{sub mean}) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value <0.05. The mean V100 was significantly lower for IB (12% vs. 15% for PT, 18% for ST, and 26% for 3D-CRT). A greater significant differential was seen when comparing V50 with mean values of 24%, 43%, 47%, and 52% for IB, PT, ST, and 3D-CRT, respectively. The IB and PT were similar and delivered an average lung NTD{sub mean} dose of 1.3 Gy{sub 3} and 1.2 Gy{sub 3}, respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals.

  2. SU-F-P-52: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Trials Comparing Elective Nodal Irradiation with Involved-Field Irradiation for Conformal Or Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Zhang, R; Zhou, Z; Qiao, X

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer by a metaanalysis. Methods: Wanfang, CNKI, VIP, CBM databases, PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched to identify the controlled clinical trials of elective nodal irradiation with involved-field irradiation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. The obtained data were analyzed using Stata 11.0. The difference between two groups was estimated by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Results: A total of 12 controlled clinical trials involving 1095 esophageal cancer patients, which were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the elective nodal irradiation group reduced the rates of out-field failure comparing with involved-field irradiation group (OR=3.727, P=0.007). However, the rates of ≥grades 3 acute radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were significantly higher in the elective nodal irradiation group than in the involved-field irradiation group (OR=0.348, P=0.001, OR=0.385, P=0.000). 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates (OR=0.966, P=0.837, OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732P=0.098) and 1-, 3-, 5-year survival rates were similar in the two groups ( OR=0.966, P=0.837; OR=0.946, P=0.781; OR=0.732, P=0.098; OR=0.952, P=0.756; OR=1.149, P=0.422; OR=0.768, P=0.120). It is the same with the rates of distant metastasis (OR=0.986, P=0.937). Conclusion: Compared with involved-field irradiation, the elective nodal irradiation can reduce the rates of out-field failure for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. However, its advantage of local control and survival rates is not obvious and it increases the incidence

  3. Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Lim, Young-Suk; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang; Lee, Sung Gyu; Park, Jin-hong; Suh, Dong Jin

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

  4. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  5. No differences in radiological changes after 3D conformal vs VMAT-based stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Badellino, Serena; Muzio, Jacopo Di; Schivazappa, Giulia; Guarneri, Alessia; Ragona, Riccardo; Bartoncini, Sara; Trino, Elisabetta; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Fonio, Paolo; Ricardi, Umberto

    2017-10-01

    To compare patterns of acute and late radiological lung injury following either 3D conformal or image-guided volumetric modulated arc therapy stereotactic radiotherapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. We included 148 patients from a prospective mono-institutional stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) series (time interval 2004-2014), treated with prescription BED10 Gy (at 80%) in the range 100-120 Gy. The first 95 patients (2004-2010) were planned with 3D-CRT, with a stereotactic body frame. The second cohort (2010-2014) included 53 patients, planned with volumetric IMRT on a smaller planning target volume generated from a patient's specific internal target volume, with a frameless approach through cone-beam CT guidance. Acute and late radiological modifications were scored based on modified Kimura's and Koenig's classifications, respectively. Median follow-up time was 20.5 months. The incidence of acute radiological changes was superimposable between the groups: increased density was observed in 68.4 and 64.2% of patients for 3D-CRT and VMAT, respectively, and patchy ground glass opacity in 23.7 and 24.5%, respectively; diffuse ground glass opacity was 2.6 vs 9.4%, respectively, and patchy consolidation 2.6 vs 1.9%, respectively. Late changes occurred in approximately 60% of patients: modified conventional pattern was the most frequent modification (25 vs 32.6%, respectively); other patterns were less common (mass-like 19.6 vs 17.4%, and scar-like 13 vs 10.9%, respectively). Results of the present study indicate that the pattern of radiological lung changes following SBRT for peripheral early stage non-small-cell lung cancer is not influenced by the different techniques used for planning and delivery. Advances in knowledge: This comparative observational study shows that smaller margins, image guidance and most importantly dose distribution do not change the pattern of radiological injury after lung SBRT; the same scoring system can be used, and

  6. 3-Dimensional Topographic Models for the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Stockman, S.; Frey, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently undertaken a program to develop educational tools using 3-dimensional solid models of digital elevation data acquired by the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) for Mars as well as a variety of sources for elevation data of the Earth. This work is made possible by the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct solid 3-Dimensional models of science data. We recently acquired rapid prototyping machine that builds 3-dimensional models in extruded plastic. While the machine was acquired to assist in the design and development of scientific instruments and hardware, it is also fully capable of producing models of spacecraft remote sensing data. We have demonstrated this by using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data and Earth based topographic data to produce extruded plastic topographic models which are visually appealing and instantly engage those who handle them.

  7. 3-Dimensional Topographic Models for the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Stockman, S.; Frey, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently undertaken a program to develop educational tools using 3-dimensional solid models of digital elevation data acquired by the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) for Mars as well as a variety of sources for elevation data of the Earth. This work is made possible by the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct solid 3-Dimensional models of science data. We recently acquired rapid prototyping machine that builds 3-dimensional models in extruded plastic. While the machine was acquired to assist in the design and development of scientific instruments and hardware, it is also fully capable of producing models of spacecraft remote sensing data. We have demonstrated this by using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data and Earth based topographic data to produce extruded plastic topographic models which are visually appealing and instantly engage those who handle them.

  8. Stereotactic linear accelerator radiotherapy for pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankama; Brada, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Last decade has seen important advances in radiotherapy technology which combine precise tumor localization with accurate targeted delivery of radiation. This technique of high precision conformal radiotherapy, described as stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery, uses modern linear accelerators available in most radiation oncology departments. The article describes the new technique as applied to the treatment of pituitary adenoma and reviews published clinical results.

  9. PT-06RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF HIGH-PRECISION CONFORMAL RADIATION THERAPY COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL RADIOTHERAPY IN PRESERVATION OF LONG-TERM NEURO-COGNITIVE OUTCOMES IN YOUNG PATIENTS WITH PROGRESSIVE OR RESIDUAL BENIGN/LOW-GRADE BRAIN TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Rakesh; Gupta, Tejpal; Goswami, Savita; Krishna, Uday; Dutta, Debnarayan; Deodhar, Joyita; Kannan, Sadhna; Sarin, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To report neuro-psychological outcomes in young patients with progressive benign and low-grade brain tumors treated with high-precision stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) versus conventional radiotherapy (Conv RT) (NCT00517959). METHODS: Between 2001-10, 200 patients (median age 13 years, commonest histology craniopraryngioma) were randomized to SCRT (n = 105; 6MV, non-coplanar fields using micromultileaf collimators) or Conv RT (n = 95; 6MV, 2-4 open fields) to 54 Gy/30 fractions. Neuropsychological battery included full-scale IQ (FSIQ), verbal quotient (VQ), performance quotient (PQ), memory quotient (MQ in patients > 16 years) by Wechsler scores, LOTCA battery and state-trait Anxiety Inventory and Hamilton Anxiety-Depression Scales. Serial evaluations were performed at baseline (pre-RT), 6-months and 2, 3, 4, and 5-years post-RT and analyzed using generalized linear-mixed model (GLMM). RESULTS: Pre- RT baseline revealed considerable proportion of patients with low intelligence in both arms indicating effects of tumor and prior treatments. GLMM for repeated measures demonstrated significantly better preservation of FSIQ over time in SCRT versus Conv RT arm at 3 years (p = 0.0003) and 5 years (p = 0.012). There was significantly better preservation of VQ (age < 16 years) (p = 0.047) and MQ (age > 16 years) (p = 0.049) in SCRT than Conv RT arm. Anxiety scores between two arms was not significant at 5 years but mean depression scores at 5 years in age group <16 years was found significantly higher in Conv RT arm (p = 0.01). Patients in Conv RT also had significantly more neurocognitive decline in LOTCA battery at 5 years (p = 0.019), particularly in visuomotor organization and attention-concentration domains. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate high-precision conformal radiotherapy superior to conventional radiotherapy in preservation of neuropsychological functions in young patients with benign/low grade brain tumors. This is among few trials generating

  10. 3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions

    DOEpatents

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2010-03-09

    An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

  11. Intensity-Modulated and 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Whole-Ventricular Irradiation as Compared With Conventional Whole-Brain Irradiation in the Management of Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva Santos, Adriana da; Sakuraba, Roberto Kenji; Lopes, Cleverson Perceu; Goncalves, Vinicius Demanboro; Weltman, Eduardo; Ferrigno, Robson; Cruz, Jose Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluated at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.

  12. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy for patients with single and no more than three metastatic brain tumors, with noninvasive fixation of the skull without whole brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Masahiko . E-mail: maoki-rad@umin.ac.jp; Abe, Yoshinao; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kondo, Hidehiro; Basaki, Kiyoshi

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy (HCCRT) with noninvasive fixation of the skull on patients with single or several brain metastases. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 44 patients who had three or fewer brain metastases (26 solitary, 18 multiple). Treatment was conducted on 65 metastases by rotational conformal beam or multiple fixed coplanar beams with a standard linear accelerator. The planning target volume consisted of the tumor and a 1-cm safety margin. The median isocentric dose was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in 3-5 fractions. Whole-brain irradiation was not applied as an initial treatment. Results: Actuarial local tumor control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 78.4% and 71.9%, respectively. In-field recurrence was noted in 10 of 65 tumors, and repeat HCCRT was applied in 5 tumors. Actuarial overall survival rates at 1 year, 2 years, and the median survival time were 50.8%, 24.1%, and 5.8 months, respectively. The patients with an active primary cancer and poor performance status had a poorer prognosis than those without those factors. Actuarial freedom from second brain metastases rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 86.6%, 69.0%, and 40.9%, respectively. Second brain metastases were observed in 9 of 44 patients. Lung adenocarcinomas had a higher risk of second brain metastasis than others. Treatment-related severe early or late complications were not observed in this series. Conclusions: Hypofractionated conventional conformation radiotherapy achieved sufficient tumor control and survival. The results suggest that HCCRT would be one of the alternatives for patients with either solitary or several brain metastases.

  13. 3-dimensional fabrication of soft energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas; Walters, Peter; Rossiter, Jonathan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Anderson, Iain

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEG) provide an opportunity to harvest energy from low frequency and aperiodic sources. Because DEG are soft, deformable, high energy density generators, they can be coupled to complex structures such as the human body to harvest excess mechanical energy. However, DEG are typically constrained by a rigid frame and manufactured in a simple planar structure. This planar arrangement is unlikely to be optimal for harvesting from compliant and/or complex structures. In this paper we present a soft generator which is fabricated into a 3 Dimensional geometry. This capability will enable the 3-dimensional structure of a dielectric elastomer to be customised to the energy source, allowing efficient and/or non-invasive coupling. This paper demonstrates our first 3 dimensional generator which includes a diaphragm with a soft elastomer frame. When the generator was connected to a self-priming circuit and cyclically inflated, energy was accumulated in the system, demonstrated by an increased voltage. Our 3D generator promises a bright future for dielectric elastomers that will be customised for integration with complex and soft structures. In addition to customisable geometries, the 3D printing process may lend itself to fabricating large arrays of small generator units and for fabricating truly soft generators with excellent impedance matching to biological tissue. Thus comfortable, wearable energy harvesters are one step closer to reality.

  14. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to assess the efficacy of tadalafil (Cialis[reg]) in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Incrocci, Luca . E-mail: l.incrocci@erasmusmc.nl; Slagter, Cleo; Slob, A. Koos; Hop, Wim C.J.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (3DCRT) for prostatic carcinoma is reported in as many as 64% of those patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the oral drug tadalafil (Cialis (registered) ) in patients with erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 358) who completed radiotherapy at least 12 months before the study were approached by mail. All patients had been treated by 3DCRT; 60 patients were included and entered a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study lasting 12 weeks. They received 20 mg of tadalafil or placebo for 6 weeks. Drug or placebo was taken on demand at patient's discretion, with no restrictions regarding the consumption of alcohol or food, at least once a week and no more than once daily. At 6 weeks patients crossed over to the alternative treatment. Data were collected using the Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaires. Side effects were also recorded. Results: Mean age at study entry was 69 years. All patients completed the study. For almost all questions of the IIEF questionnaire there was a significant increase in mean scores from baseline with tadalafil, but not with placebo. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported an improvement of erectile function with tadalafil (placebo: 20%), and 48% reported successful intercourse with tadalafil (placebo: 9%) (p < 0.0001). Side effects were mild or moderate. Conclusions: Tadalafil is an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction after 3DCRT for prostatic carcinoma with successful intercourse reported in almost 50% of the patients, and it is well tolerated.

  15. Feasibility and efficacy of high-dose three-dimensional-conformal radiotherapy in cirrhotic patients with small-size hepatocellular carcinoma non-eligible for curative therapies-mature results of the French Phase II RTF-1 trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mornex, Francoise . E-mail: francoise.mornex@chu-lyon.fr; Girard, Nicolas; Beziat, Christophe; Kubas, Abdul; Khodri, Mustapha; Trepo, Christian; Merle, Philippe

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a poor prognosis tumor, and only 20% of patients will benefit from curative therapies (surgery, liver transplantation, percutaneous ablation). Although conventional radiotherapy has been traditionally regarded as inefficient and toxic for cirrhotic patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) has provided promising preliminary data for the treatment of HCC. Methods and Materials: Prospective phase II trial including Child-Pugh A/B cirrhotic patients with small-size HCC (1 nodule {<=}5 cm, or 2 nodules {<=}3 cm) nonsuitable for curative treatments, to assess tolerance and efficacy of high-dose (66 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) 3DCRT. Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. Among the 25 assessable patients, tumor response was observed for 23 patients (92%), with complete response for 20 patients (80%), and partial response for 3 patients (12%). Stable disease was observed in 2 patients (8%). Grade 4 toxicities occurred in 2 of 11 (22%) Child-Pugh B patients only. Child-Pugh A patients tolerated treatment well, and 3/16 (19%) developed asymptomatic Grade 3 toxicities. Conclusion: High-dose 3DCRT is a noninvasive, well-tolerated modality that is highly suitable for the treatment of small HCCs in cirrhotic patients, with promising results. However, additional trials are needed to optimize this technique and formally compare it with the usual curative approaches.

  16. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  17. Axillary Irradiation with High Tangent Fields for Clinically Node-Negative Breast Cancer: Can 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy with a Field-in-Field Technique Better Control the Axilla?

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Amemiya, Atsushi; Ofuchi, Toru; Ono, Masato; Ogata, Haruki; Yamagami, Ryo; Hatayama, Jun; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-10-01

    The target volume for postoperative breast irradiation is the remaining breast tissue, and the axillary region is not an intentional target volume. Between 2001 and 2009, eligible women with pT1-2cN0/pN0(sn) breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy without axillary dissection. Treatment outcomes between 2 radiotherapy planning groups, high tangent fields with 2-dimensional (2-D) simulation-based planning and 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography-based planning with a field-in-field technique, were compared. The correlating factors for axillary failure were also calculated. In total, 678 patients were eligible. As of May 2009, the median follow-up times for the 2-D (n = 346) and 3-D (n = 332) groups were 94 and 52 months, respectively. Patient characteristics were balanced, except for a younger population in the 2-D group and more lymphovascular invasion in the 3-D group. On multivariate analysis, 2-D planning was the only risk factor for axillary failure. In the 2-D and 3-D groups, the 5-year cumulative incidences of axillary failure were 8 (3.1%) and 1 (0.3%) (log-rank p = 0.009), respectively. The respective 5-year overall survival rates were 97.4 and 98.4% (p = 0.4). High tangent irradiation with 3-D planning improved axillary control compared to that with 2-D planning, suggesting that optimizing axillary dose distribution may impact outcomes.

  18. Hydroelectric structures studies using 3-dimensional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, T.R.; Jones, G.V.; Toner, C.K. )

    1989-01-01

    Deterioration and degradation of aged, hydroelectric project structures can significantly affect the operation and safety of a project. In many cases, hydroelectric headworks (in particular) have complicated geometrical configurations, loading patterns and hence, stress conditions. An accurate study of such structures can be performed using 3-dimensional computer models. 3-D computer models can be used for both stability evaluation and for finite element stress analysis. Computer aided engineering processes facilitate the use of 3-D methods in both pre-processing and post-processing of data. Two actual project examples are used to emphasize the authors' points.

  19. Preservation of memory with conformal avoidance of the hippocampal neural stem-cell compartment during whole-brain radiotherapy for brain metastases (RTOG 0933): a phase II multi-institutional trial.

    PubMed

    Gondi, Vinai; Pugh, Stephanie L; Tome, Wolfgang A; Caine, Chip; Corn, Ben; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey N; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Shah, Sunjay; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa; Mehta, Minesh P

    2014-12-01

    Hippocampal neural stem-cell injury during whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) may play a role in memory decline. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy can be used to avoid conformally the hippocampal neural stem-cell compartment during WBRT (HA-WBRT). RTOG 0933 was a single-arm phase II study of HA-WBRT for brain metastases with prespecified comparison with a historical control of patients treated with WBRT without hippocampal avoidance. Eligible adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Standardized cognitive function and quality-of-life (QOL) assessments were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 6 months. The primary end point was the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 4 months. The historical control demonstrated a 30% mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months. To detect a mean relative decline ≤ 15% in HVLT-R DR after HA-WBRT, 51 analyzable patients were required to ensure 80% statistical power with α = 0.05. Of 113 patients accrued from March 2011 through November 2012, 42 patients were analyzable at 4 months. Mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months was 7.0% (95% CI, -4.7% to 18.7%), significantly lower in comparison with the historical control (P < .001). No decline in QOL scores was observed. Two grade 3 toxicities and no grade 4 to 5 toxicities were reported. Median survival was 6.8 months. Conformal avoidance of the hippocampus during WBRT is associated with preservation of memory and QOL as compared with historical series. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and systemic interferon-α for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in combination with or without three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to venous tumor thrombosis in hepatic vein or inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Eisuke; Aikata, Hiroshi; Miyaki, Daisuke; Nagaoki, Yuko; Katamura, Yoshio; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Takaki, Shintaro; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Kimura, Tomoki; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nagata, Yasushi; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Awai, Kazuo; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2012-05-01

      We investigated the efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and systemic interferon (IFN)-α (HAIC-5-FU/IFN) for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with venous tumor thrombosis (VTT) in the hepatic vein trunk (Vv2) or inferior vena cava (Vv3).   Thirty-three patients with HCC/Vv2/3 underwent HAIC with 5-FU (500 mg/body weight/day, into hepatic artery on days 1-5 on the first and second weeks) and IFN-α (recombinant IFN-α-2b 3 000 000 U or natural IFN-α 5 000 000 U, intramuscularly on days 1, 3 and 5 of each week). Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) was used in combination with HAIC-5-FU/IFN in 14 of 33 patients to reduce VTT.   The median survival time (MST) was 7.9 months, and 1- and 2-year survival rates were 30% and 20%, respectively. Evaluation of intrahepatic response after two cycles of HAIC-5-FU/IFN showed complete response (CR) in three (9%) and partial response (PR) in seven (21%), with an objective response rate of 30%. Multivariate analysis identified reduction of VTT (P = 0.0006), size of largest tumor (P = 0.013) and intrahepatic response CR/PR (P = 0.030) as determinants of survival. CR/PR correlated significantly with tumor liver occupying rate (P = 0.016) and hepatitis C virus Ab (P = 0.010). Reduction of VTT correlated significantly with radiotherapy (P = 0.021) and platelet count (P = 0.015). Radiotherapy-related reduction in VTT significantly improved survival of 16 patients with Vv3 and non-CR/PR response of HAIC-5-FU/IFN (P = 0.028).   As for advanced HCC with VTT of Vv2/3, HAIC-5-FU/IFN responsive patients could obtain favorable survival. Despite ineffective HAIC-5-FU/IFN, the combination with effective radiotherapy to VTT might improve patients' prognosis. © 2011 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  1. Phase II Trial of Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Bevacizumab in Combination With Attenuated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Rademaker, Alfred; Bentrem, David J.; Benson, Al B.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Talamonti, Mark S.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate response rate, survival, and toxicity in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients received three cycles of therapy over 10 weeks. In total, treatment consisted of intravenous (IV) gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}, every 1 to 2 weeks (7 doses), IV bevacizumab, 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks (5 doses), and 36 Gy of radiotherapy (2.4-Gy fractions during cycle two). Response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels. Patients with resectable tumors underwent surgery 6 to 8 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Maintenance gemcitabine and bevacizumab doses were delivered to patients who had unresected tumors and no progression. Results: Twenty-eight of the 32 enrolled patients completed all three cycles. The median follow-up was 11.07 months. Most grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in the initial treatment phase; the most frequent toxicities were leukopenia (21%), neutropenia (17%), and nausea (17%). At week 10, 1 patient (4%) had a complete response, 2 patients (7%) had partial responses, 21 patients (75%) had stable disease, and 4 patients (14%) had progressive disease. The median pretreatment and posttreatment CA 19-9 levels (25 patients) were 184.3 and 57.9 U/ml, respectively (p = 0.0006). One of 10 patients proceeding to surgery experienced a major complication. Two of 6 patients undergoing resection had complete pathologic responses. The median progression-free and overall survival durations were 9.9 months and 11.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: The combination of full-dose gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy was active and was not associated with a high rate of major surgical complications.

  2. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds.

  3. Labial morphology: a 3-dimensional anthropometric study.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Rosati, Riccardo; Peretta, Redento; Dellavia, Claudia; Sforza, Chiarella

    2009-09-01

    To develop a noninvasive 3-dimensional method to evaluate labial morphology and to assess gender-related differences in healthy young adults. Dental and lip impressions of 11 men and 10 women aged 21 to 34 years, with sound, full, permanent dentition were obtained. The models were digitized and 3-dimensional virtual reproductions obtained. The labial thickness, vermilion area, and volume of the upper and lower lips were measured from the digital reconstructions. The male and female data were compared using Student's t test. The mean lip thickness was significantly larger (P = .02) in men (14.3 mm) than in women (12.3 mm). The lower lip was thicker than the upper lip. The vermilion width was larger in men (75 mm) than in women (70 mm), and no differences were found for vermilion height (10 mm). In the upper lip, the height/width ratio was significantly larger in women (14.1%) than in men (12.3%). The vermilion surface area was slightly larger in men than in women (upper lip area: women, 467 mm(2); men, 501 mm(2); lower lip area: women, 491 mm(2); men, 569 mm(2)). The labial volume was significantly larger in men (upper lip, 2,390 mm(3); lower lip, 2,902 mm(3)) than in women (upper lip, 1,743 mm(3); lower lip, 1,764 mm(3); P = .021). The upper/lower lip area and volume ratios were similar in the 2 genders. Overall, men had larger lips than women. The inferior lip height/width ratio was similar in both genders, and men had a relatively thinner upper lip than women.

  4. Classification of (n+3)-dimensional metric n-Lie algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Qiaozhi; Ren Mingming; Chen Zhiqi

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we focus on (n+3)-dimensional metric n-Lie algebras. To begin with, we give some properties on (n+3)-dimensional n-Lie algebras. Then based on the properties, we obtain the classification of (n+3)-dimensional metric n-Lie algebras.

  5. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  6. Consequences of Anatomic Changes and Respiratory Motion on Radiation Dose Distributions in Conformal Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, Keith R. Starkschall, George; Liu, Helen; Chang, Joe Y.; Bilton, Stephen; Ezhil, Muthuveni; John-Baptiste, Sandra C.; Kantor, Michael; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Mohan, Radhe

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of interfractional changes in anatomy on the target and normal tissue dose distributions during course of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Weekly respiration-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 10 patients. Original beam arrangements from conventional and inverse treatment plans were transferred into each of the weekly four-dimensional computed tomography data sets, and the dose distributions were recalculated. Dosimetric changes to the target volumes and relevant normal structures relative to the baseline treatment plans were analyzed by dose-volume histograms. Results: The overall difference in the mean {+-} standard deviation of the doses to 95% of the planning target volume and internal target volume between the initial and weekly treatment plans was -11.9% {+-} 12.1% and -2.5% {+-} 3.9%, respectively. The mean {+-} standard deviation change in the internal target volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose was -2.3% {+-} 4.1%. The overall differences in the mean {+-} standard deviation between the initial and weekly treatment plans was 3.1% {+-} 6.8% for the total lung volume exceeding 20 Gy, 2.2% {+-} 4.8% for mean total lung dose, and 34.3% {+-} 43.0% for the spinal cord maximal dose. Conclusion: Serial four-dimensional computed tomography scans provided useful anatomic information and dosimetric changes during radiotherapy. Although the observed dosimetric variations were small, on average, the interfractional changes in tumor volume, mobility, and patient setup was sometimes associated with dramatic dosimetric consequences. Therefore, for locally advanced lung cancer patients, efforts to include image-guided treatment and to perform repeated imaging during the treatment course are recommended.

  7. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  8. The GOFURTGO Study: AGITG Phase II Study of fixed dose rate gemcitabine–oxaliplatin integrated with concomitant 5FU and 3-D conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of localised pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D; Spry, N; Cummins, M M; Brown, C; van Hazel, G A; Carroll, S; Selva-Nayagam, S; Borg, M; Ackland, S P; Wratten, C; Shapiro, J; Porter, I W T; Hruby, G; Horvath, L; Bydder, S; Underhill, C; Harvey, J; Gebski, V J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Locally advanced inoperable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) has a poor prognosis. By increasing intensity of systemic therapy combined with an established safe chemoradiation technique, our intention was to enhance the outcomes of LAPC. In preparation for phase III evaluation, the feasibility and efficacy of our candidate regimen gemcitabine–oxaliplatin chemotherapy with sandwich 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) needs to be established. Methods: A total of 48 patients with inoperable LAPC without metastases were given gemcitabine (1000 mg m−2 d1 + d15 q28) and oxaliplatin (100 mg m−2 d2 + d16 q28) in induction (one cycle) and consolidation (three cycles), and 5FU 200 mg m−2 per day over 6 weeks during 3DCRT 54 Gy. Results: Median duration of sustained local control (LC) was 15.8 months, progression-free survival (PFS) was 11.0 months, and overall survival was 15.7 months. Survival rates for 1, 2, and 3 years were 70.2%, 21.3%, and 12.8%, respectively. Global quality of life did not significantly decline from baseline during treatment, which was associated with modest treatment-related toxicity. Conclusion: Fixed-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, combined with an effective and safe regimen of 5FU and 3DCRT radiotherapy, was feasible and reasonably tolerated. The observed improved duration of LC and PFS with more intensive therapy over previous trials may be due to patient selection, but suggest that further evaluation in phase III trials is warranted. PMID:22134511

  9. Evolution of radiation techniques in the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma: from 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) using helical tomotherapy (HT): a single-centre experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Nadia; Pernin, Victor; Zefkili, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate radiation techniques and their toxicity in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with mediastinal disease over a 10-year period. Methods: Between 2003 and 2015, 173 patients with Stage I–III nodal lymphoma were treated in our institution: some of these patients were irradiated for HL or NHL with mediastinal disease. Some of the patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), others by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Results: We studied 26 males and 43 females with a median age of 26 years. The median follow-up was 43 months. 49 patients were treated by 3DCRT and 20 patients by IMRT. The median dose received by patients treated for NHL was 40 Gy (range: 36–44 Gy), and the median dose received by patients with HL was 30 Gy (range: 30–36 Gy). Between 2003 and 2006, 16 patients were treated by 3DCRT vs 0 patients by IMRT. Between 2007 and 2009, 16 patients received 3DCRT and one patient received IMRT. Between 2010 and 2015, 19 patients received IMRT, and no patients received 3DCRT. 11 of the 20 (55%) patients treated by IMRT and 35 of the 49 (71.4%) patients treated by 3DCRT experienced acute toxicity. Among the patients treated by 3DCRT, one patient experienced Grade 1 radiation pneumonitis and two patients experienced Grade 1 acute mucositis. No late toxicity was observed in patients treated by IMRT. Conclusion: Improvement of radiation techniques for HL and NHL appears to have improved acute and late clinical safety. Longer follow-up is necessary to evaluate very late toxicity. Advances in knowledge: Improvement of radiation techniques for HL and NHL appears to improve the tolerance. PMID:26744079

  10. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  11. The GOFURTGO Study: AGITG phase II study of fixed dose rate gemcitabine-oxaliplatin integrated with concomitant 5FU and 3-D conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of localised pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D; Spry, N; Cummins, M M; Brown, C; van Hazel, G A; Carroll, S; Selva-Nayagam, S; Borg, M; Ackland, S P; Wratten, C; Shapiro, J; Porter, I W T; Hruby, G; Horvath, L; Bydder, S; Underhill, C; Harvey, J; Gebski, V J

    2012-01-03

    Locally advanced inoperable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) has a poor prognosis. By increasing intensity of systemic therapy combined with an established safe chemoradiation technique, our intention was to enhance the outcomes of LAPC. In preparation for phase III evaluation, the feasibility and efficacy of our candidate regimen gemcitabine-oxaliplatin chemotherapy with sandwich 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) needs to be established. A total of 48 patients with inoperable LAPC without metastases were given gemcitabine (1000 mg m(-2) d1 + d15 q28) and oxaliplatin (100 mg m(-2) d2 + d16 q28) in induction (one cycle) and consolidation (three cycles), and 5FU 200 mg m(-2) per day over 6 weeks during 3DCRT 54 Gy. Median duration of sustained local control (LC) was 15.8 months, progression-free survival (PFS) was 11.0 months, and overall survival was 15.7 months. Survival rates for 1, 2, and 3 years were 70.2%, 21.3%, and 12.8%, respectively. Global quality of life did not significantly decline from baseline during treatment, which was associated with modest treatment-related toxicity. Fixed-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, combined with an effective and safe regimen of 5FU and 3DCRT radiotherapy, was feasible and reasonably tolerated. The observed improved duration of LC and PFS with more intensive therapy over previous trials may be due to patient selection, but suggest that further evaluation in phase III trials is warranted.

  12. Conformity index: a review.

    PubMed

    Feuvret, Loïc; Noël, Georges; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Bey, Pierre

    2006-02-01

    We present a critical analysis of the conformity indices described in the literature and an evaluation of their field of application. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with or without intensity modulation, is based on medical imaging techniques, three-dimensional dosimetry software, compression accessories, and verification procedures. It consists of delineating target volumes and critical healthy tissues to select the best combination of beams. This approach allows better adaptation of the isodose to the tumor volume, while limiting irradiation of healthy tissues. Tools must be developed to evaluate the quality of proposed treatment plans. Dosimetry software provides the dose distribution in each CT section and dose-volume histograms without really indicating the degree of conformity. The conformity index is a complementary tool that attributes a score to a treatment plan or that can compare several treatment plans for the same patient. The future of conformal index in everyday practice therefore remains unclear.

  13. Conformity index: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Feuvret, Loic . E-mail: loic.feuvret@cpo.curie.net; Noel, Georges; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Bey, Pierre

    2006-02-01

    We present a critical analysis of the conformity indices described in the literature and an evaluation of their field of application. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with or without intensity modulation, is based on medical imaging techniques, three-dimensional dosimetry software, compression accessories, and verification procedures. It consists of delineating target volumes and critical healthy tissues to select the best combination of beams. This approach allows better adaptation of the isodose to the tumor volume, while limiting irradiation of healthy tissues. Tools must be developed to evaluate the quality of proposed treatment plans. Dosimetry software provides the dose distribution in each CT section and dose-volume histograms without really indicating the degree of conformity. The conformity index is a complementary tool that attributes a score to a treatment plan or that can compare several treatment plans for the same patient. The future of conformal index in everyday practice therefore remains unclear.

  14. Clinical applications of 3-dimensional printing in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yizhou; Moran, Kathryn; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Allan, James; Clarke, Scott; Rajaraman, Murali; Wilke, Derek; Joseph, Paul; Robar, James L

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is suitable for the fabrication of complex radiotherapy bolus. Although investigated from dosimetric and feasibility standpoints, there are few reports to date of its use for actual patient treatment. This study illustrates the versatile applications of 3D printing in clinical radiation oncology through a selection of patient cases, namely, to create bolus for photon and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), as well as applicators for surface high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Photon boluses were 3D-printed to treat a recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the nasal septum and a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the posterior pinna. For a patient with a mycosis fungoides involving the upper face, a 3D-printed MERT bolus was used. To treat an SCC of the nose, a 3D-printed applicator for surface brachytherapy was made. The structures' fit to the anatomy and the radiotherapy treatment plans were assessed. Based on the treatment planning computed tomography (CT), the size of the largest air gap at the interface of the 3D-printed structure was 3 mm for the SCC of the nasal septum, 3 mm for the BCC of the pinna, 2 mm for the mycosis fungoides of the face, and 2 mm for the SCC of the nose. Acceptable treatment plans were obtained for the SCC of the nasal septum (95% isodose to 99.8% of planning target volume [PTV]), the BCC of the pinna (95% isodose to 97.7% of PTV), and the mycosis fungoides of the face (90% isodose to 92.5% of PTV). For the latter, compared with a plan with a uniform thickness bolus, the one featuring the MERT bolus achieved relative sparing of all the organs at risk (OARs) distal to the target volume, while maintaining similar target volume coverage. The surface brachytherapy plan for the SCC of the nose had adequate coverage (95% isodose to 95.6% of clinical target volume [CTV]), but a relatively high dose to the left eye, owing to its proximity to the tumor. 3D printing can be implemented effectively in the

  15. Phase II Trial of Radiation Dose Escalation With Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression in Unfavorable Prostate Cancer: Feasibility Report

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, Jeanette; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Galan, Carlos; Teijeira, Mercedes; Romero, Pilar; Zudaire, Javier; Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Aristu, Jose Javier; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist-based androgen suppressive therapy (AST) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for high-risk (HRPC) or very-high-risk prostate cancer (VHRPC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and October 2006, 134 patients (median age, 70 years) with either National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria-defined HRPC (n = 47, 35.1%) or VHRPC (n = 87, 64.9%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 14.6 ng/mL, a median clinical stage of T2c, and a median Gleason score of 7. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (54 Gy in 30 fractions) was followed by HDR brachytherapy (19 Gy in 4 b.i.d. treatments). Androgen suppressive therapy started 0-3 months before three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and continued for 2 years. Results: One implant was repositioned with a new procedure (0.7%). Five patients (3.7%) discontinued AST at a median of 13 months (range, 6-18 months) because of disease progression (n = 1), hot flashes (n = 2), fatigue (n = 1), and impotence (n = 1). After a median follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 24-90 months), the highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late urinary toxicities were Grade 0 in 47.8%, Grade 1 in 38.1%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 6.7% of patients. Maximal late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 0 in 73.1%, Grade 1 in 16.4%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 2.9% of patients. There were no Grade 4 or 5 events. Conclusions: Intermediate-term results show that dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy combined with long-term AST is feasible and has a toxicity profile similar to that reported by previous HDR brachytherapy studies.

  16. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial;Prostate cancer; Dose escalation; Conformal radiotherapy; Randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Bougnoux, Agnes; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdain, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal; Hay, Men; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a

  17. Topological entropy and renormalization group flow in 3-dimensional spherical spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Beneventano, C. G.; Cavero-Peláez, I.; D'Ascanio, D.; Santangelo, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the renormalization group (RG) flow of the temperature independent term of the entropy in the high temperature limit β/a ≪ 1 of a massive field theory in 3-dimensional spherical spaces, M 3, with constant curvature 6 /a 2. For masses lower than , this term can be identified with the free energy of the same theory on M 3 considered as a 3-dimensional Euclidean space-time. The non-extensive part of this free energy, S hol, is generated by the holonomy of the spatial metric connection. We show that for homogeneous spherical spaces the holonomy entropy S hol decreases monotonically when the RG scale flows to the infrared. At the conformal fixed points the values of the holonomy entropy do coincide with the genuine topological entropies recently introduced. The monotonic behavior of the RG flow leads to an inequality between the topological entropies of the conformal field theories connected by such flow, i.e. S {top/ UV } > S {top/ IR }. From a 3-dimensional viewpoint the same term arises in the 3-dimensional Euclidean effective action and has the same monotonic behavior under the RG group flow. We conjecture that such monotonic behavior is generic, which would give rise to a 3-dimensional generalization of the c-theorem, along the lines of the 2-dimensional c-theorem and the 4-dimensional a-theorem. The conjecture is related to recent formulations of the F -theorem. In particular, the holonomy entropy on lens spaces is directly related to the topological Rényi entanglement entropy on disks of 2-dimensional flat spaces.

  18. [Radiotherapy of a glioma in a pregnant woman: evaluation of the foetal dose in conformational 3D or intensity-modulated].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, L; Doyeux, K; Linca, S; Challand, T; Hanzen, C

    2014-12-01

    The purpose was to assess three treatments planning techniques including one in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cerebral irradiation of pregnant woman, in order to limit the dose delivered to the foetus. The treatment provided was 60 Gy to the planning target volume. Estimated foetal dose was measured using an anthropomorphic phantom, on the upper and middle part of the uterus. The first plan consisted in four beams in conformational technique delivered from a Varian accelerator with a 120 leaves collimator, the second one used non-coplanar fields and the third one assessed IMRT. With the conformational technique, the dose at the upper part of the uterus was 8.3 mGy and 6.3 mGy at the middle part. The dose delivered to the foetus was higher with the non-coplanar fields. In IMRT, the dose at the upper part of the uterus was 23.8 mGy and 14.3 mGy at the middle part. The three plans used 6 MV X-rays. Because of the use of leaves and non-coplanar fields, IMRT does not seem to be the optimal technique for the treatment of pregnant woman. However, the dose delivered to the foetus remains low and below the dose of 100 mGy recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection. It seems possible to consider the use of this technique for a better sparing of organs at risk for the mother.

  19. Infants’ Representations of 3-Dimensional Occluded Objects

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Rebecca J.; Wilcox, Teresa; Armstrong, Jennifer; Alexander, Gerianne

    2012-01-01

    Infants’ ability to represent objects has received significant attention from the developmental research community. With the advent of eye-tracking technology, detailed analysis of infants’ looking patterns during object occlusion have revealed much about the nature of infants’ representations. The current study continues this research by analyzing infants’ looking patterns in a novel manner and by comparing infants’ looking at a simple display in which a single 3-dimensional (3-D) object moves along a continuous trajectory to a more complex display in which two 3-D objects undergo trajectories that are interrupted behind an occluder. Six-month-old infants saw an occlusion sequence in which a ball moved along a linear path, disappeared behind a rectangular screen, and then a ball (ball-ball event) or a box (ball-box event) emerged at the other edge. An eye-tracking system recorded infants’ eye-movements during the event sequence. Results from examination of infants’ attention to the occluder indicate that during the occlusion interval infants looked longer to the side of the occluder behind which the moving occluded object was located, shifting gaze from one side of the occluder to the other as the object(s) moved behind the screen. Furthermore, when events included two objects, infants attended to the spatiotemporal coordinates of the objects longer than when a single object was involved. These results provide clear evidence that infants’ visual tracking is different in response to a one-object display than to a two-object display. Furthermore, this finding suggests that infants may require more focused attention to the hidden position of objects in more complex multiple-object displays and provides additional evidence that infants represent the spatial location of moving occluded objects. PMID:20926138

  20. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3-dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Steigner, Michael L; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    Medical 3-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D-printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced preoperative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases and valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing perioperative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality.

  1. Radiation-induced fibrosis in the boost area after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost technique for early-stage breast cancer: A multivariable prediction model.

    PubMed

    Hammer, C; Maduro, J H; Bantema-Joppe, E J; van der Schaaf, A; van der Laan, H P; Langendijk, J A; Crijns, A P G

    2017-01-01

    To develop a multivariable prediction model for the risk of grade⩾2 fibrosis in the boost area after breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT) with a simultaneous integrated photon boost (3D-CRT-SIB), five years after RT. This prospective cohort study included 1,030 patients treated with RT for breast cancer (stage 0-III), after BCS. Data regarding physician-rated fibrosis and dose-volume parameters were available in 546 patients. A multivariable logistic regression model for grade⩾2 fibrosis was generated. At 5years, grade⩾2 fibrosis was observed in 13.4% of the patients. The multivariable analysis resulted in a prediction model for grade⩾2 fibrosis in the boost area including three independent variables: patient age, breast volume receiving⩾55Gy (V55 CTV breast) and the maximum radiation dose in the breast (Dmax). A multivariable prediction model was developed including age, V55 CTV breast and Dmax for grade⩾2 fibrosis in the boost area after breast cancer RT using a 3D-CRT-SIB technique. This model can be used to estimate the risk of fibrosis and to optimize dose distributions aiming at reducing this risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  3. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles.

    PubMed

    Cevidanes, Lucia H S; Ruellas, Antonio C O; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this article are to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article's online version for viewing and downloading using the reader's software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader's software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. When submitting manuscripts, authors can now upload 3D models that will allow readers to

  4. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Ruellasa, Antonio C. O.; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this article were to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Methods Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. Results All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article’s online version for viewing and downloading using the reader’s software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader’s software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. Conclusions When submitting manuscripts, authors can

  5. Lung reexpansion of obstructive atelectasis caused by radiotherapy after continuous gefitinib treatment in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xueqin; Xu, Mingfang; Xiong, Yanli; Peng, Bo

    2015-01-01

    A 75-year-old male was diagnosed with central squamous cell carcinoma of the left lung, who has been given 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of total dose with 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Three years later, the tumor relapsed in situ and he received another stereotactic radiotherapy with a total dose of 40 Gy at a margin of planning target volume (PTV) in 10 (5 fractions/week) at 4 Gy/fraction. Gefitinib (250 mg/day) was initiated immediately after radiotherapy. Obstructive atelectasis in the left lung and increased pleural effusion occurred at the fourth month after radiotherapy. As this patient has been detected with deletion in exon 19 of the EGFR gene, gefitinib was continuous administered without interruption. After another 4 months, the atelectasis in the left lung reexpanded significantly. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI) reversed the radiation atelectasis of pulmonary in the nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient.

  6. Lithographically defined 3-dimensional graphene scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Polsky, Ronen

    2015-09-01

    Interferometrically defined 3D photoresist scaffolds are formed through a series of three successive two-beam interference exposures, a post exposure bake and development. Heating the resist scaffold in a reducing atmosphere to > 1000 °C, results in the conversion of the resist structure into a carbon scaffold through pyrolysis, resulting in a 3D sp3- bonded glassy carbon scaffold which maintains the same in-plane morphology as the resist despite significant shrinkage. The carbon scaffolds are readily modified using a variety of deposition methods such as electrochemical, sputtering and CVD/ALD. Remarkably, sputtering metal into scaffolds with ~ 5 unit cells tall results in conformal coating of the scaffold with the metal. When the metal is a transition metal such as nickel, the scaffold can be re-annealed, during which time the carbon diffuses through the nickel, emerging on the exterior of the nickel as sp2-bonded carbon, termed 3D graphene. This paper details the fabrication, characterization and some potential applications for these structures.

  7. Chaotic Advection in a Bounded 3-Dimensional Potential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Smith, Lachlan; Lester, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    3-dimensional potential, or Darcy flows, are central to understanding and designing laminar transport in porous media; however, chaotic advection in 3-dimensional, volume-preserving flows is still not well understood. We show results of advecting passive scalars in a transient 3-dimensional potential flow that consists of a steady dipole flow and periodic reorientation. Even for the most symmetric reorientation protocol, neither of the two invarients of the motion are conserved; however, one invarient is closely shadowed by a surface of revolution constructed from particle paths of the steady flow, creating in practice an adiabatic surface. A consequence is that chaotic regions cover 3-dimensional space, though tubular regular regions are still transport barriers. This appears to be a new mechanism generating 3-dimensional chaotic orbits. These results contast with the experimental and theoretical results for chaotic scalar transport in 2-dimensional Darcy flows. Wiggins, J. Fluid Mech. 654 (2010).

  8. The usefulness of 3-dimensional endoscope systems in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Egi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Minoru; Suzuki, Takahisa; Sawada, Hiroyuki; Kurita, Yuichi; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-10-01

    The image quality and performance of 3-dimensional video image systems has improved along with improvements in technology. However, objective evaluation on the usefulness of 3-dimensional video image systems is insufficient. Therefore, we decided to investigate the usefulness of 3-dimensional video image systems using the objective endoscopic surgery technology evaluating apparatus that we have developed, the Hiroshima University Endoscopic Surgical Assessment Device (HUESAD). The participants were 28 student volunteers enrolled in Hiroshima University (17 men and 11 women, age: median 22.5, range 20-25), with no one having experienced endoscopic surgery training. Testing was carried out by dividing the subjects into two groups to initially carry out HUESAD with 2-dimensional video imaging (N = 14) and with 3-dimensional video imaging (N = 14). Questionnaires were carried out along with the investigation regarding both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional video imaging. The task was carried out for approximately 15 min regarding both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional video imaging. Lastly, the Mental Rotation Test, which is a standard space perception ability test, was used to evaluate the space perception ability. No difference was observed in the nauseous and uncomfortable feeling of practitioners between the two groups. Regarding smoothness, no difference was observed between 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional video imaging (p = 0.8665). Deviation (space perception ability) and approaching time (accuracy) were significantly lower with 3-dimensional video imaging compared to 2-dimensional video imaging. Moreover, the approaching time (accuracy) significantly improved in 3-dimensional video imaging compared to 2-dimensional video imaging in the group with low space perception ability (p = 0.0085). Objective evaluation using HUESAD and subjective evaluation by questionnaire revealed that endoscopic surgery techniques significantly improved in 3-dimensional video

  9. Radiation dose delivered to the proximal penis as a predictor of the risk of erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Valicenti, Richard . E-mail: richard.valicenti@mail.tju.edu; DiEva, Kelly; Houser, Christopher; Pequignot, Ed

    2004-12-01

    Purpose/objective: In this study, we evaluated in a serial manner whether radiation dose to the bulb of the penis is predictive of erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory difficulty (EJ), and overall satisfaction with sex life (quality of life) by using serial validated self-administered questionnaires. Methods and materials: Twenty-nine potent men with AJCC Stage II prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy alone to a median dose 72.0 Gy (range: 66.6-79.2 Gy) were evaluated by determining the doses received by the penile bulb. The penile bulb was delineated volumetrically, and the dose-volume histogram was obtained on each patient. Results: The median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 16-43 months). We found that for D{sub 30}, D{sub 45}, D{sub 60}, and D{sub 75} (doses to a percent volume of PB: 30%, 45%, 60%, and 75%), higher than the corresponding median dose (defined as high-dose group) correlated with an increased risk of impotence (erectile dysfunction firmness score = 0) (odds ratio [OR] = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 7.5, p = 0.02; OR = 8.6, p = 0.008; and OR = 6.9, p = 0.015, respectively). Similarly, for EJD D{sub 30}, D{sub 45}, D{sub 60}, and D{sub 75}, doses higher than the corresponding median ones correlated with worsening ejaculatory function score (EJ = 0 or 1) (OR = 8, p = 0.013; OR = 8, p 0.013; OR = 9.2, p = 0.015; and OR = 8, p = 0.026, respectively). For quality of life, low ({<=}median dose) dose groups of patients improve over time, whereas high-dose groups of patients worsen. Conclusions: This study supports the existence of a penile bulb dose-volume relationship underlying the development of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction. Our data may guide the use of inverse treatment planning to maximize the probability of maintaining sexual potency after radiation therapy.

  10. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Methods Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3–4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist’s PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. Results The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm3 to 137 ± 83 cm3 after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. Conclusions The contouring

  11. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case.

    PubMed

    Lobefalo, Francesca; Bignardi, Mario; Reggiori, Giacomo; Tozzi, Angelo; Tomatis, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo; Fogliata, Antonella; Gaudino, Anna; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta; Mancosu, Pietro

    2013-07-09

    To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3-4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist's PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm³ to 137 ± 83 cm³ after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. The contouring inter-observer variability has dosimetric

  12. Optimization of 3-dimensional imaging of the breast region with 3-dimensional laser scanners.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Yassouridis, Alexander; Zimmermann, Alexander; Brockmann, Gernot; Wöhnl, Antonia; Blaschke, Matthias; Eder, Maximilian; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, Katja; Rosenberg, Robert; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Biemer, Edgar

    2006-03-01

    The anatomic conditions of the female breast require imaging the breast region 3-dimensionally in a normal standing position for quality assurance and for surgery planning or surgery simulation. The goal of this work was to optimize the imaging technology for the mammary region with a 3-dimensional (3D) laser scanner, to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the method, and to allow optimum data reproducibility. Avoiding the influence of biotic factors, such as mobility, we tested the most favorable imaging technology on dummy models for scanner-related factors such as the scanner position in comparison with the torso and the number of scanners and single shots. The influence of different factors of the breast region, such as different breast shapes or premarking of anatomic landmarks, was also first investigated on dummies. The findings from the dummy models were then compared with investigations on test persons, and the accuracy of measurements on the virtual models was compared with a coincidence analysis of the manually measured values. The best precision and accuracy of breast region measurements were achieved when landmarks were marked before taking the shots and when shots at 30 degrees left and 30 degrees right, relative to the sagittal line, were taken with 2 connected scanners mounted with a +10-degree upward angle. However, the precision of the measurements on test persons was significantly lower than those measured on dummies. Our findings show that the correct settings for 3D imaging of the breast region with a laser scanner can achieve an acceptable degree of accuracy and reproducibility.

  13. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy compared with permanent prostate implantation in low-risk prostate cancer based on endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging and prostate-specific antigen level

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Barby . E-mail: pickett@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Kurhanewicz, John; Pouliot, Jean; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Coakley, Fergus; Roach, Mack

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response by comparing the time to resolution of spectroscopic abnormalities (TRSA) and the time to prostate-specific antigen level in low-risk prostate cancer patients after treatment with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) compared with permanent prostate implantation (PPI). Recent studies have suggested that the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer yields similar results for patients treated with 3D-CRT or PPI. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients, 25 in each group, who had been treated with 3D-CRT or PPI, had undergone endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging before and/or at varying times after therapy. The 3D-CRT patients had received radiation doses of {>=}72 Gy compared with 144 Gy for the PPI patients. The spectra from all usable voxels were examined for detectable levels of metabolic signal, and the percentages of atrophic and cancerous voxels were tabulated. Results: The median time to resolution of the spectroscopic abnormalities was 32.2 and 24.8 months and the time to the nadir prostate-specific antigen level was 52.4 and 38.0 months for the 3D-CRT and PPI patients, respectively. Of the 3D-CRT patients, 92% achieved negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 40% having complete metabolic atrophy. All 25 PPI patients had negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 60% achieving complete metabolic atrophy. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that metabolic and biochemical responses of the prostate are more pronounced after PPI. Our results have not proved PPI is more effective at curing prostate cancer, but they have demonstrated that it may be more effective at destroying prostate metabolism.

  14. Risk-adapted androgen deprivation and escalated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Does radiation dose influence outcome of patients treated with adjuvant androgen deprivation? A GICOR study.

    PubMed

    Zapatero, Almudena; Valcárcel, Francisco; Calvo, Felipe A; Algás, Rosa; Béjar, Amelia; Maldonado, Javier; Villá, Salvador

    2005-09-20

    Multicenter study conducted to determine the impact on biochemical control and survival of risk-adapted androgen deprivation (AD) combined with high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for prostate cancer. Results of biochemical control are reported. Between October 1999 and October 2001, 416 eligible patients with prostate cancer were assigned to one of three treatment groups according to their risk factors: 181 low-risk patients were treated with 3DCRT alone; 75 intermediate-risk patients were allocated to receive neoadjuvant AD (NAD) 4-6 months before and during 3DCRT; and 160 high-risk patients received NAD and adjuvant AD (AAD) 2 years after 3DCRT. Stratification was performed for treatment/risk group and total radiation dose. After a median follow-up of 36 months (range, 18 to 63 months), the actuarial biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) at 5 years for all patients was 74%. The corresponding figures for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk disease were 80%, 73%, and 79%, respectively (P = .847). Univariate analysis showed that higher radiation dose was the only significant factor associated with bDFS for all patients (P = .0004). When stratified for treatment group, this benefit was evident for low-risk patients (P = .009) and, more interestingly, for high-risk patients treated with AAD. The 5-year bDFS for high-risk patients treated with AAD was 63% for radiation doses less than 72 Gy and 84% for those > or = 72 Gy (P = .003). The results of combined AAD plus high-dose 3DCRT are encouraging. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing an additional benefit of high-dose 3DCRT when combined with long-term AD for unfavorable disease.

  15. Feasibility and Efficacy of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Based Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma 8 cm or More With Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus in Combination With Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio; Suwa, Kazuhiro; Kishi, Kazushi; Shimono, Chigusa; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography-based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (SPECT-B 3D-CRT) for large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods and Materials: HCC patients with PVTT in the first branch or main trunk, 8 cm or greater in size, were admitted to the study. SPECT, using Tc-99m-galactosyl human serum albumin, was used in radiation treatment planning to explore the optimal irradiation beam angle. SPECT enabled the minimum possible irradiation of functional liver (FL). Clinical target volume (CTV) included the main tumor and PVTT. SPECT-B 3D-CRT targeted the CTV to a total dose of 45 Gy/18 fractions. HCC outside the CTV was treated by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Results: Nineteen cases were enrolled in this study. The mean maximum dimension, mean CTV, and mean dose to FL were 11.0 cm (range, 8.0-20.0), 435 cm{sup 3} (range, 60-2,535), and 1,102 cGy (range, 691-1,695), respectively. Follow-up SPECT demonstrated radiation-induced dysfunctional liver. Despite the inclusion of 6 cases of Child-Pugh B or C, no patients experienced Grade 3 or worse radiation-induced liver disease. The cumulative non-progression rates of PVTT and PVTT plus main tumor were 78.0 and 43.2%, respectively. Survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 47.4 and 23.7%, respectively. Conclusions: SPECT-B 3D-CRT with TACE appears to be tolerable to cirrhotic liver and to provide promising prognosis for patients with HCC sized 8 cm or more, in comparison with previous treatment methods. A longer follow-up period is required to evaluate these findings.

  16. Prospective Study of Alternating Chemoradiotherapy Consisting of Extended-Field Dynamic Conformational Radiotherapy and Systemic Chemotherapy Using 5-FU and Nedaplatin for Patients in High-Risk Group With Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaira, Takeshi Fuwa, Nobukazu; Nakanishi, Toru; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomita, Natsuo; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of alternating chemoradiotherapy combined with extended-field conformal radiotherapy for patients with high-risk cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated cervical cancer, with Stage III/IVA disease, or Stage IB/II with high-risk factor (primary tumor diameter {>=}50 mm or positive lymph node) were entered into this study. Three cycles of chemotherapy with 3,500 mg/m{sup 2} of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and nedaplatin (NDP) were accompanied with pelvic irradiation of 45.6-51.3 Gy in 24-27 fractions over 6 weeks. Prophylactic (36 Gy/20 fractions) or definitive (45-56 Gy) irradiation for para-aortic region was followed by pelvic irradiation. Results: Between 1998 and 2004, 40 patients were recruited for this protocol study. Eighteen patients from Phase I setting were registered. Twenty-two patients were treated with NDP of 140 mg/m{sup 2} (the recommended dose) in the Phase II segment. Twenty-five patients had T3 disease, and 25 patients had nodal disease including para-aortic involvement (n = 5). Overall/progression-free survival rates at 5 years were 78.8 and 66.5%, respectively. The median follow-up time was 61.8 months (25.5-106.7). Hematologic and gastrointestinal Grade 3 or more toxicities were relatively high rate (27.5-45%); however, they were well manageable. Two for bladder toxicity of Grade 3 were noted. Comparing the data from historical control group evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging, alternating chemoradiotherapy revealed a significant favorable factor for survival and disease recurrence in multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Acquired results from our unique protocol for cervical cancer with high-risk factor were thought to be promising, considering that the majority of our cohort consisted of high-risk population.

  17. A new three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique for large breast and/or high body mass index patients: evaluation of a novel fields assessment aimed to reduce extra–target-tissue irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Stimato, Gerardina; Ippolito, Edy; Silipigni, Sonia; Venanzio, Cristina Di; Gaudino, Diego; Fiore, Michele; Trodella, Lucio; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Ramella, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop an alternative three-dimensional treatment plan with standardized fields class solution for whole-breast radiotherapy in patients with large/pendulous breast and/or high body mass index (BMI). Methods: Two treatment plans [tangential fields and standardized five-fields technique (S5F)] for a total dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions were generated for patients with large breasts [planning target volume (PTV) >1000 cm3 and/or BMI >25 kg m−2], supine positioned. S5F plans consist of two wedged tangential beams, anteroposterior: 20° for the right breast and 340° for the left breast, and posteroanterior: 181° for the right breast and 179° for the left breast. A field in field in medial–lateral beam and additional fields were added to reduce hot spot areas and extra–target-tissue irradiation and to improve dose distribution. The percentage of PTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%), percentage of PTV receiving 105% of the prescribed dose (PTV V105%), maximal dose to PTV (PTV Dmax), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index were recorded. V10%, V20%, V105% and V107% of a “proper” normal tissue structure (body-PTV healthy tissue) were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using SYSTAT v.12.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). Results: In 38 patients included, S5F improved HI (8.4 vs 10.1; p ≤ 0.001) and significantly reduced PTV Dmax and PTV V105%. The extra–target-tissue irradiation was significantly reduced using S5F for V105% (cm3) and V107% (cm3) with a very high difference in tissue irradiation (46.6 vs 3.0 cm3, p ≤ 0.001 for V105% and 12.2 vs 0.0 cm3, p ≤ 0.001 for V107% for tangential field and S5F plans, respectively). Only a slight increase in low-dose extra–target-tissue irradiation (V10%) was observed (2.2719 vs 1.8261 cm3, p = 0.002). Conclusion: The S5F technique in patients with large breast or high BMI increases HI and decreases hot spots in extra-target-tissues and can therefore be

  18. Prone Whole-Breast Irradiation Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Early Disease Yields High Rates of Excellent to Good Cosmetic Outcomes in Patients With Large and/or Pendulous Breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy; Morrow, Natalya; Wilson, J. Frank; Walker, Alonzo; Xiang Qun; Ahn, Kwang Woo; White, Julia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our institution's experience using prone positioning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation (WBI) in a cohort of women with large and/or pendulous breasts, to determine the rate of acute and late toxicities and, more specifically, cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that using 3D-CRT for WBI in the prone position would reduce or eliminate patient and breast size as negative prognostic indicators for toxicities associated with WBI. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 110 cases were treated with prone WBI using 3D-CRT. The lumpectomy, breast target volumes, heart, and lung were contoured on all computed tomography scans. A dose of 45-50 Gy was prescribed to the breast volume using standard fractionation schemes. The planning goals were {>=}95% of prescription to 95% of the breast volume, and 100% of boost dose to 95% of lumpectomy planning target volume. Toxicities and cosmesis were prospectively scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects Version 3.0 and the Harvard Scale. The median follow-up was 40 months. Results: The median body mass index (BMI) was 33.6 kg/m{sup 2}, and median breast volume was 1396 cm{sup 3}. The worst toxicity encountered during radiation was Grade 3 dermatitis in 5% of our patient population. Moist desquamation occurred in 16% of patients, with only 2% of patients with moist desquamation outside the inframammary/axillary folds. Eleven percent of patients had Grade {>=}2 late toxicities, including Grade 3 induration/fibrosis in 2%. Excellent to good cosmesis was achieved in 89%. Higher BMI was associated with moist desquamation and breast pain, but BMI and breast volume did not impact fibrosis or excellent to good cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients with higher BMI and/or large-pendulous breasts, delivering prone WBI using 3D-CRT results in favorable toxicity profiles and high excellent to good cosmesis rates. Higher BMI was

  19. 3-Dimensional wireless sensor network localization: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najib, Yasmeen Nadhirah Ahmad; Daud, Hanita; Aziz, Azrina Abd; Razali, Radzuan

    2016-11-01

    The proliferation of wireless sensor network (WSN) has shifted the focus to 3-Dimensional geometry rather than 2-Dimensional geometry. Since exact location of sensors has been the fundamental issue in wireless sensor network, node localization is essential for any wireless sensor network applications. Most algorithms mainly focus on 2-Dimensional geometry, where the application of this algorithm will decrease the accuracy on 3-Dimensional geometry. The low rank attribute in WSN's node estimation makes the application of nuclear norm minimization as a viable solution for dimensionality reduction problems. This research proposes a novel localization algorithm for 3-Dimensional WSN which is nuclear norm minimization. The node localization is formulated via Euclidean Distance Matrix (EDM) and is then optimized using Nuclear-Norm Minimization (NNM).

  20. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  1. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-03-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  2. Differential Cross Section Kinematics for 3-dimensional Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In support of the development of 3-dimensional transport codes, this paper derives the relevant relativistic particle kinematic theory. Formulas are given for invariant, spectral and angular distributions in both the lab (spacecraft) and center of momentum frames, for collisions involving 2, 3 and n - body final states.

  3. Controlled teleportation of a 3-dimensional bipartite quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Song, He-Shan

    2008-07-01

    A controlled teleportation scheme of an unknown 3-dimensional (3D) two-particle quantum state is proposed, where a 3D Bell state and 3D GHZ state function as the quantum channel. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional bipartite quantum state.

  4. Airway growth and development: a computerized 3-dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Stephen A; Jacobson, Richard; Khalessi, Sadri

    2012-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the changes in the normal upper airway during growth and development using 3-dimensional computer analysis from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) data to provide a normative reference. The airway size and respiratory mode are known to have a relationship to facial morphology and the development of a malocclusion. The use of CBCT, 3-dimensional imaging, and automated computer analysis in treatment planning allows the upper airway to be precisely evaluated. In the present study, we evaluated the growth of the airway using 3-dimensional analysis and CBCT data from age 6 through old age, in 1300 normal individuals. The airway size and length increase until age 20 at which time a variable period of stability occurs. Next, the airway at first decreases slowly in size and then, after age 40, more rapidly. Normative data are provided in the present study for age groups from 6 to 60 years in relation to the airway total volume, smallest cross-sectional area and vertical length of the airway. This 3-dimensional data of the upper airway will provide a normative reference as an aid in the early understanding of respiration and dentofacial anatomy, which will help in early treatment planning. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 3-dimensional bundle adjustments in industrial metrology: A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gaydosh, M.; LeCocq, C.; Ruland, R.; Wand, B.

    1992-07-01

    Several theodolite measurement systems are available for use in the industrial metrology market. Many of them offer a rigorous 3-dimensional bundle adjustment routine. In this paper several systems in use and available for evaluation purposes at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be tested and their results compared.

  6. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  7. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon; Liu, Tian X.; Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian; Hu, Y. Angie

    2014-10-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed

  8. Carbohydrate Cluster Microarrays Fabricated on 3-Dimensional Dendrimeric Platforms for Functional Glycomics Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xichun; Turchi, Craig; Wang, Denong

    2009-01-01

    We reported here a novel, ready-to-use bioarray platform and methodology for construction of sensitive carbohydrate cluster microarrays. This technology utilizes a 3-dimensional (3-D) poly(amidoamine) starburst dendrimer monolayer assembled on glass surface, which is functionalized with terminal aminooxy and hydrazide groups for site-specific coupling of carbohydrates. A wide range of saccharides, including monosaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides of diverse structures, are applicable for the 3-D bioarray platform without prior chemical derivatization. The process of carbohydrate coupling is effectively accelerated by microwave radiation energy. The carbohydrate concentration required for microarray fabrication is substantially reduced using this technology. Importantly, this bioarray platform presents sugar chains in defined orientation and cluster configurations. It is, thus, uniquely useful for exploration of the structural and conformational diversities of glyco-epitope and their functional properties. PMID:19791771

  9. 3-dimensional (3D) fabricated polymer based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2014-11-10

    Drug delivery from 3-dimensional (3D) structures is a rapidly growing area of research. It is essential to achieve structures wherein drug stability is ensured, the drug loading capacity is appropriate and the desired controlled release profile can be attained. Attention must also be paid to the development of appropriate fabrication machinery that allows 3D drug delivery systems (DDS) to be produced in a simple, reliable and reproducible manner. The range of fabrication methods currently being used to form 3D DDSs include electrospinning (solution and melt), wet-spinning and printing (3-dimensional). The use of these techniques enables production of DDSs from the macro-scale down to the nano-scale. This article reviews progress in these fabrication techniques to form DDSs that possess desirable drug delivery kinetics for a wide range of applications.

  10. Wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Ethan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Lijia; Lu, Yongfeng; Ndao, Sidy

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the fabrication and wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces (3DNFS). Three distinct 3DNFS surfaces, namely cubic, Romanesco broccoli, and sphereflake were fabricated using two-photon direct laser writing. Contact angle measurements were performed on the multiscale fractal surfaces to characterize their wetting properties. Average contact angles ranged from 66.8° for the smooth control surface to 0° for one of the fractal surfaces. The change in wetting behavior was attributed to modification of the interfacial surface properties due to the inclusion of 3-dimensional hierarchical fractal nanostructures. However, this behavior does not exactly obey existing surface wetting models in the literature. Potential applications for these types of surfaces in physical and biological sciences are also discussed.

  11. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT.

  12. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  13. Bystander effects and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25535579

  14. Cohomological rigidity of manifolds defined by 3-dimensional polytopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchstaber, V. M.; Erokhovets, N. Yu.; Masuda, M.; Panov, T. E.; Park, S.

    2017-04-01

    A family of closed manifolds is said to be cohomologically rigid if a cohomology ring isomorphism implies a diffeomorphism for any two manifolds in the family. Cohomological rigidity is established here for large families of 3-dimensional and 6-dimensional manifolds defined by 3-dimensional polytopes. The class \\mathscr{P} of 3-dimensional combinatorial simple polytopes P different from tetrahedra and without facets forming 3- and 4-belts is studied. This class includes mathematical fullerenes, that is, simple 3- polytopes with only 5-gonal and 6-gonal facets. By a theorem of Pogorelov, any polytope in \\mathscr{P} admits in Lobachevsky 3-space a right-angled realisation which is unique up to isometry. Our families of smooth manifolds are associated with polytopes in the class \\mathscr{P}. The first family consists of 3-dimensional small covers of polytopes in \\mathscr{P}, or equivalently, hyperbolic 3-manifolds of Löbell type. The second family consists of 6-dimensional quasitoric manifolds over polytopes in \\mathscr{P}. Our main result is that both families are cohomologically rigid, that is, two manifolds M and M' from either family are diffeomorphic if and only if their cohomology rings are isomorphic. It is also proved that if M and M' are diffeomorphic, then their corresponding polytopes P and P' are combinatorially equivalent. These results are intertwined with classical subjects in geometry and topology such as the combinatorics of 3-polytopes, the Four Colour Theorem, aspherical manifolds, a diffeomorphism classification of 6-manifolds, and invariance of Pontryagin classes. The proofs use techniques of toric topology. Bibliography: 69 titles.

  15. Multimodality 3-Dimensional Image Integration for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures for patients with congenital and structural heart disease are becoming more complex. New imaging strategies involving integration of 3-dimensional images from rotational angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are employed to facilitate these procedures. We discuss the current use of these new 3D imaging technologies and their advantages and challenges when used to guide complex diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25114757

  16. A dose comparison of proton radiotherapy and photon radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of photon radiotherapy and to compare the dose of treatment planning between proton radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pediatric brain tumor patients. This study was conducted in five pediatric brain tumor patients who underwent craniospinal irradiation treatment from October 2013 to April 2014 in the hospital. The study compared organs at risk (OARs) by assessing the dose distribution of normal tissue from the proton plan and 3D-CRT. Furthermore, this study assessed the treatment plans by looking at the homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). As a result, the study revealed OARs due to the small volume proton radiotherapy dose distribution in the normal tissue. Also, by comparing HI and CI between the 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy plan, the study found that the dose of proton radiotherapy plan was homogenized. When conducting 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy in a dose-volume histogram comparison, the dose of distribution turned out to be low. Consequently, proton radiotherapy is used for protecting the normal tissue, and is used in tumor tissue as a homogenized dose for effective treatment.

  17. Ga-68 MAA Perfusion 4D-PET/CT Scanning Allows for Functional Lung Avoidance Using Conformal Radiation Therapy Planning.

    PubMed

    Siva, Shankar; Devereux, Thomas; Ball, David L; MacManus, Michael P; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Plumridge, Nikki; Steinfort, Daniel; Shaw, Mark; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    Ga-68-macroaggregated albumin ((68)Ga-perfusion) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a novel imaging technique for the assessment of functional lung volumes. The purpose of this study was to use this imaging technique for functional adaptation of definitive radiotherapy plans in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This was a prospective clinical trial of patients with NSCLC who received definitive 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy to 60 Gy in 30 fx and underwent pretreatment respiratory-gated (4-dimensional [4D]) perfusion PET/CT. The "perfused" lung volume was defined as all lung parenchyma taking up radiotracer, and the "well-perfused" lung volume was contoured using a visually adapted threshold of 30% maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max). Alternate 3D conformal plans were subsequently created and optimized to avoid perfused and well-perfused lung volumes. Functional dose volumetrics were compared using mean lung dose (MLD), V5 (volume receiving 5 Gy or more), V10, V20, V30, V40, V50, and V60 parameters. Fourteen consecutive patients had alternate radiotherapy plans created based on functional lung volumes. When considering the original treatment plan, the dose to perfused and well-perfused functional lung volumes was similar to that of the conventional anatomical lung volumes with an average MLD of 12.15, 12.67, and 12.11 Gy, respectively. Plans optimized for well-perfused lung improved functional V30, V40, V50, and V60 metrics (all P values <.05). The functional MLD of well-perfused lung was improved by a median of 0.86 Gy, P < .01. However, plans optimized for perfused lung only showed significant improvement in the functional V60 dose parameter (median 1.00%, P = .04) but at a detriment of a worse functional V5 (median 3.33%, P = .05). This study demonstrates proof of principle that 4D-perfusion PET/CT may enable functional lung avoidance during treatment planning of patients with NSCLC. Radiotherapy plans

  18. Do All Patients of Breast Carcinoma Need 3-Dimensional CT-Based Planning? A Dosimetric Study Comparing Different Breast Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Anusheel Pai, Rajeshri H.; Phurailatpam, Reena; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, D.D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Dinshaw, Ketayun A.

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of dose distribution in a single plane (i.e., 2-dimensional [2D] planning) is simple and less resource-intensive than CT-based 3-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) planning or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of the study was to determine if 2D planning could be an appropriate treatment in a subgroup of breast cancer patients based on their breast size. Twenty consecutive patients who underwent breast conservation were planned for radiotherapy. The patients were grouped in 3 different categories based on their respective chest wall separation (CWS) and the thickness of breast, as 'small,' 'medium,' and 'large.' Two more contours were taken at locations 5 cm superior and 5 cm inferior to the isocenter plane. Maximum dose recorded at specified points was compared in superior/inferior slices as compared to the central slice. The mean difference for small breast size was 1.93 (standard deviation [SD] = 1.08). For medium breas size, the mean difference was 2.98 (SD = 2.40). For the large breasts, the mean difference was 4.28 (SD = 2.69). Based on our dosimetric study, breast planning only on the single isocentric contour is an appropriate technique for patients with small breasts. However, for large- and medium-size breasts, CT-based planning and 3D planning have a definite role. These results can be especially useful for rationalizing treatment in busy oncology centers.

  19. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  20. Transportation Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  1. Proton Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors: Dosimetric Advantages Over Photon Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun Krishnan, Sunil; Zhang Xiaodong; Dong Lei; Briere, Tina; Crane, Christopher H.; Martel, Mary; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to dosimetrically investigate the advantages of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy for liver tumors. The proton plan and the photon plan were designed using commercial treatment planning systems. The treatment target dose conformity and heterogeneity and dose-volume analyses of normal structures were compared between proton and photon radiotherapy for 9 patients with liver tumors. Proton radiotherapy delivered a more conformal target dose with slightly less homogeneity when compared with photon radiotherapy. Protons significantly reduced the fractional volume of liver receiving dose greater or equal to 30 Gy (V{sub 30}) and the mean liver dose. The stomach and duodenal V{sub 45} were significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. The V{sub 40} and V{sub 50} of the heart and the maximum spinal cord dose were also significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. Protons were better able to spare one kidney completely and deliver less dose to one (generally the left) kidney than photons. The mean dose to the total body and most critical structures was significantly decreased using protons when compared to corresponding photon plans. In conclusion, our study suggests the dosimetric benefits of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy. These dosimetric advantages of proton plans may permit further dose escalation with lower risk of complications.

  2. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J; Wu, L; Wu, F; Huang, B; Li, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  3. Graviton 1-loop partition function for 3-dimensional massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Grumiller, Daniel; Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2010-11-01

    Thegraviton1-loop partition function in Euclidean topologically massivegravity (TMG) is calculated using heat kernel techniques. The partition function does not factorize holomorphically, and at the chiral point it has the structure expected from a logarithmic conformal field theory. This gives strong evidence for the proposal that the dual conformal field theory to TMG at the chiral point is indeed logarithmic. We also generalize our results to new massive gravity.

  4. Cellular Changes of Stem Cells in 3-Dimensional Culture.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew P; Hou, Bo

    2017-06-12

    During various operations and procedures, such as distraction osteogenesis and orthodontics, skeletal tissues use mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction is important for maintaining bone health and converting mechanical forces into biochemical signals. We hypothesized that cells put under mechanical stress would adapt and change morphologically and respond with a decrease in cellular proliferation to accommodate the stress differences. These differences will be measured at the molecular and genetic level. We also wanted to test the practicality of an in vitro 3-dimensional gel model system. We implemented a 3-dimensional cell culture model. The sample was composed of isolated mouse mesenchymal prefibroblast bone marrow cells from the femurs and tibias of 6- to 8-week-old wild-type C57BL6 mice. The cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated hydrogels along with fibrin and nodulin growth factors. The variables tested were a no-force model (control) and a force model. The force model required two 0.1-mm suture pins put through one 0.25-cm length of cell-gel matrix. After the experiments were run to completion, the samples were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections were cut at a thickness of 5 μm along the long axis for the force construct and encompassing the entire circular area of the control construct. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and the P value was set at 5%. There was a statistically significant difference between the 2 models. The force model had longer and straighter primary cilia, less apoptosis, and an increase in cell proliferation. In addition, the shape of the cells was markedly different after the experiment. The results of the study suggest cells put under tensile stress have the ability to mechanically sense the environment to provide improved adaptation. Our work also confirms the usefulness of the in vitro 3-dimensional gel model system to mimic in vivo applications. Published by Elsevier

  5. [Bile duct reconstruction using 3-dimensional collagen tubes].

    PubMed

    Pérez Alonso, Alejandro José; del Olmo Rivas, Carlos; Machado Romero, Ignacio; Pérez Cabrera, Beatriz; Cañizares Garcia, Francisco Javier; Torne Poyatos, Pablo

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, with widespread laparoscopic cholecystectomy and liver transplantation, complications involving the biliary system are increasing. All current techniques have a high risk of recurrence or high-morbidity. A 3-dimensional collagen bile duct modified with agarose hydrogel was developed to substitute the affected extrahepatic bile duct. It was used in 40 guinea pigs and the histology and physiology was studied at 4 weeks, 3 and 6 months after transplantation. The graft shows to have a high potential in applications to treat hepatobiliary diseases which require surgery. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. 3-dimensional electronic structures of CaC6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Wonshik; Kim, Yeongkwan; Han, Garam; Leem, Choonshik; Kim, Junsung; Kim, Yeongwook; Kim, Keunsu; Rotenberg, Eli; Kim, Changyoung; Postech Collaboration; Advanced Light Source Collaboration; Yonsei University Team

    2014-03-01

    There is still remaining issues on origin of superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds, especially CaC6 because of its relatively high transition temperature than other GICs. There are two competing theories on where the superconductivity occurs in this material; intercalant metal or charge doped graphene layer. To elucidate this issue, it is necessary to confirm existence of intercalant driven band. Therefore, we performed 3 dimensional electronic structure studies with ARPES to find out 3d dispersive intercalant band. However, we could not observe it, instead observed 3d dispersive carbon band. This support the aspect of charge doped graphene superconductivity more than intercalant driving aspect.

  7. The 3-dimensional cellular automata for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Youbin; Ren, Bin; Yang, Wencao; Shuai, Jianwei

    2014-04-01

    The HIV infection dynamics is discussed in detail with a 3-dimensional cellular automata model in this paper. The model can reproduce the three-phase development, i.e., the acute period, the asymptotic period and the AIDS period, observed in the HIV-infected patients in a clinic. We show that the 3D HIV model performs a better robustness on the model parameters than the 2D cellular automata. Furthermore, we reveal that the occurrence of a perpetual source to successively generate infectious waves to spread to the whole system drives the model from the asymptotic state to the AIDS state.

  8. Automated feature extraction for 3-dimensional point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, Lori A.; Leigh, Holly W.; Soderlund, Alexander; Clymer, Bradley; Baer, Jessica; Neuenschwander, Amy L.

    2016-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology offers the capability to rapidly capture high-resolution, 3-dimensional surface data with centimeter-level accuracy for a large variety of applications. Due to the foliage-penetrating properties of LIDAR systems, these geospatial data sets can detect ground surfaces beneath trees, enabling the production of highfidelity bare earth elevation models. Precise characterization of the ground surface allows for identification of terrain and non-terrain points within the point cloud, and facilitates further discernment between natural and man-made objects based solely on structural aspects and relative neighboring parameterizations. A framework is presented here for automated extraction of natural and man-made features that does not rely on coincident ortho-imagery or point RGB attributes. The TEXAS (Terrain EXtraction And Segmentation) algorithm is used first to generate a bare earth surface from a lidar survey, which is then used to classify points as terrain or non-terrain. Further classifications are assigned at the point level by leveraging local spatial information. Similarly classed points are then clustered together into regions to identify individual features. Descriptions of the spatial attributes of each region are generated, resulting in the identification of individual tree locations, forest extents, building footprints, and 3-dimensional building shapes, among others. Results of the fully-automated feature extraction algorithm are then compared to ground truth to assess completeness and accuracy of the methodology.

  9. Conformal Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-12-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  10. General Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    PubMed

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  12. Scientific visualization of 3-dimensional optimized stellarator configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    The design techniques and physics analysis of modern stellarator configurations for magnetic fusion research rely heavily on high performance computing and simulation. Stellarators, which are fundamentally 3-dimensional in nature, offer significantly more design flexibility than more symmetric devices such as the tokamak. By varying the outer boundary shape of the plasma, a variety of physics features, such as transport, stability, and heating efficiency can be optimized. Scientific visualization techniques are an important adjunct to this effort as they provide a necessary ergonomic link between the numerical results and the intuition of the human researcher. The authors have developed a variety of visualization techniques for stellarators which both facilitate the design optimization process and allow the physics simulations to be more readily understood.

  13. [3-Dimensional model reconstruction of penis and surrounding tissue].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Heng; Cao, Chuan; Mei, Wen-Ming; Wang, Wen-Xian; Tan, Li-Wen; Li, Shi-Rong

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3-Dimensional (3-D) model reconstruction of penis and surrounding structures based on magnetic resonance images, which may provide the model building method for modeling surgery of individual penoplasty. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of penis with different imaging parameters were evaluated. With the surface rendering construction, the 3D virtual model was established by Amira software. The anatomical details imaging is better in T2-weighted fast spin-echo images with 3.0 mm slice thickness. The established model based on the MR images can show the soft-tissue, suspensory ligament of the penis. The suspensory ligament stretches between the pubic symphysis and the corpora cavernosa. The penile roots attach to inferior ramus of pubis. MR imaging provides enough anatomical information for modeling. It can be used for the development of model surgery system of individual penoplasty.

  14. Quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis of olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Bart; Janssen, Stein; Mellema, Jos; Ring, David

    2016-05-01

    Olecranon fractures have variable size of the proximal fragment, patterns of fragmentation, and subluxation of the ulnohumeral joint that might be better understood and categorized on the basis of quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis. Mayo type I fractures are undisplaced, Mayo type II are displaced and stable, and Mayo type III are displaced and unstable. The last is categorized into anterior and posterior dislocations. The purpose of this study was to further clarify fracture morphology between Mayo type I, II, and III fractures. Three-dimensional models were created for a consecutive series of 78 patients with olecranon fractures that were evaluated with computed tomography. We determined the total number of fracture fragments, the volume and articular surface area of each fracture fragment, and the degree of displacement of the most proximal olecranon fracture fragment. Displaced olecranon fractures were more comminuted than nondisplaced fractures (P = .02). Displaced fractures without ulnohumeral subluxation were smallest in terms of both volume (P < .001) and articular surface involvement (P < .001) of the most proximal olecranon fracture fragment. There was no difference in average displacement of the proximal fragment between displaced fractures with and without ulnohumeral subluxation (P = .74). Anterior olecranon fracture-dislocations created more displaced (P = .04) and smaller proximal fragments than posterior fracture-dislocations (P = .005), with comparable fragmentation on average (P = .60). The ability to quantify volume, articular surface area, displacement, and fragmentation using quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography should be considered when increased knowledge of fracture morphology and fracture patterns might be useful. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 3-dimensional analysis of regenerative endodontic treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    EzEldeen, Mostafa; Van Gorp, Gertrude; Van Dessel, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-03-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the regeneration potential of dental tissues after regenerative endodontic treatment (RET). Nevertheless, a standard method for the evaluation of RET outcome is lacking. The aim of this study was to develop a standardized quantitative method for RET outcome analysis based on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) volumetric measurements. Five human teeth embedded in mandibular bone samples were scanned using both an Accuitomo 170 CBCT machine (Morita, Kyoto, Japan) and a SkyScan 1174 micro-computed tomographic (μCT) system (SkyScan, Antwerp, Belgium). For subsequent clinical application, clinical data and low-dose CBCT scans (preoperatively and follow-up) from 5 immature permanent teeth treated with RET were retrieved. In vitro and clinical 3-dimensional image data sets were imported into a dedicated software tool. Two segmentation steps were applied to extract the teeth of interest from the surrounding tissue (livewire) and to separate tooth hard tissue and root canal space (level set methods). In vitro and clinical volumetric measurements were assessed separately for differences using Wilcoxon matched pairs test. Pearson correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate the relation and agreement between the segmented CBCT and μCT volumes. The results showed no statistical differences and strong agreement between CBCT and μCT volumetric measurements. Volumetric comparison of the root hard tissue showed significant hard tissue formation. (The mean volume of newly formed hard tissue was 27.9 [±10.5] mm(3) [P < .05]). Analysis of 3-dimensional data for teeth treated with RET offers valuable insights into the treatment outcome and patterns of hard tissue formation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Review of 3-Dimensional Printing on Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training.

    PubMed

    Vakharia, Vejay N; Vakharia, Nilesh N; Hill, Ciaran S

    2016-04-01

    Shorter working times, reduced operative exposure to complex procedures, and increased subspecialization have resulted in training constraints within most surgical fields. Simulation has been suggested as a possible means of acquiring new surgical skills without exposing patients to the surgeon's operative "learning curve." Here we review the potential impact of 3-dimensional printing on simulation and training within cranial neurosurgery and its implications for the future. In accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, a comprehensive search of PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was performed. In total, 31 studies relating to the use of 3-dimensional (3D) printing within neurosurgery, of which 16 were specifically related to simulation and training, were identified. The main impact of 3D printing on neurosurgical simulation training was within vascular surgery, where patient-specific replication of vascular anatomy and pathologies can aid surgeons in operative planning and clip placement for reconstruction of vascular anatomy. Models containing replicas of brain tumors have also been reconstructed and used for training purposes, with some providing realistic representations of skin, subcutaneous tissue, bone, dura, normal brain, and tumor tissue. 3D printing provides a unique means of directly replicating patient-specific pathologies. It can identify anatomic variation and provide a medium in which training models can be generated rapidly, allowing the trainee and experienced neurosurgeon to practice parts of operations preoperatively. Future studies are required to validate this technology in comparison with current simulators and show improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Recent developments in radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Seong, Jinsil

    2004-12-01

    With the accumulation of clinical experiences, the efficacy of radiotherapy has been recognized in management scheme for HCC. While hepatologists are beginning to show less reluctance for applying radiotherapy to the treatment of HCC, it is necessary that the hepatologists be informed of the rapid developments in technical strategy for radiation oncology. Recent advances in several technologies have opened a new era in radiation oncology. Modern imaging technologies can provide a 3-dimensional model of patient's anatomy, and this allows radiation oncologists to identify accurate tumor volumes as well as the tumors' relationship with the adjacent normal tissues. Moreover, the development of the computer-controlled multileaf collimator systems now enables physicians to perform precise beam shaping and to modulate the radiation dose distribution. A combination of these systems, 3-DCRT, is rapidly replacing the more conventional 2-D radiotherapy. 3-DCRT has evolved into a more sophisticated technology, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In IMRT, with the powerful computer-aided optimization process, the radiation dose can be delivered to the target using highly complex isodose profiles. This new technology has been further developed into IGRT, which combines the CT-images scanning system and radiation equipments into one hardware package, and this system is currently ready for clinical application. In parallel with the radiation technologies described above, the strategy of stereotactic radiation has evolved from the conventional linear accelerator-based system to a gammaknife, and more recently, to a cyberknife. These systems are primarily based on the concept of radiosurgery. Currently, various radiation technologies have been adopted for the radiotherapy of HCC. In this article, each strategy will be discussed as well as the indications for radiotherapy and the radiation-related complications.

  18. [Reformatting 3-dimensional medical images. Application to MRI and scanners].

    PubMed

    Cuchet, E; Lambert, F; Derosier, C

    1994-04-01

    Several kinds of images, each giving a different information, are now available to radiologists. The MRI images have excellent contrast resolution and enable soft tissues to be differentiated, but they do not distinguish structures with low water content, notably air and bone, whereas these are easily recognized by CT. The aim of this study is to present a simple, entirely radiologist-supervised method to examine the radiological data of any patient, obtained from several kinds of images. MRI is performed using a GEMS Signa, 1.5 Tesla, 4.9 version magnet. Acquisitions are T1- or T2-weighted spin-echo or gradient sequences, with a 256 or 512 matrix, on axial sections, with of without contrast injection. CT is performed using a GEMS Hi Speed scanner. Acquisitions are obtained on a 512 matrix and with a "Soft" or "Bone" filter, without contrast injection. The two series of sections are transmitted, through an Etherne network, to a Sun console where the two corresponding volumes are reconstructed on a GEMS Voxtol by means of a 3-dimensional soft ware for image treatment. At least 3 couples define the rotation and translation required for one of the two volumes to reset it in the guide mark of the other. The soft ware then looks for the best transformation, in terms of least square, between the two 3-dimensional volumes. The calculation demands only a few seconds. One of the two objects is then recalculated in the guide mark of the other. The cursor positioned by the user on any point of the object is linked to a second cursor which will automatically position itself on the corresponding point of the other object. The accuracy obtained (about one millimeter) is specified by the soft ware which indicates how to improve resetting. In addition to its teaching value, this superimposition image can help in the diagnosis and can be used for surgical stimulation because it is possible to mix the images. This mixing gives access to a new type of imaging, since the images spared

  19. [Efficacy observation of accelerated hyperfractionation recourse radiotherapy plus concurrent capecitabine in the treatment of locoregional recurrent rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-dong; Dai, Yong; Yu, Jin-ming; Shao, Zhen-yu

    2010-04-13

    To evaluate the efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionation (CAF) radiotherapy plus concurrent capecitabine in the treatment of locoregional recurrent rectal cancer. Between June 2004 and January 2008, 53 patients with locoregional recurrent rectal cancer were treated with CAF 1.2 Gy/f, 2 f/d plus concurrent capecitabine at an oral dosage of 825 mg/m2 bid on each day of radiotherapy period. The first daily dose was applied at 2 h pre-irradiation, d1-14 and d22-35. After a regimen of 36 Gy/30 f/3 w, the feasibility of surgical resection was then evaluated by CT. Patients unsuitable for surgical resection continued CAF. And the total dose was 52.8-57.6 Gy. The complete response rate was 9.8%, the partial response rate 45.1%, the effective rate 54.9%, the no-change rate 29.4%, the progression rate 15.7%, the surgical resection rate 23.5% and the R0, R1 resection rates 21.6% and 1.9% respectively. The Time to Progression was 10.5 months, 1-year survival rate was 84.3%, 2-year survival rate was 61.1%. Quality of life improved in treatment group. Toxic and adverse effects were gastrointestinal and hematological toxicities. There was no treatment-related mortality. The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy may be an effective and well-tolerated regimen in patients with postoperative locoregional recurrent or metastatic rectal cancer.

  20. Evaluations of secondary cancer risk in spine radiotherapy using 3DCRT, IMRT, and VMAT: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Jalil ur; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Isa, Muhammad; Afzal, Muhammad; Chow, James; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the secondary cancer risk from volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for spine radiotherapy compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Computed tomography images of an Radiological Physics Center spine anthropomorphic phantom were exported to a treatment planning system (Pinnacle{sup 3}, version 9.4). Radiation treatment plans for spine were prepared using VMAT (dual-arc), 7-field IMRT (beam angles: 110°, 130°, 150°, 180°, 210°, 230°, and 250°), and 4-field 3DCRT technique. The mean and maximum doses, dose-volume histograms, and volumes receiving more than 2 and 4 Gy to organs at risk (OARs) were calculated and compared. The lifetime risk for secondary cancers was estimated according to the National Cancer Registry Programme Report 116. VMAT delivered the lowest maximum dose to the esophagus (4.03 Gy), bone (8.11 Gy), heart (2.11 Gy), spinal cord (6.45 Gy), and whole lung (5.66 Gy) as compared with other techniques (IMRT and 3DCRT). The volumes of OAR (esophagus) receiving more than 4 Gy were 0% for VMAT, 27.06% for IMRT, and up to 32.35% for 3DCRT. The estimated risk for secondary cancer in the respective OAR is considerably lower in VMAT compared with other techniques. The results of maximum doses and volumes of OARs suggest that the risk of secondary cancer induction for the spine in VMAT is lower than IMRT and 3DCRT, whereas VMAT has the best target coverage compared with the other techniques.

  1. [Radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Vieillard, M-H; Supiot, S; Lagrange, J-L

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in palliative treatment of bone metastases. Recent developments of stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy give the possibility to treat oligometastatic diseases. The objective of this paper is to report indications and treatment modalities of radiotherapy in these situations.

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer : Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Waldstein, Cora; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor

    2017-09-19

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4‑field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects.

  3. In vitro measurement of muscle volume with 3-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Walker, F; Caress, J; Hunt, C; Tegeler, C

    1999-05-01

    The aim was to test the accuracy of muscle volume measurements with a new 3-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system, which allows a freehand scanning of the transducer with an improved quality of the ultrasound images and therefore the outlines of the muscles. Five resected cadaveric hand muscles were insonated and the muscle volumes calculated by 3-D reconstructions of the acquired 2-D ultrasound sections. Intra-reader, inter-reader and follow-up variability were calculated, as well as the volume of the muscle tissue measured by water displacement. In the results, 3-D ultrasound and water displacement measurements showed an average deviation of 10.1%; Data of 3-D ultrasound measurements were: intra-reader variability 2.8%; inter-reader variability 2.4% and follow-up variability 2.3%. 3-D measurements of muscle volume are valid and reliable. Serial sonographic measurements of muscle may be able to quantitate changes in muscle volume that occur in disease and recovery.

  4. A 3-Dimensional Atlas of Human Tongue Muscles

    PubMed Central

    SANDERS, IRA; MU, LIANCAI

    2013-01-01

    The human tongue is one of the most important yet least understood structures of the body. One reason for the relative lack of research on the human tongue is its complex anatomy. This is a real barrier to investigators as there are few anatomical resources in the literature that show this complex anatomy clearly. As a result, the diagnosis and treatment of tongue disorders lags behind that for other structures of the head and neck. This report intended to fill this gap by displaying the tongue’s anatomy in multiple ways. The primary material used in this study was serial axial images of the male and female human tongue from the Visible Human (VH) Project of the National Library of Medicine. In addition, thick serial coronal sections of three human tongues were rendered translucent. The VH axial images were computer reconstructed into serial coronal sections and each tongue muscle was outlined. These outlines were used to construct a 3-dimensional computer model of the tongue that allows each muscle to be seen in its in vivo anatomical position. The thick coronal sections supplement the 3-D model by showing details of the complex interweaving of tongue muscles throughout the tongue. The graphics are perhaps the clearest guide to date to aid clinical or basic science investigators in identifying each tongue muscle in any part of the human tongue. PMID:23650264

  5. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-08-27

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation.

  6. Mandibular reconstruction using stereolithographic 3-dimensional printing modeling technology.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Adir; Laviv, Amir; Berman, Phillip; Nashef, Rizan; Abu-Tair, Jawad

    2009-11-01

    Mandibular reconstruction can be challenging for the surgeon wishing to restore its unique geometry. Reconstruction can be achieved with titanium bone plates followed by autogenous bone grafting. Incorporation of the bone graft into the mandible provides continuity and strength required for proper esthetics and function and permitting dental implant rehabilitation at a later stage. Precious time in the operating room is invested in plate contouring to reconstruct the mandible. Rapid prototyping technologies can construct physical models from computer-aided design via 3-dimensional (3D) printers. A prefabricated 3D model is achieved, which assists in accurate contouring of plates and/or planning of bone graft harvest geometry before surgery. The 2 most commonly used rapid prototyping technologies are stereolithography and 3D printing (3DP). Three-dimensional printing is advantageous to stereolithography for better accuracy, quicker printing time, and lower cost. We present 3 clinical cases based on 3DP modeling technology. Models were fabricated before the resection of mandibular ameloblastoma and were used to prepare bridging plates before the first stage of reconstruction. In 1 case, another model was fabricated and used as a template for iliac crest bone graft in the second stage of reconstruction. The 3DP technology provided a precise, fast, and cheap mandibular reconstruction, which aids in shortened operation time (and therefore decreased exposure time to general anesthesia, decreased blood loss, and shorter wound exposure time) and easier surgical procedure.

  7. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-08-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation.

  8. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation. PMID:26310537

  9. A 3-Dimensional Printed Ultrasound Probe Visuospatial Trainer.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Ryan T; Dove, Jesse C; Ratzlaff, Robert A; Diaz-Gomez, Jose L; Cox, Daniel J; Simon, Leslie V

    2017-09-04

    Training adult learners to use ultrasound in clinical practice relies on the ability of the learner to apply visuospatial concepts to the anatomy of the human body. We describe a visuospatial trainer that replicates the housing of an ultrasound transducer, through which a linear laser projects light in the same plane and orientation as the ultrasonic sound waves. We use this trainer in combination with a porcine heart dissection laboratory to teach bedside cardiac ultrasound and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Off-the-shelf components, including an on/off switch, a laser, and 2 ampere batteries are connected in series and placed inside the 3-dimensional (3D)-printed housing. The trainer's laser emission projects a red line that visually represents the ultrasound's field. Learners project the laser against a porcine or human heart in the orientation of the TTE window they wish to obtain and then dissect the heart in that plane, allowing for visualization of how grayscale images are obtained from 3D structures. Previous research has demonstrated that visuospatial aptitude is correlated with ultrasound procedural performance. We present this trainer and educational method as a specific training intervention that could enhance the visuospatial ability of the ultrasound learner. This visuospatial trainer and educational method present a novel process for enhancing learner understanding of 2-dimensional ultrasound images as they relate to 3D structures. Having a clear understanding of how images are generated in cross section may translate into more proficient adaptation of cardiac ultrasound and TTE.

  10. The first 3-dimensional assemblies of organotin-functionalized polyanions.

    PubMed

    Piedra-Garza, Luis Fernando; Reinoso, Santiago; Dickman, Michael H; Sanguineti, Michael M; Kortz, Ulrich

    2009-08-21

    Reaction of the (CH(3))(2)Sn(2+) electrophile toward trilacunary [A-alpha-XW(9)O(34)](n-) Keggin polytungstates (X = P(V), As(V), Si(IV)) with guanidinium as templating-cation resulted in the isostructural compounds Na[C(NH(2))(3)](2)[{(CH(3))(2)Sn(H(2)O)}(3)(A-alpha-PW(9)O(34))] x 9 H(2)O (1), Na[C(NH(2))(3)](2)[{(CH(3))(2)Sn(H(2)O)}(3)(A-alpha-AsW(9)O(34))] x 8 H(2)O (2) and Na(2)[C(NH(2))(3)](2)[{(CH(3))(2)Sn(H(2)O)}(3)(A-alpha-SiW(9)O(34))] x 10 H(2)O (3). Compounds 1-3 constitute the first 3-dimensional assemblies of organotin-functionalized polyanions, as well as the first example of a dimethyltin-containing tungstosilicate in the case of 3, and they show a similar chiral architecture based on tetrahedrally-arranged {(CH(3))(2)Sn}(3)(A-alpha-XW(9)O(34)) monomeric building-blocks connected via intermolecular Sn-O=W bridges regardless of the size and/or charge of the heteroatom.

  11. 3-Dimensional simulation of the grain formation in investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Gandin, C.A.; Rappaz, M. ); Tintillier, R. . Dept. Materiaux et Procedes-Direction Technique)

    1994-03-01

    A 3-dimensional (3-D) probabilistic model which has been developed previously for the prediction of grain structure formation during solidification is applied to thin superalloy plates produced using the investment-casting process. This model considers the random nucleation and orientation of nuclei formed at the mold surface and in the bulk of the liquid, the growth kinetics of the dendrite tips, and the preferential growth directions of the dendrite trunks and arms. In the present study, the grains are assumed to nucleate at the surface of the mold only. The computed grain structures, as observed in 2-dimensional (2-D) sections made parallel to the mold surface, are compared with experimental micrographs. The grain densities are then deduced as a function of the distance from the mold surface for both the experiment and the simulation. It is shown that these values are in good agreement, thus, providing validation of the grain formation mechanisms built into the 3-D probabilistic model. Finally, this model is further extended to more complex geometries and the 3-D computed grain structure of an equiaxed turbine-blade airfoil is compared with the experimental transverse section micrograph.

  12. Finger Character Recognition Using 3-Dimensional Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Kazuhiro; Ono, Satoshi; Wang, Yu; Nakayama, Shigeru

    This paper proposes a method for Japanese finger character recognition, using a 3-dimensional (3D) scanner. A hand is a complex dexterous manipulator, evolved to be more complex than any other animals. The hand, being capable of making many different complex shapes, it is ideal for communicating using gestures. The recognition of a whole language, such as the Japanese finger characters, requires the differentiation of subtle similar positioning of each digit. To know the exact 3D position of the hand's digits and overall shape, data gloves had been developed, but these are inconvenient to use. 2D image recognition systems struggle with recreating the 3D information. To capture the 3D information, the proposed method uses a 3D scanner, and then makes matches with 3D templates representing each unique character. Experimental results show that the proposed method recognizes a greater number of characters than existing 2D-based systems with recognition accuracy, on average of 93% for 9 testees, and a peak of over 98% for 4 of them.

  13. The International Intercomparison of 3-Dimensional Radiation Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    I3RC (International Intercomparison of 3-dimensional Radiation Codes) has as its primary goal to compare a wide variety of three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer methods applied to Earth's atmosphere, with a few selected cloud fields as input, and a few selected radiative quantities as output. Phases 1 and 2 are now complete, and participants represented institutions in Canada, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the USA, who met for two workshops in Tucson, Arizona USA, and compared results from 5 cloud fields of varying complexity, beginning with simplified atmosphere and surface, and proceeding to more realistic cases. Phase 3 is now underway, focusing on improvement and sharing of 3D radiation code, aided by working groups on "Approximations" and "Open Source". The "Approximations" group has so far focused on diffusive approximate methods in an attempt to gain advantages in execution time, and also to advance the understanding of 3D radiation processes. The "Open Source" subgroup is developing a Monte Carlo radiative transfer toolkit that makes state-of-the-art techniques available to a wide range of users. Activities of both subgroups are further explained at the I3RC website http://i3rc.gsfc.nasa.gov. Participants in 13RC are forming a 3D Working Group under the auspices of the International Radiation Commission, and will meet for this and related activities at a workshop in Tucson in November 2002.

  14. 3-Dimensional Facial Analysis—Facing Precision Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Baynam, Gareth; Bauskis, Alicia; Pachter, Nicholas; Schofield, Lyn; Verhoef, Hedwig; Palmer, Richard L.; Kung, Stefanie; Helmholz, Petra; Ridout, Michael; Walker, Caroline E.; Hawkins, Anne; Goldblatt, Jack; Weeramanthri, Tarun S.; Dawkins, Hugh J. S.; Molster, Caron M.

    2017-01-01

    Precision public health is a new field driven by technological advances that enable more precise descriptions and analyses of individuals and population groups, with a view to improving the overall health of populations. This promises to lead to more precise clinical and public health practices, across the continuum of prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment. A phenotype is the set of observable characteristics of an individual resulting from the interaction of a genotype with the environment. Precision (deep) phenotyping applies innovative technologies to exhaustively and more precisely examine the discrete components of a phenotype and goes beyond the information usually included in medical charts. This form of phenotyping is a critical component of more precise diagnostic capability and 3-dimensional facial analysis (3DFA) is a key technological enabler in this domain. In this paper, we examine the potential of 3DFA as a public health tool, by viewing it against the 10 essential public health services of the “public health wheel,” developed by the US Centers for Disease Control. This provides an illustrative framework to gage current and emergent applications of genomic technologies for implementing precision public health. PMID:28443272

  15. Invasive 3-Dimensional Organotypic Neoplasia from Multiple Normal Human Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ridky, Todd W.; Chow, Jennifer M.; Wong, David J.; Khavari, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Refined cancer models are required to assess the burgeoning number of potential targets for cancer therapeutics within a rapid and clinically relevant context. Here we utilize tumor-associated genetic pathways to transform primary human epithelial cells from epidermis, oropharynx, esophagus, and cervix into genetically defined tumors within a human 3-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment incorporating cell-populated stroma and intact basement membrane. These engineered organotypic tissues recapitulated natural features of tumor progression, including epithelial invasion through basement membrane, a complex process critically required for biologic malignancy in 90% of human cancers. Invasion was rapid, and potentiated by stromal cells. Oncogenic signals in 3-D tissue, but not 2-D culture, resembled gene expression profiles from spontaneous human cancers. Screening well-characterized signaling pathway inhibitors in 3-D organotypic neoplasia helped distil a clinically faithful cancer gene signature. Multi-tissue 3-D human tissue cancer models may provide an efficient and relevant complement to current approaches to characterize cancer progression. PMID:21102459

  16. Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jarad M; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Rosewall, Tara; Warde, Padraig R; Catton, Charles N

    2009-01-01

    Background Prostate radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation has been reported to result in improved biochemical control at the cost of greater late toxicity. We report on the application of 79.8 Gy in 42 fractions of prostate image guided RT (IGRT). The primary objective was to assess 5-year biochemical control and potential prognostic factors by the Phoenix definition. Secondary endpoints included acute and late toxicity by the Radiotherapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring scales. Methods From October/2001 and June/2003, 259 men were treated with at least 2-years follow-up. 59 patients had low, 163 intermediate and 37 high risk disease. 43 had adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), mostly for high- or multiple risk factor intermediate-risk disease (n = 25). They received either 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT, n = 226) or intensity modulated RT (IMRT) including daily on-line IGRT with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results Median follow-up was 67.8 months (range 24.4-84.7). There was no severe (grade 3-4) acute toxicity, and grade 2 acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was unusual (10.1%). The 5-year incidence of grade 2-3 late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 13.7% and 12.1%, with corresponding grade 3 figures of 3.5% and 2.0% respectively. HT had an association with an increased risk of grade 2-3 late GI toxicity (11% v 21%, p = 0.018). Using the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the 5 year-bNED is 88.4%, 76.5% and 77.9% for low, intermediate and high risk patients respectively. On univariate analysis, T-category and Gleason grade correlated with Phoenix bNED (p = 0.006 and 0.039 respectively). Hormonal therapy was not a significant prognostic factor on uni- or multi-variate analysis. Men with positive prostate biopsies following RT had a lower chance of bNED at 5 years (34.4% v 64.3%; p = 0.147). Conclusion IGRT to 79.8 Gy results in favourable rates of late toxicity compared with published non-IGRT treated cohorts. Future avenues of investigation for

  17. Effect of heterogeneity correction on dosimetric parameters of radiotherapy planning for thoracic esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Masao; Yoshida, Kenji; Nishimura, Hideki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Okayama, Takanobu; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2014-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of heterogeneity correction (HC) on dosimetric parameters in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for patients with thoracic esophageal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 20 patients. Two treatment plans were generated for each patient using a superposition algorithm on the Xio radiotherapy planning system. The first plan was calculated without HC. The second was a new plan calculated with HC, using identical beam geometries and maintaining the same number of monitor units as the first. With regard to the planning target volume (PTV), the overall mean differences in the prescription dose, maximum dose, mean dose, and dose that covers 95% of the PTV between the first and second plans were 1.10 Gy (1.8%), 1.35 Gy (2.2%), 1.10 Gy (1.9%), and 0.56 Gy (1.0%), respectively. With regard to parameters related to the organs at risk (OARs), the mean differences in the absolute percentages of lung volume receiving greater than 5, 10, 20, and 30 Gy (lung V{sub 5}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, and V{sub 30}) between the first and second plans were 7.1%, 2.7%, 0.4%, and 0.5%, respectively. These results suggest that HC might have a more pronounced effect on the percentages of lung volume receiving lower doses (e.g., V{sub 5} and V{sub 10}) than on the dosimetric parameters related to the PTV and other OARs.

  18. Video Based Sensor for Tracking 3-Dimensional Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R. T.; Book, Michael L.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    Video-Based Sensor for Tracking 3-Dimensional Targets The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing and testing video-based sensors for automated spacecraft guidance for several years, and the next generation of video sensor will have tracking rates up to 100 Hz and will be able to track multiple reflectors and targets. The Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) developed over the past several years has performed well in testing and met the objective of being used as the terminal guidance sensor for an automated rendezvous and capture system. The first VGS was successfully tested in closed-loop 3-degree-of-freedom (3- DOF) tests in 1989 and then in 6-DOF open-loop tests in 1992 and closed-loop tests in 1993-4. Development and testing continued, and in 1995 approval was given to test the VGS in an experiment on the Space Shuttle. The VGS flew in 1997 and in 1998, performing well for both flights. During the development and testing before, during, and after the flight experiments, numerous areas for improvement were found. The VGS was developed with a sensor head and an electronics box, connected by cables. The VGS was used in conjunction with a target that had wavelength-filtered retro-reflectors in a specific pattern, The sensor head contained the laser diodes, video camera, and heaters and coolers. The electronics box contained a frame grabber, image processor, the electronics to control the components in the sensor head, the communications electronics, and the power supply. The system works by sequentially firing two different wavelengths of laser diodes at the target and processing the two images. Since the target only reflects one wavelength, it shows up well in one image and not at all in the other. Because the target's dimensions are known, the relative positions and attitudes of the target and the sensor can be computed from the spots reflected from the target. The system was designed to work from I

  19. The 3-dimensional grid: a novel approach to stereoelectroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Munyon, Charles; Sweet, Jennifer; Luders, Hans; Lhatoo, Samden; Miller, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Successful surgical treatment of epilepsy requires accurate definition of areas of ictal onset and eloquent brain. Although invasive monitoring can help, subdural grids cannot sample sulci or subcortical tissue; traditional stereoelectroencephalography depth electrodes are usually placed too far apart to provide sufficient resolution for mapping. To report a strategy of depth electrode placement in a dense array to allow precise anatomic localization of epileptic and eloquent cortex. Twenty patients with medically intractable epilepsy either poorly localized or found to arise adjacent to eloquent areas underwent placement of arrays of depth electrodes into and around the putative area of seizure onset with the use of framed stereotaxy. Each array consisted of a "grid" of parallel electrodes in a rectangular pattern with 1 cm between entry sites. In a subset of patients, a few electrodes were placed initially, with additional electrodes placed in a second stage. Trajectories were modified to avoid cortical vessels defined on magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were monitored for 4 to 21 days to establish the precise location of seizure onset. Stimulation was performed to map cortical and subcortical eloquent regions. Electrode locations were coregistered for frameless stereotaxy during subsequent resection of seizure focus. Two hundred fifty-four electrodes were implanted. Discrete regions of seizure onset and functional cortex were identified, which were used during resection to remove epileptogenic tissue while preserving eloquent areas. There were no hemorrhagic or infectious complications; no patient suffered permanent neurological deficit. The 3-dimensional intraparenchymal grid is useful for identifying the location and extent of epileptic and eloquent brain.

  20. Development and Validation of a 3-Dimensional CFB Furnace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vepsäläinen, Arl; Myöhänen, Karl; Hyppäneni, Timo; Leino, Timo; Tourunen, Antti

    At Foster Wheeler, a three-dimensional CFB furnace model is essential part of knowledge development of CFB furnace process regarding solid mixing, combustion, emission formation and heat transfer. Results of laboratory and pilot scale phenomenon research are utilized in development of sub-models. Analyses of field-test results in industrial-scale CFB boilers including furnace profile measurements are simultaneously carried out with development of 3-dimensional process modeling, which provides a chain of knowledge that is utilized as feedback for phenomenon research. Knowledge gathered by model validation studies and up-to-date parameter databases are utilized in performance prediction and design development of CFB boiler furnaces. This paper reports recent development steps related to modeling of combustion and formation of char and volatiles of various fuel types in CFB conditions. Also a new model for predicting the formation of nitrogen oxides is presented. Validation of mixing and combustion parameters for solids and gases are based on test balances at several large-scale CFB boilers combusting coal, peat and bio-fuels. Field-tests including lateral and vertical furnace profile measurements and characterization of solid materials provides a window for characterization of fuel specific mixing and combustion behavior in CFB furnace at different loads and operation conditions. Measured horizontal gas profiles are projection of balance between fuel mixing and reactions at lower part of furnace and are used together with both lateral temperature profiles at bed and upper parts of furnace for determination of solid mixing and combustion model parameters. Modeling of char and volatile based formation of NO profiles is followed by analysis of oxidizing and reducing regions formed due lower furnace design and mixing characteristics of fuel and combustion airs effecting to formation ofNO furnace profile by reduction and volatile-nitrogen reactions. This paper presents

  1. A new preclinical 3-dimensional agarose colony formation assay.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Panchabhai, Sonali; Levin, Victor A

    2008-08-01

    The evaluation of new drug treatments and combination treatments for gliomas and other cancers requires a robust means to interrogate wide dose ranges and varying times of drug exposure without stain-inactivation of the cells (colonies). To this end, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) colony formation assay that makes use of GelCount technology, a new cell colony counter for gels and soft agars. We used U251MG, SNB19, and LNZ308 glioma cell lines and MiaPaCa pancreas adenocarcinoma and SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Colonies were grown in a two-tiered agarose that had 0.7% agarose on the bottom and 0.3% agarose on top. We then studied the effects of DFMO, carboplatin, and SAHA over a 3-log dose range and over multiple days of drug exposure. Using GelCount we approximated the area under the curve (AUC) of colony volumes as the sum of colony volumes (microm2xOD) in each plate to calculate IC50 values. Adenocarcinoma colonies were recognized by GelCount scanning at 3-4 days, while it took 6-7 days to detect glioma colonies. The growth rate of MiaPaCa and SW480 cells was rapid, with 100 colonies counted in 5-6 days; glioma cells grew more slowly, with 100 colonies counted in 9-10 days. Reliable log dose versus AUC curves were observed for all drugs studied. In conclusion, the GelCount method that we describe is more quantitative than traditional colony assays and allows precise study of drug effects with respect to both dose and time of exposure using fewer culture plates.

  2. Distance stereotest using a 3-dimensional monitor for adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongshin; Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Youngmin; Lee, Byoungho; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the validity and test-retest reliability of a contour-based 3-dimensional (3-D) monitor distance stereotest (distance 3-D stereotest) and to measure the maximum horizontal disparity that can be fused with disparity vergence for determining the largest measurable disparity of true stereopsis. Observational case series. Sixty-four normal adult subjects (age range, 23 to 39 years) were recruited. Contour-based circles (crossed disparity, 5000 to 20 seconds of arc; Microsoft Visual Studio C(++) 6.0; Microsoft, Inc, Seattle, Washington, USA) were generated on a 3-D monitor (46-inch stereoscopic display) using polarization glasses and were presented to subjects with normal binocularity at 3 m. While the position of the stimulus changed among 4 possible locations, the subjects were instructed to press the corresponding position of the stimulus on a keypad. The results with the new distance 3-D stereotest were compared with those from the distance Randot stereotest. The results of the distance 3-D stereotest and the distance Randot stereotests were identical in 64% and within 1 disparity level in 97% of normal adults. Scores obtained with the 2 tests showed a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.324, P = .009). The half-width of the 95% limit of agreement was 0.47 log seconds of arc (1.55 octaves) using the distance 3-D stereotest--similar to or better than that obtained with conventional distance stereotests. The maximum binocular disparity that can be fused with vergence was 1828 ± 794 seconds of arc (range, 4000 to 500). The distance 3-D stereotest showed good concordance with the distance Randot stereotest and relatively good test-retest reliability, supporting the validity of the distance 3-D stereotest. The normative data set obtained from the present study can serve as a useful reference for quantitative assessment of a wide range of binocular sensory abnormalities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The 3-dimensional construction of the Rae craton, central Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Craven, James A.; Pilkington, Mark; Hillier, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the 3-dimensional tectonic assembly of early continents, first as Archean cratons and then Proterozoic shields, remains poorly understood. In this paper, all readily available geophysical and geochemical data are assembled in a 3-D model with the most accurate bedrock geology in order to understand better the geometry of major structures within the Rae craton of central Canada. Analysis of geophysical observations of gravity and seismic wave speed variations revealed several lithospheric-scale discontinuities in physical properties. Where these discontinuities project upward to correlate with mapped upper crustal geological structures, the discontinuities can be interpreted as shear zones. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can also be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae craton comprises at least three smaller continental terranes, which "cratonized" during a granitic bloom. Cratonization probably represents final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho. The peak thermotectonic event at 1.86-1.7 Ga was associated with the Hudsonian orogeny that assembled several cratons and lesser continental blocks into the Canadian Shield using a number of southeast-dipping megathrusts. This orogeny metasomatized, mineralized, and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making them more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite. Little evidence exists of thin slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in this Precambrian construction history whereas underthrusting and wedging of continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities.

  4. Quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography measurements of coronoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Jos J; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2015-03-01

    Using quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography (Q3DCT) modeling, we tested the null hypothesis that there was no difference in fracture fragment volume, articular surface involvement, and number of fracture fragments between coronoid fracture types and patterns of traumatic elbow instability. We studied 82 patients with a computed tomography scan of a coronoid fracture using Q3DCT modeling. Fracture fragments were identified and fragment volume and articular surface involvement were measured within fracture types and injury patterns. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate the Q3DCT data of the coronoid fractures. Fractures of the coronoid tip (n = 45) were less fragmented and had the smallest fragment volume and articular surface area involvement compared with anteromedial facet fractures (n = 20) and base fractures (n = 17). Anteromedial facet and base fractures were more fragmented than tip fractures, and base fractures had the largest fragment volume and articular surface area involvement compared with tip and anteromedial facet fractures. We found similar differences between fracture types described by Regan and Morrey. Furthermore, fractures associated with terrible triad fracture dislocation (n = 42) had the smallest fragment volume, and fractures associated with olecranon fracture dislocations (n = 17) had the largest fragment volume and articular surface area involvement compared with the other injury patterns. Analyzing fractures of the coronoid using Q3DCT modeling demonstrated that fracture fragment characteristics differ significantly between fracture types and injury patterns. Detailed knowledge of fracture characteristics and their association with specific patterns of traumatic elbow instability may assist decision making and preoperative planning. Quantitative 3DCT modeling can provide a more detailed understanding of fracture morphology, which might guide decision making and implant development. Copyright © 2015 American Society for

  5. Brain tumor surgery with 3-dimensional surface navigation.

    PubMed

    Mert, Ayguel; Buehler, Katja; Sutherland, Garnette R; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Widhalm, Georg; Kasprian, Gregor; Knosp, Engelbert; Wolfsberger, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Precise lesion localization is necessary for neurosurgical procedures not only during the operative approach, but also during the preoperative planning phase. To evaluate the advantages of 3-dimensional (3-D) brain surface visualization over conventional 2-dimensional (2-D) magnetic resonance images for surgical planning and intraoperative guidance in brain tumor surgery. Preoperative 3-D brain surface visualization was performed with neurosurgical planning software in 77 cases (58 gliomas, 7 cavernomas, 6 meningiomas, and 6 metastasis). Direct intraoperative navigation on the 3-D brain surface was additionally performed in the last 20 cases with a neurosurgical navigation system. For brain surface reconstruction, patient-specific anatomy was obtained from MR imaging and brain volume was extracted with skull stripping or watershed algorithms, respectively. Three-dimensional visualization was performed by direct volume rendering in both systems. To assess the value of 3-D brain surface visualization for topographic lesion localization, a multiple-choice test was developed. To assess accuracy and reliability of 3-D brain surface visualization for intraoperative orientation, we topographically correlated superficial vessels and gyral anatomy on 3-D brain models with intraoperative images. The rate of correct lesion localization with 3-D was significantly higher (P = .001, χ), while being significantly less time consuming (P < .001, χ) compared with 2-D images. Intraoperatively, visual correlation was found between the 3-D images, superficial vessels, and gyral anatomy. The proposed method of 3-D brain surface visualization is fast, clinically reliable for preoperative anatomic lesion localization and patient-specific planning, and, together with navigation, improves intraoperative orientation in brain tumor surgery and is relatively independent of brain shift.

  6. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  7. 3-Dimensional shear wave elastography of breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-ling; Chang, Cai; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Fen; Chen, Jia-jian; Qu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Color patterns of 3-dimensional (3D) shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising method in differentiating tumoral nodules recently. This study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of color patterns of 3D SWE in breast lesions, with special emphasis on coronal planes. A total of 198 consecutive women with 198 breast lesions (125 malignant and 73 benign) were included, who underwent conventional ultrasound (US), 3D B-mode, and 3D SWE before surgical excision. SWE color patterns of Views A (transverse), T (sagittal), and C (coronal) were determined. Sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Distribution of SWE color patterns was significantly different between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.001). In malignant lesions, “Stiff Rim” was significantly more frequent in View C (crater sign, 60.8%) than in View A (51.2%, P = 0.013) and View T (54.1%, P = 0.035). AUC for combination of “Crater Sign” and conventional US was significantly higher than View A (0.929 vs 0.902, P = 0.004) and View T (0.929 vs 0.907, P = 0.009), and specificity significantly increased (90.4% vs 78.1%, P = 0.013) without significant change in sensitivity (85.6% vs 88.0%, P = 0.664) as compared with conventional US. In conclusion, combination of conventional US with 3D SWE color patterns significantly increased diagnostic accuracy, with “Crater Sign” in coronal plane of the highest value. PMID:27684820

  8. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  9. Real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography for prosthetic valve endocarditis: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Kort, Smadar

    2006-02-01

    Real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography is a relatively new technology with rapidly growing potential applications. Prosthetic valve endocarditis is still a challenging diagnosis despite improvements in image qualities obtained by both transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiograms. The purpose of this article is to present 4 cases of suggested prosthetic valve endocarditis, in which real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography was performed, and to discuss the potential use of real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography for this application.

  10. [Radiotherapy of hypopharynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Trémolières, P; Legouté, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    The intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of hypopharynx cancers. Early T1 and T2 tumours could be treated by exclusive radiotherapy or surgery. For tumours requiring total pharyngolaryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy are possible. For T4 tumours, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, curative dose is 70Gy and prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used for locally advanced cancers with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation is based on guidelines.

  11. Hypothyroidism After Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-H.; Wang, H-M.; Chen, Hellen Hi-Wen; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Fan, K.-H.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I-How; Liao, C.-T.; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the long-term incidence and possible predictive factors for posttreatment hypothyroidism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Four hundred and eight sequential NPC patients who had received regular annual thyroid hormone surveys prospectively after radiotherapy were included in this study. Median patient age was 47.3 years, and 286 patients were male. Thyroid function was prospectively evaluated by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and serum free thyroxine (FT4) levels. Low FT4 levels indicated clinical hypothyroidism in this study. Results: With a median follow-up of 4.3 years (range, 0.54-19.7 years), the incidence of low FT4 level was 5.3%, 9.0%, and 19.1% at 3, 5, and 10 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Hypothyroidism was more common with early T stage (p = 0.044), female sex (p = 0.037), and three-dimensional conformal therapy with the altered fractionation technique (p = 0.005) after univariate analysis. N stage, chemotherapy, reirradiation, and neck electron boost did not affect the incidence of hypothyroidism. Younger age and conformal therapy were significant factors that determined clinical hypothyroidism after multivariate analysis. Overall, patients presented with a low FT4 level about 1 year after presenting with an elevated TSH level. Conclusion: Among our study group of NPC patients, 19.1% experienced clinical hypothyroidism by 10 years after treatment. Younger age and conformal therapy increased the risk of hypothyroidism. We suggest routine evaluation of thyroid function in NPC patients after radiotherapy. The impact of pituitary injury should be also considered.

  12. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  13. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3 Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0 cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  14. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  15. Quantitative comparison of operative skill using 2- and 3-dimensional monitors during laparoscopic phantom tasks.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Masayasu; Kanaji, Shingo; Otake, Yoshito; Harada, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Oshikiri, Taro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yuki; Hiasa, Yuta; Sato, Yoshinobu; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-01

    The recent development of stereoscopic images using 3-dimensional monitors is expected to improve techniques for laparoscopic operation. Several studies have reported technical advantages in using 3-dimensional monitors with regard to operative accuracy and working speed, but there are few reports that analyze forceps motions by 3-dimensional optical tracking systems during standardized laparoscopic phantom tasks. We attempted to develop a 3-dimensional motion analysis system for assessing laparoscopic tasks and to clarify the efficacy of using stereoscopic images from a 3-dimensional monitor to track forceps movement during laparoscopy. Twenty surgeons performed 3 tasks (Task 1: a simple operation by the dominant hand, Task 2: a simple operation using both hands, Task 3: a complicated operation using both hands) under 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional systems. We tracked and recorded the motion of forceps tips with an optical marker captured by a 3-dimensional position tracker. We analyzed factors such as forceps path lengths, operation times, and technical errors for each task and compared the results of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional monitors. Mean operation times and technical errors were improved significantly for all tasks performed under the 3-dimensional system compared with the 2-dimensional system; in addition, mean path lengths for the forceps tips were shorter for all tasks performed under the 3-dimensional system. We found that stereoscopic images using a 3-dimensional monitor improved operative techniques with regard to increased accuracy and shorter path lengths for forceps movement, which resulted in a shorter operation time for basic phantom laparoscopic tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  18. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V5). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Method and apparatus for imaging through 3-dimensional tracking of protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M. (Inventor); Macri, John R. (Inventor); McConnell, Mark L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for creating density images of an object through the 3-dimensional tracking of protons that have passed through the object are provided. More specifically, the 3-dimensional tracking of the protons is accomplished by gathering and analyzing images of the ionization tracks of the protons in a closely packed stack of scintillating fibers.

  20. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. Chen, Peter; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Hasan, Yasmin; Grills, Inga; Kestin, Larry; Schell, Scott; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kunzman, Jonathan; Gilbert, Sam; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.

  1. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowson, Nicholas; Fay, Michael; Thomas, Paul; Jeffree, Rosalind; McDowall, Robert; Winter, Craig; Coulthard, Alan; Smith, Jye; Gal, Yaniv; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Salvado, Olivier; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  2. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  3. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new "toxicity index" (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V20 in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules.

  5. Dosimetric Comparison and Evaluation of Three Radiotherapy Techniques for Use after Modified Radical Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Left-sided Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changchun; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Lili; Wu, Fangcai; Huang, Baotian; Lin, Yan; Li, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the post-modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer utilizing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with field-in-field technique (3DCRT-FinF), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5F-IMRT) and 2- partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (2P-VMAT). We created the 3 different PMRMRT plans for each of the ten consecutive patients. We performed Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Dunn’s-type multiple comparisons to establish a hierarchy in terms of plan quality and dosimetric benefits. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Both 5F-IMRT and 2P-VMAT plans exhibited similar PTV coverage (V95%), hotspot areas (V110%) and conformity (all p > 0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with 3DCRT-FinF (both p < 0.001). In addition, 5F-IMRT plans provided significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure than 2P-VMAT (all p < 0.05). The 3DCRT-FinF plans with accurately estimated CTV displacement exhibited enhanced target coverage but worse organs at risk (OARs) sparing compared with those plans with underestimated displacements. Our results indicate that 5F-IMRT has dosimetrical advantages compared with the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer given its optimal balance between PTV coverage and OAR sparing (especially heart sparing). Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. PMID:26194593

  6. Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy in cervical cancer with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis after radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-lan; Chen, Zhen-yun; Cui, Yong-chun; Sheng, Xui-gui

    2015-06-01

    To compare the dosimetry, toxicity, and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in cervical cancer with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis after radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Total 32 patients who underwent SMART were retrospectively evaluated. Daily fractions of 2.2 to 2.4 Gy and 1.8 to 2 Gy were prescribed and delivered to gross tumor volume and clinical target volume to a total dose of 63.8 and 52.2 Gy, respectively. A 3DCRT plan was designed for the SMART group and planned to deliver the same prescribed dose. The doses of organs at risk (OARs) were compared. Thirty-six patients who received 3DCRT were used to compare the target dose, toxicities, and efficacy with 32 cases who received SMART. The mean doses delivered to gross tumor volume and clinical target volume were significantly higher in the SMART group than in the 3DCRT group (63.8 vs 55.2 Gy [P < 0.01] and 52.5 vs 48.6 Gy [P < 0.01], respectively). For SMART plan, the doses of OARs were significantly lower than that of 3DCRT plans (small intestine: 25.1 vs 30.9 Gy [P < 0.01], bladder: 35.3 vs 46.3 [P < 0.01], and rectum: 31.7 vs 43.7 [P = 0.002], respectively). The patients experienced less acute and late toxicities in the SMART group (acute toxicities: enteroproctitis, P = 0.019; cystitis, P = 0.013; leukopenia, P = 0.025; late toxicities: enteroproctitis, P = 0.007; and cystitis, P = 0.026, respectively). No significant difference was found for 1-year survival (78.7% vs 67.7%, P = 0.222), but SMART group had a higher 2-year survival rate (2-year: 63.1% vs 39.1%, P = 0.029). Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy plans yielded higher dose to the targets and better sparing of OARs than did 3DCRT in cervical cancer with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis after radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy provided better clinical outcomes than

  7. Virtual 3-dimensional preoperative planning with the dextroscope for excision of a 4th ventricular ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Anil, S M; Kato, Y; Hayakawa, M; Yoshida, K; Nagahisha, S; Kanno, T

    2007-04-01

    Advances in computer imaging and technology have facilitated enhancement in surgical planning with a 3-dimensional model of the surgical plan of action utilizing advanced visualization tools in order to plan individual interactive operations with the aid of the dextroscope. This provides a proper 3-dimensional imaging insight to the pathological anatomy and sets a new dimension in collaboration for training and education. The case of a seventeen-year-old female, being operated with the aid of a preoperative 3-dimensional virtual reality planning and the practical application of the neurosurgical operation, is presented. This young lady presented with a two-year history of recurrent episodes of severe, global, throbbing headache with episodes of projectile vomiting associated with shoulder pain which progressively worsened. She had no obvious neurological deficits on clinical examination. CT and MRI showed a contrast-enhancing midline posterior fossa space-occupying lesion. Utilizing virtual imaging technology with the aid of a dextroscope which generates stereoscopic images, a 3-dimensional image was produced with the CT and MRI images. A preoperative planning for excision of the lesion was made and a real-time 3-dimensional volume was produced and surgical planning with the dextroscope was made and the lesion excised. Virtual reality has brought new proportions in 3-dimensional planning and management of various complex neuroanatomical problems that are faced during various operations. Integration of 3-dimensional imaging with stereoscopic vision makes understanding the complex anatomy easier and helps improve decision making in patient management.

  8. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  9. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  10. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  11. Control of Grasp and Manipulation by Soft Fingers with 3-Dimensional Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Akira; Shibata, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Yoshikazu

    In this paper, we consider control of grasp and manipulation of an object in a 3-dimensional space by a 3-fingered hand robot with soft finger tips. We firstly propose a 3-dimensional deformation model of a hemispherical soft finger tip and verify its relevance by experimental data. Second, we consider the contact kinematics and derive the dynamical equations of the fingers and the object where the 3-dimensional deformation is considered. For the system, we thirdly propose a method to regulate the object and the internal force with the information of the hand, the object and the deformation. A simulation result is presented to show the effectiveness of the control method.

  12. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.; Liao, Jay J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge. PMID:22701482

  13. Rail Shear and Short Beam Shear Properties of Various 3-Dimensional (3-D) Woven Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Woven Composites by Mark Pankow, Ashiq Quabili, Stephen Whittie, and Chian Yen Approved for public release; distribution...2016 US Army Research Laboratory Rail Shear and Short Beam Shear Properties of Various 3-Dimensional (3-D) Woven Composites by Mark...Properties of Various 3-Dimensional Woven Composites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mark Pankow

  14. Particle radiotherapy with carbon ion beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated malignant tumours compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. The algorithm of treatment planning and beam delivery system is tailored to the individual parameters of the patient. The present article reviews the available literatures for various disease sites including the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer as well as physical and biological properties. PMID:23497542

  15. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  16. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  17. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Conformation and conformational exchange of Olopatadine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lian-di; Zhu, Chuan-jun; Yang, Chun-hui; Cui, Yu-xin

    2008-12-01

    Besides the assignments of the 13C and 1H shifts by 1D and 2D NMR, the experiment 1H spectra of Olopatadine hydrochloride were recorded at temperature range 228-338 K. The variable-temperature spectra revealed a dynamic NMR effect which is attributed to conformational interconversion of the drug. At low temperature, the solution was shown to contain two conformers and the ration of them was 1:1. A conformational process with a free energy of activation of 56.7 kJ mol -1, coalescence temperature 298 K, was interpreted as geminal 1H exchange. Using molecule simulation, conformational candidates for two conformers are proposed.

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  20. Application of 3-dimensional printing in hand surgery for production of a novel bone reduction clamp.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Sam M; Butz, Daniel R; Vevang, Curt B; Makhlouf, Mansour V

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional printing is being rapidly incorporated in the medical field to produce external prosthetics for improved cosmesis and fabricated molds to aid in presurgical planning. Biomedically engineered products from 3-dimensional printers are also utilized as implantable devices for knee arthroplasty, airway orthoses, and other surgical procedures. Although at first expensive and conceptually difficult to construct, 3-dimensional printing is now becoming more affordable and widely accessible. In hand surgery, like many other specialties, new or customized instruments would be desirable; however, the overall production cost restricts their development. We are presenting our step-by-step experience in creating a bone reduction clamp for finger fractures using 3-dimensional printing technology. Using free, downloadable software, a 3-dimensional model of a bone reduction clamp for hand fractures was created based on the senior author's (M.V.M.) specific design, previous experience, and preferences for fracture fixation. Once deemed satisfactory, the computer files were sent to a 3-dimensional printing company for the production of the prototypes. Multiple plastic prototypes were made and adjusted, affording a fast, low-cost working model of the proposed clamp. Once a workable design was obtained, a printing company produced the surgical clamp prototype directly from the 3-dimensional model represented in the computer files. This prototype was used in the operating room, meeting the expectations of the surgeon. Three-dimensional printing is affordable and offers the benefits of reducing production time and nurturing innovations in hand surgery. This article presents a step-by-step description of our design process using online software programs and 3-dimensional printing services. As medical technology advances, it is important that hand surgeons remain aware of available resources, are knowledgeable about how the process works, and are able to take advantage of

  1. Preoperative 3-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Uterine Myoma and Endometrium Before Myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi; Lee, Sa Ra; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kang, Byung Chul

    2017-02-01

    Uterine myomas are the most common gynecologic benign tumor affecting women of childbearing age, and myomectomy is the main surgical option to preserve the uterus and fertility. During myomectomy for women with multiple myomas, it is advisable to identify and remove as many as possible to decrease the risk of future myomectomies. With deficient preoperative imaging, gynecologists are challenged to identify the location and size of myomas and the endometrium, which, in turn, can lead to uterine rupture during future pregnancies. Current conventional 2-dimensional imaging has limitations in identifying precise locations of multiple myomas and the endometrium. In our experience, we preferred to use 3-dimensional imaging to delineate the myomas, endometrium, or blood vessels, which we were able to successfully reconstruct by using the following imaging method. To achieve 3-dimensional imaging, we matched T2 turbo spin echo images to detect uterine myomas and endometria with T1 high-resolution isotropic volume excitation-post images used to detect blood vessels by using an algorithm based on the 3-dimensional region growing method. Then, we produced images of the uterine myomas, endometria, and blood vessels using a 3-dimensional surface rendering method and successfully reconstructed selective 3-dimensional imaging for uterine myomas, endometria, and adjacent blood vessels. A Web-based survey was sent to 66 gynecologists concerning imaging techniques used before myomectomy. Twenty-eight of 36 responding gynecologists answered that the 3-dimensional image produced in the current study is preferred to conventional 2-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging in identifying precise locations of uterine myomas and endometria. The proposed 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging method successfully reconstructed uterine myomas, endometria, and adjacent vessels. We propose that this will be a helpful adjunct to uterine myomectomy as a preoperative imaging technique in future

  2. Steinberg conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, A. V.; Pinchuk, I. A.

    2005-06-01

    The structure of Steinberg conformal algebras is studied; these are analogues of Steinberg groups (algebras, superalgebras).A Steinberg conformal algebra is defined as an abstract algebra by a system of generators and relations between the generators. It is proved that a Steinberg conformal algebra is the universal central extension of the corresponding conformal Lie algebra; the kernel of this extension is calculated.

  3. Comparison of Optimised Treatment Plans for Radiosurgery and Conformal Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    beam is obtained by simulated annealing method. With regard to multibeam stereotactic radiosurgery, the number of isocenters is determined by the...Classification of Abstract unclassified Limitation of Abstract UU Number of Pages 2 (4mm width at the isocenter ). The dose calculation is...appears especially when numerous isocenters are used. Even if these results remain to be validated in the case of the µMLC, the comparison between the

  4. Patterns of practice in palliative radiotherapy in Africa - case revisited.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, B; Vanderpuye, V; Abdel-Wahab, S; Gaye, P; Kochbati, L; Diwani, M; Emwula, P; Oro, B; Lishimpi, K; Kigula-Mugambe, J; Dawotola, D; Wondemagegnehu, T; Nyongesa, C; Oumar, N; El-Omrani, A; Shuman, T; Langenhoven, L; Fourie, L

    2014-06-01

    To investigate patterns of practice in palliative radiotherapy in Africa. Fifteen centres in Africa provided detailed information about radiotherapy in both metastatic and locally advanced disease via a questionnaire. Information included general information (institution status, equipment, staff, patient number), radiotherapy and other treatment characteristics in bone metastasis, brain metastasis, metastatic spinal cord compression, lung and liver metastasis, as well as locally advanced tumours. The number of patients annually seen/treated ranged from 285 to 5000. Breast, cervix, head and neck, gastrointestinal and prostate cancer were the top five cancers overall. Eight (53%) institutions were without linear accelerators, four (27%) had a single one, whereas one institution each had two, three and four linear accelerators. The number of cobalt machines ranged from 0 to 2 (median 1). Most centres still prefer to use fractionated radiotherapy regimens over single-fraction regimens in bone metastasis, although most centres are now using single-fraction radiotherapy in retreatments. Radiotherapy in brain metastasis and metastatic spinal cord compression mostly conform to worldwide standards. Lung and liver metastases are rarely irradiated, largely as a consequence of the lack of modern radiotherapy technology. Locally advanced disease in various tumour sites was mostly palliated, in agreement with current evidence-based practices. African countries still lack adequate staffing and equipment to adequately address their clinical burden, being palliative in most cases. Emphasis should also be made on more rationally using existing capacities by using more of the single-fraction radiotherapy regimens, especially in bone metastasis. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Axes of resistance for tooth movement: does the center of resistance exist in 3-dimensional space?

    PubMed

    Viecilli, Rodrigo F; Budiman, Amanda; Burstone, Charles J

    2013-02-01

    The center of resistance is considered the most important reference point for tooth movement. It is often stated that forces through this point will result in tooth translation. The purpose of this article is to report the results of numeric experiments testing the hypothesis that centers of resistance do not exist in space as 3-dimensional points, primarily because of the geometric asymmetry of the periodontal ligament. As an alternative theory, we propose that, for an arbitrary tooth, translation references can be determined by 2-dimensional projection intersections of 3-dimensional axes of resistance. Finite element analyses were conducted on a maxillary first molar model to determine the position of the axes of rotation generated by 3-dimensional couples. Translation tests were performed to compare tooth movement by using different combinations of axes of resistance as references. The couple-generated axes of rotation did not intersect in 3 dimensions; therefore, they do not determine a 3-dimensional center of resistance. Translation was obtained by using projection intersections of the 2 axes of resistance perpendicular to the force direction. Three-dimensional axes of resistance, or their 2-dimensional projection intersections, should be used to plan movement of an arbitrary tooth. Clinical approximations to a small 3-dimensional "center of resistance volume" might be adequate in nearly symmetric periodontal ligament cases. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines.

  7. [What is the level of evidence of new techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Khadige, M; Peiffert, D; Supiot, S

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer radiotherapy has evolved from the old 2D technique to conformal, and then to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy. At the same time, image-guidance (IGRT) is routinely used. New techniques such as protontherapy or carbontherapy are being developed with the objective of increased efficacy, decreased treatment duration, toxicity or cost. This review summarizes the evidence-based medicine of new technologies in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  8. Development of the DVH management software for the biologically-guided evaluation of radiotherapy plan

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoKyong; Park, Hee Chul; Oh, Dongryul; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Jinsung

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop the dose volume histogram (DVH) management software which guides the evaluation of radiotherapy (RT) plan of a new case according to the biological consequences of the DVHs from the previously treated patients. Materials and Methods We determined the radiation pneumonitis (RP) as an biological response parameter in order to develop DVH management software. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of lung cancer patients treated with curative 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The biological event was defined as RP of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade III or more. Results The DVH management software consisted of three parts (pre-existing DVH database, graphical tool, and Pinnacle3 script). The pre-existing DVH data were retrieved from 128 patients. RP events were tagged to the specific DVH data through retrospective review of patients' medical records. The graphical too