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Sample records for 3-dimensional time-resolved model

  1. Receptor modeling for multiple time resolved species: The Baltimore supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogulei, David; Hopke, Philip K.; Zhou, Liming; Paatero, Pentti; Park, Seung Shik; Ondov, John M.

    A number of advances have been made toward solving receptor modeling problems using advanced factor analysis methods. Most recently, a factor analysis method has been developed for source apportionment utilizing aerosol compositional data with varying temporal resolution. The data used in that study had time resolutions ranged from 10 min to 1 h. In this work, this expanded model is tested using a data set from the Ponca Street site of the Baltimore supersite with time resolutions ranging from 30 min to 24 h. The nature of this data set implies that traditional eigenvalue-based methods cannot adequately resolve source factors for the atmospheric situation under consideration. Also, valuable temporal information is lost if one averaged or interpolated data in an attempt to produce a data set of the identical time resolution. Each data point has been used in its original time schedule and the source contributions were averaged to correspond to the specific sampling time interval. A weighting coefficient, w24, was incorporated in the modeling equations in order to improve data fitting for the 24-h data in the model. A total of nine sources were resolved: oil-fired power plant (2%), diesel emissions (1%), secondary sulfate (23%), coal-fired power plant (3%), incinerator (9%), steel plant (12%), aged sea salt (1%), secondary nitrate (23%), and spark-ignition emissions (26%). The results showed the very strong influence of the adjacent interstate highways I-95 and I-895 as well as the tunnel toll booths located to the south of the sampling site. Most of the sulfate observed was found to be associated with distant coal-fired power plants situated in the heavily industrialized midwestern parts of the United States. The contribution of the steel plant (<10 miles, 141°SE) to the observed PM concentrations (12%) was also significant.

  2. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Ruellasa, Antonio C. O.; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this article were to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Methods Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. Results All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article’s online version for viewing and downloading using the reader’s software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader’s software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. Conclusions When submitting manuscripts, authors can

  3. Modeling and optimization of a time-resolved proton radiographic imaging system for proton cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bin

    This dissertation describes a research project to test the clinical utility of a time-resolved proton radiographic (TRPR) imaging system by performing comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations of a physical device coupled with realistic lung cancer patient anatomy defined by 4DCT for proton therapy. A time-resolved proton radiographic imaging system was modeled through Monte Carlo simulations. A particle-tracking feature was employed to evaluate the performance of the proton imaging system, especially in its ability to visualize and quantify proton range variations during respiration. The Most Likely Path (MLP) algorithm was developed to approximate the multiple Coulomb scattering paths of protons for the purpose of image reconstruction. Spatial resolution of ˜ 1 mm and range resolution of 1.3% of the total range were achieved using the MLP algorithm. Time-resolved proton radiographs of five patient cases were reconstructed to track tumor motion and to calculate water equivalent length variations. By comparing with direct 4DCT measurement, the accuracy of tumor tracking was found to be better than 2 mm in five patient cases. Utilizing tumor tracking information to reduce margins to the planning target volume, a gated treatment plan was compared with un-gated treatment plan. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were used to quantify the gain in the quality of treatments. The EUD of the OARs was found to be reduced up to 11% and the corresponding NTCP of organs at risk (OARs) was found to be reduced up to 16.5%. These results suggest that, with image guidance by proton radiography, dose to OARs can be reduced and the corresponding NTCPs can be significantly reduced. The study concludes that the proton imaging system can accurately track the motion of the tumor and detect the WEL variations, leading to potential gains in using image-guided proton radiography for lung cancer treatments.

  4. A CTRW-based model of time-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging in a turbid medium

    PubMed Central

    Chernomordik, Victor; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Hassan, Moinuddin; Pajevic, Sinisa; Weiss, George H.

    2010-01-01

    We develop an analytic model of time-resolved fluorescent imaging of photons migrating through a semi-infinite turbid medium bounded by an infinite plane in the presence of a single stationary point fluorophore embedded in the medium. In contrast to earlier models of fluorescent imaging in which photon motion is assumed to be some form of continuous diffusion process, the present analysis is based on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) on a simple cubic lattice, the object being to estimate the position and lifetime of the fluorophore. Such information can provide information related to local variations in pH and temperature with potential medical significance. Aspects of the theory were tested using time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence from small inclusions inside tissue-like phantoms. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions provided that the fluorophore was not located too close to the planar boundary, a common problem in many diffusive systems. PMID:21057657

  5. A CTRW-based model of time-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging in a turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Chernomordik, Victor; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Hassan, Moinuddin; Pajevic, Sinisa; Weiss, George H

    2010-12-01

    We develop an analytic model of time-resolved fluorescent imaging of photons migrating through a semi-infinite turbid medium bounded by an infinite plane in the presence of a single stationary point fluorophore embedded in the medium. In contrast to earlier models of fluorescent imaging in which photon motion is assumed to be some form of continuous diffusion process, the present analysis is based on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) on a simple cubic lattice, the object being to estimate the position and lifetime of the fluorophore. Such information can provide information related to local variations in pH and temperature with potential medical significance. Aspects of the theory were tested using time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence from small inclusions inside tissue-like phantoms. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions provided that the fluorophore was not located too close to the planar boundary, a common problem in many diffusive systems.

  6. Enthalpy modulation of a laminar pulsed nitrogen arc jet: time-resolved diagnostics and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Krowka, J.; Coudert, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    In most studies, plasma spraying of liquid feedstock for ceramic coating elaboration requires limiting the arc motion to obtain stable plasma and to favour homogeneous treatment of nanomaterials. In this chapter, an alternative approach is proposed and consists of using a pulsed arc jet modulating the specific enthalpy in time. The momentum and heat transfers can be controlled provided a synchronous injection of materials is associated with it. The rotational temperatures of the nitrogen arc jet are measured by means of time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy synchronized with the arc voltage. The enthalpy modulation ratio (hmax/hmin) is shown to be close to 2.68. A simplified model of the dynamics of heat transfers is used to interpret diagnostics and highlights a time delay between arc voltage and enthalpy at the nozzle exit due to the characteristic time of heat transfers and residence time of plasma.

  7. Time-resolved simplified chemical kinetics modelling using computational singular perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, S. H.; Goussis, D. A.; Konopka, D.

    1989-01-01

    A CO-CH4-air reaction system is used to demonstrate the computational singular perturbation (CSP) method for deriving time-resolved simplified chemical kinetics models. CSP provides a programmable algorithm to group the given collection of elementary reactions into reaction groups which are ordered according to their speed. The concept of Importance Index k(m)exp s is introduced: k(m)exp s is defined to be a number between 0 and 1 which measures the importance of the m-th reaction group to the s-th reactant and can readily be computed from data generated by CSP. It is suggested that the robustness of the solutions of the reaction system can be qualitatively assessed by inspecting the Importance Index data.

  8. Model-based image reconstruction from time-resolved diffusion data

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, S.S.; Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

    1997-02-01

    This paper addresses the issue of reconstructing the unknown field of absorption and scattering coefficients from time-resolved measurements of diffused light in a computationally efficient manner. The intended application is optical tomography, which has generated considerable interest in recent times. The inverse problem is posed in the Bayesian framework. The maximum {ital a posteriori} (MAP) estimate is used to compute the reconstruction. We use an edge- preserving generalized Gaussian Markov random field to model the unknown image. The diffusion model used for the measurements is solved forward in time using a finite-difference approach known as the alternating-directions implicit method. This method requires the inversion of a tridiagonal matrix at each time step and is therefore of O(N) complexity, where N is the dimensionality of the image. Adjoint differentiation is used to compute the sensitivity of the measurements with respect to the unknown image. The novelty of our method lies in the computation of the sensitivity since we can achieve it in O(N) time as opposed to O(N{sup 2}) time required by the perturbation approach. We present results using simulated data to show that the proposed method yields superior quality reconstructions with substantial savings in computation.

  9. Validation of a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy apparatus in a rabbit atherosclerosis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin; Jo, Javier A.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Dorafshar, Amir; Reil, Todd; Qiao, Jian-Hua; Fishbein, Michael C.; Freischlag, Julie A.; Marcu, Laura

    2004-07-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (tr-LIFS) has been studied as a potential tool for in vivo diagnosis of atherosclerotic lesions. This study is to evaluate the potential of a compact fiber-optics based tr-LIFS instrument developed in our laboratory for in vivo analysis of atherosclerotic plaque composition. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy studies were performed in vivo on fifteen New Zealand White rabbits (atherosclerotic: N=8, control: N=7). Time-resolved fluorescence spectra were acquired (range: 360-600 nm, increment: 5 nm, total acquisition time: 65 s) from normal aorta wall and lesions in the abdominal aorta. Data were analyzed in terms of fluorescence emission spectra and wavelength specific lifetimes. Following trichrome staining, tissue specimens were analyzed histopathologically in terms of intima/media thickness and biochemical composition (collagen, elastin, foam cells, and etc). Based on intimal thickness, the lesions were divided into thin and thick lesions. Each group was further separated into two categories: collagen rich lesions and foam cell rich lesions based on their biochemical composition. The obtained spectral and time domain fluorescence signatures were subsequently correlated to the histopathological findings. The results have shown that time-domain fluorescence spectral features can be used in vivo to separate atherosclerotic lesions from normal aorta wall as well discrimination within certain types of lesions.

  10. Quantification of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy and tracer kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith; Diop, Mamadou

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation, which can cause progressive joint damage and disability. Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging have the potential to become potent monitoring tools for RA. We devised a method that combined time-resolved DOS and tracer kinetics modeling to rapidly and reliably quantify blood flow in the joint. Preliminary results obtained from two animals show that the technique can detect joint inflammation as early as 5 days after onset.

  11. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow field in a stenosed, compliant arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoghegan, P. H.; Buchmann, N. A.; Soria, J.; Jermy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Compliant (flexible) structures play an important role in several biological flows including the lungs, heart and arteries. Coronary heart disease is caused by a constriction in the artery due to a build-up of atherosclerotic plaque. This plaque is also of major concern in the carotid artery which supplies blood to the brain. Blood flow within these arteries is strongly influenced by the movement of the wall. To study these problems experimentally in vitro, especially using flow visualisation techniques, can be expensive due to the high-intensity and high-repetition rate light sources required. In this work, time-resolved particle image velocimetry using a relatively low-cost light-emitting diode illumination system was applied to the study of a compliant flow phantom representing a stenosed (constricted) carotid artery experiencing a physiologically realistic flow wave. Dynamic similarity between in vivo and in vitro conditions was ensured in phantom construction by matching the distensibility and the elastic wave propagation wavelength and in the fluid system through matching Reynolds ( Re) and Womersley number ( α) with a maximum, minimum and mean Re of 939, 379 and 632, respectively, and a α of 4.54. The stenosis had a symmetric constriction of 50 % by diameter (75 % by area). Once the flow rate reached a critical value, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were observed to occur in the shear layer between the main jet exiting the stenosis and a reverse flow region that occurred at a radial distance of 0.34 D from the axis of symmetry in the region on interest 0-2.5 D longitudinally downstream from the stenosis exit. The instability had an axis-symmetric nature, but as peak flow rate was approached this symmetry breaks down producing instability in the flow field. The characteristics of the vortex train were sensitive not only to the instantaneous flow rate, but also to whether the flow was accelerating or decelerating globally.

  12. Computational modeling of time-resolved fluorescence transport in turbid media for non-invasive clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging methods, including fluorescence lifetime sensing, are being developed for a variety of non-invasive clinical diagnostic procedures, including applications to early cancer diagnosis. Here, both the theoretical developments and experimental validations of a versatile, numerical Monte Carlo code that models photon migration in turbid media to include simulations of time-resolved fluorescence transport are presented. The developed numerical model was used to study, for the first time, the dependence of time-resolved fluorescence signals emanating from turbid media on the optical transport coefficients, fluorophore properties and source-detector configurations in single-layered turbid media as well as more complex multi-layered turbid media. The numerical codes presented here can be adapted to model a wide range of experimental techniques measuring the optical responses of biological tissues to laser irradiation and are demonstrated here for two specific applications (a) to model time-resolved fluorescence dynamics in human colon tissues and (b) to extract the frequency-dependent optical responses of a model adult human head to an incident laser-source whose intensity was harmonically modulated i.e. simulating frequency-domain measurements. Specifically, measurements of time-resolved fluorescence decays from a previous clinical study aimed toward detecting differences in tissue pathologies in patients undergoing gastro-intestinal endoscopy were simulated using the Monte Carlo model and results demonstrated that variations in tissue optical transport coefficients (absorption and scattering) alone could not account for the fluorescence decay differences detected between tissue pathologies in vivo. However, variations in fluorescence decay time as large as those detected clinically between normal and pre-malignant tissues (of 2 ns) could be accounted for by simulated variations in tissue morphology or biochemistry while intrinsic

  13. Constructing Time-Resolved Species Sensitivity Distributions Using a Hierarchical Toxico-Dynamic Model.

    PubMed

    Kon Kam King, Guillaume; Delignette-Muller, Marie Laure; Kefford, Ben J; Piscart, Christophe; Charles, Sandrine

    2015-10-20

    Classical species sensitivity distribution (SSD) is used to assess the threat to ecological communities posed by a contaminant and derive a safe concentration. It suffers from several well-documented weaknesses regarding its ecological realism and statistical soundness. Criticism includes that SSD does not take time-dependence of the data into account, that safe concentrations obtained from SSD might not be entirely protective of the target communities, and that there are issues of statistical representativity and of uncertainty propagation from the experimental data. We present a hierarchical toxico-dynamic (TD) model to simultaneously address these weaknesses: TD models incorporate time-dependence and allow improvement of the ecological relevance of safe concentrations, while the hierarchical approach affords appropriate propagation of uncertainty from the original data. We develop this model on a published data set containing the salinity tolerance over 72 h of 217 macroinvertebrate taxa, obtained through rapid toxicity testing (RTT). The shrinkage properties of the hierarchical model prove particularly adequate for modeling inhomogeneous RTT data. Taking into account the large variability in the species response, the model fits the whole data set well. Moreover, the model predicts a time-independent safe concentration below that obtained with classical SSD at 72 h, demonstrating under-protectiveness of the classical approach. PMID:26406398

  14. Space-time-resolved quantum electrodynamics: A (1+1)-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasgow, Scott; Smith, Dallas; Pritchett, Luke; Gardner, John; Ware, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a model that reduces quantum electrodynamics (QED) in time plus three spatial dimensions to time plus a single spatial dimension, making it is possible to numerically calculate the dynamic behavior of simple QED systems. The dimensionality is restricted in such a way as to preserve the influence of spin and angular momentum. In contrast to the S -matrix scattering approach, these calculations are not perturbative within the zero- and one-photon sector of the relevant Hilbert space. The model restricts the electron occupation number to one and the photon occupation number to zero or one. We use this model to calculate the dynamics of a so-called bare electron that dresses itself by a photon field.

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy at surfaces and adsorbate dynamics: Insights from a model-system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Emil; Mikkelsen, Anders; Verdozzi, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a model description of femtosecond laser induced desorption at surfaces. The substrate part of the system is taken into account as a (possibly semi-infinite) linear chain. Here, being especially interested in the early stages of dissociation, we consider a finite-size implementation of the model (i.e., a finite substrate), for which an exact numerical solution is possible. By time-evolving the many-body wave function, and also using results from a time-dependent density functional theory description for electron-nuclear systems, we analyze the competition between several surface-response mechanisms and electronic correlations in the transient and longer time dynamics under the influence of dipole-coupled fields. Our model allows us to explore how coherent multiple-pulse protocols can impact desorption in a variety of prototypical experiments.

  16. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation. PMID:27699137

  17. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation.

  18. Bio-physical modeling of time-resolved forward scattering by Listeria colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Hirleman, E. Daniel

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a detection system and associated protocol based on optical forward scattering where the bacterial colonies of various species and strains growing on solid nutrient surfaces produced unique scatter signatures. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a bio-physical model for the relevant phenomena. In particular, we considered time-varying macroscopic morphological properties of the growing colonies and modeled the scattering using scalar diffraction theory. For the present work we performed detailed studies with three species of Listeria; L. innocua, L. monocytogenes, and L. ivanovii. The baseline experiments involved cultures grown on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar and the scatter images were captured every six hours for an incubation period of 42 hours. The morphologies of the colonies were studied by phase contrast microscopy, including measurement of the diameter of the colony. Growth curves, represented by colony diameter as a function of time, were compared with the time-evolution of scattering signatures. Similar studies were carried out with L. monocytogenes grown on different substrates. Non-dimensionalizing incubation time in terms of the time to reach stationary phase was effective in reducing the dimensionality of the model. Bio-physical properties of the colony such as diameter, bacteria density variation, surface curvature/profile, and transmission coefficient are important parameters in predicting the features of the forward scattering signatures. These parameters are included in a baseline model that treats the colony as a concentric structure with radial variations in phase modulation. In some cases azimuthal variations and random phase inclusions were included as well. The end result is a protocol (growth media, incubation time and conditions) that produces reproducible and distinguishable scatter patterns for a variety of harmful food borne pathogens in a short period of time. Further, the bio-physical model we

  19. Time-resolved fluorescence study of electron transfer in a model peptide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald, Fiona; Hungerford, Graham; Moore, Barry D.; Birch, David J. S.

    1994-08-01

    At present there is a great deal of interest in the study of the transference of energy in biological systems. For example, electron transfer is of major importance in many synthetic and biological processes and in nature is mediated by proteins. Information regarding this process is therefore useful in leading to a greater understanding of phenomena such as photosynthesis and respiration. Previous work on protein systems has shown the electron transfer process to be complex to analyze because of the presence of competing pathways. This has led to the use of model systems to simplify the kinetics. We have synthesized novel model systems using peptides containing both a fluorescent methoxy- naphthalene donor and a dicyanoethylene group as a potential electron acceptor and observed fluorescence quenching for both dipeptide and oligopeptide systems. Biexponential fluorescence decay behavior was observed for all donor acceptor systems, with an increase in the amount of the shorter fluorescence decay component on increasing temperature.

  20. Experimental investigation and modeling of time resolved thrust of a flapping wing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apker, Thomas B.

    This work presents a novel method of measuring the unsteady thrust of a hovering flapping wing vehicle and the development of phenomenological models to simulate it. The measurements were taken using a balance beam with the flapping wings mounted at one end and a counterweight plus an accelerometer mounted at the other. The trust axis of the flapping wings was mounted vertically, and the counterweight was adjusted to balance the weight and average thrust of the flapping wings. An accelerometer mounted above the counterweight measured the unsteady thrust. This method decoupled the force sensing element from the mass of the flapping wings, as opposed to standard force sensors that use a linear spring. This study showed that the spectral content of the flapping wings extended to 15 times the flapping frequency, well above the resonant frequency of the mass-spring-damper system formed by a load cell and flapping mechanism. High speed video of the wings was used to determine the motion of the flexible structure. This motion was used to develop phenomenological linear models of flapping wing thrust generation. The results show that this approach to linear modeling produces a system of equations that can be used for flight dynamics simulation and controller design.

  1. Atmospheric transport modelling of time resolved 133Xe emissions from the isotope production facility ANSTO, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schöppner, M; Plastino, W; Hermanspahn, N; Hoffmann, E; Kalinowski, M; Orr, B; Tinker, R

    2013-12-01

    The verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) relies amongst other things on the continuous and worldwide monitoring of radioxenon. The characterization of the existing and legitimate background, which is produced mainly by nuclear power plants and isotope production facilities, is of high interest to improve the capabilities of the monitoring network. However, the emissions from legitimate sources can usually only be estimated. For this paper historic source terms of (133)Xe emissions from the isotope production facility at ANSTO, Sydney, Australia, have been made available in a daily resolution. Based on these high resolution data, different source term sets with weekly, monthly and yearly time resolution have been compiled. These different sets are then applied together with atmospheric transport modelling (ATM) to predict the concentration time series at two radioxenon monitoring stations. The results are compared with each other in order to examine the improvement of the prediction capability depending on the used time resolution of the most dominant source term in the region.

  2. Dynamics of Nuclear Receptor Helix-12 Switch of Transcription Activation by Modeling Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Decays

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Mariana R.B.; Martínez, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are major targets for pharmaceutical development. Many experiments demonstrate that their C-terminal Helix (H12) is more flexible in the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) without ligand, this increased mobility being correlated with transcription repression and human diseases. Crystal structures have been obtained in which the H12 is extended, suggesting the possibility of large amplitude H12 motions in solution. However, these structures were interpreted as possible crystallographic artifacts, and thus the microscopic nature of H12 movements is not well known. To bridge the gap between experiments and molecular models and provide a definitive picture of H12 motions in solution, extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ LBD, in which the H12 was bound to a fluorescent probe, were performed. A direct comparison of the modeled anisotropy decays to time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiments was obtained. It is shown that the decay rates are dependent on the interactions of the probe with the surface of the protein, and display little correlation with the flexibility of the H12. Nevertheless, for the probe to interact with the surface of the LBD, the H12 must be folded over the body of the LBD. Therefore, the molecular mobility of the H12 should preserve the globularity of the LBD, so that ligand binding and dissociation occur by diffusion through the surface of a compact receptor. These results advance the comprehension of both ligand-bound and ligand-free receptor structures in solution, and also guide the interpretation of time-resolved anisotropy decays from a molecular perspective, particularly by the use of simulations. PMID:24094408

  3. Time-resolved functional analysis of acute impairment of frataxin expression in an inducible cell model of Friedreich ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Poburski, Dörte; Boerner, Josefine Barbara; Koenig, Michel; Ristow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a GAA triplet repeat expansion in the first intron of the frataxin gene, which results in reduced expression levels of the corresponding protein. Despite numerous animal and cellular models, therapeutic options that mechanistically address impaired frataxin expression are lacking. Here, we have developed a new mammalian cell model employing the Cre/loxP recombination system to induce a homozygous or heterozygous frataxin knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Induction of Cre-mediated disruption by tamoxifen was successfully tested on RNA and protein levels. After loss of frataxin protein, cell division, aconitase activity and oxygen consumption rates were found to be decreased, while ROS production was increased in the homozygous state. By contrast, in the heterozygous state no such changes were observed. A time-resolved analysis revealed the loss of aconitase activity as an initial event after induction of complete frataxin deficiency, followed by secondarily elevated ROS production and a late increase in iron content. Initial impairments of oxygen consumption and ATP production were found to be compensated in the late state and seemed to play a minor role in Friedreich ataxia pathophysiology. In conclusion and as predicted from its proposed role in iron sulfur cluster (ISC) biosynthesis, disruption of frataxin primarily causes impaired function of ISC-containing enzymes, whereas other consequences, including elevated ROS production and iron accumulation, appear secondary. These parameters and the robustness of the newly established system may additionally be used for a time-resolved study of pharmacological candidates in a HTS manner. PMID:27106929

  4. Establishment of Magnetic Microparticles-Assisted Time-Resolved Fluoroimmunoassay for Determinating Biomarker Models in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhi-Qi; Liu, Tian-Cai; Zhuang, Si-Hui; Lin, Guan-Feng; Hou, Jing-Yuan; Wu, Ying-Song

    2015-01-01

    In order to early screen and detect suspected biomarkers from pathogens and the human body itself, tracers or reaction strategies that can act as signal enhancers have been proposed forth at purpose. In this paper, we discussed the applicability of magnetic microparticles-assisted time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (MMPs-TRFIA) for sensitive determination of potential analytes. Hepatitis B e antigen, antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and free triiodothyronine were used as biomarker models to explore the reliability of the method. By coupling with bioprobes, MMPs were used as immunoassay carriers to capture target molecules. Under optimal condition, assay performance, including accuracy, precision and specificity, was outstanding and demonstrated satisfactory. To further evaluate the performance of the MMPs-TRFIA in patients, a total of 728 serum samples from hospital were analyzed for three biomarkers in parallel with the proposed method and chemiluminescence immunoassay kit commercially available. Fairly good agreements are obtained between the two methods via data analysis. Not only that but the reliability of MMPs-TRFIA has also been illustrated by three different reaction models. It is confirmed that the novel method modified with MMPs has been established and showed great potential applications in both biological detection and clinical diagnosis, including big molecule protein and low molecular weight haptens. PMID:26103625

  5. Time-resolved non-sequential ray-tracing modelling of non-line-of-sight picosecond pulse LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Adam; Chan, Susan; Warburton, Ryan; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Leach, Jonathan; Faccio, Daniele; Lee, Stephen T.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to detect motion and to track a moving object that is hidden around a corner or behind a wall provides a crucial advantage when physically going around the obstacle is impossible or dangerous. One recently demonstrated approach to achieving this goal makes use of non-line-of-sight picosecond pulse laser ranging. This approach has recently become interesting due to the availability of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) receivers with picosecond time resolution. We present a time-resolved non-sequential ray-tracing model and its application to indirect line-of-sight detection of moving targets. The model makes use of the Zemax optical design programme's capabilities in stray light analysis where it traces large numbers of rays through multiple random scattering events in a 3D non-sequential environment. Our model then reconstructs the generated multi-segment ray paths and adds temporal analysis. Validation of this model against experimental results is shown. We then exercise the model to explore the limits placed on system design by available laser sources and detectors. In particular we detail the requirements on the laser's pulse energy, duration and repetition rate, and on the receiver's temporal response and sensitivity. These are discussed in terms of the resulting implications for achievable range, resolution and measurement time while retaining eye-safety with this technique. Finally, the model is used to examine potential extensions to the experimental system that may allow for increased localisation of the position of the detected moving object, such as the inclusion of multiple detectors and/or multiple emitters.

  6. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements with Wall Shear Stress and Uncertainty Quantification for the FDA Nozzle Model.

    PubMed

    Raben, Jaime S; Hariharan, Prasanna; Robinson, Ronald; Malinauskas, Richard; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2016-03-01

    We present advanced particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing, post-processing, and uncertainty estimation techniques to support the validation of computational fluid dynamics analyses of medical devices. This work is an extension of a previous FDA-sponsored multi-laboratory study, which used a medical device mimicking geometry referred to as the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Experimental measurements were performed using time-resolved PIV at five overlapping regions of the model for Reynolds numbers in the nozzle throat of 500, 2000, 5000, and 8000. Images included a twofold increase in spatial resolution in comparison to the previous study. Data was processed using ensemble correlation, dynamic range enhancement, and phase correlations to increase signal-to-noise ratios and measurement accuracy, and to resolve flow regions with large velocity ranges and gradients, which is typical of many blood-contacting medical devices. Parameters relevant to device safety, including shear stress at the wall and in bulk flow, were computed using radial basis functions. In addition, in-field spatially resolved pressure distributions, Reynolds stresses, and energy dissipation rates were computed from PIV measurements. Velocity measurement uncertainty was estimated directly from the PIV correlation plane, and uncertainty analysis for wall shear stress at each measurement location was performed using a Monte Carlo model. Local velocity uncertainty varied greatly and depended largely on local conditions such as particle seeding, velocity gradients, and particle displacements. Uncertainty in low velocity regions in the sudden expansion section of the nozzle was greatly reduced by over an order of magnitude when dynamic range enhancement was applied. Wall shear stress uncertainty was dominated by uncertainty contributions from velocity estimations, which were shown to account for 90-99% of the total uncertainty. This study provides advancements in the PIV processing methodologies over

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence of thioredoxin single-tryptophan mutants: modeling experimental results with minimum perturbation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Norberto D., Jr.; Haydock, Christopher; Prendergast, Franklyn G.

    1994-08-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence decay of single tryptophan (Trp) proteins is typically described using either a distribution of lifetimes or a sum of two or more exponential terms. A possible interpretation for this fluorescence decay heterogeneity is the existence of different isomeric conformations of Trp about its (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Are multiple Trp conformations compatible with the remainder of the protein in its crystallographic configuration or do they require repacking of neighbor side chains? It is conceivable that isomers of the neighbor side chains interconvert slowly on the fluorescence timescale and contribute additional lifetime components to the fluorescence intensity. We have explored this possibility by performing minimum perturbation mapping simulations of Trp 28 and Trp 31 in thioredoxin (TRX) using CHARMm 22. Mappings of Trp 29 and Trp 31 give the TRX Trp residue energy landscape as a function of (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay of mutant TRX (W28F and W31F) are measured and interpreted in light of the above simulations. Relevant observables, like order parameters and isomerization rates, can be derived from the minimum perturbation maps and compared with experiment.

  8. 3-dimensional modeling of transcranial magnetic stimulation: Design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Felipe Santiago

    Over the past three decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has emerged as an effective tool for many research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications in humans. TMS delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this dissertation, we present a thorough examination of the total electric field induced by TMS in air and a realistic head model with clinically relevant coil poses. In the first chapter, a detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry was shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of primary E-field calculations. Three-dimensional models which accounted for the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed primary E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured values) whereas simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured). In the second chapter, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3-D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistic head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. We found that secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes were predominantly between 25% and 45% of the primary E-fields magnitude. The direction of the secondary E

  9. 3-dimensional current collection model. [Of Tethered Satellite System 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kai-Shen; Shiah, A.; Wu, S.T.; Stone, N. Alabama, University, Huntsvilll NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ae )

    1992-07-01

    A three-dimensional, time dependent current collection model of a satellite has been developed for the TSS-1 system. The system has been simulated particularly for the Research of Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) experiment. The Maxwellian distributed particles with the geomagnetic field effects are applied in this numerical simulation. The preliminary results indicate that a ring current is observed surrounding the satellite in the equatorial plane. This ring current is found between the plasma sheath and the satellite surface and is oscillating with a time scale of approximately 1 microsec. This is equivalent to the electron plasma frequency. An hour glass shape of electron distribution was observed when the viewing direction is perpendicular to the equatorial plane. This result is consistent with previous findings from Linson (1969) and Antoniades et al. (1990). Electrons that are absorbed by the satellite are limited from the background ionosphere as indicated by Parker and Murphy (1967). 6 refs.

  10. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  11. Investigation of the near and far wake of a bluff airfoil model with trailing edge modifications using time-resolved particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krentel, Daniel; Nitsche, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    Experimental investigations on the topology and the structure of the near and far wake of a quasi-2D blunt NACA0012 airfoil cut at 80 % of the original chord length c master have been performed by means of time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The experiments took place in a closed-loop water tunnel at a model-thickness H-based Reynolds number of Re H = 44,000. The periodic and alternating vortex formation process at the base of the bluff model with a dimensionless frequency of Sr h = 0.2 (relating to the trailing edge height h) was investigated in detail. Subsequently, four modifications of the trailing edge geometry (broken trailing edge, square-wave base, stepped afterbody and extension of the reference model by Δ c/c_master = 7.5 %) have been investigated in order to mitigate the periodic vortex formation and the alternating shedding process. In the far wake, a considerable decrease in momentum loss and resulting drag force in the range of 29 % has been achieved for this specific Reynolds number. Investigations of the time-resolved flow field proved that the periodic, alternating flow separation can be attenuated resulting in an optimized recirculation region and a low-loss wake. It can be inferred that passive flow control means like modifications of the rear end geometry of quasi-2D blunt models are a capable method to improve the flow field with respect to a minimization of momentum losses in the wake.

  12. Combined Monte Carlo and path-integral method for simulated library of time-resolved reflectance curves from layered tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-02-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are considered the "gold standard" for mathematical description of photon transport in tissue, but they can require large computation times. Therefore, it is important to develop simple and efficient methods for accelerating MC simulations, especially when a large "library" of related simulations is needed. A semi-analytical method involving MC simulations and a path-integral (PI) based scaling technique generated time-resolved reflectance curves from layered tissue models. First, a zero-absorption MC simulation was run for a tissue model with fixed scattering properties in each layer. Then, a closed-form expression for the average classical path of a photon in tissue was used to determine the percentage of time that the photon spent in each layer, to create a weighted Beer-Lambert factor to scale the time-resolved reflectance of the simulated zero-absorption tissue model. This method is a unique alternative to other scaling techniques in that it does not require the path length or number of collisions of each photon to be stored during the initial simulation. Effects of various layer thicknesses and absorption and scattering coefficients on the accuracy of the method will be discussed.

  13. Time-resolved optical diffusion tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appledorn, C. Robert; Kruger, Robert A.; Liu, Pingyu

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model is proposed describing time-resolved output measurements obtained on the surface of a diffusely scattering body due to an input pulse of near-IR light at a different location also on the surface. Such measurements can be obtained using a pulsed near-IR laser coupled with a CCD streak camera. The scattering body is assumed to exhibit homogenous scattering and spatially varying absorption. Using this model, an iterative algorithm is derived using maximum likelihood methods that allows the reconstruction of the spatial absorption pattern from a set of time-resolved tomographic measurements. The methodology places no restrictions upon the time-of-arrival of the detected photons, thus permitting the entire time-resolved signal to be used in the reconstruction process. The reconstruction algorithm is easily initialized and preliminary results indicate that stable reconstructions can be performed.

  14. Exciton transfer between localized states in CdS1- xSex alloys: Time-resolved photoluminescence and theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdon, C.; Lavallard, P.

    1990-04-01

    Luminescence decay curves as well as time-resolved and time-integrated spectra obtained with selective excitation in the localized exciton band of CdS1- xSex are fitted using two theoretical models. In the first one, exciton transfer to lower energy states occurs through tunnel effect assisted by acoustical phonons. From the energy dependence of the lifetime measured with quasi-resonant excitation in the localized exciton band, we determine the characteristic energy of the tail density of states: E0 = 2.2 meV. The radiative lifetime is set equal to 1.5 ns. We show that both piezoelectric and deformation potential coupling have to be taken into account to describe exciton transfer. The second model is phenomenological and was used to describe exciton transfer in GaAs1- xPx alloys. We obtain a good agreement with experimental results using parameters close to the previous ones. We demonstrate that, for selective excitation in the low energy side of the luminescence band, not only the transfer process but also luminescence assisted by acoustical phonons must be taken into account in order to explain time-resolved luminescence results.

  15. Time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haller, Emmanuel B.

    1996-01-01

    In response to an invitation by the editor-in-chief, I would like to present the current status of time-domain imaging. With exciting new photon diffusion techniques being developed in the frequency domain and promising optical coherence tomography, time-resolved transillumination is in constant evolution and the subject of passionate discussions during the numerous conferences dedicated to this subject. The purpose of time-resolved optical tomography is to provide noninvasive, high-resolution imaging of the interior of living bodies by the use of nonionizing radiation. Moreover, the use of visible to near-infrared wavelength yields metabolic information. Breast cancer screening is the primary potential application for time-resolved imaging. Neurology and tissue characterization are also possible fields of applications. Time- resolved transillumination and optical tomography should not only improve diagnoses, but the welfare of the patient. As no overview of this technique has yet been presented to my knowledge, this paper briefly describes the various methods enabling time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods, as well as the clinical challenges they face are discussed. Although an analytic and computable model of light transport through tissues is essential for a meaningful interpretation of the transillumination process, this paper will not dwell on the mathematics of photon propagation.

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy at surfaces and adsorbate dynamics:insights from a model-system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Emil; Mikkelsen, Anders; Verdozzi, Claudio

    We introduce a finite-system, model description of the initial stages of femtosecond laser induced desorption at surfaces. Using the exact many-body time evolution and also results from a novel time-dependent DFT description for electron-nuclear systems, we analyse the competition between several surface-response mechanisms and electronic correlations in the transient and longer time dynamics under the influence of dipole-coupled fields. Our model allows us to explore how coherent multiple-pulse protocols impact desorption in a variety of prototypical experiments.

  17. Time-resolved EPR investigation of potential model systems for acrylate polymer main chain radicals based on esters of Kemp's tri-acid.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Natalia V; Gorelik, Elena V; Magnus-Aryitey, Damaris; Hill, Terence E; Forbes, Malcolm D E

    2009-05-14

    Methyl esters of Kemp's tri-acid and cyclohexanetricarboxylic acid are structurally similar to acrylate polymers, having the same functionalities and stereoregularities as poly(methylmethacrylate) and poly(methylacrylate), respectively. The photochemistry and free radicals from these model systems have been studied using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with laser flash photolysis at 248 nm. Chemically induced electron spin polarization from the triplet mechanism (net emission) is observed. Well-resolved spectra are obtained at all temperatures for the model system radicals, which are determined to be in the slow motion condition, that is, there is no interconversion of chair conformations. The temperature dependence of the spectra is minimal; some hyperfine lines shift as the temperature increases, but without much broadening. Density functional theory calculations are presented and discussed in support of the experimental data.

  18. Investigations on the Interactions of 5-Fluorouracil with Herring Sperm DNA: Steady State/Time Resolved and Molecular Modeling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Karthikeyan, Subramani; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the interaction of 5-Fluorouracil with herring sperm DNA is reported using spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. This binding study of 5-FU with hs-DNA is of paramount importance in understanding chemico-biological interactions for drug design, pharmacy and biochemistry without altering the original structure. The challenge of the study was to find the exact binding mode of the drug 5-Fluorouracil with hs-DNA. From the absorption studies, a hyperchromic effect was observed for the herring sperm DNA in the presence of 5-Fluorouracil and a binding constant of 6.153 × 103 M-1 for 5-Fluorouracil reveals the existence of weak interaction between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. Ethidium bromide loaded herring sperm DNA showed a quenching in the fluorescence intensity after the addition of 5-Fluorouracil. The binding constants for 5-Fluorouracil stranded DNA and competitive bindings of 5-FU interacting with DNA-EB systems were examined by fluorescence spectra. The Stern-Volmer plots and fluorescence lifetime results confirm the static quenching nature of the drug-DNA complex. The binding constant Kb was 2.5 × 104 L mol-1 and the number of binding sites are 1.17. The 5-FU on DNA system was calculated using double logarithmic plot. From the Forster nonradiative energy transfer study it has been found that the distance of 5-FU from DNA was 4.24 nm. In addition to the spectroscopic results, the molecular modeling studies also revealed the major groove binding as well as the partial intercalation mode of binding between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. The binding energy and major groove binding as -6.04 kcal mol-1 and -6.31 kcal mol-1 were calculated from the modeling studies. All the testimonies manifested that binding modes between 5-Fluorouracil and DNA were evidenced to be groove binding and in partial intercalative mode.

  19. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  20. Time-resolved diagnostics and kinetic modelling of the ignition transient of a H2 + 10% N2 square wave modulated hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.

    2012-08-01

    Time-resolved emission spectroscopy and quadrupole mass spectrometry are used for the experimental diagnostics of a low pressure (8 Pa) modulated dc hollow cathode discharge of H2 + 10% N2. The time-dependent experimental results are reasonably accounted for by a zero-order kinetic model developed in our group and checked previously with steady-state measurements (Carrasco et al 2011 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13 19561), which is now validated under more stringent conditions. In addition to the discharge precursors, which are partly recycled in wall reactions, NH3 is produced in small but appreciable amounts. The slower evolution of NH3, as compared with H2 and N2, is traced back to the multistep surface reaction mechanism responsible for its production. An analysis of the time variation of optical emission measurements shows that excited NH(c 1Π) radicals are essentially formed in the electron-impact dissociation of NH3.

  1. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  2. Experimental support for a novel compount motion model for the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of TMA-PDH in lipid vesicle bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Johan M.; van Faassen, Ernst E.; van Ginkel, Gijsbert

    1994-08-01

    Many structural studies of lipid membrane systems employ fluorescence anisotropy experiments on lipid soluble dyes that have been embedded in the lipid bilayers as optical probes. The conventional models for the interpretation of the anisotropy decay curves have a number of conceptual problems related to the form of the effective potential experienced by the probe molecules due to the interaction with the surrounding lipid environment. Therefore, a new model recently proposed by van der Sijs. (Chem. Phys. Letters 216 (1993) 559). In this paper we test this new compound model in a reanalysis of time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiments using TMA-DPH as a fluorescent probe. The orientational order and reorientational dynamics of TMA-DPH in small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) of POPC, DOPC, EGGPC, DLPC, EGGPG, DOPG, SQDG and DGDG was studied. We find that the new model improves the description of the underlying motional processes at short time scales and lacks certain unphysical aspects of previous models, e.g. a population of TMA-DPH probe molecules at and beyond 90° with the local bilayer normal. In contrast with previous models the compound motion model yields a good agreement between our vesicle data and previously published results from oriental lipid bilayers using ESR and AFD.

  3. Finite element modelling of a 3 dimensional dielectrophoretic flow separator device for optimal bioprocessing conditions.

    PubMed

    Fatoyinbo, H O; Hughes, M P

    2004-01-01

    Planar 2-dimensional dielectrophoresis electrode geometries are limited in only being capable of handling fluid volumes ranging from picolitres to hundreds of microliters per hour. A 3-dimensional electrode system has been developed capable of handling significantly larger volumes of fluid. Using finite element modeling the electric field distribution within various bore sizes was realized. From these simulations it is possible to optimize bioprocessing factors influencing the performance of a dielectrophoretic separator. Process calculations have shown that flow-rates of 25ml hr/sup -1/ or more can be attained for the separation of heterogeneous populations of bio-particles based on their dielectric properties.

  4. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans . PMID:25995102

  5. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans .

  6. Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; French, Paul M W; Phillips, David

    2005-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the fluorescence emission can be characterised not only by intensity and position, but also by lifetime, polarization and wavelength. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can report on photophysical events that are difficult or impossible to observe by fluorescence intensity imaging, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging (TR-FAIM) can measure the rotational mobility of a fluorophore in its environment. We compare different FLIM methods: a chief advantage of wide-field time-gating and phase modulation methods is the speed of acquisition whereas for time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) based confocal scanning it is accuracy in the fluorescence decay. FLIM has been used to image interactions between proteins such as receptor oligomerisation and to reveal protein phosphorylation by detecting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition, FLIM can also probe the local environment of fluorophores, reporting, for example, on the local pH, refractive index, ion or oxygen concentration without the need for ratiometric measurements.

  7. Investigation of Asymmetries in Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching Reactors Using a 3-Dimensional Hybrid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.; Grapperhaus, Michael J.

    1996-10-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) reactors have the potential for scaling to large area substrates while maintaining azimuthal symmetry or side-to-side uniformity across the wafer. Asymmetric etch properties in these devices have been attributed to transmission line properties of the coil, internal structures (such as wafer clamps) and non-uniform gas injection or pumping. To investigate the origins of asymmetric etch properties, a 3-dimensional hybrid model has been developed. The hybrid model contains electromagnetic, electric circuit, electron energy equation, and fluid modules. Continuity and momentum equations are solved in the fluid module along with Poisson's equation. We will discuss results for ion and radical flux uniformity to the substrate while varying the transmission line characteristics of the coil, symmetry of gas inlets/pumping, and internal structures. Comparisons will be made to expermental measurements of etch rates. ^*Work supported by SRC, NSF, ARPA/AFOSR and LAM Research.

  8. Using 3-dimensional printing to create presurgical models for endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, James K

    2014-09-01

    Advances in endodontic surgery--from both a technological and procedural perspective-have been significant over the last 18 years. Although these technologies and procedural enhancements have significantly improved endodontic surgical treatment outcomes, there is still an ongoing challenge of overcoming the limitations of interpreting preoperative 2-dimensional (2-D) radiographic representation of a 3-dimensional (3-D) in vivo surgical field. Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has helped to address this issue by providing a 3-D enhancement of the 2-D radiograph. The next logical step to further improve a presurgical case 3-D assessment is to create a surgical model from the CBCT scan. The purpose of this article is to introduce 3-D printing of CBCT scans for creating presurgical models for endodontic surgery. PMID:25197746

  9. Argon metastables in HiPIMS: validation of the ionization region model by direct comparison to time resolved tunable diode-laser diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, G. D.; Brenning, N.; Vitelaru, C.; Lundin, D.; Minea, T.

    2015-08-01

    The volume plasma interactions of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges operated with a Ti target is analyzed in detail by combining time-resolved diagnostics with modeling of plasma kinetics. The model employed is the ionization region model (IRM) with an improved and detailed treatment of the kinetics of the argon metastable (Arm) state, called m-IRM. The diagnostics used is tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TD-LAS) of the Arm state, which gives the line-of-sight density integrated along the laser path parallel to the target surface. The TD-LAS recordings exhibit quite complex temporal evolutions Arm(t), with distinct features that are shown to reflect the time evolution of the plasma (the electron density and temperature), and of the argon gas (gas rarefaction and refill). The Arm(t) function is thus a tracer for the most important aspects of internal discharge physics, and therefore suitable for model testing and validation. The IRM model is constructed to be locked to obey specific experimental macroscopic discharge parameters, specifically the discharge current ID(t) and the voltage UD(t). It has to this purpose been run with the appropriate process gas pressures (from 0.67 to 2.67 Pa), with the experimentally applied voltage pulse profiles UD(t), and with the resulting current pulse profiles ID(t) (with maxima from 0.5 to 70 A). It is shown that the model reproduces the features in the TD-LAS measurements: both the Arm(t) evolution in single pulses, and how the pulse shapes change with gas pressure and with pulse amplitude. The good agreement between the measurements and model output is in this work taken to validate the basic assumptions of the m-IRM. In addition, the m-IRM results have been used to unravel the connections between volume plasma kinetics and various features recorded in the TD-LAS measurement, and to generalize the foremost characteristics of the studied discharges.

  10. 3-Dimensional Geologic Modeling Applied to the Structural Characterization of Geothermal Systems: Astor Pass, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett

    2013-04-16

    Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, USA, are controlled by a variety of fault intersection and fault interaction areas. Understanding the specific geometry of the structures most conducive to broad-scale geothermal circulation is crucial to both the mitigation of the costs of geothermal exploration (especially drilling) and to the identification of geothermal systems that have no surface expression (blind systems). 3-dimensional geologic modeling is a tool that can elucidate the specific stratigraphic intervals and structural geometries that host geothermal reservoirs. Astor Pass, NV USA lies just beyond the northern extent of the dextral Pyramid Lake fault zone near the boundary between two distinct structural domains, the Walker Lane and the Basin and Range, and exhibits characteristics of each setting. Both northwest-striking, left-stepping dextral faults of the Walker Lane and kinematically linked northerly striking normal faults associated with the Basin and Range are present. Previous studies at Astor Pass identified a blind geothermal system controlled by the intersection of west-northwest and north-northwest striking dextral-normal faults. Wells drilled into the southwestern quadrant of the fault intersection yielded 94°C fluids, with geothermometers suggesting a maximum reservoir temperature of 130°C. A 3-dimensional model was constructed based on detailed geologic maps and cross-sections, 2-dimensional seismic data, and petrologic analysis of the cuttings from three wells in order to further constrain the structural setting. The model reveals the specific geometry of the fault interaction area at a level of detail beyond what geologic maps and cross-sections can provide.

  11. Time- and frequency-dependent model of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with a picosecond-duration probe pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Hans U.; Miller, Joseph D.; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs/ps CARS) technique presents a promising alternative to either fs time-resolved or ps frequency-resolved CARS in both gas-phase thermometry and condensed-phase excited-state dynamics applications. A theoretical description of time-dependent CARS is used to examine this recently developed probe technique, and quantitative comparisons of the full time-frequency evolution show excellent accuracy in predicting the experimental vibrational CARS spectra obtained for two model systems. The interrelated time- and frequency-domain spectral signatures of gas-phase species produced by hybrid fs/ps CARS are explored with a focus on gas-phase N2 vibrational CARS, which is commonly used as a thermometric diagnostic of combusting flows. In particular, we discuss the merits of the simple top-hat spectral filter typically used to generate the ps-duration hybrid fs/ps CARS probe pulse, including strong discrimination against non-resonant background that often contaminates CARS signal. It is further demonstrated, via comparison with vibrational CARS results on a time-evolving solvated organic chromophore, that this top-hat probe-pulse configuration can provide improved spectral resolution, although the degree of improvement depends on the dephasing timescales of the observed molecular modes and the duration and timing of the narrowband final pulse. Additionally, we discuss the virtues of a frequency-domain Lorentzian probe-pulse lineshape and its potential for improving the hybrid fs/ps CARS technique as a diagnostic in high-pressure gas-phase thermometry applications.

  12. Time- and frequency-dependent model of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with a picosecond-duration probe pulse.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Hans U; Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Meyer, Terrence R; Prince, Benjamin D; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2014-01-14

    The hybrid femtosecond∕picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs∕ps CARS) technique presents a promising alternative to either fs time-resolved or ps frequency-resolved CARS in both gas-phase thermometry and condensed-phase excited-state dynamics applications. A theoretical description of time-dependent CARS is used to examine this recently developed probe technique, and quantitative comparisons of the full time-frequency evolution show excellent accuracy in predicting the experimental vibrational CARS spectra obtained for two model systems. The interrelated time- and frequency-domain spectral signatures of gas-phase species produced by hybrid fs∕ps CARS are explored with a focus on gas-phase N2 vibrational CARS, which is commonly used as a thermometric diagnostic of combusting flows. In particular, we discuss the merits of the simple top-hat spectral filter typically used to generate the ps-duration hybrid fs∕ps CARS probe pulse, including strong discrimination against non-resonant background that often contaminates CARS signal. It is further demonstrated, via comparison with vibrational CARS results on a time-evolving solvated organic chromophore, that this top-hat probe-pulse configuration can provide improved spectral resolution, although the degree of improvement depends on the dephasing timescales of the observed molecular modes and the duration and timing of the narrowband final pulse. Additionally, we discuss the virtues of a frequency-domain Lorentzian probe-pulse lineshape and its potential for improving the hybrid fs∕ps CARS technique as a diagnostic in high-pressure gas-phase thermometry applications.

  13. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chen-Ting; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence-based detection techniques are popular in high throughput screening due to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Four commonly used techniques exist, each with distinct characteristics. Fluorescence intensity assays are the simplest to run, but suffer the most from signal interference. Fluorescence polarization assays show less interference from the compounds or the instrument, but require a design that results in change of fluorophore-containing moiety size and usually have narrow assay signal window. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used for detecting protein-protein interactions and is constrained not by the sizes of binding partners, but rather by the distance between fluorophores. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), an advanced modification of FRET approach utilizes special fluorophores with long-lived fluorescence and earns its place near the top of fluorescent techniques list by its performance and robustness, characterized by larger assay window and minimized compound spectral interference. TR-FRET technology can be applied in biochemical or cell-based in vitro assays with ease. It is commonly used to detect modulation of protein-protein interactions and in detection of products of biochemical reactions and cellular activities. PMID:27316992

  14. Using Interior Point Method Optimization Techniques to Improve 2- and 3-Dimensional Models of Earth Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, A.; Gutierrez, A. E.; Velasco, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    2- and 3-Dimensional models obtained from the inversion of geophysical data are widely used to represent the structural composition of the Earth and to constrain independent models obtained from other geological data (e.g. core samples, seismic surveys, etc.). However, inverse modeling of gravity data presents a very unstable and ill-posed mathematical problem, given that solutions are non-unique and small changes in parameters (position and density contrast of an anomalous body) can highly impact the resulting model. Through the implementation of an interior-point method constrained optimization technique, we improve the 2-D and 3-D models of Earth structures representing known density contrasts mapping anomalous bodies in uniform regions and boundaries between layers in layered environments. The proposed techniques are applied to synthetic data and gravitational data obtained from the Rio Grande Rift and the Cooper Flat Mine region located in Sierra County, New Mexico. Specifically, we improve the 2- and 3-D Earth models by getting rid of unacceptable solutions (those that do not satisfy the required constraints or are geologically unfeasible) given the reduction of the solution space.

  15. A 3-dimensional DTI MRI-based model of GBM growth and response to radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Leith; Patel, Vishal; Wen, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is both the most common and the most aggressive intra-axial brain tumor, with a notoriously poor prognosis. To improve this prognosis, it is necessary to understand the dynamics of GBM growth, response to treatment and recurrence. The present study presents a mathematical diffusion-proliferation model of GBM growth and response to radiation therapy based on diffusion tensor (DTI) MRI imaging. This represents an important advance because it allows 3-dimensional tumor modeling in the anatomical context of the brain. Specifically, tumor infiltration is guided by the direction of the white matter tracts along which glioma cells infiltrate. This provides the potential to model different tumor growth patterns based on location within the brain, and to simulate the tumor's response to different radiation therapy regimens. Tumor infiltration across the corpus callosum is simulated in biologically accurate time frames. The response to radiation therapy, including changes in cell density gradients and how these compare across different radiation fractionation protocols, can be rendered. Also, the model can estimate the amount of subthreshold tumor which has extended beyond the visible MR imaging margins. When combined with the ability of being able to estimate the biological parameters of invasiveness and proliferation of a particular GBM from serial MRI scans, it is shown that the model has potential to simulate realistic tumor growth, response and recurrence patterns in individual patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of a DTI-based GBM growth and radiation therapy treatment model. PMID:27572745

  16. The Effectiveness of an Interactive 3-Dimensional Computer Graphics Model for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoko; Moriguchi, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Background Medical students often have difficulty achieving a conceptual understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy, such as bone alignment, muscles, and complex movements, from 2-dimensional (2D) images. To this end, animated and interactive 3-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) can provide better visual information to users. In medical fields, research on the advantages of 3DCG in medical education is relatively new. Objective To determine the educational effectiveness of interactive 3DCG. Methods We divided 100 participants (27 men, mean (SD) age 17.9 (0.6) years, and 73 women, mean (SD) age 18.1 (1.1) years) from the Health Sciences University of Mongolia (HSUM) into 3DCG (n = 50) and textbook-only (control) (n = 50) groups. The control group used a textbook and 2D images, while the 3DCG group was trained to use the interactive 3DCG shoulder model in addition to a textbook. We conducted a questionnaire survey via an encrypted satellite network between HSUM and Tokushima University. The questionnaire was scored on a 5-point Likert scale from strongly disagree (score 1) to strongly agree (score 5). Results Interactive 3DCG was effective in undergraduate medical education. Specifically, there was a significant difference in mean (SD) scores between the 3DCG and control groups in their response to questionnaire items regarding content (4.26 (0.69) vs 3.85 (0.68), P = .001) and teaching methods (4.33 (0.65) vs 3.74 (0.79), P < .001), but no significant difference in the Web category. Participants also provided meaningful comments on the advantages of interactive 3DCG. Conclusions Interactive 3DCG materials have positive effects on medical education when properly integrated into conventional education. In particular, our results suggest that interactive 3DCG is more efficient than textbooks alone in medical education and can motivate students to understand complex anatomical structures. PMID:23611759

  17. 3-Dimensional Modeling of Capacitively and Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid

    2008-10-01

    Low temperature plasmas are widely used for thin film etching during micro and nano-electronic device fabrication. Fluid and hybrid plasma models were developed 15-20 years ago to understand the fundamentals of these plasmas and plasma etching. These models have significantly evolved since then, and are now a major tool used for new plasma hardware design and problem resolution. Plasma etching is a complex physical phenomenon, where inter-coupled plasma, electromagnetic, fluid dynamics, and thermal effects all have a major influence. The next frontier in the evolution of fluid-based plasma models is where these models are able to self-consistently treat the inter-coupling of plasma physics with fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, heat transfer and magnetostatics. We describe one such model in this paper and illustrate its use in solving engineering problems of interest for next generation plasma etcher design. Our 3-dimensional plasma model includes the full set of Maxwell equations, transport equations for all charged and neutral species in the plasma, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, and Kirchhoff's equations for the lumped external circuit. This model also includes Monte Carlo based kinetic models for secondary electrons and stochastic heating, and can take account of plasma chemistry. This modeling formalism allows us to self-consistently treat the dynamics in commercial inductively and capacitively coupled plasma etching reactors with realistic plasma chemistries, magnetic fields, and reactor geometries. We are also able to investigate the influence of the distributed electromagnetic circuit at very high frequencies (VHF) on the plasma dynamics. The model is used to assess the impact of azimuthal asymmetries in plasma reactor design (e.g., off-center pump, 3D magnetic field, slit valve, flow restrictor) on plasma characteristics at frequencies from 2 -- 180 MHz. With Jason Kenney, Ankur Agarwal, Ajit Balakrishna, Kallol Bera, and Ken Collins.

  18. An Explicit 3-Dimensional Model for Reactive Transport of Nitrogen in Tile Drained Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. J.; Valocchi, A. J.; Hudson, R. J.

    2001-12-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in nitrate contamination of groundwater in the Midwest because of its link to surface water eutrophication, especially in the Gulf of Mexico. The vast majority of this nitrate is the product of biologically mediated transformation of fertilizers containing ammonia in the vadose zone of agricultural fields. For this reason, it is imperative that mathematical models, which can serve as useful tools to evaluate both the impact of agricultural fertilizer applications and nutrient-reducing management practices, are able to specifically address transport in the vadose zone. The development of a 3-dimensional explicit numerical model to simulate the movement and transformation of nitrogen species through the subsurface on the scale of an individual farm plot will be presented. At this scale, nitrogen fate and transport is controlled by a complex coupling among hydrologic, agricultural and biogeochemical processes. The nitrogen model is a component of a larger modeling effort that focuses upon conditions typical of those found in agricultural fields in Illinois. These conditions include non-uniform, multi-dimensional, transient flow in both saturated and unsaturated zones, geometrically complex networks of tile drains, coupled surface-subsurface-tile flow, and dynamic levels of dissolved oxygen in the soil profile. The advection-dispersion-reaction equation is solved using an operator-splitting approach, which is a flexible and straightforward strategy. Advection is modeled using a total variation diminishing scheme, dispersion is modeled using an alternating direction explicit method, and reactions are modeled using rate law equations. The model's stability and accuracy will be discussed, and test problems will be presented.

  19. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

    2004-08-03

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

  20. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging for Time-Resolved Investigation of the Biological Complexes: Computer Modelling towards the XFEL Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Yefanov, O. M.; Lorenz, U.; Soldatov, A. V.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The development of the next generation synchrotron radiation sources - free electron lasers - is approaching to become an effective tool for the time-resolved experiments aimed to solve actual problems in various fields such as chemistry’ biology’ medicine’ etc. In order to demonstrate’ how these experiments may be performed for the real systems to obtain information at the atomic and macromolecular levels’ we have performed a molecular dynamics computer simulation combined with quantum chemistry calculations for the human phosphoglycerate kinase enzyme with Mg containing substrate. The simulated structures were used to calculate coherent X-ray diffraction patterns’ reflecting the conformational state of the enzyme, and Mg K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which depend on the local structure of the substrate. These two techniques give complementary information making such an approach highly effective for time-resolved investigation of various biological complexes, such as metalloproteins or enzymes with metal-containing substrate, to obtain information about both metal-containing active site or substrate and the atomic structure of each conformation.

  1. 3-Dimensional modeling of large diameter wire array high intensity K-shell radiation sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Thornhill, Joseph W.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-06-01

    Large diameter nested wire array z-pinches imploded on the Z-generator at Sandia National Laboratories have been used extensively to generate high intensity K-shell radiation. Large initial radii are required to obtain the high implosion velocities needed to efficiently radiate in the K-shell. This necessitates low wire numbers and large inter-wire gaps which introduce large azimuthal non-uniformities. Furthermore, the development of magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the implosion are known to generate large axial non-uniformity These effects motivate the complete, full circumference 3-dimensional modeling of these systems. Such high velocity implosions also generate large voltages, which increase current losses in the power feed and limit the current delivery to these loads. Accurate representation of the generator coupling is therefore required to reliably represent the energy delivered to, and the power radiated from these sources. We present 3D-resistive MHD calculations of the implosion and stagnation of a variety of large diameter stainless steel wire arrays (hv {approx} 6.7 keV), imploded on the Z-generator both before and after its refurbishment. Use of a tabulated K-shell emission model allows us to compare total and K-shell radiated powers to available experimental measurements. Further comparison to electrical voltage and current measurements allows us to accurately assess the power delivered to these loads. These data allow us to begin to constrain and validate our 3D MHD calculations, providing insight into ways in which these sources may be further optimized.

  2. Contributions of the Musculus Uvulae to Velopharyngeal Closure Quantified With a 3-Dimensional Multimuscle Computational Model.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Joshua M; Lin, Kant Y; Perry, Jamie L; Blemker, Silvia S

    2016-02-01

    The convexity of the dorsal surface of the velum is critical for normal velopharyngeal (VP) function and is largely attributed to the levator veli palatini (LVP) and musculus uvulae (MU). Studies have correlated a concave or flat nasal velar surface to symptoms of VP dysfunction including hypernasality and nasal air emission. In the context of surgical repair of cleft palates, the MU has been given relatively little attention in the literature compared with the larger LVP. A greater understanding of the mechanics of the MU will provide insight into understanding the influence of a dysmorphic MU, as seen in cleft palate, as it relates to VP function. The purpose of this study was to quantify the contributions of the MU to VP closure in a computational model. We created a novel 3-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the VP mechanism from magnetic resonance imaging data collected from an individual with healthy noncleft VP anatomy. The model components included the velum, posterior pharyngeal wall (PPW), LVP, and MU. Simulations were based on the muscle and soft tissue mechanical properties from the literature. We found that, similar to previous hypotheses, the MU acts as (i) a space-occupying structure and (ii) a velar extensor. As a space-occupying structure, the MU helps to nearly triple the midline VP contact length. As a velar extensor, the MU acting alone without the LVP decreases the VP distance 62%. Furthermore, activation of the MU decreases the LVP activation required for closure almost 3-fold, from 20% (without MU) to 8% (with MU). Our study suggests that any possible salvaging and anatomical reconstruction of viable MU tissue in a cleft patient may improve VP closure due to its mechanical function. In the absence or dysfunction of MU tissue, implantation of autologous or engineered tissues at the velar midline, as a possible substitute for the MU, may produce a geometric convexity more favorable to VP closure. In the future, more complex models will

  3. 3-Dimensional Marine CSEM Modeling by Employing TDFEM with Parallel Solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, parallel fulfillment is developed for forward modeling of the 3-Dimensional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) by using time-domain finite element method (TDFEM). Recently, a greater attention rises on research of hydrocarbon (HC) reservoir detection mechanism in the seabed. Since China has vast ocean resources, seeking hydrocarbon reservoirs become significant in the national economy. However, traditional methods of seismic exploration shown a crucial obstacle to detect hydrocarbon reservoirs in the seabed with a complex structure, due to relatively high acquisition costs and high-risking exploration. In addition, the development of EM simulations typically requires both a deep knowledge of the computational electromagnetics (CEM) and a proper use of sophisticated techniques and tools from computer science. However, the complexity of large-scale EM simulations often requires large memory because of a large amount of data, or solution time to address problems concerning matrix solvers, function transforms, optimization, etc. The objective of this paper is to present parallelized implementation of the time-domain finite element method for analysis of three-dimensional (3D) marine controlled source electromagnetic problems. Firstly, we established a three-dimensional basic background model according to the seismic data, then electromagnetic simulation of marine CSEM was carried out by using time-domain finite element method, which works on a MPI (Message Passing Interface) platform with exact orientation to allow fast detecting of hydrocarbons targets in ocean environment. To speed up the calculation process, SuperLU of an MPI (Message Passing Interface) version called SuperLU_DIST is employed in this approach. Regarding the representation of three-dimension seabed terrain with sense of reality, the region is discretized into an unstructured mesh rather than a uniform one in order to reduce the number of unknowns. Moreover, high-order Whitney

  4. Time-resolved DPIV analysis of vortex dynamics in a left ventricular model through bileaflet mechanical and porcine heart valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pierrakos, Olga; Vlachos, Pavios P; Telionis, Demetri P

    2004-12-01

    The performance of the heart after a mitral valve replacement operation greatly depends on the flow character downstream of the valve. The design and implanting orientation of valves may considerably affect the flow development. A study of the hemodynamics of two orientations, anatomical and anti-anatomical, of the St. Jude Medical (SJM) bileaflet valve are presented and compared with those of the SJM Biocor porcine valve, which served also to represent the natural valve. We document the velocity field in a flexible, transparent (LV) using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (TRDPIV). Vortex formation and vortex interaction are two important physical phenomena that dominate the filling and emptying of the ventricle. For the three configurations, the following effects were examined: mitral valve inlet jet asymmetry, survival of vortical structures upstream of the aortic valve, vortex-induced velocities and redirection of theflow in abidance of the Biot-Savart law, domain segmentation, resonant times of vortical structures, and regions of stagnantflow. The presence of three distinct flow patterns, for the three configurations, was identified by the location of vortical structures and level of coherence corresponding to a significant variation in the turbulence level distribution inside the LV. The adverse effect of these observations could potentially compromise the efficiency of the LV and result in flow patterns that deviate from those in the natural heart. PMID:15796330

  5. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence and Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W. K.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Dippo, P.; Geisz, J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) technique and its ability to characterize recombination in bulk photovoltaic semiconductor materials are reviewed. Results from a variety of materials and a few recent studies are summarized and compared.

  6. Time resolved thermal lens in edible oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, T. A. S.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Medina, A. N.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    In this work time resolved thermal lens spectrometry is applied to investigate the optical properties of the following edible oils: soya, sunflower, canola, and corn oils. The experiments were performed at room temperature using the mode mismatched thermal lens configuration. The results showed that when the time resolved procedure is adopted the technique can be applied to investigate the photosensitivity of edible oils. Soya oil presented a stronger photochemical reaction as compared to the other investigated samples. This observation may be relevant for future studies evaluating edible oils storage conditions and also may contribute to a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this important foodstuff.

  7. Experimental Validation of Plastic Mandible Models Produced by a “Low-Cost” 3-Dimensional Fused Deposition Modeling Printer

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Federico; Pandya, Mirali; Olszewski, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) plastic (ABS) models generated using a low-cost 3D fused deposition modelling printer. Material/Methods Two human dry mandibles were scanned with a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Accuitomo device. Preprocessing consisted of 3D reconstruction with Maxilim software and STL file repair with Netfabb software. Then, the data were used to print 2 plastic replicas with a low-cost 3D fused deposition modeling printer (Up plus 2®). Two independent observers performed the identification of 26 anatomic landmarks on the 4 mandibles (2 dry and 2 replicas) with a 3D measuring arm. Each observer repeated the identifications 20 times. The comparison between the dry and plastic mandibles was based on 13 distances: 8 distances less than 12 mm and 5 distances greater than 12 mm. Results The mean absolute difference (MAD) was 0.37 mm, and the mean dimensional error (MDE) was 3.76%. The MDE decreased to 0.93% for distances greater than 12 mm. Conclusions Plastic models generated using the low-cost 3D printer UPplus2® provide dimensional accuracies comparable to other well-established rapid prototyping technologies. Validated low-cost 3D printers could represent a step toward the better accessibility of rapid prototyping technologies in the medical field. PMID:27003456

  8. Virtual model surgery and wafer fabrication using 2-dimensional cephalograms, 3-dimensional virtual dental models, and stereolithographic technology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Young; Hwang, Jong-Min; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2012-02-01

    Although several 3-dimensional virtual model surgery (3D-VMS) programs have been introduced to reduce time-consuming manual laboratory steps and potential errors, these programs still require 3D-computed tomography (3D-CT) data and involve complex computerized maneuvers. Because it is difficult to take 3D-CTs for all cases, a new VMS program using 2D lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms and 3D virtual dental models (2.5D-VMS program; 3Txer version 2.5, Orapix, Seoul, Korea) has recently been introduced. The purposes of this article were to present the methodology of the 2.5D-VMS program and to verify the accuracy of intermediate surgical wafers fabricated with the stereolithographic technique. Two cases successfully treated using the 2.5D-VMS program are presented. There was no significant difference in the position of upper dentition after surgical movement between 2.5D-VMS and 3D-VMS in 18 samples (less than 0.10 mm, P > .05, Wilcoxon-signed rank test). The 2.5D-VMS can be regarded as an effective alternative for 3D-VMS for cases in which 3D-CT data are not available.

  9. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gravimetry, and thermodynamic modeling for a molecular level description of water sorption in poly(ε-caprolactone).

    PubMed

    Musto, Pellegrino; Galizia, Michele; Pannico, Marianna; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Mensitieri, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    Sorption of water in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), with specific focus on the hydrogen-bonding interactions, has been analyzed by combining ab initio calculations, macroscopic thermodynamics modeling, and relevant features emerging from spectroscopic and gravimetric measurements. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) data, analyzed by difference spectroscopy, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, and least-squares curve-fitting analysis associated with gravimetric determination of water sorption isotherm provided information on the system's behavior and on the molecular interactions established between the polymer and the penetrant. A consistent physical picture emerged pointing to the presence of two spectroscopically discernible water species (first-shell and second-shell layers) that have been quantified. Water molecules are present in the form of dimers within the polymer equilibrated with water vapor up to a relative humidity of 0.65. At higher humidities, clustering of water sorbed molecules starts to take place. The multicomponent ν(OH) band representative of absorbed water has been interpreted with the aid of ab initio calculations performed on suitably chosen model systems. The outcomes of spectroscopic analyses were interpreted at a macroscopic level by modeling the thermodynamics of water sorption in PCL based on a nonrandom compressible lattice theory accounting for hydrogen-bonding (HB) interactions. Starting from the fitting of the gravimetric sorption isotherm, the model provided quantitative estimates for the amount of self- and cross-HBs which compare favorably with the FTIR results.

  10. Deflection evaluation using time-resolved radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved radiography is the creation of an x-ray image for which both the start-exposure and stop-exposure times are known with respect to the event under study. The combination of image and timing are used to derive information about the event. We have applied time-resolved radiography to evaluate motions of explosive-driven events. In the particular application discussed here, our intent is to measure maximum deflections of the components involved. Exposures are made during the time just before to just after the event of interest occurs. A smear or blur of motion out to its furthest extent is recorded on the image. Comparison of the dynamic images with static images allows deflection measurements to be made. 2 figs.

  11. Time resolved astronomy with the SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Crawford, S.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; McPhate, J.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Potter, S. B.; O'Donoghue, D.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Schellart, P.; Spark, M.; Welsh, B. Y.; Zietsman, E.

    2010-07-01

    While time resolved astronomical observations are not new, the extension of such studies to sub-second time resolution is and has resulted in the opening of a new observational frontier, High Time Resolution Astronomy (HTRA). HTRA studies are well suited to objects like compact binary stars (CVs and X-ray binaries) and pulsars, while asteroseismology of pulsating stars, occultations, transits and the study of transients, will all benefit from such HTRA studies. HTRA has been a SALT science driver from the outset and the first-light instruments, namely the UV-VIS imager, SALTICAM, and the multi-purpose Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS), both have high time resolution modes. These are described, together with some observational examples. We also discuss the commissioning observations with the photon counting Berkeley Visible Image Tube camera (BVIT) on SALT. Finally we describe the software tools, developed in Python, to reduce SALT time resolved observations.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; Levitt, James; Chung, Pei-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence can be characterized by its intensity, position, wavelength, lifetime, and polarization. The more of these features are acquired in a single measurement, the more can be learned about the sample, i.e., the microenvironment of the fluorescence probe. Polarization-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging-time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging, TR-FAIM-allows mapping of viscosity or binding or of homo-FRET which can indicate dimerization or generally oligomerization.

  13. Assessment of the impact of oxidation processes on indoor air pollution using the new time-resolved INCA-Indoor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Maxence; Blond, Nadège; Blondeau, Patrice; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Hauglustaine, Didier A.

    2015-12-01

    INCA-Indoor, a new indoor air quality (IAQ) model, has been developed to simulate the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and oxidants considering indoor air specific processes such as: emission, ventilation, surface interactions (sorption, deposition, uptake). Based on the detailed version of SAPRC-07 chemical mechanism, INCA-Indoor is able to analyze the contribution of the production and loss pathways of key chemical species (VOCs, oxidants, radical species). The potential of this model has been tested through three complementary analyses: a comparison with the most detailed IAQ model found in the literature, focusing on oxidant species; realistic scenarios covering a large range of conditions, involving variable OH sources like HONO; and the investigation of alkenes ozonolysis under a large range of indoor conditions that can increase OH and HO2 concentrations. Simulations have been run changing nitrous acid (HONO) concentrations, NOx levels, photolysis rates and ventilation rates, showing that HONO can be the main source of indoor OH. Cleaning events using products containing D-limonene have been simulated at different periods of the day. These scenarios show that HOX concentrations can significantly increase in specific conditions. An assessment of the impact of indoor chemistry on the potential formation of secondary species such as formaldehyde (HCHO) and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) has been carried out under various room configuration scenarios and a study of the HOx budget for different realistic scenarios has been performed. It has been shown that, under the simulation conditions, formaldehyde can be affected by oxidant concentrations via chemical production which can account for more than 10% of the total production, representing 6.5 ppb/h. On the other hand, acetaldehyde production is affected more by oxidation processes. When the photolysis rates are high, chemical processes are responsible for about 50% of the total production of

  14. Development of an Optimum Tracer Set for Apportioning Emissions of Individual Power Plants Using Highly Time-Resolved Measurements and Advanced Receptor Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    John Ondov; Gregory Beachley

    2007-07-05

    In previous studies, 11 elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) were determined in 30-minute aerosol samples collected with the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler (SEAS; Kidwell and Ondov, 2001, 2004; SEAS-II) in several locations in which air quality is influenced by emissions from coal- or oil-fired power plants. At this time resolution, plumes from stationary high temperature combustion sources are readily detected as large excursions in ambient concentrations of elements emitted by these sources (Pancras et al. ). Moreover, the time-series data contain intrinsic information on the lateral diffusion of the plume (e.g., {sigma}{sub y}), which Park et al. (2005 and 2006) have exploited in their Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM), to calculate emission rates of SO{sub 2} and 11 elements (mentioned above) from four individual coal- and oil-fired power plants in the Tampa Bay area. In the current project, we proposed that the resolving power of source apportionment methods might be improved by expanding the set of maker species and that there exist some optimum set of marker species that could be used. The ultimate goal was to determine the utility of using additional elements to better identify and isolate contributions of individual power plants to ambient levels of PM and its constituents. And, having achieved better resolution, achieve, also, better emission rate estimates. In this study, we optimized sample preparation and instrumental protocols for simultaneous analysis of 28 elements in dilute slurry samples collected with the SEAS with a new state-of-the-art Thermo-Systems, Inc., X-series II, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and reanalyzed the samples previously collected in Tampa during the modeling period studied by Park et al. (2005) in which emission rates from four coal- and oil-fired power plants affected air quality at the sampling site. In the original model, Park et al

  15. Bayesian approach to time-resolved tomography.

    PubMed

    Myers, Glenn R; Geleta, Matthew; Kingston, Andrew M; Recur, Benoit; Sheppard, Adrian P

    2015-07-27

    Conventional X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) is unable to meet the need for real-time, high-resolution, time-resolved imaging of multi-phase fluid flow. High signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data acquisition is too slow and results in motion artefacts in the images, while fast acquisition is too noisy and results in poor image contrast. We present a Bayesian framework for time-resolved tomography that uses priors to drastically reduce the required amount of experiment data. This enables high-quality time-resolved imaging through a data acquisition protocol that is both rapid and high SNR. Here we show that the framework: (i) encompasses our previous, algorithms for imaging two-phase flow as limiting cases; (ii) produces more accurate results from imperfect (i.e. real) data, where it can be compared to our previous work; and (iii) is generalisable to previously intractable systems, such as three-phase flow. PMID:26367664

  16. TIME-RESOLVED EMISSION FROM BRIGHT HOT PIXELS OF AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED IN THE EUV BAND WITH SDO/AIA AND MULTI-STRANDED LOOP MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Tajfirouze, E.; Reale, F.; Petralia, A.; Testa, P.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of small amounts of very hot plasma has been found in active regions and might be an indication of impulsive heating released at spatial scales smaller than the cross-section of a single loop. We investigate the heating and substructure of coronal loops in the core of one such active region by analyzing the light curves in the smallest resolution elements of solar observations in two EUV channels (94 and 335 Å) from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We model the evolution of a bundle of strands heated by a storm of nanoflares by means of a hydrodynamic 0D loop model (EBTEL). The light curves obtained from a random combination of those of single strands are compared to the observed light curves either in a single pixel or in a row of pixels, simultaneously in the two channels, and using two independent methods: an artificial intelligent system (Probabilistic Neural Network) and a simple cross-correlation technique. We explore the space of the parameters to constrain the distribution of the heat pulses, their duration, their spatial size, and, as a feedback on the data, their signatures on the light curves. From both methods the best agreement is obtained for a relatively large population of events (1000) with a short duration (less than 1 minute) and a relatively shallow distribution (power law with index 1.5) in a limited energy range (1.5 decades). The feedback on the data indicates that bumps in the light curves, especially in the 94 Å channel, are signatures of a heating excess that occurred a few minutes before.

  17. Time-resolved Emission from Bright Hot Pixels of an Active Region Observed in the EUV Band with SDO/AIA and Multi-stranded Loop Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajfirouze, E.; Reale, F.; Petralia, A.; Testa, P.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of small amounts of very hot plasma has been found in active regions and might be an indication of impulsive heating released at spatial scales smaller than the cross-section of a single loop. We investigate the heating and substructure of coronal loops in the core of one such active region by analyzing the light curves in the smallest resolution elements of solar observations in two EUV channels (94 and 335 Å) from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We model the evolution of a bundle of strands heated by a storm of nanoflares by means of a hydrodynamic 0D loop model (EBTEL). The light curves obtained from a random combination of those of single strands are compared to the observed light curves either in a single pixel or in a row of pixels, simultaneously in the two channels, and using two independent methods: an artificial intelligent system (Probabilistic Neural Network) and a simple cross-correlation technique. We explore the space of the parameters to constrain the distribution of the heat pulses, their duration, their spatial size, and, as a feedback on the data, their signatures on the light curves. From both methods the best agreement is obtained for a relatively large population of events (1000) with a short duration (less than 1 minute) and a relatively shallow distribution (power law with index 1.5) in a limited energy range (1.5 decades). The feedback on the data indicates that bumps in the light curves, especially in the 94 Å channel, are signatures of a heating excess that occurred a few minutes before.

  18. The Keilson and Storer 3-dimensional (KS-3D) line shape model: applications to optical diagnostic in combustion media

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Pierre

    2008-10-22

    High-resolution infrared and Raman spectroscopies require refine spectral line shape model to account for all observed features. For instance, for gaseous mixtures of light molecules with heavy perturbers, drastic changes arise particularly in the collision regime, resulting from the inhomogeneous effects due to the radiator speed-dependence of the collisional line broadening and line shifting parameters. Following our previous work concerning the collision regime, we have developed a new line shape modelization called the Keilson and Storer 3-dimensional line shape model to lower densities, when the Doppler contribution, and the collisional confinement narrowing can be no longer neglected. The consequences for optical diagnostics, particularly for H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixtures with high pressure and high temperature are presented. The effects of collisional relaxation on the spectral line shapes are discussed.

  19. The Keilson and Storer 3-dimensional (KS-3D) line shape model: applications to optical diagnostic in combustion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    High-resolution infrared and Raman spectroscopies require refine spectral line shape model to account for all observed features. For instance, for gaseous mixtures of light molecules with heavy perturbers, drastic changes arise particularly in the collision regime, resulting from the inhomogeneous effects due to the radiator speed-dependence of the collisional line broadening and line shifting parameters. Following our previous work concerning the collision regime, we have developed a new line shape modelization called the Keilson and Storer 3-dimensional line shape model to lower densities, when the Doppler contribution, and the collisional confinement narrowing can be no longer neglected. The consequences for optical diagnostics, particularly for H2-N2 mixtures with high pressure and high temperature are presented. The effects of collisional relaxation on the spectral line shapes are discussed.

  20. Application of 3-Dimensional Printing Technology to Construct an Eye Model for Fundus Viewing Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinhua; Gao, Zhishan; Yuan, Dongqing; Liu, Qinghuai

    2014-01-01

    Objective To construct a life-sized eye model using the three-dimensional (3D) printing technology for fundus viewing study of the viewing system. Methods We devised our schematic model eye based on Navarro's eye and redesigned some parameters because of the change of the corneal material and the implantation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). Optical performance of our schematic model eye was compared with Navarro's schematic eye and other two reported physical model eyes using the ZEMAX optical design software. With computer aided design (CAD) software, we designed the 3D digital model of the main structure of the physical model eye, which was used for three-dimensional (3D) printing. Together with the main printed structure, polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) aspherical cornea, variable iris, and IOLs were assembled to a physical eye model. Angle scale bars were glued from posterior to periphery of the retina. Then we fabricated other three physical models with different states of ammetropia. Optical parameters of these physical eye models were measured to verify the 3D printing accuracy. Results In on-axis calculations, our schematic model eye possessed similar size of spot diagram compared with Navarro's and Bakaraju's model eye, much smaller than Arianpour's model eye. Moreover, the spherical aberration of our schematic eye was much less than other three model eyes. While in off- axis simulation, it possessed a bit higher coma and similar astigmatism, field curvature and distortion. The MTF curves showed that all the model eyes diminished in resolution with increasing field of view, and the diminished tendency of resolution of our physical eye model was similar to the Navarro's eye. The measured parameters of our eye models with different status of ametropia were in line with the theoretical value. Conclusions The schematic eye model we designed can well simulate the optical performance of the human eye, and the fabricated physical one can be used as a tool in fundus

  1. Oligomerization of epidermal growth factor receptors on A431 cells studied by time-resolved fluorescence imaging microscopy. A stereochemical model for tyrosine kinase receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation states of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on single A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were assessed with two new techniques for determining fluorescence resonance energy transfer: donor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (pbFRET) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Fluorescein-(donor) and rhodamine-(acceptor) labeled EGF were bound to the cells and the extent of oligomerization was monitored by the spatially resolved FRET efficiency as a function of the donor/acceptor ratio and treatment conditions. An average FRET efficiency of 5% was determined after a low temperature (4 degrees C) incubation with the fluorescent EGF analogs for 40 min. A subsequent elevation of the temperature for 5 min caused a substantial increase of the average FRET efficiency to 14% at 20 degrees C and 31% at 37 degrees C. In the context of a two-state (monomer/dimer) model for the EGFR, these FRET efficiencies were consistent with minimal average receptor dimerizations of 13, 36, and 69% at 4, 20, and 37 degrees C, respectively. A431 cells were pretreated with the monoclonal antibody mAb 2E9 that specifically blocks EGF binding to the predominant population of low affinity EGFR (15). The average FRET efficiency increased dramatically to 28% at 4 degrees C, indicative of a minimal receptor dimerization of 65% for the subpopulation of high affinity receptors. These results are in accordance with prior studies indicating that binding of EGF leads to a fast and temperature- dependent microclustering of EGFR, but suggest in addition that the high affinity functional subclass of receptors on quiescent A431 cells are present in a predimerized or oligomerized state. We propose that the transmission of the external ligand-binding signal to the cytoplasmic domain is effected by a concerted relative rotational rearrangement of the monomeric units comprising the dimeric receptor, thereby potentiating a mutual activation of

  2. Evaluation of time-resolved multi-distance methods to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads in vivo: Optical parameters dependences on geometrical structures of the models used to calculate reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved multi-distance measurements are studied to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads, which have enough depth sensitivity to determine the optical parameters in superficial tissues and brain separately. Measurements were performed by putting the injection and collection fibers on the left semi-sphere of the forehead, with the injection fiber placed toward the temporal region, and by moving the collection fiber between 10 and 60 mm from the central sulcus. It became clear that optical parameters of the forehead at all collection fibers were reasonably determined by selecting the appropriate visibility length of the geometrical head models, which is related to head surface curvature at each position.

  3. Fast time variations of supernova neutrino signals from 3-dimensional models

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, Tina; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Janka, Hans -Thomas; Muller, Ewald; Raffelt, Georg

    2012-11-19

    Here, we study supernova neutrino flux variations in the IceCube detector, using 3D models based on a simplified neutrino transport scheme. The hemispherically integrated neutrino emission shows significantly smaller variations compared with our previous study of 2D models, largely because of the reduced activity of the standing accretion shock instability in this set of 3D models which we interpret as a pessimistic extreme. For the studied cases, intrinsic flux variations up to about 100 Hz frequencies could still be detected in a supernova closer than about 2 kpc.

  4. Visualization of the 3-dimensional flow around a model with the aid of a laser knife

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovoy, V. Y.; Ivanov, V. V.; Orlov, A. A.; Kharchenko, V. N.

    1984-01-01

    A method for visualizing the three-dimensional flow around models of various shapes in a wind tunnel at a Mach number of 5 is described. A laser provides a planar light flux such that any plane through the model can be selectively illuminated. The shape of shock waves and separation regions is then determined by the intensity of light scattered by soot particles in the flow.

  5. [Rapid 3-Dimensional Models of Cerebral Aneurysm for Emergency Surgical Clipping].

    PubMed

    Konno, Takehiko; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Oguma, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Naoki; Otani, Keisuke; Watanabe, Eiju

    2016-08-01

    We developed a method for manufacturing solid models of cerebral aneurysms, with a shorter printing time than that involved in conventional methods, using a compact 3D printer with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene(ABS)resin. We further investigated the application and utility of this printing system in emergency clipping surgery. A total of 16 patients diagnosed with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage resulting from cerebral aneurysm rupture were enrolled in the present study. Emergency clipping was performed on the day of hospitalization. Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine(DICOM)data obtained from computed tomography angiography(CTA)scans were edited and converted to stereolithography(STL)file formats, followed by the production of 3D models of the cerebral aneurysm by using the 3D printer. The mean time from hospitalization to the commencement of surgery was 242 min, whereas the mean time required for manufacturing the 3D model was 67 min. The average cost of each 3D model was 194 Japanese Yen. The time required for manufacturing the 3D models shortened to approximately 1 hour with increasing experience of producing 3D models. Favorable impressions for the use of the 3D models in clipping were reported by almost all neurosurgeons included in this study. Although 3D printing is often considered to involve huge costs and long manufacturing time, the method used in the present study requires shorter time and lower costs than conventional methods for manufacturing 3D cerebral aneurysm models, thus making it suitable for use in emergency clipping. PMID:27506842

  6. High fidelity 3-dimensional models of beam-electron cloud interactions in circular accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiz Zarrin Ghalam, Ali

    Electron cloud is a low-density electron profile created inside the vacuum chamber of circular machines with positively charged beams. Electron cloud limits the peak current of the beam and degrades the beams' quality through luminosity degradation, emittance growth and head to tail or bunch to bunch instability. The adverse effects of electron cloud on long-term beam dynamics becomes more and more important as the beams go to higher and higher energies. This problem has become a major concern in many future circular machines design like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Due to the importance of the problem several simulation models have been developed to model long-term beam-electron cloud interaction. These models are based on "single kick approximation" where the electron cloud is assumed to be concentrated at one thin slab around the ring. While this model is efficient in terms of computational costs, it does not reflect the real physical situation as the forces from electron cloud to the beam are non-linear contrary to this model's assumption. To address the existing codes limitation, in this thesis a new model is developed to continuously model the beam-electron cloud interaction. The code is derived from a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell (PIC) model (QuickPIC) originally used for plasma wakefield acceleration research. To make the original model fit into circular machines environment, betatron and synchrotron equations of motions have been added to the code, also the effect of chromaticity, lattice structure have been included. QuickPIC is then benchmarked against one of the codes developed based on single kick approximation (HEAD-TAIL) for the transverse spot size of the beam in CERN-LHC. The growth predicted by QuickPIC is less than the one predicted by HEAD-TAIL. The code is then used to investigate the effect of electron cloud image charges on the long-term beam dynamics, particularly on the

  7. Remanent magnetization and 3-dimensional density model of the Kentucky anomaly region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.; Estes, R. H.; Myers, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the Kentucky body was developed to fit surface gravity and long wavelength aeromagnetic data. Magnetization and density parameters for the model are much like those of Mayhew et al (1982). The magnetic anomaly due to the model at satellite altitude is shown to be much too small by itself to account for the anomaly measured by Magsat. It is demonstrated that the source region for the satellite anomaly is considerably more extensive than the Kentucky body sensu stricto. The extended source region is modeled first using prismatic model sources and then using dipole array sources. Magnetization directions for the source region found by inversion of various combinations of scalar and vector data are found to be close to the main field direction, implying the lack of a strong remanent component. It is shown by simulation that in a case (such as this) where the geometry of the source is known, if a strong remanent component is present its direction is readily detectable, but by scalar data as readily as vector data.

  8. 3-dimensional spatially organized PEG-based hydrogels for an aortic valve co-culture model

    PubMed Central

    Puperi, Daniel S.; Balaoing, Liezl R.; O’Connell, Ronan W.; West, Jennifer L.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically relevant in vitro models are needed to study disease progression and to develop and screen potential therapeutic interventions for disease. Heart valve disease, in particular, has no early intervention or non-invasive treatment because there is a lack of understanding the cellular mechanisms which lead to disease. Here, we establish a novel, customizable synthetic hydrogel platform that can be used to study cell-cell interactions and the factors which contribute to valve disease. Spatially localized cell adhesive ligands bound in the scaffold promote cell growth and organization of valve interstitial cells and valve endothelial cells in 3D co-culture. Both cell types maintained phenotypes, homeostatic functions, and produced zonally localized extracellular matrix. This model extends the capabilities of in vitro research by providing a platform to perform direct contact co-culture with cells in their physiologically relevant spatial arrangement. PMID:26241755

  9. 3-DIMENSIONAL Geological Mapping and Modeling Activities at the Geological Survey of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarna, A.; Bang-Kittilsen, A.; Haase, C.; Henderson, I. H. C.; Høgaas, F.; Iversen, S.; Seither, A.

    2015-10-01

    Geology and all geological structures are three-dimensional in space. Geology can be easily shown as four-dimensional when time is considered. Therefore GIS, databases, and 3D visualization software are common tools used by geoscientists to view, analyse, create models, interpret and communicate geological data. The NGU (Geological Survey of Norway) is the national institution for the study of bedrock, mineral resources, surficial deposits and groundwater and marine geology. The interest in 3D mapping and modelling has been reflected by the increase of number of groups and researches dealing with 3D in geology within NGU. This paper highlights 3D geological modelling techniques and the usage of these tools in bedrock, geophysics, urban and groundwater studies at NGU, same as visualisation of 3D online. The examples show use of a wide range of data, methods, software and an increased focus on interpretation and communication of geology in 3D. The goal is to gradually expand the geospatial data infrastructure to include 3D data at the same level as 2D.

  10. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretationmore » of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.« less

  11. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  12. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tapping-mode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Finally, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  13. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tapping-mode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Finally, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments. PMID:26734515

  14. Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Superimposition Techniques on Various Skeletal Structures of the Head Using Surface Models

    PubMed Central

    Pazera, Pawel; Zorkun, Berna; Katsaros, Christos; Ludwig, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the applicability, accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of various 3D superimposition techniques for radiographic data, transformed to triangulated surface data. Methods Five superimposition techniques (3P: three-point registration; AC: anterior cranial base; AC + F: anterior cranial base + foramen magnum; BZ: both zygomatic arches; 1Z: one zygomatic arch) were tested using eight pairs of pre-existing CT data (pre- and post-treatment). These were obtained from non-growing orthodontic patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion. All datasets were superimposed by three operators independently, who repeated the whole procedure one month later. Accuracy was assessed by the distance (D) between superimposed datasets on three form-stable anatomical areas, located on the anterior cranial base and the foramen magnum. Precision and reproducibility were assessed using the distances between models at four specific landmarks. Non parametric multivariate models and Bland-Altman difference plots were used for analyses. Results There was no difference among operators or between time points on the accuracy of each superimposition technique (p>0.05). The AC + F technique was the most accurate (D<0.17 mm), as expected, followed by AC and BZ superimpositions that presented similar level of accuracy (D<0.5 mm). 3P and 1Z were the least accurate superimpositions (0.790.05), the detected structural changes differed significantly between different techniques (p<0.05). Bland-Altman difference plots showed that BZ superimposition was comparable to AC, though it presented slightly higher random error. Conclusions Superimposition of 3D datasets using surface models created from voxel data can provide accurate, precise, and reproducible results, offering also high efficiency and increased post-processing capabilities. In

  15. A 3-dimensional in vitro model of epithelioid granulomas induced by high aspect ratio nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The most common causes of granulomatous inflammation are persistent pathogens and poorly-degradable irritating materials. A characteristic pathological reaction to intratracheal instillation, pharyngeal aspiration, or inhalation of carbon nanotubes is formation of epithelioid granulomas accompanied by interstitial fibrosis in the lungs. In the mesothelium, a similar response is induced by high aspect ratio nanomaterials, including asbestos fibers, following intraperitoneal injection. This asbestos-like behaviour of some engineered nanomaterials is a concern for their potential adverse health effects in the lungs and mesothelium. We hypothesize that high aspect ratio nanomaterials will induce epithelioid granulomas in nonadherent macrophages in 3D cultures. Results Carbon black particles (Printex 90) and crocidolite asbestos fibers were used as well-characterized reference materials and compared with three commercial samples of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Doses were identified in 2D and 3D cultures in order to minimize acute toxicity and to reflect realistic occupational exposures in humans and in previous inhalation studies in rodents. Under serum-free conditions, exposure of nonadherent primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages to 0.5 μg/ml (0.38 μg/cm2) of crocidolite asbestos fibers or MWCNTs, but not carbon black, induced macrophage differentiation into epithelioid cells and formation of stable aggregates with the characteristic morphology of granulomas. Formation of multinucleated giant cells was also induced by asbestos fibers or MWCNTs in this 3D in vitro model. After 7-14 days, macrophages exposed to high aspect ratio nanomaterials co-expressed proinflammatory (M1) as well as profibrotic (M2) phenotypic markers. Conclusions Induction of epithelioid granulomas appears to correlate with high aspect ratio and complex 3D structure of carbon nanotubes, not with their iron content or surface area. This model offers a time- and cost

  16. Global simulation of canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence with a 3 dimensional radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yang, W.; Ichii, K.

    2015-12-01

    Global simulation of canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence with a 3 dimensional radiative transfer modelHideki Kobayashi, Wei Yang, and Kazuhito IchiiDepartment of Environmental Geochemical Cycle Research, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology3173-25, Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Japan.Plant canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be observed from satellites, such as Greenhouse gases Observation Satellite (GOSAT), Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2), using Fraunhofer lines in the near infrared spectral domain [1]. SIF is used to infer photosynthetic capacity of plant canopy [2]. However, it is not well understoond how the leaf-level SIF emission contributes to the top of canopy directional SIF because SIFs observed by the satellites use the near infrared spectral domain where the multiple scatterings among leaves are not negligible. It is necessary to quantify the fraction of emission for each satellite observation angle. Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation of sunlit leaves are 100 times higher than that of shaded leaves. Thus, contribution of sunlit and shaded leaves to canopy scale directional SIF emission should also be quantified. Here, we show the results of global simulation of SIF using a 3 dimensional radiative transfer simulation with MODIS atmospheric (aerosol optical thickness) and land (land cover and leaf area index) products and a forest landscape data sets prepared for each land cover category. The results are compared with satellite-based SIF (e.g. GOME-2) and the gross primary production empirically estimated by FLUXNET and remote sensing data.

  17. A 3-dimensional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived model to detect developmental neurotoxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoelting, Lisa; Scheinhardt, Benjamin; Bondarenko, Olesja; Schildknecht, Stefan; Kapitza, Marion; Tanavde, Vivek; Tan, Betty; Lee, Qian Yi; Mecking, Stefan; Leist, Marcel; Kadereit, Suzanne

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been shown to accumulate in organs, cross the blood-brain barrier and placenta, and have the potential to elicit developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Here, we developed a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model that allows for testing of potential developmental neurotoxicants. Early central nervous system PAX6(+) precursor cells were generated from hESCs and differentiated further within 3-D structures. The 3-D model was characterized for neural marker expression revealing robust differentiation toward neuronal precursor cells, and gene expression profiling suggested a predominantly forebrain-like development. Altered neural gene expression due to exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations of the known developmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury, indicated that the 3-D model could detect DNT. To test for specific toxicity of NPs, chemically inert polyethylene NPs (PE-NPs) were chosen. They penetrated deep into the 3-D structures and impacted gene expression at non-cytotoxic concentrations. NOTCH pathway genes such as HES5 and NOTCH1 were reduced in expression, as well as downstream neuronal precursor genes such as NEUROD1 and ASCL1. FOXG1, a patterning marker, was also reduced. As loss of function of these genes results in severe nervous system impairments in mice, our data suggest that the 3-D hESC-derived model could be used to test for Nano-DNT.

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence: 1996-1998

    PubMed

    Kricka; Stanley

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence continues to provide comprehensive literature surveys which will be published in most issues. These are a continuation of the literature surveys begun in 1986 in the Journal of Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence which, up until 1998, encompassed more than 6000 references cited by year or specialized topic. With this newly named journal these searches are expanding to reflect the journal's wider scope. In future we will cover all fundamental and applied aspects of biological and chemical luminescence and include not only bioluminescence and chemiluminescence but also fluorescence, time resolved fluorescence, electrochemiluminescence, phosphorescence, sonoluminescence, lyoluminescence and triboluminescence. The compilers would be pleased to receive any comments from the readership. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10398560

  19. Time-resolved MR angiography with limited projections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuexi; Wright, Graham A

    2007-08-01

    A method for reconstruction of time-resolved MRI called highly-constrained backprojection (HYPR) has been developed. To evaluate the HYPR reconstruction in relation to data sparsity and temporal dynamics, computer simulations were performed, investigating signal modulations under different situations that reflect dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). In vivo studies were also performed with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) for abdominal MRA in a canine model to demonstrate the application of HYPR for three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved MRA. When contrast dynamics vary over space, large vessels (e.g., veins) tend to introduce signal interference to small vessels (e.g., arteries) in HYPR, particularly when the vessels are in close proximity. The enhancement of background tissue signals may also alter the arterial and venous temporal profiles in HYPR. However, the artifacts are manifest as intensity modulation rather than structural interference, and therefore have little impact on structural diagnosis. Increasing the number of projections per time point increases temporal blur while reducing corruption of temporal behavior from adjacent tissues. Uniformly interleaved acquisition order, such as the bit-reversed order, is important to reduce artifacts. With high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limited artifacts, HYPR reconstruction has potential to greatly improve time-resolved MRA in clinical practice.

  20. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy: from wavepackets to observables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guorong; Hockett, Paul; Stolow, Albert

    2011-11-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) is a powerful tool for the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly excited state non-adiabatic dynamics in polyatomic molecules. Depending on the problem at hand, different levels of TRPES measurements can be performed: time-resolved photoelectron yield; time- and energy-resolved photoelectron yield; time-, energy-, and angle-resolved photoelectron yield. In this pedagogical overview, a conceptual framework for time-resolved photoionization measurements is presented, together with discussion of relevant theory for the different aspects of TRPES. Simple models are used to illustrate the theory, and key concepts are further amplified by experimental examples. These examples are chosen to show the application of TRPES to the investigation of a range of problems in the excited state dynamics of molecules: from the simplest vibrational wavepacket on a single potential energy surface; to disentangling intrinsically coupled electronic and nuclear motions; to identifying the electronic character of the intermediate states involved in non-adiabatic dynamics by angle-resolved measurements in the molecular frame, the most complete measurement.

  1. Effect of Heat-Inactivated Clostridium sporogenes and Its Conditioned Media on 3-Dimensional Colorectal Cancer Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Madhura Satish; Hassanbhai, Ammar Mansoor; Anand, Padmaja; Luo, Kathy Qian; Teoh, Swee Hin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy continue to have limited efficacy due to tumor hypoxia. While bacterial cancer therapy has the potential to overcome this problem, it comes with the risk of toxicity and infection. To circumvent these issues, this paper investigates the anti-tumor effects of non-viable bacterial derivatives of Clostridium sporogenes. These non-viable derivatives are heat-inactivated C. sporogenes bacteria (IB) and the secreted bacterial proteins in culture media, known as conditioned media (CM). In this project, the effects of IB and CM on CT26 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells were examined on a 2-Dimensional (2D) and 3-Dimensional (3D) platform. IB significantly inhibited cell proliferation of CT26 to 6.3% of the control in 72 hours for the 2D monolayer culture. In the 3D spheroid culture, cell proliferation of HCT116 spheroids notably dropped to 26.2%. Similarly the CM also remarkably reduced the cell-proliferation of the CT26 cells to 2.4% and 20% in the 2D and 3D models, respectively. Interestingly the effect of boiled conditioned media (BCM) on the cells in the 3D model was less inhibitory than that of CM. Thus, the inhibitive effect of inactivated C. sporogenes and its conditioned media on colorectal cancer cells is established. PMID:26507312

  2. Relationship between time-resolved and non-time-resolved Beer-Lambert law in turbid media.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Hazeki, O; Tamura, M

    1997-06-01

    The time-resolved Beer-Lambert law proposed for oxygen monitoring using pulsed light was extended to the non-time-resolved case in a scattered medium such as living tissues with continuous illumination. The time-resolved Beer-Lambert law was valid for the phantom model and living tissues in the visible and near-infrared regions. The absolute concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin in rat brain and thigh muscle could be determined. The temporal profile of rat brain was reproduced by Monte Carlo simulation. When the temporal profiles of rat brain under different oxygenation states were integrated with time, the absorbance difference was linearly related to changes in the absorption coefficient. When the simulated profiles were integrated, there was a linear relationship within the absorption coefficient which was predicted for fractional inspiratory oxygen concentration from 10 to 100% and, in the case beyond the range of the absorption coefficient, the deviation from linearity was slight. We concluded that an optical pathlength which is independent of changes in the absorption coefficient is a good approximation for near-infrared oxygen monitoring.

  3. 3-dimensional Modeling of Electromagnetic and Physical Sources of Aziumuthal Nonuniformities in Inductively Coupled Plasmas for Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junqing; Keiter, Eric R.; Kushner, Mark J.

    1998-10-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasmas (ICPs) are being used for a variety of deposition processes for microelectronics fabrication. Of particular concern in scaling these devices to large areas is maintaining azimuthal symmetry of the reactant fluxes. Sources of nonuniformity may be physical (e.g., gas injection and side pumping) or electromagnetic (e.g., transmission line effects in the antennas). In this paper, a 3-dimensional plasma equipment model, HPEM-3D,(M. J. Kushner, J. Appl. Phys. v.82, 5312 (1997).) is used to investigate physical and electromagentic sources of azimuthal nonuniformities in deposition tools. An ionized metal physical vapor deposition (IMPVD) system will be investigated where transmission line effects in the coils produce an asymmetric plasma density. Long mean free path transport for sputtered neutrals and tensor conducitivities have been added to HPEM-3D to address this system. Since the coil generated ion flux drifts back to the target to sputter low ionization potential metal atoms, the asymmetry is reinforced by rapid ionization of the metal atoms.

  4. Molecular profiling of the invasive tumor microenvironment in a 3-dimensional model of colorectal cancer cells and ex vivo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Marc D; Mellone, Max; Pickard, Karen M; Sayan, Abdulkadir Emre; Mitter, Richard; Primrose, John N; Packham, Graham K; Thomas, Gareth; Mirnezami, Alexander H

    2014-01-01

    Invading colorectal cancer (CRC) cells have acquired the capacity to break free from their sister cells, infiltrate the stroma, and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). Characterizing the biology of this phenotypically distinct group of cells could substantially improve our understanding of early events during the metastatic cascade. Tumor invasion is a dynamic process facilitated by bidirectional interactions between malignant epithelium and the cancer associated stroma. In order to examine cell-specific responses at the tumor stroma-interface we have combined organotypic co-culture and laser micro-dissection techniques. Organotypic models, in which key stromal constituents such as fibroblasts are 3-dimensionally co-cultured with cancer epithelial cells, are highly manipulatable experimental tools which enable invasion and cancer-stroma interactions to be studied in near-physiological conditions. Laser microdissection (LMD) is a technique which entails the surgical dissection and extraction of the various strata within tumor tissue, with micron level precision. By combining these techniques with genomic, transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling we aim to develop a deeper understanding of the molecular characteristics of invading tumor cells and surrounding stromal tissue, and in doing so potentially reveal novel biomarkers and opportunities for drug development in CRC. PMID:24836208

  5. Development of a high-throughput screening assay based on the 3-dimensional pannus model for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ibold, Yvonne; Frauenschuh, Simone; Kaps, Christian; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen; Goetz, Peter M

    2007-10-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) pannus model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on the interactive co-culture of cartilage and synovial fibroblasts (SFs). Besides the investigation of the pathogenesis of RA, it can be used to analyze the active profiles of antirheumatic pharmaceuticals and other bioactive substances under in vitro conditions. For a potential application in the industrial drug-screening process as a transitional step between 2-dimensional (2-D) cell-based assays and in vivo animal studies, the pannus model was developed into an in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. Using the CyBitrade mark-Disk workstation for parallel liquid handling, the main cell culture steps of cell seeding and cultivation were automated. Chondrocytes were isolated from articular cartilage and seeded directly into 96-well microplates in high-density pellets to ensure formation of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). Cell seeding was performed automatically and manually to compare both processes regarding accuracy, reproducibility, consistency, and handling time. For automated cultivation of the chondrocyte pellet cultures, a sequential program was developed using the CyBio Control software to minimize shear forces and handling time. After 14 days of cultivation, the pannus model was completed by coating the cartilage pellets with a layer of human SFs. The effects due to automation in comparison to manual handling were analyzed by optical analysis of the pellets, histological and immunohistochemical staining, and real-time PCR. Automation of this in vitro model was successfully achieved and resulted in an improved quality of the generated pannus cultures by enhancing the formation of cartilage-specific ECM. In addition, automated cell seeding and media exchange increased the efficiency due to a reduction of labor intensity and handling time.

  6. Time-resolved force distribution analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomolecules or other complex macromolecules undergo conformational transitions upon exposure to an external perturbation such as ligand binding or mechanical force. To follow fluctuations in pairwise forces between atoms or residues during such conformational changes as observed in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we developed Time-Resolved Force Distribution Analysis (TRFDA). Results The implementation focuses on computational efficiency and low-memory usage and, along with the wide range of output options, makes possible time series analysis of pairwise forces variation in long MD simulations and for large molecular systems. It also provides an exact decomposition of pairwise forces resulting from 3- and 4-body potentials and a unified treatment of pairwise forces between atoms or residues. As a proof of concept, we present a stress analysis during unfolding of ubiquitin in a force-clamp MD simulation. Conclusions TRFDA can be used, among others, in tracking signal propagation at atomic level, for characterizing dynamical intermolecular interactions (e.g. protein-ligand during flexible docking), in development of force fields and for following stress distribution during conformational changes. PMID:24499624

  7. Time-resolved tribo-thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Blau, Peter J.

    1999-03-01

    Wear of coated surfaces tends to progress through a series of stages in which damage accumulates until the coating fails to protect its substrate. Depending on the coating system and the contact conditions, these stages can sometimes be detected as a series of discrete periods of changing frictional behavior, or they can occur quite rapidly, leading to rapid removal of the coating. A new technique has been developed to capture magnified infrared (IR) images of a selected location on a moving wear surface and to synchronize these cycle-by-cycle images with the instantaneous friction force that occurs at the same location. A pin-on-disk tribometer has been used to demonstrate the principle, but other kinds of test geometries can also be used. Contrast in the IR images derives not only from the surface temperatures but also from the emissivity of surface features. A spatial calibration of the system allows the measurement of the width of the wear path as a function of time. By studying a series of captured and friction- synchronized images, it is possible to observe the detailed progression of wear and the corresponding frictional transitions in a limitless variety of materials. Examples of several different materials, including, steel, aluminum, brass, and paint, will be used to illustrate the application of time-resolved microscopic tribo-thermography to coatings research.

  8. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  9. A Geometric Modelling Approach to Determining the Best Sensing Coverage for 3-Dimensional Acoustic Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pashazadeh, Saeid; Sharifi, Mohsen

    2009-01-01

    Existing 3-dimensional acoustic target tracking methods that use wired/wireless networked sensor nodes to track targets based on four sensing coverage do not always compute the feasible spatio-temporal information of target objects. To investigate this discrepancy in a formal setting, we propose a geometric model of the target tracking problem alongside its equivalent geometric dual model that is easier to solve. We then study and prove some properties of dual model by exploiting its relationship with algebra. Based on these properties, we propose a four coverage axis line method based on four sensing coverage and prove that four sensing coverage always yields two dual correct answers; usually one of them is infeasible. By showing that the feasible answer can be only sometimes identified by using a simple time test method such as the one proposed by ourselves, we prove that four sensing coverage fails to always yield the feasible spatio-temporal information of a target object. We further prove that five sensing coverage always gives the feasible position of a target object under certain conditions that are discussed in this paper. We propose three extensions to four coverage axis line method, namely, five coverage extent point method, five coverage extended axis lines method, and five coverage redundant axis lines method. Computation and time complexities of all four proposed methods are equal in the worst cases as well as on average being equal to Θ(1) each. Proposed methods and proved facts about capabilities of sensing coverage degree in this paper can be used in all other methods of acoustic target tracking like Bayesian filtering methods. PMID:22423198

  10. A 3-Dimensional Model of Water-Bearing Sequences in the Dominguez Gap Region, Long Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponti, Daniel J.; Ehman, Kenneth D.; Edwards, Brian D.; Tinsley, John C.; Hildenbrand, Thomas; Hillhouse, John W.; Hanson, Randall T.; McDougall, Kristen; Powell, Charles L.; Wan, Elmira; Land, Michael; Mahan, Shannon; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.

    2007-01-01

    A 3-dimensional computer model of the Quaternary sequence stratigraphy in the Dominguez gap region of Long Beach, California has been developed to provide a robust chronostratigraphic framework for hydrologic and tectonic studies. The model consists of 13 layers within a 16.5 by 16.1 km (10.25 by 10 mile) square area and extends downward to an altitude of -900 meters (-2952.76 feet). Ten sequences of late Pliocene to Holocene age are identified and correlated within the model. Primary data to build the model comes from five reference core holes, extensive high-resolution seismic data obtained in San Pedro Bay, and logs from several hundred water and oil wells drilled in the region. The model is best constrained in the vicinity of the Dominguez gap seawater intrusion barrier where a dense network of subsurface data exist. The resultant stratigraphic framework and geologic structure differs significantly from what has been proposed in earlier studies. An important new discovery from this approach is the recognition of ongoing tectonic deformation throughout nearly all of Quaternary time that has impacted the geometry and character of the sequences. Anticlinal folding along a NW-SE trend, probably associated with Quaternary reactivation of the Wilmington anticline, has uplifted and thinned deposits along the fold crest, which intersects the Dominguez gap seawater barrier near Pacific Coast Highway. A W-NW trending fault system that approximately parallels the fold crest has also been identified. This fault progressively displaces all but the youngest sequences down to the north and serves as the southern termination of the classic Silverado aquifer. Uplift and erosion of fining-upward paralic sequences along the crest of the young fold has removed or thinned many of the fine-grained beds that serve to protect the underlying Silverado aquifer from seawater contaminated shallow groundwater. As a result of this process, the potential exists for vertical migration of

  11. Three-Dimensional Radiobiologic Dosimetry: Application of Radiobiologic Modeling to Patient-Specific 3-Dimensional Imaging–Based Internal Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Andrew R.; Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F.; He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George

    2010-01-01

    Phantom-based and patient-specific imaging-based dosimetry methodologies have traditionally yielded mean organ-absorbed doses or spatial dose distributions over tumors and normal organs. In this work, radiobiologic modeling is introduced to convert the spatial distribution of absorbed dose into biologically effective dose and equivalent uniform dose parameters. The methodology is illustrated using data from a thyroid cancer patient treated with radioiodine. Methods Three registered SPECT/CT scans were used to generate 3-dimensional images of radionuclide kinetics (clearance rate) and cumulated activity. The cumulated activity image and corresponding CT scan were provided as input into an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo calculation: The cumulated activity image was used to define the distribution of decays, and an attenuation image derived from CT was used to define the corresponding spatial tissue density and composition distribution. The rate images were used to convert the spatial absorbed dose distribution to a biologically effective dose distribution, which was then used to estimate a single equivalent uniform dose for segmented volumes of interest. Equivalent uniform dose was also calculated from the absorbed dose distribution directly. Results We validate the method using simple models; compare the dose-volume histogram with a previously analyzed clinical case; and give the mean absorbed dose, mean biologically effective dose, and equivalent uniform dose for an illustrative case of a pediatric thyroid cancer patient with diffuse lung metastases. The mean absorbed dose, mean biologically effective dose, and equivalent uniform dose for the tumor were 57.7, 58.5, and 25.0 Gy, respectively. Corresponding values for normal lung tissue were 9.5, 9.8, and 8.3 Gy, respectively. Conclusion The analysis demonstrates the impact of radiobiologic modeling on response prediction. The 57% reduction in the equivalent dose value for the tumor reflects a high level of dose

  12. Use of 3-Dimensional Volumetric Modeling of Adrenal Gland Size in Patients with Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, P P; Lodish, M B; Turkbey, E B; Papadakis, G Z; Stratakis, C A

    2016-04-01

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a rare type of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia leading to hypercortisolemia. Adrenal nodularity is often appreciable with computed tomography (CT); however, accurate radiologic characterization of adrenal size in PPNAD has not been studied well. We used 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric analysis to characterize and compare adrenal size in PPNAD patients, with and without Cushing's syndrome (CS). Patients diagnosed with PPNAD and their family members with known mutations in PRKAR1A were screened. CT scans were used to create 3D models of each adrenal. Criteria for biochemical diagnosis of CS included loss of diurnal variation and/or elevated midnight cortisol levels, and paradoxical increase in urinary free cortisol and/or urinary 17-hydroxysteroids after dexamethasone administration. Forty-five patients with PPNAD (24 females, 27.8±17.6 years) and 8 controls (19±3 years) were evaluated. 3D volumetric modeling of adrenal glands was performed in all. Thirty-eight patients out of 45 (84.4%) had CS. Their mean adrenal volume was 8.1 cc±4.1, 7.2 cc±4.5 (p=0.643) for non-CS, and 8.0cc±1.6 for controls. Mean values were corrected for body surface area; 4.7 cc/kg/m(2)±2.2 for CS, and 3.9 cc/kg/m(2)±1.3 for non-CS (p=0.189). Adrenal volume and midnight cortisol in both groups was positively correlated, r=0.35, p=0.03. We conclude that adrenal volume measured by 3D CT in patients with PPNAD and CS was similar to those without CS, confirming empirical CT imaging-based observations. However, the association between adrenal volume and midnight cortisol levels may be used as a marker of who among patients with PPNAD may develop CS, something that routine CT cannot do. PMID:27065461

  13. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Fréderick

    2015-05-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. This allows to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge about spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using Telops MS-IR MW camera which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profile derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  14. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. These allow to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge of spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using a Telops MS-IR MW camera, which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profiles derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  15. Normal growth and development of the lips: a 3-dimensional study from 6 years to adulthood using a geometric model

    PubMed Central

    FERRARIO, VIRGILIO F.; SFORZA, CHIARELLA; SCHMITZ, JOHANNES H.; CIUSA, VERONICA; COLOMBO, ANNA

    2000-01-01

    A 3-dimensional computerised system with landmark representation of the soft-tissue facial surface allows noninvasive and fast quantitative study of facial growth. The aims of the present investigation were (1) to provide reference data for selected dimensions of lips (linear distances and ratios, vermilion area, volume); (2) to quantify the relevant growth changes; and (3) to evaluate sex differences in growth patterns. The 3-dimensional coordinates of 6 soft-tissue landmarks on the lips were obtained by an optoelectronic instrument in a mixed longitudinal and cross-sectional study (2023 examinations in 1348 healthy subjects between 6 y of age and young adulthood). From the landmarks, several linear distances (mouth width, total vermilion height, total lip height, upper lip height), the vermilion height-to-mouth width ratio, some areas (vermilion of the upper lip, vermilion of the lower lip, total vermilion) and volumes (upper lip volume, lower lip volume, total lip volume) were calculated and averaged for age and sex. Male values were compared with female values by means of Student's t test. Within each age group all lip dimensions (distances, areas, volumes) were significantly larger in boys than in girls (P < 0.05), with some exceptions in the first age groups and coinciding with the earlier female growth spurt, whereas the vermilion height-to-mouth width ratio did not show a corresponding sexual dimorphism. Linear distances in girls had almost reached adult dimensions in the 13–14 y age group, while in boys a large increase was still to occur. The attainment of adult dimensions was faster in the upper than in the lower lip, especially in girls. The method used in the present investigation allowed the noninvasive evaluation of a large sample of nonpatient subjects, leading to the definition of 3-dimensional normative data. Data collected in the present study could represent a data base for the quantitative description of human lip morphology from childhood to

  16. Normal growth and development of the lips: a 3-dimensional study from 6 years to adulthood using a geometric model.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Schmitz, J H; Ciusa, V; Colombo, A

    2000-04-01

    A 3-dimensional computerised system with landmark representation of the soft-tissue facial surface allows noninvasive and fast quantitative study of facial growth. The aims of the present investigation were (1) to provide reference data for selected dimensions of lips (linear distances and ratios, vermilion area, volume); (2) to quantify the relevant growth changes; and (3) to evaluate sex differences in growth patterns. The 3-dimensional coordinates of 6 soft-tissue landmarks on the lips were obtained by an optoelectronic instrument in a mixed longitudinal and cross-sectional study (2023 examinations in 1348 healthy subjects between 6 y of age and young adulthood). From the landmarks, several linear distances (mouth width, total vermilion height, total lip height, upper lip height), the vermilion height-to-mouth width ratio, some areas (vermilion of the upper lip, vermilion of the lower lip, total vermilion) and volumes (upper lip volume, lower lip volume, total lip volume) were calculated and averaged for age and sex. Male values were compared with female values by means of Student's t test. Within each age group all lip dimensions (distances, areas, volumes) were significantly larger in boys than in girls (P < 0.05), with some exceptions in the first age groups and coinciding with the earlier female growth spurt, whereas the vermilion height-to-mouth width ratio did not show a corresponding sexual dimorphism. Linear distances in girls had almost reached adult dimensions in the 13-14 y age group, while in boys a large increase was still to occur. The attainment of adult dimensions was faster in the upper than in the lower lip, especially in girls. The method used in the present investigation allowed the noninvasive evaluation of a large sample of nonpatient subjects, leading to the definition of 3-dimensional normative data. Data collected in the present study could represent a data base for the quantitative description of human lip morphology from childhood to

  17. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 3: Verification of 3-dimensional rigid-lid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.; Sinha, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorage (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth (e.g., natural or man-made inland lakes) because surface elevation has been removed as a parameter. These models allow computation of time-dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions. The free-surface model also provides surface height variations with time.

  18. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 2: User's manual for 3-dimensional free-surface model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Tuann, S. Y.; Lee, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one-dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorage (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth. These models allow computation of time-dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions.

  19. Time-resolved molecular transport across living cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather M; Dounce, Susan M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that the nonlinear optical phenomenon known as second-harmonic generation can be used for label-free, time-resolved study of the transport of molecules through living cell membranes. The adsorption and transport of a 300-Da molecular-mass hydrophobic ion at the Escherichia coli membrane is observed. Remarkably, at low ion concentrations, the second-harmonic generation technique clearly exposes a multistep molecular transport process: Transport of the molecular ion across the outer and cytoplasmic membranes of the Gram-negative bacteria is recorded, in sequence, in time. Fitting of the data to a multiprocess kinematic model reveals that the transport of this hydrophobic ion through the outer membrane is much faster than through the cytoplasmic membrane, likely reflecting the effectiveness of ion transport porins. The observations illustrate an experimental means for studying the interactions of small molecules with cell membranes.

  20. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  1. Time-resolved fluorescence lifetime for cutaneous melanoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Layla; Nogueira, Marcelo Saito; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Moriyama, Lilian Tan; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer type. It is characterized by pigmented lesions with high tissue invasion and metastatic potential. The early detection of melanoma is extremely important to improve patient prognosis and survival rate, since it can progress to the deadly metastatic stage. Presently, the melanoma diagnosis is based on the clinical analysis of the macroscopic lesion characteristics such as shape, color, borders following the ABCD rules. The aim of this study is to evaluate the time-resolved fluorescence lifetime of NADH and FAD molecules to detect cutaneous melanoma in an experimental in vivo model. Forty-two lesions were analyzed and the data was classified using linear discriminant analysis, a sensitivity of 99.4%, specificity of 97.4% and accuracy of 98.4% were achieved. These results show the potential of this fluorescence spectroscopy for melanoma detection. PMID:25401022

  2. ABSTRACTION OF INFORMATION FROM 2- AND 3-DIMENSIONAL PORFLOW MODELS INTO A 1-D GOLDSIM MODEL - 11404

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hiergesell, R.

    2010-11-16

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has developed a 'hybrid' approach to Performance Assessment modeling which has been used for a number of Performance Assessments. This hybrid approach uses a multi-dimensional modeling platform (PorFlow) to develop deterministic flow fields and perform contaminant transport. The GoldSim modeling platform is used to develop the Sensitivity and Uncertainty analyses. Because these codes are performing complementary tasks, it is incumbent upon them that for the deterministic cases they produce very similar results. This paper discusses two very different waste forms, one with no engineered barriers and one with engineered barriers, each of which present different challenges to the abstraction of data. The hybrid approach to Performance Assessment modeling used at the SRNL uses a 2-D unsaturated zone (UZ) and a 3-D saturated zone (SZ) model in the PorFlow modeling platform. The UZ model consists of the waste zone and the unsaturated zoned between the waste zone and the water table. The SZ model consists of source cells beneath the waste form to the points of interest. Both models contain 'buffer' cells so that modeling domain boundaries do not adversely affect the calculation. The information pipeline between the two models is the contaminant flux. The domain contaminant flux, typically in units of moles (or Curies) per year from the UZ model is used as a boundary condition for the source cells in the SZ. The GoldSim modeling component of the hybrid approach is an integrated UZ-SZ model. The model is a 1-D representation of the SZ, typically 1-D in the UZ, but as discussed below, depending on the waste form being analyzed may contain pseudo-2-D elements. A waste form at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which has no engineered barriers is commonly referred to as a slit trench. A slit trench, as its name implies, is an unlined trench, typically 6 m deep, 6 m wide, and 200 m long. Low level waste consisting of soil, debris, rubble, wood

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Joseph R.

    This dissertation is a survey of ultrafast time-resolved optical measurements conducted on a variety of low-dimensional semiconductor systems to further the understanding of the dynamic behavior in the following systems: ZnMnTe/ZnSe quantum dots, ZnTe/ZnMnSe quantum dots, InGaAs quantum wells, CdMnSe colloidal quantum dots, multi-shell CdSe/CdMnS/CdS colloidal nanoplatelets, and graphene and graphene-related solutions and films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence to study epitaxially-grown ZnTe and ZnMnTe quantum dots in corresponding ZnMnSe and ZnSe matrices, the location dependence of manganese ions in respect to magnetic polaron formation is shown. The structure with manganese ions located in the matrix exhibited magnetic polaron behavior consistent with previous literature, whereas the structure with the magnetic ions located within the quantum dots exhibited unconventional magnetic polaron properties. These properties, including temperature and magnetic field insensitivity, were explained through the use of a model that predicted an increased internal magnetic field due to a decreased effective volume of the magnetic polaron and a higher effective temperature due to laser heating. Magneto-time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on a system of colloidal CdMnSe quantum dots show that the magnetic polaron properties differ significantly from the epitaxially grown quantum dots. First the timescales at which the magnetic polaron forms and the polarization saturates are different by more than an order of magnitude, and second, the magnetic polaron energy exhibited step-like behavior as the strength of the externally applied magnetic field is increased. The field dependent MP formation energy that is observed experimentally is explained as due to the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling of Mn dimers within the QDs. This model is further verified by the observation of quantized behavior in the Zeeman energy splitting. Through the use of magneto

  4. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    out the potential landscape of the system (often a molecule or an atom) under study [4, 5]. However, the dynamical processes might also be induced by the tunnelling process itself [6, 7]. In the field of molecular science, excited single molecule experiments have been especially performed [8]. As a nice example, we refer to the work of Sykes' group [9] on thioether molecular rotors. In addition, several groups explore the possibility of combining time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy with optical techniques [10, 11]. Although the majority of studies that have been performed so far focus on rather simple systems under nearly ideal and well-defined conditions, we anticipate that time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy can also be applied in other research areas, such as biology and soft condensed matter, where the experimental conditions are often less ideal. We hope that readers will enjoy this collection of papers and that it will trigger them to further explore the possibilities of this simple, but powerful technique. References [1] Besenbacher F, Laegsgaard E and Stengaard I 2005 Mater. Today 8 26 [2] van Houselt A and Zandvliet H J W 2010 Rev. Mod. Phys. 82 1593 [3] Tringides M C and Hupalo M 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264002 [4] Ronci F, Colonna S, Cricenti A and Le Lay G 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264003 [5] van Houselt A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264004 [6] Sprodowski C, Mehlhorn M and Morgenstern K 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264005 [7] Saedi A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264007 [8] Sloan P A 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264001 [9] Jewell A D, Tierney H L, Baber A E, Iski E V, Laha M M and Sykes E C H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264006 [10] Riedel D 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264009 [11] Terada Y, Yoshida S, Takeuchi O and Shigekawa H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264008

  5. High-speed detector for time-resolved diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bipin; Miller, Stuart R.; Bhandari, Harish B.; Graceffa, Rita; Irving, Thomas C.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-01-01

    There are a growing number of high brightness synchrotron sources that require high-frame-rate detectors to provide the time-scales required for performing time-resolved diffraction experiments. We report on the development of a very high frame rate CMOS X-ray detector for time-resolved muscle diffraction and time-resolved solution scattering experiments. The detector is based on a low-afterglow scintillator, provides a megapixel resolution with frame rates of up to 120,000 frames per second, an effective pixel size of 64 µm, and can be adapted for various X-ray energies. The paper describes the detector design and initial results of time-resolved diffraction experiments on a synchrotron beamline. PMID:24489595

  6. Sensing cell metabolism by time-resolved autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicong; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y

    2006-11-01

    We built a time-resolved confocal fluorescence spectroscopy system equipped with the multichannel time-correlated single-photon-counting technique. The instrument provides a unique approach to study the fluorescence sensing of cell metabolism via analysis of the wavelength- and time-resolved intracellular autofluorescence. The experiments on monolayered cell cultures show that with UV excitation at 365 nm the time-resolved autofluorescence decays, dominated by free-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide signals, are sensitive indicators for cell metabolism. However, the sensitivity decreases with the increase of excitation wavelength possibly due to the interference from free-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide fluorescence. The results demonstrate that time-resolved autofluorescence can be potentially used as an important contrast mechanism to detect epithelial precancer. PMID:17041655

  7. Sensing cell metabolism by time-resolved autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2006-11-01

    We built a time-resolved confocal fluorescence spectroscopy system equipped with the multichannel time-correlated single-photon-counting technique. The instrument provides a unique approach to study the fluorescence sensing of cell metabolism via analysis of the wavelength- and time-resolved intracellular autofluorescence. The experiments on monolayered cell cultures show that with UV excitation at 365 nm the time-resolved autofluorescence decays, dominated by free-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide signals, are sensitive indicators for cell metabolism. However, the sensitivity decreases with the increase of excitation wavelength possibly due to the interference from free-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide fluorescence. The results demonstrate that time-resolved autofluorescence can be potentially used as an important contrast mechanism to detect epithelial precancer.

  8. High-speed detector for time-resolved diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin; Miller, Stuart R.; Bhandari, Harish B.; Graceffa, Rita; Irving, Thomas C.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2013-03-01

    There are a growing number of high brightness synchrotron sources that require high-frame-rate detectors to provide the time-scales required for performing time-resolved diffraction experiments. We report on the development of a very high frame rate CMOS X-ray detector for time-resolved muscle diffraction and time-resolved solution scattering experiments. The detector is based on a low-afterglow scintillator, provides a megapixel resolution with frame rates of up to 120,000 frames per second, an effective pixel size of 64 um, and can be adapted for various X-ray energies. The paper describes the detector design and initial results of time-resolved diffraction experiments on a synchrotron beamline.

  9. Millifluidics for Chemical Synthesis and Time-resolved Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V.; Yamane, Dawit G.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  10. Millifluidics for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V; Yamane, Dawit G; Miller, Jeffrey T; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  11. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  12. Study of the time-resolved, 3-dimensional current density distribution in solid metallic liners at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott-Suzuki, S. C.; Cordaro, S. W.; Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Atoyan, L.; Byvank, T.; Potter, W.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the time varying current density distribution in solid metallic liner experiments at the 1 MA level. Measurements are taken using an array of magnetic field probes which provide 2D triangulation of the average centroid of the drive current in the load at 3 discrete axial positions. These data are correlated with gated optical self-emission imaging which directly images the breakdown and plasma formation region. Results show that the current density is azimuthally non-uniform and changes significantly throughout the 100 ns experimental timescale. Magnetic field probes show clearly motion of the current density around the liner azimuth over 10 ns timescales. If breakdown is initiated at one azimuthal location, the current density remains non-uniform even over large spatial extents throughout the current drive. The evolution timescales are suggestive of a resistive diffusion process or uneven current distributions among simultaneously formed but discrete plasma conduction paths.

  13. Time-resolved neurite mechanics by thermal fluctuation assessments.

    PubMed

    Gárate, Fernanda; Betz, Timo; Pertusa, María; Bernal, Roberto

    2015-12-30

    In the absence of simple noninvasive measurements, the knowledge of temporal and spatial variations of axons mechanics remains scarce. By extending thermal fluctuation spectroscopy (TFS) to long protrusions, we determine the transverse amplitude thermal fluctuation spectra that allow direct and simultaneous access to three key mechanics parameters: axial tension, bending flexural rigidity and plasma membrane tension. To test our model, we use PC12 cell protrusions-a well-know biophysical model of axons-in order to simplify the biological system under scope. For instance, axial and plasma membrane tension are found in the range of nano Newton and tens of pico Newtons per micron respectively. Furthermore, our results shows that the TFS technique is capable to distinguish quasi-identical protrusions. Another advantage of our approach is the time resolved nature of the measurements. Indeed, in the case of long term experiments on PC12 protrusions, TFS has revealed large temporal, correlated variations of the protrusion mechanics, displaying extraordinary feedback control over the axial tension in order to maintain a constant tension value.

  14. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.; Lerche, M.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ~ 0.8% at 5 meV and ~ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks.iop.org/jinst/10

  15. Time resolved strain dependent morphological study of electrically conducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Imran; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Mateus, Artur; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and reliable method is introduced to understand the network behaviour of nano-fillers in a polymeric matrix under uniaxial strain coupled with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes) are conductive and the particles form a percolating network that becomes apparent source of electrical conduction and consequently the samples behave as a bulk conductor. Polyurethane based nanocomposites containing 2% w/w multiwall carbon nanotubes are studied. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite was (3.28×10-5s/m).The sample was able to be extended to an extension ratio of 1.7 before fracture. A slight variation in the electrical conductivity is observed under uniaxial strain which we attribute to the disturbance of conductive pathways. Further, this work is coupled with in- situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering measurements using a synchrotron beam line to enable its measurements to be made during the deformation cycle. We use a multiscale structure to model the small angle x-ray data. The results of the analysis are interpreted as the presence of aggregates which would also go some way towards understanding why there is no alignment of the carbon nanotubes.

  16. Time-resolved photoluminescence of SiOx encapsulated Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalem, Seref; Hannas, Amal; Österman, Tomas; Sundström, Villy

    Silicon and its oxide SiOx offer a number of exciting electrical and optical properties originating from defects and size reduction enabling engineering new electronic devices including resistive switching memories. Here we present the results of photoluminescence dynamics relevant to defects and quantum confinement effects. Time-resolved luminescence at room temperature exhibits an ultrafast decay component of less than 10 ps at around 480 nm and a slower component of around 60 ps as measured by streak camera. Red shift at the initial stages of the blue luminescence decay confirms the presence of a charge transfer to long lived states. Time-correlated single photon counting measurements revealed a life-time of about 5 ns for these states. The same quantum structures emit in near infrared close to optical communication wavelengths. Nature of the emission is described and modeling is provided for the luminescence dynamics. The electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices were correlated with the optical and vibrational measurement results in order to have better insight into the switching mechanisms in such resistive devices as possible next generation RAM memory elements. ``This work was supported by ENIAC Joint Undertaking and Laser-Lab Europe''.

  17. Versatile portable fluorometer for time-resolved luminescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoying

    2005-06-01

    A robust, filter-based portable fluorometer was designed, prototyped, and tested for time-resolved luminescence (TRL) analysis. Its flexible optical design allows interchangeable configurations to support three measurement modes: liquid-phase TRL using a sample cuvette, solid-matrix TRL using a sorbent strip, and evanescent-field TRL using a quartz-rod waveguide. A xenon flashlamp is used as the light source and a photomultiplier tube (PMT) as the photodetector. A gating technique was implemented to overcome PMT saturation by the intense xenon lamp flash, therefore higher gains can be set to measure weak luminescence signals. The TRL signal is digitized at a 4μs time resolution and a 12bit amplitude resolution. Individual flashes were monitored by a photodiode and its current was integrated to compensate for source light fluctuation. Using tetracycline as a model analyte, a 0.025ppb limit of detection (LOD) with a typical 2% relative standard deviation, and a 3 orders of magnitude (0.5-300ppb) linear dynamic range (r2=0.9996) were achieved.

  18. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  19. Protein-ligand interactions probed by time-resolved crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, M.; Ihee, H.; Pahl, R.; Srajer, V.

    2005-03-09

    Time-resolved (TR) crystallography is a unique method for determining the structures of intermediates in biomolecular reactions. The technique reached its mature stage with the development of the powerful third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, and the advances in data processing and analysis of time-resolved Laue crystallographic data. A time resolution of 100 ps has been achieved and relatively small structural changes can be detected even from only partial reaction initiation. The remaining challenge facing the application of this technique to a broad range of biological systems is to find an efficient and rapid, system-specific method for the reaction initiation in the crystal. Other frontiers for the technique involve the continued improvement in time resolution and further advances in methods for determining intermediate structures and reaction mechanisms. The time-resolved technique, combined with trapping methods and computational approaches, holds the promise for a complete structure-based description of biomolecular reactions.

  20. Time-resolved EPR spectroscopy in a Unix environment.

    PubMed

    Lacoff, N M; Franke, J E; Warden, J T

    1990-02-01

    A computer-aided time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer implemented under version 2.9 BSD Unix was developed by interfacing a Varian E-9 EPR spectrometer and a Biomation 805 waveform recorder to a PDP-11/23A minicomputer having MINC A/D and D/A capabilities. Special problems with real-time data acquisition in a multiuser, multitasking Unix environment, addressing of computer main memory for the control of hardware devices, and limitation of computer main memory were resolved, and their solutions are presented. The time-resolved EPR system and the data acquisition and analysis programs, written entirely in C, are described. Furthermore, the benefits of utilizing the Unix operating system and the C language are discussed, and system performance is illustrated with time-resolved EPR spectra of the reaction center cation in photosystem 1 of green plant photosynthesis.

  1. A time-resolved image sensor for tubeless streak cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Han, SangMan; Seo, Min-Woong; Takasawa, Taishi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining-only modulation (DOM) pixels for tube-less streak cameras. Although the conventional streak camera has high time resolution, the device requires high voltage and bulky system due to the structure with a vacuum tube. The proposed time-resolved imager with a simple optics realize a streak camera without any vacuum tubes. The proposed image sensor has DOM pixels, a delay-based pulse generator, and a readout circuitry. The delay-based pulse generator in combination with an in-pixel logic allows us to create and to provide a short gating clock to the pixel array. A prototype time-resolved CMOS image sensor with the proposed pixel is designed and implemented using 0.11um CMOS image sensor technology. The image array has 30(Vertical) x 128(Memory length) pixels with the pixel pitch of 22.4um. .

  2. Time-resolved photon emission from layered turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Liu, Hanli; Chance, Britton; Tittel, Frank K.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical and experimental results of time-resolved emission profiles from various layered turbid media. Numerical solutions determined by time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations are compared with measurements on layered-tissue phantoms made from gelatin. In particular, we show that in certain cases the effects of the upper layers can be eliminated. As a practical example, these results are used to analyze in vivo measurements on the human head. This demonstrates the influence of skin, skull, and meninges on the determination of the blood oxygenation in the brain.

  3. Time-Resolved X-Ray Crystallography of Heme Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srajer, Vukica; Royer, Jr., William E.

    2008-04-29

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third-generation synchrotrons provide 100-ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have recently permitted observing for the first time allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin.

  4. Time-resolved x-ray crystallography of heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Royer, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third generation synchrotrons provide 100ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have permitted observing allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin. PMID:18433638

  5. 3DHYDROGEOCHEM: A 3-DIMENSIONAL MODEL OF DENSITY-DEPENDENT SUBSURFACE FLOW AND THERMAL MULTISPECIES-MULTICOMPONENT HYDROGEOCHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a three-dimensional finite-element numerical model designed to simulate chemical transport in subsurface systems with temperature effect taken into account. The three-dimensional model is developed to provide (1) a tool of application, with which one is able...

  6. Time-resolved microrheology of actively remodeling actomyosin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marina Soares e.; Stuhrmann, Björn; Betz, Timo; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2014-07-01

    Living cells constitute an extraordinary state of matter since they are inherently out of thermal equilibrium due to internal metabolic processes. Indeed, measurements of particle motion in the cytoplasm of animal cells have revealed clear signatures of nonthermal fluctuations superposed on passive thermal motion. However, it has been difficult to pinpoint the exact molecular origin of this activity. Here, we employ time-resolved microrheology based on particle tracking to measure nonequilibrium fluctuations produced by myosin motor proteins in a minimal model system composed of purified actin filaments and myosin motors. We show that the motors generate spatially heterogeneous contractile fluctuations, which become less frequent with time as a consequence of motor-driven network remodeling. We analyze the particle tracking data on different length scales, combining particle image velocimetry, an ensemble analysis of the particle trajectories, and finally a kymograph analysis of individual particle trajectories to quantify the length and time scales associated with active particle displacements. All analyses show clear signatures of nonequilibrium activity: the particles exhibit random motion with an enhanced amplitude compared to passive samples, and they exhibit sporadic contractile fluctuations with ballistic motion over large (up to 30 μm) distances. This nonequilibrium activity diminishes with sample age, even though the adenosine triphosphate level is held constant. We propose that network coarsening concentrates motors in large clusters and depletes them from the network, thus reducing the occurrence of contractile fluctuations. Our data provide valuable insight into the physical processes underlying stress generation within motor-driven actin networks and the analysis framework may prove useful for future microrheology studies in cells and model organisms.

  7. User's manual for master: Modeling of aerodynamic surfaces by 3-dimensional explicit representation. [input to three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    A system of computer programs was developed to model general three dimensional surfaces. Surfaces are modeled as sets of parametric bicubic patches. There are also capabilities to transform coordinates, to compute mesh/surface intersection normals, and to format input data for a transonic potential flow analysis. A graphical display of surface models and intersection normals is available. There are additional capabilities to regulate point spacing on input curves and to compute surface/surface intersection curves. Input and output data formats are described; detailed suggestions are given for user input. Instructions for execution are given, and examples are shown.

  8. The use of TOUGH2 for the LBL/USGS 3-dimensional site-scale model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.; Chen, G.; Haukwa, C.; Kwicklis, E.

    1995-12-31

    The three-dimensional site-scale numerical model o the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is under continuous development and calibration through a collaborative effort between Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The site-scale model covers an area of about 30 km{sup 2} and is bounded by major fault zones to the west (Solitario Canyon Fault), east (Bow Ridge Fault) and perhaps to the north by an unconfirmed fault (Yucca Wash Fault). The model consists of about 5,000 grid blocks (elements) with nearly 20,000 connections between them; the grid was designed to represent the most prevalent geological and hydro-geological features of the site including major faults, and layering and bedding of the hydro-geological units. Submodels are used to investigate specific hypotheses and their importance before incorporation into the three-dimensional site-scale model. The primary objectives of the three-dimensional site-scale model are to: (1) quantify moisture, gas and heat flows in the ambient conditions at Yucca Mountain, (2) help in guiding the site-characterization effort (primarily by USGS) in terms of additional data needs and to identify regions of the mountain where sufficient data have been collected, and (3) provide a reliable model of Yucca Mountain that is validated by repeated predictions of conditions in new boreboles and the ESF and has therefore the confidence of the public and scientific community. The computer code TOUGH2 developed by K. Pruess at LBL was used along with the three-dimensional site-scale model to generate these results. In this paper, we also describe the three-dimensional site-scale model emphasizing the numerical grid development, and then show some results in terms of moisture, gas and heat flow.

  9. Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy: a differential absorption approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Bassi, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    A method was developed to estimate spectral changes of the absorption properties of turbid media from time-resolved reflectance/transmittance measurements. It was derived directly from the microscopic Beer-Lambert law, and tested against simulations and phantom measurements.

  10. Time-resolved diagnostics for concrete target response

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Reaugh, J.E.; Simonson, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    In order to facilitate the design of advanced penetrating weapons for defeating land targets, the interaction of concrete with high-velocity penetrators needs to be better characterized. To aid in this effort, three new types of time-resolved diagnostics are being developed and have been used in two experiments and one demonstration: fiber optic arrays to localize penetrators in space and time, Fabry-Perot velocimetry to record the concrete particle velocity, which is related to the pressure, at specific locations within concrete targets, and micropower impulse radar to provide a non-intrusive measure of the penetrator position-time history in a target. The two experiments used the fiber optic array and the Fabry-Perot velocimeter to diagnose the response of concrete to penetration by a Viper shaped charge jet. The results were analyzed using the CALE continuum mechanics simulation program, for which a preliminary model of the material properties of concrete was developed. The fiber optic arrays recorded the bow shock at locations 6.4 and 16.9 cm from the front surfaces. The Fabry-Perot velocimeter measured a free-surface velocity of 0.13 km/s at a distance of 3 cm and obliquity 70{degree} from the jet, which was moving at an interface velocity of 4.0 km/s at a depth of 29 cm. These values imply a pressure of about 6.6 kbar at that location. The demonstration used micropower impulse radar with a pulse repetition frequency of 0.25 MHz and a cell size of 30 ps to detect and record the motion of a metal penetrator simulant moving inside a cylindrical concrete target.

  11. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  12. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue.

    PubMed

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  13. New 3-dimensional CFD modeling of CO2 and H2S simultaneous stripping from water within PVDF hollow fiber membrane contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlake, Ahmad; Farivar, Foad; Dabir, Bahram

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a 3-dimensional modeling of simultaneous stripping of carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from water using hollow fiber membrane made of polyvinylidene fluoride is developed. The water, containing CO2 and H2S enters to the membrane as feed. At the same time, pure nitrogen flow in the shell side of a shell and tube hollow fiber as the solvent. In the previous methods of modeling hollow fiber membranes just one of the membranes was modeled and the results expand to whole shell and tube system. In this research the whole hollow fiber shell and tube module is modeled to reduce the errors. Simulation results showed that increasing the velocity of solvent flow and decreasing the velocity of the feed are leads to increase in the system yield. However the effect of the feed velocity on the process is likely more than the influence of changing the velocity of the gaseous solvent. In addition H2S stripping has higher yield in comparison with CO2 stripping. This model is compared to the previous modeling methods and shows that the new model is more accurate. Finally, the effect of feed temperature is studied using response surface method and the operating conditions of feed temperature, feed velocity, and solvent velocity is optimized according to synergistic effects. Simulation results show that, in the optimum operating conditions the removal percentage of H2S and CO2 are 27 and 21 % respectively.

  14. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, F.; Njiki-Menga, G.-H.; Witschger, O.

    2013-04-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a

  15. Time-Resolved Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature fluctuation measurements in both an electrically-heated jet facility with a 10-mm diameter nozzle and also in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented.

  16. Benchtop time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Anjan; Kimura, T; Otani, Y; Fukuma, Y; Akahane, K; Meguro, S

    2008-12-01

    We present here the construction and application of a compact benchtop time-resolved Kerr magnetometer to measure the magnetization precession in magnetic thin films and lithographically patterned elements. As opposed to very expensive femtosecond lasers this system is built upon a picosecond pulsed injection diode laser and electronic pulse and delay generators. The precession is triggered by the electronic pulses of controlled duration and shape, which is launched onto the sample by a microstrip line. We used polarized optical pulses synchronous to the electronic pulses to measure the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The system is integrated in a conventional upright microscope configuration with separate illumination, imaging, and magneto-optical probe paths. The system offers high stability, relative ease of alignment, sample changing, and a long range of time delay. We demonstrate the measurements of time-resolved dynamics of a Permalloy microwire and microdot using this system, which showed dynamics at two different time scales. PMID:19123577

  17. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Schweiger, Martin; Dehghani, Hamid; Schmidt, Florian E. W.; Delpy, David T.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  18. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Ulf; Moeller, Klaus B.; Henriksen, Niels E.

    2010-02-15

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam.

  19. Time-resolved imaging of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, L. K.; Dinish, U. S.; Ong, S. K.; Chao, Z. X.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    Imaging of latent fingerprints using time-resolved (TR) method offers a broader platform to eliminate the unwanted background emission. In this paper, a novel TR imaging technique is demonstrated and implemented, which facilitates the detection of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Simulated experiments were carried out with two overlapping fingerprints treated with two fluorescent powders having different lifetimes in nanosecond range. The dependence of the fluorescence emission intensity in nanosecond resolution of TR imaging is also revealed.

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  1. Ultrafast time resolved vibrational spectroscopy in liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, G.; Hofmann, M.; Weidlich, K.; Graener, H.

    1996-04-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of small molecules in the liquid phase can successfully be studied tracing the relaxation pathways of vibrational excess energy. Two complementing experimental techniques, picosecond IR double resonance spectroscopy and time resolved incoherent Anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, are very powerful tools for such studies. The capabilities of investigations combining these methods are discussed on the example of new experimental data on liquid dichloromethane (CH2Cl2).

  2. Time-resolved photoconductivity of PbSe nanocrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James E; Beard, Matthew C; Nozik, Arthur J

    2006-12-21

    We report the sub-picosecond photoconductivity dynamics of chemically treated PbSe nanocrystal arrays utilizing time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS). TRTS allows both the degree of interdot electronic coupling and the carrier dynamics to be extracted simultaneously. The following capping ligands bonded to the quantum dot surface were studied: hydrazine, ethylenediamine, butlyamine, and aniline. In addition, the arrays were treated with NaOH. We find that the treatments affect both the degree of electronic coupling and the carrier dynamics.

  3. The RATIO method for time-resolved Laue crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Philip; Pitak, Mateusz; Gembicky, Milan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Scheins, Stephan; Benedict, Jason; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Chollet, Matthieu; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    A RATIO method for analysis of intensity changes in time-resolved pump–probe Laue diffraction experiments is described. The method eliminates the need for scaling the data with a wavelength curve representing the spectral distribution of the source and removes the effect of possible anisotropic absorption. It does not require relative scaling of series of frames and removes errors due to all but very short term fluctuations in the synchrotron beam. PMID:19240334

  4. Time resolved optical spectra from MIG welding arc ignitions

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, P.

    1985-03-01

    Optical radiation from MIG (GMAW) welding arc ignitions has been measured with a rapid scan spectrometer. The time resolved spectral measurements reveal a substantial overshoot of ultraviolet radiation during the ignition phase of a 200 A aluminum arc. Calculations which follow the ACGIH guidelines show that, at a welding current of 300 A, the unprotected eye at a distance of 0.5 m may suffer a flash after the reception of radiation from only one ignition.

  5. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  6. [System of ns time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis and radioprotection].

    PubMed

    Yao, Wei-Bo; Guo, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Yong-min; Tang, Jun-Ping; Cheng, Liang; Xu, Qi-fuo

    2014-06-01

    Cathode plasma of high current electron beam diode is an important research on high power microwave and strong pulsed radio accelerator. It is a reliable method to study cathode plasma by diagnosing the cathode plasma parameters with non-contact spectroscopy measurement system. The present paper introduced the work principle, system composition and performance of the nanosecond (ns) time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis system. Furthermore, it introduced the implementing method and the temporal relation of lower jitter synchronous trigger system. Simultaneously, the authors designed electromagnetic and radio shield room to protect the diagnosis system due to the high electromagnetic and high X-ray and γ-ray radiation, which seriously interferes with the system. Time-resolved spectroscopy experiment on brass (H62) cathode shows that, the element and matter composition of cathode plasma is clearly increase with the increase in the diode pulsed voltage and current magnitude. The spectroscopy diagnosis system could be of up to 10 ns time resolve capability. It's least is 2 ns. Synchronous trigger system's jitter is less than 4 ns. The spectroscopy diagnosis system will open a new way to study the cathode emission mechanism in depth. PMID:25358142

  7. Time-resolved luminescence of nanocrystalline inorganic complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, V.; Millers, D.; Grigorjeva, L.; Lojkowski, W.; Kareiva, A.

    2007-12-01

    Two types of complex nanosized oxides - cerium doped Y3Al5O12 (YAG) and CaWO4- have been studied by means of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Comparative study of time-resolve luminescence characteristics of cerium doped YAG single crystal, nanopowders and nanoceramic as well as for CaWO4 macro- and nanocrystals has been done. Two components in the decay kinetic of Ce3+ related emission in YAG nanocrystals were detected and it was suggested that a different energy transfer rate to volume and surface Ce3+ ions takes place. It is shown that the segregation of Ce3+ ions near nanoparticles surface and/or dislocation lines plays a crucial role in degradation of light yield of cerium related luminescence in YAG nanocrystals. Time-resolved properties of sol-gel synthesized CaWO4 nanocrystals depends strongly on the synthesis rout. It was shown that shallow traps have a strong influence on the luminescence decay times of nanosized CaWO4.

  8. Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in situ planetary mineralogy.

    PubMed

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Rossman, George R; Gleckler, Anthony

    2010-09-10

    Planetary mineralogy can be revealed through a variety of remote sensing and in situ investigations that precede any plans for eventual sample return. We briefly review those techniques and focus on the capabilities for on-surface in situ examination of Mars, Venus, the Moon, asteroids, and other bodies. Over the past decade, Raman spectroscopy has continued to develop as a prime candidate for the next generation of in situ planetary instruments, as it provides definitive structural and compositional information of minerals in their natural geological context. Traditional continuous-wave Raman spectroscopy using a green laser suffers from fluorescence interference, which can be large (sometimes saturating the detector), particularly in altered minerals, which are of the greatest geophysical interest. Taking advantage of the fact that fluorescence occurs at a later time than the instantaneous Raman signal, we have developed a time-resolved Raman spectrometer that uses a streak camera and pulsed miniature microchip laser to provide picosecond time resolution. Our ability to observe the complete time evolution of Raman and fluorescence spectra in minerals makes this technique ideal for exploration of diverse planetary environments, some of which are expected to contain strong, if not overwhelming, fluorescence signatures. We discuss performance capability and present time-resolved pulsed Raman spectra collected from several highly fluorescent and Mars-relevant minerals. In particular, we have found that conventional Raman spectra from fine grained clays, sulfates, and phosphates exhibited large fluorescent signatures, but high quality spectra could be obtained using our time-resolved approach.

  9. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the pulsating CV GW Lib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Spaandonk, L.; Steeghs, D.; Marsh, T. R.; Torres, M. A. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present time-resolved optical spectroscopy of the dwarf nova GW Librae during its rare 2007 April superoutburst and compare these with quiescent epochs. The data provide the first opportunity to track the evolution of the principal spectral features. In the early stages of the outburst, the optically thick disc dominates the optical and the line components show clear orbital radial velocity excursions. In the course of several weeks, optically thin regions become more prominent as strong emission lines replace the broad disc absorption. Post-outburst spectroscopy covering the I band illustrates the advantages of CaII relative to the commonly used Balmer lines when attempting to constrain binary parameters. Due to the lower ionization energy combined with smaller thermal and shear broadening of these lines, a sharp emission component is seen to be moving in between the accretion disc peaks in the CaII line. No such component is visible in the Balmer lines. We interpret this as an emission component originating on the hitherto unseen mass donor star. This emission component has a mean velocity of ~ -15 +/- 5 kms-1 which is associated with the systemic velocity γ, and a velocity semi-amplitude of Kem = 82.2 +/- 4.9 kms-1. Doppler tomography reveals an asymmetric accretion disc, with the S-wave mapping to a sharp spot in the tomogram with a velocity consistent to what is obtained with line profile fitting. A centre of symmetry analysis of the disc component suggests a very small value for the WD orbital velocity K1 as is also inferred from double Gaussian fits to the spectral lines. While our conservative dynamical limits place a hard upper limit on the binary mass ratio of q < 0.23, we favour a significantly lower value near q ~ 0.06. Pulsation modelling suggests a white dwarf mass ~1Msolar. This, paired with a low-mass donor, near the empirical sequence of an evolved cataclysmic variable close to the period bounce, appears to be consistent with all the

  10. Lucas–Kanade fluid trajectories for time-resolved PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegavian, Robin; Leclaire, Benjamin; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Losfeld, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating fluid trajectories in time-resolved PIV. It relies on a Lucas–Kanade paradigm and consists in a simple and direct extension of a two-frame estimation with FOLKI-PIV (Champagnat et al 2011 Exp. Fluids 50 1169–82). The so-called Lucas–Kanade Fluid Trajectories (LKFT) are assumed to be polynomial in time, and are found as the minimizer of a global functional, in which displacements are sought so as to match the intensities of a series of images pairs in the sequence, in the least-squares sense. All pairs involve the central image, similar to other recent time-resolved approaches (FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 035305) and FTEE (Jeon et al 2014 Exp. Fluids 55 1–16)). As switching from a two-frame to a time-resolved objective simply amounts to adding terms in a functional, no significant additional algorithmic element is required. Similar to FOLKI-PIV the method is very well suited for GPU acceleration, which is an important feature as computational complexity increases with the image sequence size. Tests on synthetic data exhibiting peak-locking show that increasing the image sequence size strongly reduces both associated bias and random error, and that LKFT has a remaining total error comparable to that of FTEE on this case. Results on case B of the third PIV challenge (Stanislas et al 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 27–71) also show its ability to drastically reduce the error in situations with low signal-to-noise ratio. These results are finally confirmed on experimental images acquired in the near-field of a low Reynolds number jet. Strong reductions in peak-locking, spatial and temporal noise compared to two-frame estimation are also observed, on the displacement components themselves, as well as on spatial or temporal derivatives, such as vorticity and material acceleration.

  11. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy: exploring reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sangram Keshari; Umapathy, Siva; Parker, Anthony W

    2011-10-01

    The study of reaction mechanisms involves systematic investigations of the correlation between structure, reactivity, and time. The challenge is to be able to observe the chemical changes undergone by reactants as they change into products via one or several intermediates such as electronic excited states (singlet and triplet), radicals, radical ions, carbocations, carbanions, carbenes, nitrenes, nitrinium ions, etc. The vast array of intermediates and timescales means there is no single "do-it-all" technique. The simultaneous advances in contemporary time-resolved Raman spectroscopic techniques and computational methods have done much towards visualizing molecular fingerprint snapshots of the reactive intermediates in the microsecond to femtosecond time domain. Raman spectroscopy and its sensitive counterpart resonance Raman spectroscopy have been well proven as means for determining molecular structure, chemical bonding, reactivity, and dynamics of short-lived intermediates in solution phase and are advantageous in comparison to commonly used time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopy. Today time-resolved Raman spectroscopy is a mature technique; its development owes much to the advent of pulsed tunable lasers, highly efficient spectrometers, and high speed, highly sensitive multichannel detectors able to collect a complete spectrum. This review article will provide a brief chronological development of the experimental setup and demonstrate how experimentalists have conquered numerous challenges to obtain background-free (removing fluorescence), intense, and highly spectrally resolved Raman spectra in the nanosecond to microsecond (ns-μs) and picosecond (ps) time domains and, perhaps surprisingly, laid the foundations for new techniques such as spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. PMID:21986070

  12. Lucas-Kanade fluid trajectories for time-resolved PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegavian, Robin; Leclaire, Benjamin; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Losfeld, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating fluid trajectories in time-resolved PIV. It relies on a Lucas-Kanade paradigm and consists in a simple and direct extension of a two-frame estimation with FOLKI-PIV (Champagnat et al 2011 Exp. Fluids 50 1169-82). The so-called Lucas-Kanade Fluid Trajectories (LKFT) are assumed to be polynomial in time, and are found as the minimizer of a global functional, in which displacements are sought so as to match the intensities of a series of images pairs in the sequence, in the least-squares sense. All pairs involve the central image, similar to other recent time-resolved approaches (FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 035305) and FTEE (Jeon et al 2014 Exp. Fluids 55 1-16)). As switching from a two-frame to a time-resolved objective simply amounts to adding terms in a functional, no significant additional algorithmic element is required. Similar to FOLKI-PIV the method is very well suited for GPU acceleration, which is an important feature as computational complexity increases with the image sequence size. Tests on synthetic data exhibiting peak-locking show that increasing the image sequence size strongly reduces both associated bias and random error, and that LKFT has a remaining total error comparable to that of FTEE on this case. Results on case B of the third PIV challenge (Stanislas et al 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 27-71) also show its ability to drastically reduce the error in situations with low signal-to-noise ratio. These results are finally confirmed on experimental images acquired in the near-field of a low Reynolds number jet. Strong reductions in peak-locking, spatial and temporal noise compared to two-frame estimation are also observed, on the displacement components themselves, as well as on spatial or temporal derivatives, such as vorticity and material acceleration.

  13. Time-resolved Absolute Velocity Quantification with Projections

    PubMed Central

    Langham, Michael C.; Jain, Varsha; Magland, Jeremy F.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative information on time-resolved blood velocity along the femoral/popliteal artery can provide clinical information on peripheral arterial disease and complement MR angiography since not all stenoses are hemodynamically significant. The key disadvantages of the most widely used approach to time-resolve pulsatile blood flow by cardiac-gated velocity-encoded gradient-echo imaging are gating errors and long acquisition time. Here we demonstrate a rapid non-triggered method that quantifies absolute velocity on the basis of phase difference between successive velocity-encoded projections after selectively removing the background static tissue signal via a reference image. The tissue signal from the reference image’s center k-space line is isolated by masking out the vessels in the image domain. The performance of the technique, in terms of reproducibility and agreement with results obtained with conventional phase contrast (PC)-MRI was evaluated at 3T field strength with a variable-flow rate phantom and in vivo of the triphasic velocity waveforms at several segments along the femoral and popliteal arteries. Additionally, time-resolved flow velocity was quantified in five healthy subjects and compared against gated PC-MRI results. To illustrate clinical feasibility the proposed method was shown to be able to identify hemodynamic abnormalities and impaired reactivity in a diseased femoral artery. For both phantom and in vivo studies, velocity measurements were within 1.5 cm/s and the coefficient of variation was less than 5% in an in vivo reproducibility study. In five healthy subjects, the average differences in mean peak velocities and their temporal locations were within 1 cm/s and 10 ms compared to gated PC-MRI. In conclusion, the proposed method provides temporally-resolved arterial velocity with a temporal resolution of 20 ms with minimal post-processing. PMID:20677235

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  16. Rapid high-resolution spin- and time-resolved ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiu-Yun; Gotlieb, Kenneth; Jozwiak, Chris; Hussain, Zahid; Bostwick, Aaron; Lanzara, Alessandra; Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Collaboration; Graduate Group in Applied Science; Technology, University of California, Berkeley Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer, coupled with a lab-based 6 eV laser, will be presented in this talk. Combining time-of-flight(TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry, spin-TOF ARPES achieves unprecedented measurements of near-EF physics rapidly. In addition, the successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  17. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2015-01-15

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern.

  18. Time-Resolved Conformational Dynamics in Hydrocarbon Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Michael P.; Weber, Peter M.

    2007-06-22

    Internal rotation about carbon-carbon bonds allows N,N-dimethyl-2-butanamine (DM2BA) and N,N-dimethyl-3-hexanamine (DM3HA) to assume multiple conformeric structures. We explore the equilibrium composition and dynamics between such conformeric structures using Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Time constants for conformeric interconversion of DM2BA (at 1.79 eV of internal energy) are 19 and 66 ps, and for DM3HA (1.78 eV) 23 and 41 ps. For the first time, a time-resolved and quantitative view of conformational dynamics of flexible hydrocarbon molecules at high temperatures is revealed.

  19. Femtosecond time-resolved electronic relaxation dynamics in tetrathiafulvalene

    SciTech Connect

    Staedter, D.; Polizzi, L.; Thiré, N.; Mairesse, Y.; Mayer, P.; Blanchet, V.

    2015-05-21

    In the present paper, the ultrafast electronic relaxation of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) initiated around 4 eV is studied by femtosecond time-resolved velocity-map imaging. The goal is to investigate the broad double structure observed in the absorption spectrum at this energy. By monitoring the transients of the parent cation and its fragments and by varying the pump and the probe wavelengths, two internal conversions and intramolecular vibrational relaxation are detected both on the order of a few hundred of femtoseconds. Photoelectron images permit the assignment of a dark electronic state involved in the relaxation. In addition, the formation of the dimer of TTF has been observed.

  20. Measurement of thermal transport using time-resolved thermal wave microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2011-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of time-resolved thermal wave microscopy (TRTWM) technique used for thermal wave imaging is presented. TRTWM combines the elements of both frequency and time domain laser based thermoreflectance approaches widely used for thermal wave imaging and measurement of thermal transport. An analytical thermal wave model used for analysis is described and compared to experimental results. Implementation of TRTWM to measure thermal conductivities of materials of interest is demonstrated.

  1. Coupling between the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle and the protonmotive force in Halobacterium halobium cell envelope vesicles. III. Time-resolved increase in the transmembrane electric potential and modeling of the associated ion fluxes.

    PubMed Central

    Helgerson, S L; Mathew, M K; Bivin, D B; Wolber, P K; Heinz, E; Stoeckenius, W

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin functions as an electrogenic, light-driven proton pump in Halobacterium halobium. In cell envelope vesicles, its photocycle kinetics can be correlated with membrane potential. The initial decay rate of the M photocycle intermediate(s) decreases with increasing membrane potential, allowing the construction of a calibration curve. The laser (592.5 nm) was flashed at various time delays following the start of background illumination (592 +/- 25 nm) and transient absorbance changes at 418 nm monitored in cell envelope vesicles. The vesicles were loaded with and suspended in either 3 M NaCl or 3 M KCl buffered with 50 mM HEPES at pH 7.5 and the membrane permeability to protons modified by pretreatment with N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. In each case the membrane potential rose with a halftime of approximately 75 ms. The steady-state potential achieved depends on the cation present and the proton permeability of the membrane, i.e., higher potentials are developed in dicyclohexylcarbodiimide treated vesicles or in NaCl media as compared with KCl media. The results are modeled using an irreversible thermodynamics formulation, which assumes a constant driving reaction affinity (Ach) and a variable reaction rate (Jr) for the proton-pumping cycle of bacteriorhodopsin. Additionally, the model includes a voltage-gated, electrogenic Na+/H+ antiporter that is active when vesicles are suspended in NaCl. Estimates for the linear phenomenological coefficients describing the overall proton-pumping cycle (Lr = 3.5 X 10(-11)/mol2/J X g X s), passive cation permeabilities (LHu = 2 X 10(-10), LKu = 2.2 X 10(-10), LNau = 1 X 10(-11)), and the Na+/H+ exchange via the antiporter (Lex = 5 X 10(-11)) have been obtained. PMID:4074833

  2. Time-resolved biofilm deformation measurements using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Blauert, Florian; Horn, Harald; Wagner, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of shear stress with the biofilm leads to a dynamic deformation, which is related to the structural and material characteristics of biofilms. We show how optical coherence tomography can be used as an imaging technique to investigate the time-resolved deformation on the biofilm mesoscale as well as to estimate mechanical properties of the biofilm. For the first time time-resolved deformation from cross-sectional views of the inner biofilm structure could be shown. Changes in the biofilm structure and rheological properties were calculated from cross sections in real-time and time-lapsed measurements. Heterotrophic biofilms were grown in a flow cell set-up at low shear stress of τw  = 0.01 Pa. By applying higher shear stress elastic and viscoelastic behavior of biofilms were quantified. Deformation led to a change in biofilm conformation and allowed to estimate rheological properties. Assuming an ideal wall shear stress calculation, the shear modulus G = 29.7 ± 1.7 Pa and the Young's modulus E = 36.0 ± 2.6 Pa were estimated.

  3. Time resolved imaging microscopy. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, G; Clegg, R M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1991-01-01

    An optical microscope capable of measuring time resolved luminescence (phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence) images has been developed. The technique employs two phase-locked mechanical choppers and a slow-scan scientific CCD camera attached to a normal fluorescence microscope. The sample is illuminated by a periodic train of light pulses and the image is recorded within a defined time interval after the end of each excitation period. The time resolution discriminates completely against light scattering, reflection, autofluorescence, and extraneous prompt fluorescence, which ordinarily decrease contrast in normal fluorescence microscopy measurements. Time resolved image microscopy produces a high contrast image and particular structures can be emphasized by displaying a new parameter, the ratio of the phosphorescence to fluorescence. Objects differing in luminescence decay rates are easily resolved. The lifetime of the long lived luminescence can be measured at each pixel of the microscope image by analyzing a series of images that differ by a variable time delay. The distribution of luminescence decay rates is displayed directly as an image. Several examples demonstrate the utility of the instrument and the complementarity it offers to conventional fluorescence microscopy. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1723311

  4. Formulation for Time-resolved Aerodynamic Damping in Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corke, Thomas; Bowles, Patrick; Coleman, Dusty; Thomas, Flint

    2012-11-01

    A new Hilbert transform formulation of the equation of motion for a pitching airfoil in a uniform stream yields a time resolved aerodynamic damping factor, Ξ (t) = (√{ (Cm2 (t) +C m2 } /αmax) sinψ (t) , where Cm (t) is the instantaneous pitch moment coefficient, and C m (t) is the Hilbert transform of Cm (t) , αmax is the pitching amplitude, and ψ (t) is the time-resolved phase difference between the aerodynamic pitch moment and the instantaneous angle of attack. A Ξ (t) < 0 indicates unstable pressure loading that can be considered a necessary condition to excite stall flutter in an elastic airfoil. This will be illustrated in experiments with conditions producing ``light'' dynamic stall for a range of Mach numbers from 0.3-0.6. These reveal large negative excursions of Ξ (t) during the pitch-up portion of the cycle that correlates with the formation and convection of the dynamic stall vortex. The fact that the cycle-integrated damping coefficient is positive in all these cases underscores how the traditional diagnostic masks much of the physics that underlies the destabilizing effect of the dynamic stall process. This new insight can explain instances of transient limit-cycle growth of helicopter rotor vibrations. Supported by Bell Helicopter.

  5. Structural kinetics of myosin by transient time-resolved FRET

    PubMed Central

    Nesmelov, Yuri E.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Negrashov, Igor V.; Blakely, Sarah E.; Titus, Margaret A.; Thomas, David D.

    2011-01-01

    For many proteins, especially for molecular motors and other enzymes, the functional mechanisms remain unsolved due to a gap between static structural data and kinetics. We have filled this gap by detecting structure and kinetics simultaneously. This structural kinetics experiment is made possible by a new technique, (TR)2FRET (transient time-resolved FRET), which resolves protein structural states on the submillisecond timescale during the transient phase of a biochemical reaction. (TR)2FRET is accomplished with a fluorescence instrument that uses a pulsed laser and direct waveform recording to acquire an accurate subnanosecond time-resolved fluorescence decay every 0.1 ms after stopped flow. To apply this method to myosin, we labeled the force-generating region site specifically with two probes, mixed rapidly with ATP to initiate the recovery stroke, and measured the interprobe distance by (TR)2FRET with high resolution in both space and time. We found that the relay helix bends during the recovery stroke, most of which occurs before ATP is hydrolyzed, and two structural states (relay helix straight and bent) are resolved in each nucleotide-bound biochemical state. Thus the structural transition of the force-generating region of myosin is only loosely coupled to the ATPase reaction, with conformational selection driving the motor mechanism. PMID:21245357

  6. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of spinach chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Yu, W; Pellegrino, F; Alfano, R R

    1977-04-11

    Picosecond fluorescent kinetics and time-resolved spectra of spinach chloroplast were measured at room temperature and low temperatures. The measurement is conducted with 530 nm excitation at an average intensity of 2-10(14) photons/cm2, pluse and at a pulse separation of 6 ns for the 100 pulses used. The 685 nm fluorescent kinetics was found to decay with two components, a fast component with a 56 ps lifetime, and a slow component with a 220 ps lifetime. The 730 nm fluorescent kinetics at room temperature is a single exponential decay with a 100 ps lifetime. The 730 nm fluorescence lifetime was found to increase by a factor of 6 when the temperature was lowered from room temperature to 90 K, while the 685 and 695 nm fluorescent kinetics were unchanged. The time-resolved spectra data obtained within 10 ps after excitation is consistent with the kinetic data reported here. A two-level fluorescence scheme is proposed to explain the kinetics. The effect of excitation with high light intensity and multiple pulses is discussed.

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence study of all-trans-retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Yuval; Presiado, Itay; Gepshtein, Rinat; Simkovitch, Ron; Huppert, Dan

    2014-11-01

    UV-vis steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques were employed to study the ultrafast relaxation path of all-trans-retinal. We found that the steady-state emission spectrum consists mainly of two bands that we assign to the allowed transition from the ? state and the forbidden transition from the ?(ππ*) state. The time-resolved emission signal is dependent on the excitation wavelength, and is composed of three decay components. The short-time component of less than 80 fs, irrespective of the solvent, is assigned to the transition from the ? state. The intermediate-time decay component is assigned to the transition from the ?(ππ*) state, depends on the solvent's polarity and not on the existence of hydrogen bonds between the solute and the solvent or the viscosity of the latter. It has a lifetime of ~1 ps in polar solvents, and of 0.6 and 0.4 ps in the non-polar solvents n-octane and cyclohexane, respectively.

  8. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Tailpipe Exhaust for Several Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Allen, James; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    The automotive catalytic converter reduces or eliminates the emission of various chemical species (e.g. CO, hydrocarbons, etc.) that are the products of combustion from automobile exhaust. However, these units are only effective once they have reached operating temperature. The design and placement of catalytic converters has changed in order to reduce both the quantity of emissions and the time that is required for the converter to be effective. In order to compare the effectiveness of catalytic converters, time-resolved measurements were performed on several vehicles, including a 2010 Toyota Prius, a 2010 Honda Fit, a 1994 Honda Civic, and a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 (which is not equipped with a catalytic converter but is used as a baseline). The newer vehicles demonstrate bot a reduced overall level of CO and hydrocarbon emissions but are also effective more quickly than older units. The time-resolved emissions will be discussed along with the impact of catalytic converter design and location on the measured emissions.

  9. Time-resolved luminescent lateral flow assay technology.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuedong; Knotts, Michael

    2008-09-26

    We here report a detection technology that integrates highly sensitive time-resolved luminescence technique into lateral flow assay platform to achieve excellent detection performance with low cost. We have developed very bright, surface-functionalized and mono-dispersed phosphorescent nanoparticles of long lifetime under ambient conditions. The phosphorescent nanoparticles have been used to conjugate with monoclonal antibody for C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory biomarker. Lateral flow immunoassay devices have been developed using the conjugate for highly sensitive detection of CRP. The CRP assay can achieve a detection sensitivity of <0.2 ngmL(-1) in serum with a linear response from 0.2 to 200 ngmL(-1) CRP. We have also developed a low cost time-resolved luminescence reader for the lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) devices. The reader does not use expensive band pass filter and still provide very low detection background and high detection sensitivity on solid substrates such as nitrocellulose membranes. The reader can detect less than 2.5 ng phosphorescent particles captured on a nitrocellulose membrane strip with more than three orders of magnitude linear detection dynamic range. The technology should find a number of applications, ranging from clinical diagnostics, detection of chemical and biological warfare agents, to food and environmental monitoring. PMID:18790120

  10. Noninvasive 3-dimensional imaging of liver regeneration in a mouse model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 using the sodium iodide symporter gene.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Raymond D; Mao, Shennen A; Amiot, Bruce; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Miller, Amber; Nace, Rebecca; Glorioso, Jaime; O'Connor, Michael K; Peng, Kah Whye; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2015-04-01

    Cell transplantation is a potential treatment for the many liver disorders that are currently only curable by organ transplantation. However, one of the major limitations of hepatocyte (HC) transplantation is an inability to monitor cells longitudinally after injection. We hypothesized that the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene could be used to visualize transplanted HCs in a rodent model of inherited liver disease: hereditary tyrosinemia type 1. Wild-type C57Bl/6J mouse HCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector containing the mouse Slc5a5 (NIS) gene controlled by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter. NIS-transduced cells could robustly concentrate radiolabeled iodine in vitro, with lentiviral transduction efficiencies greater than 80% achieved in the presence of dexamethasone. Next, NIS-transduced HCs were transplanted into congenic fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase knockout mice, and this resulted in the prevention of liver failure. NIS-transduced HCs were readily imaged in vivo by single-photon emission computed tomography, and this demonstrated for the first time noninvasive 3-dimensional imaging of regenerating tissue in individual animals over time. We also tested the efficacy of primary HC spheroids engrafted in the liver. With the NIS reporter, robust spheroid engraftment and survival could be detected longitudinally after direct parenchymal injection, and this thereby demonstrated a novel strategy for HC transplantation. This work is the first to demonstrate the efficacy of NIS imaging in the field of HC transplantation. We anticipate that NIS labeling will allow noninvasive and longitudinal identification of HCs and stem cells in future studies related to liver regeneration in small and large preclinical animal models.

  11. Pose estimation using time-resolved inversion of diffuse light.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Barsi, Christopher; Naik, Nikhil; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-08-25

    We present a novel approach for evaluation of position and orientation of geometric shapes from scattered time-resolved data. Traditionally, imaging systems treat scattering as unwanted and are designed to mitigate the effects. Instead, we show here that scattering can be exploited by implementing a system based on a femtosecond laser and a streak camera. The result is accurate estimation of object pose, which is a fundamental tool in analysis of complex scenarios and plays an important role in our understanding of physical phenomena. Here, we experimentally show that for a given geometry, a single incident illumination point yields enough information for pose estimation and tracking after multiple scattering events. Our technique can be used for single-shot imaging behind walls or through turbid media.

  12. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  13. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropies in mixed surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McCarroll, M.E.; Joly, A.G.; Wang, Z.; Friedrich, D.M.; Wandruszka, R. von

    1999-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decays of solutions of Triton X-114 (TX-114) with various amounts of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were measured using the emission both from the surfactant itself and from added perylene. In the former case, the monomer and aggregate species of the surfactant were spectroscopically isolated and were shown to have significantly different rotational correlation times. The rotational diffusion of perylene in micellar TX-114 with small amounts of added SDS appeared to have a component with a very short correlation time. The anisotropy decay curves showed the existence of limiting anisotropies (r{sub {infinity}}), indicating hindered probe rotation in the micellar environment. At higher SDS concentrations, the fast-decaying component slowed down and the limiting anisotropy decreased substantially, suggesting some migration of the probe to the interior of the micelle.

  14. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  15. Time-resolved air monitoring using Fourier absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    Two categories where spectroscopic techniques excel are the capabilities to perform air analyses in situ and to obtain data at very high time resolutions. Because of these features, the Department of Pesticide Regulation augmented its extensive air monitoring capabilities with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer using open-path optical systems for time resolved ambient air monitoring. A description of the instrumentation and the data analysis procedures will be presented based on two data sets obtained with this FTIR system. In one case, a 100 m folded optical path was used to measure methyl bromide concentrations after fumigation in a warehouse with a time resolution of 15 min and a detection limit of 0.2 ppm. And trying to assess the capability of this FTIR spectrometer to determine flux, water vapor concentrations were measured with a four-meter path length at a time resolution of 0.6 seconds.

  16. Time-resolved thermal transport in compositionally modulated metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, B.M.; Eesley, G.L.; Paddock, C.A.

    1988-01-15

    We report on investigations of one-dimensional thermal transport in compositionally modulated metal films produced with a systematic variation in atomic lattice mismatch. In the case of Ni-Cu, Ni-Mo, Ni-Ti, and Ni-Zr, we observe the relative effects of interfacial disorder on thermal diffusion. Our observations demonstrate the thermal impedance of a single metal-metal interface and indicate that thermal diffusion in a bilayer film is strongly influenced by the interface between contacting metal pairs. This study is made possible by picosecond time-resolved thermoreflectance measurements which probe thermal transport perpendicular to the film plane. This technique can impact on our understanding of electron scattering and transport across metallic boundaries, and it provides a means of inferring electrical transport properties.

  17. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light. PMID:27762396

  18. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging.

    PubMed

    Antolovic, I Michel; Burri, Samuel; Hoebe, Ron A; Maruyama, Yuki; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach. PMID:27367697

  19. Multidimensional time-resolved spectroscopy of vibrational coherence in biopolyenes.

    PubMed

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm(-1) to over 2,000 cm(-1) and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  20. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  1. Time Resolved Single Wire Aluminum Optical Spectroscopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesener, Kate; Pikuz, Sergey; Shelkovenko, Tatiana; Blesener, Isaac; Chalenski, David; Hammer, David; Maron, Yitzhak; Bernshtam, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    We are exploring the conditions of plasmas generated by current-driven explosions of single fine aluminum wires, including temperatures, electron density, ionization state, and potentially magnetic field, using time-resolved emission spectroscopy at visible wavelengths. The experiments are being carried out with 15μm to 75μm Al wires driven by the 10kA, 500ns rise time LCP3 pulser. To determine the magnetic field, a new diagnostic method is being developed which makes use of Zeeman-effect-produced differences in the line shapes of two fine structure components of a multiplet that are equally broadened by Stark and Doppler effects. This method has been demonstrated at the Weizmann Institute of Science in laser-produced plasmas with lower energy densities [1]. [4pt] [1] E. Stambulchik, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 225001 (2007).

  2. Time-resolved phase-sensitive second harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Paweł J; Woods, David A; Bain, Colin D; Verlet, Jan R R

    2015-02-28

    A methodology based on time-resolved, phase-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) for probing the excited state dynamics of species at interfaces is presented. It is based on an interference measurement between the SHG from the sample and a local oscillator generated at a reference together with a lock-in measurement to remove the large constant offset from the interference. The technique is characterized by measuring the phase and excited state dynamics of the dye malachite green at the water/air interface. The key attributes of the technique are that the observed signal is directly proportional to sample concentration, in contrast to the quadratic dependence from non-phase sensitive SHG, and that the real and imaginary parts of the 2nd order non-linear susceptibility can be determined independently. We show that the method is highly sensitive and can provide high quality excited state dynamics in short data acquisition times. PMID:25725724

  3. Towards time-resolved serial crystallography in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Pawate, Ashtamurthy S; Šrajer, Vukica; Schieferstein, Jeremy; Guha, Sudipto; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Schmidt, Marius; Ren, Zhong; Kenis, Paul J A; Perry, Sarah L

    2015-07-01

    Serial methods for crystallography have the potential to enable dynamic structural studies of protein targets that have been resistant to single-crystal strategies. The use of serial data-collection strategies can circumvent challenges associated with radiation damage and repeated reaction initiation. This work utilizes a microfluidic crystallization platform for the serial time-resolved Laue diffraction analysis of macroscopic crystals of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Reaction initiation was achieved via pulsed laser illumination, and the resultant electron-density difference maps clearly depict the expected pR(1)/pR(E46Q) and pR(2)/pR(CW) states at 10 µs and the pB1 intermediate at 1 ms. The strategies presented here have tremendous potential for extension to chemical triggering methods for reaction initiation and for extension to dynamic, multivariable analyses.

  4. Time-resolving electron temperature diagnostic for ALCATOR C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairfax, S. A.

    1984-05-01

    A diagnostic that provides time-resolved central electron temperatures was designed, built, and tested on the ALCATOR C Tokamak. The diagnostic uses an array of fixed-wavelength X-ray crystal monochromators to sample the X-ray continuum and determine the absolute electron temperature. The resolution and central energy of each channel were chosen to exclude any contributions from impurity line radiation. The need for such a diagnostic tool, the design methodology, and the results with typical ALCATOR C plasmas are described. Sawtooth (m = 1) temperature oscillations were observed after pellet fueling of the plasma. This is the first time that such oscillations were observed with an X-ray temperature diagnostic.

  5. Time-resolved phase-sensitive second harmonic generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Paweł J.; Woods, David A.; Bain, Colin D.; Verlet, Jan R. R.

    2015-02-01

    A methodology based on time-resolved, phase-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) for probing the excited state dynamics of species at interfaces is presented. It is based on an interference measurement between the SHG from the sample and a local oscillator generated at a reference together with a lock-in measurement to remove the large constant offset from the interference. The technique is characterized by measuring the phase and excited state dynamics of the dye malachite green at the water/air interface. The key attributes of the technique are that the observed signal is directly proportional to sample concentration, in contrast to the quadratic dependence from non-phase sensitive SHG, and that the real and imaginary parts of the 2nd order non-linear susceptibility can be determined independently. We show that the method is highly sensitive and can provide high quality excited state dynamics in short data acquisition times.

  6. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve; Szkody, Paula

    1988-01-01

    CCD time-resolved V and B differential light curves are presented for the dwarf novae AR And, FS Aur, TT Boo, UZ Boo, AF Cam, AL Com, AW Gem, X Leo, RZ Leo, CW Mon, SW UMa, and TW Vir. The time-series observations ranged from 2 to 6 hours and have accuracies of 0.025 mag or better for the majority of the runs. Except for AR And, X Leo, CW Mon, and TW Vir, the periods are below the cataclysmic-variable period gap (about 2 hours), and the systems are potential SU UMa stars. Photometric periods for five of the stars are the first such determinations, while those for the other seven generally confirm previous spectroscopic or photometric observations. In several cases, the photometric modulations are large amplitude (up to 0.5 mag). The results on AL Com and SW UMa indicate they may be magnetic variables.

  7. Time-resolved doubly bent crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Wilke, M.D.; Blake, R.L.; Vaninetti, J.; Gray, N.T.; Nedrow, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is an essential tool in high-temperature plasma research. We describe a time-resolved x-ray spectrometer suitable for measuring spectra in harsh environments common to many very high-energy density laboratory plasma sources. The spectrometer consisted of a doubly curved Si(111) crystal diffraction element, a WL-1201 (ZnO:Ga) phosphor, a coherent fiber-optic array, and two visible streak cameras. The spectrometer design described here has a minimum time resolution of 1.3 ns with 2.8-eV spectral resolution over a 200-eV-wide bandpass in the 6--7-keV region of the spectrum. Complete system spectral throughput calibrations were done at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron (CHESS). Details of the design and calibration results are presented.

  8. Time-resolved doubly bent crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Wilke, M.D.; Blake, R.L.; Vaninetti, J.; Gray, N.T.; Nedrow, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is an essential tool in high temperature plasma research. We describe a time-resolved x-ray spectrometer suitable for measuring spectra in harsh environments common to many very high energy density laboratory plasma sources. The spectrometer consisted of a doubly curved Si(111) crystal diffraction element, a WL-1201 (ZnO:Ga) phosphor, a coherent fiber optic array, and two visible streak cameras. The spectrometer design described here has a minimum time resolution of 1.3 ns with 2.8 eV spectral resolution over a 200 eV wide bandpass in the 6-7 keV region of the spectrum. Complete system spectral throughput calibrations were done at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron (CHESS). Details of the design and calibration results are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Time resolved PIV measurement of fluid dynamics in agitated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, D.; Kotek, M.; Kopecky, V.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results obtained by TR PIV measurements focused on detailed flow analysis in the selected region. The investigated area was placed 3mm above the blades axis and 5mm far from the blade edge. The captured images were firstly analysed on the mean velocity distribution and the intensity of turbulence {UV} statistics. Here we used the time resolved technique for the experimental study of the flow field in the agitated vessel. The results of the application POD and ODP algorithm on the captured datasets uncovered the existence of unsteady structures in the area that was assumed to be stable. The existence of these structures is bringing a novel view on the mixing process.

  10. Towards time-resolved serial crystallography in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Šrajer, Vukica; Schieferstein, Jeremy; Guha, Sudipto; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Schmidt, Marius; Ren, Zhong; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Perry, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Serial methods for crystallography have the potential to enable dynamic structural studies of protein targets that have been resistant to single-crystal strategies. The use of serial data-collection strategies can circumvent challenges associated with radiation damage and repeated reaction initiation. This work utilizes a microfluidic crystallization platform for the serial time-resolved Laue diffraction analysis of macroscopic crystals of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Reaction initiation was achieved via pulsed laser illumination, and the resultant electron-density difference maps clearly depict the expected pR1/pRE46Q and pR2/pRCW states at 10 µs and the pB1 intermediate at 1 ms. The strategies presented here have tremendous potential for extension to chemical triggering methods for reaction initiation and for extension to dynamic, multivariable analyses. PMID:26144226

  11. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Antolovic, I. Michel; Burri, Samuel; Hoebe, Ron A.; Maruyama, Yuki; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach. PMID:27367697

  12. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  13. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Werz, T.; Baumann, M.; Wolfram, U.; Krill, C.E.

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction.

  14. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits). PMID:27140147

  15. Subcycle interference dynamics of time-resolved photoelectron holography with midinfrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Xuebin; Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, Andre D.; Huismans, Y.; Smirnova, O.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-10-15

    Time-resolved photoelectron holography from atoms using midinfrared laser pulses is investigated by solving the corresponding time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) and a classical model, respectively. The numerical simulation of the photoelectron angular distribution of Xe irradiated with a low-frequency free-electron laser source agrees well with the experimental results. Different types of subcycle interferometric structures are predicted by the classical model. Furthermore with the TDSE model it is demonstrated that the holographic pattern is sensitive to the shape of the atomic orbitals. This is a step toward imaging by means of photoelectron holography.

  16. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  17. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, R.; Sestini, S.; De Giorgi, V.; Stambouli, D.; Carli, P.; Massi, D.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated human cutaneous basal cell carcinoma ex-vivo samples by combined time resolved two photon intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy. Morphological and spectroscopic differences were found between malignant skin and corresponding healthy skin tissues. In comparison with normal healthy skin, cancer tissue showed a different morphology and a mean fluorescence lifetime distribution slightly shifted towards higher values. Topical application of delta-aminolevulinic acid to the lesion four hours before excision resulted in an enhancement of the fluorescence signal arising from malignant tissue, due to the accumulation of protoporphyrines inside tumor cells. Contrast enhancement was prevalent at tumor borders by both two photon fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Fluorescence-based images showed a good correlation with conventional histopathological analysis, thereby supporting the diagnostic accuracy of this novel method. Combined morphological and lifetime analysis in the study of ex-vivo skin samples discriminated benign from malignant tissues, thus offering a reliable, non-invasive tool for the in-vivo analysis of inflammatory and neoplastic skin lesions.

  18. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of phytochrome and stentorin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pill-Soon

    1991-05-01

    Phytochrome is a tetrapyrrole chromoprotein. It serves as a sensitive photosensor for red lightmediated gene expression and other developmental/morphological responses in plants. In this paper photochemical dynamics of the phytochrome molecule have been described in terms of photoisomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore in its singlet excited state and subsequent thermal processes in the Pr Pfr phototransformation of phytochrome. Stentorin acts as the photosensor molecule in the ciliate Stentor coeruleus. This unicellular protozoan is most sensitive to red light (610-620 urn). Stentor also senses the direction of light propagation as evidenced by their light-avoiding and negative phototactic swimming behaviors. This aneural photosensory phenomenon is triggered by the photoreceptor stentorin. The possible involvement of a light-induced transient proton release from the photoreceptor as the primary mechanism of light-signal processing has been discussed on the basis of picosecond fluorescence decays and time-resolved fluorescence spectra of stentorin in solution. An initial sensory signal generated by the primary photoprocess of stentorin then triggers subsequent transduction steps that include calcium ion influx from the extracellular medium. Calcium ion influx from the extracellular medium to the cytosol causes the Stentor cell to reverse its ciliary beating and subsequently steer away from the light trap. II.

  19. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS.

    PubMed

    Glownia, James M; Cryan, J; Andreasson, J; Belkacem, A; Berrah, N; Blaga, C I; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J; DiMauro, L F; Fang, L; Frisch, J; Gessner, O; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hertlein, M P; Hoener, M; Huang, G; Kornilov, O; Marangos, J P; March, A M; McFarland, B K; Merdji, H; Petrovic, V S; Raman, C; Ray, D; Reis, D A; Trigo, M; White, J L; White, W; Wilcox, R; Young, L; Coffee, R N; Bucksbaum, P H

    2010-08-16

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  20. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  1. Time-resolved electric-field-induced second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshulam, Guilia; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi

    2001-12-01

    One limitation of using electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) to determine the molecular first hyperpolarizability (beta) of nonlinear optical molecules lies in the fact that part of the second harmonic signal comes from the second hyperpolarizability (gamma) produced by mixing two optical fields with the DC field. In analyzing EFISH results, the second hyperpolarizability contribution of the studied molecules is generally neglected. We present a modified time resolved EFISH technique that allows us, in a single experiment, to determine separately the beta and the gamma contributions. We study para-nitro aniline dissolved in Glycerol, a highly viscous solvent, and apply the DC field via a high voltage pulse with a fast rise time of approximately 40 nsec. As a result, the orientation of the molecules under the applied electric field is slow relative to the build-up of the field, enabling us to directly measure only the DC induced second harmonic (gamma contribution), at the beginning of the HV pulse. The pure beta contribution is determined from the difference between this signal and the conventional EFISH signal at the plateau of the HV pulse. Our result confirm that the gamma contribution is indeed less than 10% of the total.

  2. A Clinical Tissue Oximeter Using NIR Time-Resolved Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujisaka, Shin-ichi; Ozaki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kamada, Tsuyoshi; Kitazawa, Ken; Nishizawa, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The tNIRS-1, a new clinical tissue oximeter using NIR time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), has been developed. The tNIRS-1 measures oxygenated, deoxygenated and total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation in living tissues. Two-channel TRS measurements are obtained using pulsed laser diodes (LD) at three wavelengths, multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) for light detection, and time-to-digital converters (TDC) for time-of-flight photon measurements. Incorporating advanced semiconductor devices helped to make the design of this small-size, low-cost and low-power TRS instrument possible. In order to evaluate the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1, a study using blood phantoms and healthy volunteers was conducted to compare data obtained from a conventional SRS device and data from an earlier TRS system designed for research purposes. The results of the study confirmed the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. Clinical evaluations conducted in several hospitals demonstrated a high level of usability in clinical situations and confirmed the efficacy of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1.

  3. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopic techniques as applied to channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Eglof; Puskar, Ljiljana; Bartl, Franz J.; Aziz, Emad F.; Hegemann, Peter; Schade, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Among optogenetic tools, channelrhodopsins, the light gated ion channels of the plasma membrane from green algae, play the most important role. Properties like channel selectivity, timing parameters or color can be influenced by the exchange of selected amino acids. Although widely used, in the field of neurosciences for example, there is still little known about their photocycles and the mechanism of ion channel gating and conductance. One of the preferred methods for these studies is infrared spectroscopy since it allows observation of proteins and their function at a molecular level and in near-native environment. The absorption of a photon in channelrhodopsin leads to retinal isomerization within femtoseconds, the conductive states are reached in the microsecond time scale and the return into the fully dark-adapted state may take more than minutes. To be able to cover all these time regimes, a range of different spectroscopical approaches are necessary. This mini-review focuses on time-resolved applications of the infrared technique to study channelrhodopsins and other light triggered proteins. We will discuss the approaches with respect to their suitability to the investigation of channelrhodopsin and related proteins. PMID:26217670

  4. A Clinical Tissue Oximeter Using NIR Time-Resolved Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujisaka, Shin-ichi; Ozaki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kamada, Tsuyoshi; Kitazawa, Ken; Nishizawa, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The tNIRS-1, a new clinical tissue oximeter using NIR time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), has been developed. The tNIRS-1 measures oxygenated, deoxygenated and total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation in living tissues. Two-channel TRS measurements are obtained using pulsed laser diodes (LD) at three wavelengths, multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) for light detection, and time-to-digital converters (TDC) for time-of-flight photon measurements. Incorporating advanced semiconductor devices helped to make the design of this small-size, low-cost and low-power TRS instrument possible. In order to evaluate the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1, a study using blood phantoms and healthy volunteers was conducted to compare data obtained from a conventional SRS device and data from an earlier TRS system designed for research purposes. The results of the study confirmed the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. Clinical evaluations conducted in several hospitals demonstrated a high level of usability in clinical situations and confirmed the efficacy of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. PMID:26782242

  5. Time resolved EUV spectra from Zpinching capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Nawaz, Fahad

    2015-09-01

    We developed symmetrically charged driver to obtain high voltage, high current Z-pinching capillary discharge. Plasma is created by up to 70 kA, 29 ns risetime current pulse passing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with gas to initial pressure in the range of 1 kPa. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current curve. Time-integrated and time-resolved spectra of discharge plasma radiation are recorded together with the capillary current and analyzed. The most encouraging spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition. Spectral lines are identified in the NIST database using the FLY kinetic code. The line of 13.38 nm wavelength, transition NVII 2 - 3, was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents >60 kA. This work has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic grants LG13029.

  6. Time-resolved FRET strategy to screen GPCR ligand library.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Nadia; Hounsou, Candide; Belhocine, Abderazak; Rodriguez, Thieric; Dupuis, Elodie; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Durroux, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Screening chemical libraries to find specific drugs for G protein-coupled receptors is still of major interest. Indeed, because of their major roles in all physiological functions, G protein-coupled receptors remain major targets for drug development programs. Currently, interest in GPCRs as drug targets has been boosted by the discovery of biased ligands, thus allowing the development of drugs not only specific for one target but also for the specific signaling cascade expected to have the therapeutic effect. Such molecules are then expected to display fewer side effects. To reach such a goal, there is much interest in novel, efficient, simple, and direct screening assays that may help identify any drugs interacting with the target, these being then analyzed for their biased activity. Here, we present an efficient strategy to screen ligands on their binding properties. The method described is based on time-resolved FRET between a receptor and a ligand. This method has already been used to develop new assays called Tag-lite(®) binding assays for numerous G protein-coupled receptors, proving its broad application and its power.

  7. Monitoring tissue metabolism via time-resolved laser fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Buchholz, Rainer; Emmrich, Frank; Fink, Frank; Geddes, Clive L.; Pfeifer, Lutz; Raabe, Ferdinand; Marx, Uwe

    1999-05-01

    Most assays for drug screening are monitoring the metabolism of cells by detecting the NADH content, which symbolize its metabolic activity, indirectly. Nowadays, the performance of a LASER enables us to monitor the metabolic state of mammalian cells directly and on-line by using time-resolved autofluorescence detection. Therefore, we developed in combination with tissue engineering, an assay for monitoring minor toxic effects of volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are accused of inducing Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). Furthermore, we used the Laserfluoroscope (LF) for pharmacological studies on human bone marrow in vitro with special interest in chemotherapy simulation. In cancer research and therapy, the effect of chemostatica in vitro in the so-called oncobiogram is being tested; up to now without great success. However, it showed among other things that tissue structure plays a vital role. Consequently, we succeeded in simulating a chemotherapy in vitro on human bone marrow. Furthermore, after tumor ektomy we were able to distinguish between tumoric and its surrounding healthy tissue by using the LF. With its sensitive detection of metabolic changes in tissues the LF enables a wide range of applications in biotechnology, e.g. for quality control in artificial organ engineering or biocompatability testing.

  8. Time-Resolved Synchronous Fluorescence for Biomedical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Fales, Andrew; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents our most recent advances in synchronous fluorescence (SF) methodology for biomedical diagnostics. The SF method is characterized by simultaneously scanning both the excitation and emission wavelengths while keeping a constant wavelength interval between them. Compared to conventional fluorescence spectroscopy, the SF method simplifies the emission spectrum while enabling greater selectivity, and has been successfully used to detect subtle differences in the fluorescence emission signatures of biochemical species in cells and tissues. The SF method can be used in imaging to analyze dysplastic cells in vitro and tissue in vivo. Based on the SF method, here we demonstrate the feasibility of a time-resolved synchronous fluorescence (TRSF) method, which incorporates the intrinsic fluorescent decay characteristics of the fluorophores. Our prototype TRSF system has clearly shown its advantage in spectro-temporal separation of the fluorophores that were otherwise difficult to spectrally separate in SF spectroscopy. We envision that our previously-tested SF imaging and the newly-developed TRSF methods will combine their proven diagnostic potentials in cancer diagnosis to further improve the efficacy of SF-based biomedical diagnostics. PMID:26404289

  9. Ultrafast surface dynamics probed with time resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Angela, M.; Hieke, F.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Gerken, N.; Beye, M.; Gerasimova, N.; Redlin, H.; Wurth, W.

    2016-01-01

    Time resolved core level photoemission (trXPS) allows real-time atom-specific investigation of ultrafast surface dynamics. Core levels contain information on the chemical state and the structure of the surface as well as the local charge distribution around specific atoms. Monitoring their evolution after optically exciting the surface, can give valuable information on the electronic (few picosecond time scale) and lattice dynamics (several picosecond timescale). We have performed a trXPS experiment at the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY in Hamburg on a clean Ir(111) surface measuring the temporal evolution of the 4f core levels of Ir(111) after optically exciting the sample. The spectral changes due to X-ray and optical laser induced space charge effects which occur in trXPS experiments with high fluence pump and probe pulses have been fully characterized and controlled during the measurements. At early time scales after the optical excitation we observe time-dependent energy shifts and intensity changes which can be partially attributed to the formation of sidebands. Furthermore, we can clearly identify contributions which result from a change in the surface electron density which then relaxes on a time scale on the order of 2 ps.

  10. Time resolved spectroscopic NMR imaging using hyperpolarized 129Xe.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Kühn, H; Häsing, F W; Münnemann, K; Blümich, B; Appelt, S

    2004-04-01

    We have visualized the melting and dissolution processes of xenon (Xe) ice into different solvents using the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, imaging, and time resolved spectroscopic imaging by means of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Starting from the initial condition of a hyperpolarized solid Xe layer frozen on top of an ethanol (ethanol/water) ice block we measured the Xe phase transitions as a function of time and temperature. In the pure ethanol sample, pieces of Xe ice first fall through the viscous ethanol to the bottom of the sample tube and then form a thin layer of liquid Xe/ethanol. The xenon atoms are trapped in this liquid layer up to room temperature and keep their magnetization over a time period of 11 min. In the ethanol/water mixture (80 vol%/20%), most of the polarized Xe liquid first stays on top of the ethanol/water ice block and then starts to penetrate into the pores and cracks of the ethanol/water ice block. In the final stage, nearly all the Xe polarization is in the gas phase above the liquid and trapped inside the pores. NMR spectra of homogeneous samples of pure ethanol containing thermally polarized Xe and the spectroscopic images of the melting process show that very high concentrations of hyperpolarized Xe (about half of the density of liquid Xe) can be stored or delivered in pure ethanol. PMID:15040986

  11. Time-resolved spectral imaging: better photon economy, higher accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Blab, Gerhard A.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetime and spectral imaging are complementary techniques that offer a non-invasive solution for monitoring metabolic processes, identifying biochemical compounds, and characterizing their interactions in biological tissues, among other tasks. Newly developed instruments that perform time-resolved spectral imaging can provide even more information and reach higher sensitivity than either modality alone. Here we report a multispectral lifetime imaging system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), capable of operating at high photon count rates (12 MHz) per spectral detection channel, and with time resolution of 200 ps. We performed error analyses to investigate the effect of gate width and spectral-channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths. Temporal and spectral phasors were used for analysis of recorded data, and we demonstrated blind un-mixing of the fluorescent components using information from both modalities. Fractional intensities, spectra, and decay curves of components were extracted without need for prior information. We further tested this approach with fluorescently doubly-labeled DNA, and demonstrated its suitability for accurately estimating FRET efficiency in the presence of either non-interacting or interacting donor molecules.

  12. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Moya; Ian McKennaa; Thomas Keenana; Michael Cuneob

    2007-03-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  13. Time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Kenneth; Cuneo, Michael; McKenna, Ian; Keenan, Thomas; Sanford, Thomas; Mock, Ray

    2006-08-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and axial (polar) views. UNSPEC 1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  14. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; Tobey, R. I.; Hill, J. P.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing the evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.

  15. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; et al

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing themore » evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.« less

  16. Fielding of a Time-Resolved Tomographic Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Frayer, Brian Cox, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Mike Jones, Morris Kaufman

    2008-09-11

    A diagnostic instrument has been developed for the acquisition of high-speed time-resolved images at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument was developed in order to create time histories of the electron beam. Four discrete optical subsystems view Cerenkov light generated at an x-ray target inside of a vacuum envelope. Each system employs cylindrical optics to image light in one direction and collapse light in the orthogonal direction. Each of the four systems images and collapses in unique axes, thereby capturing unique information. Light along the imaging axis is relayed via optical fiber to streak cameras. A computer is used to reconstruct the original image from the four optically collapsed images. Due to DARHT’s adverse environment, the instrument can be operated remotely to adjust optical parameters and contains a subsystem for remote calibration. The instrument was deployed and calibrated, and has been used to capture and reconstruct images. Matters of alignment, calibration, control, resolution, and adverse conditions will be discussed.

  17. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Glownia, James; Cryan, J.; Andreasson, J.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Blaga, C.L.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; DiMauro, L.F.; Fang, L.; Frisch, J.; Gessner, O.; Guhr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hertlein, M.P.; Hoener, M.; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; Marangos, J.P.; March, A.M.; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  18. Noninvasive determination of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads by time-resolved reflectance measurements for functional near infra-red spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanifuji, T; Wang, L

    2014-01-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (μ(a) and μ'(s)) of adult heads have been noninvasively determined by time-resolved reflectance measurements. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis was used to calculate time-resolved reflectance from realistic adult head models with brain grooves containing a non-scattering layer. In vivo time-resolved reflectances of human heads were measured by a system composed of a time-correlated single photon counter and a diode laser. By minimizing the objective functions that compare theoretical and experimental time resolved reflectances, μ(a) and μ'(s) of brain were determined. It became clear that time-resolved measurements have enough sensitivity to determine both μ(a) and μ'(s) for superficial tissues, gray matter and white matter, except μ(s) for white matter.

  19. A thermodynamic and mechanical model for formation of the Solar System via 3-dimensional collapse of the dusty pre-solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Anne M.; Criss, Robert E.

    2012-03-01

    The fundamental and shared rotational characteristics of the Solar System (nearly circular, co-planar orbits and mostly upright axial spins of the planets) record conditions of origin, yet are not explained by prevailing 2-dimensional disk models. Current planetary spin and orbital rotational energies (R.E.) each nearly equal and linearly depend on gravitational self-potential of formation (Ug), revealing mechanical energy conservation. We derive -ΔUg≅Δ.R.E. and stability criteria from thermodynamic principles, and parlay these relationships into a detailed model of simultaneous accretion of the protoSun and planets from the dust-bearing 3-d pre-solar nebula (PSN). Gravitational heating is insignificant because Ug is negative, the 2nd law of thermodynamics must be fulfilled, and ideal gas conditions pertain to the rarified PSN until the objects were nearly fully formed. Combined conservation of angular momentum and mechanical energy during 3-dimensional collapse of spheroidal dust shells in a contracting nebula provides ΔR.E.≅R.E. for the central body, whereas for formation of orbiting bodies, ΔR.E.≅R.E.f(1-If/Ii), where I is the moment of inertia. Orbital data for the inner planets follow 0.04×R.E.f≅-Ug which confirms conservation of angular momentum. Significant loss of spin, attributed to viscous dissipation during differential rotation, masks the initial spin of the un-ignited protoSun predicted by R.E.=-Ug. Heat production occurs after nearly final sizes are reached via mechanisms such as shear during differential rotation and radioactivity. We focus on the dilute stage, showing that the PSN was compositionally graded due to light molecules diffusing preferentially, providing the observed planetary chemistry, and set limits on PSN mass, density, and temperature. From measured planetary masses and orbital characteristics, accounting for dissipation of spin, we deduce mechanisms and the sequence of converting a 3-d dusty cloud to the present 2-d

  20. Time-resolved photoresponse studies of ferromagnet/superconductor nanobilayers and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong

    Interactions of superconducting nanostructures with external ultrafast optical radiation represent a very interesting topic in both the framework of nonequilibrium physics and photodetector applications. Heterogeneous proximized ferromagnet/superconductor nano-bilayers are very promising since they exhibit the ultrafast Cooper-pair and quasiparticle dynamics. In this thesis, to study on the role of proximity effect on electron-phonon coupling in F/S heterostructures, we have characterized NiCu/Nb, NiCu/Au/YBaCuO, and LaSrMnO/YBaCuO nano-bilayers, using time-resolved, all optical, femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy method and transient photoimpedance measurement. We fitted the experimental data with the two-temperature (2-T) model and our own extension model, the three-temperature (3-T) model, which involves relaxation quasiparticles with both optical and acoustic phonons. The 3-T model gives more accurate fitting results than the 2-T model. Moreover, our time-resolved studies of the carrier dynamics in oxide-based F/S structures open the way to novel basic-physics investigations of nonequilibrium effects in correlated systems. Our research results demonstrate that the F/S nanobilayers represent a new class of designed superconducting structures, which can be used in future for ultrafast photodetectors.

  1. Time-Resolved Quantum Dynamics of Double Ionization in Strong Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2007-05-18

    Quantum calculations of a (1+1)-dimensional model for double ionization in strong laser fields are used to trace the time evolution from the ground state through ionization and rescattering to the two-electron escape. The subspace of symmetric escape, a prime characteristic of nonsequential double ionization, remains accessible by a judicious choice of 1D coordinates for the electrons. The time-resolved ionization fluxes show the onset of single and double ionization, the sequence of events during the pulse, and the influences of pulse duration and reveal the relative importance of sequential and nonsequential double ionization, even when ionization takes place during the same field cycle.

  2. Time-resolved FTIR studies of the photodissociation of pyruvic acid at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gregory E.; Muckerman, James T.; Preses, Jack M.; Flynn, Ralph E. Weston George W., Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Infrared emission from carbon dioxide produced in the 193 nm photolysis of pyruvic acid vapor has been investigated using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as a probe. A broad feature, strongly red-shifted from the antisymmetric stretching fundamental (ν 3) of CO 2, dominates the early spectrum. A statistical model using a linear surprisal is shown to provide good agreement with the observed spectral contour, but only if the energy available to the photofragments corresponds to the direct formation of acetaldehyde along with CO 2.

  3. Time-resolved serial crystallography captures high-resolution intermediates of photoactive yellow protein

    SciTech Connect

    Tenboer, Jason; Basu, Shibom; Zatsepin, Nadia; Pande, Kanupriya; Milathianaki, Despina; Frank, Matthias; Hunter, Mark; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Heymann, Michael; Kupitz, Christopher; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Grant, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Scales, Jennifer; Gati, Cornelius; Seuring, Carolin; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Schwander, Peter; Fromme, Raimund; Ourmazd, Abbas; Moffat, Keith; Van Thor, Jasper J.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Chapman, Henry N.; Schmidt, Marius

    2014-12-05

    We report that serial femtosecond crystallography using ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) offers the possibility to study light-triggered dynamics of biomolecules. Using microcrystals of the blue light photoreceptor, photoactive yellow protein, as a model system, we present high resolution, time-resolved difference electron density maps of excellent quality with strong features, which allow the determination of structures of reaction intermediates to 1.6 Å resolution. These results open the way to the study of reversible and non-reversible biological reactions on time scales as short as femtoseconds under conditions which maximize the extent of reaction initiation throughout the crystal.

  4. Time-Resolved Serial Crystallography Captures High Resolution Intermediates of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tenboer, Jason; Basu, Shibom; Zatsepin, Nadia; Pande, Kanupria; Milathianaki, Despina; Frank, Matthias; Hunter, Mark; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Heymann, Michael; Kupitz, Christopher; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Grant, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Scales, Jennifer; Gati, Cornelius; Seuring, Carolin; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Schwander, Peter; Fromme, Raimund; Ourmazd, Abbas; Moffat, Keith; Van Thor, Jasper; Spence, John H. C.; Fromme, Petra; Chapman, Henry N.; Schmidt, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography using ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) offers the possibility to study light-triggered dynamics of biomolecules. Using microcrystals of the blue light photoreceptor, photoactive yellow protein, as a model system, we present high resolution, time-resolved difference electron density maps of excellent quality with strong features, which allow the determination of structures of reaction intermediates to 1.6 Å resolution. These results open the way to the study of reversible and non-reversible biological reactions on time scales as short as femtoseconds under conditions which maximize the extent of reaction initiation throughout the crystal. PMID:25477465

  5. Time-resolved serial crystallography captures high-resolution intermediates of photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Tenboer, Jason; Basu, Shibom; Zatsepin, Nadia; Pande, Kanupriya; Milathianaki, Despina; Frank, Matthias; Hunter, Mark; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Koglin, Jason E; Oberthuer, Dominik; Heymann, Michael; Kupitz, Christopher; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Grant, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Scales, Jennifer; Gati, Cornelius; Seuring, Carolin; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Schwander, Peter; Fromme, Raimund; Ourmazd, Abbas; Moffat, Keith; Van Thor, Jasper J; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Chapman, Henry N; Schmidt, Marius

    2014-12-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography using ultrashort pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enables studies of the light-triggered dynamics of biomolecules. We used microcrystals of photoactive yellow protein (a bacterial blue light photoreceptor) as a model system and obtained high-resolution, time-resolved difference electron density maps of excellent quality with strong features; these allowed the determination of structures of reaction intermediates to a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. Our results open the way to the study of reversible and nonreversible biological reactions on time scales as short as femtoseconds under conditions that maximize the extent of reaction initiation throughout the crystal.

  6. Time-resolved serial crystallography captures high-resolution intermediates of photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Tenboer, Jason; Basu, Shibom; Zatsepin, Nadia; Pande, Kanupriya; Milathianaki, Despina; Frank, Matthias; Hunter, Mark; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Koglin, Jason E; Oberthuer, Dominik; Heymann, Michael; Kupitz, Christopher; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Grant, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Scales, Jennifer; Gati, Cornelius; Seuring, Carolin; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Schwander, Peter; Fromme, Raimund; Ourmazd, Abbas; Moffat, Keith; Van Thor, Jasper J; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Chapman, Henry N; Schmidt, Marius

    2014-12-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography using ultrashort pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enables studies of the light-triggered dynamics of biomolecules. We used microcrystals of photoactive yellow protein (a bacterial blue light photoreceptor) as a model system and obtained high-resolution, time-resolved difference electron density maps of excellent quality with strong features; these allowed the determination of structures of reaction intermediates to a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. Our results open the way to the study of reversible and nonreversible biological reactions on time scales as short as femtoseconds under conditions that maximize the extent of reaction initiation throughout the crystal. PMID:25477465

  7. Time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay of plasma daidzein and genistein.

    PubMed

    Wang, G J; Lapcík, O; Hampl, R; Uehara, M; Al-Maharik, N; Stumpf, K; Mikola, H; Wähälä, K; Adlercreutz, H

    2000-06-01

    We present a method for the determination of the phytoestrogens daidzein and genistein in plasma (serum). These weakly estrogenic isoflavones occur in soybeans and in smaller amounts in some other beans and plants. It has been suggested that they may afford protection against prostate and breast cancer. The method is based on time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA) using a europium chelate as a label. After synthesis of 4'-O-carboxymethyl-daidzein and 4'-O-carboxymethyl-genistein the compounds are coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA), then used as antigens to immunize rabbits. The tracers with the europium chelate are synthesized using the same 4'-O-derivative of the isoflavones. After enzymatic hydrolysis and ether extraction the immunoassay is carried out using the VICTOR 1420 multilabel counter (Wallac Oy, Turku, Finland). The antisera cross-reacted to some extent with some isoflavonoids but not with flavonoids. The cross-reactivity seems not to influence the results, which were highly specific for both compounds. The correlation coefficients between the TR-FIA methods and the reference method based on isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were high; r-values were about 0.95-0.99 depending on concentration. The intra-assay coefficients of variation (CV%) for daidzein and genistein at three different concentrations vary 3.2-4.5 and 3.2-4.1, respectively. The inter-assay CVs vary 5.0-6.3 and 4.5-5.3, respectively. The working ranges of the daidzein and genistein assays are 1.0-216 and 1.7-370 nmol/l, respectively. The plasma values (n = 80) of daidzein and genistein are very low in Finnish subjects (mean for daidzein, 3.8+/-6.8 and for genistein, 3.2+/-7.6 nmol/l; median value for daidzein 1.5 and for genistein 1.4 nmol/l). PMID:10802284

  8. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, O; Aksoy, B; Akalin, O B; Bayraktar, H; Alaca, B E

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads. PMID:26931864

  9. Time-resolved White-light Interferometry for Ultrafast Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingareev, I.; Wortmann, D.; Brand, A.; Horn, A.

    2010-10-01

    The material modification in the volume of transparent dielectrics using tightly focused fs-laser radiation is an important topic for many research groups all over the world. A wide range of applications like the writing of waveguides, micro-structuring by material modification and subsequent etching, or the micro-welding of glass is based on the localized melting and quenching in a different state. Time-resolved white-light interferometry is adopted for the measurement of the optical phase changes in processed materials. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup combined with microscope objectives is used. The white light is generated by focusing ultrafast laser radiation (tp = 80 fs) in a sapphire crystal using a micro-lens array to minimize temporal and spatial fluctuations in the white-light continuum. Lateral and coaxial pump-probe measurements of the phase changes during material processing are performed using one or two coupled ultrafast laser sources at different repetition rates (frep = 1 kHz-1 MHz) or by adopting single pulses. The temporal delay between the pump and the probe can be adjusted in the range τ⩽1.8 μs in dependence on the repetition rate of the pump radiation. The optical phase shift and therefore the refractive index of the material is calculated from the interference images. The knowledge of the refractive index during the modification process with a temporal resolution in the ps-range and a spatial resolution of several microns leads to a better understanding of the initial processes for the permanent material modifications.

  10. Time-resolved study of Higgs mode in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, Ryo

    The behavior of superconductors far from equilibrium has been intensively studied over decades. Goals of these studies are the elucidation of bosonic fluctuations essential for the pairing mechanisms, the manifestation of competing orders or hidden phases, and the optical manipulation of superconductivity. The study of collective modes is crucially important for these perspectives as it provides the information on the dynamics of order parameters in non-equilibirium states. Generally, collective modes in ordered phases associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking are classified into 1) gapless phase modes and 2) gapped amplitude modes. In superconductors, the phase mode is eaten by gauge field, according to the Anderson-Higgs mechanism. The remaining amplitude mode is recently termed as Higgs mode from its analogy to the Higgs boson in particle physics. Despite its long history of investigation, unambiguous observation of Higgs mode has remained elusive. This is because the Higgs mode does not have a charge nor electric dipole and therefore it does not couple directly to the electromagnetic field. Here we report on our recent observation of Higgs mode in s-wave superconductors by using THz-pump and THz-probe spectroscopy technique. After nonadiabatic excitation near the superconducting gap energy with monocycle THz pulses, Higgs mode was observed as oscillations in the transmission of THz probe pulse. The resonant nonlinear coupling between the Higgs mode and coherent radiation field was also discovered, resulting in an efficient third order harmonic generation of the incident THz radiation. The extension of experiments to multiband superconductors and unconventional superconductors will be discussed. Time-resolved study of Higgs mode in superconductors.

  11. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  12. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  13. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of magnetization dynamics in spin-transfer torque devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chembrolu, V.

    2010-02-24

    Time-resolved x-ray imaging techniques have recently demonstrated the capability to probe the magnetic switching of nanoscale devices. This technique has enabled, for example, the direct observation of the nonuniform intermediate states assumed by the magnetic free layer during reversal by a spin-polarized current. These experiments have shown an interesting size-dependent behavior associated with the motion of vortices to mediate the magnetization reversal which cannot be explained by the macrospin picture of spin-torque switching. In this paper we present both experimental and analytical results which show the origin of the complex switching behavior. We use time-resolved x-ray microscopy to further study the switching behavior of samples with 45{sup o} angle between the free and polarizing magnetic layers. A model is developed in terms of a linearized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation showing that the initial dynamics is dominated by the balance between the Oersted field and thermal fluctuations. The spin torque amplifies this dynamics, leading to a strong sensitivity to sample size, angle, and temperature. The model is in good agreement with current and previous experimental observations.

  14. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Chelliah V.; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S.; Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06752a

  15. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-01

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform’s size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257-65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke’s brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz.

  16. Characterization of female breast lesions from multi-wavelength time-resolved optical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Danesini, Gianmaria; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2005-06-01

    Characterization of both malignant and benign lesions in the female breast is presented as the result of a clinical study that involved more than 190 subjects in the framework of the OPTIMAMM European project. All the subjects underwent optical mammography, by means of a multi-wavelength time-resolved mammograph, in the range 637-985 nm. Optical images were processed by applying a perturbation model, relying on a nonlinear approximation of time-resolved transmittance curves in the presence of an inclusion, with the aim of estimating the major tissue constituents (i.e. oxy- and deoxy-haemoglobin, lipid and water) and structural parameters (linked to dimension and density of the scatterer centres) for both the lesion area and the surrounding tissue. The critical factors for the application of the perturbation model on in vivo data are also discussed. Forty-six malignant and 68 benign lesions were analysed. A subset of 32 cancers, 40 cysts and 14 fibroadenomas were found reliable for the perturbation analysis. For cancers, we show a higher blood content with respect to the surrounding tissue, while cysts are characterized by a lower concentration of scattering centres with respect to the surrounding tissue. For fibroadenomas, the low number of cases does not allow any definite conclusions.

  17. Use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate diagnostic value of collagen degradation products.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Joanna; Cyrankiewicz, Michał; Wybranowski, Tomasz; Ziomkowska, Blanka; Ośmiałowski, Borys; Obońska, Ewa; Augustyńska, Beata; Kruszewski, Stefan; Kubica, Jacek

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of collagen degradation products (CDPs) may reflect the process of left ventricular remodeling (LVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic usefulness of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) in assessment of CDPs. The preliminary experiment was designed to establish if CDPs’ characteristics might be visible by mean fluorescence lifetime (FLT) in determined conditions. The in vitro model of CDPs was prepared by conducting the hydrolysis of type III collagen. The FLT of samples was measured by the time-resolved spectrometer Life Spec II with the subnanosecond pulsed 360-nm EPLED diode. The FLTs were obtained by deconvolution analysis of the data using a multiexponential model of fluorescence decay. In order to determine the limit of traceability of CDPs, a comparison of different collagen/plasma ratio in samples was performed. The results of our study showed that the increase of added plasma to hydrolyzed collagen extended the mean FLT. Thus, the diagnosis of LVR based on measurements using TRFS is possible. However, it is important to point out the experiment was preliminary and further investigation in this field of research is crucial. PMID:25764396

  18. Use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate diagnostic value of collagen degradation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Joanna; Cyrankiewicz, Michał; Wybranowski, Tomasz; Ziomkowska, Blanka; Ośmiałowski, Borys; Obońska, Ewa; Augustyńska, Beata; Kruszewski, Stefan; Kubica, Jacek

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of collagen degradation products (CDPs) may reflect the process of left ventricular remodeling (LVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic usefulness of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) in assessment of CDPs. The preliminary experiment was designed to establish if CDPs' characteristics might be visible by mean fluorescence lifetime (FLT) in determined conditions. The in vitro model of CDPs was prepared by conducting the hydrolysis of type III collagen. The FLT of samples was measured by the time-resolved spectrometer Life Spec II with the subnanosecond pulsed 360-nm EPLED diode. The FLTs were obtained by deconvolution analysis of the data using a multiexponential model of fluorescence decay. In order to determine the limit of traceability of CDPs, a comparison of different collagen/plasma ratio in samples was performed. The results of our study showed that the increase of added plasma to hydrolyzed collagen extended the mean FLT. Thus, the diagnosis of LVR based on measurements using TRFS is possible. However, it is important to point out the experiment was preliminary and further investigation in this field of research is crucial.

  19. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-01

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform’s size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257–65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke’s brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz.

  20. Feasibility analysis of an epidermal glucose sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of using an embedded time-resolved fluorescence sensor for monitoring glucose concentration. Skin is modeled as a multilayer medium with each layer having its own optical properties and fluorophore absorption coefficients, lifetimes, and quantum yields obtained from the literature. It is assumed that the two main fluorophores contributing to the fluorescence at these excitation and emission wavelengths are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)H and collagen. The intensity distributions of excitation and fluorescent light in skin are determined by solving the transient radiative transfer equation by using the modified method of characteristics. The fluorophore lifetimes are then recovered from the simulated fluorescence decays and compared with the actual lifetimes used in the simulations. Furthermore, the effect of adding Poissonian noise to the simulated decays on recovering the lifetimes was studied. For all cases, it was found that the fluorescence lifetime of NADH could not be recovered because of its negligible contribution to the overall fluorescence signal. The other lifetimes could be recovered to within 1.3% of input values. Finally, the glucose concentrations within the skin were recovered to within 13.5% of their actual values, indicating a possibility of measuring glucose concentrations by using a time-resolved fluorescence sensor.

  1. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  2. Eight-channel time-resolved tissue oximeter for functional muscle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Biscotti, Giovanni; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Marco; Quaresima, Valentina

    2003-07-01

    A portable instrument for tissue oximetry based on time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy was developed. The output pulses of 2 laser diodes (683 and 785 nm, 80 MHz pulse repetition rate, 1 mW average power, 100 ps FWHM) are delayed and coupled into a multimode graded-index fiber (50/125 μm and injected into the tissue. The reflectance photons are collected by 8 independent 1 mm fibers and detected by a 16-anode photomultiplier. A time-correlated single photon counting PC board is used for the parallel acquisition of the curves. Simultaneous estimate of the transport scattering and absorption coefficients is achieved by best fitting of time-resolved reflectance curves with a standard model of Diffusion Theory. The performances of the system were tested on phantoms in terms of stability, reproducibility among channels, and accuracy in the determination of the optical properties. Preliminary in vivo measurements were performed on healthy volunteers to monitor spatial changes in calf (medical and lateral gastrocnemius) oxygen hemoglobin saturation and blood volume during dynamic plantar flexion exercise.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica extracted from oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kumada, Takayuki Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2014-03-14

    Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica is examined via time-resolved reflectivity measurements. After optical breakdown was caused by irradiation of a pump pulse with fluence F{sub pump} = 3.3–14.9 J/cm{sup 2}, the reflectivity oscillated with a period of 63 ± 2 ps for a wavelength λ = 795 nm. The period was reduced by half for λ = 398 nm. We ascribe the oscillation to the interference between the probe pulses reflected from the front and rear surfaces of the photo-excited molten fused silica layer. The time-resolved reflectivity agrees closely with a model comprising a photo-excited layer which expands due to the formation of voids, and then separates into two parts, one of which is left on the sample surface and the other separated as a molten thin layer from the surface by the spallation mechanism. Such oscillations were not observed in the reflectivity of soda-lime glass. Whether the reflectivity oscillates or not probably depends on the layer viscosity while in a molten state. Since viscosity of the molten fused silica is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the soda-lime glass at the same temperature, fused silica forms a molten thin layer that reflects the probe pulse, whereas the soda-lime glass is fragmented into clusters.

  4. Digital image correlation for full-field time-resolved assessment of arterial stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Soons, Joris; Heuten, Hilde; Ennekens, Guy; Goovaerts, Inge; Vrints, Christiaan; Lava, Pascal; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arterial system is a very important parameter to evaluate cardiovascular health. Currently, however, there is no golden standard for PWV measurement. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used for full-field time-resolved assessment of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and strains of the skin in the neck directly above the common carotid artery. By assessing these parameters, propagation of the pulse wave could be tracked, leading to a new method for PWV detection based on DIC. The method was tested on five healthy subjects. As a means of validation, PWV was measured with ultrasound (US) as well. Measured PWV values were between 3.68 and 5.19 m/s as measured with DIC and between 5.14 and 6.58 m/s as measured with US, with a maximum absolute difference of 2.78 m/s between the two methods. DIC measurements of the neck region can serve as a test base for determining a robust strategy for PWV detection, they can serve as reference for three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, or they may even evolve into a screening method of their own. Moreover, full-field, time-resolved DIC can be adapted for other applications in biomechanics.

  5. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development.

  6. Time-resolved photoemission of correlated electrons driven out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Freericks, J. K.

    2010-04-15

    We describe the temporal evolution of the time-resolved photoemission response of the spinless Falicov-Kimball model driven out of equilibrium by strong applied fields. The model is one of the few possessing a metal-insulator transition and admitting an exact solution in the time domain. The nonequilibrium dynamics, evaluated using an extension of dynamical mean-field theory, show how the driven system differs from two common viewpoints--a quasiequilibrium system at an elevated effective temperature (the 'hot' electron model) or a rapid interaction quench ('melting' of the Mott gap) - due to the rearrangement of electronic states and redistribution of spectral weight. The results demonstrate the inherent trade-off between energy and time resolution accompanying the finite width probe pulses, characteristic of those employed in pump-probe time-domain experiments, which can be used to focus attention on different aspects of the dynamics near the transition.

  7. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Chithambo, Makaiko L.

    2016-09-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IRSL signals, both during and after short infrared stimulation pulses. The equations are developed using a recently proposed kinetic model, which describes localized electronic recombination via tunneling between trapped electrons and recombination centers in luminescent materials. Recombination is assumed to take place from the excited state of the trapped electron to the nearest-neighbor center within a random distribution of luminescence recombination centers. Different possibilities are examined within the model, depending on the relative importance of electron de-excitation and recombination. The equations are applied to experimental TR-IRSL data of natural feldspars, and good agreement is found between experimental and modeling results.

  8. Cooperative macromolecular device revealed by meta-analysis of static and time-resolved structures

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhong; Šrajer, Vukica; Knapp, James E.; Royer, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a meta-analysis of a large collection of static structures of a protein in the Protein Data Bank in order to extract the progression of structural events during protein function. We apply this strategy to the homodimeric hemoglobin HbI from Scapharca inaequivalvis. We derive a simple dynamic model describing how binding of the first ligand in one of the two chemically identical subunits facilitates a second binding event in the other partner subunit. The results of our ultrafast time-resolved crystallographic studies support this model. We demonstrate that HbI functions like a homodimeric mechanical device, such as pliers or scissors. Ligand-induced motion originating in one subunit is transmitted to the other via conserved pivot points, where the E and F′ helices from two partner subunits are “bolted” together to form a stable dimer interface permitting slight relative rotation but preventing sliding. PMID:22171006

  9. Time-resolved mirage method: A three-dimensional theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Malacarne, L. C.; Bernabe, H. S.; Baesso, M. L.; Jacinto, C.

    2012-05-01

    A general time-resolved three-dimensional theory of the photothermal beam deflection for the measurement of thermal properties of opaque materials is presented. We derive the analytical solutions for the laser induced temperature profiles in the sample and in the fluid above the sample assuming flux discontinuity at the interface sample/fluid. We compare the analytical solutions with all numerical modeling using finite element analysis. The photothermal deflection signal is calculated and an expression is provided for the transverse photothermal signal at a position-sensing detector. We use the model and the experimental method to investigate opaque plastic and metals, and the results for the thermal properties of the samples are in an excellent agreement in the literature values.

  10. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography with patterned-light illumination and detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Venugopal, Vivek; Lesage, Frederic; Intes, Xavier

    2010-07-01

    This investigation explores the feasibility of performing diffuse optical tomography based on time-domain wide-field illumination and detection strategies. Wide-field patterned excitation and detection schemes are investigated in transmittance geometry with time-gated detection channels. A Monte Carlo forward model is employed to compute the time-resolved Jacobians for rigorous light propagation modeling. We demonstrate both in silico and experimentally that reconstructions of absorption structures based on wide-field patterned-light strategies are feasible and outperform classical point excitation schemes for similar data set sizes. Moreover, we demonstrate that time-domain information is retained even though large spatial areas are illuminated. The enhanced time-domain data set allows for quantitative three-dimensional imaging in thick tissue based on relatively small data sets associated with much shorter acquisition times.

  11. Time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Yuma; Fukami, Masaya; Tashiro, Takaharu; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator using the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). We measured magnetic field dependence of the spin-current emission in the time domain and found that the spectral shape of the ISHE voltage changes with time. The change in the spectral shape is due to field and power dependent temporal oscillation of the spin pumping driven by parametric magnons. The observed oscillating spin-current emission driven by dipole-exchange magnons is well reproduced by a model calculation based on the S theory. In contrast, the spin-current emission driven by short-wavelength exchange magnons cannot be reproduced with this model, illustrating an important role of higher-order nonlinear effects in the spin-current emission.

  12. Turbulent Statistics from Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  13. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  14. Cooperative macromolecular device revealed by meta-analysis of static and time-resolved structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhong; Šrajer, Vukica; Knapp, James E.; Royer, Jr., William E.

    2013-04-08

    Here we present a meta-analysis of a large collection of static structures of a protein in the Protein Data Bank in order to extract the progression of structural events during protein function. We apply this strategy to the homodimeric hemoglobin HbI from Scapharca inaequivalvis. We derive a simple dynamic model describing how binding of the first ligand in one of the two chemically identical subunits facilitates a second binding event in the other partner subunit. The results of our ultrafast time-resolved crystallographic studies support this model. We demonstrate that HbI functions like a homodimeric mechanical device, such as pliers or scissors. Ligand-induced motion originating in one subunit is transmitted to the other via conserved pivot points, where the E and F' helices from two partner subunits are 'bolted' together to form a stable dimer interface permitting slight relative rotation but preventing sliding.

  15. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds.

  16. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds. PMID:27114828

  17. On AGV's navigation in 3-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, Jürgen

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with position estimation and path control for Autonomous Guided Vehicles (AGV). To enable a vehicle or a mobile robot in following a continuous “virtual” path without human control, these techniques play an important role. The relationship between the vehicle's motion in 3-dimensional space and the shape of a curved surface is described. In particular, the introduction of a digital terrain model in dead reckoning is considered. Moreover, a possible nonlinear control is developed based on curvilinear path coordinates, and the proof for global stability is given. To achieve general validity, these topics are treated here independently of the cart's special mechanization (the configuration of steered wheels and driven wheels). Simulation studies are presented to illustrate the investigations.

  18. Structure and function of proteins investigated by crystallographic and spectroscopic time-resolved methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwar, Namrta

    Biomolecules play an essential role in performing the necessary functions for life. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to an understanding of how biological systems work on the molecular level. We used two biological systems, beef liver catalase (BLC) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BLC is a metalloprotein that protects living cells from the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species by converting H2O2 into water and oxygen. By binding nitric oxide (NO) to the catalase, a complex was generated that mimics the Cat-H2O2 adduct, a crucial intermediate in the reaction promoted by the catalase. The Cat-NO complex is obtained by using a convenient NO generator (1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate). Concentrations up to 100˜200 mM are reached by using a specially designed glass cavity. With this glass apparatus and DEANO, sufficient NO occupation is achieved and structure determination of the catalase with NO bound to the heme iron becomes possible. Structural changes upon NO binding are minute. NO has a slightly bent geometry with respect to the heme normal, which results in a substantial overlap of the NO orbitals with the iron-porphyrin molecular orbitals. From the structure of the iron-NO complex, conclusions on the electronic properties of the heme iron can be drawn that ultimately lead to an insight into the catalytic properties of this enzyme. Enzyme kinetics is affected by additional parameters such as temperature and pH. Additionally, in crystallography, the absorbed X-ray dose may impair protein function. To address the effect of these parameters, we performed time-resolved crystallographic experiments on a model system, PYP. By collecting multiple time-series on PYP at increasing X-ray dose levels, we determined a kinetic dose limit up to which kinetically meaningful X-ray data sets can be collected. From this, we conclude that comprehensive time-series spanning up to 12 orders of magnitude in time can be collected from a single PYP

  19. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Navin, Chelliah V; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2016-03-14

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.

  20. Protein analysis by time-resolved measurements with an electro-switchable DNA chip

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Andreas; Hampel, Paul A.; Kaiser, Wolfgang; Knezevic, Jelena; Welte, Thomas; Villa, Valentina; Maruyama, Makiko; Svejda, Matej; Jähner, Simone; Fischer, Frank; Strasser, Ralf; Rant, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Measurements in stationary or mobile phases are fundamental principles in protein analysis. Although the immobilization of molecules on solid supports allows for the parallel analysis of interactions, properties like size or shape are usually inferred from the molecular mobility under the influence of external forces. However, as these principles are mutually exclusive, a comprehensive characterization of proteins usually involves a multi-step workflow. Here we show how these measurement modalities can be reconciled by tethering proteins to a surface via dynamically actuated nanolevers. Short DNA strands, which are switched by alternating electric fields, are employed as capture probes to bind target proteins. By swaying the proteins over nanometre amplitudes and comparing their motional dynamics to a theoretical model, the protein diameter can be quantified with Angström accuracy. Alterations in the tertiary protein structure (folding) and conformational changes are readily detected, and even post-translational modifications are revealed by time-resolved molecular dynamics measurements. PMID:23839273

  1. Time-resolved photoabsorption in finite systems: A first-principles NEGF approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, E.; Uimonen, A.-M.; van Leeuwen, R.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a first-principles NonEquilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) approach to time-resolved photoabsortion spectroscopy in atomic and nanoscale systems. The method is used to highlight a recently discovered dynamical correlation effect in the spectrum of a Krypton gas subject to a strong ionizing pump pulse. We propose a minimal model that captures the effect, and study the performance of time-local approximations versus time-nonlocal ones. In particular we implement the time-local Hartree-Fock and Markovian second Born (2B) approximation as well as the exact adiabatic approximation within the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory framework. For the time-nonlocal approximation we instead use the 2B one. We provide enough convincing evidence for the fact that a proper description of the spectrum of an evolving admixture of ionizing atoms requires the simultaneous occurrence of correlation and memory effects.

  2. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, K. V.; Baldis, H. A.; Dunn, J.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Scott, H. A.; Purvis, M. A.

    2012-10-15

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated by a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in two-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  3. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma.

    PubMed

    Cone, K V; Baldis, H A; Dunn, J; May, M J; Purvis, M A; Schneider, M B; Scott, H A

    2012-10-01

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated by a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in two-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  4. Photogenerated radical intermediates of vitamin K 1: a time-resolved resonance Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, G.; Umapathy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Quinones play a vital role in the process of electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers. It is of interest to investigate the photochemical reactions involving quinones with a view to elucidating the structure-function relationships in the biological processes. Resonance Raman spectra of radical anions and the time-resolved resonance Raman spectra of vitamin K 1 (model compound for Q A in Rhodopseudomonas viridis, a bacterial photosynthetic reception center) are presented. The photochemical intermediates of vitamin K 1, viz. radical anion, ketyl radical and o-quinone methide have been identified. The vibrational assignments of all these intermediates are made on the basis of comparison with our earlier TR3 studies on radical anions of naphthoquinone and menaquinone.

  5. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, K V; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A; May, M J; Purvis, M A; Scott, H A; Schneider, M B

    2012-05-02

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated from a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terrawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in 2-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  6. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zewen; Zhang Hongchao; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu

    2013-07-21

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  7. Imaging plasmonic fields near gold nanospheres in attosecond time-resolved streaked photoelectron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianxiong; Thumm, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    To study time-resolved photoemission from gold nanospheres, we introduce a quantum-mechanical approach, including the plasmonic near-field-enhancement of the streaking field at the surface of the nanosphere. We use Mie theory to calculate the plasmonically enhanced fields near 10 to 200 nm gold nanospheres, driven by incident near infrared (NIR) or visible laser pulses. We model the gold conduction band in terms of a spherical square well potential. Our simulated streaked photoelectron spectra reveal a plasmonic amplitude enhancement and phase shift related to calculations that exclude the induced plasmonic field. The phase shift is due to the plasma resonance. This suggests the use of streaked photoelectron spectroscopy for imaging the dielectric response and plasmonic field near nanoparticles. Supported by the NSD-EPSCoR program, NSF, and the USDoE.

  8. Time-resolved spectrophotometry of the AM Herculis system E2003 + 225

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick; Bowyer, Stuart; Clarke, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved, medium-resolution photometry is reported for the binary system E2003 + 225 over a complete orbital period in 1984. The object was 1.5-2 mag fainter than when viewed earlier in 1984. The fluxes, equivalent widths and full widths at FWHM for dominant lines are presented for four points in the cycle. A coincidence of emission lines and a 4860 A continuum line was observed for the faster component, which had a 500 km/sec velocity amplitude that was symmetric around the zero line. An aberrant emission line component, i.e., stationary narrow emission lines displaced about 9 A from the rest wavelengths, is modeled as Zeeman splitting of emission from material close to the primary.

  9. Efficient signal processing for time-resolved fluorescence detection of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Hacquebard, L.; Childress, L.

    2016-03-01

    Room-temperature fluorescence detection of the nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin typically has low signal to noise, requiring long experiments to reveal an averaged signal. Here, we present a simple approach to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence data that permits an improvement in measurement precision through signal processing alone. Applying our technique to experimental data reveals an improvement in signal to noise equivalent to a 14% increase in photon collection efficiency. We further explore the dependence of the signal to noise ratio on excitation power, and analyze our results using a rate equation model. Our results provide a rubric for optimizing fluorescence spin detection, which has direct implications for improving precision of nitrogen-vacancy-based sensors.

  10. Revealing the photophysics of gold-nanobeacons via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guoke; Simionesie, Dorin; Sefcik, Jan; Sutter, Jens U; Xue, Qingjiang; Yu, Jun; Wang, Jinliang; Birch, David J S; Chen, Yu

    2015-12-15

    We demonstrate that time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the conformation states of hairpin DNA on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and energy transfer processes in Au-nanobeacons. Long-range fluorescence quenching of Cy5 by AuNPs has been found to be in good agreement with electrodynamics modeling. Moreover, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is shown to be promising for real-time monitoring of the hybridization kinetics of Au-nanobeacons, with up to 60% increase in decay time component and 300% increase in component fluorescence fraction observed. Our results also indicate the importance of the stem and spacer designs for the performance of Au-nanobeacons. PMID:26670500

  11. Teleportation of a 3-dimensional GHZ State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Li, Peng-Fei; Song, He-Shan

    2012-05-01

    The process of teleportation of a completely unknown 3-dimensional GHZ state is considered. Three maximally entangled 3-dimensional Bell states function as quantum channel in the scheme. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional GHZ state.

  12. Determination of blood oxygenation in the brain by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy: influence of the skin, skull, and meninges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Liu, Hanli; Wang, Lihong V.; Tittel, Frank K.; Chance, Britton; Jacques, Steven L.

    1994-07-01

    Near infrared light has been used for the determination of blood oxygenation in the brain but little attention has been paid to the fact that the states of blood oxygenation in arteries, veins, and capillaries differ substantially. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations for a heterogeneous system were conducted, and near infrared time-resolved reflectance measurements were performed on a heterogeneous tissue phantom model. The model was made of a solid polyester resin, which simulates the tissue background. A network of tubes was distributed uniformly through the resin to simulate the blood vessels. The time-resolved reflectance spectra were taken with different absorbing solutions filled in the network. Based on the simulation and experimental results, we investigated the dependence of the absorption coefficient obtained from the heterogeneous system on the absorption of the actual absorbing solution filled in the tubes. We show that light absorption by the brain should result from the combination of blood and blood-free tissue background.

  13. Time-resolved view on charge-resonance-enhanced ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Takemoto, Norio; Becker, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    We theoretically investigate the electronic dynamics in the hydrogen molecular ion at fixed intermediate internuclear distances in two-dimensional space for the electron in a linearly polarized laser field. Our results of numerical simulations confirm the predictions of multiple bursts of ionization within a half cycle of the laser field oscillation as recently reported for one-dimensional models. Based on the analysis of the Floquet states for a two-state model of the molecular ion, we discuss the relation of the multiple ionization bursts to the so-called charge-resonance-enhanced ionization phenomenon and the momentum gates.

  14. Time-resolved spectral measurements on a multielectrode DFB laser using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. [Distributed feedback laser

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; O'Dowd, R.F. . Dept. of Electronic Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    A Fabry-Perot interferometer based time-resolved spectral measurement system capable of transform limited performance is described here. The system results from a model developed for the Fabry-Perot interferometer from which the mirror reflectivity emerges as the critical parameter in determining both the temporal and spectral response. Using this system, the response of a multi-electrode DFB laser under a number of different modulation formats is investigated.

  15. An integrated approach using high time-resolved tools to study the origin of aerosols.

    PubMed

    Di Gilio, A; de Gennaro, G; Dambruoso, P; Ventrella, G

    2015-10-15

    Long-range transport of natural and/or anthropogenic particles can contribute significantly to PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and some European cities often fail to comply with PM daily limit values due to the additional impact of particles from remote sources. For this reason, reliable methodologies to identify long-range transport (LRT) events would be useful to better understand air pollution phenomena and support proper decision-making. This study explores the potential of an integrated and high time-resolved monitoring approach for the identification and characterization of local, regional and long-range transport events of high PM. In particular, the goal of this work was also the identification of time-limited event. For this purpose, a high time-resolved monitoring campaign was carried out at an urban background site in Bari (southern Italy) for about 20 days (1st-20th October 2011). The integration of collected data as the hourly measurements of inorganic ions in PM2.5 and their gas precursors and of the natural radioactivity, in addition to the analyses of aerosol maps and hourly back trajectories (BT), provided useful information for the identification and chemical characterization of local sources and trans-boundary intrusions. Non-sea salt (nss) sulfate levels were found to increase when air masses came from northeastern Europe and higher dispersive conditions of the atmosphere were detected. Instead, higher nitrate and lower nss-sulfate concentrations were registered in correspondence with air mass stagnation and attributed to local traffic source. In some cases, combinations of local and trans-boundary sources were observed. Finally, statistical investigations such as the principal component analysis (PCA) applied on hourly ion concentrations and the cluster analyses, the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) and the Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) models computed on hourly back-trajectories enabled to complete a cognitive framework

  16. Frame-Transfer Gating Raman Spectroscopy for Time-Resolved Multiscalar Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Fischer, David G.; Kojima, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Accurate experimental measurement of spatially and temporally resolved variations in chemical composition (species concentrations) and temperature in turbulent flames is vital for characterizing the complex phenomena occurring in most practical combustion systems. These diagnostic measurements are called multiscalar because they are capable of acquiring multiple scalar quantities simultaneously. Multiscalar diagnostics also play a critical role in the area of computational code validation. In order to improve the design of combustion devices, computational codes for modeling turbulent combustion are often used to speed up and optimize the development process. The experimental validation of these codes is a critical step in accepting their predictions for engine performance in the absence of cost-prohibitive testing. One of the most critical aspects of setting up a time-resolved stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) diagnostic system is the temporal optical gating scheme. A short optical gate is necessary in order for weak SRS signals to be detected with a good signal- to-noise ratio (SNR) in the presence of strong background optical emissions. This time-synchronized optical gating is a classical problem even to other spectroscopic techniques such as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Traditionally, experimenters have had basically two options for gating: (1) an electronic means of gating using an image intensifier before the charge-coupled-device (CCD), or (2) a mechanical optical shutter (a rotary chopper/mechanical shutter combination). A new diagnostic technology has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center that utilizes a frame-transfer CCD sensor, in conjunction with a pulsed laser and multiplex optical fiber collection, to realize time-resolved Raman spectroscopy of turbulent flames that is free from optical background noise (interference). The technology permits not only shorter temporal optical gating (down

  17. Monolithic Microfluidic Mixing-Spraying Devices for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Mohamed, Hisham; Yassin, Aymen; Mannella, Carmen A.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The goal of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy is to determine structural models for transient functional states of large macromolecular complexes such as ribosomes and viruses. The challenge of time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy is to rapidly mix reactants, and then, following a defined time interval, to rapidly deposit them as a thin film and freeze the sample to the vitreous state. Here we describe a methodology in which reaction components are mixed and allowed to react, and are then sprayed onto an EM grid as it is being plunged into cryogen. All steps are accomplished by a monolithic, microfabricated silicon device that incorporates a mixer, reaction channel, and pneumatic sprayer in a single chip. We have found that microdroplets produced by air atomization spread to sufficiently thin films on a millisecond time scale provided that the carbon supporting film is made suitably hydrophilic. The device incorporates two T-mixers flowing into a single channel of four butterfly-shaped mixing elements that ensure effective mixing, followed by a microfluidic reaction channel whose length can be varied to achieve the desired reaction time. The reaction channel is flanked by two ports connected to compressed humidified nitrogen gas (at 50 psi) to generate the spray. The monolithic mixer-sprayer is incorporated into a computer-controlled plunging apparatus. To test the mixing performance and the suitability of the device for preparation of biological macromolecules for cryo-EM, ribosomes and ferritin were mixed in the device and sprayed onto grids. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the ribosomes demonstrated retention of native structure, and 30S and 50S subunits were shown to be capable of reassociation into ribosomes after passage through the device. PMID:19683579

  18. Protein structural dynamics in solution unveiled via 100-ps time-resolved x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Anfinrud, Philip

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a time-resolved x-ray scattering diffractometer capable of probing structural dynamics of proteins in solution with 100-ps time resolution. This diffractometer, developed on the ID14B BioCARS (Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources) beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, records x-ray scattering snapshots over a broad range of q spanning 0.02–2.5 Å-1, thereby providing simultaneous coverage of the small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) regions. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have tracked structural changes in myoglobin as it undergoes a photolysis-induced transition from its carbon monoxy form (MbCO) to its deoxy form (Mb). Though the differences between the MbCO and Mb crystal structures are small (rmsd < 0.2 Å), time-resolved x-ray scattering differences recorded over 8 decades of time from 100 ps to 10 ms are rich in structure, illustrating the sensitivity of this technique. A strong, negative-going feature in the SAXS region appears promptly and corresponds to a sudden > 22 Å3 volume expansion of the protein. The ensuing conformational relaxation causes the protein to contract to a volume ∼2 Å3 larger than MbCO within ∼10 ns. On the timescale for CO escape from the primary docking site, another change in the SAXS/WAXS fingerprint appears, demonstrating sensitivity to the location of the dissociated CO. Global analysis of the SAXS/WAXS patterns recovered time-independent scattering fingerprints for four intermediate states of Mb. These SAXS/WAXS fingerprints provide stringent constraints for putative models of conformational states and structural transitions between them. PMID:20406909

  19. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development. PMID:27209747

  20. Protein structural dynamics in solution unveiled via 100-ps time-resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Schotte, Friedrich; Graber, Timothy; Henning, Robert; Anfinruda, Philip

    2010-04-21

    We have developed a time-resolved x-ray scattering diffractometer capable of probing structural dynamics of proteins in solution with 100-ps time resolution. This diffractometer, developed on the ID14B BioCARS (Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources) beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, records x-ray scattering snapshots over a broad range of q spanning 0.02-2.5 {angstrom}{sup -1}, thereby providing simultaneous coverage of the small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) regions. To demonstrate its capabilities, we have tracked structural changes in myoglobin as it undergoes a photolysis-induced transition from its carbon monoxy form (MbCO) to its deoxy form (Mb). Though the differences between the MbCO and Mb crystal structures are small (rmsd < 0.2 {angstrom}), time-resolved x-ray scattering differences recorded over 8 decades of time from 100 ps to 10 ms are rich in structure, illustrating the sensitivity of this technique. A strong, negative-going feature in the SAXS region appears promptly and corresponds to a sudden > 22 {angstrom}{sup 3} volume expansion of the protein. The ensuing conformational relaxation causes the protein to contract to a volume {approx}2 {angstrom}{sup 3} larger than MbCO within {approx}10 ns. On the timescale for CO escape from the primary docking site, another change in the SAXS/WAXS fingerprint appears, demonstrating sensitivity to the location of the dissociated CO. Global analysis of the SAXS/WAXS patterns recovered time-independent scattering fingerprints for four intermediate states of Mb. These SAXS/WAXS fingerprints provide stringent constraints for putative models of conformational states and structural transitions between them.

  1. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexander

    EUVE has provided the first stellar coronal spectra showing individual emission lines, thereby allowing coronal modelling at a level of sophistication previously unattainable. Long EUVE observations have shown the prevalence of large-scale flaring in the coronae of active binary stars. We propose to obtain EUVE DSS spectra and photometry for 8 active binaries, four of which have never been observed by EUVE (EI Eri, AR Psc, V478 Lyr, BY Dra) and four EUV-bright systems that merit reobservation (Sigma CrB, Sigma Gem, Xi UMa, Lambda And). We shall use these observations to derive high quality quiescent coronal spectra for modelling, and to obtain new flare data. We shall try to coordinate these observations with ground-based radio observations and other spacecraft, if the scheduling allows. The proposed observations will significantly increase the available EUVE spectroscopy of active binaries.

  2. Determining biomolecular structures by time-resolved fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; Hernandez-Santana, Aaron; Graham, Duncan

    2006-09-01

    We demonstrate a new fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based approach to determine the donor-acceptor distributions and apply it to two model molecular systems: double stranded DNA labeled with Hoechst 33258 and FAM, and perylene randomly surrounded by cobalt ions in a bulk solution. The approach makes some generic assumptions regarding the FRET kinetics, but no a priori assumptions regarding the distribution function.

  3. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of High Field Polars (FUSE 00)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The following work has been accomplished: 1) The emission lines of O VI1 and He II were used to produce Doppler tomograms of the plasma emission. 2) An improved interstellar absorption model is being developed for the CIAO spectral fitting program, Sherpa. Use of the earlier version of this model showed it to be inadequate for its purpose. Once this model is working, we intend to complete our analysis of V884 Her and those of other FUSE programs. In addition to the above work, this grant has helped support the following related work: 1) The publication of the paper "Periodicities in the X-ray intensity variations of TV Columbae: an Intermediate Polar" by Rana, V. R., Singh, K. P., Schlegel, E. M., & Barrett, P. 2004, AJ, 126,489, and 2) FUSE data of a possible nova-like variable Ret 1 has been analyzed and shown to contain a hot (37000 deg) white dwarf (WD 0334-6400). The FUV spectrum shows strong absorption lines of C III.

  4. Application of Time-resolved PIV to Supersonic Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation lays out the ground-breaking work at bringing high-speed (25kHz) particle image velocimetry (PIV) to bear on measurements of noise-producing turbulence in hot jets. The work is still in progress in that the tremendous amount of data obtained are still be analyzed, but the method has been validated and initial results of interest to jet noise modeling have been obtained. After a brief demonstration of the validation process used on the data, results are shown for hot jets at different temperatures and Mach numbers. Comparisons of first order statistics show the relative indifference of the turbulence to the presence of shocks and independence to jet temperature. What does come out is that when the shock-containing jets are in a screech mode the turbulence is highly elevated, showing the importance of removing screech phenomena from model-scale jets before applying findings to full-scale aircraft which typically do not contain shocks.

  5. Resonant and Time-Resolved Spin Noise Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinlin; Pursley, Brennan; Sih, Vanessa

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a technique which can probe the system while it remains in equilibrium. It was first demonstrated in atomic gases and then in solid state systems. Most existing spin noise measurement setups digitize the spin fluctuation signal and then analyze the power spectrum. Recently, pulsed lasers have been used to expand the bandwidth of accessible dynamics and allow direct time-domain correlation measurements. Here we develop and test a model for ultrafast pulsed laser spin noise measurements as well as a scheme to measure spin lifetimes longer than the laser repetition period. For the resonant spin noise technique, analog electronics are used to capture correlations from the extended pulse train, and the signal at a fixed time delay is measured as a function of applied magnetic field.

  6. Time-resolved pressure measurements in chemically reacting powder mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, E. ); Graham, R.A.; Holman, G.T.; Anderson, M.U. ); Thadhani, N.N. )

    1994-07-10

    PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauges have been used to detect and record stress pulses input to and propagated through powder mixtures of 5Ti+3Si at densities of 53%. Data are obtained for the porous solid crush-up'' and in the chemically reacting state. Wave speed is determined to an accuracy of 0.1% and serves as a sensitive and overt indication of chemical reactions. Compressed-gas gun and high explosive loading experiments show a crush strength of about 1 GPa. Strong exothermic chemical transformation is indicated by large increases in wave speed to expanded volume states. The degree of reaction is approximately 50%. The pressure measurements are supplemented by studies of shock treated powder mixtures preserved for post-shock analysis which determine the effect of particle size and morphology on reaction threshold and degree of reaction. The materials response is consistent with Graham's CONMAH conceptual model of shock-induced solid state chemistry reaction. [copyright]American Institute of Physics

  7. In vivo time-resolved autofluorescence measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent; Dipple, Katrina; Levin, Seymour; Blackwell, Jennifer; Berberoglu, Halil

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results obtained from fluorescence lifetime measurements on human skin using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) techniques. Human skin was exposed to light from a pulsed LED of 700 ps pulse width at a wavelength of 375 nm and fluorescence decays were recorded at four different emission wavelengths (442, 460, 478 and 496 nm) using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a monochromator. Measurements were carried out on the left and right palms of subjects recruited for the study after obtaining consent using a UCLA IRB approved consent form. The subjects recruited consisted of 18 males and 17 females with different skin complexions and ages ranging from 10 to 70 years. In addition, a set of experiments were also performed on various locations including the palm, the arm and the cheek of a Caucasian subject. The fluorescence decays thus obtained were fit to a three-exponential decay model in all cases and were approximately 0.4, 2.7 and 9.4 ns, respectively. The variations in these lifetimes with location, gender, skin complexion and age are studied. It is speculated that the shorter lifetimes correspond to free and bound NADH while the longer lifetime is due to AGE crosslinks.

  8. 3DHYDROGEOCHEM: A 3-DIMENSIONAL MODEL OF DENSITY-DEPENDENT SUBSURFACE FLOW AND THERMAL MULTISPECIES-MULTICOMPONENT HYDROGEOCHEMICAL TRANSPORT (EPA/600/SR-98/159)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a three-dimensional finite-element numerical model designed to simulate chemical transport in subsurface systems with temperature effect taken into account. The three-dimensional model is developed to provide (1) a tool of application, with which one is able ...

  9. Phase diagram of quark-antiquark and diquark condensates in the 3-dimensional Gross-Neveu model with the 4-component spinor representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kohyama, Hiroaki

    2008-07-01

    We construct the phase diagram of the quark-antiquark and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 2+1 dimensional (3D) two flavor massless Gross-Neveu (GN) model with the 4-component quarks. In contrast to the case of the 2-component quarks, there appears the coexisting phase of the quark-antiquark and diquark condensates. This is the crucial difference between the 2-component and 4-component quark cases in the 3D GN model. The coexisting phase is also seen in the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio model. Then we see that the 3D GN model with the 4-component quarks bears closer resemblance to the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio model.

  10. An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Ahmed, Nasar; Iqbal, J.; Baig, M. Aslam

    2016-08-01

    We present an efficient and inexpensive method for calculating the time resolved emission spectrum from the time integrated spectrum by monitoring the time evolution of neutral and singly ionized species in the laser produced plasma. To validate our assertion of extracting time resolved information from the time integrated spectrum, the time evolution data of the Cu II line at 481.29 nm and the molecular bands of AlO in the wavelength region (450-550 nm) have been studied. The plasma parameters were also estimated from the time resolved and time integrated spectra. A comparison of the results clearly reveals that the time resolved information about the plasma parameters can be extracted from the spectra registered with a time integrated spectrograph. Our proposed method will make the laser induced plasma spectroscopy robust and a low cost technique which is attractive for industry and environmental monitoring.

  11. Flow cytometry using Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-11-01

    A novel concept of Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements is introduced for flow cytometry applications. The system affords robust, maintenance-free and high-speed elasticity-sensitive measurements. PMID:26347908

  12. Wavelet-based fast time-resolved magnetic sensing with electronic spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nanyang; Jiang, Fengjian; Tian, Yu; Ye, Jianfeng; Shi, Fazhan; Lv, Haijiang; Wang, Ya; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved magnetic sensing is of great importance from fundamental studies to applications in physical and biological sciences. Recently, the nitrogen-vacancy defect center in diamond has been developed as a promising sensor of magnetic fields under ambient conditions. However, methods to reconstruct time-resolved magnetic fields with high sensitivity are not yet fully developed. Here, we propose and demonstrate a sensing method based on spin echo and Haar wavelet transformation. Our method is exponentially faster in reconstructing time-resolved magnetic fields with comparable sensitivity than existing methods. It is also easier to implement in experiments. Furthermore, the wavelet's unique features enable our method to extract information from the whole signal with only part of the measuring sequences. We then explore this feature for a fast detection of simulated nerve impulses. These results will be useful to time-resolved magnetic sensing with quantum probes at nanoscale.

  13. Time-resolved digital holographic microscopy of laser-induced forward transfer process

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H.; Venugopalan, V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a method for time-resolved digital holographic microscopy to obtain time-resolved 3-D deformation measurements of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) processes. We demonstrate nanometer axial resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution of our method which is suitable for measuring dynamic morphological changes in LIFT target materials. Such measurements provide insight into the early dynamics of the LIFT process and a means to examine the effect of laser and material parameters on LIFT process dynamics. PMID:24748724

  14. Analysis of time-resolved interaction force mode AFM imaging using active and passive probes.

    PubMed

    Giray Oral, Hasan; Parlak, Zehra; Levent Degertekin, F

    2012-09-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) mode imaging for atomic force microscopy (AFM). A nonlinear model of an active AFM probe, performing simultaneous topography and material property imaging on samples with varying elasticity and adhesion is implemented in Simulink®. The model is capable of simulating various imaging modes, probe structures, sample material properties, tip-sample interaction force models, and actuation and feedback schemes. For passive AFM cantilevers, the model is verified by comparing results from the literature. As an example of an active probe, the force sensing integrated readout and active tip (FIRAT) probe is used. Simulation results indicate that the active and damped nature of FIRAT provides a significant level of control over the force applied to the sample, minimizing sample indentation and topography error. Active tip control (ATC) preserves constant contact time during force control for stable contact while preventing the loss of material property information such as elasticity and adhesive force. Simulation results are verified by TRIF mode imaging of the samples with both soft and stiff regions. PMID:22813887

  15. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    PubMed

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  16. Time-resolved crystallography and protein design: signalling photoreceptors and optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Keith

    2014-07-17

    Time-resolved X-ray crystallography and solution scattering have been successfully conducted on proteins on time-scales down to around 100 ps, set by the duration of the hard X-ray pulses emitted by synchrotron sources. The advent of hard X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), which emit extremely intense, very brief, coherent X-ray pulses, opens the exciting possibility of time-resolved experiments with femtosecond time resolution on macromolecular structure, in both single crystals and solution. The X-ray pulses emitted by an FEL differ greatly in many properties from those emitted by a synchrotron, in ways that at first glance make time-resolved measurements of X-ray scattering with the required accuracy extremely challenging. This opens up several questions which I consider in this brief overview. Are there likely to be chemically and biologically interesting structural changes to be revealed on the femtosecond time-scale? How shall time-resolved experiments best be designed and conducted to exploit the properties of FELs and overcome challenges that they pose? To date, fast time-resolved reactions have been initiated by a brief laser pulse, which obviously requires that the system under study be light-sensitive. Although this is true for proteins of the visual system and for signalling photoreceptors, it is not naturally the case for most interesting biological systems. To generate more biological targets for time-resolved study, can this limitation be overcome by optogenetic, chemical or other means?

  17. [Posterior glass fiber-reinforced composite resin-bonded fixed partial dentures: A 3-dimensional modeling and finite element numerical analysis].

    PubMed

    Han, Jingyun; Fei, Renyuan; Li, Yansheng; Zhang, Lei

    2006-08-01

    The method of modeling and mesh generation about 3-unit tooth/restoration complex were established. The three-dimensional finite element models were subjected to four types of occlusal load applied to pontic element to evaluate 3 fiber framework designs and 3 cavities preparation configurations. By comparing the difference of stress distribution, following conclusions were obtained: the principal stress under buccal-lingual cusp load in traditional fiber framework pontic increased by 6.22% compared to that in pure composite resin pontic; optimized fiber framework obviously reduced stress level under any load; modified cavities exhibited better stress transfer and decreased share stress at adhesive interface than traditional cavities. PMID:17002101

  18. A 3-dimensional micro- and nanoparticle transport and filtration model (MNM3D) applied to the migration of carbon-based nanomaterials in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Carlo; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2016-10-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment can act both as contaminants, when they are unintentionally released, and as remediation agents when injected on purpose at contaminated sites. In this work two carbon-based NPs are considered, namely CARBO-IRON®, a new material developed for contaminated site remediation, and single layer graphene oxide (SLGO), a potential contaminant of the next future. Understanding and modeling the transport and deposition of such NPs in aquifer systems is a key aspect in both cases, and numerical models capable to simulate NP transport in groundwater in complex 3D scenarios are necessary. To this aim, this work proposes a modeling approach based on modified advection-dispersion-deposition equations accounting for the coupled influence of flow velocity and ionic strength on particle transport. A new modeling tool (MNM3D - Micro and Nanoparticle transport Model in 3D geometries) is presented for the simulation of NPs injection and transport in 3D scenarios. MNM3D is the result of the integration of the numerical code MNMs (Micro and Nanoparticle transport, filtration and clogging Model - Suite) in the well-known transport model RT3D (Clement et al., 1998). The injection in field-like conditions of CARBO-IRON® (20 g/l) amended by CMC (4 g/l) in a 2D vertical tank (0.7 × 1.0 × 0.12 m) was simulated using MNM3D, and compared to experimental results under the same conditions. Column transport tests of SLGO at a concentration (10 mg/l) representative of a possible spill of SLGO-containing waste water were performed at different values of ionic strength (0.1 to 35 mM), evidencing a strong dependence of SLGO transport on IS, and a reversible blocking deposition. The experimental data were fitted using the numerical code MNMs and the ionic strength-dependent transport was up-scaled for a full scale 3D simulation of SLGO release and long-term transport in a heterogeneous aquifer. MNM3D showed to potentially represent a valid tool for

  19. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3-dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Steigner, Michael L; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    Medical 3-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D-printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced preoperative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases and valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing perioperative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality.

  20. The 3-Dimensional Structure of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lindsay

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury Program CLASH (PI Postman) has provided the community with the most detailed views ever of the central regions of massive galaxy clusters. These galaxy clusters have also been observed with NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, with the ground-based Subaru telescope, and with other ground- and space-based facilities, resulting in unprecedented multi-wavelength data sets of the most massive bound structures in the universe. Fitting 3-Dimensional mass models is crucial to understanding how mass is distributed in individual clusters, investigating the properties of dark matter, and testing our cosmological model. With the exquisite data available, the time is now ideal to undertake this analysis. We propose to use algorithms that we have developed and obtain mass models for the clusters from the CLASH sample. The project would use archival gravitational lensing data, X-ray data of the cluster's hot gas and additional constraints from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) data. Specifically, we would model the 23 clusters for which both HST and Subaru data (or in one case WFI data) are publicly available, since the exquisite imaging of HST in the clusters' central regions is beautifully augmented by the wide field coverage of Subaru imaging. If the true 3-D shapes of clusters are not properly accounted for when analysing data, this can lead to inaccuracies in the mass density profiles of individual clusters - up to 50% bias in mass for the most highly triaxial systems. Our proposed project represents an independent analysis of the CLASH sample, complementary to that of the CLASH team, probing the triaxial shapes and orientations of the cluster dark matter halos and hot gas. Our findings will be relevant to the analysis of data from future missions such as JWST and Euclid, and also to ground-based surveys to be made with telescopes such as LSST.

  1. The Spatiotemporal Stability of Dominant Frequency Sites in In-Silico Modeling of 3-Dimensional Left Atrial Mapping of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Minki; Song, Jun-Seop; Lee, Young-Seon; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously reported that stable rotors were observed in in-silico human atrial fibrillation (AF) models, and were well represented by dominant frequency (DF). We explored the spatiotemporal stability of DF sites in 3D-AF models imported from patient CT images of the left atrium (LA). Methods We integrated 3-D CT images of the LA obtained from ten patients with persistent AF (male 80%, 61.8 ± 13.5 years old) into an in-silico AF model. After induction, we obtained 6 seconds of AF simulation data for DF analyses in 30 second intervals (T1–T9). The LA was divided into ten sections. Spatiotemporal changes and variations in the temporal consistency of DF were evaluated at each section of the LA. The high DF area was defined as the area with the highest 10% DF. Results 1. There was no spatial consistency in the high DF distribution at each LA section during T1–T9 except in one patient (p = 0.027). 2. Coefficients of variation for the high DF area were highly different among the ten LA sections (p < 0.001), and they were significantly higher in the four pulmonary vein (PV) areas, the LA appendage, and the peri-mitral area than in the other LA sections (p < 0.001). 3. When we conducted virtual ablation of 10%, 15%, and 20% of the highest DF areas (n = 270 cases), AF was changed to atrial tachycardia (AT) or terminated at a rate of 40%, 57%, and 76%, respectively. Conclusions Spatiotemporal consistency of the DF area was observed in 10% of AF patients, and high DF areas were temporally variable. Virtual ablation of DF is moderately effective in AF termination and AF changing into AT. PMID:27459377

  2. [Time-resolved optical studies of charge relaxation and charge transfer at electrode interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Key components were identified in a quantitative model of carrier relaxation in semiconductor electrodes: nonlinear aspects of nonradiative and radiative recombination, effect of space charge field on carrier dynamics, self-absorption effects in direct gas semiconductors, and influence of surface state population kinetics on charge carrier recombination. For CdSe, the first three are operative (no direct proof of the last one). A realistic kinetic model for carrier recombination in the bulk of CdSe was used which includes important nonlinear effects, both radiative and nonradiative. The change in interfacial recombination velocity with the chemical nature of the sinterface was studied (n-CdSe/silane interfaces). Temperature effect (278 to 328 K) on fluorescence decay of n-CdSe in contact with 0.5 M KOH was found to be weak. An analytical solution was obtained for time-resolved fluoresence from electrodes under potential bias, and is being tested. Fluorescence work on a different material, CdS, indicate different recombination kinetics; this material was used to directly pump an optical transition of a surface state.

  3. [Time-resolved optical studies of charge relaxation and charge transfer at electrode interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Key components were identified in a quantitative model of carrier relaxation in semiconductor electrodes: nonlinear aspects of nonradiative and radiative recombination, effect of space charge field on carrier dynamics, self-absorption effects in direct gas semiconductors, and influence of surface state population kinetics on charge carrier recombination. For CdSe, the first three are operative (no direct proof of the last one). A realistic kinetic model for carrier recombination in the bulk of CdSe was used which includes important nonlinear effects, both radiative and nonradiative. The change in interfacial recombination velocity with the chemical nature of the sinterface was studied (n-CdSe/silane interfaces). Temperature effect (278 to 328 K) on fluorescence decay of n-CdSe in contact with 0.5 M KOH was found to be weak. An analytical solution was obtained for time-resolved fluoresence from electrodes under potential bias, and is being tested. Fluorescence work on a different material, CdS, indicate different recombination kinetics; this material was used to directly pump an optical transition of a surface state.

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  5. Time resolved analysis of steady and oscillating flow in the upper human airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große, S.; Schröder, W.; Klaas, M.; Klöckner, A.; Roggenkamp, J.

    2007-06-01

    In this experimental study a thorough analysis of the steady and unsteady flow field in a realistic transparent silicone lung model of the first bifurcation of the upper human airways will be presented. To determine the temporal evolution of the flow time-resolved particle-image velocimetry recordings were performed for a Womersley number range 3.3 ≤ α ≤ 5.8 and Reynolds numbers of Re D = 1,050, 1,400, and 2,100. The results evidence a highly three-dimensional and asymmetric character of the velocity field in the upper human airways, in which the influence of the asymmetric geometry of the realistic lung model plays a significant role for the development of the flow field in the respiratory system. At steady inspiration, the flow shows independent of the Reynolds number a large zone with embedded counter-rotating vortices in the left bronchia ensuring a continuous streamwise transport into the lung. At unsteady flow the critical Reynolds number, which describes the onset of vortices in the first bifurcation, is increased at higher Womersley number and decreased at higher Reynolds number. At expiration the unsteady and steady flows are almost alike.

  6. Water distribution in a sorption enhanced methanation reactor by time resolved neutron imaging.

    PubMed

    Borgschulte, A; Delmelle, R; Duarte, R B; Heel, A; Boillat, P; Lehmann, E

    2016-06-29

    Water adsorption enhanced catalysis has been recently shown to greatly increase the conversion yield of CO2 methanation. However, the joint catalysis and adsorption process requires new reactor concepts. We measured the spatial water distribution in a model fixed bed reactor using time resolved neutron imaging. Due to the high neutron attenuation coefficient of hydrogen, the absorbed water in the sorption catalyst gives a high contrast allowing us to follow its formation and map its distribution. At the same time, the product gas was analysed by FTIR-gas analysis. The measurements provided crucial insights into the future design of sorption reactors: during the sorption enhanced reaction, a reaction front runs through the reactor. Once the extension of the reaction front reaches the exhaust, the conversion rate of sorption enhanced methanation decreases. The existence of a reaction front running through the reactor is prerequisite for a high conversion rate. We give a simple model of the experimental results, in particular the conditions, under which a reaction front is established. In particular the latter effect must be taken into account for the dimensions of a large scale reactor. PMID:26791100

  7. Water distribution in a sorption enhanced methanation reactor by time resolved neutron imaging.

    PubMed

    Borgschulte, A; Delmelle, R; Duarte, R B; Heel, A; Boillat, P; Lehmann, E

    2016-06-29

    Water adsorption enhanced catalysis has been recently shown to greatly increase the conversion yield of CO2 methanation. However, the joint catalysis and adsorption process requires new reactor concepts. We measured the spatial water distribution in a model fixed bed reactor using time resolved neutron imaging. Due to the high neutron attenuation coefficient of hydrogen, the absorbed water in the sorption catalyst gives a high contrast allowing us to follow its formation and map its distribution. At the same time, the product gas was analysed by FTIR-gas analysis. The measurements provided crucial insights into the future design of sorption reactors: during the sorption enhanced reaction, a reaction front runs through the reactor. Once the extension of the reaction front reaches the exhaust, the conversion rate of sorption enhanced methanation decreases. The existence of a reaction front running through the reactor is prerequisite for a high conversion rate. We give a simple model of the experimental results, in particular the conditions, under which a reaction front is established. In particular the latter effect must be taken into account for the dimensions of a large scale reactor.

  8. Wear Particles Derived from Metal Hip Implants Induce the Generation of Multinucleated Giant Cells in a 3-Dimensional Peripheral Tissue-Equivalent Model

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debargh K.; Potnis, Pushya A.; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1–5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which

  9. Whole-field, time resolved velocity measurements of flow structures on insect wings during free flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Kenneth; Thomson, Scott; Truscott, Tadd

    2012-11-01

    The development of micro air vehicles (MAVs) that are propelled using flapping flight necessitates an understanding of the unsteady aerodynamics that enable this mode of flight. Flapping flight has been studied using a variety of methods including computational models, experimentation and observation. Until recently, the observation of natural flyers has been limited to qualitative methods such as smoke-line visualization. Advances in imaging technology have enabled the use of particle image velocimetry (PIV) to gain a quantitative understanding of the unsteady nature of the flight. Previously published PIV studies performed on insects have been limited to velocities in a single plane on tethered insects in a wind tunnel. We present the three-dimensional, time-resolved velocity fields of flight around a butterfly, using an array of high-speed cameras at 1 kHz through a technique known as 3D Synthetic Aperture PIV (SAPIV). These results are useful in understanding the relationship between wing kinematics and the unsteady aerodynamics generated.

  10. Time-resolved energy dynamics after single electron injection into an interacting helical liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzona, Alessio; Acciai, Matteo; Carrega, Matteo; Cavaliere, Fabio; Sassetti, Maura

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of injecting a single electron into ballistic conductors is at the basis of the new field of electron quantum optics. Here, we consider a single electron injection into the helical edge channels of a topological insulator. Their counterpropagating nature and the unavoidable presence of electron-electron interactions dramatically affect the time evolution of the single wave packet. Modeling the injection process from a mesoscopic capacitor in the presence of nonlocal tunneling, we focus on the time-resolved charge and energy packet dynamics. Both quantities split up into counterpropagating contributions whose profiles are strongly affected by the interaction strength. In addition, stronger signatures are found for the injected energy, which is also affected by the finite width of the tunneling region, in contrast to what happens for the charge. Indeed, the energy flow can be controlled by tuning the injection parameters, and we demonstrate that, in the presence of nonlocal tunneling, it is possible to achieve a situation in which charge and energy flow in opposite directions.

  11. Multiplexed measurements by time resolved spectroscopy using colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, U.; Jimenez de Aberasturi, D.; Malinowski, R.; Amin, F.; Parak, W. J.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2014-01-27

    Multiplexed measurements of analytes in parallel is a topical demand in bioanalysis and bioimaging. An interesting alternative to commonly performed spectral multiplexing is lifetime multiplexing. In this Letter, we present a proof of principle of single-color lifetime multiplexing by coupling the same fluorophore to different nanoparticles. The effective lifetime of the fluorophores can be tuned by more than one order of magnitude due to resonance energy transfer from donor states. Measurements have been done on a model systems consisting of ATTO-590 dye molecules linked to either gold particles or to CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots. Both systems show the same luminescence spectrum of ATTO-590 dye emission in continuous wave excitation, but can be distinguished by means of time resolved measurements. The dye molecules bound to gold particles exhibit a mono-exponential decay with a lifetime of 4.5 ns, whereas the dye molecules bound to CdSe/ZnS dots show a nonexponential decay with a slow component of about 135 ns due to the energy transfer from the quantum dots. We demonstrate the fundamental possibility to determine the mixing ratio for dyes with equal luminescence spectra but very different transients. This opens up a pathway independent of the standard optical multiplexing with many different fluorophores emitting from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared spectral region.

  12. In vivo flow cytometry and time-resolved near-IR angiography and lymphography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Brock, Robert W.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2007-05-01

    Integration of photoacoustic and photothermal techniques with high-speed, high-resolution transmission and fluorescence microscopy shows great potential for in vivo flow cytometry and indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared (IR) angiography of blood and lymph microvessels. In particular, the capabilities of in vivo flow cytometry using rat mesentery and nude mouse ear models are demonstrated for real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells in skin, mesentery, lymph nodes, liver, kidney; studying vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics; monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems; high-speed imaging of cell deformability in flow; and label-free real-time monitoring of single cell extravasation from blood vessel lumen into tissue. As presented, the advantages of ICG IR-angiography include estimation of time resolved dye dynamics (appearance and clearance) in blood and lymph microvessels using fluorescent and photoacoustic modules of the integrated technique. These new approaches are important for monitoring and quantifying metastatic and apoptotic cells; comparative measurements of plasma and cell velocities; analysis of immune responses; monitoring of circulating macromolecules, chylomicrons, bacteria, viruses and nanoparticles; molecular imaging. In the future, we believe that the integrated technique presented will have great potential for translation to early disease diagnoses (e.g. cancer) or assessment of innovative therapeutic interventions in humans.

  13. Time-resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Hopping: Body Size Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipper, A. N.; Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    The flow field of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna is quantified with time-resolved tomographic PIV. In the current work, we compare body kinematics and flow disturbance between organisms of small (body length = 1.8 mm) versus medium (2.3 mm) versus large (2.65 mm) size. These plankters are equipped with a pair of antennae that are biramous such that the protopodite splits or branches into an exopodite and an endopodite. They beat the antennae pair synchronously to impulsively propel themselves, or `hop,' through the water. The stroke cycle of Daphnia magna is roughly 80 ms in duration and this period is evenly split between the power and recovery strokes. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. Unlike copepod escape motion, no body vortex is observed in front of the animal. Rather, the flow induced by each antennae consists of a viscous vortex ring that demonstrates a slow decay. The time-record of velocity (peak of 40 mm/s for the medium specimen) and hop acceleration (1.8 m/s2 for the medium specimen) are compared, as well as the strength, size, and decay of the induced viscous vortex rings. The viscous vortex ring analysis will be presented in the context of a double Stokeslet model consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width.

  14. High-Speed Hopping: Time-Resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Daphniids, also known as water fleas, are small, freshwater crustaceans that live in a low-to-intermediate Reynolds number regime. These plankters are equipped with a pair of branched, setae-bearing antennae that they beat to impulsively propel themselves, or ``hop,'' through the water. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. We present time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of swimming by Daphnia magna. The body kinematics and flow physics of the daphniid hop are quantified. It is shown that the flow generated by each stroking antenna resembles an asymmetric viscous vortex ring. It is proposed that the flow produced by the daphniid hop can be modeled as a double Stokeslet consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width. The flow physics are discussed in the context of other species operating in the same Reynolds number range of 10 to 100: sea butterfly swimming and flight by the smallest flying insects.

  15. Conductivity of ZnO nanowires, nanoparticles, and thin films using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jason B; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2006-12-21

    The terahertz absorption coefficient, index of refraction, and conductivity of nanostructured ZnO have been determined using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, a noncontact optical probe. ZnO properties were measured directly for thin films and were extracted from measurements of nanowire arrays and mesoporous nanoparticle films by applying Bruggeman effective medium theory to the composite samples. Annealing significantly reduces the intrinsic carrier concentration in the ZnO films and nanowires, which were grown by chemical bath deposition. The complex-valued, frequency-dependent photoconductivities for all morphologies were found to be similar at short pump-probe delay times. Fits using the Drude-Smith model show that films have the highest mobility, followed by nanowires and then nanoparticles, and that annealing the ZnO increases its mobility. Time constants for decay of photoinjected electron density in films are twice as long as those in nanowires and more than 5 times those for nanoparticles due to increased electron interaction with interfaces and grain boundaries in the smaller-grained materials. Implications for electron transport in dye-sensitized solar cells are discussed.

  16. Time-resolved EUV spectroscopy in the early stage of laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseleur, Pierre; Hansen, Tue N.; Larour, Jean; Lunney, James G.

    2002-09-01

    In the early stages of laser ablation the combination of high density and optical opacity makes it difficult to use visible spectroscopy for plasma diagnosis. However, these problems can be overcome by working at shorter wavelengths in the EUV. We have used time-resolved EUV emission spectroscopy to study the early stages (1-30 ns) of plasma development in the laser ablation of carbon at an irradiance of 5 GW cm -2. The ablation was done using a 6 ns Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 μm. The spectra were recorded using a grazing incidence spectrometer with a 5 ns-gated micro-channel plate (MCP) detector. An ion probe operating in the time-of-flight mode was used to measure the ion velocity distribution of the plasma outflow. In the 10-35 nm region the predominant line emission was due to Li-like carbon. The temporal variation of the electron density and temperature was deduced by fitting the observed spectrum to a synthetic spectrum calculated using the FLY numerical model of the plasma ionisation and excitation. The temperature deduced from spectroscopy was in good agreement with the estimation from the measured ion velocity distribution in the plasma outflow.

  17. Applications of Phasors to In Vitro Time-Resolved Fluorescence Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Štefl, Martin; James, Nicholas G.; Ross, Justin A.; Jameson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The phasor method of treating fluorescence lifetime data provides a facile and convenient approach to characterize lifetime heterogeneity and to detect the presence of excited state reactions, such as solvent relaxation and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer. The method utilizes a plot of M sin(Φ) versus M cos(Φ), where M is the modulation ratio and Φ is the phase angle taken from frequency domain fluorometry. A principle advantage of the phasor method is that it provides a model-less approach to time-resolved data, amenable to visual inspection. Although the phasor approach has been recently applied to Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy it has not been extensively utilized for cuvette studies. In the present study we explore the applications of the method to in vitro samples. The phasors of binary and ternary mixtures of fluorescent dyes demonstrates the utility of the method for investigating complex mixtures. Data from excited state reactions, such as dipolar relaxation in membrane and protein systems and also energy transfer from the tryptophan residue to the chromophore in EGFP, are also presented. PMID:21078290

  18. Time Resolved Nucleation and Growth of Monodisperse FeOOH Nanoparticles Observed in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, B. A.; Zhu, M.; Zhang, H.; Waychunas, G.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The nucleation and growth of oxide minerals from aqueous solution is a poorly understood process. Complexities such as two-stage precipitation, phase transformation, and hydrolysis often inhibit simple interpretation. In this study, we track the thermally induced nucleation and growth of akaganeite (β-FeOOH) nanoparticles from FeCl3 solutions, using in situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variations in reaction temperature (from 37 deg C to 80 deg C) and FeCl3 concentration (from 5 mM to 800 mM) produce systematic changes in nucleation rate, growth rate, particle size distribution, and aspect ratio. Low FeCl3 concentrations and high temperatures lead to formation of very small particles via rapid nucleation. (FeCl3 solutions are actually more supersaturated with respect to akaganeite when concentrations are low, due to the acid-base chemistry of ferric iron.) Increasing the FeCl3 concentration leads to large, highly monodisperse particles via size focused growth. Suspensions of highly monodisperse, elongated particles are found to self-organize into two dimensional colloidal crystals. The well-controlled growth processes in this system make it possible to conduct detailed kinetic modeling, and determine how both nucleation and growth rate respond to changes in the experimental conditions.

  19. Nonadiabatic Dynamics May Be Probed through Electronic Coherence in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-01

    We present a hierarchy of Fermi golden rules (FGRs) that incorporate strongly coupled electronic/nuclear dynamics in time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) signals at different levels of theory. Expansion in the joint electronic and nuclear eigenbasis yields the numerically most challenging exact FGR (eFGR). The quasistatic Fermi Golden Rule (qsFGR) neglects nuclear motion during the photoionization process but takes into account electronic coherences as well as populations initially present in the pumped matter as well as those generated internally by coupling between electronic surfaces. The standard semiclassical Fermi Golden Rule (scFGR) neglects the electronic coherences and the nuclear kinetic energy during the ionizing pulse altogether, yielding the classical Condon approximation. The coherence contributions depend on the phase-profile of the ionizing field, allowing coherent control of TRPES signals. The photoelectron spectrum from model systems is simulated using these three levels of theory. The eFGR and the qsFGR show temporal oscillations originating from the electronic or vibrational coherences generated as the nuclear wave packet traverses a conical intersection. These oscillations, which are missed by the scFGR, directly reveal the time-evolving splitting between electronic states of the neutral molecule in the curve-crossing regime.

  20. Photon-momentum transfer in multiphoton ionization and in time-resolved holography with photoelectrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.; Corkum, Paul B.

    2015-11-01

    In most models and theoretical calculations describing multiphoton ionization by infrared light, the dipole approximation is used. This is equivalent to setting the very small photon momentum to zero. Using numerical solutions of the two-dimensional (2-D) time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron (H-like) systems, we show that, for linear polarization, the radiation pressure on photoelectrons is very sensitive to the details of the ionization mechanism. The directly ionized photoelectrons, those that never recollide with the parent ion, are driven in the direction of the laser photon momentum, whereas a fraction of slower photoelectrons are pushed in the opposite direction, leading to the counterintuitive shifts observed in recent experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 243001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.243001]. This complex response is due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and the Coulomb attraction from the ion. On average, however, the photoelectron momentum is in the direction of the photon momentum as in the case of circular polarization. The influence of the photon momentum is shown to be discernible in the holographic patterns of time-resolved atomic and molecular holography with photoelectrons, thus suggesting a new research subject in multiphoton ionization.

  1. Using Separable Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Techniques for the Analysis of Time-Resolved Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Luce, Robert; Hildebrandt, Peter; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Liesen, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    The key challenge of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy is the identification of the constituent species and the analysis of the kinetics of the underlying reaction network. In this work we present an integral approach that allows for determining both the component spectra and the rate constants simultaneously from a series of vibrational spectra. It is based on an algorithm for nonnegative matrix factorization that is applied to the experimental data set following a few pre-processing steps. As a prerequisite for physically unambiguous solutions, each component spectrum must include one vibrational band that does not significantly interfere with the vibrational bands of other species. The approach is applied to synthetic "experimental" spectra derived from model systems comprising a set of species with component spectra differing with respect to their degree of spectral interferences and signal-to-noise ratios. In each case, the species involved are connected via monomolecular reaction pathways. The potential and limitations of the approach for recovering the respective rate constants and component spectra are discussed. PMID:27635022

  2. Multiplexed measurements by time resolved spectroscopy using colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, U.; Jimenez de Aberasturi, D.; Malinowski, R.; Amin, F.; Parak, W. J.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2014-01-01

    Multiplexed measurements of analytes in parallel is a topical demand in bioanalysis and bioimaging. An interesting alternative to commonly performed spectral multiplexing is lifetime multiplexing. In this Letter, we present a proof of principle of single-color lifetime multiplexing by coupling the same fluorophore to different nanoparticles. The effective lifetime of the fluorophores can be tuned by more than one order of magnitude due to resonance energy transfer from donor states. Measurements have been done on a model systems consisting of ATTO-590 dye molecules linked to either gold particles or to CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots. Both systems show the same luminescence spectrum of ATTO-590 dye emission in continuous wave excitation, but can be distinguished by means of time resolved measurements. The dye molecules bound to gold particles exhibit a mono-exponential decay with a lifetime of 4.5 ns, whereas the dye molecules bound to CdSe/ZnS dots show a nonexponential decay with a slow component of about 135 ns due to the energy transfer from the quantum dots. We demonstrate the fundamental possibility to determine the mixing ratio for dyes with equal luminescence spectra but very different transients. This opens up a pathway independent of the standard optical multiplexing with many different fluorophores emitting from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared spectral region.

  3. Time-resolved four-wave-mixing spectroscopy for inner-valence transitions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Thomas; Ott, Christian; Kaldun, Andreas; Blättermann, Alexander; Meyer, Kristina; Stooss, Veit; Rebholz, Marc; Birk, Paul; Hartmann, Maximilian; Brown, Andrew; Van Der Hart, Hugo; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Noncollinear four-wave-mixing (FWM) techniques at near-infrared (NIR), visible, and ultraviolet frequencies have been widely used to map vibrational and electronic couplings, typically in complex molecules. However, correlations between spatially localized inner-valence transitions among different sites of a molecule in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range have not been observed yet. As an experimental step toward this goal, we perform time-resolved FWM spectroscopy with femtosecond NIR and attosecond XUV pulses. The first two pulses (XUV-NIR) coincide in time and act as coherent excitation fields, while the third pulse (NIR) acts as a probe. As a first application, we show how coupling dynamics between odd- and even-parity, inner-valence excited states of neon can be revealed using a two-dimensional spectral representation. Experimentally obtained results are found to be in good agreement with ab initio time-dependent R-matrix calculations providing the full description of multielectron interactions, as well as few-level model simulations. Future applications of this method also include site-specific probing of electronic processes in molecules. PMID:26872169

  4. Exploiting sparsity in time-of-flight range acquisition using a single time-resolved sensor.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Goyal, Vivek K

    2011-10-24

    Range acquisition systems such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) cameras operate by measuring the time difference of arrival between a transmitted pulse and the scene reflection. We introduce the design of a range acquisition system for acquiring depth maps of piecewise-planar scenes with high spatial resolution using a single, omnidirectional, time-resolved photodetector and no scanning components. In our experiment, we reconstructed 64 × 64-pixel depth maps of scenes comprising two to four planar shapes using only 205 spatially-patterned, femtosecond illuminations of the scene. The reconstruction uses parametric signal modeling to recover a set of depths present in the scene. Then, a convex optimization that exploits sparsity of the Laplacian of the depth map of a typical scene determines correspondences between spatial positions and depths. In contrast with 2D laser scanning used in LIDAR systems and low-resolution 2D sensor arrays used in TOF cameras, our experiment demonstrates that it is possible to build a non-scanning range acquisition system with high spatial resolution using only a standard, low-cost photodetector and a spatial light modulator. PMID:22108998

  5. pH Dependence of the Photoactive Yellow Protein Photocycle Investigated by Time-Resolved Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Šrajer, Vukica; Purwar, Namrta; Henning, Robert; Schmidt, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Visualizing the three-dimensional structures of a protein during its biological activity is key to understanding its mechanism. In general, protein structure and function are pH-dependent. Changing the pH provides new insights into the mechanisms that are involved in protein activity. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is a signaling protein that serves as an ideal model for time-dependent studies on light-activated proteins. Its photocycle is studied extensively under different pH conditions. However, the structures of the intermediates remain unknown until time-resolved crystallography is employed. With the newest beamline developments, a comprehensive time series of Laue data can now be collected from a single protein crystal. This allows us to vary the pH. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of a short-lived protein-inhibitor complex formed in the pB state of the PYP photocycle at pH 4. A water molecule that is transiently stabilized in the chromophore active site prevents the relaxation of the chromophore back to the trans configuration. As a result, the dark-state recovery is slowed down dramatically. At pH 9, PYP stops cycling through the pB state altogether. The electrostatic environment in the chromophore-binding site is the likely reason for this altered kinetics at different pH values. PMID:22339869

  6. pH Dependence of the Photoactive Yellow Protein Photocycle Investigated by Time-Resolved Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Šrajer, Vukica; Purwar, Namrta; Henning, Robert; Schmidt, Marius

    2012-05-24

    Visualizing the three-dimensional structures of a protein during its biological activity is key to understanding its mechanism. In general, protein structure and function are pH-dependent. Changing the pH provides new insights into the mechanisms that are involved in protein activity. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is a signaling protein that serves as an ideal model for time-dependent studies on light-activated proteins. Its photocycle is studied extensively under different pH conditions. However, the structures of the intermediates remain unknown until time-resolved crystallography is employed. With the newest beamline developments, a comprehensive time series of Laue data can now be collected from a single protein crystal. This allows us to vary the pH. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of a short-lived protein-inhibitor complex formed in the pB state of the PYP photocycle at pH 4. A water molecule that is transiently stabilized in the chromophore active site prevents the relaxation of the chromophore back to the trans configuration. As a result, the dark-state recovery is slowed down dramatically. At pH 9, PYP stops cycling through the pB state altogether. The electrostatic environment in the chromophore-binding site is the likely reason for this altered kinetics at different pH values.

  7. The time-resolved photoelectron spectrum of toluene using a perturbation theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Richings, Gareth W.; Worth, Graham A.

    2014-12-28

    A theoretical study of the intra-molecular vibrational-energy redistribution of toluene using time-resolved photo-electron spectra calculated using nuclear quantum dynamics and a simple, two-mode model is presented. Calculations have been carried out using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method, using three levels of approximation for the calculation of the spectra. The first is a full quantum dynamics simulation with a discretisation of the continuum wavefunction of the ejected electron, whilst the second uses first-order perturbation theory to calculate the wavefunction of the ion. Both methods rely on the explicit inclusion of both the pump and probe laser pulses. The third method includes only the pump pulse and generates the photo-electron spectrum by projection of the pumped wavepacket onto the ion potential energy surface, followed by evaluation of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the subsequently propagated wavepacket. The calculations performed have been used to study the periodic population flow between the 6a and 10b16b modes in the S{sub 1} excited state, and compared to recent experimental data. We obtain results in excellent agreement with the experiment and note the efficiency of the perturbation method.

  8. Diffusion optical spectroscopy of cancerous and normal prostate tissues in time-resolved and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kenneth J.; Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun

    2014-03-01

    It is well-known that light transport can be well described using Maxwell's electromagnetic theory. In biological tissue, the scattering particles cause the interaction of scattered waves from neighboring particles. Since such interaction cannot be ignored, multiple scattering occurs. The theoretical solution of multiple scattering is complicated. A suitable description is that the wavelike behavior of light is ignored and the transport of an individual photon is considered to be absorbed or scattered. This is known as the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) theory. Analytical solutions to the RTE that explicitly describes photon migration can be obtained by introducing some proper approximations. One of the most popular models used in the field of tissue optics is the Diffusion Approximation (DA). In this study, we report on the results of our initial study of optical properties of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissues and how tissue parameters affect the near infrared light transporting in the two types of tissues. The time-resolved transport of light is simulated as an impulse isotropic point source of energy within a homogeneous unbounded medium with different absorption and scattering properties of cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Light source is also modulated sinusoidally to yield a varied fluence rate in frequency domain at a distant observation point within the cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Due to difference of the absorption and scattering coefficients between cancerous and normal tissues, the expansion of light pulse, intensity, phase are found to be different.

  9. Optical characterisation of gold films for time-resolved reflectance thermometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Jasmina; White, Thomas G.; Chapman, David J.; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of temperature represents a long-standing challenge within the field of high-pressure science. Recently, a promising time-resolved reflectance thermometry technique employing embedded gold films has been demonstrated. As an active diagnostic, reflectance thermometry is well suited for dynamic experiments generating temperatures below 1000K, where passive diagnostics such as pyrometry become infeasible due to the transient states created. A critical component of the reflectance thermometry technique is a robust optical characterisation of the gold films, decoupling the thermal and pressure contributions. Additionally, the optical properties of gold vary with both sample preparation and thermal history. With a view towards the development of a spatially-resolved reflectance thermometry technique for temperature measurement, we report the optical characterisation of a range of commercially available or deposited thin film gold samples. Reflectance spectroscopy was performed on the gold films as a function of temperature from ambient conditions to 400K, and as a function of pressure using a diamond anvil cell. The experimental data are fitted to a simple phenomenological Drude model paving the way for the calibrated films to be used during future dynamic experiments.

  10. The kinetic dose limit in room-temperature time-resolved macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, M.; Srajer, V.; Purwar, N.; Tripathi, S.

    2012-05-24

    Protein X-ray structures are determined with ionizing radiation that damages the protein at high X-ray doses. As a result, diffraction patterns deteriorate with the increased absorbed dose. Several strategies such as sample freezing or scavenging of X-ray-generated free radicals are currently employed to minimize this damage. However, little is known about how the absorbed X-ray dose affects time-resolved Laue data collected at physiological temperatures where the protein is fully functional in the crystal, and how the kinetic analysis of such data depends on the absorbed dose. Here, direct evidence for the impact of radiation damage on the function of a protein is presented using time-resolved macromolecular crystallography. The effect of radiation damage on the kinetic analysis of time-resolved X-ray data is also explored.

  11. Time-resolved electron beam energy spectrum diagnostics for Vanderbilt FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bibo; Kozub, John A.; Gabella, William E.

    2002-06-01

    A fast electron energy spectrometer has been built using a photodiode array measuring the backward optical transition radiation from a thin film of aluminum. The resolution of the electron energy spectrometer is about 0.2% with a time resolution of 50 ns. The maximum energy spread that can be measured is 6.4%. We present the measurements of the time-resolved electron beam energy spectrum on the Mark III linear accelerator at Vanderbilt University, while lasing at different wavelengths and while not lasing. We also discuss the effects of different parameters, such as cathode heating, alpha magnet strength and RF phase, on the electron energy spectrum and optical spectrum. The diagnostics of time-resolved electron energy spectrum and time-resolved laser spectrum provide the technology to understand the physical process of the FEL interaction. Based on these diagnostics, the FEL facility can realize some special modes of operation, such as macropulse chirping and macropulse two color lasing.

  12. The time-resolved D-SERS vibrational spectra of pesticide thiram.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Liu, Honglin; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2013-12-15

    Time-resolved dynamic-SERS (D-SERS) can observe the process of chemical reaction between target and substrate and changes of adsorptive forms for analytes. In this paper, the vibrational spectra of pesticide thiram adsorbed on Au nanoparticles and intensity alternation of SERS spectra depended on different laser powers have been systematically investigated using the method of D-SERS. The Raman intensities of b2 and a1 modes of thiram related to the standard band appear different regulars with the extending time. Meanwhile, due to SERS vibrational spectra of pesticide thiram at different concentrations exhibit different SERS signals, the results of time-resolve D-SERS demonstrate the breakdown of band and different adsorptive forms of molecule on Au substrate. The continuous time-resolved the spectroscopic method offers the fingerprints of target molecules and provides great practical potentials for the continuous assessment and identification of pesticide or other probe molecules.

  13. Cluster mass fraction and size distribution determined by fs-time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaoming; Shim, Bonggu; Arefiev, Alexey; Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Downer, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of supersonic gas jets is important for accurate interpretation and control of laser-cluster experiments. While average size and total atomic density can be found by standard Rayleigh scatter and interferometry, cluster mass fraction and size distribution are usually difficult to measure. Here we determine the cluster fraction and the size distribution with fs-time-resolved refractive index and absorption measurements in cluster gas jets after ionization and heating by an intense pump pulse. The fs-time-resolved refractive index measured with frequency domain interferometer (FDI) shows different contributions from monomer plasma and cluster plasma in the time domain, enabling us to determine the cluster fraction. The fs-time-resolved absorption measured by a delayed probe shows the contribution from clusters of various sizes, allowing us to find the size distribution.

  14. Fractal dimension of time-resolved autofluorescence discriminates tumour from healthy tissues in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Jan; Gerich, Carola E; Gröbe, Alexander; Opitz, Jörg; Schreiber, Jürgen; Hanken, Henning; Salomon, Georg; Heiland, Max; Kluwe, Lan; Blessmann, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Early detection and complete resection of oral carcinomas is of crucial importance for patient survival. This could be significantly improved by developing a non-invasive, sensitive and real-time detection technique. Time-resolved autofluorescence measurement is state-of-the-art technology originally developed for non-destructive inspection of material. In this study, we measured time-resolved autofluorescence in tumours and healthy tissues of the oral cavity ex vivo and calculated the corresponding fractal dimension which was significantly higher in tumours than in healthy tissues (1.8 vs. 1.6, P < 0.001, unpaired t-test) with non-overlapping 95% confidential intervals 1.88-1.84 and 1.57-1.69, respectively. Very high specificity (86%) could be reached at 100% sensitivity. The area under the curve was 99%, further suggesting the superior prediction potential of fractal dimension based on time-resolved autofluorescence spectra.

  15. Disentangling Multichannel Photodissociation Dynamics in Acetone by Time-Resolved Photoelectron-Photoion Coincidence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Paul; Bainschab, Markus; Thaler, Bernhard; Heim, Pascal; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Koch, Markus

    2016-08-18

    For the investigation of photoinduced dynamics in molecules with time-resolved pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy, it is essential to obtain unequivocal information about the fragmentation behavior induced by the laser pulses. We present time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) experiments to investigate the excited-state dynamics of isolated acetone molecules triggered by two-photon (269 nm) excitation. In the complex situation of different relaxation pathways, we unambiguously identify three distinct pump-probe ionization channels. The high selectivity of PEPICO detection allows us to observe the fragmentation behavior and to follow the time evolution of each channel separately. For channels leading to fragment ions, we quantitatively obtain the fragment-to-parent branching ratio and are able to determine experimentally whether dissociation occurs in the neutral molecule or in the parent ion. These results highlight the importance of coincidence detection for the interpretation of time-resolved photochemical relaxation and dissociation studies if multiple pathways are present.

  16. Feasibility experiments on time-resolved fluorosensing applied to oil slicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camagni, P.; Colombo, G.; Koechler, C.; Pedrini, A.; Omenetto, N.; Rossi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of time resolved observations can provide a very penetrating tool in the practice of laser fluorosensing. The investigations have demonstrated a relevance of multispectral, time resolved analysis for oil fingerprinting. By comparative studies on a variety of crude oils and their most significant fractions, it was found that the process of time decay in a composite oil is characterized by a few steps, which are associated with specific components in the medium light range. The average decay times of these pure fractions are markedly differentiated as to absolute values and spectral spread; as a consequence, the corresponding parameters in the resultant crude are quite sensitive to the particular mixture of these components. Measurements of the time response give then a finer discrimination between oil classes, depending on the relative content of certain fractions. Experiments were pursued with an improved fluorosensor facility, in order to test the application of time resolved fluorosensing to remote samples on water.

  17. Apparatus and Techniques for Time-resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction using Diamond Anvil Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lin, C.; Rod, E.; Bai, L.; Shen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Complementary advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have recently made possible many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. Herein we present key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  18. Time-resolved materials science opportunities using synchrotron x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1995-06-01

    The high brightness, high intensity, and pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources provide new opportunities for time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. With third generation synchrotron sources coming on line, high brilliance and high brightness are now available in x-ray beams with the highest flux. In addition to the high average flux, the instantaneous flux available in synchrotron beams is greatly enhanced by the pulsed time structure, which consists of short bursts of x-rays that are separated by {approximately}tens to hundreds of nanoseconds. Time-resolved one- and two-dimensional position sensitive detection techniques that take advantage of synchrotron radiation for materials science x-ray diffraction investigations are presented, and time resolved materials science applications are discussed in terms of recent diffraction and spectroscopy results and materials research opportunities.

  19. The kinetic dose limit in room-temperature time-resolved macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M.; Šrajer, V.; Purwar, N.; Tripathi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Protein X-ray structures are determined with ionizing radiation that damages the protein at high X-ray doses. As a result, diffraction patterns deteriorate with the increased absorbed dose. Several strategies such as sample freezing or scavenging of X-ray-generated free radicals are currently employed to minimize this damage. However, little is known about how the absorbed X-ray dose affects time-resolved Laue data collected at physiological temperatures where the protein is fully functional in the crystal, and how the kinetic analysis of such data depends on the absorbed dose. Here, direct evidence for the impact of radiation damage on the function of a protein is presented using time-resolved macromolecular crystallography. The effect of radiation damage on the kinetic analysis of time-resolved X-ray data is also explored. PMID:22338689

  20. A high-sensitivity femtosecond to microsecond time-resolved infrared vibrational spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Towrie, Michael; Gabrielsson, Anders; Matousek, Pavel; Parker, Anthony W; Rodriguez, Ana Maria Blanco; Vlcek, Antonín

    2005-04-01

    We describe an apparatus that provides, for the first time, a seamless bridge between femtosecond and microsecond time-resolved Raman and infrared vibrational spectroscopy. The laser system comprises an actively Q-switched sub-nanosecond pulsed kilohertz laser electronically synchronized to an ultrafast titanium sapphire regenerative amplifier to within 0.2 ns. The ultrafast amplifier provides the stable probe light source enabling high-sensitivity infrared vibrational spectroscopy of transients. Time-resolved infrared spectra of the excited-state relaxation dynamics of metal carbonyl compounds are presented to illustrate the capability of the apparatus, and transient data is resolved from 1 picosecond to over 100 microseconds. The results are compared to conventional nanosecond Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and laser based flash photolysis time-resolved infrared technology.

  1. Time-resolved temperature and O atom measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in combustible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Suzanne; Bowman, Sherrie; Burnette, David; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents results of time-resolved rotational temperature measurements, by pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and absolute O atom number density measurements, by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The experiments were conducted in nanosecond pulse discharges in H2-O2-Ar and C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, initially at room temperature, operated at a high pulse repetition rate of 40 kHz, in a plane-to-plane double dielectric barrier geometry at a pressure of 40 Torr. Intensified charge-coupled device images show that O2-Ar and H2-O2-Ar plasmas remain diffuse and volume-filling during the entire burst. Images taken in C2H4-O2-Ar plasma demonstrate significant discharge filamentation and constriction along the center plane and in the corners of the test section. The experimental results demonstrate high accuracy of pure rotational psec CARS for thermometry measurements at low partial pressures of oxygen in nonequilibrium plasmas. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, using two different H2-O2 chemistry and C2H4-O2 chemistry mechanisms. In H2-O2-Ar mixtures, the kinetic modeling predictions are in fairly good agreement with the data, predicting temperature rise and O atom accumulation in long discharge bursts, up to 450 pulses. The results show that adding hydrogen to the mixture results in an additional temperature rise, due to its partial oxidation by radicals generated in the plasma, essentially without chain branching. In C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, the model consistently underpredicts both temperature and O atom number density. The most likely reason for the difference between the experimental data and model predictions is discharge filamentation developing when ethylene is added to the O2-Ar mixture, at fairly low temperatures.

  2. A time-resolved fluorescence study of electronic excitation energy transport in concentrated dye solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, A. D.; Matsumoto, A.; Hirayama, S.

    1991-11-01

    Singlet-state radiative and nonradiative energy transport among randomly distributed donor and acceptor molecules in solutions of ethylene glycol has been investigated by using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Radiative energy transfer in moderately concentrated solutions of rhodamine 6G contained in a 1 cm pathlength cuvette results in nonexponential fluorescence decay curves which can be described in terms of the relative fluorescence emission yield of the ith transfer process, φ i, the average number of transfer steps, < n >, and the apparent fluorescence lifetime, <τ >. The fluorescence decay profiles measured from thin films (⩽ 20 μm) of solutions of rhodamine 6G donors in the presence of malachite green acceptors are also nonexponential and at low donor concentrations (1.0 × 10 -4 M) the decay curves can be described by using Förster's dipole-dipole model for nonradiative energy transfer, where the value for the critical transfer distance, R0, is calculated to be (5.9±0.1) nm. At higher donor concentrations (3.0 × 10 -3 M) the Förster model is inappropriate. However, the model proposed by Loring, Anderson and Fayer (LAF), which allows for the effects of nonradiative energy transfer among donors, provides excellent fits to the experimentally determined fluorescence decay curves for this donor concentration and results in a value of R0 for nonradiative energy transfer between rhodamine 6G chromophores of (5.8±0.1) nm. The LAF model also provides a satisfactory description of the kinetics of the quenching by rhodamine 6G dimers of the fluorescence from thin films of highly concentrated solutions of rhodamine 6G. The value of R0 for nonradiative energy transfer from monomer to dimer and the equilibrium constant for rhodamine 6G dimerization are calculated to be (3.2±0.1) nm and 19 M -1, respectively.

  3. 3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions

    DOEpatents

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2010-03-09

    An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

  4. Time-resolved crystallography and protein design: signalling photoreceptors and optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray crystallography and solution scattering have been successfully conducted on proteins on time-scales down to around 100 ps, set by the duration of the hard X-ray pulses emitted by synchrotron sources. The advent of hard X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), which emit extremely intense, very brief, coherent X-ray pulses, opens the exciting possibility of time-resolved experiments with femtosecond time resolution on macromolecular structure, in both single crystals and solution. The X-ray pulses emitted by an FEL differ greatly in many properties from those emitted by a synchrotron, in ways that at first glance make time-resolved measurements of X-ray scattering with the required accuracy extremely challenging. This opens up several questions which I consider in this brief overview. Are there likely to be chemically and biologically interesting structural changes to be revealed on the femtosecond time-scale? How shall time-resolved experiments best be designed and conducted to exploit the properties of FELs and overcome challenges that they pose? To date, fast time-resolved reactions have been initiated by a brief laser pulse, which obviously requires that the system under study be light-sensitive. Although this is true for proteins of the visual system and for signalling photoreceptors, it is not naturally the case for most interesting biological systems. To generate more biological targets for time-resolved study, can this limitation be overcome by optogenetic, chemical or other means? PMID:24914168

  5. Electron-hole recombination on ZnO(0001) single-crystal surface studied by time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, R.; Yamamoto, S.; Ogawa, M.; Yamamoto, Sh.; Fujikawa, K.; Hobara, R.; Matsuda, I.; Ozawa, K.; Emori, M.; Sakama, H.; Kitagawa, S.; Daimon, H.

    2014-10-13

    Time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments were performed with time scales from picoseconds to nanoseconds to trace relaxation of surface photovoltage on the ZnO(0001) single crystal surface in real time. The band diagram of the surface has been obtained numerically using PES data, showing a depletion layer which extends to 1 μm. Temporal evolution of the photovoltage effect is well explained by a recombination process of a thermionic model, giving the photoexcited carrier lifetime of about 1 ps at the surface under the flat band condition. This lifetime agrees with a temporal range reported by the previous time-resolved optical experiments.

  6. Excited-state dynamics of guanosine in aqueous solution revealed by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Franziska; Heggen, Berit; Ritze, Hans-Hermann; Thiel, Walter; Lübcke, Andrea

    2015-12-21

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is performed on aqueous guanosine solution to study its excited-state relaxation dynamics. Experimental results are complemented by surface hopping dynamic simulations and evaluation of the excited-state ionization energy by Koopmans' theorem. Two alternative models for the relaxation dynamics are discussed. The experimentally observed excited-state lifetime is about 2.5 ps if the molecule is excited at 266 nm and about 1.1 ps if the molecule is excited at 238 nm. The experimental probe photon energy dependence of the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution suggests that the probe step is not vertical and involves a doubly-excited autoionizing state.

  7. Time-resolved studies of particle effects in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D.; Bajic, S.; Baldwin, D.; Houk, R.

    2007-11-13

    Time resolved signals in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are studied to determine the influence of experimental parameters on ICP-induced fractionation effects. Differences in sample composition and morphology, i.e., ablating brass, glass, or dust pellets, have a profound effect on the time resolved signal. Helium transport gas significantly decreases large positive signal spikes arising from large particles in the ICP. A binder for pellets also reduces the abundance and amplitude of spikes in the signal. MO{sup +} ions also yield signal spikes, but these MO{sup +} spikes generally occur at different times from their atomic ion counterparts.

  8. Four-wavelength time-resolved optical mammography in the 680-980-nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Messina, Fabrizio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Danesini, Gianmaria

    2003-07-01

    What is to our knowledge the first instrument for time-resolved optical mammography operating at wavelengths longer than 900 nm has been developed. It is a scanning system that relies on the acquisition of time-resolved transmittance curves at 683, 785, 912, and 975 nm, with a total measurement time of ~5 min for an entire image. Breast structures and lesions can be discriminated based on the different absorption and scattering properties at the four wavelengths, which reflect different contributions of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, water, and lipids, as well as distinct structures. The system is currently used in a European clinical trial.

  9. Single shot, time-resolved measurement of the coherence properties of OCT swept source lasers.

    PubMed

    Butler, T; Slepneva, S; O'Shaughnessy, B; Kelleher, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Lyu, H-C; Karnowski, K; Wojtkowski, M; Huyet, G

    2015-05-15

    A novel, time-resolved interferometric technique is presented that allows the reconstruction of the complex electric field output of a swept source laser in a single-shot measurement. The power of the technique is demonstrated by examining a short cavity swept source designed for optical coherence tomography (OCT) applications with a spectral width of over 100 nm. The novel analysis allows a time-resolved real-time characterization of the roll-off, optical spectrum, linewidth, and coherence properties of a dynamic, rapidly swept laser source.

  10. Combined single-pulse holography and time-resolved laser schlieren for flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed ruby laser and continuous-wave argon ion laser were used in a combined setup at the Langley Expansion Tube for single pulse holography and time resolved laser schlieren with a common optical axis. The systems can be operated simultaneously for a single run. For a single frame, the pulsed holographic setup offers the options of shadowgraph, Schlieren, and interferometry from the reconstructed hologram as well as the advantage of post-run sensitivity adjustments. For flow establishment studies the time resolved laser Schlieren provides visualization of the flow field every 12.5 microns for up to 80 frames with an exposure time per frame of 5.4 microns.

  11. TRIASSIC: the Time-Resolved Industrial Alpha-Source Scanning Induced Current microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Arthur

    Time-resolved ion beam induced current (TRIBIC) microscopy yields useful information such as carrier mobility and lifetimes in semiconductors and defect locations in devices; however, traditional TRIBIC uses large, expensive particle accelerators that require specialized training to operate and maintain. The time-resolved industrial alpha-source scanning induced current (TRIASSIC) microscope transforms TRIBIC by replacing the particle accelerator facility with an affordable, tabletop instrument suitable for use in research and education at smaller colleges and universities. I will discuss the development of, successes with, setbacks to and future directions for TRIASSIC.

  12. Three-dimensional, Time-Resolved, Intrafraction Motion Monitoring Throughout Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy on a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Worm, Esben S.; Høyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walter; Poulsen, Per R.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the time-resolved 3-dimensional (3D) internal motion throughout stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver using standard x-ray imagers of a conventional linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with implanted gold markers received 11 treatment courses of 3-fraction SBRT in a stereotactic body-frame on a conventional linear accelerator. Two pretreatment and 1 posttreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired during each fraction. The CBCT projection images were used to estimate the internal 3D marker motion during CBCT acquisition with 11-Hz resolution by a monoscopic probability-based method. Throughout the treatment delivery by conformal or volumetric modulated arc fields, simultaneous MV portal imaging (8 Hz) and orthogonal kV imaging (5 Hz) were applied to determine the 3D marker motion using either MV/kV triangulation or the monoscopic method when marker segmentation was unachievable in either MV or kV images. The accuracy of monoscopic motion estimation was quantified by also applying monoscopic estimation as a test for all treatments during which MV/kV triangulation was possible. Results: Root-mean-square deviations between monoscopic estimations and triangulations were less than 1.0 mm. The mean 3D intrafraction and intrafield motion ranges during liver SBRT were 17.6 mm (range, 5.6-39.5 mm) and 11.3 mm (2.1-35.5mm), respectively. The risk of large intrafraction baseline shifts correlated with intrafield respiratory motion range. The mean 3D intrafractional marker displacement relative to the first CBCT was 3.4 mm (range, 0.7-14.5 mm). The 3D displacements exceeded 8.8 mm 10% of the time. Conclusions: Highly detailed time-resolved internal 3D motion was determined throughout liver SBRT using standard imaging equipment. Considerable intrafraction motion was observed. The demonstrated methods provide a widely available approach for motion monitoring that, combined with motion

  13. Time Resolved Temperature Measurement of Hypervelocity Impact Generated Plasma Using a Global Optimization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hew, Y. M.; Linscott, I.; Close, S.

    2015-12-01

    Meteoroids and orbital debris, collectively referred to as hypervelocity impactors, travel between 7 and 72 km/s in free space. Upon their impact onto the spacecraft, the energy conversion from kinetic to ionization/vaporization occurs within a very brief timescale and results in a small and dense expanding plasma with a very strong optical flash. The radio frequency (RF) emission produced by this plasma can potentially lead to electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In addition, space weather, such as solar activity and background plasma, can establish spacecraft conditions which can exaggerate the damages done by these impacts. During the impact, a very strong impact flash will be generated. Through the studying of this emission spectrum of the impact, we hope to study the impact generated gas cloud/plasma properties. The impact flash emitted from a ground-based hypervelocity impact test is long expected by many scientists to contain the characteristics of the impact generated plasma, such as plasma temperature and density. This paper presents a method for the time-resolved plasma temperature estimation using three-color visible band photometry data with a global pattern search optimization method. The equilibrium temperature of the plasma can be estimated using an optical model which accounts for both the line emission and continuum emission from the plasma. Using a global pattern search based optimizer, the model can isolate the contribution of the continuum emission versus the line emission from the plasma. The plasma temperature can thus be estimated. Prior to the optimization step, a Gaussian process is also applied to extract the optical emission signal out of the noisy background. The resultant temperature and line-to-continuum emission weighting factor are consistent with the spectrum of the impactor material and current literature.

  14. Expected resolution and detectability of adenocarcinoma tumors within human breast in time-resolved images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Nossal, Ralph J.; Dadmarz, Roya; Schwartzentruber, Douglas; Bonner, Robert F.

    1995-04-01

    The prospects for time-resolved optical mammography rests on the ability to detect adenocarcinoma within the breast with sufficient resolution and specificity to compete with X-ray mammography. We characterized the optical properties of an unusually large (6 cm diameter) fresh adenocarcinoma and normal breast tissue (determined by histology to be predominantly adipose tissue) obtained from a patient undergoing mastectomy. Large specimens (5 mm thick and 3 cm wide) allowed the determination of absorption and scattering coefficients and their spatial heterogeneity as probed with a 1 mm diameter laser beam at 633 nm and 800 nm utilizing total reflectance and transmittance measure with integrating spheres. The difference between scattering coefficients of the malignant tumor and those of normal (principally adipose) breast tissue at 633 nm was much greater than the heterogeneity within each sample. This scattering difference is the principal source of contrast, particularly in time-resolved images. However, the high scattering coefficient of normal breast tissue at 633 nm limits the practicality of time-resolved mammography of a human breast compressed to 5 cm. Although the scattering coefficient of the normal breast tissue decreases at 800 nm, the differences between the optical properties of normal and abnormal breast tissue also are reduced. We used these empirical results in theoretical expressions obtained from random walk theory to quantify the expected resolution, contrast, and the detected intensity of 3, 6, and 9 mm tumors within otherwise homogeneous human breasts as a function of the gating-time of time-resolved optical mammography.

  15. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  16. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-05-06

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

  17. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence of fluorescein derivative for time-resolved and confocal fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoqing; Song, Fengling; Wang, Jingyun; Zhang, Yukang; Xue, Yingying; Sun, Liangliang; Jiang, Na; Gao, Pan; Tian, Lu; Peng, Xiaojun

    2014-07-01

    Compared with fluorescence imaging utilizing fluorophores whose lifetimes are in the order of nanoseconds, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy has more advantages in monitoring target fluorescence. In this work, compound DCF-MPYM, which is based on a fluorescein derivative, showed long-lived luminescence (22.11 μs in deaerated ethanol) and was used in time-resolved fluorescence imaging in living cells. Both nanosecond time-resolved transient difference absorption spectra and time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) were employed to explain the long lifetime of the compound, which is rare in pure organic fluorophores without rare earth metals and heavy atoms. A mechanism of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) that considers the long wavelength fluorescence, large Stokes shift, and long-lived triplet state of DCF-MPYM was proposed. The energy gap (ΔEST) of DCF-MPYM between the singlet and triplet state was determined to be 28.36 meV by the decay rate of DF as a function of temperature. The ΔE(ST) was small enough to allow efficient intersystem crossing (ISC) and reverse ISC, leading to efficient TADF at room temperature. The straightforward synthesis of DCF-MPYM and wide availability of its starting materials contribute to the excellent potential of the compound to replace luminescent lanthanide complexes in future time-resolved imaging technologies.

  18. Examination of laser microbeam cell lysis in a PDMS microfluidic channel using time-resolved imaging.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A; Lai, Hsuan-Hong; Yoon, Helen H; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2008-03-01

    We use time-resolved imaging to examine the lysis dynamics of non-adherent BAF-3 cells within a microfluidic channel produced by the delivery of single highly-focused 540 ps duration laser pulses at lambda = 532 nm. Time-resolved bright-field images reveal that the delivery of the pulsed laser microbeam results in the formation of a laser-induced plasma followed by shock wave emission and cavitation bubble formation. The confinement offered by the microfluidic channel constrains substantially the cavitation bubble expansion and results in significant deformation of the PDMS channel walls. To examine the cell lysis and dispersal of the cellular contents, we acquire time-resolved fluorescence images of the process in which the cells were loaded with a fluorescent dye. These fluorescence images reveal cell lysis to occur on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale by the plasma formation and cavitation bubble dynamics. Moreover, the time-resolved fluorescence images show that while the cellular contents are dispersed by the expansion of the laser-induced cavitation bubble, the flow associated with the bubble collapse subsequently re-localizes the cellular contents to a small region. This capacity of pulsed laser microbeam irradiation to achieve rapid cell lysis in microfluidic channels with minimal dilution of the cellular contents has important implications for their use in lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:18305858

  19. Time-resolved heat transfer and skin friction measurements in unsteady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, T. E.; Telionis, D. P.

    A review of heat transfer and skin friction measurement methods is presented with particular emphasis on techniques that yield details of time-resolved properties. A description of the calibration methods necessary to insure accurate measurements is included. Examples of recent unsteady heat transfer and skin friction measurements with interpretations of the meaning and importance of the results are given.

  20. Classification of aortic atherosclerotic lesions with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Marcu, Laura; Grundfest, Warren S.; Fishbein, Michael C.

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we examine the possibility of differentiating between classes of atherosclerotic lesions based on time- resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and we compare the performance of classification schemes that use either the time-resolved spectra or only the intensity spectra. Transient fluorescence emissions induced by pulsed nitrogen laser excitation was measured on 87 excised samples of human aorta. The samples were classified histologically using the AHA classification Predictor variables derived from the time-resolved spectra included the spectral intensities at 360-510 nm and parameters of a biexponential fit of the fluorescence impulse response function. Stepwise discriminant analysis using these predict variables showed that a few predictor variables sufficed to correctly classify 89 percent of the samples. Excluding the time- dependent decay and using only the spectral intensities, the percentage of correctly classified cases was significantly lower: 51 percent. These results establish that time- resolved fluorescence spectroscopy markedly improved on the performance of steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy for fine classification of atherosclerotic lesions.

  1. Latent fingerprint and trace explosives detection by photoluminescence and time-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouldin, Kimberly Kay

    Latent fingerprint detection by photoluminescence is a well-developed field. Many development techniques exist and are currently being employed in forensic laboratories to detect fingerprints by making them luminescent. However, in forensic science, time-resolved imaging techniques, designed to suppress background fluorescence that interferes with fingerprint detectability, are to date not used outside of the research laboratory, and the chemistry necessary to use time-resolved imaging for fingerprint detection is somewhat limited. For this reason, the first section of this dissertation deals with fingerprint detection methods that have direct application to time-resolved imaging techniques. Trace explosive detection field methods based on chemical reactions have until recently utilized only colorimetric products. To increase the sensitivity of such detection, a field explosive test kit which produces a product that is both colorimetric and luminescent is studied. Detection sensitivity can be gained by taking advantage of the luminescence of these products, something that has not been done to date. When the appropriate chemistry is chosen for explosive detection, time-resolved imaging techniques may again be applicable. This dissertation thus looks at possibilities of taking trace explosives detection to this next level.

  2. Femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging on ultrafast electronic dephasing in an isolated molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshinori; Wang, Li; Kohguchi, Hiroshi

    1999-09-01

    Ultrafast dephasing in an intermediate case of molecular radiationless transition has been visualized for the first time by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. The decay of photoexcited S1(n,π*) state of pyrazine in 100 ps and the corresponding build-up of triplet states were clearly observed.

  3. Dynamic structural science: recent developments in time-resolved spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Trincao, Jose; Hamilton, Michelle L; Christensen, Jeppe; Pearson, Arwen R

    2013-10-01

    To understand the mechanism of biological processes, time-resolved methodologies are required to investigate how functionality is linked to changes in molecular structure. A number of spectroscopic techniques are available that probe local structural rearrangements with high temporal resolution. However, for macromolecules, these techniques do not yield an overall high-resolution description of the structure. Time-resolved X-ray crystallographic methods exist, but, due to both instrument availability and stringent sample requirements, they have not been widely applied to macromolecular systems, especially for time resolutions below 1 s. Recently, there has been a resurgent interest in time-resolved structural science, fuelled by the recognition that both chemical and life scientists face many of the same challenges. In the present article, we review the current state-of-the-art in dynamic structural science, highlighting applications to enzymes. We also look to the future and discuss current method developments with the potential to widen access to time-resolved studies across discipline boundaries.

  4. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  5. Plastique: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Savoia, A.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-06-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and dynamics of molecules. We describe the beamline and some initial data.

  6. TIME-RESOLVED INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY IN THE U121R BEAMLINE AT THE NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    CARR,G.L.; LAVEIGNE,J.D.; LOBO,R.P.S.M.; REITZE,D.H.; TANNER,D.B.

    1999-07-19

    A facility for performing time-resolved infrared spectroscopy has been developed at the NSLS, primarily at beamline U12IR. The pulsed IR light from the synchrotron is used to perform pump-probe spectroscopy. The authors present here a description of the facility and results for the relaxation of photoexcitations in both a semiconductor and superconductor.

  7. The 3-dimensional cellular automata for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Youbin; Ren, Bin; Yang, Wencao; Shuai, Jianwei

    2014-04-01

    The HIV infection dynamics is discussed in detail with a 3-dimensional cellular automata model in this paper. The model can reproduce the three-phase development, i.e., the acute period, the asymptotic period and the AIDS period, observed in the HIV-infected patients in a clinic. We show that the 3D HIV model performs a better robustness on the model parameters than the 2D cellular automata. Furthermore, we reveal that the occurrence of a perpetual source to successively generate infectious waves to spread to the whole system drives the model from the asymptotic state to the AIDS state.

  8. Time-Resolved Absorption in Cryogenic and Room-Temperature, Direct-Drive Imploding Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seka, W.

    2007-11-01

    Time-resolved absorption has been measured in direct-drive-implosion experiments for various targets and pulse shapes using OMEGA's UV Laser System. These experiments reveal a number of interaction processes beyond inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. During the first 100 to 200 ps, evidence of enhanced absorption points toward resonance absorption. Depending on target material and pulse shapes, the absorption at times t > 0.7 ns is reduced compared to predictions by hydrodynamic simulations with flux-limited electron heat transport. This discrepancy may be partly due to uncertainties in the heat transport model. Scattered light spectra further indicate that beam-to-beam energy transfer with gain provided by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) may also contribute. Evidence for two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability is seen in almost all direct-drive-implosion experiments as evidenced by hard-x-ray and 3φ/2 emission. The TPD instability is driven particularly hard when the laser burns through the CD shell during the laser pulse in a cryogenic target implosion with the concomitant possibility of fast-electron preheat. This wealth of interaction processes will be discussed along with implications for future larger-scale experiments. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-92SF19460. Contributors: D.H. Edgell, V.N. Goncharov, I.V. Igumenshchev, J.A. Delettrez, J. Myatt, A.V. Maximov, R.W. Short, C. Stoeckl, and T.C. Sangster.

  9. Influence of steering magnetic field on the time-resolved plasma chemistry in cathodic arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. Eh; New, R.; Valter, J.

    2004-08-01

    External magnetic fields are used extensively to steer the cathode spot of arc discharges in order to improve target utilization and minimize droplet generation. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and electrostatic probe measurements in a Cr arc discharge were used to characterize the effect of the external magnetic field on the ion flux to the substrates and on the composition and time evolution of the plasma. A combination of a permanent magnet array and an electromagnetic coil was used to vary the shape and strength of the magnetic field on the cathode surface. Finite element modelling of the magnetic field distribution identified two types of geometry—through-field, with lines normal to the cathode surface, and arched-field, with lines forming a magnetic 'tunnel'. The magnetic flux densities measured with a Hall probe were in the range from -15 to +15 mT. The particular shape and strength of the magnetic field determined the specific confinement regions and diffusion pathways for the plasma. The total ion saturation current density at the substrate position was in the range between 2 and 11.5 mA cm-2 depending on the magnetic field shape. The magnetic field strongly influenced the relative optical emission from Cr0, Cr1+ and Cr2+ metal species, and the resulting charge state distribution. Time-resolved OES and probe measurements of a particular position on the arc cathode revealed that an Ar plasma is trapped near the cathode and is sustained even when the cathode spot is a significant distance from the observation volume. The importance of this 'residual' Ar plasma for the charge state distribution of metal ions is discussed.

  10. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow.

  11. 3-dimensional fabrication of soft energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas; Walters, Peter; Rossiter, Jonathan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Anderson, Iain

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEG) provide an opportunity to harvest energy from low frequency and aperiodic sources. Because DEG are soft, deformable, high energy density generators, they can be coupled to complex structures such as the human body to harvest excess mechanical energy. However, DEG are typically constrained by a rigid frame and manufactured in a simple planar structure. This planar arrangement is unlikely to be optimal for harvesting from compliant and/or complex structures. In this paper we present a soft generator which is fabricated into a 3 Dimensional geometry. This capability will enable the 3-dimensional structure of a dielectric elastomer to be customised to the energy source, allowing efficient and/or non-invasive coupling. This paper demonstrates our first 3 dimensional generator which includes a diaphragm with a soft elastomer frame. When the generator was connected to a self-priming circuit and cyclically inflated, energy was accumulated in the system, demonstrated by an increased voltage. Our 3D generator promises a bright future for dielectric elastomers that will be customised for integration with complex and soft structures. In addition to customisable geometries, the 3D printing process may lend itself to fabricating large arrays of small generator units and for fabricating truly soft generators with excellent impedance matching to biological tissue. Thus comfortable, wearable energy harvesters are one step closer to reality.

  12. Biochemical Applications Of 3-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, Marc J.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigated the 3-dimensional fluorescence of complex mixtures of bioloquids such as human serum, serum ultrafiltrate, human urine, and human plasma low density lipoproteins. The total fluorescence of human serum can be divided into a few peaks. When comparing fluorescence topograms of sera, from normal and cancerous subjects, we found significant differences in tryptophan fluorescence. Although the total fluorescence of human urine can be resolved into 3-5 distinct peaks, some of them. do not result from single fluorescent urinary metabolites, but rather from. several species having similar spectral properties. Human plasma, low density lipoproteins possess a native fluorescence that changes when submitted to in-vitro autoxidation. The 3-dimensional fluorescence demonstrated the presence of 7 fluorophores in the lipid domain, and 6 fluorophores in the protein. dovain- The above results demonstrated that 3-dimensional fluorescence can resolve the spectral properties of complex ,lxtures much better than other methods. Moreover, other parameters than excitation and emission wavelength and intensity (for instance fluorescence lifetime, polarization, or quenchability) may be exploited to give a multidl,ensio,a1 matrix, that is unique for each sample. Consequently, 3-dimensio:Hhal fluorescence as such, or in combination with separation techniques is therefore considered to have the potential of becoming a useful new H.ethod in clinical chemistry and analytical biochemistry.

  13. Rate constant of exciton quenching of Ir(ppy)3 with hole measured by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Shiho; Sakai, Heisuke; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    We observed the quenching of tris(2-phenylpyridinato)iridium(III) [Ir(ppy)3] excitons by polarons (holes or electrons) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to clarify the dynamics of the triplet-polaron quenching of excitons. We employed a hole-only device (HOD) and an electron-only device (EOD), where the emitting layer consists of Ir(ppy)3 doped in 4,4‧-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl. Time-resolved PL spectroscopy of the EOD and HOD were measured under a constant current density. The results showed that the excitons of Ir(ppy)3 were significantly quenched only by holes. The PL decay curves of HOD were well fitted by the biexponential function, where lifetimes (τ1 and τ2) remain unchanged but the coefficient of each exponential term depends on hole current density. From the results, we proposed a model of exciton quenching where the exciton-hole quenching area expands with increasing hole current density. On the basis of the model, the triplet-polaron quenching rate constant Kq was determined.

  14. Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of Vortical Structures in the Upper Human Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    e, Sebastian Groß; Schröder, Wolfgang; Klaas, Michael

    A detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional flow structures in the human lung is an inevitable prerequisite to optimize respiratory-assist devices. To achieve this goal the indepth analysis of the flow field that evolves during normal breathing conditions is indispensable. This study focuses on the experimental investigation of the steady and oscillatory flow in the first lung bifurcation of a three-dimensional realistic transparent silicone lung model. The particle image velocimetry technique was used for the measurements. To match the refractive index of the model, the fluid was a mixture of water and glycerine. The flow structures occurring in the first bifurcation during steady inflow have been studied in detail at different flow rates and Reynolds numbers ranging from ReD = 1250 to ReD = 1700 based on the hydraulic diameter D of the trachea. The results evidence a highly three-dimensional and asymmetric character of the velocity field in the upper human airways, in which the influence of the asymmetric geometry of the realistic lung model plays a significant role for the development of the flow field in the respiratory system. The inspiration flow shows large zones with secondary vortical flow structures with reduced streamwise velocity near the outer walls of the bifurcation and regions of high-speed fluid in the vicinity of the inner side walls of the bifurcation. Depending on the local geometry of the lung these zones extend to the next generation of the airway system, resulting in a strong impact on the flow-rate distribution in the different branches of the lung. During expiration small zones of reduced streamwise velocity can be observed mainly in the trachea and the flow profile is characterized by typical jet-like structures and an M-shaped velocity profile. To investigate the temporal evolution of the flow phenomena in the first lung bifurcation time-resolved recordings were performed for Womersley numbers α ranging from 3.3 to 5.8 and Reynolds

  15. Monitoring the folding kinetics of a β-hairpin by time-resolved IR spectroscopy in silico.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Thukral, Lipi; Smith, Jeremy C; Amadei, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern biochemistry. Time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the amide I region is commonly used to monitor folding kinetics. However, associated atomic detail information on the folding mechanism requires simulations. In atomistic simulations structural order parameters are typically used to follow the folding process along the simulated trajectories. However, a rigorous test of the reliability of the mechanisms found in the simulations requires calculation of the time-dependent experimental observable, i.e., in the present case the IR signal in the amide I region. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulation with a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics theoretical methodology, the Perturbed Matrix Method, in order to characterize the folding of a β-hairpin peptide, through modeling the time-dependence of the amide I IR signal. The kinetic and thermodynamic data (folding and unfolding rate constants, and equilibrium folded- and unfolded-state probabilities) obtained from the fit of the calculated signal are in good agreement with the available experimental data [Xu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 15388-15394]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the simulation of the time-resolved IR signal of a complex process occurring on a long (microsecond) time scale.

  16. Relation of exact Gaussian basis methods to the dephasing representation: Theory and application to time-resolved electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Miroslav; Hernández, Henar; Martínez, Todd J.; Vaníček, Jiří

    2013-07-01

    We recently showed that the dephasing representation (DR) provides an efficient tool for computing ultrafast electronic spectra and that further acceleration is possible with cellularization [M. Šulc and J. Vaníček, Mol. Phys. 110, 945 (2012)], 10.1080/00268976.2012.668971. Here, we focus on increasing the accuracy of this approximation by first implementing an exact Gaussian basis method, which benefits from the accuracy of quantum dynamics and efficiency of classical dynamics. Starting from this exact method, the DR is derived together with ten other methods for computing time-resolved spectra with intermediate accuracy and efficiency. These methods include the Gaussian DR, an exact generalization of the DR, in which trajectories are replaced by communicating frozen Gaussian basis functions evolving classically with an average Hamiltonian. The newly obtained methods are tested numerically on time correlation functions and time-resolved stimulated emission spectra in the harmonic potential, pyrazine S0/S1 model, and quartic oscillator. Numerical results confirm that both the Gaussian basis method and the Gaussian DR increase the accuracy of the DR. Surprisingly, in chaotic systems the Gaussian DR can outperform the presumably more accurate Gaussian basis method, in which the two bases are evolved separately.

  17. Temperature measurements in reacting flows by time-resolved femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Kinnius, Paul J.; Lucht, Robert P.; Gord, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectroscopy of the nitrogen molecule is used for the measurement of temperature in atmospheric-pressure, near-adiabatic, hydrogen-air diffusion flames. The initial frequency-spread dephasing rate of the Raman coherence induced by the ultrafast (∼85 fs) Stokes and pump beams is used as a measure of gas-phase temperature. This initial frequency-spread dephasing rate of the Raman coherence is completely independent of collisions and depends only on the frequency spread of the Raman transitions at different temperatures. A simple theoretical model based on the assumption of impulsive excitation of Raman coherence is used to extract temperatures from time-resolved fs-CARS experimental signals. The extracted temperatures from fs-CARS signals are in excellent agreement with the theoretical temperatures calculated from an adiabatic equilibrium calculation. The estimated absolute accuracy and the precision of the measurement technique are found to be ±40 K and ±50 K, respectively, over the temperature range 1500-2500 K.

  18. Measurement of time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in photosynthetic systems by nitroxide-based EPR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, K; Walczak, T; Sarna, T; Swartz, H M

    1990-09-01

    The application of recent developments of EPR oximetry to photosynthetic systems is described and used to study rapid processes in isolated thylakoid membranes from spinach and in intact photoautotrophic soybean cells. Using the peak heights of 15N perdeuterated Tempone and two microwave power levels oxygen evolution and consumption were measured. The method measured time-resolved oxygen concentration changes in the micromolar range. Oxygen evolution was linearly proportionate to the chlorophyl concentration of thylakoid membrane over the range studied (0-2 mg/ml). Oxygen evolution associated with single turnover light pulses was consistent with the four state model. The time (t1/2) to reach equilibrium of oxygen concentrations after a single turnover pulse was 0.4-0.5 ms, indicating that the evolution of oxygen coupled to the S4-S0 transition may be shorter than reported previously. The time for equilibrium of oxygen after single turnover pulses in soybean cells was relatively long (400 ms), which suggests that there are significant barriers to the free diffusion of oxygen in this system. The method also was used to study oxygen consumption by the electron transport chain of photosystem I and photosystem II. We conclude that EPR oximetry can provide quantitative and time-resolved data on oxygen concentrations with a sensitivity that is useful for studies of such systems. PMID:2168161

  19. In-SITU, Time-resolved Raman Spectro-micro-topography of an Operating Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Yu; Cai, Wen-Bin; Xing, Xue-Kun; Scherson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    A Raman microscope has been coupled to a computer-controlled, two-dimensional linear translator attached to a custom-designed, sealed optical chamber to allow in situ acquisition of space-, and time-resolved spectra of an operating thin graphite/LiCoO2 Li-ion battery. This unique arrangement made it possible to collect continuously series of Raman spectra from a sharply defined edge of the battery exposing the anode (A), separator (S), and cathode (C), during charge and discharge, while the device was moved back and forth under the fixed focused laser beam along an axis normal to the layered A/S/C plane. Clear spectral evidence was obtained for changes in the amount of Li(+) within particles of graphite in the anode, and, to a lesser extent, of LiCoO2 in the cathode, during battery discharge both as a function of position and time. Analysis of time-resolved Raman spectro-micro-topography (SMT) measurements of the type described in this work are expected to open new prospects for assessing the validity of theoretical models aimed at simulating the flow of Li(+) within Li-ion batteries under operating conditions.

  20. Monitoring the folding kinetics of a β-hairpin by time-resolved IR spectroscopy in silico.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Thukral, Lipi; Smith, Jeremy C; Amadei, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern biochemistry. Time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the amide I region is commonly used to monitor folding kinetics. However, associated atomic detail information on the folding mechanism requires simulations. In atomistic simulations structural order parameters are typically used to follow the folding process along the simulated trajectories. However, a rigorous test of the reliability of the mechanisms found in the simulations requires calculation of the time-dependent experimental observable, i.e., in the present case the IR signal in the amide I region. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulation with a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics theoretical methodology, the Perturbed Matrix Method, in order to characterize the folding of a β-hairpin peptide, through modeling the time-dependence of the amide I IR signal. The kinetic and thermodynamic data (folding and unfolding rate constants, and equilibrium folded- and unfolded-state probabilities) obtained from the fit of the calculated signal are in good agreement with the available experimental data [Xu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 15388-15394]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the simulation of the time-resolved IR signal of a complex process occurring on a long (microsecond) time scale. PMID:25777154

  1. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-15

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  2. Phosphorescent nanoparticles and their applications for time-resolved luminescent biological assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuedong; Huang, Lei; Knotts, Mike; Wu, Bin

    2009-02-01

    A new class of phosphorescent nanoparticles has been developed that use halogen-containing polymers and copolymers to encapsulate phosphorescent molecules. Their strong phosphorescence of long lifetime and large Stoke shift are not subject to oxygen quenching under ambient conditions due to the low oxygen permeability of the encapsulation matrix. The cross-linked phosphorescent particles are very stable and easily re-suspendable in aqueous media with surface functional groups to allow covalent tagging of biological recognition molecules such as antibodies. The conjugates can be used to provide very sensitive detection of analytes through time-resolved phosphorescence measurements. In addition to their applications for solution-based biological assays, those particles have also been demonstrated to be very useful for dry-chemistry-based time-resolved luminescent lateral flow assays.

  3. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Rudge, J; Xu, H; Kolthammer, J; Hong, Y K; Choi, B C

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new magnetic microscope, time-resolved near-field scanning magneto-optical microscope, which combines a near-field scanning optical microscope and magneto-optical contrast. By taking advantage of the high temporal resolution of time-resolved Kerr microscope and the sub-wavelength spatial resolution of a near-field microscope, we achieved a temporal resolution of ∼50 ps and a spatial resolution of <100 nm. In order to demonstrate the spatiotemporal magnetic imaging capability of this microscope, the magnetic field pulse induced gyrotropic vortex dynamics occurring in 1 μm diameter, 20 nm thick CoFeB circular disks has been investigated. The microscope provides sub-wavelength resolution magnetic images of the gyrotropic motion of the vortex core at a resonance frequency of ∼240 MHz. PMID:25725848

  4. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  5. Estimating wide-angle, spatially varying reflectance using time-resolved inversion of backscattered light.

    PubMed

    Naik, Nikhil; Barsi, Christopher; Velten, Andreas; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-05-01

    Imaging through complex media is a well-known challenge, as scattering distorts a signal and invalidates imaging equations. For coherent imaging, the input field can be reconstructed using phase conjugation or knowledge of the complex transmission matrix. However, for incoherent light, wave interference methods are limited to small viewing angles. On the other hand, time-resolved methods do not rely on signal or object phase correlations, making them suitable for reconstructing wide-angle, larger-scale objects. Previously, a time-resolved technique was demonstrated for uniformly reflecting objects. Here, we generalize the technique to reconstruct the spatially varying reflectance of shapes hidden by angle-dependent diffuse layers. The technique is a noninvasive method of imaging three-dimensional objects without relying on coherence. For a given diffuser, ultrafast measurements are used in a convex optimization program to reconstruct a wide-angle, three-dimensional reflectance function. The method has potential use for biological imaging and material characterization.

  6. Locating and classifying fluorescent tags behind turbid layers using time-resolved inversion.

    PubMed

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Barsi, Christopher; Raviv, Dan; Chen, Ou; Bawendi, Moungi G; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-04-13

    The use of fluorescent probes and the recovery of their lifetimes allow for significant advances in many imaging systems, in particular, medical imaging systems. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate reconstructing the locations and lifetimes of fluorescent markers hidden behind a turbid layer. This opens the door to various applications for non-invasive diagnosis, analysis, flowmetry and inspection. The method is based on a time-resolved measurement that captures information about both fluorescence lifetime and spatial position of the probes. To reconstruct the scene, the method relies on a sparse optimization framework to invert time-resolved measurements. This wide-angle technique does not rely on coherence, and does not require the probes to be directly in line of sight of the camera, making it potentially suitable for long-range imaging.

  7. Fourier-transform spectrophotometer for time-resolved emission measurements using a 100-point transient digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preses, Jack M.; Hall, Gregory E.; Muckerman, James T.; Sears, Trevor J.; Weston, Ralph E., Jr.; Guyot, Christian; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Flynn, George W.; Bernstein, Herbert J.

    1993-01-01

    An infrared time-resolved Fourier-transform emission spectrophotometer was constructed and its use demonstrated. The instrument is based on a commercial interferometer combined with a data acquisition system. Operation in a smooth scan mode and the use of a transient digitizer provides good time efficiency for data acquisition and reduces the need to maintain constant energy pulses for long periods of time. An entire 100-point time history of a single point of an interferogram is obtained from a single laser pulse and usable data can be obtained from 10 to 50 mirror scans. The experimental apparatus, data acquisition program, and data evaluation are reviewed. Time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy is an efficient method of determining the dynamics of molecular reactions and relaxation.

  8. Towards Measurement of the Time-resolved Heat Release of Protein Conformation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchalla, Jason; Adamek, Daniel; Austin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We present a way to observe time-resolved heat release using a laminar flow diffusional mixer coupled with a highly sensitive infrared camera which measures the temperature change of the solvent. There are significant benefits to the use of laminar flow mixers for time-resolved calorimetry: (1) The thermal signal can be made position and time- stationary to allow for signal integration; (2) Extremely small volumes (nl/s) of sample are required for a measurement; (3) The same mixing environment can be observed spectroscopically to obtain state occupation information; (4) The mixer allows one to do out of equilibrium dynamic studies. The hope is that these measurements will allow us probe the non-equilibrium thermodynamics as a protein moves along a free energy trajectory from one state to another.

  9. Alteration of time-resolved autofluorescence properties of rat aorta, induced by diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherek, M.; Uličná, O.; Vančová, O.; Muchová, J.; Ďuračková, Z.; Šikurová, L.; Chorvát, D.

    2016-10-01

    Changes in autofluorescence properties of isolated rat aorta, induced by diabetes mellitus, were detected using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation. We demonstrated that time-resolved spectroscopy was able to detect changes in aorta tissues related to diabetes and unambiguously discriminate diabetic (τ 1 0.63  ±  0.05 ns, τ 2 3.66  ±  0.10 ns) samples from the control (τ 1 0.76  ±  0.03 ns, τ 2 4.48  ±  0.15 ns) group. We also report changes in the ratio of relative amplitudes of the two lifetime component in aorta tissue during diabetes, most likely related to the pseudohypoxic state with altered NADH homeostasis.

  10. Time-resolved backscattering of circularly and linearly polarized light in a turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaohui; Alfano, R R

    2004-12-01

    Time-resolved backscattering profiles of circularly and linearly polarized light were measured from a turbid medium composed of small and large polystyrene sphere particles in water. It is shown that, based on the measurements of the time-resolved backscattered copolarized and cross-polarized components of the incident polarized light, either linearly or circularly polarized light can be used to effectively image an object that is deep inside a turbid medium composed of small particles, depending on the depolarization properties of the object itself. For large particles such as in tissue, fog, and clouds, the experimentally observed polarization memory effect on the backscattering temporal profiles suggests that a significant improvement in the image contrast can be achieved by use of circularly polarized light.

  11. Time-Resolved High-Spatial-Resolution Measurements of Underwater Laser Ionization and Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Kaganovich, D.; Helle, M. H.; Penano, J.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D.

    2013-10-01

    Laser triggering and guiding of underwater electrical discharges are being investigated and developed at NRL for applications including advanced micromachining and low-frequency laser acoustic generation. As part of this development we recently made several high-spatial-resolution, time-resolved measurements of underwater optical filamentation and laser ionization. Using 2-laser pump-probe backlit imaging techniques, we were able to achieve time resolution as short as 35 fs and spatial resolution down to 1 micron. Shadowgraph images show few-micron diameter gas bubbles forming throughout the pump beam path in ps timescales. Microbubble numbers and density increased with pulse energy and time during the pump pulse. We also obtained time-resolved spectra of ns-laser-ionized water, revealing black-body radiation lasting more than 100 ns after the ionizing pulse. Results from ongoing underwater laser ionization, filamentation, and discharge-guiding experiments will be presented. This work is supported by NRL Base Funds.

  12. A fluorescence LIDAR sensor for hyper-spectral time-resolved remote sensing and mapping.

    PubMed

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Alderighi, Daniele; Cecchi, Giovanna; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Lognoli, David

    2013-06-17

    In this work we present a LIDAR sensor devised for the acquisition of time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra. The gating time for the acquisition of the fluorescence spectra can be sequentially delayed in order to achieve fluorescence data that are resolved both in the spectral and temporal domains. The sensor can provide sub-nanometric spectral resolution and nanosecond time resolution. The sensor has also imaging capabilities by means of a computer-controlled motorized steering mirror featuring a biaxial angular scanning with 200 μradiant angular resolution. The measurement can be repeated for each point of a geometric grid in order to collect a hyper-spectral time-resolved map of an extended target.

  13. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme.

  14. Time-resolved X-ray scattering program at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodricks, B.

    1994-08-01

    The Time-Resolved Scattering Program`s goal is the development of instruments and techniques for time-resolved studies. This entails the development of wide bandpass and focusing optics, high-speed detectors, mechanical choppers, and components for the measurement and creation of changes in samples. Techniques being developed are pump-probe experiments, single-bunch scattering experiments, high-speed white and pink beam Laue scattering, and nanosecond to microsecond synchronization of instruments. This program will be carried out primarily from a white-beam, bend-magnet source, experimental station, 1-BM-B, that immediately follows the first optics enclosure (1-BM-A). This paper will describe the experimental station and instruments under development to carry out the program.

  15. Isotope identification capabilities using time resolved prompt gamma emission from epithermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Arcidiacono, L.; Pappalardo, A.; Minniti, T.; Cazzaniga, C.; Scherillo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a concept of integrated measurements for isotope identification which takes advantage of the time structure of spallation neutron sources for time resolved γ spectroscopy. Time resolved Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (T-PGAA) consists in the measurement of gamma energy spectrum induced by the radioactive capture as a function of incident neutron Time Of Flight (TOF), directly related with the energy of incident neutrons. The potential of the proposed concept was explored on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (U.K.). Through this new technique we show an increase in the sensitivity to specific elements of archaeometric relevance, through incident neutron energy selection in prompt γ spectra for multicomponent samples. Results on a standard bronze sample are presented.

  16. Time-resolved wave profile measurements in copper to Megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L C; Asay, J R

    1981-01-01

    Many time-resolved techniques have been developed which have greatly aided in the understanding of dynamic material behavior such as the high pressure-dynamic strength of materials. In the paper, time-resolved measurements of copper (at shock-induced high pressures and temperatures) are used to illustrate the capability of using such techniques to investigate high pressure strength. Continuous shock loading and release wave profiles have been made in copper to 93 GPa using velocity interferometric techniques. Fine structure in the release wave profiles from the shocked state indicates an increase in shear strength of copper to 1.5 GPa at 93 GPa from its ambient value of 0.08 GPa.

  17. Time-resolved optical studies and Doppler imaging of the eclipsing dwarf nova V893 Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Mennickent, R. E.; Kato, T.

    2000-11-01

    We present time-resolved optical spectroscopic and photometric observations of the re-discovered dwarf nova V893 Sco. The orbital period of 0fd07610 (3) derived from the radial velocity and equivalent width variations of the Hα emission line is confirmed. The photometric light curves clearly show the eclipse of the accretion disk. A mass of the white dwarf ~ 0.5-0.6 Msun is derived from the orbital amplitude K1 = 86 +/- 11 km s-1 and the eclipse constraint. The mass ratio is likely small enough to make V893 Sco an SU UMa-type dwarf nova, though this object has shown only normal outbursts in its light curve. Time-resolved Doppler maps for the emission lines show two isolated Hα emission regions, which are associated with a strong hot spot and the irradiated secondary star. Based on observations obtained at ESO La Silla Observatory (ESO Proposal 61.D-0395)

  18. A fluorescence LIDAR sensor for hyper-spectral time-resolved remote sensing and mapping.

    PubMed

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Alderighi, Daniele; Cecchi, Giovanna; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Lognoli, David

    2013-06-17

    In this work we present a LIDAR sensor devised for the acquisition of time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra. The gating time for the acquisition of the fluorescence spectra can be sequentially delayed in order to achieve fluorescence data that are resolved both in the spectral and temporal domains. The sensor can provide sub-nanometric spectral resolution and nanosecond time resolution. The sensor has also imaging capabilities by means of a computer-controlled motorized steering mirror featuring a biaxial angular scanning with 200 μradiant angular resolution. The measurement can be repeated for each point of a geometric grid in order to collect a hyper-spectral time-resolved map of an extended target. PMID:23787661

  19. Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Doak, R. Bruce; Kirian, Richard A.; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Andreasson, Jakob; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bottin, Hervé; Bozek, John D.; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; DePonte, Daniel P.; Elser, Veit; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Graafsma, Heinz; Grotjohann, Ingo; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M.; Hömke, André; Johansson, Linda; Kimmel, Nils; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Neutze, Richard; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Williams, Garth J.; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. PMID:22330507

  20. Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Doak, R Bruce; Kirian, Richard A; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A; Andreasson, Jakob; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R M; Barthelmess, Miriam; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Bottin, Hervé; Bozek, John D; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; DePonte, Daniel P; Elser, Veit; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Graafsma, Heinz; Grotjohann, Ingo; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M; Hömke, André; Johansson, Linda; Kimmel, Nils; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V; Maia, Filipe R N C; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Neutze, Richard; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Schmidt, Kevin E; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Williams, Garth J; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems.

  1. Time-resolved imaging using x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, Anton

    2010-10-01

    The ultra-intense, ultra-short x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources are ideally suited to time-resolved studies of structural dynamics with spatial resolution from nanometre to atomic length scales and a temporal resolution of 10 fs or less. With enough photons in a single pulse to enable single-shot measurements and short enough pulses to freeze atomic motion, researchers now have a new window into the time evolution ultrafast phenomena that are intrinsically not cyclic in nature. In this paper we recap some of the key time-resolved imaging experiments performed at FLASH and look ahead to a new generation of experiments at higher resolution using a new generation of new XFEL sources that are only just becoming available.

  2. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence study on dyes used in DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kaisyang; Force, R.K. )

    1993-01-01

    Research on the time-resolved fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate, NBD, tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate, and Texas Red - the dyes used for fluorescence-based DNA sequencing - is described. Mean fluorescence lifetiems in both aqueous buffer solution and 5.3%T, 4.8%C polyacrylamide gel were determined as a function of excitation wave-lengths at 337, 470, and 550 nm and were found to be 3.5, 1.1, 2.5, and 4.3 ns; the detection limits are 10, 200, 200 and 200 amol for FITC, NBD, TEMR, and T. Red, respectively. Comparisons of fluorescence parameters between the conjugated dyes and the free dyes are also reported. Results on the optimization of the excitation source wavelengths to improve sensitivity and reduce background scattering in polyacrylamide gel are also reported. Time-resolved fluorescence was successfully applied to resolve spectral overlapping of emissions in both solution and in polyacrylamide gel. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Doak, R Bruce; Kirian, Richard A; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A; Andreasson, Jakob; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R M; Barthelmess, Miriam; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Bottin, Hervé; Bozek, John D; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; DePonte, Daniel P; Elser, Veit; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Graafsma, Heinz; Grotjohann, Ingo; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M; Hömke, André; Johansson, Linda; Kimmel, Nils; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V; Maia, Filipe R N C; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Neutze, Richard; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Schmidt, Kevin E; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Williams, Garth J; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. PMID:22330507

  4. Time-resolved spectroscopy in ZnWO4 and ZnWO4 : Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorjeva, L.; Pankratov, V.; Millers, D.; Chernov, S.; Nagirnyi, V.; Kotlov, A.; Watterich, A.

    2003-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence and absorption of ZnWO4 and ZnWO4:Fe have been studied. The fast decaying luminescence at similar to 1.7 eV is attributed to either Fe2+ or a Fe3+ related center. The two observed stages in luminescence decay kinetics under ionising radiation are suggested to be due to two types of self-trapped excitons.

  5. A Flow-Through Reaction Cell that Couples Time - Resolved Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    A Wall; P Heaney; R Mathur; J Post; J Hanson; P Eng

    2011-12-31

    A non-metallic flow-through reaction cell is described, designed for in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction coupled with stable isotope analysis. The experimental setup allows the correlation of Cu isotope fractionation with changes in crystal structure during copper sulfide dissolution. This flow-through cell can be applied to many classes of fluid-mineral reactions that involve dissolution or ion exchange.

  6. Properties of Liquid Silicon Observed by Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. L.; Heimann, P. A.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Jeschke, H. O.; Garcia, M. E.; Chang, Z.; Lee, R. W.; Rehr, J. J.; Falcone, R. W.

    2003-10-01

    Time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy at the Si L edges is used to probe the electronic structure of an amorphous Si foil as it melts following absorption of an ultrafast laser pulse. Picosecond temporal resolution allows observation of the transient liquid phase before vaporization and before the liquid breaks up into droplets. The melting causes changes in the spectrum that match predictions of molecular dynamics and ab initio x-ray absorption codes.

  7. Communication: Broadband and ultrasensitive femtosecond time-resolved circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kotaro; Nagata, Takashi

    2015-09-28

    We report the development of broadband and sensitive time-resolved circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy by exploiting optical heterodyne detection. Using this method, transient CD signals of submillidegree level can be detected over the spectral range of 415-730 nm. We also demonstrate that the broadband measurement with the aid of singular value decomposition enables the discrimination of genuine TRCD signals from artificial optical-anisotropy, such as linear birefringence and linear dichroism, induced by photoexcitation. PMID:26428989

  8. Time-resolved photoresponse of nanometer-thick Nb/NiCu bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlato, L.; Pepe, G. P.; Latempa, R.; De Lisio, C.; Altucci, C.; D'Acunto, P.; Peluso, G.; Barone, A.; Taneda, T.; Sobolewski, R.

    2005-07-01

    We present femtosecond optical time-resolved pump-probe investigations of superconducting hybrids structures consisting of Nb/NiCu bilayers with various thickness. Measurements performed on pure Nb and NiCu films are also given. The photoresponse experiments provide the quasiparticle relaxation times in bilayers of different thickness ratios. The study of the photoresponse as a function of the temperature reveals the spatial evolution of the superconductor order parameter across the bilayers.

  9. Visualizing a protein quake with time resolved X-ray scattering at a free electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Barty, Anton; Williams, Garth J.; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Milathianaki, Despina; DePonte, Daniel P.; Shoeman, Robert L.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Katona, Gergely; Westenhoff, Sebastian; White, Thomas A.; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Berntsen, Peter; Bogan, Mike; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Doak, R. Bruce; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Henning, Robert; Hunter, Mark S.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kosheleva, Irina; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Stellato, Francesco; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Schlichting, Ilme; Boutet, Sébastien; Groenhof, Gerrit; Chapman, Henry N.; Neutze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A ‘protein quake’ describes the hypothesis that proteins rapidly dissipate energy through quake like structural motions. Here we measure ultrafast structural changes in the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center following multi-photon excitation using time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free electron laser. A global conformational change arises within picoseconds, which precedes the propagation of heat through the protein. This motion is damped within a hundred picoseconds. PMID:25108686

  10. Time-resolved dosimetry using a pinpoint ionization chamber as quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Louwe, Robert J. W. Satherley, Thomas; Day, Rebecca A.; Greig, Lynne; Wendling, Markus; Monshouwer, René

    2015-04-15

    study showed that time-resolved dosimetry using an ionization chamber is feasible and can be largely automated which limits the required additional time compared to integrated dose measurements. It provides a unique QA method which enables identification and quantification of the contribution of various error sources during IMRT and VMAT delivery.

  11. Time-Resolved Optical Measurements of Fuel-Air Mixedness in Windowless High Speed Research Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    1998-01-01

    Fuel distribution measurements in gas turbine combustors are needed from both pollution and fuel-efficiency standpoints. In addition to providing valuable data for performance testing and engine development, measurements of fuel distributions uniquely complement predictive numerical simulations. Although equally important as spatial distribution, the temporal distribution of the fuel is an often overlooked aspect of combustor design and development. This is due partly to the difficulties in applying time-resolved diagnostic techniques to the high-pressure, high-temperature environments inside gas turbine engines. Time-resolved measurements of the fuel-to-air ratio (F/A) can give researchers critical insights into combustor dynamics and acoustics. Beginning in early 1998, a windowless technique that uses fiber-optic, line-of-sight, infrared laser light absorption to measure the time-resolved fluctuations of the F/A (refs. 1 and 2) will be used within the premixer section of a lean-premixed, prevaporized (LPP) combustor in NASA Lewis Research Center's CE-5 facility. The fiber-optic F/A sensor will permit optical access while eliminating the need for film-cooled windows, which perturb the flow. More importantly, the real-time data from the fiber-optic F/A sensor will provide unique information for the active feedback control of combustor dynamics. This will be a prototype for an airborne sensor control system.

  12. The analysis of time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy based on positive matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Zhu; Li, Bo; Shi, Guolong; Li, Minqiang; Yu, Daoyang; Liu, Jinhuai

    2013-08-01

    Time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy (OWAS) makes use of an evanescent field to detect the polarized absorption spectra of sub-monomolecular adlayers. This technique is suitable for the investigation of kinetics at the solid/liquid interface of dyes, pigments, fluorescent molecules, quantum dots, metallic nanoparticles, and proteins with chromophores. In this work, we demonstrate the application of positive matrix factorization (PMF) to analyze time-resolved OWAS for the first time. Meanwhile, PCA is researched to compare with PMF. The absorption/desorption kinetics of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic process of Meisenheimer complex between Cysteine and TNT are selected as samples to verify experimental system and analytical methods. The results are shown that time-resolved OWAS can well record the absorption/desorption of R6G onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic formation process of Meisenheimer complexes. The feature of OWAS extracted by PMF is dynamic and consistent with the results analyzed by the traditional function of time/wavelength-absorbance. Moreover, PMF prevents the negative factors from occurring, avoids contradicting physical reality, and makes factors more easily interpretable. Therefore, we believe that PMF will provide a valuable analysis route to allow processing of increasingly large and complex data sets.

  13. Fast single photon avalanche photodiode-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography scanner

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Resolution in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a persistent problem and is primarily limited by high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. We showed previously that the reduction in photon scatter between a source and detector pair at early time points following a laser pulse in time-resolved DOT is highly dependent on the temporal response of the instrument. To this end, we developed a new single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) based time-resolved DOT scanner. This instrument uses an array of fast SPADs, a femto-second Titanium Sapphire laser and single photon counting electronics. In combination, the overall instrument temporal impulse response function width was 59 ps. In this paper, we report the design of this instrument and validate its operation in symmetrical and irregularly shaped optical phantoms of approximately small animal size. We were able to accurately reconstruct the size and position of up to 4 absorbing inclusions, with increasing image quality at earlier time windows. We attribute these results primarily to the rapid response time of our instrument. These data illustrate the potential utility of fast SPAD detectors in time-resolved DOT. PMID:26417526

  14. Kerr-gated time-resolved Raman spectroscopy of equine cortical bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael D; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Goodship, Allen E; Draper, Edward R C

    2005-01-01

    Picosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy in equine cortical bone tissue is demonstrated. Using 400-nm pulsed laser excitation (1 ps at 1 kHz) it is shown that Kerr cell gating with a 4-ps window provides simultaneously time-resolved rejection of fluorescence and time-resolved Raman scatter enabling depth profiling through tissue. The Raman shifts are the same as those observed by conventional cw Raman spectroscopy using deep-red or near-infrared lasers. The time decay of Raman photons is shown to fit an inverse square root of time function, suggesting propagation by a diffusive mechanism. Using polystyrene behind a bone specimen, it is shown that the 400-nm laser light penetrates at least 0.31 mm below the surface of a fully mineralized bone tissue specimen and generates observable bone Raman scatter (approximately 415 to 430 nm) through most of this depth. These novel results demonstrate great promise for in vivo applications for studying diseased bone tissue, and ways to optimize the setup are discussed.

  15. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  16. Time-resolved optical spectroscopic quantification of red blood cell damage caused by cardiovascular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, D.; Sakamoto, R.; Sobajima, H.; Yokoyama, N.; Yokoyama, Y.; Waguri, S.; Ohuchi, K.; Takatani, S.

    2008-02-01

    Cardiovascular devices such as heart-lung machine generate un-physiological level of shear stress to damage red blood cells, leading to hemolysis. The diagnostic techniques of cell damages, however, have not yet been established. In this study, the time-resolved optical spectroscopy was applied to quantify red blood cell (RBC) damages caused by the extracorporeal circulation system. Experimentally, the fresh porcine blood was subjected to varying degrees of shear stress in the rotary blood pump, followed with measurement of the time-resolved transmission characteristics using the pico-second pulses at 651 nm. The propagated optical energy through the blood specimen was detected using a streak camera. The data were analyzed in terms of the mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) measured separately versus the energy and propagation time of the light pulses. The results showed that as the circulation time increased, the MCV increased with decrease in MCHC. It was speculated that the older RBCs with smaller size and fragile membrane properties had been selectively destroyed by the shear stress. The time-resolved optical spectroscopy is a useful technique in quantifying the RBCs' damages by measuring the energy and propagation time of the ultra-short light pulses through the blood.

  17. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; et al

    2016-08-22

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within themore » crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, this study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX.« less

  18. Disentangling Multichannel Photodissociation Dynamics in Acetone by Time-Resolved Photoelectron-Photoion Coincidence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Paul; Bainschab, Markus; Thaler, Bernhard; Heim, Pascal; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Koch, Markus

    2016-08-18

    For the investigation of photoinduced dynamics in molecules with time-resolved pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy, it is essential to obtain unequivocal information about the fragmentation behavior induced by the laser pulses. We present time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) experiments to investigate the excited-state dynamics of isolated acetone molecules triggered by two-photon (269 nm) excitation. In the complex situation of different relaxation pathways, we unambiguously identify three distinct pump-probe ionization channels. The high selectivity of PEPICO detection allows us to observe the fragmentation behavior and to follow the time evolution of each channel separately. For channels leading to fragment ions, we quantitatively obtain the fragment-to-parent branching ratio and are able to determine experimentally whether dissociation occurs in the neutral molecule or in the parent ion. These results highlight the importance of coincidence detection for the interpretation of time-resolved photochemical relaxation and dissociation studies if multiple pathways are present. PMID:27459051

  19. Implementation and evaluation of data analysis strategies for time-resolved optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Chavdar; Hartmann, Helvi; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2015-02-17

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy plays a key role in illuminating the mechanisms of many fundamental processes in physics, chemistry, and biology. However, to extract the essential information from the highly complex time-resolved data, advanced data analysis techniques are required. Here we present the implementation strategies and the evaluation of the familiar global lifetime and target analysis as well as the not so widely adopted lifetime distribution analysis (LDA). Furthermore, we demonstrate the implementation of analysis strategies dealing with a number of artifacts inherently present in data from ultrafast optical experiments. The focus of the work is placed on LDA as it allows invaluable exploration depth of the kinetic information contained in the experimental data. We establish a clear regularization procedure for the use of LDA in ultrafast optical spectroscopy and evaluate the performance of a number of factors that play a role in the reliable reconstruction of lifetime distributions. Our results show that the optimal regularization factor can be determined well with the L-curve and the generalized cross-validation techniques. Moreover, the performance evaluations indicate that the most efficient regularization norm is the identity matrix. The analytical procedures described in this work can be readily implemented and used for the analysis of any time-resolved data.

  20. New time-resolved micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy of natural and synthetic analogue minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panczer, G.; Ollier, N.; Champagnon, B.; Gaft, M.

    2003-04-01

    Minerals as well as geomaterials often present light emissions under UV or visible excitations. This property called photoluminescence is due to low concentration impurities such as the rare earths, the transition elements and the lanthanides. The induced color is used for ore prospection but only spectroscopic analyses indicate the nature of the emitted centers. However natural samples contained numerous luminescent centers simultaneously and with regular steady-state measurements (such as in cathodoluminescence) all the emissions are often over lapping. In order to record the contributions of each separate center, it is possible to use time-resolved measurements based on the decay time of the emissions and using pulsed laser excitation. Some characteristic examples will be presented on apatites, zircons as well as gemstones. Geomaterials present as well micro scale heterogeneities (growth zoning, inclusions, devitrification, microphases...). Precise identification and optical effects of such heterogeneities have to be taken into account. To reach the microscale using photo luminescence studies, a microscope has be modified to allowed pulsed laser injection (from UV to visible), beam focus with micro scale resolution on the sample (<10 μm), as well as time resolved collection of micro fluorescence. Such equipment allows now undertaking time-resolved measurements of microphases. Applications on geomaterials will be presented.

  1. Use of Time-Resolved Fluorescence to Monitor Bioactive Compounds in Plant Based Foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Lemos, M Adília; Sárniková, Katarína; Bot, Francesca; Anese, Monica; Hungerford, Graham

    2015-06-26

    The study of compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity has recently received much interest in the food industry because of their potential health benefits. Most of these compounds are plant based, such as polyphenolics and carotenoids, and there is a need to monitor them from the field through processing and into the body. Ideally, a monitoring technique should be non-invasive with the potential for remote capabilities. The application of the phenomenon of fluorescence has proved to be well suited, as many plant associated compounds exhibit fluorescence. The photophysical behaviour of fluorescent molecules is also highly dependent on their microenvironment, making them suitable probes to monitor changes in pH, viscosity and polarity, for example. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques have recently come to the fore, as they offer the ability to obtain more information, coupled with the fact that the fluorescence lifetime is an absolute measure, while steady state just provides relative and average information. In this work, we will present illustrative time-resolved measurements, rather than a comprehensive review, to show the potential of time-resolved fluorescence applied to the study of bioactive substances. The aim is to help assess if any changes occur in their form, going from extraction via storage and cooking to the interaction with serum albumin, a principal blood transport protein.

  2. Novel laser gain and time-resolved FTIR studies of photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques are discussed which can be used to explore laboratory photochemical processes and kinetics relevant to planetary atmospheres; these include time-resolved laser gain-versus-absorption spectroscopy and time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) emission studies. The laser gain-versus-absorption method employed tunable diode and F-center lasers to determine the yields of excited photofragments and their kinetics. The time-resolved FTIR technique synchronizes the sweep of a commercial FTIR with a pulsed source of light to obtain emission spectra of novel transient species in the infrared. These methods are presently being employed to investigate molecular photodissociation, the yields of excited states of fragments, their subsequent reaction kinetics, Doppler velocity distributions, and velocity-changing collisions of translationally fast atoms. Such techniques may be employed in future investigations of planetary atmospheres, for example to study polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons related to cometary emissions, to analyze acetylene decomposition products and reactions, and to determine spectral features in the near infrared and infrared wavelength regions for planetary molecules and clusters.

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a chopper wheel as a fast shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.

    2015-01-15

    Widely available, small form-factor, fiber-coupled spectrometers typically have a minimum exposure time measured in milliseconds, and thus cannot be used directly for time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Spectroscopy at these faster time scales is typically done with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) system where the image intensifier acts as a “fast” electronic shutter for the slower CCD array. In this paper, we describe simple modifications to a commercially available chopper wheel system to allow it to be used as a “fast” mechanical shutter for gating a fiber-coupled spectrometer to achieve microsecond-scale time-resolved optical measurements of a periodically pulsed light source. With the chopper wheel synchronized to the pulsing of the light source, the time resolution can be set to a small fraction of the pulse period by using a chopper wheel with narrow slots separated by wide spokes. Different methods of synchronizing the chopper wheel and pulsing of the light sources are explored. The capability of the chopper wheel system is illustrated with time-resolved measurements of pulsed plasmas.

  4. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz: An overview of contemporary developments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithambo, M. L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separate in time the stimulation and emission of luminescence. The luminescence is stimulated from a sample using a brief light pulse and the emission monitored during stimulation in the presence of scattered stimulating light or after pulsing, over photomultiplier noise only. Although the use of the method in retrospective dosimetry has been somewhat limited, the technique has been successfully applied to study mechanisms in the processes leading up to luminescence emission. The main means for this has been the temperature dependence of the luminescence intensity as well as the luminescence lifetimes determined from time-resolved luminescence spectra. In this paper we review some key developments in theory and applications to quartz including methods of evaluating lifetimes, techniques of evaluating kinetic parameters using both the dependence of luminescence intensity and lifetime on measurement temperature, and of lifetimes on annealing temperature. We then provide an overview of some notable applications such as separation of quartz signals from a quartz-feldspar admixture and the utility of the dynamic throughput, a measure of luminescence measured as a function of the pulse width. The paper concludes with some suggestions of areas where further exploration would advance understanding of dynamics of luminescence in quartz and help address some outstanding problems in its application.

  5. Fast single photon avalanche photodiode-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Resolution in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a persistent problem and is primarily limited by high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. We showed previously that the reduction in photon scatter between a source and detector pair at early time points following a laser pulse in time-resolved DOT is highly dependent on the temporal response of the instrument. To this end, we developed a new single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) based time-resolved DOT scanner. This instrument uses an array of fast SPADs, a femto-second Titanium Sapphire laser and single photon counting electronics. In combination, the overall instrument temporal impulse response function width was 59 ps. In this paper, we report the design of this instrument and validate its operation in symmetrical and irregularly shaped optical phantoms of approximately small animal size. We were able to accurately reconstruct the size and position of up to 4 absorbing inclusions, with increasing image quality at earlier time windows. We attribute these results primarily to the rapid response time of our instrument. These data illustrate the potential utility of fast SPAD detectors in time-resolved DOT.

  6. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography.

    PubMed

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Bean, Richard; Zhao, Yun; Båth, Petra; Dods, Robert; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Rheinberger, Jan; James, Daniel; DePonte, Daniel; Li, Chufeng; Sala, Leonardo; Williams, Garth J; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason E; Berntsen, Peter; Nango, Eriko; Iwata, So; Chapman, Henry N; Fromme, Petra; Frank, Matthias; Abela, Rafael; Boutet, Sébastien; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Neutze, Richard; Schertler, Gebhard; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-08-22

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. This study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX.

  7. Time-resolved spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for depth analysis of diffusely scattering layers.

    PubMed

    Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Dvořák, Patrick; Buijs, Joost B; Gooijer, Cees; Ariese, Freek

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to use time-resolved (TR) Raman spectroscopy, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), and a combination of these approaches to obtain high quality Raman spectra from materials hidden underneath an opaque layer. Both TR Raman and SORS are advanced techniques that allow for an increased relative selectivity of photons from deeper layers within a sample. Time-resolved detection reduces fluorescence background, and the selectivity for the second layer is improved. By combining this with spatially offset excitation we additionally increased selectivity for deeper layers. Test samples were opaque white polymer blocks of several mm thicknesses. Excitation was carried out with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser at 460 nm, 3 ps pulse width and 76 MHz repetition rate. Detection was either with a continuous-wave CCD camera or in time-resolved mode using an intensified CCD camera with a 250 ps gate width. The Raman photons were collected in backscatter mode, with or without lateral offset. By measuring the delay of the Raman signal from the second layer (polyethylene terephthalate/PET/Arnite), the net photon migration speeds through Teflon, polythene, Delrin and Nylon were determined. Raman spectra could be obtained from a second layer of PET through Teflon layers up to 7 mm of thickness. The ability to obtain chemical information through layers of diffusely scattering materials has powerful potential for biomedical applications.

  8. Time-resolved single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for ultrafast irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Li-Guo; Meng, Kun; Li, Jiang; Liu, Qiao; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Zhao, Jian-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy is suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of ultrafast events. However, the study of irreversible or single shot ultrafast events requires ability to record transient properties at multiple time delays, i.e., time resolved at single shot level, which is not available currently. Here by angular multiplexing use of femtosecond laser pulses, we developed and demonstrated a time resolved, transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique, where burst mode THz pulses were generated and then detected in a single shot measurement manner. The burst mode THz pulses contain 2 sub-THz pulses, and the time gap between them is adjustable up to 1 ns with picosecond accuracy, thus it can be used to probe the single shot event at two different time delays. The system can detect the sub-THz pulses at 0.1 THz-2.5 THz range with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ˜400 and spectrum resolution of 0.05 THz. System design was described here, and optimizations of single shot measurement of THz pulses were discussed in detail. Methods to improve SNR were also discussed in detail. A system application was demonstrated where pulsed THz signals at different time delays of the ultrafast process were successfully acquired within single shot measurement. This time resolved transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique provides a new diagnostic tool for irreversible or single shot ultrafast events where dynamic information can be extracted at terahertz range within one-shot experiment.

  9. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a chopper wheel as a fast shutter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E; Boffard, John B; Lin, Chun C

    2015-01-01

    Widely available, small form-factor, fiber-coupled spectrometers typically have a minimum exposure time measured in milliseconds, and thus cannot be used directly for time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Spectroscopy at these faster time scales is typically done with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) system where the image intensifier acts as a "fast" electronic shutter for the slower CCD array. In this paper, we describe simple modifications to a commercially available chopper wheel system to allow it to be used as a "fast" mechanical shutter for gating a fiber-coupled spectrometer to achieve microsecond-scale time-resolved optical measurements of a periodically pulsed light source. With the chopper wheel synchronized to the pulsing of the light source, the time resolution can be set to a small fraction of the pulse period by using a chopper wheel with narrow slots separated by wide spokes. Different methods of synchronizing the chopper wheel and pulsing of the light sources are explored. The capability of the chopper wheel system is illustrated with time-resolved measurements of pulsed plasmas.

  10. Use of Time-Resolved Fluorescence to Monitor Bioactive Compounds in Plant Based Foodstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, M. Adília; Sárniková, Katarína; Bot, Francesca; Anese, Monica; Hungerford, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The study of compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity has recently received much interest in the food industry because of their potential health benefits. Most of these compounds are plant based, such as polyphenolics and carotenoids, and there is a need to monitor them from the field through processing and into the body. Ideally, a monitoring technique should be non-invasive with the potential for remote capabilities. The application of the phenomenon of fluorescence has proved to be well suited, as many plant associated compounds exhibit fluorescence. The photophysical behaviour of fluorescent molecules is also highly dependent on their microenvironment, making them suitable probes to monitor changes in pH, viscosity and polarity, for example. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques have recently come to the fore, as they offer the ability to obtain more information, coupled with the fact that the fluorescence lifetime is an absolute measure, while steady state just provides relative and average information. In this work, we will present illustrative time-resolved measurements, rather than a comprehensive review, to show the potential of time-resolved fluorescence applied to the study of bioactive substances. The aim is to help assess if any changes occur in their form, going from extraction via storage and cooking to the interaction with serum albumin, a principal blood transport protein. PMID:26132136

  11. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Bean, Richard; Zhao, Yun; Båth, Petra; Dods, Robert; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Rheinberger, Jan; James, Daniel; DePonte, Daniel; Li, Chufeng; Sala, Leonardo; Williams, Garth J.; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Berntsen, Peter; Nango, Eriko; Iwata, So; Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Frank, Matthias; Abela, Rafael; Boutet, Sébastien; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Neutze, Richard; Schertler, Gebhard; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. This study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX. PMID:27545823

  12. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography.

    PubMed

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Bean, Richard; Zhao, Yun; Båth, Petra; Dods, Robert; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Rheinberger, Jan; James, Daniel; DePonte, Daniel; Li, Chufeng; Sala, Leonardo; Williams, Garth J; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason E; Berntsen, Peter; Nango, Eriko; Iwata, So; Chapman, Henry N; Fromme, Petra; Frank, Matthias; Abela, Rafael; Boutet, Sébastien; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Neutze, Richard; Schertler, Gebhard; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. This study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX. PMID:27545823

  13. Monitoring antibacterial permeabilization in real time using time-resolved flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Freire, João Miguel; Gaspar, Diana; de la Torre, Beatriz Garcia; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-02-01

    Despite the intensive study of antibiotic-induced bacterial permeabilization, its kinetics and molecular mechanism remain largely elusive. A new methodology that extends the concept of the live-dead assay in flow cytometry to real time-resolved detection was used to overcome these limitations. The antimicrobial activity of pepR was monitored in time-resolved flow cytometry for three bacterial strains: Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), E. coli K-12 (CGSC Strain 4401) and E. coli JW3596-1 (CGSC Strain 11805). The latter strain has truncated lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer membrane. This new methodology provided information on the efficacy of the antibiotics and sheds light on their mode of action at membrane-level. Kinetic data regarding antibiotic binding and lytic action were retrieved. Membrane interaction and permeabilization events differ significantly among strains. The truncation of LPS moieties does not hamper AMP binding but compromises membrane disruption and bacterial killing. We demonstrated the usefulness of time-resolved flow cytometry to study antimicrobial-induced permeabilization by collecting kinetic data that contribute to characterize the action of antibiotics directly on bacteria. PMID:25445678

  14. [3-dimensional documentation of wound-healing].

    PubMed

    Körber, A; Grabbe, S; Dissemond, J

    2006-04-01

    The objective evaluation of the course of wound-healing represents a substantial parameter for the quality assurance of a modern wound management in chronic wounds. Established procedures exclusively based on a two-dimensional measurement of the wound surface with planimetry or digital photo documentation in combination with a metric statement of size. Thus so far an objective method is missing for the evaluation of the volumes of chronic wounds. By the linkage of digital photography, optical grid by means of digital scanner and an image processing software in co-operation with the company RSI we were able to do an accurate 3-dimensional documentation of chronic wounds (DigiSkin). The generated scatter-plots allow a visual, computer-assisted 3-dimensional measurement and documentation of chronic wounds. In comparison with available systems it is now possible for the first time to objectify the volume changes of a chronic wound. On the basis of a case report of a female patient with an venous leg ulcer, which has been treated with a vacuum closure therapy before and after performing a mesh-graft transplantation, we would like to describe the advantages and the resulting scientific use of this new, objective wound documentation system in the clinical employment. PMID:16575675

  15. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Ortiz, Sebastian F.; Fradkin, Jamie; Eoh, Joon; Trivero, Jacqueline; Davenport, Matthew; Ginn, Brian; Mao, Hai-Quan; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Despite current advances in engineering blood vessels over 1 mm in diameter and the existing wealth of knowledge regarding capillary bed formation, studies for the development of microvasculature, the connecting bridge between them, have been extremely limited so far. Here, we evaluate the use of 3-dimensional (3D) microfibers fabricated by hydrogel electrospinning as templates for microvascular structure formation. We hypothesize that 3D microfibers improve extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition from vascular cells, enabling the formation of freestanding luminal multicellular microvasculature. Compared to 2-dimensional cultures, we demonstrate with confocal microscopy and RT-PCR that fibrin microfibers induce an increased ECM protein deposition by vascular cells, specifically endothelial colony-forming cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells. These ECM proteins comprise different layers of the vascular wall including collagen types I, III, and IV, as well as elastin, fibronectin, and laminin. We further demonstrate the achievement of multicellular microvascular structures with an organized endothelium and a robust multicellular perivascular tunica media. This, along with the increased ECM deposition, allowed for the creation of self-supporting multilayered microvasculature with a distinct circular lumen following fibrin microfiber core removal. This approach presents an advancement toward the development of human microvasculature for basic and translational studies.—Barreto-Ortiz, S. F., Fradkin, J., Eoh, J., Trivero, J., Davenport, M., Ginn, B., Mao, H.-Q., Gerecht, S. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures. PMID:25900808

  16. In situ nanoparticle size measurements of gas-borne silicon nanoparticles by time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipkens, T. A.; Mansmann, R.; Daun, K. J.; Petermann, N.; Titantah, J. T.; Karttunen, M.; Wiggers, H.; Dreier, T.; Schulz, C.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the application of time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII), a combustion diagnostic used mainly for measuring soot primary particles, to size silicon nanoparticles formed within a plasma reactor. Inferring nanoparticle sizes from TiRe-LII data requires knowledge of the heat transfer through which the laser-heated nanoparticles equilibrate with their surroundings. Models of the free molecular conduction and evaporation are derived, including a thermal accommodation coefficient found through molecular dynamics. The model is used to analyze TiRe-LII measurements made on silicon nanoparticles synthesized in a low-pressure plasma reactor containing argon and hydrogen. Nanoparticle sizes inferred from the TiRe-LII data agree with the results of a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis.

  17. Determination of the spin-flip time in ferromagnetic SrRuO3 from time-resolved Kerr measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kantner, C.L.S.; Langner, M.C.; Siemons, W.; Blok, J.L.; Koster, G.; Rijnders, A.J.H.M.; Ramesh, R.; Orenstein, J.

    2010-07-30

    We report time-resolved Kerr effect measurements of magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic SrRuO{sub 3}. We observe that the demagnetization time slows substantially at temperatures within 15K of the Curie temperature, which is {approx} 150K. We analyze the data with a phenomenological model that relates the demagnetization time to the spin flip time. In agreement with our observations the model yields a demagnetization time that is inversely proportional to T-T{sub c}. We also make a direct comparison of the spin flip rate and the Gilbert damping coefficient showing that their ratio very close to k{sub B}T{sub c}, indicating a common origin for these phenomena.

  18. Light-induced switching of HAMP domain conformation and dynamics revealed by time-resolved EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Klose, Daniel; Voskoboynikova, Natalia; Orban-Glass, Ioan; Rickert, Christian; Engelhard, Martin; Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    HAMP domains are widely abundant signaling modules. The putative mechanism of their function comprises switching between two distinct states. To unravel these conformational transitions, we apply site-directed spin labeling and time-resolved EPR spectroscopy to the phototactic receptor/transducer complex NpSRII/NpHtrII. We characterize the kinetic coupling of NpHtrII to NpSRII along with the activation period of the transducer and follow the transient conformational signal. The observed transient shift towards a more compact state of the HAMP domain upon light-activation agrees with structure-based calculations. It thereby validates the two modeled signaling states and integrates the domain's dynamics into the current model.

  19. Time-resolved measurements of PM2.5 carbonaceous aerosols at Gosan, Korea.

    PubMed

    Batmunkh, T; Kim, Y J; Lee, K Y; Cayetano, M G; Jung, J S; Kim, S Y; Kim, K C; Lee, S J; Kim, J S; Chang, L S; An, J Y

    2011-11-01

    In order to better understand the characteristics of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosol at a background site in Northeast Asia, semicontinuous organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), and time-resolved water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were measured by a Sunset OC/ EC and a PILS-TOC (particle-into-liquid sampler coupled with an online total organic carbon) analyzer, respectively, at the Gosan supersite on Jeju Island, Korea, in the summer (May 28-June 17) and fall (August 24-September 30) of 2009. Hourly average OC concentration varied in the range of approximately 0.87-28.38 microgC m-3, with a mean of 4.07+/- 2.60 microgC m-3, while the hourly average EC concentration ranged approximately from 0.04 to 8.19 .microgC m-3, with a mean of 1.35 +/- 0.71 microgC m-3, from May 28 to June 17, 2009. During the fall season, OC varied in the approximate range 0.9-9.6 microgC m-3, with a mean of 2.30 +/-0.80 microgC m-3, whereas EC ranged approximately from 0.01 to 5.40 microgC m-3, with a mean of 0.66 +/- 0.38 microgC m-3. Average contributions of EC to TC and WSOC to OC were 26.0% +/- 9.7% and 20.6% +/-7.4%, and 37.6% +/- 23.5% and 57.2% +/- 22.2% during summer and fall seasons, respectively. As expected, clear diurnal variation of WSOC/OC was found in summer, varying from 0.22 during the nighttime up to 0.72 during the daytime, mainly due to the photo-oxidation process. In order to investigate the effect of air mass pathway on the characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol, 5-day back-trajectory analysis was conducted using the HYSPLIT model. The air mass pathways were classified into four types: Continental (CC), Marine (M), East Sea (ES) and Korean Peninsula (KP). The highest OC/EC ratio of 3.63 was observed when air mass originated from the Continental area (CC). The lowest OC/EC ratio of 0.79 was measured when air mass originated from the Marine area (M). A high OC concentration was occasionally observed at Gosan due to local biomass burning activities. The

  20. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    SciTech Connect

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S.

    2011-04-15

    )]. Results: As expected, RE{sub preplan} for our edema model indicated underdosage in the calculation volume with a clear dependence on seed and calculation point positions, and increased with increasing values of {Delta} and T. Values of RE{sub preplan} were generally larger near the ends of the virtual prostate in the RPC phantom compared with more central locations. For edema characteristics similar to the population average values previously measured at our center, i.e., {Delta}=0.2 and T=28 d, mean values of RE{sub preplan} in an axial plane located 1.5 cm from the center of the seed distribution were 8.3% for {sup 131}Cs seeds, 7.5% for {sup 103}Pd seeds, and 2.2% for {sup 125}I seeds. Maximum values of RE{sub preplan} in the same plane were about 1.5 times greater. Note that detailed results strictly apply only for loose seed implants where the seeds are fixed in tissue and move in synchrony with that tissue. Conclusions: A dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema was developed for which cumulative dose can be written in closed form. The method yields values for RE{sub preplan} that differ from those for spatially isotropic edema. The method is suitable for calculating pre- and postimplant dosimetry correction factors for clinical seed configurations when edema characteristics can be measured or estimated.

  1. Exciton dynamics at a single dislocation in GaN probed by picosecond time-resolved cathodoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Deveaud, B.; Jacopin, G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of donor bound excitons (D°XA) at T = 10 K around an isolated single edge dislocation in homoepitaxial GaN, using a picosecond time-resolved cathodoluminescence (TR-CL) setup with high temporal and spatial resolutions. An ˜ 1.3 meV dipole-like energy shift of D°XA is observed around the dislocation, induced by the local strain fields. By simultaneously recording the variations of both the exciton lifetime and the CL intensity across the dislocation, we directly assess the dynamics of excitons around the defect. Our observations are well reproduced by a diffusion model. It allows us to deduce an exciton diffusion length of ˜24 nm as well as an effective area of the dislocation with a radius of ˜95 nm, where the recombination can be regarded as entirely non-radiative.

  2. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and imaging: new approaches to the analysis of cultural heritage and its degradation.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Austin; Cesaratto, Anna; Bellei, Sara; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Toniolo, Lucia; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, Daniela

    2014-04-02

    Applications of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the analysis of cultural heritage are presented. Examples range from historic wall paintings and stone sculptures to 20th century iconic design objects. A detailed description of the instrumentation developed and employed for analysis in the laboratory or in situ is given. Both instruments rely on a pulsed laser source coupled to a gated detection system, but differ in the type of information they provide. Applications of FLIM to the analysis of model samples and for the in-situ monitoring of works of art range from the analysis of organic materials and pigments in wall paintings, the detection of trace organic substances on stone sculptures, to the mapping of luminescence in late 19th century paintings. TRPL and FLIM are employed as sensors for the detection of the degradation of design objects made in plastic. Applications and avenues for future research are suggested.

  3. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Spectroscopy and Imaging: New Approaches to the Analysis of Cultural Heritage and Its Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Austin; Cesaratto, Anna; Bellei, Sara; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Toniolo, Lucia; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the analysis of cultural heritage are presented. Examples range from historic wall paintings and stone sculptures to 20th century iconic design objects. A detailed description of the instrumentation developed and employed for analysis in the laboratory or in situ is given. Both instruments rely on a pulsed laser source coupled to a gated detection system, but differ in the type of information they provide. Applications of FLIM to the analysis of model samples and for the in-situ monitoring of works of art range from the analysis of organic materials and pigments in wall paintings, the detection of trace organic substances on stone sculptures, to the mapping of luminescence in late 19th century paintings. TRPL and FLIM are employed as sensors for the detection of the degradation of design objects made in plastic. Applications and avenues for future research are suggested. PMID:24699285

  4. Time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements of shock propagation in laser-driven CH foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbrel, Benjamin; Koenig, Michel; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Brambrink, Erik; Brown, Colin; Khattak, Fida; Nagler, Bob; Rabec-Le-Gloaec, Marc; Spindloe, Chris; Tolley, Marc; Vinko, Samuel; Riley, David; Wark, Justin; Gregori, Gianluca

    2008-11-01

    We have performed time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements in the warm dense matter regime at the LULI 2000 laser facility (Ecole Polytechnique, France). The laser-driven shocked CH samples were probed with 30ps, 8keV Cu Kalpha radiation, delayed with respect to the shock propagation. The angularly resolved scattered x-ray signal, collected over a wide angle range (25-55 degrees), gives access to the plasma structure factor. For the first time, the use of a short pulse x-ray source allows ourselves to probe the microscopic properties of WDM at different plasma conditions as the shock travels. Spectrum shows evidence of strong coupling behaviour in the CH plasma. Results are compared to simulations taking account strong coupling effect and appropriate multi ionic-species treatment. The data analysis and the models used will be presented and discussed.

  5. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence Decays (TRPL) in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  6. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) Decays in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  7. Generation and Propagation of a Picosecond Acoustic Pulse at a Buried Interface: Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Cavalieri, A.L.; Fritz, D.M.; Swan, M.C.; Reis, D.A.; Hegde, R.S.; Reason, M.; Goldman, R.S.

    2005-12-09

    We report on the propagation of coherent acoustic wave packets in (001) surface oriented Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs heterostructure, generated through localized femtosecond photoexcitation of the GaAs. Transient structural changes in both the substrate and film are measured with picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The data indicate an elastic response consisting of unipolar compression pulses of a few hundred picosecond duration traveling along [001] and [001] directions that are produced by predominately impulsive stress. The transmission and reflection of the strain pulses are in agreement with an acoustic mismatch model of the heterostructure and free-space interfaces.

  8. Photodissociation of thioglycolic acid studied by femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, Andrew R.; Blumling, Daniel E.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L. Jr.

    2011-01-14

    Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies were employed to study the photodissociation of both the neutral (HS-CH{sub 2}-COOH) and doubly deprotonated ({sup -}S-CH{sub 2}-COO{sup -}) forms of thioglycolic acid (TGA), a common surface-passivating ligand used in the aqueous synthesis and organization of semiconducting nanostructures. Room temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated strong absorption by the S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} excited states at 250 nm and 185 nm, respectively. The spectrum also contained a weaker absorption band that extended to approximately 550 nm, which was assigned to the {pi}{sub CO}{sup *}(leftarrow)n{sub O} transition. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was performed on TGA using 400 nm excitation and a white-light continuum probe to provide the temporally and spectrally resolved data. Both forms of TGA underwent a photoinduced dissociation from the excited state to form an {alpha}-thiol-substituted acyl radical ({alpha}-TAR, S-CH{sub 2}-CO). For the acidic form of TGA, radical formation occurred with an apparent time constant of 60 {+-} 5 fs; subsequent unimolecular decay took 400 {+-} 60 fs. Similar kinetics were observed for the deprotonated form of TGA (70 {+-} 10 fs radical formation; 420 {+-} 40 fs decay). The production of the {alpha}-TAR was corroborated by the observation of its characteristic optical absorption. Time-resolved data indicated that the photoinduced dissociation of TGA via cleavage of the C-OH bond occurred rapidly ({<=}100 fs). The prevalence of TGA in aqueous semiconducting nanoparticles makes its absorption in the visible spectral region and subsequent dissociation key to understanding the behavior of nanoscale systems.

  9. Time-resolved beam symmetry measurement for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Greer, Peter B

    2016-03-08

    In volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery perfect beam symmetry is assumed by the planning system. This study aims to test this assumption and present a method of measuring time-resolved beam symmetry measurement during a VMAT delivery that includes extreme variations of dose rate and gantry speed. The Sun Nuclear IC Profiler in gantry mount was used to measure time-resolved in-plane and cross-plane profiles during plan delivery from which symmetry could be determined. Time-resolved symmetry measurements were performed throughout static field exposures at cardinal gantry angles, conformal arcs with constant dose rate and gantry speed, and during a VMAT test plan with gantry speed and dose rate modulation. Measurements were performed for both clockwise and counterclockwise gantry rotation and across four Varian 21iX lin-acs. The symmetry was found to be generally constant throughout the static field exposures to within 0.3% with an exception on one linac of up to 0.7%. Agreement in symmetry between cardinal angles was always within 1.0% and typically within 0.6%. During conformal arcs the results for clockwise and counterclockwise rotation were in agreement to within 0.3%. Both clockwise and counterclockwise tended to vary in similar manner by up to 0.5% during arc consistent with the cardinal gantry angle static field results. During the VMAT test plan the symmetry generally was in agreement with the conformal arc results. Greater variation in symmetry was observed in the low-dose-rate regions by up to 1.75%. All results were within clinically acceptable levels using the tolerances of NCS Report 24 (2015).

  10. Role of electron-electron interference in ultrafast time-resolved imaging of electronic wavepackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Gopal; Santra, Robin

    2013-04-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering is an emerging approach to image the dynamical evolution of the electronic charge distribution during complex chemical and biological processes in real-space and real-time. Recently, the differences between semiclassical and quantum-electrodynamical (QED) theory of light-matter interaction for scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from the electronic wavepacket were formally demonstrated and visually illustrated by scattering patterns calculated for an electronic wavepacket in atomic hydrogen [G. Dixit, O. Vendrell, and R. Santra, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 11636 (2012)], 10.1073/pnas.1202226109. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of time-resolved x-ray scattering from a sample containing a mixture of non-stationary and stationary electrons within both the theories. In a many-electron system, the role of scattering interference between a non-stationary and several stationary electrons to the total scattering signal is investigated. In general, QED and semiclassical theory provide different results for the contribution from the scattering interference, which depends on the energy resolution of the detector and the x-ray pulse duration. The present findings are demonstrated by means of a numerical example of x-ray time-resolved imaging for an electronic wavepacket in helium. It is shown that the time-dependent scattering interference vanishes within semiclassical theory and the corresponding patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the time-independent interference, whereas the time-dependent scattering interference contribution do not vanish in the QED theory and the patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the non-stationary electron scattering.

  11. Time-resolved beam symmetry measurement for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Greer, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    In volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery perfect beam symmetry is assumed by the planning system. This study aims to test this assumption and present a method of measuring time-resolved beam symmetry measurement during a VMAT delivery that includes extreme variations of dose rate and gantry speed. The Sun Nuclear IC Profiler in gantry mount was used to measure time-resolved in-plane and cross-plane profiles during plan delivery from which symmetry could be determined. Time-resolved symmetry measurements were performed throughout static field exposures at cardinal gantry angles, conformal arcs with constant dose rate and gantry speed, and during a VMAT test plan with gantry speed and dose rate modulation. Measurements were performed for both clockwise and counterclockwise gantry rotation and across four Varian 21iX lin-acs. The symmetry was found to be generally constant throughout the static field exposures to within 0.3% with an exception on one linac of up to 0.7%. Agreement in symmetry between cardinal angles was always within 1.0% and typically within 0.6%. During conformal arcs the results for clockwise and counterclockwise rotation were in agreement to within 0.3%. Both clockwise and counterclockwise tended to vary in similar manner by up to 0.5% during arc consistent with the cardinal gantry angle static field results. During the VMAT test plan the symmetry generally was in agreement with the conformal arc results. Greater variation in symmetry was observed in the low-dose-rate regions by up to 1.75%. All results were within clinically acceptable levels using the tolerances of NCS Report 24 (2015). PMID:27074485

  12. Time-resolvable fluorescent conjugates for the detection of pathogens in environmental samples containing autofluorescent material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connally, Russell; Veal, Duncan; Piper, James A.

    2003-07-01

    Water is routinely monitored for environmental pathogens such a Cryptosporidium and Giardia using immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM). Autofluorescence can greatly diminish an operators capacity to resolve labeled pathogens from non-specific background. Naturally fluorescing components (autofluorophores) encountered in biological samples typically have fluorescent lifetimes (τ) of less than 100 nanoseconds and their emissions may be excluded through use of time-resolved fluorescence microscopy (TRFM). TRFM relies on the large differences in τ between autofluorescent molecules and long-lived lanthanide chelates. In TRFM, targets labeled with a time-resolvable fluorescent immunoconjugate are excited by an intense (UV) light pulse. A short delay is imposed to permit the decay of autofluorescence before capture of luminescence from the excited chelate using an image intensified CCD camera. In our experience, autofluorescence can be reduced to insignificant levels with a consequent 30-fold increase in target visibility using TRFM techniques. We report conjugation of a novel europium chelate to a monoclonal antibody specific for Giardia lamblia and use of the immunoconjugate for TRFM studies. Initial attempts to conjugate the same chelate to a monoclonal antibody directed against Cryptosporidium parvum led to poorly fluorescent constructs that were prone to denature and precipitate. We successfully conjugated BHHCT to anti-mouse polyvalent immunoglobulin and used this construct to overcome the difficulties in direct labeling of the anti-Cryptosporidium antibody. Both Giardia and Cryptosporidium were labeled using the anti-mouse protocol with a subsequent 20-fold and 6.6-fold suppression of autofluorescence respectively. A rapid protocol for conjugating and purifying the immunoconjugate was found and methods of quantifying the fluorescence to protein ratio determined. Performance of our TRFM was dependent on the quality and brightness of the immunoconjugate and

  13. BHHST: An improved lanthanide chelate for time-resolved fluorescence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connally, Russell; Jin, Dayong; Piper, James

    2005-04-01

    The detection of the waterborne pathogens Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental water bodies requires concentration of large volumes of water due to the low dose required for infection. The highly concentrated (10,000-fold) water sample is often rich in strongly autofluorescent algae, organic debris and mineral particles that can obscure immunofluorescently labeled (oo)cysts during analysis. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques exploit the long fluorescence lifetimes of lanthanide chelates (ms) to differentiate target fluorescence from background autofluorescence (ns). Relatively simple instrumentation can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of labelled target. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques exploit the large difference in lifetime by briefly exciting fluorescence from the sample using a pulsed excitation source. Capture of the resulting fluorescence emission is delayed until the more rapidly decaying autofluorescence has faded beyond detection, whereon the much stronger and slower fading emission from labelled target is collected. BHHCT is a tetradentate beta-diketone chelate that is activated to bind with protein (antibody) as the chlorosulfonate. The high activity of this residue makes conjugations difficult to control and can lead to the formation of unstable immunoconjugates. To overcome these limitations a 5-atom hydrophylic molecular tether was attached to BHHCT via the chlorosulfonate and the BHHCT derivative was then activated to bind to proteins as the succinimide. The new compound (BHHST) could be prepared in high purity and was far more stable than the chlorosulfonate on storage. A high activity immunocojugate was prepared against Cryptosporidium that yielded an 8-fold increase in SNR using a lab-built time-resolved fluorescence microscope.

  14. A 0.18-µm CMOS Array Sensor for Integrated Time-Resolved Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ta-chien D.; Sorgenfrei, Sebastian; Gong, Ping; Levicky, Rastislav; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an active, integrated CMOS sensor array for fluorescence applications which enables time-gated, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The 64-by-64 array is sensitive to photon densities as low as 8.8 × 106 photons/cm2 with 64-point averaging and, through a differential pixel design, has a measured impulse response of better than 800 ps. Applications include both active microarrays and high-frame-rate imagers for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:20436922

  15. Time-resolved energy spectrum measurement of a linear induction accelerator with the magnetic analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Yang, Guo-Jun; Chen, Si-Fu; Zhang, Zhuo; Wei, Tao; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We recently set up a time-resolved optical beam diagnostic system. Using this system, we measured the high current electron beam energy in the accelerator under construction. This paper introduces the principle of the diagnostic system, describes the setup, and shows the results. A bending beam line was designed using an existing magnetic analyzer with a 300 mm-bending radius and a 60° bending angle at hard-edge approximation. Calculations show that the magnitude of the beam energy is about 18 MeV, and the energy spread is within 2%. Our results agree well with the initial estimates deduced from the diode voltage approach.

  16. The 7BM beamline at the APS: a facility for time-resolved fluid dynamics measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Christopher F.; Arms, Dohn; Dufresne, Eric M.; Gibson, Harold; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray radiography has been used to probe the internal structure of dense sprays with microsecond time resolution and a spatial resolution of 15 µm even in high-pressure environments. Recently, the 7BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been commissioned to focus on the needs of X-ray spray radiography measurements. The spatial resolution and X-ray intensity at this beamline represent a significant improvement over previous time-resolved X-ray radiography measurements at the APS. PMID:22713903

  17. Time-resolved FRET and PCT in cationic conjugated polymer/dye-labeled DNA complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Inhong; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Bumjin; Kang, Mijeong; Woo, Han Young; Kyhm, Kwangseuk

    2011-12-01

    The energy transfer mechanism between cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes and a single stranded DNA labeled with fluorescein was investigated in terms of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and photo-induced charge transfer (PCT) by time-resolved fluorescence. Both FRET and PCT rate efficiencies were obtained by phenomenological coupled rate equations, which are in excellent agreement with experiments. We found the total energy transfer in the complex is maximized as a consequence of FRET and PCT at an optimum distance 32.7Å.

  18. Time-resolved protein dynamics using synchronized Ti sapphire regenerative amplifier/infrared FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.J.; Haar, P.; Boxer, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    We have synchronized a femtosecond 5 kHz Ti Sapphire regenerative amplifier (regen) to the Stanford Superconducting Accelerator/Free Electron laser (SCA/FEL) to within 2 picoseconds time jitter. We are using this capability to measure the time resolved spectral evolution of the radical cation band of the initial electron donor from bacterial reaction centers (Rb sphaeroides) after the initiation of electron transfer using a {approximately} 120 fs NIR pulse from the regen. The FEL is used to probe for the appearance of the radical cation band at {approximately} 4 {mu}m.

  19. Time-resolved circular dichroism and absorption studies of the photolysis reaction of (carbonmonoxy)myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Milder, S J; Bjorling, S C; Kuntz, I D; Kliger, D S

    1988-01-01

    Time-resolved circular dichroism (TRCD) and absorption spectroscopy are used to follow the photolysis reaction of (carbonmonoxy)myoglobin (MbCO). Following the spectral changes associated with the initial loss of CO, a subtle change is observed in the visible absorption spectrum of the Mb product on a time scale of a few hundred nanoseconds. No changes are seen in the CD spectrum of Mb in the visible and near-UV regions subsequent to the loss of CO. The data suggest the existence of an intermediate found after ligand loss from MbCO that is similar in structure to the final Mb product. PMID:3390516

  20. Exploiting time-resolved magnetic field effects for determining radical ion reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmertnykh, A. O.; Borovkov, V. I.; Bagryansky, V. A.; Molin, Yu N.

    2016-07-01

    The capabilities of the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in determining the rates of charge transfer reactions between radical ions and molecules on a nanosecond time scale have been investigated. The approach relies on the electron spin coherence in radical pair's partners generated by ionizing radiation. The spin evolution of the pair is sensitive to the reaction since the latter results in changing magnetic interactions of the unpaired electron. This process can be monitored by magnetic-field-sensitive fluorescence from an irradiated sample that is illustrated using reactions involving alkane radical cations. The accuracy and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  1. Time-resolved far-field analysis of a high power single emitter laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Unge, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    A system was developed which is capable of measuring the time-resolved far-field radiation patterns from a high-power semiconductor laser under intensity modulated conditions. Angular steering of the fundamental spatial mode was observed, with pointing variations as large as 0.5 deg, or 7.5 percent of the beamwidth, during the time of the optical pulse. The variations in pointing angle were directly related to gradients in the transverse index profile of the laser, which may oscillate based on lateral spatial hole burning of the gain and carrier density.

  2. A CAMAC system controlled by an IBM AT computer for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lindquist, L.O.; Moss, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    An IBM AT computer interfaced to a small CAMAC system offers considerable power without the complexity and expense of a large general-purpose system. Our system for time-resolved spectroscopy features menu-driven FORTRAN-based software; high-resolution and high-speed (8K channels, 5-..mu..s fixed dead time) ADCs; segmentable histogram memories (24-bit counts) with large memory space for many histogram segments; independently variable separate histogram dwell times; remote control via a CAMAC serial highway; and ground isolation between the data acquisition equipment and control computer by means of fiber optics.

  3. Time-resolved crystal structure analysis of resonantly vibrating langasite oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    The momentary crystal structure of a Y-cut langasite oscillator resonantly vibrating under an alternating electric field is revealed by time-resolved crystal structure analysis to understand the microscopic mechanism of piezoelectricity. The thickness-shear lattice strain under an electric field is amplified ∼103 times by the resonant effect. The lattice vibration involves the deformation of GaO4 and Ga0.5Si0.5O4 tetrahedra accompanied by atomic displacements of specific oxygen atoms along the electric field. The deformation of GaO4 and Ga0.5Si0.5O4 tetrahedra enhances the piezoelectricity of langasite.

  4. Ferryl intermediates of catalase captured by time-resolved Weissenberg crystallography and UV-VIS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gouet, P; Jouve, H M; Williams, P A; Andersson, I; Andreoletti, P; Nussaume, L; Hajdu, J

    1996-11-01

    Various enzymes use semi-stable ferryl intermediates and free radicals during their catalytic cycle, amongst them haem catalases. Structures for two transient intermediates (compounds I and II) of the NADPH-dependent catalase from Proteus mirabilis (PMC) have been determined by time-resolved X-ray crystallography and single crystal microspectrophotometry. The results show the formation and transformation of the ferryl group in the haem, and the unexpected binding of an anion during this reaction at a site distant from the haem.

  5. Time-resolved regression rate of innovative hybrid solid fuel formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paravan, C.; Reina, A.; Sossi, A.; Manzoni, M.; Massini, G.; Rambaldi, G.; Duranti, E.; Adami, A.; Seletti, E.; DeLuca, L. T.

    2013-03-01

    Low regression rates limit application of hybrid rocket engines (HREs). In this paper, combustion of HTPB- and solid paraffin wax-based fuels is investigated in a lab-scale burner by a time-resolved optical technique. The effects of pressure are explored over the range 7 to 16 bar. Nanosized (ALEXTM , 100 nm, uncoated) and micronsized (MgB composite, 5 µm) metal additives are tested. For all runs, the instantaneous regression rate is not constant but higher at the beginning of tests. Overall, MgB performance and relatively ease of manufacturing enable to consider this additive as an interesting novel candidate to enhance hybrid rocket engines performance.

  6. Time-Resolved SAXS Spectra after Rapidly Mixing Anionic and Cationic Surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Mayuko; Sasaki, Shigeo

    2006-05-05

    The temporal evolution of nano-structures in mixing the aqueous solutions of anionic and cationic surfactants was investigated by measuring time-resolved SAXS spectra. It is found that vesicles formed just after mixing annihilate to be followed by the lamella formation. The peak intensity due to the vesicle structure decays exponentially with an elapsing time. The peak intensity assigned to the lamella structure grows with a power law of time. The decay time of vesicle and the exponent of power function of time describing the lamella growth increase with NaCl concentration. These results indicate that the electrostatic interaction affects the stability of nano-structures.

  7. Planetary Surface Exploration Using Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy on Rovers and Landers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Alerstam, Erik; Maruyama, Yuki; Charbon, Edoardo; Rossman, George

    2013-04-01

    Planetary surface exploration using laser spectroscopy has become increasingly relevant as these techniques become a reality on Mars surface missions. The ChemCam instrument onboard the Curiosity rover is currently using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on a mast-mounted platform to measure elemental composition of target rocks. The RLS Raman Spectrometer is included on the payload for the ExoMars mission to be launched in 2018 and will identify minerals and organics on the Martian surface. We present a next-generation instrument that builds on these widely used techniques to provide a means for performing both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS in conjunction with microscopic imaging. Microscopic Raman spectroscopy with a laser spot size smaller than the grains of interest can provide surface mapping of mineralogy while preserving morphology. A very small laser spot size (~ 1 µm) is often necessary to identify minor phases that are often of greater interest than the matrix phases. In addition to the difficulties that can be posed by fine-grained material, fluorescence interference from the very same material is often problematic. This is particularly true for many of the minerals of interest that form in environments of aqueous alteration and can be highly fluorescent. We use time-resolved laser spectroscopy to eliminate fluorescence interference that can often make it difficult or impossible to obtain Raman spectra. As an added benefit, we have found that with small changes in operating parameters we can include microscopic LIBS using the same hardware. This new technique relies on sub-ns, high rep-rate lasers with relatively low pulse energy and compact solid state detectors with sub-ns time resolution. The detector technology that makes this instrument possible is a newly developed Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The use of this solid state time-resolved detector offers a

  8. Time-resolved internal-electron-scattering effect of H2 + in enhanced ionization regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Zhou, Yueming; He, Mingrui; Li, Min; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron interference dynamics of H2 + in an intense infrared laser field. At intermediate internuclear distances, an interference fringe appears in the electron momentum distribution. By tracing the time evolution of the electron density, we identify an internal scattering channel of the electrons. The observed fringe is attributed to the interference between the internal scattered and direct photoelectrons. Our results reveal that the electron behaviors inside a molecule can be mapped onto the experimentally accessible photoelectron momentum spectra, suggesting a time-resolved way of probing the complex laser-driven electron dynamics on an attosecond time scale.

  9. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  10. Trace Explosives Detection by Photoluminescence with Applications to Time-Resolved Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouldin, Kimberly

    2003-10-01

    Trace explosive detection field methods based on chemical reactions have until recently utilized only colorimetric products. To increase the sensitivity of such detection, a field explosive test kit which produces a product that is both colorimetric and luminescent is studied. Detection sensitivity can be gained by taking advantage of the luminescence of these products, something that has not been done to date. When the appropriate chemistry is chosen for explosive detection, time-resolved imaging techniques may again be applicable. Thus, in this talk, the possibilities of taking trace explosives detection to this next level will be discussed.

  11. Discrimination of molecular thin films by surface-sensitive time-resolved optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peli, Simone; Nembrini, Nicola; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; Giannetti, Claudio; Banfi, Francesco; Ferrini, Gabriele

    2015-10-01

    An optical discrimination technique, tailored to nanometric-sized, low optical absorbance molecular complexes adhering to thin metal films, is proposed and demonstrated. It is based on a time-resolved evanescent-wave detection scheme in conjunction with hierarchical cluster analysis and principal value decomposition. The present approach aims to differentiate among molecular films based on statistical methods, without using previous detailed knowledge of the physical mechanisms responsible for the detected signal. The technique is open to integration in lab-on-a-chip architectures and nanoscopy platforms for applications ranging from medical screening to material diagnostics.

  12. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-14

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on {beta}-carotene are discussed.

  13. Time resolved FRET measurement in various heterogeneous media using merocyanine dye as a donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Niraja; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a merocyanine dye to a Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecule in micelles formed by the surfactants SDS and DTAB and also in a catanionic vesicle formed by SDS and DTAB has been studied by picosecond time resolved emission spectroscopy. Here the dye acts as a donor molecule and R6G acts as the acceptor molecule. Multiple timescales of FRET have been detected, namely, an ultrafast component of 100-500 ps and relatively long component (1800-3300 ps). The different time scales are attributed to different donor-acceptor distances.

  14. Time resolved FRET measurement in various heterogeneous media using merocyanine dye as a donor.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Niraja; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2015-06-15

    Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a merocyanine dye to a Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecule in micelles formed by the surfactants SDS and DTAB and also in a catanionic vesicle formed by SDS and DTAB has been studied by picosecond time resolved emission spectroscopy. Here the dye acts as a donor molecule and R6G acts as the acceptor molecule. Multiple timescales of FRET have been detected, namely, an ultrafast component of 100-500 ps and relatively long component (1800-3300 ps). The different time scales are attributed to different donor-acceptor distances.

  15. Microscopic Study of Glass Transition: Time-Resolved Fluorescence Measurements of Doped Dye Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, H.; Ye, J. Y.; Hattori, T.; Maruyama, Y.; Ishikawa, M.

    The microscopic dynamics of several monomeric and polymeric glass formers has been investigated by the time-resolved fluorescence measurement of doped malachite green molecules in a wide temperature range. For monomers and a polymer without side chains, beside a kink around the calorimetric glass transition temperature Tg, another crossover at Tc about 30 - 50 K above Tg has been clearly observed, which is in agreement with the prediction of the mode-coupling theory. On the other hand, for the complex polymers with side chains, although we could not distinguish any singularities above Tg, we observed another kink below Tg, which can be attributed to the side-chain motions.

  16. An efficient and accurate approach to MTE-MART for time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. P.; Scarano, F.

    2015-03-01

    The motion-tracking-enhanced MART (MTE-MART; Novara et al. in Meas Sci Technol 21:035401, 2010) has demonstrated the potential to increase the accuracy of tomographic PIV by the combined use of a short sequence of non-simultaneous recordings. A clear bottleneck of the MTE-MART technique has been its computational cost. For large datasets comprising time-resolved sequences, MTE-MART becomes unaffordable and has been barely applied even for the analysis of densely seeded tomographic PIV datasets. A novel implementation is proposed for tomographic PIV image sequences, which strongly reduces the computational burden of MTE-MART, possibly below that of regular MART. The method is a sequential algorithm that produces a time-marching estimation of the object intensity field based on an enhanced guess, which is built upon the object reconstructed at the previous time instant. As the method becomes effective after a number of snapshots (typically 5-10), the sequential MTE-MART (SMTE) is most suited for time-resolved sequences. The computational cost reduction due to SMTE simply stems from the fewer MART iterations required for each time instant. Moreover, the method yields superior reconstruction quality and higher velocity field measurement precision when compared with both MART and MTE-MART. The working principle is assessed in terms of computational effort, reconstruction quality and velocity field accuracy with both synthetic time-resolved tomographic images of a turbulent boundary layer and two experimental databases documented in the literature. The first is the time-resolved data of flow past an airfoil trailing edge used in the study of Novara and Scarano (Exp Fluids 52:1027-1041, 2012); the second is a swirling jet in a water flow. In both cases, the effective elimination of ghost particles is demonstrated in number and intensity within a short temporal transient of 5-10 frames, depending on the seeding density. The increased value of the velocity space

  17. Molecular diffusivity measurement through an alumina membrane using time-resolved fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, Raymond; DeSisto, William J.; Mason, Michael D.

    2010-11-01

    We present a simple fluorescence imaging method for measuring the time-resolved concentration of a fluorescent molecule diffusing through an anodic alumina membrane with a pore diameter of 20 nm. From the concentration breakthrough curve, the molecular diffusivity of the fluorophore was extracted. The experimentally determined diffusivity was three orders of magnitude lower than reported bulk values. Due to the relative simplicity and ease of use, this method can be applied to provide fundamental information for biomolecular separations applications. One feature of this method is the high sensitivity at intercellular volumes broadening its application to drug delivery and controlled cell growth.

  18. Time-resolved experiments in the frequency domain using synchrotron radiation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Giusti, A. M.; Parasassi, T.; Ravagnan, G.; Sapora, O.

    1992-01-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beam line in the world that performs time-resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and the dynamics of molecules. This technique measures fluorescence lifetimes with picosecond resolution in the near UV spectral range. Such accurate measurements are rendered possible by taking phase and modulation data, and by the advantages of the cross-correlation technique. A successful experiment demonstrated the radiation damage induced by low doses of radiation on rabbit blood cell membranes.

  19. Application of time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy to a remote uranyl sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varineau, Pierre T.; Duesing, Richard W., Jr.; Wangen, Larry E.

    1992-03-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy is an effective method for the determination of a wide range of uranyl concentrations in aqueous samples. We have applied this technique to the development of a remote-sensing device using fiber optic cables coupled with a microflow cell to probe for uranyl in aqueous samples. This sensor incorporates a Nafion membrane through which UO22+ can diffuse into a reaction/analysis chamber containing phosphoric acid, a reagent that enhances the uranyl luminescence intensity and lifetime. With this device, anionic and fluorescing organic interferences could be eliminated, allowing for the determination of uranyl over a concentration range of 10-4 to 10-9 M.

  20. Time-resolved measurements of Cooper-pair radiative recombination in InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, S. S.; Nakajima, H.; Kumano, H.; Suemune, I.; Irie, H.; Asano, Y.; Akahane, K.; Sasaki, M.; Murayama, A.

    2015-08-21

    We studied InAs quantum dots (QDs) where electron Cooper pairs penetrate from an adjacent niobium (Nb) superconductor with the proximity effect. With time-resolved luminescence measurements at the wavelength around 1550 nm, we observed luminescence enhancement and reduction of luminescence decay time constants at temperature below the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub C}) of Nb. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a method to determine the contribution of Cooper-pair recombination in InAs QDs. We show that the luminescence enhancement measured below T{sub C} is well explained with our theory including Cooper-pair recombination.