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Sample records for 3-dimensional traction forces

  1. Analysis of the traction forces in different skull traction systems.

    PubMed

    Nyström, B; Allard, H; Karlsson, H

    1988-03-01

    During transportation of patients under skull traction, swinging of the weights produces acceleration forces that not only can cause pain and discomfort for the patient, but also can cause worsening of the cervical fracture or dislocation. Skull traction systems also involve friction forces. In a system with one pulley, the friction forces were 10 to 21.5% of the weight applied but, in a system with three pulleys (Stryker SurgiBed 965), they were as much as 65%. A new spring traction device that permits traction during transportation showed better physical characteristics than the hanging weight systems.

  2. Confocal reference free traction force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bergert, Martin; Lendenmann, Tobias; Zündel, Manuel; Ehret, Alexander E.; Panozzo, Daniele; Richner, Patrizia; Kim, David K.; Kress, Stephan J. P.; Norris, David J.; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Mazza, Edoardo; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical wiring between cells and their surroundings is fundamental to the regulation of complex biological processes during tissue development, repair or pathology. Traction force microscopy (TFM) enables determination of the actuating forces. Despite progress, important limitations with intrusion effects in low resolution 2D pillar-based methods or disruptive intermediate steps of cell removal and substrate relaxation in high-resolution continuum TFM methods need to be overcome. Here we introduce a novel method allowing a one-shot (live) acquisition of continuous in- and out-of-plane traction fields with high sensitivity. The method is based on electrohydrodynamic nanodrip-printing of quantum dots into confocal monocrystalline arrays, rendering individually identifiable point light sources on compliant substrates. We demonstrate the undisrupted reference-free acquisition and quantification of high-resolution continuous force fields, and the simultaneous capability of this method to correlatively overlap traction forces with spatial localization of proteins revealed using immunofluorescence methods. PMID:27681958

  3. 3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Hannen, Erin; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Darling, Eric M; Henann, David L; Franck, Christian

    2014-10-28

    Native cell-material interactions occur on materials differing in their structural composition, chemistry, and physical compliance. While the last two decades have shown the importance of traction forces during cell-material interactions, they have been almost exclusively presented on purely elastic in vitro materials. Yet, most bodily tissue materials exhibit some level of viscoelasticity, which could play an important role in how cells sense and transduce tractions. To expand the realm of cell traction measurements and to encompass all materials from elastic to viscoelastic, this paper presents a general, and comprehensive approach for quantifying 3D cell tractions in viscoelastic materials. This methodology includes the experimental characterization of the time-dependent material properties for any viscoelastic material with the subsequent mathematical implementation of the determined material model into a 3D traction force microscopy (3D TFM) framework. Utilizing this new 3D viscoelastic TFM (3D VTFM) approach, we quantify the influence of viscosity on the overall material traction calculations and quantify the error associated with omitting time-dependent material effects, as is the case for all other TFM formulations. We anticipate that the 3D VTFM technique will open up new avenues of cell-material investigations on even more physiologically relevant time-dependent materials including collagen and fibrin gels.

  4. Micropatterning tractional forces in living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Ostuni, Emanuele; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Here we describe a method for quantifying traction in cells that are physically constrained within micron-sized adhesive islands of defined shape and size on the surface of flexible polyacrylamide gels that contain fluorescent microbeads (0.2-microm diameter). Smooth muscle cells were plated onto square (50 x 50 microm) or circular (25- or 50-microm diameter) adhesive islands that were created on the surface of the gels by applying a collagen coating through microengineered holes in an elastomeric membrane that was later removed. Adherent cells spread to take on the size and shape of the islands and cell tractions were quantitated by mapping displacement fields of the fluorescent microbeads within the gel. Cells on round islands did not exhibit any preferential direction of force application, but they exerted their strongest traction at sites where they formed protrusions. When cells were confined to squares, traction was highest in the corners both in the absence and presence of the contractile agonist, histamine, and cell protrusions were also observed in these regions. Quantitation of the mean traction exerted by cells cultured on the different islands revealed that cell tension increased as cell spreading was promoted. These results provide a mechanical basis for past studies that demonstrated a similar correlation between spreading and growth within various anchorage-dependent cells. This new approach for analyzing the spatial distribution of mechanical forces beneath individual cells that are experimentally constrained to defined sizes and shapes may provide additional insight into the biophysical basis of cell regulation. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  6. Traction forces at solid-lubricated rolling/sliding contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, B. B.; Bovenkerk, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A single-element traction rig was used to measure the traction forces at a solid-lubricated contact of a ball against a flat disk at room temperature under combine rolling and sliding. The load and speed conditions were selected to match those anticipated for bearing applications in adiabatic diesel engines. Traction vs slide/roll ratio curves were similar to those for liquid lubricants but the traction forces were an order of magnitude higher. The test data were used to derive equations to predict traction force as a function of contact stress and rolling speed. The data showed that the magnitude of traction forces were almost the same for all the lubricants tested. The lubricants, should, therefore, be selected on the basis of their ability to limit the wear of contact surfaces.

  7. Factors influencing the determination of cell traction forces

    PubMed Central

    Ehret, Alexander E.; Mazza, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    Methods summarized by the term Traction Force Microscopy are widely used to quantify cellular forces in mechanobiological studies. These methods are inverse, in the sense that forces must be determined such that they comply with a measured displacement field. This study investigates how several experimental and analytical factors, originating in the realization of the experiments and the procedures for the analysis, affect the determined traction forces. The present results demonstrate that even for very high resolution measurements free of noise, traction forces can be significantly underestimated, while traction peaks are typically overestimated by 50% or more, even in the noise free case. Compared to this errors, which are inherent to the nature of the mechanical problem and its discretization, the effect of ignoring the out-of-plane displacement component, the interpolation scheme used between the discrete measurement points and the disregard of the geometrical non-linearities when using a nearly linear substrate material are less consequential. Nevertheless, a nonlinear elastic substrate, with strain-stiffening response and some degree of compressibility, can substantially improve the robustness of the reconstruction of traction forces over a wide range of magnitudes. This poses the need for a correct mechanical representation of these non-linearities during the traction reconstruction and a correct mechanical characterization of the substrate itself, especially for the large strain shear domain which is shown to plays a major role in the deformations induced by cells. PMID:28235004

  8. Three-dimensional traction force distribution in migrating amoeboid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Begona; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Meili, Rudolf; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-03-01

    We have studied the 3D traction forces exerted by migrating Dictyostelium cells moving over flat elastic substrates. For that purpose, we have developed a method to calculate both vertical and tangential cell traction forces from measurements of 3D substrate deformation, based on the solution of the elastostatic equation for a linearly elastic medium. 3D substrate deformation is measured by applying correlation techniques to a volume of substrate containing fluorescent markers. We have performed experiments for wild-type (WT) and mutant cell lines with crosslinking defects to study how cytoskeletal organization affects the overall distribution of traction forces. We find that cells push the substrate downwards near their center and pull upwards at their periphery with forces of comparable magnitude. Our initial findings show that the effect of the crosslinking mutations on the tangential forces do not necessarily predict the effect on the vertical forces. For instance, myosin II-null cells show a significant reduction of the front-back organization of the tangential traction forces, while the distribution of vertical forces basically remains unaffected.

  9. Changes in cervical muscle activity according to the traction force of an air-inflatable neck traction device

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Ho; Park, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze cervical muscle activity at different traction forces of an air-inflatable neck traction device. [Subjects] Eighteen males participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects put on an air-inflatable neck traction device and the traction forces administered were 40, 80, and 120 mmHg. The electromyography (EMG) signals of the splenius capitis, and upper trapezius were measured to assess the muscle activity. [Results] The muscle activity of the splenius capitis was significantly higher at 80, and 120 mmHg compared to 40 mmHg. The muscle activity of the upper trapezius did not show significant differences among the traction forces. [Conclusion] Our research result showed that the air-inflatable home neck traction device did not meet the condition of muscle relaxation. PMID:26504278

  10. Changes in cervical muscle activity according to the traction force of an air-inflatable neck traction device.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jong Ho; Park, Tae-Sung

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze cervical muscle activity at different traction forces of an air-inflatable neck traction device. [Subjects] Eighteen males participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects put on an air-inflatable neck traction device and the traction forces administered were 40, 80, and 120 mmHg. The electromyography (EMG) signals of the splenius capitis, and upper trapezius were measured to assess the muscle activity. [Results] The muscle activity of the splenius capitis was significantly higher at 80, and 120 mmHg compared to 40 mmHg. The muscle activity of the upper trapezius did not show significant differences among the traction forces. [Conclusion] Our research result showed that the air-inflatable home neck traction device did not meet the condition of muscle relaxation.

  11. Rigid two-axis MEMS force plate for measuring cellular traction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Jung, Uijin G.; Kan, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-10-01

    Cellular traction force is one of the important factors for understanding cell behaviors, such as spreading, migration and differentiation. Cells are known to change their behavior according to the mechanical stiffness of the environment. However, the measurement of cell traction forces on a rigid environment has remained difficult. This paper reports a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) force plate that provides a cellular traction force measurement on a rigid substrate. Both the high force sensitivity and high stiffness of the substrate were obtained using piezoresistive sensing elements. The proposed force plate consists of a 70 µm  ×  15 µm  ×  5 µm base as the substrate for cultivating a bovine aortic smooth muscle cell, and the supporting beams with piezoresistors on the sidewall and the surface were used to measure the forces in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The spring constant and force resolution of the fabricated force plate in the horizontal direction were 0.2 N m-1 and less than 0.05 µN, respectively. The cell traction force was measured, and the traction force increased by approximately 1 µN over 30 min. These results demonstrate that the proposed force plate is applicable as an effective traction force measurement.

  12. Microglia mechanics: immune activation alters traction forces and durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Lars; Koser, David E.; Shahapure, Rajesh; Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Gather, Malte C.; Ulbricht, Elke; Franze, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are key players in the primary immune response of the central nervous system. They are highly active and motile cells that chemically and mechanically interact with their environment. While the impact of chemical signaling on microglia function has been studied in much detail, the current understanding of mechanical signaling is very limited. When cultured on compliant substrates, primary microglial cells adapted their spread area, morphology, and actin cytoskeleton to the stiffness of their environment. Traction force microscopy revealed that forces exerted by microglia increase with substrate stiffness until reaching a plateau at a shear modulus of ~5 kPa. When cultured on substrates incorporating stiffness gradients, microglia preferentially migrated toward stiffer regions, a process termed durotaxis. Lipopolysaccharide-induced immune-activation of microglia led to changes in traction forces, increased migration velocities and an amplification of durotaxis. We finally developed a mathematical model connecting traction forces with the durotactic behavior of migrating microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that microglia are susceptible to mechanical signals, which could be important during central nervous system development and pathologies. Stiffness gradients in tissue surrounding neural implants such as electrodes, for example, could mechanically attract microglial cells, thus facilitating foreign body reactions detrimental to electrode functioning. PMID:26441534

  13. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  14. Matrix identity and tractional forces influence indirect cardiac reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yen P.; Carrion, Bita; Singh, Rahul K.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2013-12-01

    Heart regeneration through in vivo cardiac reprogramming has been demonstrated as a possible regenerative strategy. While it has been reported that cardiac reprogramming in vivo is more efficient than in vitro, the influence of the extracellular microenvironment on cardiac reprogramming remains incompletely understood. This understanding is necessary to improve the efficiency of cardiac reprogramming in order to implement this strategy successfully. Here we have identified matrix identity and cell-generated tractional forces as key determinants of the dedifferentiation and differentiation stages during reprogramming. Cell proliferation, matrix mechanics, and matrix microstructure are also important, but play lesser roles. Our results suggest that the extracellular microenvironment can be optimized to enhance cardiac reprogramming.

  15. Traction force and tension fluctuations in growing axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Polackwich, Jamie; Koch, Daniel; McAllister, Ryan; Geller, Herbert

    Actively generated mechanical forces play a central role in axon growth and guidance during nervous system development. We describe the dynamics of traction stresses from growth cones of actively advancing axons from postnatal rat DRG neurons. By tracking the movement of the growth cone and analyzing the traction stresses in a co-moving reference frame, we show that there is a clear and consistent average stress field underlying the complex spatial stresses present at any one time. The average stress field has strong maxima on the sides of the growth cone, directed inward toward the growth cone neck. This pattern represents a Contractile stress contained within the growth cone, and a net force that is balanced by the axon tension. In addition, using high time-resolution measurements, we show that the stress field is composed of fluctuating local stress peaks, with a population of peaks whose lifetime distribution follows an exponential decay, and a small number of very long-lived peaks. We also find that the tension appears to vary randomly over short time scales, roughly consistent with the lifetime of the stress peaks, suggesting that the tension fluctuations originate from stochastic adhesion dynamics.

  16. Human small intestinal contractions and aboral traction forces during fasting and after feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, N K; Thompson, D G; Barlow, J; Heggie, L

    1994-01-01

    Small intestinal intraluminal pressure activity and aboral traction forces were explored in 19 healthy volunteers using a combined manometry and traction force detecting assembly sited in the upper small intestine. Each aboral traction event was classified as being associated with either a propagating or a stationary contraction and its force measured. During phase I no contractions or traction events were seen. During phase II, traction events related to propagating contractions mean (SEM) (2.2 (0.2)/min) and to stationary contractions (0.3 (0.1)/min) generated similar force/event (7.5(0.9 g v 8.7 (1.4) g, p > 0.05). During phase III, all traction events were related to propagating contractions and generated 9.3 (2.4) g force/event (p > 0.05 v phase II). After feeding, traction events related to propagating contractions generated similar force/event to those related to stationary contractions (5.9 (1.0) g v 9.3 (2.7) g, p > 0.05 v each other and v fasting). No consistent pattern was seen in the temporal distribution of the traction events or in the pattern of the amplitude of the force of successive traction events. PMID:8200554

  17. Applications of Traction Force Microscopy in Measuring Adhesion Molecule Dependent Cell Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Cynthia Marie

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the use of polyacrylamide hydrogels as controlled elastic modulus substrates for single cell traction force microscopy studies. The first section describes the use of EDC/NHS chemistry to convalently link microbeads to the hydrogel matrix for the purpose of performing long-term traction force studies (7 days). The final study…

  18. Matrix identity and tractional forces influence indirect cardiac reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yen P.; Carrion, Bita; Singh, Rahul K.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Heart regeneration through in vivo cardiac reprogramming has been demonstrated as a possible regenerative strategy. While it has been reported that cardiac reprogramming in vivo is more efficient than in vitro, the influence of the extracellular microenvironment on cardiac reprogramming remains incompletely understood. This understanding is necessary to improve the efficiency of cardiac reprogramming in order to implement this strategy successfully. Here we have identified matrix identity and cell-generated tractional forces as key determinants of the dedifferentiation and differentiation stages during reprogramming. Cell proliferation, matrix mechanics, and matrix microstructure are also important, but play lesser roles. Our results suggest that the extracellular microenvironment can be optimized to enhance cardiac reprogramming. PMID:24326998

  19. Two-Layer Elastographic 3-D Traction Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Zhang, Shun; Gómez-González, Manuel; Meili, Ruedi; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; Del Álamo, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular traction force microscopy (TFM) requires knowledge of the mechanical properties of the substratum where the cells adhere to calculate cell-generated forces from measurements of substratum deformation. Polymer-based hydrogels are broadly used for TFM due to their linearly elastic behavior in the range of measured deformations. However, the calculated stresses, particularly their spatial patterns, can be highly sensitive to the substratum’s Poisson’s ratio. We present two-layer elastographic TFM (2LETFM), a method that allows for simultaneously measuring the Poisson’s ratio of the substratum while also determining the cell-generated forces. The new method exploits the analytical solution of the elastostatic equation and deformation measurements from two layers of the substratum. We perform an in silico analysis of 2LETFM concluding that this technique is robust with respect to TFM experimental parameters, and remains accurate even for noisy measurement data. We also provide experimental proof of principle of 2LETFM by simultaneously measuring the stresses exerted by migrating Physarum amoeboae on the surface of polyacrylamide substrata, and the Poisson’s ratio of the substrata. The 2LETFM method could be generalized to concurrently determine the mechanical properties and cell-generated forces in more physiologically relevant extracellular environments, opening new possibilities to study cell-matrix interactions.

  20. Two-Layer Elastographic 3-D Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Zhang, Shun; Gómez-González, Manuel; Meili, Ruedi; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular traction force microscopy (TFM) requires knowledge of the mechanical properties of the substratum where the cells adhere to calculate cell-generated forces from measurements of substratum deformation. Polymer-based hydrogels are broadly used for TFM due to their linearly elastic behavior in the range of measured deformations. However, the calculated stresses, particularly their spatial patterns, can be highly sensitive to the substratum’s Poisson’s ratio. We present two-layer elastographic TFM (2LETFM), a method that allows for simultaneously measuring the Poisson’s ratio of the substratum while also determining the cell-generated forces. The new method exploits the analytical solution of the elastostatic equation and deformation measurements from two layers of the substratum. We perform an in silico analysis of 2LETFM concluding that this technique is robust with respect to TFM experimental parameters, and remains accurate even for noisy measurement data. We also provide experimental proof of principle of 2LETFM by simultaneously measuring the stresses exerted by migrating Physarum amoeboae on the surface of polyacrylamide substrata, and the Poisson’s ratio of the substrata. The 2LETFM method could be generalized to concurrently determine the mechanical properties and cell-generated forces in more physiologically relevant extracellular environments, opening new possibilities to study cell-matrix interactions. PMID:28074837

  1. Predictive value of traction force measurement in vacuum extraction: Development of a multivariate prognostic model

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Kristina; Yousaf, Khurram; Ranstam, Jonas; Westgren, Magnus; Ajne, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Objective To enable early prediction of strong traction force vacuum extraction. Design Observational cohort. Setting Karolinska University Hospital delivery ward, tertiary unit. Population and sample size Term mid and low metal cup vacuum extraction deliveries June 2012—February 2015, n = 277. Methods Traction forces during vacuum extraction were collected prospectively using an intelligent handle. Levels of traction force were analysed pairwise by subjective category strong versus non-strong extraction, in order to define an objective predictive value for strong extraction. Statistical analysis A logistic regression model based on the shrinkage and selection method lasso was used to identify the predictive capacity of the different traction force variables. Predictors Total (time force integral, Newton minutes) and peak traction (Newton) force in the first to third pull; difference in traction force between the second and first pull, as well as the third and first pull respectively. Accumulated traction force at the second and third pull. Outcome Subjectively categorized extraction as strong versus non-strong. Results The prevalence of strong extraction was 26%. Prediction including the first and second pull: AUC 0,85 (CI 0,80–0,90); specificity 0,76; sensitivity 0,87; PPV 0,56; NPV 0,94. Prediction including the first to third pull: AUC 0,86 (CI 0,80–0,91); specificity 0,87; sensitivity 0,70; PPV 0,65; NPV 0,89. Conclusion Traction force measurement during vacuum extraction can help exclude strong category extraction from the second pull. From the third pull, two-thirds of strong extractions can be predicted. PMID:28257459

  2. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ˜16-89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (˜64-89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (˜16-51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction.

  3. Dynamic peripheral traction forces balance stable neurite tension in regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Callen; Mertz, Aaron F; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric

    2014-05-14

    Growth cones of elongating neurites exert force against the external environment, but little is known about the role of force in outgrowth or its relationship to the mechanical organization of neurons. We used traction force microscopy to examine patterns of force in growth cones of regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons. We find that traction is highest in the peripheral actin-rich domain and internal stress reaches a plateau near the transition between peripheral and central microtubule-rich domains. Integrating stress over the area of the growth cone reveals that total scalar force increases with area but net tension on the neurite does not. Tensions fall within a limited range while a substantial fraction of the total force can be balanced locally within the growth cone. Although traction continuously redistributes during extension and retraction of the peripheral domain, tension is stable over time, suggesting that tension is a tightly regulated property of the neurite independent of growth cone dynamics. We observe that redistribution of traction in the peripheral domain can reorient the end of the neurite shaft. This suggests a role for off-axis force in growth cone turning and neuronal guidance.

  4. A simple force-motion relation for migrating cells revealed by multipole analysis of traction stress.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Sano, Masaki

    2014-01-07

    For biophysical understanding of cell motility, the relationship between mechanical force and cell migration must be uncovered, but it remains elusive. Since cells migrate at small scale in dissipative circumstances, the inertia force is negligible and all forces should cancel out. This implies that one must quantify the spatial pattern of the force instead of just the summation to elucidate the force-motion relation. Here, we introduced multipole analysis to quantify the traction stress dynamics of migrating cells. We measured the traction stress of Dictyostelium discoideum cells and investigated the lowest two moments, the force dipole and quadrupole moments, which reflect rotational and front-rear asymmetries of the stress field. We derived a simple force-motion relation in which cells migrate along the force dipole axis with a direction determined by the force quadrupole. Furthermore, as a complementary approach, we also investigated fine structures in the stress field that show front-rear asymmetric kinetics consistent with the multipole analysis. The tight force-motion relation enables us to predict cell migration only from the traction stress patterns.

  5. Roles of cell confluency and fluid shear in 3-dimensional intracellular forces in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hur, Sung Sik; del Álamo, Juan C; Park, Joon Seok; Li, Yi-Shuan; Nguyen, Hong A; Teng, Dayu; Wang, Kuei-Chun; Flores, Leona; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Lasheras, Juan C; Chien, Shu

    2012-07-10

    We use a novel 3D inter-/intracellular force microscopy technique based on 3D traction force microscopy to measure the cell-cell junctional and intracellular tensions in subconfluent and confluent vascular endothelial cell (EC) monolayers under static and shear flow conditions. We found that z-direction cell-cell junctional tensions are higher in confluent EC monolayers than those in subconfluent ECs, which cannot be revealed in the previous 2D methods. Under static conditions, subconfluent cells are under spatially non-uniform tensions, whereas cells in confluent monolayers are under uniform tensions. The shear modulations of EC cytoskeletal remodeling, extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions, and cell-cell junctions lead to significant changes in intracellular tensions. When a confluent monolayer is subjected to flow shear stresses with a high forward component comparable to that seen in the straight part of the arterial system, the intracellular and junction tensions preferentially increase along the flow direction over time, which may be related to the relocation of adherens junction proteins. The increases in intracellular tensions are shown to be a result of chemo-mechanical responses of the ECs under flow shear rather than a direct result of mechanical loading. In contrast, the intracellular tensions do not show a preferential orientation under oscillatory flow with a very low mean shear. These differences in the directionality and magnitude of intracellular tensions may modulate translation and transcription of ECs under different flow patterns, thus affecting their susceptibility for atherogenesis.

  6. Free Form Deformation–Based Image Registration Improves Accuracy of Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Izquierdo-Alvarez, Alicia; Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocio; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Garcia-Aznar, José Manuel; Van Oosterwyck, Hans; de-Juan-Pardo, Elena M.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate

    2015-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a widespread method used to recover cellular tractions from the deformation that they cause in their surrounding substrate. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is commonly used to quantify the substrate’s deformations, due to its simplicity and efficiency. However, PIV relies on a block-matching scheme that easily underestimates the deformations. This is especially relevant in the case of large, locally non-uniform deformations as those usually found in the vicinity of a cell’s adhesions to the substrate. To overcome these limitations, we formulate the calculation of the deformation of the substrate in TFM as a non-rigid image registration process that warps the image of the unstressed material to match the image of the stressed one. In particular, we propose to use a B-spline -based Free Form Deformation (FFD) algorithm that uses a connected deformable mesh to model a wide range of flexible deformations caused by cellular tractions. Our FFD approach is validated in 3D fields using synthetic (simulated) data as well as with experimental data obtained using isolated endothelial cells lying on a deformable, polyacrylamide substrate. Our results show that FFD outperforms PIV providing a deformation field that allows a better recovery of the magnitude and orientation of tractions. Together, these results demonstrate the added value of the FFD algorithm for improving the accuracy of traction recovery. PMID:26641883

  7. Cell-ECM traction force modulates endogenous tension at cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Gardel, Margaret L

    2011-03-22

    Cells in tissues are mechanically coupled both to the ECM and neighboring cells, but the coordination and interdependency of forces sustained at cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions are unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that the endogenous force sustained at the cell-cell contact between a pair of epithelial cells is approximately 100 nN, directed perpendicular to the cell-cell interface and concentrated at the contact edges. This force is stably maintained over time despite significant fluctuations in cell-cell contact length and cell morphology. A direct relationship between the total cellular traction force on the ECM and the endogenous cell-cell force exists, indicating that the cell-cell tension is a constant fraction of the cell-ECM traction. Thus, modulation of ECM properties that impact cell-ECM traction alters cell-cell tension. Finally, we show in a minimal model of a tissue that all cells experience similar forces from the surrounding microenvironment, despite differences in the extent of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion. This interdependence of cell-cell and cell-ECM forces has significant implications for the maintenance of the mechanical integrity of tissues, mechanotransduction, and tumor mechanobiology.

  8. Model-based traction force microscopy reveals differential tension in cellular actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Soiné, Jérôme R D; Brand, Christoph A; Stricker, Jonathan; Oakes, Patrick W; Gardel, Margaret L; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-03-01

    Adherent cells use forces at the cell-substrate interface to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment. These cell forces can be measured with traction force microscopy which inverts the equations of elasticity theory to calculate them from the deformations of soft polymer substrates. We introduce a new type of traction force microscopy that in contrast to traditional methods uses additional image data for cytoskeleton and adhesion structures and a biophysical model to improve the robustness of the inverse procedure and abolishes the need for regularization. We use this method to demonstrate that ventral stress fibers of U2OS-cells are typically under higher mechanical tension than dorsal stress fibers or transverse arcs.

  9. Model-based Traction Force Microscopy Reveals Differential Tension in Cellular Actin Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Soiné, Jérôme R. D.; Brand, Christoph A.; Stricker, Jonathan; Oakes, Patrick W.; Gardel, Margaret L.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2015-01-01

    Adherent cells use forces at the cell-substrate interface to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment. These cell forces can be measured with traction force microscopy which inverts the equations of elasticity theory to calculate them from the deformations of soft polymer substrates. We introduce a new type of traction force microscopy that in contrast to traditional methods uses additional image data for cytoskeleton and adhesion structures and a biophysical model to improve the robustness of the inverse procedure and abolishes the need for regularization. We use this method to demonstrate that ventral stress fibers of U2OS-cells are typically under higher mechanical tension than dorsal stress fibers or transverse arcs. PMID:25748431

  10. Creep force modelling for rail traction vehicles based on the Fastsim algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Polach, Oldrich; Cole, Colin

    2013-11-01

    The evaluation of creep forces is a complex task and their calculation is a time-consuming process for multibody simulation (MBS). A methodology of creep forces modelling at large traction creepages has been proposed by Polach [Creep forces in simulations of traction vehicles running on adhesion limit. Wear. 2005;258:992-1000; Influence of locomotive tractive effort on the forces between wheel and rail. Veh Syst Dyn. 2001(Suppl);35:7-22] adapting his previously published algorithm [Polach O. A fast wheel-rail forces calculation computer code. Veh Syst Dyn. 1999(Suppl);33:728-739]. The most common method for creep force modelling used by software packages for MBS of running dynamics is the Fastsim algorithm by Kalker [A fast algorithm for the simplified theory of rolling contact. Veh Syst Dyn. 1982;11:1-13]. However, the Fastsim code has some limitations which do not allow modelling the creep force - creep characteristic in agreement with measurements for locomotives and other high-power traction vehicles, mainly for large traction creep at low-adhesion conditions. This paper describes a newly developed methodology based on a variable contact flexibility increasing with the ratio of the slip area to the area of adhesion. This variable contact flexibility is introduced in a modification of Kalker's code Fastsim by replacing the constant Kalker's reduction factor, widely used in MBS, by a variable reduction factor together with a slip-velocity-dependent friction coefficient decreasing with increasing global creepage. The proposed methodology is presented in this work and compared with measurements for different locomotives. The modification allows use of the well recognised Fastsim code for simulation of creep forces at large creepages in agreement with measurements without modifying the proven modelling methodology at small creepages.

  11. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed Central

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two compiled physiotherapy programs: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (±SD) age for all participants was 59 ± 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score ≥20 points or ≥50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0–100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7–16) over 5–12 weeks and 20 (18–24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (≥20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented. PMID:18833335

  12. Flexible substrata for the detection of cellular traction forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beningo, Karen A.; Wang, Yu-Li

    2002-01-01

    By modulating adhesion signaling and cytoskeletal organization, mechanical forces play an important role in various cellular functions, from propelling cell migration to mediating communication between cells. Recent developments have resulted in several new approaches for the detection, analysis and visualization of mechanical forces generated by cultured cells. Combining these methods with other approaches, such as green-fluorescent protein (GFP) imaging and gene manipulation, proves to be particularly powerful for analyzing the interplay between extracellular physical forces and intracellular chemical events.

  13. Cadherin-based intercellular adhesions organize epithelial cell–matrix traction forces

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Aaron F.; Che, Yonglu; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill M.; Rosowski, Kathryn A.; Revilla, Stephen F.; Niessen, Carien M.; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R.; Horsley, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of cross talk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell–cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is sufficient to recreate the spatial rearrangement of traction forces observed experimentally with varying strength of cadherin-based adhesions. This work defines the importance of cadherin-based cell–cell adhesions in coordinating mechanical activity of epithelial cells and has implications for the mechanical regulation of epithelial tissues during development, homeostasis, and disease. PMID:23277553

  14. Fast numerical calculations of EHD sliding traction forces Application to rolling bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpert, L.

    1984-01-01

    Based on analytical calculations assuming isothermal elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubrication conditions, and on curve-fitting of a thermal correction factor, a new formula is proposed to calculate the sliding traction force developed in a concentrated contact, assuming a nonlinear, viscoelastic lubricant and undirectional sliding. When sliding occurs in the rolling and transverse directions (bidimensional sliding), a simplified numerical method is outlined by which the components of the local shear stress are quickly calculated. The latter method is applied to the calculation of the shear stress and temperature distribution in the ball-raceway contacts of an angular-contact ball bearing. Because of the viscoelastic behavior of the lubricant, a nonzero lateral traction force is obtained.

  15. Active Traction Force Response to Long-Term Cyclic Stretch Is Dependent on Cell Pre-stress.

    PubMed

    Cirka, Heather; Monterosso, Melissa; Diamantides, Nicole; Favreau, John; Wen, Qi; Billiar, Kristen

    2016-04-26

    Mechanical stimulation is recognized as a potent modulator of cellular behaviors such as proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix assembly. However, the study of how cell-generated traction force changes in response to stretch is generally limited to short-term stimulation. The goal of this work is to determine how cells actively alter their traction force in response to long-term physiological cyclic stretch as a function of cell pre-stress. We have developed, to our knowledge, a novel method to assess traction force after long-term (24 h) uniaxial or biaxial cyclic stretch under conditions of high cell pre-stress with culture on stiff (7.5 kPa) polyacrylamide gels (with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)) and low pre-stress by treating with blebbistatin or culture on soft gels (0.6 kPa). In response to equibiaxial stretch, valvular interstitial cells on stiff substrates decreased their traction force (from 300 nN to 100 nN) and spread area (from 3000 to 2100 μm(2)). With uniaxial stretch, the cells had similar decreases in traction force and area and reoriented perpendicular to the stretch. TGF-β1-treated valvular interstitial cells had higher pre-stress (1100 nN) and exhibited a larger drop in traction force with uniaxial stretch, but the percentage changes in force and area with stretch were similar to the non-TGF-β1-treated group. Cells with inhibited myosin II motors increased traction force (from 41 nN to 63 nN) and slightly reoriented toward the stretch direction. In contrast, cells cultured on soft gels increased their traction force significantly, from 15 nN to 45 nN, doubled their spread area, elongated from an initially rounded morphology, and reoriented perpendicular to the uniaxial stretch. Contractile-moment measurements provided results consistent with total traction force measurements. The combined results indicate that the change in traction force in response to external cyclic stretch is dependent upon the

  16. Characterization of Intracellular Streaming and Traction Forces in Migrating Physarum Plasmodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shun; Meili, Ruedi; Guy, Robert D.; Lasheras, Juan C.; Del Alamo, Juan C.

    2013-11-01

    Physarum plasmodium is a model organism for cell migration that exhibits fast intracellular streaming. Single amoebae were seeded and allowed to move on polyacrilamide gels that contained 0.2 μm fluorescent beads. Joint time-lapse sequences of intracellular streaming and gel deformation were acquired respectively in the bright and fluorescent fields of a confocal microscope. Images were analyzed using particle image velocimetry (PIV) algorithms, and the traction stresses applied by the amoebae on the surface were computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the gel. These measurements provide, for the first time, a joint characterization of intracellular mass transport and the forces applied on the substrate of motile amoeboid cells with high resolution in both time and space, enables a through study about the locomotive mechanism and the relation between intracellular flow and traction stress, shedding light on related biomimetic research. The results reveal a pronounced auto-oscillation character in intracellular flow, contact area, centroid speed and strain energy, all with the same periodicity about 60 seconds. Adhesion sites are found to be almost stationary while a traction wave propagates from the tail to the anterior region in each cycle.

  17. Characterization of Intracellular Streaming and Traction Forces in Migrating Physarum Plasmodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shun; Meili, Ruedi; Guy, Robert; Lasheras, Juan; Del Alamo, Juan C.

    2014-11-01

    Physarum plasmodium is a model organism for cell migration that exhibits fast intracellular streaming. Single amoebae were seeded and allowed to move on polyacrilamide gels that contained 0.5-micron fluorescent beads. Joint time-lapse sequences of intracellular streaming and gel deformation were acquired respectively in the bright and fluorescent fields under microscope. These images were analyzed using particle image velocimetry (PIV) algorithms, and the traction stresses applied by the amoebae on the surface were computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the gel using the measured bead displacements as boundary conditions. These measurements provide, for the first time, a joint characterization of intracellular mass transport and the forces applied on the substrate of motile amoeboid cells with high resolution in both time and space, enables a through study about the locomotive mechanism and the relation between intracellular flow and traction stress, shedding light on related biomimetic research. The results reveal a pronounced auto-oscillation character in intracellular flow, contact area, centroid speed and strain energy, all with the same periodicity about 100 seconds. Locomotion modes that were distinct in flow/ traction stress pattern as well as migration speed have been discovered and studied.

  18. Master equation-based analysis of a motor-clutch model for cell traction force.

    PubMed

    Bangasser, Benjamin L; Odde, David J

    2013-12-01

    Microenvironmental mechanics play an important role in determining the morphology, traction, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. A stochastic motor-clutch model has been proposed to describe this stiffness sensitivity. In this work, we present a master equation-based ordinary differential equation (ODE) description of the motor-clutch model, from which we derive an analytical expression to for a cell's optimum stiffness (i.e. the stiffness at which the traction force is maximal). This analytical expression provides insight into the requirements for stiffness sensing by establishing fundamental relationships between the key controlling cell-specific parameters. We find that the fundamental controlling parameters are the numbers of motors and clutches (constrained to be nearly equal), and the time scale of the on-off kinetics of the clutches (constrained to favor clutch binding over clutch unbinding). Both the ODE solution and the analytical expression show good agreement with Monte Carlo motor-clutch output, and reduce computation time by several orders of magnitude, which potentially enables long time scale behaviors (hours-days) to be studied computationally in an efficient manner. The ODE solution and the analytical expression may be incorporated into larger scale models of cellular behavior to bridge the gap from molecular time scales to cellular and tissue time scales.

  19. Characterization of Intracellular Streaming and Traction Forces in Migrating Physarum Plasmodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shun; Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Physarum plasmodium is a model organism for cell migration that exhibits fast intracellular streaming. Single amoebae were seeded and allowed to move on polyacrilamide gels that contained 0.5-micron fluorescent beads. Joint time-lapse sequences of intracellular streaming and gel deformation were acquired respectively in the bright and fluorescent fields under microscope. These images were analyzed using particle image velocimetry (PIV) algorithms, and the traction stresses applied by the amoebae on the surface were computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the gel using the measured bead displacements as boundary conditions. These measurements provide, for the first time, a joint characterization of intracellular mass transport, the forces applied on the substrate and the signal of free intracellular calcium with high resolution in both time and space, enables a through study about the locomotive mechanism, shedding light on related biomimetic research. The results reveal a pronounced auto-oscillation character in intracellular flow, contact area, centroid speed and strain energy, all with the same periodicity about 100 seconds. Locomotion modes that were distinct in flow/ traction stress pattern as well as migration speed have been discovered and studied.

  20. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  1. Analysis of the contraction of fibroblast-collagen gels and the traction force of individual cells by a novel elementary structural model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Z; Wagatsuma, Y; Kobayashi, S; Kosawada, T; Sato, D; Nakamura, T; Kitajima, T; Umezu, M

    2013-01-01

    Based on the experimental data of the contraction ratio of fibroblast-collagen gels with different initial collagen concentrations and cell numbers, we analyzed the traction force exerted by individual cells through a novel elementary structural model. We postulate that the mechanical mechanism of the gel contraction is mainly because that populated cells apply traction force to some of the surrounding collagen fibrils with such proper length potential to be pulled straight so as to be able to sustain the traction force; this traction induce the cells moving closely to each other and consequently compact the fibrillar network; the bending force of the fibrils in turn resists the movement. By employing fiber packing theory for random fibrillar networks and network alteration theory, the bending force of collagen fibrils was deduced. The traction force exerted by individual fibroblasts in the gels was balanced by the bending force and the resistance from interstitial fluid since inertial force can be neglected. The maximum traction force per cell under free floating condition is in the range of 0.27-9.02 nN depending on the initial collagen concentration and populated cell number. The most important outcome of this study is that the traction force of individual cells dynamically varies under different gel conditions, whereas the adhesion force between cell and individual fibrils is relatively converging and stable.

  2. Directional control of lamellipodia extension by constraining cell shape and orienting cell tractional forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Kevin Kit; Brock, Amy Lepre; Brangwynne, Cliff; Mannix, Robert J.; Wang, Ning; Ostuni, Emanuele; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Adams, Josephine C.; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for tissue morphogenesis and wound healing, but the mechanism of directional control is poorly understood. Here we show that the direction in which cells extend their leading edge can be controlled by constraining cell shape using micrometer-sized extracellular matrix (ECM) islands. When cultured on square ECM islands in the presence of motility factors, cells preferentially extended lamellipodia, filopodia, and microspikes from their corners. Square cells reoriented their stress fibers and focal adhesions so that tractional forces were concentrated in these corner regions. When cell tension was dissipated, lamellipodia extension ceased. Mechanical interactions between cells and ECM that modulate cytoskeletal tension may therefore play a key role in the control of directional cell motility.

  3. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  4. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretationmore » of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.« less

  5. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tapping-mode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Finally, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  6. 4D Traction Force Microscopy Reveals Asymmetric Cortical Forces in Migrating Dictyostelium Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delanoë-Ayari, H.; Rieu, J. P.; Sano, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a 4D (x; y; z; t) force map of Dictyostelium cells crawling on a soft gel substrate. Vertical forces are of the same order as the tangential ones. The cells pull the substratum upward along the cell, medium, or substratum contact line and push it downward under the cell except for the pseudopods. We demonstrate quantitatively that the variations in the asymmetry in cortical forces correlates with the variations of the direction and speed of cell displacement.

  7. High-resolution traction force microscopy on small focal adhesions - improved accuracy through optimal marker distribution and optical flow tracking

    PubMed Central

    Holenstein, Claude N.; Silvan, Unai; Snedeker, Jess G.

    2017-01-01

    The accurate determination of cellular forces using Traction Force Microscopy at increasingly small focal attachments to the extracellular environment presents an important yet substantial technical challenge. In these measurements, uncertainty regarding accuracy is prominent since experimental calibration frameworks at this size scale are fraught with errors – denying a gold standard against which accuracy of TFM methods can be judged. Therefore, we have developed a simulation platform for generating synthetic traction images that can be used as a benchmark to quantify the influence of critical experimental parameters and the associated errors. Using this approach, we show that TFM accuracy can be improved >35% compared to the standard approach by placing fluorescent beads as densely and closely as possible to the site of applied traction. Moreover, we use the platform to test tracking algorithms based on optical flow that measure deformation directly at the beads and show that these can dramatically outperform classical particle image velocimetry algorithms in terms of noise sensitivity and error. We then report how optimized experimental and numerical strategy can improve traction map accuracy, and further provide the best available benchmark to date for defining practical limits to TFM accuracy as a function of focal adhesion size. PMID:28164999

  8. High-throughput and non-destructive sidewall roughness measurement using 3-dimensional atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yueming; Buenviaje-Coggins, Cynthia; Lee, Yong-ha; Park, Sang-il

    2012-03-01

    As the feature size of the semiconductor device is becoming increasingly smaller and the transistor has become three-dimensional (e.g. Fin-FET structure), a simple Line Edge Roughness (LER) is no longer sufficient for characterizing these devices. Sidewall Roughness (SWR) is now the more proper metric for these metrology applications. However, current metrology technologies, such as SEM and OCD, provide limited information on the sidewall of such small structures. The subject of this study is the sidewall roughness measurement with a three-dimensional Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) using tilted Z scanner. This 3D AFM is based on a decoupled XY and Z scanning configuration, in which the Z scanner can be intentionally tilted to the side. A sharp conical tip is typically used for imaging, which provides high resolution capability on both the flat surfaces (top and bottom) and the steep sidewalls.

  9. Quantification of Cell Edge Velocities and Traction Forces Reveals Distinct Motility Modules during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yunfei; Xenias, Harry; Spielman, Ingrid; Shneidman, Anna V.; David, Lawrence A.; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Wiggins, Chris H.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-based cell motility and force generation are central to immune response, tissue development, and cancer metastasis, and understanding actin cytoskeleton regulation is a major goal of cell biologists. Cell spreading is a commonly used model system for motility experiments – spreading fibroblasts exhibit stereotypic, spatially-isotropic edge dynamics during a reproducible sequence of functional phases: 1) During early spreading, cells form initial contacts with the surface. 2) The middle spreading phase exhibits rapidly increasing attachment area. 3) Late spreading is characterized by periodic contractions and stable adhesions formation. While differences in cytoskeletal regulation between phases are known, a global analysis of the spatial and temporal coordination of motility and force generation is missing. Implementing improved algorithms for analyzing edge dynamics over the entire cell periphery, we observed that a single domain of homogeneous cytoskeletal dynamics dominated each of the three phases of spreading. These domains exhibited a unique combination of biophysical and biochemical parameters – a motility module. Biophysical characterization of the motility modules revealed that the early phase was dominated by periodic, rapid membrane blebbing; the middle phase exhibited continuous protrusion with very low traction force generation; and the late phase was characterized by global periodic contractions and high force generation. Biochemically, each motility module exhibited a different distribution of the actin-related protein VASP, while inhibition of actin polymerization revealed different dependencies on barbed-end polymerization. In addition, our whole-cell analysis revealed that many cells exhibited heterogeneous combinations of motility modules in neighboring regions of the cell edge. Together, these observations support a model of motility in which regions of the cell edge exhibit one of a limited number of motility modules that, together

  10. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively. PMID:26817674

  11. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively.

  12. Multiphoton photochemical crosslinking-based fabrication of protein micropatterns with controllable mechanical properties for single cell traction force measurements.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ming Hui; Huang, Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan; Du, Yanan; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-28

    Engineering 3D microstructures with predetermined properties is critical for stem cell niche studies. We have developed a multiphoton femtosecond laser-based 3D printing platform, which generates complex protein microstructures in minutes. Here, we used the platform to test a series of fabrication and reagent parameters in precisely controlling the mechanical properties of protein micropillars. Atomic force microscopy was utilized to measure the reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars, and transmission electron microscopy was used to visualize the porosity of the structures. The reduced elastic modulus of the micropillars associated positively and linearly with the scanning power. On the other hand, the porosity and pore size of the micropillars associated inversely and linearly with the scanning power and reagent concentrations. While keeping the elastic modulus constant, the stiffness of the micropillars was controlled by varying their height. Subsequently, the single cell traction forces of rabbit chondrocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPCs) were successfully measured by culturing the cells on micropillar arrays of different stiffness. Our results showed that the traction forces of all groups showed positive relationship with stiffness, and that the chondrocytes and bNPCs generated the highest and lowest traction forces, respectively.

  13. Characterization of Intracellular Streaming and Traction Forces in Migrating Physarum Plasmodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shun; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Guy, Robert D.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2012-11-01

    Physarum plasmodium is a model organism for cell migration that exhibits fast intracellular streaming. Motile amoeboid physarum plasmodia were obtained from dish cultures of Physarum Polycephalum, a slime mold that inhabits shady cool moist areas in the wild, such as decaying vegetable material. The migrating amoebae were obtained by cutting successively smaller pieces from the growing tips of the cultured parent mold, and their size ranged 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Single amoebae were seeded and let adhere on flexible polyacrilamide gels that were functionalized with collagen, contained 0.2-micron fluorescent beads, and were embedded in an aqueous medium. Soon after adhering to the gel, the amoeabe began crawling at about 1mm/hr. Joint time-lapse sequences of intracellular streaming and gel deformation were acquired respectively in the bright and fluorescent fields of a confocal microscope at 20X magnification. These images were analyzed using particle-tracking algorithms, and the traction stresses applied by the amoebae on the surface were computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the gel using the measured bead displacements as boundary conditions. These measurements provide, for the first time, a joint characterization of intracellular mass transport and the forces driving this transport in motile amoeboid cells.

  14. Measurement of dynamic cell-induced 3D displacement fields in vitro for traction force optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Bordeleau, François; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-01-01

    Traction force microscopy (TFM) is a method used to study the forces exerted by cells as they sense and interact with their environment. Cell forces play a role in processes that take place over a wide range of spatiotemporal scales, and so it is desirable that TFM makes use of imaging modalities that can effectively capture the dynamics associated with these processes. To date, confocal microscopy has been the imaging modality of choice to perform TFM in 3D settings, although multiple factors limit its spatiotemporal coverage. We propose traction force optical coherence microscopy (TF-OCM) as a novel technique that may offer enhanced spatial coverage and temporal sampling compared to current methods used for volumetric TFM studies. Reconstructed volumetric OCM data sets were used to compute time-lapse extracellular matrix deformations resulting from cell forces in 3D culture. These matrix deformations revealed clear differences that can be attributed to the dynamic forces exerted by normal versus contractility-inhibited NIH-3T3 fibroblasts embedded within 3D Matrigel matrices. Our results are the first step toward the realization of 3D TF-OCM, and they highlight the potential use of OCM as a platform for advancing cell mechanics research. PMID:28271010

  15. Development And Use Of Advanced Microfabricated Traction Force Sensing Substrates To Study The Effect of Nanosilver On Human Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Daniel Thomas

    While nanoparticles are a natural byproduct of combustion and a number of natural processes, engineered nanoparticles have only recently entered the consumer market. This motivates the development of methods for studying their effects on human cells, thereby indicating how larger models such as animals and humans might react to them. This research develops a method to mechanically characterize cellular traction forces as a measure of exposure to nanoparticles. To do this, 1microm micropillar molds were fabricated in silicon wafers using smooth sidewall reactive ion plasma etching technologies. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), was cured inside the silicon molds, subsequently treated for cell culture and used to measure cellular traction forces over time in live cell time-lapse experiments. For the first time, transmitted light was used to visualize the PDMS micropillars; a force resolution of 5.6 +/-2.1nN was achieved across all experiments using a standard Olympus IX81 confocal microscope affixed with a 60x NA2.1 objective. To initiate cellular movement, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) was conjugated to 1microm latex beads. The effects of 40nm silver nanoparticle exposures were quantified using the micropillar array. Changes in cellular behavior between the control group and cells exposed to nanosilver were not significant, although a comparison between the 5microg/ml and 10microg/ml nanosilver concentrations yielded strong significance using a 2 sided Students t test.

  16. Three-dimensional traction forces of Schwann cells on compliant substrates.

    PubMed

    López-Fagundo, Cristina; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Livi, Liane L; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Franck, Christian

    2014-08-06

    The mechanical interaction between Schwann cells (SCs) and their microenvironment is crucial for the development, maintenance and repair of the peripheral nervous system. In this paper, we present a detailed investigation on the mechanosensitivity of SCs across a physiologically relevant substrate stiffness range. Contrary to many other cell types, we find that the SC spreading area and cytoskeletal actin architecture were relatively insensitive to substrate stiffness with pronounced stress fibre formation across all moduli tested (0.24-4.80 kPa). Consistent with the presence of stress fibres, we found that SCs generated large surface tractions on stiff substrates and large, finite material deformations on soft substrates. When quantifying the three-dimensional characteristics of the SC traction profiles, we observed a significant contribution from the out-of-plane traction component, locally giving rise to rotational moments similar to those observed in mesenchymal embryonic fibroblasts. Taken together, these measurements provide the first set of quantitative biophysical metrics of how SCs interact with their physical microenvironment, which are anticipated to aid in the development of tissue engineering scaffolds designed to promote functional integration of SCs into post-injury in vivo environments.

  17. Young adult patient with two palatally maxillary impacted canines and forced traction on rigid arches of stabilization. Case report

    PubMed Central

    MUCEDERO, M.; PEZZUTO, C.; ROZZI, M.; RICCHIUTI, M.R.; COZZA, P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Young adult patient treated for impaction of two maxillary canines. Methods C.S., 15 years, female. Diagnostic evaluation by clinical and radiographic examinations shows permanent dentition with persistence of 5.3 and 6.3, impaction of 1.3 and 2.3, dento-skeletal Cl I malocclusion, normodivergence of bone bases. Analysis of TC dentalscan confirms the palatal impaction of 1.3 and 2.3. The treatment plan provided an orthodontic-surgical approach for adequate space management in dental arch, evaluation of eruption movements, choice of anchorage device, surgical exposure and application of the brackets. Results Deciduous canines have been extracted and an edgewise appliance with rigid rectangular full thickness archwires has been used to align the arches and to obtain maximum anchorage during the forced traction. The surgical phase, for exposure of 1.3 and 2.3 respectively, performed an open technique by excisional uncovering and a close technique by a repositioned flap. The case has been finalized for the achievement of the right occlusal keys. Conclusion The possibility to choose the surgical technique depending on the intraosseous position of impacted teeth in association to the edgewise therapy with full thickness arches allows to realize an effectiveness surgical-orthodontic approach for the forced traction of impacted teeth in a favourable position. PMID:28042427

  18. Local Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly modulates applied traction force during apCAM adhesion site maturation

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Kenneth B.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Schoonderwoert, Vincent T.; Creamer, Matthew S.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Forscher, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Homophilic binding of immunoglobulin superfamily molecules such as the Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM) leads to actin filament assembly near nascent adhesion sites. Such actin assembly can generate significant localized forces that have not been characterized in the larger context of axon growth and guidance. We used apCAM-coated bead substrates applied to the surface of neuronal growth cones to characterize the development of forces evoked by varying stiffness of mechanical restraint. Unrestrained bead propulsion matched or exceeded rates of retrograde network flow and was dependent on Arp2/3 complex activity. Analysis of growth cone forces applied to beads at low stiffness of restraint revealed switching between two states: frictional coupling to retrograde flow and Arp2/3-dependent propulsion. Stiff mechanical restraint led to formation of an extensive actin cup matching the geometric profile of the bead target and forward growth cone translocation; pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex or Rac attenuated F-actin assembly near bead binding sites, decreased the efficacy of growth responses, and blocked accumulation of signaling molecules associated with nascent adhesions. These studies introduce a new model for regulation of traction force in which local actin assembly forces buffer nascent adhesion sites from the mechanical effects of retrograde flow. PMID:27852899

  19. Traction Model Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Viscosity Coefficient ...o.......112 9.4.3 Pressure Viscosity Coefficient ..ee*...e.*.112 9.4.4 SpecificGrvt..... . .... ..... 13 9.4.5 Conductivityoo...series of solutions are therefore usually wanted giving, e.g., the traction force Fx in the rolling direction or perhaps the traction coefficient Fx/P...radius in rolling direction S= pressure viscosity coefficient a,b = contact ellipse semi-axes in the direction of and transverse to the rolling direction

  20. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated matrix

  1. The emergence of extracellular matrix mechanics and cell traction forces as important regulators of cellular self-organization.

    PubMed

    Checa, Sara; Rausch, Manuel K; Petersen, Ansgar; Kuhl, Ellen; Duda, Georg N

    2015-01-01

    Physical cues play a fundamental role in a wide range of biological processes, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, tumour invasion and connective tissue morphogenesis. Although it is well known that during these processes, cells continuously interact with the local extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell traction forces, the role of these mechanical interactions on large scale cellular and matrix organization remains largely unknown. In this study, we use a simple theoretical model to investigate cellular and matrix organization as a result of mechanical feedback signals between cells and the surrounding ECM. The model includes bi-directional coupling through cellular traction forces to deform the ECM and through matrix deformation to trigger cellular migration. In addition, we incorporate the mechanical contribution of matrix fibres and their reorganization by the cells. We show that a group of contractile cells will self-polarize at a large scale, even in homogeneous environments. In addition, our simulations mimic the experimentally observed alignment of cells in the direction of maximum stiffness and the building up of tension as a consequence of cell and fibre reorganization. Moreover, we demonstrate that cellular organization is tightly linked to the mechanical feedback loop between cells and matrix. Cells with a preference for stiff environments have a tendency to form chains, while cells with a tendency for soft environments tend to form clusters. The model presented here illustrates the potential of simple physical cues and their impact on cellular self-organization. It can be used in applications where cell-matrix interactions play a key role, such as in the design of tissue engineering scaffolds and to gain a basic understanding of pattern formation in organogenesis or tissue regeneration.

  2. Integrin-beta3 clusters recruit clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery in the absence of traction force

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-han; Rafiq, Nisha Bte Mohd; Cao, Fakun; Zhou, Yuhuan; Krishnasamy, Anitha; Biswas, Kabir Hassan; Ravasio, Andrea; Chen, Zhongwen; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Kawauchi, Keiko; Jones, Gareth E.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The turnover of integrin receptors is critical for cell migration and adhesion dynamics. Here we find that force development at integrins regulates adaptor protein recruitment and endocytosis. Using mobile RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) ligands on supported lipid membranes (RGD membranes) and rigid RGD ligands on glass (RGD-glass), we find that matrix force-dependent integrin signals block endocytosis. Dab2, an adaptor protein of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is not recruited to activated integrin-beta3 clusters on RGD-glass; however, it is recruited to integrin-mediated adhesions on RGD membranes. Further, when force generation is inhibited on RGD-glass, Dab2 binds to integrin-beta3 clusters. Dab2 binding to integrin-beta3 excludes other adhesion-related adaptor proteins, such as talin. The clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery combines with Dab2 to facilitate the endocytosis of RGD-integrin-beta3 clusters. From these observations, we propose that loss of traction force on ligand-bound integrin-beta3 causes recruitment of Dab2/clathrin, resulting in endocytosis of integrins. PMID:26507506

  3. Cell Origami: Self-Folding of Three-Dimensional Cell-Laden Microstructures Driven by Cell Traction Force

    PubMed Central

    Kuribayashi-Shigetomi, Kaori; Onoe, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method of generating three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden microstructures by applying the principle of origami folding technique and cell traction force (CTF). We harness the CTF as a biological driving force to fold the microstructures. Cells stretch and adhere across multiple microplates. Upon detaching the microplates from a substrate, CTF causes the plates to lift and fold according to a prescribed pattern. This self-folding technique using cells is highly biocompatible and does not involve special material requirements for the microplates and hinges to induce folding. We successfully produced various 3D cell-laden microstructures by just changing the geometry of the patterned 2D plates. We also achieved mass-production of the 3D cell-laden microstructures without causing damage to the cells. We believe that our methods will be useful for biotechnology applications that require analysis of cells in 3D configurations and for self-assembly of cell-based micro-medical devices. PMID:23251426

  4. Characterization of cellular traction forces at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    The ability of cells to generate and respond to mechanical cues is an essential aspect of stem cell differentiation, embryonic development, and our senses of touch and hearing. However, our understanding of the roles of mechanical force in cell biology remains in its infancy, due largely to a lack of tools that measure the forces generated by living cells at the molecular scale. Here we describe a new technique termed Molecular Force Microscopy (MFM) that visualizes the forces exerted by single cellular adhesion molecules with nm, pN, and sub-second resolutions. MFM uses novel FRET-based molecular tension sensors that bind to a glass coverslip and present a binding site for integrins, a ubiquitous class of cell adhesion proteins. Cell-generated forces stretch the MFM sensor molecules, resulting in decreased FRET with increasing load that can be imaged at the single-molecule level. Human foreskin fibroblasts adhere to surfaces functionalized with the MFM probes and develop robust focal adhesions. FRET values measured using MFM indicate forces of between 1 and 4 pN per integrin, thus providing the first direct measurement of the tension per integrin molecule necessary to form stable adhesions. The relatively narrow force distribution suggests that mechanical tension is subject to exquisite feedback and control at the molecular level.

  5. Vibrating-traction method for mechanical joint distraction.

    PubMed

    Minagi, S; Sakiya, M; Sato, T; Matsunaga, T; Natsuaki, N

    2000-08-01

    Mechanical static traction has been adopted as one of the treatment procedures for joint diseases and fractures. The effect of mechanical vibration on the mechanical traction of the temporomandibular joint was studied in six human subjects. A mechanical traction force of 2000 gf was applied as a dynamic traction force with mechanical vibration or as a static traction force. The dynamic traction force with vibration was applied for 5 min to the right temporomandibular joint using a vibrating-traction apparatus which generated mechanical vibrations of 1000, 3000 or 4000 Hz. Application of a static traction force for 5 min was used as a control condition. Vertical condylar displacement was mathematically evaluated from the deviation of the mandible using Eddy current displacement sensors which were attached to the maxillary dental arch. Among the three vibration frequencies, 3000 Hz resulted in the maximum vertical condylar displacement for all six subjects, showing the mean condylar displacement of 668+/-242 microm. In contrast, vibrations of 1000 and 4000 Hz showed a smaller traction effect. Application of the static traction force for 5 min resulted in a mean vertical condylar displacement of 5.7+/-4.9 microm, showing almost no traction effect to the joint. From the results of this study, it was revealed that vibrating traction could distract a joint more effectively than could static traction and that the traction force necessary for effective vibrating traction was less than that for static traction.

  6. Micropillar displacements by cell traction forces are mechanically correlated with nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingsen; Makhija, Ekta; Hameed, F.M.; Shivashankar, G.V.

    2015-05-29

    Cells sense physical cues at the level of focal adhesions and transduce them to the nucleus by biochemical and mechanical pathways. While the molecular intermediates in the mechanical links have been well studied, their dynamic coupling is poorly understood. In this study, fibroblast cells were adhered to micropillar arrays to probe correlations in the physical coupling between focal adhesions and nucleus. For this, we used novel imaging setup to simultaneously visualize micropillar deflections and EGFP labeled chromatin structure at high spatial and temporal resolution. We observed that micropillar deflections, depending on their relative positions, were positively or negatively correlated to nuclear and heterochromatin movements. Our results measuring the time scales between micropillar deflections and nucleus centroid displacement are suggestive of a strong elastic coupling that mediates differential force transmission to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Correlation between focal adhesions and nucleus studied using novel imaging setup. • Micropillar and nuclear displacements were measured at high resolution. • Correlation timescales show strong elastic coupling between cell edge and nucleus.

  7. Cell-generated traction forces and the resulting matrix deformation modulate microvascular alignment and growth during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Clayton J.; Edgar, Lowell T.; Hoying, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The details of the mechanical factors that modulate angiogenesis remain poorly understood. Previous in vitro studies of angiogenesis using microvessel fragments cultured within collagen constructs demonstrated that neovessel alignment can be induced via mechanical constraint of the boundaries (i.e., boundary conditions). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of mechanical boundary conditions in the regulation of angiogenic alignment and growth in an in vitro model of angiogenesis. Angiogenic microvessels within three-dimensional constructs were subjected to different boundary conditions, thus producing different stress and strain fields during growth. Neovessel outgrowth and orientation were quantified from confocal image data after 6 days. Vascularity and branching decreased as the amount of constraint imposed on the culture increased. In long-axis constrained hexahedral constructs, microvessels aligned parallel to the constrained axis. In contrast, constructs that were constrained along the short axis had random microvessel orientation. Finite element models were used to simulate the contraction of gels under the various boundary conditions and to predict the local strain field experienced by microvessels. Results from the experiments and simulations demonstrated that microvessels aligned perpendicular to directions of compressive strain. Alignment was due to anisotropic deformation of the matrix from cell-generated traction forces interacting with the mechanical boundary conditions. These findings demonstrate that boundary conditions and thus the effective stiffness of the matrix regulate angiogenesis. This study offers a potential explanation for the oriented vascular beds that occur in native tissues and provides the basis for improved control of tissue vascularization in both native tissues and tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:24816262

  8. Direct observation of CD4 T cell morphologies and their cross-sectional traction force derivation on quartz nanopillar substrates using focused ion beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Gil-Sung; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Won-Yong; Hong, Chang-Hee; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Direct observations of the primary mouse CD4 T cell morphologies, e.g., cell adhesion and cell spreading by culturing CD4 T cells in a short period of incubation (e.g., 20 min) on streptavidin-functionalized quartz nanopillar arrays (QNPA) using a high-content scanning electron microscopy method were reported. Furthermore, we first demonstrated cross-sectional cell traction force distribution of surface-bound CD4 T cells on QNPA substrates by culturing the cells on top of the QNPA and further analysis in deflection of underlying QNPA via focused ion beam-assisted technique.

  9. Role of Tractional Forces and Internal Limiting Membrane in Macular Hole Formation: Insights from Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Moisseiev, Elad; Yiu, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent vitrectomy for vitreomacular traction (VMT) and developed a postoperative macular hole that was observed 1 week after surgery. The hole did not close by in-office fluid-gas exchange alone, but was achieved after repeat surgery with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. Intraoperative OCT (iOCT) images from the first surgery revealed an occult macular hole that formed after VMT release. We discuss how iOCT findings provide insight into the role of the ILM in macular hole formation and emphasize the importance of carefully inspecting iOCT images in real time to avoid missing small but important findings. PMID:27721786

  10. Effects of gape and tooth position on bite force and skull stress in the dingo (Canis lupus dingo) using a 3-dimensional finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Jason; Wroe, Stephen; Moreno, Karen; McHenry, Colin; Clausen, Philip

    2008-05-21

    Models of the mammalian jaw have predicted that bite force is intimately linked to jaw gape and to tooth position. Despite widespread use, few empirical studies have provided evidence to validate these models in non-human mammals and none have considered the influence of gape angle on the distribution of stress. Here using a multi-property finite element (FE) model of Canis lupus dingo, we examined the influence of gape angle and bite point on both bite force and cranial stress. Bite force data in relation to jaw gape and along the tooth row, are in broad agreement with previously reported results. However stress data showed that the skull of C. l. dingo is mechanically suited to withstand stresses at wide gapes; a result that agreed well with previously held views regarding carnivoran evolution. Stress data, combined with bite force information, suggested that there is an optimal bite angle of between 25 degrees and 35 degrees in C. l. dingo. The function of these rather small bite angles remains unclear.

  11. Separation of Propulsive and Adhesive Traction Stresses in Locomoting Keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Tim; Dembo, Micah; Jacobson, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Strong, actomyosin-dependent, pinching tractions in steadily locomoting (gliding) fish keratocytes revealed by traction imaging present a paradox, since only forces perpendicular to the direction of locomotion are apparent, leaving the actual propulsive forces unresolved. When keratocytes become transiently “stuck” by their trailing edge and adopt a fibroblast-like morphology, the tractions opposing locomotion are concentrated into the tail, leaving the active pinching and propulsive tractions clearly visible under the cell body. Stuck keratocytes can develop ∼1 mdyn (10,000 pN) total propulsive thrust, originating in the wings of the cell. The leading lamella develops no detectable propulsive traction, even when the cell pulls on its transient tail anchorage. The separation of propulsive and adhesive tractions in the stuck phenotype leads to a mechanically consistent hypothesis that resolves the traction paradox for gliding keratocytes: the propulsive tractions driving locomotion are normally canceled by adhesive tractions resisting locomotion, leaving only the pinching tractions as a resultant. The resolution of the traction pattern into its components specifies conditions to be met for models of cytoskeletal force production, such as the dynamic network contraction model (Svitkina, T.M., A.B. Verkhovsky, K.M. McQuade, and G.G. Borisy. 1997. J. Cell Biol. 139:397–415). The traction pattern associated with cells undergoing sharp turns differs markedly from the normal pinching traction pattern, and can be accounted for by postulating an asymmetry in contractile activity of the opposed lateral wings of the cell. PMID:10225959

  12. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  13. Follicular traction urticaria*

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Hatice; Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Kocaturk, Emek

    2016-01-01

    Inducible urticaria is a heterogeneous subgroup of chronic urticarias caused by a wide variety of environmental stimuli, such as exercise, cold, heat, pressure, sunlight, vibration, and water. A new term, follicular traction urticaria, was suggested as an unusual form of inducible urticarias. We report a patient who was diagnosed with follicular traction urticaria.

  14. 21 CFR 888.5890 - Noninvasive traction component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5890 Noninvasive traction component. (a... splint, that does not penetrate the skin and is intended to assist in connecting a patient to a traction apparatus so that a therapeutic pulling force may be applied to the patient's body. (b)...

  15. 21 CFR 888.5890 - Noninvasive traction component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5890 Noninvasive traction component. (a... splint, that does not penetrate the skin and is intended to assist in connecting a patient to a traction apparatus so that a therapeutic pulling force may be applied to the patient's body. (b)...

  16. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  17. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  18. Advances in traction drive technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Anderson, N. E.; Rohn, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Traction drives are traced from early uses as main transmissions in automobiles at the turn of the century to modern, high-powered traction drives capable of transmitting hundreds of horsepower. Recent advances in technology are described which enable today's traction drive to be a serious candidate for off-highway vehicles and helicopter applications. Improvements in materials, traction fluids, design techniques, power loss and life prediction methods will be highlighted. Performance characteristics of the Nasvytis fixed-ratio drive are given. Promising future drive applications, such as helicopter main transmissions and servo-control positioning mechanisms are also addressed.

  19. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  20. Vitreomacular traction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bottós, Juliana; Elizalde, Javier; Arevalo, J Fernando; Rodrigues, Eduardo B; Maia, Maurício

    2012-04-01

    The advent of new technologies such as high definition optical coherence tomography (OCT) has not only provided unprecedented imaging capabilities, but also raised the need to define concepts not yet settled and often confusing such as the vitreomacular traction (VMT) syndrome. While technological advances drive us into the future by clarifying the pathophysiology of many diseases and enabling novel therapeutic options, it is at the same time necessary to review basic disease concepts in addition to definitions and classifications. VMT syndrome is implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of macular disorders, translating into a variety of anatomical and functional consequences underscoring the complexity of the condition. These macular changes are closely related to the VMT configuration and have led to proposing classification of this syndrome based on OCT findings. The size and severity of the remaining vitreomacular attachment may define the specific maculopathy. Focal VMT usually leads to macular hole formation, tractional cystoid macular edema and foveal retinal detachment, while broad VMT is associated with epiretinal membranes, diffuse retinal thickening and impaired foveal depression recovery. Despite similar postoperative visual acuity (VA) in focal and broad VMT subgroups, visual improvement is greater with focal VMT because preoperative VA is frequently lower. Surgical procedures are effective to relieve VMT and improve VA in most eyes; outcomes vary with VMT morphology and the duration of symptoms.

  1. Advanced Integrated Traction System

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Smith; Charles Gough

    2011-08-31

    The United States Department of Energy elaborates the compelling need for a commercialized competitively priced electric traction drive system to proliferate the acceptance of HEVs, PHEVs, and FCVs in the market. The desired end result is a technically and commercially verified integrated ETS (Electric Traction System) product design that can be manufactured and distributed through a broad network of competitive suppliers to all auto manufacturers. The objectives of this FCVT program are to develop advanced technologies for an integrated ETS capable of 55kW peak power for 18 seconds and 30kW of continuous power. Additionally, to accommodate a variety of automotive platforms the ETS design should be scalable to 120kW peak power for 18 seconds and 65kW of continuous power. The ETS (exclusive of the DC/DC Converter) is to cost no more than $660 (55kW at $12/kW) to produce in quantities of 100,000 units per year, should have a total weight less than 46kg, and have a volume less than 16 liters. The cost target for the optional Bi-Directional DC/DC Converter is $375. The goal is to achieve these targets with the use of engine coolant at a nominal temperature of 105C. The system efficiency should exceed 90% at 20% of rated torque over 10% to 100% of maximum speed. The nominal operating system voltage is to be 325V, with consideration for higher voltages. This project investigated a wide range of technologies, including ETS topologies, components, and interconnects. Each technology and its validity for automotive use were verified and then these technologies were integrated into a high temperature ETS design that would support a wide variety of applications (fuel cell, hybrids, electrics, and plug-ins). This ETS met all the DOE 2010 objectives of cost, weight, volume and efficiency, and the specific power and power density 2015 objectives. Additionally a bi-directional converter was developed that provides charging and electric power take-off which is the first step

  2. Two Distinct Actin Networks Mediate Traction Oscillations to Confer Focal Adhesion Mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanghan; Plotnikov, Sergey V; Moalim, Abdiwahab Y; Waterman, Clare M; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-28

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are integrin-based transmembrane assemblies that connect a cell to its extracellular matrix (ECM). They are mechanosensors through which cells exert actin cytoskeleton-mediated traction forces to sense the ECM stiffness. Interestingly, FAs themselves are dynamic structures that adapt their growth in response to mechanical force. It is unclear how the cell manages the plasticity of the FA structure and the associated traction force to accurately sense ECM stiffness. Strikingly, FA traction forces oscillate in time and space, and govern the cell mechanosensing of ECM stiffness. However, precisely how and why the FA traction oscillates is unknown. We developed a model of FA growth that integrates the contributions of the branched actin network and stress fibers (SFs). Using the model in combination with experimental tests, we show that the retrograde flux of the branched actin network promotes the proximal growth of the FA and contributes to a traction peak near the FA's distal tip. The resulting traction gradient within the growing FA favors SF formation near the FA's proximal end. The SF-mediated actomyosin contractility further stabilizes the FA and generates a second traction peak near the center of the FA. Formin-mediated SF elongation negatively feeds back with actomyosin contractility, resulting in central traction peak oscillation. This underpins the observed FA traction oscillation and, importantly, broadens the ECM stiffness range over which FAs can accurately adapt to traction force generation. Actin cytoskeleton-mediated FA growth and maturation thus culminate with FA traction oscillation to drive efficient FA mechanosensing.

  3. A magnetic emergency release system for halo traction.

    PubMed

    Augsburger, Sam; White, Hank; Iwinski, Henry; Tylkowski, Chester M

    2010-01-01

    A magnetic emergency release system was developed for use in halo traction systems. Commercially available rare earth mounting magnets, with selected weight-carrying capacities, along with ferromagnetic receptacles, were used in line between halos and overhead pulleys to both carry the prescribed traction force and provide an emergency release in the event of excessive applied force due to a transportation accident and/or sudden application of full body weight when using overhead walkers equipped with traction systems. The magnet-receptacle pairs were calibrated with an in-line digital scale. Load rate dependencies were noted, indicating that prescribed magnet-receptacle pairs should be chosen to carry at least 110% body weight. This weight capacity is reduced to approximately 88% of body weight during higher loading rates, such as transportation accidents and accidental falls.

  4. Traction reveals mechanisms of wall effects for microswimmers near boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhui; Marcos, Fu, Henry C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of a plane boundary on low-Reynolds-number swimmers has frequently been studied using image systems for flow singularities. However, the boundary effect can also be expressed using a boundary integral representation over the traction on the boundary. We show that examining the traction pattern on the boundary caused by a swimmer can yield physical insights into determining when far-field multipole models are accurate. We investigate the swimming velocities and the traction of a three-sphere swimmer initially placed parallel to an infinite planar wall. In the far field, the instantaneous effect of the wall on the swimmer is well approximated by that of a multipole expansion consisting of a force dipole and a force quadrupole. On the other hand, the swimmer close to the wall must be described by a system of singularities reflecting its internal structure. We show that these limits and the transition between them can be independently identified by examining the traction pattern on the wall, either using a quantitative correlation coefficient or by visual inspection. Last, we find that for nonconstant propulsion, correlations between swimming stroke motions and internal positions are important and not captured by time-averaged traction on the wall, indicating that care must be taken when applying multipole expansions to study boundary effects in cases of nonconstant propulsion.

  5. Diesel developments for rail traction

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1995-03-01

    The latest developments in diesel rail traction systems are playing an important role in providing economical passenger transportation, especially in Europe. A new generation of diesel-hydraulic and diesel-electric traction systems - featuring reduced weight and using electronic control systems for easier operation, lower engine emissions and reduced fuel consumption - are being introduced into public and private railway networks worldwide. This paper reviews the specifications of diesel based locomotives and trains being currently supplied in Germany, China, Netherlands, Switzerland, and USA. 6 figs.

  6. Effects of intermittent traction therapy in an experimental spinal column model.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Hun; Jun, Seung-lyul; Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hyo; Hwang, Sung-Yeoun; Ahn, Seong-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Traction therapy, which is known to be a treatment method for scoliosis, one of many muscles disease, has been used since Hippocrates introduced it. However, the effects of traction therapy are still not clear. In addition, the meridian sinew theory, which is related to muscle treatment and is mentioned in the book on meridian sinews in the Miraculous Pivot of Huangdi's Internal Classic, has not been the subject of much study. For these reasons, experimental spinal models were made for this study to observe and analyze the lengths of vertebral interspaces after intermittent traction therapy, which is known to be excellent among muscle treatment methods, with various tensile forces. The results showed that the effects of intermittent traction therapy were unclear and that it might be harmful, especially when the pain was induced by muscle weakness. Because the results of this study on intermittent traction therapy were different from those expected from osteopathy or craniosacral theory, better studies of the subject are necessary.

  7. 3-Dimensional Topographic Models for the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Stockman, S.; Frey, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently undertaken a program to develop educational tools using 3-dimensional solid models of digital elevation data acquired by the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) for Mars as well as a variety of sources for elevation data of the Earth. This work is made possible by the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct solid 3-Dimensional models of science data. We recently acquired rapid prototyping machine that builds 3-dimensional models in extruded plastic. While the machine was acquired to assist in the design and development of scientific instruments and hardware, it is also fully capable of producing models of spacecraft remote sensing data. We have demonstrated this by using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data and Earth based topographic data to produce extruded plastic topographic models which are visually appealing and instantly engage those who handle them.

  8. 3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions

    DOEpatents

    Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Shreve, Andrew P.

    2010-03-09

    An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

  9. Counter traction makes endoscopic submucosal dissection easier.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tsuneo

    2012-11-01

    Poor counter traction and poor field of vision make endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) difficult. Good counter traction allows dissections to be performed more quickly and safely. Position change, which utilizes gravity, is the simplest method to create a clear field of vision. It is useful especially for esophageal and colon ESD. The second easiest method is clip with line method. Counter traction made by clip with line accomplishes the creation of a clear field of vision and suitable counter traction thereby making ESD more efficient and safe. The author published this method in 2002. The name ESD was not established in those days; the name cutting endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or EMR with hook knife was used. The other traction methods such as external grasping forceps, internal traction, double channel scope, and double scopes method are introduced in this paper. A good strategy for creating counter traction makes ESD easier.

  10. Application of traction drives as servo mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Rohn, D. A.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of traction drives for a wide class of aerospace control mechanisms is examined. Potential applications include antenna or solar array drive positioners, robotic joints, control moment gyro (CMG) actuators and propeller pitch change mechanisms. In these and similar applications the zero backlash, high torsional stiffness, low hysteresis and torque ripple characteristics of traction drives are of particular interest, as is the ability to run without liquid lubrication in certain cases. Wear and fatigue considerations for wet and dry operation are examined along with the tribological performance of several promising self lubricating polymers for traction contracts. The speed regulation capabilities of variable ratio traction drives are reviewed. A torsional stiffness analysis described suggests that traction contacts are relatively stiff compared to gears and are significantly stiffer than the other structural elements in the prototype CMG traction drive analyzed. Discussion is also given of an advanced turboprop propeller pitch change mechanism that incorporates a traction drive.

  11. Traction contact performance evaluation at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of traction tests performed on two fluids are presented. These tests covered a pressure range of 1.0 to 2.5 GPa, an inlet temperature range of 30 'C to 70 'C, a speed range of 10 to 80 m/sec, aspect ratios of .5 to 5 and spin from 0 to 2.1 percent. The test results are presented in the form of two dimensionless parameters, the initial traction slope and the maximum traction peak. With the use of a suitable rheological fluid model the actual traction curves measured can now be reconstituted from the two fluid parameters. More importantly, the knowledge of these parameters together with the fluid rheological model, allow the prediction of traction under conditions of spin, slip and any combination thereof. Comparison between theoretically predicted traction under these conditions and those measured in actual traction tests shows that this method gives good results.

  12. Control of Grasp and Manipulation by Soft Fingers with 3-Dimensional Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Akira; Shibata, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Yoshikazu

    In this paper, we consider control of grasp and manipulation of an object in a 3-dimensional space by a 3-fingered hand robot with soft finger tips. We firstly propose a 3-dimensional deformation model of a hemispherical soft finger tip and verify its relevance by experimental data. Second, we consider the contact kinematics and derive the dynamical equations of the fingers and the object where the 3-dimensional deformation is considered. For the system, we thirdly propose a method to regulate the object and the internal force with the information of the hand, the object and the deformation. A simulation result is presented to show the effectiveness of the control method.

  13. 3-dimensional fabrication of soft energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas; Walters, Peter; Rossiter, Jonathan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Anderson, Iain

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEG) provide an opportunity to harvest energy from low frequency and aperiodic sources. Because DEG are soft, deformable, high energy density generators, they can be coupled to complex structures such as the human body to harvest excess mechanical energy. However, DEG are typically constrained by a rigid frame and manufactured in a simple planar structure. This planar arrangement is unlikely to be optimal for harvesting from compliant and/or complex structures. In this paper we present a soft generator which is fabricated into a 3 Dimensional geometry. This capability will enable the 3-dimensional structure of a dielectric elastomer to be customised to the energy source, allowing efficient and/or non-invasive coupling. This paper demonstrates our first 3 dimensional generator which includes a diaphragm with a soft elastomer frame. When the generator was connected to a self-priming circuit and cyclically inflated, energy was accumulated in the system, demonstrated by an increased voltage. Our 3D generator promises a bright future for dielectric elastomers that will be customised for integration with complex and soft structures. In addition to customisable geometries, the 3D printing process may lend itself to fabricating large arrays of small generator units and for fabricating truly soft generators with excellent impedance matching to biological tissue. Thus comfortable, wearable energy harvesters are one step closer to reality.

  14. Matrix confinement plays a pivotal role in regulating neutrophil-generated tractions, speed, and integrin utilization.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Flores-Cortez, Estefany; Reichner, Jonathan S; Franck, Christian

    2015-02-06

    Neutrophils are capable of switching from integrin-dependent motility on two-dimensional substrata to integrin-independent motion following entry into the confined three-dimensional matrix of an afflicted tissue. However, whether integrins still maintain a regulatory role for cell traction generation and cell locomotion under the physical confinement of the three-dimensional matrix is unknown, and this is challenging to deduce from motility studies alone. Using three-dimensional traction force microscopy and a double hydrogel sandwich system, we determined the three-dimensional spatiotemporal traction forces of motile neutrophils at unprecedented resolution and show, for the first time, that entry into a highly confined space (2.5D) is a sufficient trigger to convert to integrin-independent migration. We find that integrins exert a significant regulatory role in determining the magnitude and spatial distribution of tractions and cell speed on confined cells. We also find that 90% of neutrophil tractions are in the out-of-plane axis, and this may be a fundamental element of neutrophil traction force generation.

  15. Life Analysis of Multiroller Planetary Traction Drive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    Nasvytis eUltirollcr Traction Drive. The analysis was based on the Lundberg- Palmgren method for rolling- element bearing life prediction. Life...a steel rail. There are dozens bearing life. The effect of stress, stressed volume, of traction drive designs, distinguished by the and depth to the...clene¶,t bearing materials, lubrication and traction drive concept. Cleaner steels (vacuum design were considered as well as the potentially induction

  16. Periodic traction in migrating large amoeba of Physarum polycephalum

    PubMed Central

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène; Takagi, Seiji; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The slime mould Physarum polycephalum is a giant multinucleated cell exhibiting well-known Ca2+-dependent actomyosin contractions of its vein network driving the so-called cytoplasmic shuttle streaming. Its actomyosin network forms both a filamentous cortical layer and large fibrils. In order to understand the role of each structure in the locomotory activity, we performed birefringence observations and traction force microscopy on excised fragments of Physarum. After several hours, these microplasmodia adopt three main morphologies: flat motile amoeba, chain types with round contractile heads connected by tubes and motile hybrid types. Each type exhibits oscillations with a period of about 1.5 min of cell area, traction forces and fibril activity (retardance) when fibrils are present. The amoeboid types show only peripheral forces while the chain types present a never-reported force pattern with contractile rings far from the cell boundary under the spherical heads. Forces are mostly transmitted where the actomyosin cortical layer anchors to the substratum, but fibrils maintain highly invaginated structures and contribute to forces by increasing the length of the anchorage line. Microplasmodia are motile only when there is an asymmetry in the shape and/or the force distribution. PMID:25808339

  17. Hydroelectric structures studies using 3-dimensional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, T.R.; Jones, G.V.; Toner, C.K. )

    1989-01-01

    Deterioration and degradation of aged, hydroelectric project structures can significantly affect the operation and safety of a project. In many cases, hydroelectric headworks (in particular) have complicated geometrical configurations, loading patterns and hence, stress conditions. An accurate study of such structures can be performed using 3-dimensional computer models. 3-D computer models can be used for both stability evaluation and for finite element stress analysis. Computer aided engineering processes facilitate the use of 3-D methods in both pre-processing and post-processing of data. Two actual project examples are used to emphasize the authors' points.

  18. Traction Stresses and Translational Distortion of the Nucleus During Fibroblast Migration on a Physiologically Relevant ECM Mimic

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhi; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Liu, Yajie; Clark, Richard A.F.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular traction forces, resulting in cell-substrate physical interactions, are generated by actin-myosin complexes and transmitted to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. These processes are highly dynamic under physiological conditions and modulate cell migration. To better understand the precise dynamics of cell migration, we measured the spatiotemporal redistribution of cellular traction stresses (force per area) during fibroblast migration at a submicron level and correlated it with nuclear translocation, an indicator of cell migration, on a physiologically relevant extracellular matrix mimic. We found that nuclear translocation occurred in pulses whose magnitude was larger on the low ligand density surfaces than on the high ligand density surfaces. Large nuclear translocations only occurred on low ligand density surfaces when the rear traction stresses completely relocated to a posterior nuclear location, whereas such relocation took much longer time on high ligand density surfaces, probably due to the greater magnitude of traction stresses. Nuclear distortion was also observed as the traction stresses redistributed. Our results suggest that the reinforcement of the traction stresses around the nucleus as well as the relaxation of nuclear deformation are critical steps during fibroblast migration, serving as a speed regulator, which must be considered in any dynamic molecular reconstruction model of tissue cell migration. A traction gradient foreshortening model was proposed to explain how the relocation of rear traction stresses leads to pulsed fibroblast migration. PMID:19450499

  19. The Arp2/3 complex mediates multigeneration dendritic protrusions for efficient 3-dimensional cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Giri, Anjil; Bajpai, Saumendra; Trenton, Nicholaus; Jayatilaka, Hasini; Longmore, Gregory D; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    Arp2/3 is a protein complex that nucleates actin filament assembly in the lamellipodium in adherent cells crawling on planar 2-dimensional (2D) substrates. However, in physiopathological situations, cell migration typically occurs within a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, and little is known about the role of Arp2/3 and associated proteins in 3D cell migration. Using time resolved live-cell imaging and HT1080, a fibrosarcoma cell line commonly used to study cell migration, we find that the Arp2/3 complex and associated proteins N-WASP, WAVE1, cortactin, and Cdc42 regulate 3D cell migration. We report that this regulation is caused by formation of multigeneration dendritic protrusions, which mediate traction forces on the surrounding matrix and effective cell migration. The primary protrusions emanating directly from the cell body and prolonging the nucleus forms independent of Arp2/3 and dependent on focal adhesion proteins FAK, talin, and p130Cas. The Arp2/3 complex, N-WASP, WAVE1, cortactin, and Cdc42 regulate the secondary protrusions branching off from the primary protrusions. In 3D matrices, fibrosarcoma cells as well as migrating breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer cells do not display lamellipodial structures. This study characterizes the unique topology of protrusions made by cells in a 3D matrix and show that these dendritic protrusions play a critical role in 3D cell motility and matrix deformation. The relative contribution of these proteins to 3D migration is significantly different from their role in 2D migration.

  20. Advanced dc-Traction-Motor Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittone, O.

    1985-01-01

    Motor-control concept for battery-powered vehicles includes stateof-the-art power-transistor switching and separate excitation of motor windings in traction and regenerative braking. Switching transistors and other components of power-conditioning subsystem operate under control of computer that coordinates traction, braking, and protective functions.

  1. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  2. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  3. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  4. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  5. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  6. Elastohydrodynamic Traction Properties of Seed Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elastohydrodynamic traction coefficient (tc) properties of nine seed oils of varying chemical structures, PAO and hexadecane, were investigated using a ball-on disk traction apparatus. The seed oils were: castor oil, a triglyceride with hydroxyl functional group; jojoba, a monoglyceride; and s...

  7. Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) traction properties of seed oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elastohydrodynamic traction coefficient (tc) properties of nine seed oils of varying chemical structures, PAO and hexadecane, were investigated using a ball-on disk traction apparatus. The seed oils were: castor oil, a triglyceride with hydroxyl functional group; jojoba, a monoglyceride; and sev...

  8. The Failure Analysis in Traction Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungchul; Heo, Guk-bum; Lee, Hyungwoo; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jin O.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a failure analysis of traction power systems. The electric railway consists of traction power systems, various vehicles, operating equipment, track, overhead line and electric equipment. It is a fundamental function of traction power systems that they supply customers with acceptable reliability and high quality power. Perhaps the most commonly used reliability assessment for railway systems has been the failure analysis of the traction signal system. The reliability assessment of traction power systems has also been an indispensable issue for reliability assessment. This paper deals with the classification of railway accidents caused by electrification problems, the estimation of failure rate in power equipments and failure analysis using fault trees. In study cases, the fault tree method for failure analysis is applied to railway substations in South Korea.

  9. Traction reveals mechanisms of wall-effects for microswimmers near boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhui; Marcos, -; Fu, Henry C.

    2015-11-01

    Swimming of microorganism near solid boundaries plays an important role in various biological processes, such as biofilm formation and the early stage of infection. The influence of a plane boundary on low-Reynolds number swimmers has frequently been studied using image systems for flow singularities. However, the effect of a boundary can also be expressed in terms of the flow caused by the force or traction exerted by the boundary on the fluid. Here we show that examining the traction pattern on the boundary caused by a nearby swimmer can yield physical insight into the effect of the boundary on swimming velocities. To illustrate this point, we investigate a three-sphere swimmer initially placed parallel to a solid planar wall. The three spheres are modelled as three stokeslets and the method of images for a stokeslet is employed to solve for the traction on the wall. When the swimmer is close to the boundary, the middle sphere and end spheres produce a quadrupolar and dipolar time-averaged traction, respectively, reflecting the internal structure of the swimmer. Far away from the boundary, the time-averaged traction of the swimmer is similar to that of a pure far-field quadrupole. Thus the traction patterns reveal how close the swimmer must be to the boundary for the internal structure of the swimmer to influence the boundary effects.

  10. 77 FR 56910 - Iowa Traction Railway Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Rail Line of Iowa Traction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Surface Transportation Board Iowa Traction Railway Company--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Rail Line of Iowa Traction Railroad Company Iowa Traction Railway Company (Iowa Railway), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from Iowa Traction Railroad...

  11. Traction drive performance prediction for the Johnson and Tevaarwerk traction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    The fluid rheology model is used to investigate the traction behavior for typical traction drive contacts. The aspect ratio of the contact and the invariably present spin are investigated. Contacts with a low aspect ratio predict a superior performance in that they show less slip for the same degree of traction. Spin always has a diminishing effect on the traction at the same slip. At sufficiently high spin the model may be simplified to a limiting shear stress model. The conventional rigid plastic analysis applies here equally well.

  12. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3-dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Steigner, Michael L; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    Medical 3-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D-printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced preoperative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases and valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing perioperative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality.

  13. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Ruellasa, Antonio C. O.; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this article were to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Methods Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. Results All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article’s online version for viewing and downloading using the reader’s software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader’s software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. Conclusions When submitting manuscripts, authors can

  14. Changes in joint space width during Kaltenborn traction according to traction grade in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Moon, Gui-do; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the joint space width of the humeral head and glenoid fossa during traction under 2 grade conditions (grade 2/grade 3). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 healthy male adults who had not experienced any shoulder injury. Three radiographs were obtained with the subjects in the supine position (resting, grades 2 and 3). The glenohumeral joint space was examined on radiography. Joint space width was measured by a radiologist at the points described by Petersson and Redlund-Johnell. A radiologist blinded to the variable "resting" or "traction" performed all radiographic measurements. The joint space widths were compared by using one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The results of this study indicated significant differences in the changes in joint space width according to traction grade. Compared to resting, grades 2 and 3 traction significantly increased joint space width. However, no significant difference in joint space width was found between grades 2 and 3 traction. [Conclusion] Although no significant differences were found between grades 2 and 3 traction during glenohumeral joint traction, the increase in joint space width between the glenoid fossa and humeral head was highest during grade 3 traction.

  15. Rolling, slip and traction measurements on low modulus materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Traction and wear tests were performed on six low modulus materials (LMM). Three different traction tests were performed to determine the suitability of the material for use as traction rollers. These were the rolling, slip and endurance traction tests. For each material the combination LMM on LMM and LMM on steel were evaluated. Rolling traction test were conducted to determine the load - velocity limits, the rolling traction coefficient of the materials and to establish the type of failures that would result when loading beyond the limit. It was found that in general a simple constant rolling traction coefficient was enough to describe the results of all the test. The slip traction tests revealed that the peak traction coefficients were considerably higher than for lubricated traction contacts. The endurance traction tests were performed to establish the durability of the LMM under conditions of prolonged traction. Wear measurements were performed during and after the test. Energetic wear rates were determined from the wear measurements conducted in the endurance traction tests. These values show that the roller wear is not severe when reasonable levels of traction are transmitted.

  16. Coordination of Flow and Traction in Migration of Amoeboid Physarum polycephalum: Model and Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert; Zhang, Shun; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we develop a computational model of crawling Physarum based on the Immersed Boundary Method. Our model incorporates the effects of cell cytoplasm, the internal cytoskeleton and adhesions to the substrate. Cytoplasmic flows and traction stresses predicted by the model are compared to experimentally measured values obtained using simultaneous Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Of particular interest are stresses generated by flow and how transmission of stresses to the substrate is coordinated. We identify methods of adhesion-flow coordination which are consistent with experiments. Certain consisten coordinations are seen to be ``optimal'' with regards to crawling speed, and robust to perturbations in the extracellular environment.

  17. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  18. Chaotic Advection in a Bounded 3-Dimensional Potential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Smith, Lachlan; Lester, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    3-dimensional potential, or Darcy flows, are central to understanding and designing laminar transport in porous media; however, chaotic advection in 3-dimensional, volume-preserving flows is still not well understood. We show results of advecting passive scalars in a transient 3-dimensional potential flow that consists of a steady dipole flow and periodic reorientation. Even for the most symmetric reorientation protocol, neither of the two invarients of the motion are conserved; however, one invarient is closely shadowed by a surface of revolution constructed from particle paths of the steady flow, creating in practice an adiabatic surface. A consequence is that chaotic regions cover 3-dimensional space, though tubular regular regions are still transport barriers. This appears to be a new mechanism generating 3-dimensional chaotic orbits. These results contast with the experimental and theoretical results for chaotic scalar transport in 2-dimensional Darcy flows. Wiggins, J. Fluid Mech. 654 (2010).

  19. Temporal variations in cell migration and traction during fibroblast-mediated gel compaction.

    PubMed

    Shreiber, David I; Barocas, Victor H; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2003-06-01

    Current models used in our laboratory to assess the migration and traction of a population of cells within biopolymer gels are extended to investigate temporal changes in these parameters during compaction of mechanically constrained gels. The random cell migration coefficient, micro (t) is calculated using a windowing technique by regressing the mean-squared displacement of cells tracked at high magnification in three dimensions with a generalized least squares algorithm for a subset of experimental time intervals, and then shifting the window interval-by-interval until all time points are analyzed. The cell traction parameter, tau(0)(t), is determined by optimizing the solution of our anisotropic biphasic theory to tissue equivalent compaction. The windowing technique captured simulated sinusoidal and step changes in cell migration superposed on a persistent random walk in simulated cell movement. The optimization software captured simulated time dependence of compaction on cell spreading. Employment of these techniques on experimental data using rat dermal fibroblasts (RDFs) and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) demonstrated that these cells exhibit different migration-traction relationships. Rat dermal fibroblast migration was negatively correlated to traction, suggesting migration was not the driving force for compaction with these cells, whereas human foreskin fibroblast migration was positively correlated to traction.

  20. Optimization of 3-dimensional imaging of the breast region with 3-dimensional laser scanners.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Yassouridis, Alexander; Zimmermann, Alexander; Brockmann, Gernot; Wöhnl, Antonia; Blaschke, Matthias; Eder, Maximilian; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, Katja; Rosenberg, Robert; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Biemer, Edgar

    2006-03-01

    The anatomic conditions of the female breast require imaging the breast region 3-dimensionally in a normal standing position for quality assurance and for surgery planning or surgery simulation. The goal of this work was to optimize the imaging technology for the mammary region with a 3-dimensional (3D) laser scanner, to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the method, and to allow optimum data reproducibility. Avoiding the influence of biotic factors, such as mobility, we tested the most favorable imaging technology on dummy models for scanner-related factors such as the scanner position in comparison with the torso and the number of scanners and single shots. The influence of different factors of the breast region, such as different breast shapes or premarking of anatomic landmarks, was also first investigated on dummies. The findings from the dummy models were then compared with investigations on test persons, and the accuracy of measurements on the virtual models was compared with a coincidence analysis of the manually measured values. The best precision and accuracy of breast region measurements were achieved when landmarks were marked before taking the shots and when shots at 30 degrees left and 30 degrees right, relative to the sagittal line, were taken with 2 connected scanners mounted with a +10-degree upward angle. However, the precision of the measurements on test persons was significantly lower than those measured on dummies. Our findings show that the correct settings for 3D imaging of the breast region with a laser scanner can achieve an acceptable degree of accuracy and reproducibility.

  1. Recent traction methods for endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kunihiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Doyama, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is problematic with regard to en bloc and curable resection rates. Advancements in endoscopic techniques have enabled novel endoscopic approaches such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), which has overcome some EMR problems, and has become the standard treatment for gastrointestinal tumors. However, ESD is technically difficult. Procedure time is longer and complications such as intraoperative perforation and bleeding occur more frequently than in EMR. Recently various traction methods have been introduced to facilitate ESD procedures, such as clip with line, external forceps, clip and snare, internal traction, double scope, and magnetic anchor. Each method must be used appropriately according to the anatomical characteristics. In this review we discuss recently proposed traction methods for ESD based on the characteristics of various anatomical sites. PMID:27468186

  2. Traction Control System for Formula Student Electric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houf, Z.; Čeřovský, Z.; Hlinovský, V.

    This paper deals with design of traction control of Formula Student Electric Car. There will introduced new conception of formula traction system and its application to the Formula car. In next season we would like to use 2 motors, each of them will be directly connected to its wheel. This solution needs precise control of them to provide high dynamics and great ability to ride curves in high speeds. Using the same torque on each wheel brings problem when one of wheel loss the traction ability. Some slip could happen and the unexpected lateral movement becomes. There will described the mathematic model of formula car. To reduce slips etc. we will publish the theoretical algorithm that reduces or increases torques on rear wheels to stabilize the car. There will be described what states have to be measured and evaluated. Also places where the sensors will be placed will be shown.

  3. Changes in joint space width during Kaltenborn traction according to traction grade in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Gui-do; Kim, Tae-ho; Lim, Jin-yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the joint space width of the humeral head and glenoid fossa during traction under 2 grade conditions (grade 2/grade 3). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 healthy male adults who had not experienced any shoulder injury. Three radiographs were obtained with the subjects in the supine position (resting, grades 2 and 3). The glenohumeral joint space was examined on radiography. Joint space width was measured by a radiologist at the points described by Petersson and Redlund-Johnell. A radiologist blinded to the variable “resting” or “traction” performed all radiographic measurements. The joint space widths were compared by using one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The results of this study indicated significant differences in the changes in joint space width according to traction grade. Compared to resting, grades 2 and 3 traction significantly increased joint space width. However, no significant difference in joint space width was found between grades 2 and 3 traction. [Conclusion] Although no significant differences were found between grades 2 and 3 traction during glenohumeral joint traction, the increase in joint space width between the glenoid fossa and humeral head was highest during grade 3 traction. PMID:26957767

  4. How vinculin regulates force transmission.

    PubMed

    Dumbauld, David W; Lee, Ted T; Singh, Ankur; Scrimgeour, Jan; Gersbach, Charles A; Zamir, Evan A; Fu, Jianping; Chen, Christopher S; Curtis, Jennifer E; Craig, Susan W; García, Andrés J

    2013-06-11

    Focal adhesions mediate force transfer between ECM-integrin complexes and the cytoskeleton. Although vinculin has been implicated in force transmission, few direct measurements have been made, and there is little mechanistic insight. Using vinculin-null cells expressing vinculin mutants, we demonstrate that vinculin is not required for transmission of adhesive and traction forces but is necessary for myosin contractility-dependent adhesion strength and traction force and for the coupling of cell area and traction force. Adhesion strength and traction forces depend differentially on vinculin head (V(H)) and tail domains. V(H) enhances adhesion strength by increasing ECM-bound integrin-talin complexes, independently from interactions with vinculin tail ligands and contractility. A full-length, autoinhibition-deficient mutant (T12) increases adhesion strength compared with VH, implying roles for both vinculin activation and the actin-binding tail. In contrast to adhesion strength, vinculin-dependent traction forces absolutely require a full-length and activated molecule; V(H) has no effect. Physical linkage of the head and tail domains is required for maximal force responses. Residence times of vinculin in focal adhesions, but not T12 or V(H), correlate with applied force, supporting a mechanosensitive model for vinculin activation in which forces stabilize vinculin's active conformation to promote force transfer.

  5. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE TRACTION CABLE BULL WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE TRACTION CABLE BULL WHEEL AND DEPARTING BUCKET "12," STILL ON RAIL AND JUST PRIOR TO ENGAGING TRACTION CABLE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  6. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  11. Real-time implementation of a traction control algorithm on a scaled roller rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosso, N.; Zampieri, N.

    2013-04-01

    Traction control is a very important aspect in railway vehicle dynamics. Its optimisation allows improvement of the performance of a locomotive by working close to the limit of adhesion. On the other hand, in case the adhesion limit is surpassed, the wheels are subjected to heavy wear and there is also a big risk that vibrations in the traction occur. Similar considerations can be made in the case of braking. The development and optimisation of a traction/braking control algorithm is a complex activity, because it is usually performed on a real vehicle on the track, where many uncertainties are present due to environmental conditions and vehicle characteristics. This work shows the use of a scaled roller rig to develop and optimise a traction control algorithm on a single wheelset. Measurements performed on the wheelset are used to estimate the optimal adhesion forces by means of a wheel/rail contact algorithm executed in real time. This allows application of the optimal adhesion force.

  12. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  13. Elastic response of DNA molecules under the action of interfacial traction and stretching: An elastic thin rod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Qiang, Lei; Gao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In a multivalent salt solution, a segment of DNA is modeled as an elastic rod subjected to the interfacial traction. The shooting method is used to calculate the equilibrium configurations of condensed DNA under the action of the longitudinal end-force and interfacial traction simultaneously. The results show that the shapes of DNA are mainly determined by the competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of stretching. The change of end-to-end distance with the longitudinal end-force is consistent with the worm-like chain (WLC) model. The higher the concentration is, the stronger the condensation of DNA.

  14. 3-Dimensional wireless sensor network localization: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najib, Yasmeen Nadhirah Ahmad; Daud, Hanita; Aziz, Azrina Abd; Razali, Radzuan

    2016-11-01

    The proliferation of wireless sensor network (WSN) has shifted the focus to 3-Dimensional geometry rather than 2-Dimensional geometry. Since exact location of sensors has been the fundamental issue in wireless sensor network, node localization is essential for any wireless sensor network applications. Most algorithms mainly focus on 2-Dimensional geometry, where the application of this algorithm will decrease the accuracy on 3-Dimensional geometry. The low rank attribute in WSN's node estimation makes the application of nuclear norm minimization as a viable solution for dimensionality reduction problems. This research proposes a novel localization algorithm for 3-Dimensional WSN which is nuclear norm minimization. The node localization is formulated via Euclidean Distance Matrix (EDM) and is then optimized using Nuclear-Norm Minimization (NNM).

  15. Digital Model of Railway Electric Traction Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Rachana; Mahajan, Priya; Kumar, Parmod

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic impedance and propagation constant define the behavior of signal propagation over the transmission lines. The digital model for railway traction lines which includes railway tracks is developed, using curve fitting technique in MATLAB. The sensitivity of this model has been computed with respect to frequency. The digital sensitivity values are compared with the values of analog sensitivity. The developed model is useful for digital protection, integrated operation, control and planning of the system.

  16. Orthodontic Traction of Impacted Canine Using Cantilever

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, João Roberto; Cassano, Daniel Serra; Bianchi, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The impaction of the maxillary canines causes relevant aesthetic and functional problems. The multidisciplinary approach to the proper planning and execution of orthodontic traction of the element in question is essential. Many strategies are cited in the literature; among them is the good biomechanical control in order to avoid possible side effects. The aim of this paper is to present a case report in which a superior canine impacted by palatine was pulled out with the aid of the cantilever on the Segmented Arch Technique (SAT) concept. A 14.7-year-old female patient appeared at clinic complaining about the absence of the upper right permanent canine. The proposed treatment prioritized the traction of the upper right canine without changing the occlusion and aesthetics. For this, it only installed the upper fixed appliance (Roth with slot 0.018), opting for SAT in order to minimize unwanted side effects. The use of cantilever to the traction of the upper right canine has enabled an efficient and predictable outcome, because it is of statically determined mechanics. PMID:27800192

  17. Differential Cross Section Kinematics for 3-dimensional Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In support of the development of 3-dimensional transport codes, this paper derives the relevant relativistic particle kinematic theory. Formulas are given for invariant, spectral and angular distributions in both the lab (spacecraft) and center of momentum frames, for collisions involving 2, 3 and n - body final states.

  18. MR imaging of the acutely injured patient with cervical traction.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Wright, J W; Prevost, W J; Dornfest, D J; Amparo, E G

    1986-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the patient with acute cervical injury is important because of the potential prognostic significance of the appearance of the spinal cord at the time of injury. However, cervical traction may involve equipment incompatible with the magnetic environment, and transferring the patient to the imaging table may make it difficult to maintain traction. The authors describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method for providing cervical traction within the magnet room.

  19. Visceral pain triggered by traction on the ileocecal ligament with ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Janyaro, Habibullah; Wan, Juan; Tahir, Adnan H; Shah, Manoj K; Li, Xiao-Jing; Ding, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral pain is a common symptom of several gastrointestinal disorders. Despite tremendous progress in understanding its basic mechanisms, it remains a significant health challenge for clinicians. The present study quantified the intensity of visceral pain using ileocecal ligament traction on an inflamed ileum in goats. Materials and methods A total of 36 male goats weighing 20.05±2.1 kg were randomly allocated equally into a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) group (n=18) and a saline group (n=18). Ileitis was induced via the injection of 30 mg TNBS dissolved in 30% ethanol into the ileal wall through a laparotomy. An equal volume of normal saline was injected into the ileal wall of the saline goats. Behavioral responses to traction (2, 4, and 6 N) on the ileocecal ligament were observed on days 3, 7, and 14. Six goats from each group received a laparotomy and partial intestinal resection for ileal sample collection immediately after behavioral testing on days 3, 7, and 14. Ileal histopathological changes were assessed and concentrations of myeloperoxidase, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The TNBS-treated goats exhibited remarkably increased macroscopic scores, mast-cell counts, myeloperoxidase, and TNFα concentrations on days 3 and 7 compared to the saline group, and increased microscopic scores and IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations on days 3–14. The TNBS-treated goats exhibited behavioral changes in response to traction in the same pattern as their microscopic changes and cytokine levels. The traction force correlated positively with pain-behavior responses. Conclusion Traction on the ileocecal ligament of goats with ileitis provoked an apparent, stable, and reproducible ileum-derived pain. The current model may be helpful in evaluating the efficacy of new drugs for the management of visceral pain and in investigating its underlying mechanisms. PMID:27757049

  20. Traction Forces of Drive Tyre on the Compacted Soil,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    tyre were effected at the Institute for Buildings, Mechanization and Electrification in Agriculture in Warsaw. Tests dealt with in this report were...made under humidity of soil and operation parameters of the tyre (vertical load and inflation pressure) kept fixed while changing the compaction of soil.

  1. Simple cost model for EV traction motors

    SciTech Connect

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1995-02-01

    A simple cost model has been developed that allows the calculation of the OEM cost of electric traction motors of three different types, normalized as a function of power in order to accommodate different power and size. The model includes enough information on the various elements integrated in the motors to allow analysis of individual components and to factor-in the effects of changes in commodities prices. A scalable cost model for each of the main components of an electric vehicle (EV) is a useful tool that can have direct application in computer simulation or in parametric studies. For the cost model to have wide usefulness, it needs to be valid for a range of values of some parameter that determines the magnitude or size of the component. For instance, in the case of batteries, size may be determined by energy capacity, usually expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), while in the case of traction motors, size is better determined by rated power, usually expressed in kilowatts (kW). The simplest case is when the cost of the component in question is a direct function of its size; then cost is simply the product of its specific cost ($/unit size) and the number of units (size) in the vehicle in question. Batteries usually fall in this category (cost = energy capacity x $/kWh). But cost is not always linear with size or magnitude; motors (and controllers), for instance, become relatively less expensive as power rating increases. Traction motors, one of the main components for EV powertrains are examined in this paper, and a simplified cost model is developed for the three most popular design variations.

  2. Wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Ethan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Lijia; Lu, Yongfeng; Ndao, Sidy

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the fabrication and wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces (3DNFS). Three distinct 3DNFS surfaces, namely cubic, Romanesco broccoli, and sphereflake were fabricated using two-photon direct laser writing. Contact angle measurements were performed on the multiscale fractal surfaces to characterize their wetting properties. Average contact angles ranged from 66.8° for the smooth control surface to 0° for one of the fractal surfaces. The change in wetting behavior was attributed to modification of the interfacial surface properties due to the inclusion of 3-dimensional hierarchical fractal nanostructures. However, this behavior does not exactly obey existing surface wetting models in the literature. Potential applications for these types of surfaces in physical and biological sciences are also discussed.

  3. 3-dimensional (3D) fabricated polymer based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2014-11-10

    Drug delivery from 3-dimensional (3D) structures is a rapidly growing area of research. It is essential to achieve structures wherein drug stability is ensured, the drug loading capacity is appropriate and the desired controlled release profile can be attained. Attention must also be paid to the development of appropriate fabrication machinery that allows 3D drug delivery systems (DDS) to be produced in a simple, reliable and reproducible manner. The range of fabrication methods currently being used to form 3D DDSs include electrospinning (solution and melt), wet-spinning and printing (3-dimensional). The use of these techniques enables production of DDSs from the macro-scale down to the nano-scale. This article reviews progress in these fabrication techniques to form DDSs that possess desirable drug delivery kinetics for a wide range of applications.

  4. Imaging the traction stresses exerted by locomoting cells with the elastic substratum method.

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, M; Oliver, T; Ishihara, A; Jacobson, K

    1996-01-01

    The cytoskeletal activity of motile or adherent cells is frequently seen to induce detectable displacements of sufficiently compliant substrata. The physics of this phenomenon is discussed in terms of the classical theory of small-strain, plane-stress elasticity. The main results of such analysis is a transform expressing the displacement field of the elastic substrate as an integral over the traction field. The existence of this transform is used to derive a Bayesian method for converting noisy measurements of substratum displacement into "images" of the actual traction forces exerted by adherent or locomoting cells. Finally, the Monte Carlo validation of the statistical method is discussed, some new rheological studies of films are presented, and a practical application is given. PMID:8785360

  5. Traction in elastohydrodynamic line contacts for two synthesized hydrocarbon fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The paper describes the disk machine designed and constructed for the investigation of the traction in elastohydrodynamic line contacts for two synthesized hydrocarbon fluids. The results of this experimental study are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions of traction according to the thermal and non-Newtonian theory recently presented by the authors.

  6. DETAIL OF TRACTION CABLE ENGAGEMENT DEVICE. SMALL, KNOBBED LEVER ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF TRACTION CABLE ENGAGEMENT DEVICE. SMALL, KNOBBED LEVER ON BUCKET HANGER WAS PULLED DOWN BY A CAMEL (FIXED CAM RAIL AT CENTER) AS BUCKET ROLLED PAST IT, CAUSING A CLAMP TO CLOSE AGAINST TRACTION CABLE. A SIMILAR CAMEL (NO LONGER EXTANT) DISENGAGED CLAMP ON RECEIVING SIDE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  7. Development of Traction Drive Motors for the Toyota Hybrid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Munehiro

    Toyota Motor Corporation developed in 2005 a new hybrid system for a large SUV. This system included the new development of a high-speed traction drive motor achieving a significant increase in power weight ratio. This paper provides an overview of the hybrid system, discusses the characteristics required of a traction drive motor, and presents the technologies employed in the developed motor.

  8. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cikanek, Susan R.

    1995-01-01

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydrualic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  9. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cikanek, S.R.

    1995-09-12

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 10 figs.

  10. Effects on traction of outsole composition and hardnesses of basketball shoes and three types of playing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rheinstein, D J; Morehouse, C A; Niebel, B W

    1978-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to determine the effects of outsole composition and hardness, playing surfaces and player weight on the dynamic torque, traction forces and static drag developed at the shoe-surface interface. Basketball shoes of polyurethane and elastomer outsoles, each of three different hardnesses, were tested on clean and dusty hardwood floor samples, and on a sample of an artificial gymnasium flooring. The tests were conducted using a laboratory apparatus which included a player leg assembly with simulation of two player weights. Dynamic torque, traction forces from side and rear impacts and static drag were measured at the shoe surface interface. The results indicated that in basketball the magnitude of the resistance forces and torques are influenced by the outsole material and outsole hardness of the shoes, the playing surface and player weights.

  11. 3-dimensional electronic structures of CaC6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Wonshik; Kim, Yeongkwan; Han, Garam; Leem, Choonshik; Kim, Junsung; Kim, Yeongwook; Kim, Keunsu; Rotenberg, Eli; Kim, Changyoung; Postech Collaboration; Advanced Light Source Collaboration; Yonsei University Team

    2014-03-01

    There is still remaining issues on origin of superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds, especially CaC6 because of its relatively high transition temperature than other GICs. There are two competing theories on where the superconductivity occurs in this material; intercalant metal or charge doped graphene layer. To elucidate this issue, it is necessary to confirm existence of intercalant driven band. Therefore, we performed 3 dimensional electronic structure studies with ARPES to find out 3d dispersive intercalant band. However, we could not observe it, instead observed 3d dispersive carbon band. This support the aspect of charge doped graphene superconductivity more than intercalant driving aspect.

  12. The 3-dimensional cellular automata for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Youbin; Ren, Bin; Yang, Wencao; Shuai, Jianwei

    2014-04-01

    The HIV infection dynamics is discussed in detail with a 3-dimensional cellular automata model in this paper. The model can reproduce the three-phase development, i.e., the acute period, the asymptotic period and the AIDS period, observed in the HIV-infected patients in a clinic. We show that the 3D HIV model performs a better robustness on the model parameters than the 2D cellular automata. Furthermore, we reveal that the occurrence of a perpetual source to successively generate infectious waves to spread to the whole system drives the model from the asymptotic state to the AIDS state.

  13. Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver

    2011-01-14

    As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

  14. Energy and wear optimisation of train longitudinal dynamics and of traction and braking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, R.; Galardi, E.; Meli, E.; Nocciolini, D.; Pugi, L.; Rindi, A.

    2015-05-01

    Traction and braking systems deeply affect longitudinal train dynamics, especially when an extensive blending phase among different pneumatic, electric and magnetic devices is required. The energy and wear optimisation of longitudinal vehicle dynamics has a crucial economic impact and involves several engineering problems such as wear of braking friction components, energy efficiency, thermal load on components, level of safety under degraded or adhesion conditions (often constrained by the current regulation in force on signalling or other safety-related subsystem). In fact, the application of energy storage systems can lead to an efficiency improvement of at least 10% while, as regards the wear reduction, the improvement due to distributed traction systems and to optimised traction devices can be quantified in about 50%. In this work, an innovative integrated procedure is proposed by the authors to optimise longitudinal train dynamics and traction and braking manoeuvres in terms of both energy and wear. The new approach has been applied to existing test cases and validated with experimental data provided by Breda and, for some components and their homologation process, the results of experimental activities derive from cooperation performed with relevant industrial partners such as Trenitalia and Italcertifer. In particular, simulation results are referred to the simulation tests performed on a high-speed train (Ansaldo Breda Emu V250) and on a tram (Ansaldo Breda Sirio Tram). The proposed approach is based on a modular simulation platform in which the sub-models corresponding to different subsystems can be easily customised, depending on the considered application, on the availability of technical data and on the homologation process of different components.

  15. Automated feature extraction for 3-dimensional point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, Lori A.; Leigh, Holly W.; Soderlund, Alexander; Clymer, Bradley; Baer, Jessica; Neuenschwander, Amy L.

    2016-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology offers the capability to rapidly capture high-resolution, 3-dimensional surface data with centimeter-level accuracy for a large variety of applications. Due to the foliage-penetrating properties of LIDAR systems, these geospatial data sets can detect ground surfaces beneath trees, enabling the production of highfidelity bare earth elevation models. Precise characterization of the ground surface allows for identification of terrain and non-terrain points within the point cloud, and facilitates further discernment between natural and man-made objects based solely on structural aspects and relative neighboring parameterizations. A framework is presented here for automated extraction of natural and man-made features that does not rely on coincident ortho-imagery or point RGB attributes. The TEXAS (Terrain EXtraction And Segmentation) algorithm is used first to generate a bare earth surface from a lidar survey, which is then used to classify points as terrain or non-terrain. Further classifications are assigned at the point level by leveraging local spatial information. Similarly classed points are then clustered together into regions to identify individual features. Descriptions of the spatial attributes of each region are generated, resulting in the identification of individual tree locations, forest extents, building footprints, and 3-dimensional building shapes, among others. Results of the fully-automated feature extraction algorithm are then compared to ground truth to assess completeness and accuracy of the methodology.

  16. Grain boundary segregation in boron added interstitial free steels studied by 3-dimensional atom probe

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, K.; Larson, D.J.; Warren, P.J.; Smith, G.D.W.

    1999-04-09

    The development of deep-drawable sheet steels is of particular significance for the automotive industry. Titanium and/or niobium added extra-low carbon interstitial free (IF) steels are key materials. The virtually complete removal of carbon and nitrogen should lead to superior forming properties. However, the lack of solute carbon at grain boundaries significantly decreases the bonding force at the interfaces, which often causes intergranular brittle fracture when deeply drawn steel sheets are subjected to impact deformation at low temperature. This phenomenon is called secondary working embrittlement (SWE), and is a major problem when solute atoms such as phosphorus, manganese or silicon are added to increase the tensile strength of the steels. Small amounts of boron, which does not affect the formability of the steels significantly, are usually added as a remedial measure in such cases. The 3-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) combined with field ion microscopy (FIM) has the ability to produce 3-dimensional images from regions approximately 20nm*20nm*100nm in size, and identify each atomic species and the relative location of each atom with nearly lattice resolution. In this study, a combination of these methods was applied to produce FIM tips of IF steel containing grain boundaries. The authors report here the first observations of the segregation of boron in IF steels using 3DAP.

  17. Force transmission in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauser, Roger; Ambrosi, Davide; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    During cell migration, forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted through adhesion complexes to the substrate. To investigate the mechanism of force generation and transmission, we analyzed the relationship between actin network velocity and traction forces at the substrate in a model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. Front and lateral sides of the cell exhibited much stronger coupling between actin motion and traction forces than the trailing cell body. Further analysis of the traction–velocity relationship suggested that the force transmission mechanisms were different in different cell regions: at the front, traction was generated by a gripping of the actin network to the substrate, whereas at the sides and back, it was produced by the network’s slipping over the substrate. Treatment with inhibitors of the actin–myosin system demonstrated that the cell body translocation could be powered by either of the two different processes, actomyosin contraction or actin assembly, with the former associated with significantly larger traction forces than the latter. PMID:20100912

  18. Traction and film thickness measurements under starved elastohydrodynamic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    Traction measurements under starved elastohydrodynamic conditions were obtained for a point contact geometry. Simultaneous measurements of the film thickness and the locations of the inlet lubricant boundary were made optically. The thickness of a starved film for combination rolling and sliding conditions varies with the location of the inlet boundary in the same way found previously for pure rolling. A starved film was observed to possess greater traction than a flooded film for the same slide roll ratio. For a given slide roll ratio a starved film simply increases the shear rate in the Hertz region. The maximum shear rate depends on the degree of starvation and has no theoretical limit. Traction measurements under starved conditions were compared with flooded conditions under equivalent shear rates in the Hertz region. When the shear rates in the Hertz region were low and the film severely starved, the measured tractions were found to be much lower than expected.

  19. Scientific visualization of 3-dimensional optimized stellarator configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    The design techniques and physics analysis of modern stellarator configurations for magnetic fusion research rely heavily on high performance computing and simulation. Stellarators, which are fundamentally 3-dimensional in nature, offer significantly more design flexibility than more symmetric devices such as the tokamak. By varying the outer boundary shape of the plasma, a variety of physics features, such as transport, stability, and heating efficiency can be optimized. Scientific visualization techniques are an important adjunct to this effort as they provide a necessary ergonomic link between the numerical results and the intuition of the human researcher. The authors have developed a variety of visualization techniques for stellarators which both facilitate the design optimization process and allow the physics simulations to be more readily understood.

  20. α1 -AR agonist induced piloerection protects against the development of traction alopecia.

    PubMed

    Goren, Andy; Shapiro, Jerry; Sinclair, Rodney; Kovacevic, Maja; McCoy, John

    2016-05-01

    Traction alopecia is hair loss that occurs after persistent pulling (e.g., during cosmetic procedures) on the roots of hair over time. Unlike plucking, which is painful, persistent pulling may go unnoticed until a patient presents with either bald spots or diffuse telogen shedding. Each hair follicle in the scalp contains an arrector pili muscle that, when contracted, erects the hair. The smooth muscle in the arrector pili expresses α1 adrenergic receptors (α1 -AR). As such, we hypothesized that contraction of the arrector pili muscle via an α1 -AR agonist would increase the threshold of force required to pluck hair during cosmetic procedures. Female subjects, ages 18-40, were recruited to study the effect of topically applied phenylephrine, a selective α1 -AR agonist, on epilation force and hair shedding during cosmetic procedures. In our blinded study, 80% of subjects demonstrated reduced shedding on days using phenylephrine compared to days using a placebo solution. The average reduction in hair loss was approximately 42%. In addition, the force threshold required for epilation increased by approximately 172% following topical phenylephrine application. To our knowledge this is the first study demonstrating the utility of α1 -AR agonists in the treatment of traction alopecia and hair shedding during cosmetic procedures.

  1. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike today’s large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldor’s motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  2. Wet Traction Tests - Marcy Siped Tire.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Force vs Slip Angle, Dry Test Surface, Tire Code Number 11-N (Siped 5/32" Deep X 1/8" Spacing) 67 26 Lateral Force vs Slip Angle, Damp Test Surface, 5...Slip Angle, Dry Test Surface, 5 MPH, Tire Code Number 24-N (Siped 8/32" Deep X 3/16" Spacing) 73 32 Lateral Force vs Slip Angle, Dry Test Surface, 10...MPH, Tire Code Number 24-N (Siped 8/32" Deep X 3/16" Spacing) 74 33 Lateral Force vs Slip Angle, Dry Test Surface, 30 MPH, Tire Code Number 24-N

  3. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-08-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation.

  4. The first 3-dimensional assemblies of organotin-functionalized polyanions.

    PubMed

    Piedra-Garza, Luis Fernando; Reinoso, Santiago; Dickman, Michael H; Sanguineti, Michael M; Kortz, Ulrich

    2009-08-21

    Reaction of the (CH(3))(2)Sn(2+) electrophile toward trilacunary [A-alpha-XW(9)O(34)](n-) Keggin polytungstates (X = P(V), As(V), Si(IV)) with guanidinium as templating-cation resulted in the isostructural compounds Na[C(NH(2))(3)](2)[{(CH(3))(2)Sn(H(2)O)}(3)(A-alpha-PW(9)O(34))] x 9 H(2)O (1), Na[C(NH(2))(3)](2)[{(CH(3))(2)Sn(H(2)O)}(3)(A-alpha-AsW(9)O(34))] x 8 H(2)O (2) and Na(2)[C(NH(2))(3)](2)[{(CH(3))(2)Sn(H(2)O)}(3)(A-alpha-SiW(9)O(34))] x 10 H(2)O (3). Compounds 1-3 constitute the first 3-dimensional assemblies of organotin-functionalized polyanions, as well as the first example of a dimethyltin-containing tungstosilicate in the case of 3, and they show a similar chiral architecture based on tetrahedrally-arranged {(CH(3))(2)Sn}(3)(A-alpha-XW(9)O(34)) monomeric building-blocks connected via intermolecular Sn-O=W bridges regardless of the size and/or charge of the heteroatom.

  5. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation. PMID:26310537

  6. Mandibular reconstruction using stereolithographic 3-dimensional printing modeling technology.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Adir; Laviv, Amir; Berman, Phillip; Nashef, Rizan; Abu-Tair, Jawad

    2009-11-01

    Mandibular reconstruction can be challenging for the surgeon wishing to restore its unique geometry. Reconstruction can be achieved with titanium bone plates followed by autogenous bone grafting. Incorporation of the bone graft into the mandible provides continuity and strength required for proper esthetics and function and permitting dental implant rehabilitation at a later stage. Precious time in the operating room is invested in plate contouring to reconstruct the mandible. Rapid prototyping technologies can construct physical models from computer-aided design via 3-dimensional (3D) printers. A prefabricated 3D model is achieved, which assists in accurate contouring of plates and/or planning of bone graft harvest geometry before surgery. The 2 most commonly used rapid prototyping technologies are stereolithography and 3D printing (3DP). Three-dimensional printing is advantageous to stereolithography for better accuracy, quicker printing time, and lower cost. We present 3 clinical cases based on 3DP modeling technology. Models were fabricated before the resection of mandibular ameloblastoma and were used to prepare bridging plates before the first stage of reconstruction. In 1 case, another model was fabricated and used as a template for iliac crest bone graft in the second stage of reconstruction. The 3DP technology provided a precise, fast, and cheap mandibular reconstruction, which aids in shortened operation time (and therefore decreased exposure time to general anesthesia, decreased blood loss, and shorter wound exposure time) and easier surgical procedure.

  7. Thermal crosstalk in 3-dimensional RRAM crossbar array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengxiao; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Li, Yingtao; Wang, Hong; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Long, Shibing; Liu, Su; Liu, Ming

    2015-08-27

    High density 3-dimensional (3D) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) is one of the major focus of the new age technologies. To compete with the ultra-high density NAND and NOR memories, understanding of reliability mechanisms and scaling potential of 3D RRAM crossbar array is needed. Thermal crosstalk is one of the most critical effects that should be considered in 3D crossbar array application. The Joule heat generated inside the RRAM device will determine the switching behavior itself, and for dense memory arrays, the temperature surrounding may lead to a consequent resistance degradation of neighboring devices. In this work, thermal crosstalk effect and scaling potential under thermal effect in 3D RRAM crossbar array are systematically investigated. It is revealed that the reset process is dominated by transient thermal effect in 3D RRAM array. More importantly, thermal crosstalk phenomena could deteriorate device retention performance and even lead to data storage state failure from LRS (low resistance state) to HRS (high resistance state) of the disturbed RRAM cell. In addition, the resistance state degradation will be more serious with continuously scaling down the feature size. Possible methods for alleviating thermal crosstalk effect while further advancing the scaling potential are also provided and verified by numerical simulation.

  8. In vitro measurement of muscle volume with 3-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Walker, F; Caress, J; Hunt, C; Tegeler, C

    1999-05-01

    The aim was to test the accuracy of muscle volume measurements with a new 3-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system, which allows a freehand scanning of the transducer with an improved quality of the ultrasound images and therefore the outlines of the muscles. Five resected cadaveric hand muscles were insonated and the muscle volumes calculated by 3-D reconstructions of the acquired 2-D ultrasound sections. Intra-reader, inter-reader and follow-up variability were calculated, as well as the volume of the muscle tissue measured by water displacement. In the results, 3-D ultrasound and water displacement measurements showed an average deviation of 10.1%; Data of 3-D ultrasound measurements were: intra-reader variability 2.8%; inter-reader variability 2.4% and follow-up variability 2.3%. 3-D measurements of muscle volume are valid and reliable. Serial sonographic measurements of muscle may be able to quantitate changes in muscle volume that occur in disease and recovery.

  9. Invasive 3-Dimensional Organotypic Neoplasia from Multiple Normal Human Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ridky, Todd W.; Chow, Jennifer M.; Wong, David J.; Khavari, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Refined cancer models are required to assess the burgeoning number of potential targets for cancer therapeutics within a rapid and clinically relevant context. Here we utilize tumor-associated genetic pathways to transform primary human epithelial cells from epidermis, oropharynx, esophagus, and cervix into genetically defined tumors within a human 3-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment incorporating cell-populated stroma and intact basement membrane. These engineered organotypic tissues recapitulated natural features of tumor progression, including epithelial invasion through basement membrane, a complex process critically required for biologic malignancy in 90% of human cancers. Invasion was rapid, and potentiated by stromal cells. Oncogenic signals in 3-D tissue, but not 2-D culture, resembled gene expression profiles from spontaneous human cancers. Screening well-characterized signaling pathway inhibitors in 3-D organotypic neoplasia helped distil a clinically faithful cancer gene signature. Multi-tissue 3-D human tissue cancer models may provide an efficient and relevant complement to current approaches to characterize cancer progression. PMID:21102459

  10. Pneumatic release of focal vitreomacular traction.

    PubMed

    Claus, M G; Feron, E; Veckeneer, M

    2017-03-01

    PurposeTo study the efficacy of a single intravitreal injection of expansile gas as a valuable alternative to current treatment options (conservative, pharmacological, and surgical) in patients with symptomatic, focal vitreomacular traction (VMT).Patients and methodsThis study comprises a retrospective, interventional case series of patients. Twenty eyes in seventeen patients with symptomatic and persisting focal VMT were treated in an outpatient setting with an intravitreal gas injection of 0.2 ml. In 19 eyes, 100% hexafluoroethane (C2F6) was used. One eye received sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). To all but three patients posturing advice was given. Patients were reviewed with a full-eye examination and ocular coherence tomography (OCT) after 14 days and later. The primary outcome measure was the release of VMT on OCT.ResultsIn 17 of the 20 (85.0%) treated eyes, a release of VMT was achieved as documented on OCT. The release of VMT was diagnosed during the first month after injection in 11 eyes of 11 patients and within 3 months in 16 eyes of 15 patients. In all but five of our patients, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) remained stable or improved. In four patients, the progression or development of cataract was the probable cause of the decrease in BCVA. One patient developed a stage II macular hole after injection and needed vitrectomy. None of the treated patients developed retinal breaks.ConclusionIntravitreal expansile gas injection could offer a minimally invasive, low-cost alternative treatment in patients with symptomatic, persisting VMT. Additional studies on a larger number of patients are required.

  11. Advantages of diabetic tractional retinal detachment repair

    PubMed Central

    Sternfeld, Amir; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Weinberger, Dov; Ehrlich, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients with diabetic tractional retinal detachment (TRD) treated with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Patients and methods We retrospectively studied a case series of 24 eyes of 21 patients at a single tertiary, university-affiliated medical center. A review was carried out on patients who underwent PPV for the management of TRD due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy from October 2011 to November 2013. Preoperative and final visual outcomes, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and medical background were evaluated. Results A 23 G instrumentation was used in 23 eyes (95.8%), and a 25 G instrumentation in one (4.2%). Mean postoperative follow-up time was 13.3 months (4–30 months). Visual acuity significantly improved from logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) 1.48 to LogMAR 1.05 (P<0.05). Visual acuity improved by ≥3 lines in 75% of patients. Intraoperative complications included iatrogenic retinal breaks in seven eyes (22.9%) and vitreal hemorrhage in nine eyes (37.5%). In two eyes, one sclerotomy was enlarged to 20 G (8.3%). Postoperative complications included reoperation in five eyes (20.8%) due to persistent subretinal fluid (n=3), vitreous hemorrhage (n=1), and dislocated intraocular lens (n=1). Thirteen patients (54.2%) had postoperative vitreous hemorrhage that cleared spontaneously, five patients (20.8%) required antiglaucoma medications for increased intraocular pressure, seven patients (29.2%) developed an epiretinal membrane, and two patients (8.3%) developed a macular hole. Conclusion Patients with diabetic TRD can benefit from PPV surgery. Intraoperative and postoperative complications can be attributed to the complexity of this disease. PMID:26604667

  12. Cell traction in collective cell migration and morphogenesis: The chase and run mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Directional collective cell migration plays an important role in development, physiology, and disease. An increasing number of studies revealed key aspects of how cells coordinate their movement through distances surpassing several cell diameters. While physical modeling and measurements of forces during collective cell movements helped to reveal key mechanisms, most of these studies focus on tightly connected epithelial cultures. Less is known about collective migration of mesenchymal cells. A typical example of such behavior is the migration of the neural crest cells, which migrate large distances as a group. A recent study revealed that this persistent migration is aided by the interaction between the neural crest and the neighboring placode cells, whereby neural crest chase the placodes via chemotaxis, but upon contact both populations undergo contact inhibition of locomotion and a rapid reorganization of cellular traction. The resulting asymmetric traction field of the placodes forces them to run away from the chasers. We argue that this chase and run interaction may not be specific only to the neural crest system, but could serve as the underlying mechanism for several morphogenetic processes involving collective cell migration. PMID:26267782

  13. 3-Dimensional shear wave elastography of breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-ling; Chang, Cai; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Fen; Chen, Jia-jian; Qu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Color patterns of 3-dimensional (3D) shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising method in differentiating tumoral nodules recently. This study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of color patterns of 3D SWE in breast lesions, with special emphasis on coronal planes. A total of 198 consecutive women with 198 breast lesions (125 malignant and 73 benign) were included, who underwent conventional ultrasound (US), 3D B-mode, and 3D SWE before surgical excision. SWE color patterns of Views A (transverse), T (sagittal), and C (coronal) were determined. Sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Distribution of SWE color patterns was significantly different between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.001). In malignant lesions, “Stiff Rim” was significantly more frequent in View C (crater sign, 60.8%) than in View A (51.2%, P = 0.013) and View T (54.1%, P = 0.035). AUC for combination of “Crater Sign” and conventional US was significantly higher than View A (0.929 vs 0.902, P = 0.004) and View T (0.929 vs 0.907, P = 0.009), and specificity significantly increased (90.4% vs 78.1%, P = 0.013) without significant change in sensitivity (85.6% vs 88.0%, P = 0.664) as compared with conventional US. In conclusion, combination of conventional US with 3D SWE color patterns significantly increased diagnostic accuracy, with “Crater Sign” in coronal plane of the highest value. PMID:27684820

  14. The 3-dimensional construction of the Rae craton, central Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David B.; Craven, James A.; Pilkington, Mark; Hillier, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the 3-dimensional tectonic assembly of early continents, first as Archean cratons and then Proterozoic shields, remains poorly understood. In this paper, all readily available geophysical and geochemical data are assembled in a 3-D model with the most accurate bedrock geology in order to understand better the geometry of major structures within the Rae craton of central Canada. Analysis of geophysical observations of gravity and seismic wave speed variations revealed several lithospheric-scale discontinuities in physical properties. Where these discontinuities project upward to correlate with mapped upper crustal geological structures, the discontinuities can be interpreted as shear zones. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can also be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae craton comprises at least three smaller continental terranes, which "cratonized" during a granitic bloom. Cratonization probably represents final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho. The peak thermotectonic event at 1.86-1.7 Ga was associated with the Hudsonian orogeny that assembled several cratons and lesser continental blocks into the Canadian Shield using a number of southeast-dipping megathrusts. This orogeny metasomatized, mineralized, and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making them more conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite. Little evidence exists of thin slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in this Precambrian construction history whereas underthrusting and wedging of continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities.

  15. A new preclinical 3-dimensional agarose colony formation assay.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Yoshinori; Panchabhai, Sonali; Levin, Victor A

    2008-08-01

    The evaluation of new drug treatments and combination treatments for gliomas and other cancers requires a robust means to interrogate wide dose ranges and varying times of drug exposure without stain-inactivation of the cells (colonies). To this end, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) colony formation assay that makes use of GelCount technology, a new cell colony counter for gels and soft agars. We used U251MG, SNB19, and LNZ308 glioma cell lines and MiaPaCa pancreas adenocarcinoma and SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Colonies were grown in a two-tiered agarose that had 0.7% agarose on the bottom and 0.3% agarose on top. We then studied the effects of DFMO, carboplatin, and SAHA over a 3-log dose range and over multiple days of drug exposure. Using GelCount we approximated the area under the curve (AUC) of colony volumes as the sum of colony volumes (microm2xOD) in each plate to calculate IC50 values. Adenocarcinoma colonies were recognized by GelCount scanning at 3-4 days, while it took 6-7 days to detect glioma colonies. The growth rate of MiaPaCa and SW480 cells was rapid, with 100 colonies counted in 5-6 days; glioma cells grew more slowly, with 100 colonies counted in 9-10 days. Reliable log dose versus AUC curves were observed for all drugs studied. In conclusion, the GelCount method that we describe is more quantitative than traditional colony assays and allows precise study of drug effects with respect to both dose and time of exposure using fewer culture plates.

  16. Development and Validation of a 3-Dimensional CFB Furnace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vepsäläinen, Arl; Myöhänen, Karl; Hyppäneni, Timo; Leino, Timo; Tourunen, Antti

    At Foster Wheeler, a three-dimensional CFB furnace model is essential part of knowledge development of CFB furnace process regarding solid mixing, combustion, emission formation and heat transfer. Results of laboratory and pilot scale phenomenon research are utilized in development of sub-models. Analyses of field-test results in industrial-scale CFB boilers including furnace profile measurements are simultaneously carried out with development of 3-dimensional process modeling, which provides a chain of knowledge that is utilized as feedback for phenomenon research. Knowledge gathered by model validation studies and up-to-date parameter databases are utilized in performance prediction and design development of CFB boiler furnaces. This paper reports recent development steps related to modeling of combustion and formation of char and volatiles of various fuel types in CFB conditions. Also a new model for predicting the formation of nitrogen oxides is presented. Validation of mixing and combustion parameters for solids and gases are based on test balances at several large-scale CFB boilers combusting coal, peat and bio-fuels. Field-tests including lateral and vertical furnace profile measurements and characterization of solid materials provides a window for characterization of fuel specific mixing and combustion behavior in CFB furnace at different loads and operation conditions. Measured horizontal gas profiles are projection of balance between fuel mixing and reactions at lower part of furnace and are used together with both lateral temperature profiles at bed and upper parts of furnace for determination of solid mixing and combustion model parameters. Modeling of char and volatile based formation of NO profiles is followed by analysis of oxidizing and reducing regions formed due lower furnace design and mixing characteristics of fuel and combustion airs effecting to formation ofNO furnace profile by reduction and volatile-nitrogen reactions. This paper presents

  17. Rho-directed forces in collective migration.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Peter; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M

    2014-03-01

    Collective cell migration depends on multicellular mechanocoupling between leader and follower cells to coordinate traction force and position change. Co-registration of Rho GTPase activity and forces in migrating epithelial cell sheets now shows how RhoA controls leader-follower cell hierarchy, multicellular cytoskeletal contractility and mechanocoupling, to prevent ectopic leading edges and to move the cell sheet forward.

  18. Traction sheave elevator, hoisting unit and machine space

    DOEpatents

    Hakala, Harri; Mustalahti, Jorma; Aulanko, Esko

    2000-01-01

    Traction sheave elevator consisting of an elevator car moving along elevator guide rails, a counterweight moving along counterweight guide rails, a set of hoisting ropes (3) on which the elevator car and counterweight are suspended, and a drive machine unit (6) driving a traction sheave (7) acting on the hoisting ropes (3) and placed in the elevator shaft. The drive machine unit (6) is of a flat construction. A wall of the elevator shaft is provided with a machine space with its open side facing towards the shaft, the essential parts of the drive machine unit (6) being placed in the space. The hoisting unit (9) of the traction sheave elevator consists of a substantially discoidal drive machine unit (6) and an instrument panel (8) mounted on the frame (20) of the hoisting unit.

  19. An advanced pitch change mechanism incorporating a hybrid traction drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, B. M.; Sargisson, D. F.; White, G.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A design of a propeller pitch control mechanism is described that meets the demanding requirements of a high-power, advanced turboprop. In this application, blade twisting moment torque can be comparable to that of the main reduction gearbox output: precise pitch control, reliability and compactness are all at a premium. A key element in the design is a compact, high-ratio hybrid traction drive which offers low torque ripple and high torsional stiffness. The traction drive couples a high speed electric motor/alternator unit to a ball screw that actuates the blade control links. The technical merits of this arrangement and the performance characteristics of the traction drive are discussed. Comparisons are made to the more conventional pitch control mechanisms.

  20. Evaluation of a high performance fixed-ratio traction drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Anderson, N. E.; Rohn, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a test program to evaluate a compact, high performance, fixed ratio traction drive are presented. This transmission, the Nasvytis Multiroller Traction Drive, is a fixed ratio, single stage planetary with two rows of stepped planet rollers. Two versions of the drive were parametrically tested back-to-back at speeds to 73,000 rpm and power levels to 180 kW (240 hp). Parametric tests were also conducted with the Nasvytis drive retrofitted to an automotive gas turbine engine. The drives exhibited good performance, with a nominal peak efficiency of 94 to 96 percent and a maximum speed loss due to creep of approximately 3.5 percent.

  1. Temperature control of power semiconductor devices in traction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, A. A.; Strekalov, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    The peculiarity of thermal management of traction frequency converters of a railway rolling stock is highlighted. The topology and the operation principle of the automatic temperature control system of power semiconductor modules of the traction frequency converter are designed and discussed. The features of semiconductors as an object of temperature control are considered; the equivalent circuit of thermal processes in the semiconductors is suggested, the power losses in the two-level voltage source inverters are evaluated and analyzed. The dynamic properties and characteristics of the cooling fan induction motor electric drive with the scalar control are presented. The results of simulation in Matlab are shown for the steady state of thermal processes.

  2. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle biomechanics were compared. In the course of bending, from plantar flexion 20° to back flexion 20°, the extortion of talus decreased while the eversion increased. Four reconstruction models failed to bring back the impaired ankle to normal, with an obvious increase of extortion and eversion. The Kitaoka technique was useful to reduce the extortion angle in a consequential manner. Compared with the other three techniques, the Kitaoka technique produced better results for extortion angle and the difference was statistically significant. However, in case of eversion, there was no significant difference among the four techniques (P>0.05). Lateral ligament's stress in all the four models was different from the normal one. When the ankle was imposed with extortion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with the Kitaoka reconstruction method was close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. When ankle was imposed with eversion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with Kitaoka and Deland reconstruction methods were close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. We concluded that Kitaoka and Deland tendon reconstruction technique could recover impaired ankle deltoid ligament and re-established its normal biomechanics characteristics. PMID:28105122

  3. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle biomechanics were compared. In the course of bending, from plantar flexion 20° to back flexion 20°, the extortion of talus decreased while the eversion increased. Four reconstruction models failed to bring back the impaired ankle to normal, with an obvious increase of extortion and eversion. The Kitaoka technique was useful to reduce the extortion angle in a consequential manner. Compared with the other three techniques, the Kitaoka technique produced better results for extortion angle and the difference was statistically significant. However, in case of eversion, there was no significant difference among the four techniques (P>0.05). Lateral ligament's stress in all the four models was different from the normal one. When the ankle was imposed with extortion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with the Kitaoka reconstruction method was close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. When ankle was imposed with eversion moment of force, stress of anterior talofibular ligament with Kitaoka and Deland reconstruction methods were close to that of the complete deltoid ligament. We concluded that Kitaoka and Deland tendon reconstruction technique could recover impaired ankle deltoid ligament and re-established its normal biomechanics characteristics.

  4. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction...

  5. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction...

  6. Idiopathic vitreomacular traction and macular hole: a comprehensive review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Steel, D H W; Lotery, A J

    2013-10-01

    Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common phenomenon in the aging eye. However, this may be complicated by persistent symptomatic vitreomacular adhesions that exert tractional forces on the macula (vitreomacular traction; VMT). VMT itself may be associated with epiretinal membrane formation and the development of idiopathic macular holes (IMH). Such pathologies may cause visual disturbances, including metamorphopsia, photopsia, blurred vision, and decreased visual acuity, which impact an individual's quality of life. Technologies such as optical coherence tomography allow an increasingly more accurate visualisation of the macular anatomy, including quantification of macular hole characteristics, and this facilitates treatment decision-making. Pars plana vitrectomy remains the primary treatment option for many patients with VMT or IMH; for the latter, peeling of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) of the retina has shown improved outcomes when compared with no ILM peeling. The development of narrow-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy systems has improved the rate of visual recovery following surgery. Ocriplasmin, by degrading laminin and fibronectin at the vitreoretinal interface, may allow induction of PVD in a non-invasive manner. Indeed, clinical studies have supported its use as an alternative to surgery in certain patient populations. However, further research is still needed with respect to greater understanding of the pathophysiology underlying the development of VMT and IMH.

  7. Idiopathic vitreomacular traction and macular hole: a comprehensive review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Steel, D H W; Lotery, A J

    2013-01-01

    Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common phenomenon in the aging eye. However, this may be complicated by persistent symptomatic vitreomacular adhesions that exert tractional forces on the macula (vitreomacular traction; VMT). VMT itself may be associated with epiretinal membrane formation and the development of idiopathic macular holes (IMH). Such pathologies may cause visual disturbances, including metamorphopsia, photopsia, blurred vision, and decreased visual acuity, which impact an individual's quality of life. Technologies such as optical coherence tomography allow an increasingly more accurate visualisation of the macular anatomy, including quantification of macular hole characteristics, and this facilitates treatment decision-making. Pars plana vitrectomy remains the primary treatment option for many patients with VMT or IMH; for the latter, peeling of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) of the retina has shown improved outcomes when compared with no ILM peeling. The development of narrow-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy systems has improved the rate of visual recovery following surgery. Ocriplasmin, by degrading laminin and fibronectin at the vitreoretinal interface, may allow induction of PVD in a non-invasive manner. Indeed, clinical studies have supported its use as an alternative to surgery in certain patient populations. However, further research is still needed with respect to greater understanding of the pathophysiology underlying the development of VMT and IMH. PMID:24108069

  8. Candidate Coatings and Dry Traction Drives for Planetary Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert; Oswald, Fred B.

    2002-01-01

    Robert Fusaro and Fred Oswald of the Mechanical Components Branch discussed 'Candidate Coatings and Dry Traction Drives for Planetary Vehicles'. Vehicles to be designed for exploration of planets and moons of the solar system will require reliable mechanical drives to operate efficiently. Long-term operation of these drives will be challenging because of extreme operating conditions. These extreme conditions include: very high and/or very cold temperatures, wide temperature ranges, dust, vacuum or low-pressure atmospheres, and corrosive environments. Most drives used on Earth involve oil-lubricated gears. However, due to the extreme conditions on planetary surfaces, it may not be advisable or even possible to use oil lubrication. Unfortunately, solid lubricants do not work well when applied to gears because of the high contact stress conditions and large sliding motion between the teeth, which cause wear and limit life. We believe traction drives will provide an attractive alternative to gear drives. Traction drives are composed of rollers that provide geometry more conducive to solid lubrication. Minimal slip occurs in this contact geometry and thus there is very low wear to the solid lubricant. The challenge for these solid-lubricated drives is finding materials or coatings that provide the required long-life while also providing high traction. We seek materials that provide low wear with high friction.

  9. 21 CFR 890.5900 - Power traction equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Power traction equipment. 890.5900 Section 890.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5900 Power...

  10. 21 CFR 890.5900 - Power traction equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Power traction equipment. 890.5900 Section 890.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5900 Power...

  11. 21 CFR 890.5900 - Power traction equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Power traction equipment. 890.5900 Section 890.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5900 Power...

  12. 21 CFR 890.5900 - Power traction equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Power traction equipment. 890.5900 Section 890.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5900 Power...

  13. 21 CFR 890.5900 - Power traction equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Power traction equipment. 890.5900 Section 890.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5900 Power...

  14. Animal Traction. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Manual M-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter R.

    This manual is designed for use by Peace Corps volunteers and agricultural extension personnel working in animal traction development programs. While some of the information contained in the manual is specific to the extension of animal-powered agriculture in Africa, the principles covered are generally applicable wherever the method is being used…

  15. Structural strength analysis and fatigue life prediction of traction converter box in high-speed EMU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qin; Li, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The method of building the FEA model of traction converter box in high-speed EMU and analyzing the static strength and fatigue strength of traction converter box based on IEC 61373-2010 and EN 12663 standards is presented in this paper. The load-stress correlation coefficients of weak points is obtained by FEA model, applied to transfer the load history of traction converter box to stress history of each point. The fatigue damage is calculated based on Miner's rule and the fatigue life of traction converter box is predicted. According to study, the structural strength of traction converter box meets design requirements.

  16. Retinal Changes Induced by Epiretinal Tangential Forces

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Mario R.; Comune, Chiara; Ferrara, Mariantonia; Cennamo, Gilda; De Cillà, Stefano; Toto, Lisa; Cennamo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Two kinds of forces are active in vitreoretinal traction diseases: tangential and anterior-posterior forces. However, tangential forces are less characterized and classified in literature compared to the anterior-posterior ones. Tangential epiretinal forces are mainly due to anomalous posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), vitreoschisis, vitreopapillary adhesion (VPA), and epiretinal membranes (ERMs). Anomalous PVD plays a key role in the formation of the tangential vectorial forces on the retinal surface as consequence of gel liquefaction (synchysis) without sufficient and fast vitreous dehiscence at the vitreoretinal interface. The anomalous and persistent adherence of the posterior hyaloid to the retina can lead to vitreomacular/vitreopapillary adhesion or to a formation of avascular fibrocellular tissue (ERM) resulting from the proliferation and transdifferentiation of hyalocytes resident in the cortical vitreous remnants after vitreoschisis. The right interpretation of the forces involved in the epiretinal tangential tractions helps in a better definition of diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and surgical outcomes of vitreomacular interfaces. PMID:26421183

  17. Data-based fault-tolerant control of high-speed trains with traction/braking notch nonlinearities and actuator failures.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Song, Yong-Duan

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the position and velocity tracking control problem of high-speed trains with multiple vehicles connected through couplers. A dynamic model reflecting nonlinear and elastic impacts between adjacent vehicles as well as traction/braking nonlinearities and actuation faults is derived. Neuroadaptive fault-tolerant control algorithms are developed to account for various factors such as input nonlinearities, actuator failures, and uncertain impacts of in-train forces in the system simultaneously. The resultant control scheme is essentially independent of system model and is primarily data-driven because with the appropriate input-output data, the proposed control algorithms are capable of automatically generating the intermediate control parameters, neuro-weights, and the compensation signals, literally producing the traction/braking force based upon input and response data only--the whole process does not require precise information on system model or system parameter, nor human intervention. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is also confirmed through numerical simulations.

  18. Traction drive automatic transmission for gas turbine engine driveline

    DOEpatents

    Carriere, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    A transaxle driveline for a wheeled vehicle has a high speed turbine engine and a torque splitting gearset that includes a traction drive unit and a torque converter on a common axis transversely arranged with respect to the longitudinal centerline of the vehicle. The drive wheels of the vehicle are mounted on a shaft parallel to the turbine shaft and carry a final drive gearset for driving the axle shafts. A second embodiment of the final drive gearing produces an overdrive ratio between the output of the first gearset and the axle shafts. A continuously variable range of speed ratios is produced by varying the position of the drive rollers of the traction unit. After starting the vehicle from rest, the transmission is set for operation in the high speed range by engaging a first lockup clutch that joins the torque converter impeller to the turbine for operation as a hydraulic coupling.

  19. Minimal Role of Basal Shear Tractions in Driving Nubia-Somalia Divergence Across the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, D. S.; Calais, E.; Iaffaldano, G.; Flesch, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Nubian and Somalian plates actively diverge along the topographically high, ~5000 km long East African Rift System (EARS). As no major subduction zones bound Africa, one can assume that the forces driving the Nubia-Somalia plate system result primarily from mantle buoyancies and lateral variation in lithospheric gravitational potential energy. Images from seismic tomography and convection models suggest active mantle flow beneath Africa. However, the contribution from large-scale convection to the force balance driving plate divergence across the EARS remains in question. In this work we investigate the impact of mantle shear tractions on the dynamics of Nubia-Somalia divergence across the EARS. We compare surface motions inferred from GPS observations with strain rates and velocities predicted from dynamic models where basal shear stresses are (1) derived from forward mantle circulation models and (2) inferred from stress field boundary conditions that balance buoyancy forces in the African lithosphere. Upper mantle anisotropy derived from seismic observations beneath Africa provide independent constraints for the latter. Preliminary results suggest that basal shear tractions play a minor role in the dynamics of Nubia-Somalia divergence along the EARS. This result implies mantle-lithosphere decoupling, possibly promoted by a low viscosity asthenosphere. We corroborate the robustness of our results with estimates of upper mantle viscosity based on local upper mantle temperature estimates and rheological parameters obtained from laboratory experiments.

  20. Thermal traction contact performance evaluation under fully flooded and starved conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Ultra high speed traction tests were performed on two traction fluids commonly employed. Traction data on these fluids is required for purposes of traction drive design optimization techniques. To obtain the traction data, an existing twin disc traction test machine was employed. This machine was modified to accommodate the range of test variables. All the data reported was obtained under conditions of side slip, a technique whereby only low power levels are required to simulate real traction drive contacts. Theoretical traction predictions were performed for a representative number of curves that showed the influence of rolling velocity, of contact pressure and of aspect ratio. To establish the accuracy of the thermal model the predictions were performed ith increasing levels of independence of experimentally determined parameters. In the final resulting prediction only two non linear thermal parameters were used for the prediction of 15 different traction curves covering the entire range of variables as used in the investigation, with the exception of the influence of asperity traction. Comparison of these theoretical curves and corresponding experimental traces show very good agreement.

  1. Design study of toroidal traction CVT for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raynard, A. E.; Kraus, J.; Bell, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The development, evaluation, and optimization of a preliminary design concept for a continuously variable transmission (CVT) to couple the high-speed output shaft of an energy storage flywheel to the drive train of an electric vehicle is discussed. An existing computer simulation program was modified and used to compare the performance of five CVT design configurations. Based on this analysis, a dual-cavity full-toroidal drive with regenerative gearing is selected for the CVT design configuration. Three areas are identified that will require some technological development: the ratio control system, the traction fluid properities, and evaluation of the traction contact performance. Finally, the suitability of the selected CVT design concept for alternate electric and hybrid vehicle applications and alternate vehicle sizes and maximum output torques is determined. In all cases the toroidal traction drive design concept is applicable to the vehicle system. The regenerative gearing could be eliminated in the electric powered vehicle because of the reduced ratio range requirements. In other cases the CVT with regenerative gearing would meet the design requirements after appropriate adjustments in size and reduction gearing ratio.

  2. Dynamic in vivo 3-dimensional moment arms of the individual quadriceps components.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicole A; Sheehan, Frances T

    2009-08-25

    The purpose of this study was to provide the first in vivo 3-dimensional (3D) measures of knee extensor moment arms, measured during dynamic volitional activity. The hypothesis was that the vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) have significant off-axis moment arms compared to the central quadriceps components. After obtaining informed consent, three 3D dynamic cine phase contrast (PC) MRI sets (x,y,z velocity and anatomic images) were acquired from 22 subjects during active knee flexion and extension. Using a sagittal-oblique and two coronal-oblique imaging planes, the origins and insertions of each quadriceps muscle were identified and tracked through each time frame by integrating the cine-PC velocity data. The moment arm (MA) and relative moment (RM, defined as the cross product of the tendon line-of-action and a line connecting the line-of-action with the patellar center of mass) were calculated for each quadriceps component. The tendencies of the VM and VL to produce patellar tilt were evenly balanced. Interestingly, the magnitude of RM-P(Spin) for the VM and VL is approximately four times greater than the magnitude of RM-P(Tilt) for the same muscles suggesting that patellar spin may play a more important role in patellofemoral kinematics than previously thought. Thus, a force imbalance that leads to excessive lateral tilt, such as VM weakness in patellofemoral pain syndrome, would produce excessive negative spin (positive spin: superior patellar pole rotates laterally) and to a much greater degree. This would explain the increased negative spin found in recent studies of patellar maltracking. Assessing the contribution of each quadriceps component in three dimensions provides a more complete understanding of muscle functionality.

  3. Enzymatic vitreolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for vitreomacular traction

    PubMed Central

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Lipowski, Paweł; Zorena, Katarzyna; Skorek, Andrzej; Glasner, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of our research was to gain data about the efficacy of intravitreal injections of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in dissolving vitreoretinal tractions (VRTs). Materials and methods The study group consisted of patients of our Ophthalmology Clinic who had received an injection of rTPA (TPA Group) for an existent vitreomacular traction confirmed by optical coherence tomography and stereoscopic examinations. The control group consisted of patients who had declined treatment despite the existence of a vitreomacular traction confirmed by the same diagnostic methods. Each group consisted of 30 people (30 eyes). The observation period was 6 months. Conclusion In both groups some of the VRTs had dissolved. In the TPA group the traction dissolved in 10 patients (33.33%) and in the control group only in 5 (16.67%). It is also important to point out that the mean baseline membrane thickness was higher in the TPA group than in the control group. Observing patients in both groups we noticed that the dissolution of vitreoretinal membrane occurred most frequently in those cases where the membrane was thin. In the TPA group, the mean membrane thickness after 6 months decreased considerably. At the same time, no significant change in the membrane thickness could be observed in the control group. Observation of the retinal thickness allows us to draw the following conclusion: in the TPA group, the retinal thickness in the macular area (edema) had decreased over the study period, whereas in the control group it had increased. In those cases where the traction had dissolved, the edema of the retina decreased by the end of the 6-month period in both groups. In the TPA group, the dissolution of the membrane occurred most often within 3 months from the primary injection. Based on statistics, we can confirm that in the control group there was a decrease in visual acuity during the 6 months of the study period. At the same time, visual acuity in the TPA

  4. [Traction folliculitis: 6 cases caused by different types of hairstyle that pull on the hair].

    PubMed

    Urbina, F; Sudy, E; Barrios, M

    2009-01-01

    Excessive hair traction caused by hairstyles that pull the hair too tightly may cause noninfectious mechanical and irritant folliculitis known as traction folliculitis. We present a series of 6 cases of traction folliculitis caused by different hairstyles. All patients were women aged between 12 and 26 years old. Their hairstyles were braids, ponytails, pigtails, cornrows, and hair extensions in 2 patients. The lesions consisted of small, slightly painful, follicular pustules confined to the sites of maximum hair traction and surrounded by erythema. Only in 1 case were the lesions associated with traction alopecia. In 2 cases in which bacterial cultures were done, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. All patients improved after undoing their hairstyle and treatment with oral flucloxacillin. We assume that the role of S aureus is secondary and opportunistic, given that only follicles subject to traction and not the adjacent ones were affected.

  5. Force sensing using 3D displacement measurements in linear elastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xinzeng; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2016-07-01

    In cell traction microscopy, the mechanical forces exerted by a cell on its environment is usually determined from experimentally measured displacement by solving an inverse problem in elasticity. In this paper, an innovative numerical method is proposed which finds the "optimal" traction to the inverse problem. When sufficient regularization is applied, we demonstrate that the proposed method significantly improves the widely used approach using Green's functions. Motivated by real cell experiments, the equilibrium condition of a slowly migrating cell is imposed as a set of equality constraints on the unknown traction. Our validation benchmarks demonstrate that the numeric solution to the constrained inverse problem well recovers the actual traction when the optimal regularization parameter is used. The proposed method can thus be applied to study general force sensing problems, which utilize displacement measurements to sense inaccessible forces in linear elastic bodies with a priori constraints.

  6. Preoperative 3-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Uterine Myoma and Endometrium Before Myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi; Lee, Sa Ra; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kang, Byung Chul

    2017-02-01

    Uterine myomas are the most common gynecologic benign tumor affecting women of childbearing age, and myomectomy is the main surgical option to preserve the uterus and fertility. During myomectomy for women with multiple myomas, it is advisable to identify and remove as many as possible to decrease the risk of future myomectomies. With deficient preoperative imaging, gynecologists are challenged to identify the location and size of myomas and the endometrium, which, in turn, can lead to uterine rupture during future pregnancies. Current conventional 2-dimensional imaging has limitations in identifying precise locations of multiple myomas and the endometrium. In our experience, we preferred to use 3-dimensional imaging to delineate the myomas, endometrium, or blood vessels, which we were able to successfully reconstruct by using the following imaging method. To achieve 3-dimensional imaging, we matched T2 turbo spin echo images to detect uterine myomas and endometria with T1 high-resolution isotropic volume excitation-post images used to detect blood vessels by using an algorithm based on the 3-dimensional region growing method. Then, we produced images of the uterine myomas, endometria, and blood vessels using a 3-dimensional surface rendering method and successfully reconstructed selective 3-dimensional imaging for uterine myomas, endometria, and adjacent blood vessels. A Web-based survey was sent to 66 gynecologists concerning imaging techniques used before myomectomy. Twenty-eight of 36 responding gynecologists answered that the 3-dimensional image produced in the current study is preferred to conventional 2-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging in identifying precise locations of uterine myomas and endometria. The proposed 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging method successfully reconstructed uterine myomas, endometria, and adjacent vessels. We propose that this will be a helpful adjunct to uterine myomectomy as a preoperative imaging technique in future

  7. Influences on lifetime of wire ropes in traction lifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, W.

    2016-05-01

    Traction lifts are complex systems with rotating and translating moving masses, springs and dampers and several system inputs from the lifts and the users. The wire ropes are essential mechanical elements. The mechanical properties of the ropes in use depend on the rope construction, the load situation, nonlinearities and the lift dimensions. The mechanical properties are important for the proper use in lifts and the ride quality. But first of all the wire ropes (for all other suspension means as well) have to satisfy the safety relevant requirements sufficient lifetime, reliable determination of discard and sufficient and limited traction capacity. The lifetime of the wire ropes better the number of trips until rope discard depends on a lot of parameters of the rope and the rope application eg use of plastic deflection sheaves and reverse bending layouts. New challenges for rope lifetime are resulting from the more or less open D/d-ratio limits possible by certificates concerning the examination of conformity by notified bodies. This paper will highlight the basics of wire rope technology, the endurance and lifetime of wire ropes running over sheaves, and the different influences from the ropes and more and more important from the lift application parameters. Very often underestimated are the influences of transport, storage, installation and maintenance. With this background we will lead over to the calculation methods of wire rope lifetime considering the actual findings of wire rope endurance research. We'll show in this paper new and innovative facts as the influence of rope length and size factor in the lifetime formular, the reduction of lifetime caused by traction grooves, the new model for the calculation in reverse bending operations and the statistically firmed possibilities for machine roomless lifts (MRL) under very small bending conditions.

  8. Macular hole closure following spontaneous release of vitreomacular traction.

    PubMed

    Ozgonul, Cem; Besirli, Cagri G

    2017-03-01

    We describe the temporal changes observed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in the left eye of a 65-year-old man who developed a stage 1 macular hole secondary to vitreomacular traction (VMT). After 1 month, VMT had resolved spontaneously with a complete posterior vitreous detachment. Following VMT resolution, macular hole demonstrated progressive improvement and outer retinal disruption recovered spontaneously. This report highlights the importance of observation before any intervention for cases of stage 1 macular hole associated with VMT.

  9. Discharge Behavior Modeling of Traction lead-Acid Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhou, D. S.; Feng, N. L.; Wen, N.

    2010-03-01

    In hybrid electric vehicles, one of the key tasks for the battery management system is to maintain the batteries in the proper range which can fulfill the requirement of energy flow. Considering the dynamic operating conditions of traction batteries, an equivalent circuit model is proposed to simulate electro-chemical characteristics of the battery. According to the dynamic equations of the circuit model, internal parameters can be induced through battery response under pulse current test. Different experiments are implemented exploring how the internal parameters vary with the depth of discharge, which is critical for the battery management to determine the energy conversion range.

  10. FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, Josh; Lutz, Jon

    2006-09-01

    The overall objective of this program is to design and develop an advanced traction motor that will meet the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) 2010 goals and the traction motor technical targets. The motor specifications are given in Section 1.3. Other goals of the program include providing a cost study to ensure the motor can be developed within the cost targets needed for the automotive industry. The program has focused on using materials that are both high performance and low costs such that the performance can be met and cost targets are achieved. In addition, the motor technologies and machine design features must be compatible with high volume manufacturing and able to provide high reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness while simultaneously reducing weight and volume. Weight and volume reduction will become a major factor in reducing cost, material cost being the most significant part of manufacturing cost at high volume. Many motor technology categories have been considered in the past and present for traction drive applications, including: brushed direct current (DC), PM (PM) brushless dc (BLDC), alternating current (AC) induction, switched reluctance and synchronous reluctance machines. Of these machine technologies, PM BLDC has consistently demonstrated an advantage in terms of power density and efficiency. As rare earth magnet cost has declined, total cost may also be reduced over the other technologies. Of the many different configurations of PM BLDC machines, those which incorporate power production utilizing both magnetic torque as well as reluctance torque appear to have the most promise for traction applications. There are many different PM BLDC machine configurations which employ both of these torque producing mechanisms; however, most would fall into one of two categories--some use weaker magnets and rely more heavily on reluctance torque (reluctance-dominant PM machines), others use strong PMs and supplement with reluctance torque

  11. Traction studies of northeast corridor rail passenger service: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macie, T. W.; Stallkamp, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The enabling legislation of 1976 for improvement of service in the Northeast corridor (NEC) requires a schedule of 2 h 40 min between Washington and New York City by 1981 and 3 h 40 min between NYC and Boston, when the electrification is completed. Various options of the NEC operation that may satisfy the legislation were investigated, particularly in terms of travel time and energy consumption. NEC operations were compared with overseas systems and practices. The emerging new technology of AC traction was also evaluated.

  12. Interface traction stress of 3D dislocation loop in anisotropic bimaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenwang; Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, JinHuan

    2016-02-01

    By applying discrete Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT), semi-analytical solutions are developed to calculate the interface elastic fields of anisotropic bimaterial systems with perfect bonding, dislocation-like, force-like and linear spring-like interface models. Interface elastic fields are the linear superimposition of bulk stress, free surface relaxation image stress and interface traction stress (ITS) fields. Interface image energy of perfect bonding bimaterials can be solved through area integral over the interface plane, including the contribution of several componential stress fields. Calculation examples on dislocation loops within Cu-Nb bimaterial are performed to demonstrate the efficiency of such approaches. Effects of Ku = [kiju] for the dislocation-like, Kt = [kijt] for the force-like and Ks = diag [KT , KN ] for the linear spring-like imperfect interface models are investigated. Differences between perfect bonding and imperfect interface models, isotropic and anisotropic models are also studied. It is found that interface conditions and anisotropy have drastic effects on the interface elastic fields.

  13. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  14. Force mapping in epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    du Roure, Olivia; Saez, Alexandre; Buguin, Axel; Austin, Robert H.; Chavrier, Philippe; Siberzan, Pascal; Ladoux, Benoit

    2005-01-01

    We measure dynamic traction forces exerted by epithelial cells on a substrate. The force sensor is a high-density array of elastomeric microfabricated pillars that support the cells. Traction forces induced by cell migration are deduced from the measurement of the bending of these pillars and are correlated with actin localization by fluorescence microscopy. We use a multiple-particle tracking method to estimate the mechanical activity of cells in real time with a high-spatial resolution (down to 2 μm) imposed by the periodicity of the post array. For these experiments, we use differentiated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Our data provide definite information on mechanical forces exerted by a cellular assembly. The maximum intensity of the forces is localized on the edge of the epithelia. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes cell motility and induces strong scattering activity of MDCK cells. Thus, we compare forces generated by MDCK cells in subconfluent epithelia versus isolated cells after hepatocyte growth factor treatment. Maximal-traction stresses at the edge of a monolayer correspond to higher values than those measured for a single cell and may be due to a collective behavior. PMID:15695588

  15. Ocriplasmin for Treatment of Vitreomacular Traction: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed Ali; Haller, Julia A

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacologic vitreolysis with ocriplasmin, a 27 kilodalton serine protease, is an effective nonsurgical treatment option for vitreomacular traction (VMT). Data from phase III clinical studies, including the Microplasmin for Intravitreal Injection-Traction Release without Surgical Treatment (MIVI-TRUST) and Ocriplasmin for Treatment for Symptomatic Vitreomacular Adhesion Including Macular Hole (OASIS) studies, have demonstrated the treatment efficacy of ocriplasmin for VMT and full-thickness macular hole (FTMH). Subgroup analysis of these clinical trials as well as post-marketing clinical series have aided in patient selection by identifying features associated with successful pharmacologic release of VMT with ocriplasmin, including adhesion diameter ≤1500 μm, absence of epiretinal membrane, phakic status, and age younger than 65. As a first-in-class therapeutic, ocriplasmin and its side effects have been carefully monitored by the vitreoretinal community. The following categories of related or possibly related adverse events have been identified: acute reduction in visual acuity, ERG changes, dyschromatopsia, retinal tear or detachment, lens subluxation or phacodonesis, abnormal pupillary reflex, retinal vascular changes, and OCT ellipsoid zone alterations. Adverse events have almost all been transient with restoration of visual acuity; however, in select patients, alterations may persist.

  16. Friction self-oscillation decrease in nonlinear system of locomotive traction drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipin, D. Ya; Vorobiyov, V. I.; Izmerov, O. V.; Shorokhov, S. G.; Bondarenko, D. A.

    2017-02-01

    The problems of the friction self-oscillation decrease in a nonlinear system of a locomotive traction drive are considered. It is determined that the self-oscillation amplitude decrease in a locomotive wheel pair during boxing in traction drives with an elastic linkage between an armature of a traction electric motor and gearing can be achieved due to drive damping capacity during impact vibro-damping in an axle reduction gear with a hard driven gear. The self-oscillation amplitude reduction in a wheel pair in the designs of locomotive traction drives with the location of elastic elements between a wheel pair and gearing can be obtained owing to the application of drive inertial masses as an anti-vibrator. On the basis of the carried out investigations, a design variant of a self-oscillation shock absorber of a traction electric motor framework on a reduction gear suspension with an absorber located beyond a wheel-motor unit was offered.

  17. Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cikanek, Susan R.

    1994-01-01

    An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  18. Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cikanek, S.R.

    1994-10-25

    An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control. 123 figs.

  19. Quality of Care for Patients With Traction in Shahid Beheshti Hospital in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Adib Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Moradi, Tayebeh

    2013-01-01

    Background With increasing incidence of traumatic fractures, the use of orthopedic intervention such as traction has increased. Inappropriate traction care may cause substantial morbidity and delay the patient rehabilitation. Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of care for patients with traction in the orthopedic unit of Kashan's Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods This observational study was conducted on 100 patients with traumatic fractures of hip and femur bones who were admitted to Kashan Shahid-Beheshti Hospital during the first 6 months of 2012, and for whom skeletal or skin traction was performed. Data were collected using a checklist including questions about the personal characteristics and 23 items related to care for patients with tractions. These items were in three domains including caring while establishing traction, recording care and patient’s education. Descriptive statistics were calculated and data were analyzed using the independent sample t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The mean age of patients was 51.16 ± 23.28 years and 66% of them were male. In total, 47% of the patients were treated by skin traction and 53% by skeletal traction. The overall mean score of quality of care was 10.20 ± 2.64. Quality of establishing traction was good in 55% of patients, but the quality of care was poor in the domains of recording care (88%) and patient education (96%). Total mean of quality of care was significantly different between male and female patients (P < 0.02). Conclusions The quality of care of patients with traction was not optimal. Therefore it is necessary to improve measures in this area. PMID:24396800

  20. 77 FR 61049 - Iowa Traction Railway Company-Change in Operators Exemption-Rail Line of Backtrack, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Surface Transportation Board Iowa Traction Railway Company--Change in Operators Exemption-- Rail Line of Backtrack, Inc. Iowa Traction Railway Company (Iowa Railway) \\1\\ has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to change operators from Iowa Traction Railroad Company (Iowa Railroad) to...

  1. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  2. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  3. A Novel Transverse Flux Machine for Vehicle Traction Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Zhao; Ahmed, Adeeb; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-10-05

    A novel transverse flux machine topology for electric vehicle traction application using ferrite magnets is presented in this paper. The proposed transverse flux topology utilizes novel magnet arrangements in the rotor that are similar to Halbach-array to boost flux linkage; on the stator side, cores are alternately arranged around a pair of ring windings in each phase to make use of the entire rotor flux that eliminates end windings. Analytical design considerations and finite element methods are used for an optimized design of a scooter in-wheel motor. Simulation results from Finite Element Analysis (FEA) show the motor achieved comparable torque density to conventional rare-earth permanent magnet machines. This machine is a viable candidate for direct drive applications with low cost and high torque density.

  4. Novel Transverse Flux Machine for Vehicle Traction Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Z.; Ahmed, A.; Husain, I.; Muljadi, E.

    2015-04-02

    A novel transverse flux machine topology for electric vehicle traction applications using ferrite magnets is presented in this paper. The proposed transverse flux topology utilizes novel magnet arrangements in the rotor that are similar to the Halbach array to boost flux linkage; on the stator side, cores are alternately arranged around a pair of ring windings in each phase to make use of the entire rotor flux that eliminates end windings. Analytical design considerations and finite-element methods are used for an optimized design of a scooter in-wheel motor. Simulation results from finite element analysis (FEA) show that the motor achieved comparable torque density to conventional rare-earth permanent magnet (PM) machines. This machine is a viable candidate for direct-drive applications with low cost and high torque density.

  5. Brachial plexus injury: the London experience with supraclavicular traction lesions.

    PubMed

    Birch, Rolfe

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author details the experiences of his hospital and other London hospitals in treating brachial plexus injury. As noted, important advances have been made in methods of diagnosis and repair. Myelography was replaced by CT scan and later by MRI. Among the topics the author explores are diagnosis (including pain, the presence or absence of the Tinel sign, and the irradiation of pins and needles) and the principles of repair. The author emphasizes that it is imperative that ruptured nerves be repaired as soon as possible, with the closed traction lesion coming, in urgency, close behind reattachment of the amputated hand or repair of a great artery and a trunk nerve in the combined lesion. Finally, the article concludes that the surgeon must be actively engaged in the whole process of rehabilitation and treatment of pain. This is part of a Point-Counterpoint discussion with Dr. David G. Kline's presentation of "A Personal Experience."

  6. Traction drive for cryogenic boost pump. [hydrogen oxygen rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, S.; Connelly, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Two versions of a Nasvytis multiroller traction drive were tested in liquid oxygen for possible application as cryogenic boost pump speed reduction drives for advanced hydrogen-oxygen rocket engines. The roller drive, with a 10.8:1 reduction ratio, was successfully run at up to 70,000 rpm input speed and up to 14.9 kW (20 hp) input power level. Three drive assemblies were tested for a total of about three hours of which approximately one hour was at nominal full speed and full power conditions. Peak efficiency of 60 percent was determined. There was no evidence of slippage between rollers for any of the conditions tested. The ball drive, a version using balls instead of one row of rollers, and having a 3.25:1 reduction ratio, failed to perform satisfactorily.

  7. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  8. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  9. Pulse charging of lead-acid traction cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1980-05-01

    Pulse charging, as a method of rapidly and efficiently charging 300 amp-hour lead-acid traction cells for an electric vehicle application was investigated. A wide range of charge pulse current square waveforms were investigated and the results were compared to constant current charging at the time averaged pulse current values. Representative pulse current waveforms were: (1) positive waveform-peak charge pulse current of 300 amperes (amps), discharge pulse-current of zero amps, and a duty cycle of about 50%; (2) Romanov waveform-peak charge pulse current of 300 amps, peak discharge pulse current of 15 amps, and a duty of 50%; and (3) McCulloch waveform peak charge pulse current of 193 amps, peak discharge pulse current of about 575 amps, and a duty cycle of 94%. Experimental results indicate that on the basis of amp-hour efficiency, pulse charging offered no significant advantage as a method of rapidly charging 300 amp-hour lead-acid traction cells when compared to constant current charging at the time average pulse current value. There were, however, some disadvantages of pulse charging in particular a decrease in charge amp-hour and energy efficiencies and an increase in cell electrolyte temperature. The constant current charge method resulted in the best energy efficiency with no significant sacrifice of charge time or amp-hour output. Whether or not pulse charging offers an advantage over constant current charging with regard to the cell charge/discharge cycle life is unknown at this time.

  10. Pulse charging of lead-acid traction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Pulse charging, as a method of rapidly and efficiently charging 300 amp-hour lead-acid traction cells for an electric vehicle application was investigated. A wide range of charge pulse current square waveforms were investigated and the results were compared to constant current charging at the time averaged pulse current values. Representative pulse current waveforms were: (1) positive waveform-peak charge pulse current of 300 amperes (amps), discharge pulse-current of zero amps, and a duty cycle of about 50%; (2) Romanov waveform-peak charge pulse current of 300 amps, peak discharge pulse current of 15 amps, and a duty of 50%; and (3) McCulloch waveform peak charge pulse current of 193 amps, peak discharge pulse current of about 575 amps, and a duty cycle of 94%. Experimental results indicate that on the basis of amp-hour efficiency, pulse charging offered no significant advantage as a method of rapidly charging 300 amp-hour lead-acid traction cells when compared to constant current charging at the time average pulse current value. There were, however, some disadvantages of pulse charging in particular a decrease in charge amp-hour and energy efficiencies and an increase in cell electrolyte temperature. The constant current charge method resulted in the best energy efficiency with no significant sacrifice of charge time or amp-hour output. Whether or not pulse charging offers an advantage over constant current charging with regard to the cell charge/discharge cycle life is unknown at this time.

  11. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  12. Halo Gravity Traction Is Associated with Reduced Bone Mineral Density of Patients with Severe Kyphoscoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weixiang; Qiu, Yong; Xu, Leilei; Sha, Shifu; Shi, Benlong; Yan, Huang; Liu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Halo gravity traction (HGT) is one of the most commonly used perioperative techniques for the treatment of severe kyphoscoliosis. This study was to explore the influence of HGT on the BMD of these patients. Methods. Patients with severe kyphoscoliosis treated by preoperative HGT for at least 2 months were included. Patients' BMD were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine (LS, L2–L4) and femur neck (FN) of the nondominant side. The weight and duration of traction, as well as baseline characteristics, were recorded. Results. Twenty patients were recruited. The average traction duration was 77.9 ± 13.0 days while the mean traction weight was 39.9% ± 11.1% of total body weight. Remarkable decrease of BMD was observed at LS of 17 (85%) patients and at FN of 18 (90%) patients. After HGT, 75% of patients were found to have osteoporosis, the incidence of which was significantly higher than that before HGT (35%). The correlation analysis revealed BMD reduction was only significantly correlated with the traction duration. Conclusions. The current study showed that preoperative HGT can have obvious impact on the BMD. The BMD reduction is associated with traction duration, suggesting that long traction duration may bring more bone mineral loss. PMID:27896274

  13. Halo Gravity Traction Is Associated with Reduced Bone Mineral Density of Patients with Severe Kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Sun, Weixiang; Qiu, Yong; Xu, Leilei; Sha, Shifu; Shi, Benlong; Yan, Huang; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Zezhang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Halo gravity traction (HGT) is one of the most commonly used perioperative techniques for the treatment of severe kyphoscoliosis. This study was to explore the influence of HGT on the BMD of these patients. Methods. Patients with severe kyphoscoliosis treated by preoperative HGT for at least 2 months were included. Patients' BMD were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine (LS, L2-L4) and femur neck (FN) of the nondominant side. The weight and duration of traction, as well as baseline characteristics, were recorded. Results. Twenty patients were recruited. The average traction duration was 77.9 ± 13.0 days while the mean traction weight was 39.9% ± 11.1% of total body weight. Remarkable decrease of BMD was observed at LS of 17 (85%) patients and at FN of 18 (90%) patients. After HGT, 75% of patients were found to have osteoporosis, the incidence of which was significantly higher than that before HGT (35%). The correlation analysis revealed BMD reduction was only significantly correlated with the traction duration. Conclusions. The current study showed that preoperative HGT can have obvious impact on the BMD. The BMD reduction is associated with traction duration, suggesting that long traction duration may bring more bone mineral loss.

  14. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire: an aid for facial bone fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Good; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Chang, Hak; Kwon, Sung-Tack; Baek, Rong-Min; Minn, Kyung-Won

    2009-07-01

    We have devised a new technique to improve stabilization of fractured facial bone fractures (frontal sinus fractures, zygomatic fractures, mandibular condyle fractures) by intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires (stainless steel wires through intermaxillary fixation screws). A retrospective study evaluating intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. We have used this technique for 3 cases of frontal sinus fractures, 9 cases of zygomatic fractures, and 7 cases of mandibular condyle fractures. After dissection of a fractured site, a hole is drilled on the fractured bone where it does not interfere with positioning the plate across the fracture line. After an intermaxillary fixation screw is inserted, a stainless steel wire is tied through a hole in the screw head. By the aid of wire for traction, the displaced fractured bone is easily aligned to the proper position. Plates and screws are applied readily on the predetermined area. A retrospective study on 19 patients using intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. The diagnoses and associated complications of the cases were recorded. No associated complication as a result of using this technique was identified. The use of intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire enhances stabilization and visualization without possible risk for surrounding soft tissue injury using, a sharp traction device like a bone hook. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire is an useful aid for visualization and stabilization during facial bone fracture reduction, particularly where exposure is difficult such as in the condylar region of the mandible. And unlike a classic traction wire, the intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire has almost no risk of having it loosened from the screw.

  15. Characterizing components of the Saw Palmetto Berry Extract (SPBE) on prostate cancer cell growth and traction

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtysek, Carina; Krukiewicz, Aleksandra A.; Alonso, Jose-Luis; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.

    2009-02-13

    Saw Palmetto Berry Extract (SPBE) is applied for prostate health and treatment of urinary tract infections, nonbacterial prostitis and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) in man. An assumption is that SPBE affects tumor cell progression and migration in breast and prostate tissue. In this work, DU-145 cells were used to demonstrate that SPBE and its sterol components, {beta}-sitosterol and stigmasterol, inhibit prostate cancer growth by increasing p53 protein expression and also inhibit carcinoma development by decreasing p21 and p27 protein expression. In the presence of cholesterol, these features are not only reversed but increased significantly. The results show for the first time the potential of SPBE, {beta}-sitosterol and stigmasterol as potential anti-tumor agents. Since the protein p53 is also regarded as nuclear matrix protein facilitating actin cytoskeletal binding, 2D tractions were measured. The cell adhesion strength in the presence of SPBE, {beta}-sitosterol and cholesterol and the observation was that the increase in p53 expression triggered an increase in the intracellular force generation. The results suggest a dual function of p53 in cells.

  16. Characterizing components of the Saw Palmetto Berry Extract (SPBE) on prostate cancer cell growth and traction.

    PubMed

    Scholtysek, Carina; Krukiewicz, Aleksandra A; Alonso, José-Luis; Sharma, Karan P; Sharma, Pal C; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2009-02-13

    Saw Palmetto Berry Extract (SPBE) is applied for prostate health and treatment of urinary tract infections, nonbacterial prostitis and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) in man. An assumption is that SPBE affects tumor cell progression and migration in breast and prostate tissue. In this work, DU-145 cells were used to demonstrate that SPBE and its sterol components, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol, inhibit prostate cancer growth by increasing p53 protein expression and also inhibit carcinoma development by decreasing p21 and p27 protein expression. In the presence of cholesterol, these features are not only reversed but increased significantly. The results show for the first time the potential of SPBE, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol as potential anti-tumor agents. Since the protein p53 is also regarded as nuclear matrix protein facilitating actin cytoskeletal binding, 2D tractions were measured. The cell adhesion strength in the presence of SPBE, beta-sitosterol and cholesterol and the observation was that the increase in p53 expression triggered an increase in the intracellular force generation. The results suggest a dual function of p53 in cells.

  17. A numerical method for the inverse problem of cell traction in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, G.; Preziosi, L.; Ambrosi, D.

    2012-09-01

    Force traction microscopy is an inversion method that allows us to obtain the stress field applied by a living cell on the environment on the basis of a pointwise knowledge of the displacement produced by the cell itself. This classical biophysical problem, usually addressed in terms of Green’s functions, can be alternatively tackled in a variational framework. In such a case, a variation of the error functional under suitable regularization is operated in view of its minimization. This setting naturally suggests the introduction of a new equation, based on the adjoint operator of the elasticity problem. In this paper, we illustrate a numerical strategy of the inversion method that discretizes the partial differential equations associated with the optimal control problem by finite elements. A detailed discussion of the numerical approximation of a test problem (with known solution) that contains most of the mathematical difficulties of the real one allows a precise evaluation of the degree of confidence that one can achieve in the numerical results.

  18. Traction free finite elements with the assumed stress hybrid model. M.S. Thesis, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafie, Kurosh

    1991-01-01

    An effective approach in the finite element analysis of the stress field at the traction free boundary of a solid continuum was studied. Conventional displacement and assumed stress finite elements were used in the determination of stress concentrations around circular and elliptical holes. Specialized hybrid elements were then developed to improve the satisfaction of prescribed traction boundary conditions. Results of the stress analysis indicated that finite elements which exactly satisfy the free stress boundary conditions are the most accurate and efficient in such problems. A general approach for hybrid finite elements which incorporate traction free boundaries of arbitrary geometry was formulated.

  19. Traction alopecia: how to translate study data for public education--closing the KAP gap?

    PubMed

    Mirmirani, Paradi; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P

    2014-04-01

    Traction alopecia (TA) affects up to 32% of women and 22% of high school girls with Afro-textured hair but can start in the preschool years. Traction induces inflammation and follicle damage. The risk of TA increases with symptomatic traction and combined hairstyles. To influence the practice of hairdressers and at risk individuals and help narrow the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) gap, scientific data should be translated into simple messages like "tolerate pain from a hairstyle and risk hair loss" and "no braids or weaves on relaxed hair". With appropriate education and public awareness, TA could potentially be eradicated.

  20. The results of preoperative halo-gravity traction in children with severe spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Garabekyan, Tigran; Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Iwinski, Henry J; Muchow, Ryan D; Talwalkar, Vishwas R; Walker, Janet; Milbrandt, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    Halo-gravity traction has been used preoperatively for patients with severe spinal deformity but there are limited data in the literature on the results and complications. We studied the outcomes of perioperative halo-gravity traction in children with severe spinal deformity. A retrospective study was carried out on patients who were treated at our center. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. Radiographic and pulmonary function parameters showed significant improvement during the course of traction and at the final follow-up. The overall complication rate was 19%, including two patients with pin loosening and two patients with superficial pin-site infections treated with oral antibiotics.

  1. Energy Sources of the Dominant Frequency Dependent 3-dimensional Atmospheric Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, S.

    1985-01-01

    The energy sources and sinks associated with the zonally asymmetric winter mean flow are investigated as part of an on-going study of atmospheric variability. Distinctly different horizontal structures for the long, intermediate and short time scale atmospheric variations were noted. In previous observations, the 3-dimensional structure of the fluctuations is investigated and the relative roles of barotropic and baroclinic terms are assessed.

  2. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Decay vertex reconstruction and 3-dimensional lifetime determination at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; He, Kang-Lin; Zhang, Zi-Ping; Wang, Yi-Fang; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; Han, Lei; Han, Shao-Qing; He, Miao; Hu, Ji-Feng; Hu, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Jia, Lu-Kui; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yong; Luo, Tao; Lü, Qi-Wen; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mao, Ze-Pu; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Ning, Fei-Peng; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Song, Wen-Bo; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Yan, Jie; Yan, Liang; Yao, Jian; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-06-01

    This paper focuses mainly on the vertex reconstruction of resonance particles with a relatively long lifetime such as K0S, Λ, as well as on lifetime measurements using a 3-dimensional fit. The kinematic constraints between the production and decay vertices and the decay vertex fitting algorithm based on the least squares method are both presented. Reconstruction efficiencies including experimental resolutions are discussed. The results and systematic errors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. Fast Apriori-based Graph Mining Algorithm and application to 3-dimensional Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yoshio; Washio, Takashi; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Motoda, Hiroshi; Inokuchi, Akihiro; Okada, Takashi

    Apriori-based Graph Mining (AGM) algorithm efficiently extracts all the subgraph patterns which frequently appear in graph structured data. The algorithm can deal with general graph structured data with multiple labels of vartices and edges, and is capable of analyzing the topological structure of graphs. In this paper, we propose a new method to analyze graph structured data for a 3-dimensional coordinate by AGM. In this method the distance between each vertex of a graph is calculated and added to the edge label so that AGM can handle 3-dimensional graph structured data. One problem in our approach is that the number of edge labels increases, which results in the increase of computational time to extract subgraph patterns. To alleviate this problem, we also propose a faster algorithm of AGM by adding an extra constraint to reduce the number of generated candidates for seeking frequent subgraphs. Chemical compounds with dopamine antagonist in MDDR database were analyzed by AGM to characterize their 3-dimensional chemical structure and correlation with physiological activity.

  4. Reconstructing a 3-dimensional image of the results of antinuclear antibody testing by indirect immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Murai, Ryosei; Yamada, Koji; Tanaka, Maki; Kuribayashi, Kageaki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tsuji, Naoki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2013-01-31

    Indirect immunofluorescence anti-nuclear antibody testing (IIF-ANAT) is an essential screening tool in the diagnosis of various autoimmune disorders. ANA titer quantification and interpretation of immunofluorescence patterns are determined subjectively, which is problematic. First, we determined the examination conditions under which IIF-ANAT fluorescence intensities are quantified. Next, IIF-ANAT was performed using homogeneous, discrete speckled, and mixed serum samples. Images were obtained using Bio Zero BZ-8000, and 3-dimensional images were reconstructed using the BZ analyzer software. In the 2-dimensional analysis, homogeneous ANAs hid the discrete speckled pattern, resulting in a diagnosis of homogeneous immunofluorescence. However, 3-dimensional analysis of the same sample showed discrete speckled-type ANA in the homogeneous background. This study strengthened the current IIF-ANAT method by providing a new approach to quantify the fluorescence intensity and enhance the resolution of IIF-ANAT fluorescence patterns. Reconstructed 3-dimensional imaging of IIF-ANAT can be a powerful tool for routine laboratory examination.

  5. An in vitro correlation of mechanical forces and metastatic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indra, Indrajyoti; Undyala, Vishnu; Kandow, Casey; Thirumurthi, Umadevi; Dembo, Micah; Beningo, Karen A.

    2011-02-01

    Mechanical forces have a major influence on cell migration and are predicted to significantly impact cancer metastasis, yet this idea is currently poorly defined. In this study we have asked if changes in traction stress and migratory properties correlate with the metastatic progression of tumor cells. For this purpose, four murine breast cancer cell lines derived from the same primary tumor, but possessing increasing metastatic capacity, were tested for adhesion strength, traction stress, focal adhesion organization and for differential migration rates in two-dimensional and three-dimensional environments. Using traction force microscopy (TFM), we were surprised to find an inverse relationship between traction stress and metastatic capacity, such that force production decreased as the metastatic capacity increased. Consistent with this observation, adhesion strength exhibited an identical profile to the traction data. A count of adhesions indicated a general reduction in the number as metastatic capacity increased but no difference in the maturation as determined by the ratio of nascent to mature adhesions. These changes correlated well with a reduction in active beta-1 integrin with increasing metastatic ability. Finally, in two dimensions, wound healing, migration and persistence were relatively low in the entire panel, maintaining a downward trend with increasing metastatic capacity. Why metastatic cells would migrate so poorly prompted us to ask if the loss of adhesive parameters in the most metastatic cells indicated a switch to a less adhesive mode of migration that would only be detected in a three-dimensional environment. Indeed, in three-dimensional migration assays, the most metastatic cells now showed the greatest linear speed. We conclude that traction stress, adhesion strength and rate of migration do indeed change as tumor cells progress in metastatic capacity and do so in a dimension-sensitive manner.

  6. Demonstrating Cell Traction--Using Hens' Egg Vitelline Membrane as Substratum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, Roger

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways in which hens' egg vitelline membranes can be used to demonstrate cell traction effects. Reviews procedures for using and culturing the membranes and identifies topic areas for student projects. (ML)

  7. Investigation of brachial plexus traction lesions by peripheral and spinal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S J

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral, spinal and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 26 patients with unilateral traction injuries of the brachial plexus ganglia. Of 10 cases explored surgically the recordings correctly anticipated the major site of the lesion in eight. PMID:422958

  8. Rolling-element fatigue life with two synthetic cycloaliphatic traction fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The life potential of two synthetic cycloaliphatic hydrocarbon traction fluids in rolling element fatigue was evaluated in a five ball fatigue tester. Life comparisons with a MIL-L-23699 qualified tetraester oil showed that the traction test oils had good fatigue life performance, comparable to that of the tetraester oil. No statistically significant life differences between the traction fluids and the tetraester oil were exhibited under the accelerated fatigue test conditions. Erratic operating behavior was occasionally encountered during tests with the antiwear additive containing traction fluid for reasons thought to be related to excessive chemical activity under high contact pressure. This behavior occasionally resulted in premature test termination due to excessive surface distress and overheating.

  9. Size and composition of airborne particles from pavement wear, tires, and traction sanding.

    PubMed

    Kupiainen, Kaarle J; Tervahattu, Heikki; Räisänen, Mika; Mäkelä, Timo; Aurela, Minna; Hillamo, Risto

    2005-02-01

    Mineral matter is an important component of airborne particles in urban areas. In northern cities of the world, mineral matter dominates PM10 during spring because of enhanced road abrasion caused by the use of antiskid methods, including studded tires and traction sanding. In this study, factors that affect formation of abrasion components of springtime road dust were assessed. Effects of traction sanding and tires on concentrations, mass size distribution, and composition of the particles were studied in a test facility. Lowest particle concentrations were observed in tests without traction sanding. The concentrations increased when traction sand was introduced and continued to increase as a function of the amount of aggregate dispersed. Emissions were additionally affected by type of tire, properties of traction sand aggregate, and driving speed. Aggregates with high fragmentation resistance and coarse grain size distribution had the lowest emissions. Over 90% of PM10 was mineral particles. Mineralogy of the dust and source apportionment showed that they originated from both traction sand and pavement aggregates. The remaining portion was mostly carbonaceous and originated from tires and road bitumen. Mass size distributions were dominated by coarse particles. Contribution of fine and submicron size ranges were approximately 15 and 10% in PM10, respectively.

  10. Influence of basketball shoe mass, outsole traction, and forefoot bending stiffness on three athletic movements.

    PubMed

    Worobets, Jay; Wannop, John William

    2015-09-01

    Prior research has shown that footwear can enhance athletic performance. However, public information is not available on what basketball shoe properties should be selected to maximise movement performance. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of basketball shoe mass, outsole traction, and forefoot bending stiffness on sprinting, jumping, and cutting performance. Each of these three basketball shoe properties was systematically varied by ± 20% to produce three shoe conditions of varying mass, three conditions of varying traction, and three conditions of varying bending stiffness. Each shoe was tested by 20 recreational basketball players completing maximal effort sprints, vertical jumps, and a cutting drill. Outsole traction had the largest influence on performance, as the participants performed significantly worse in all tests when traction was decreased by 20% (p < 0.001), and performed significantly better in the cutting drill when traction was increased by 20% (p = 0.005). Forefoot bending stiffness had a moderate effect on sprint and cutting performance (p = 0.013 and p = 0.016 respectively) and shoe mass was found to have no effect on performance. Therefore, choosing a shoe with relatively high outsole traction and forefoot bending stiffness should be prioritised, and less concern should be focused on selecting the lightest shoe.

  11. Effects of Non-Uniform Wall Heating on Thermal and Momentum Fields in a 3-Dimensional Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarian, N.; Kleissl, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    As urbanization progresses, microclimate modifications are also aggravated and the increasing environmental concerns call for more sophisticated methods of urban microclimate analysis. Comprehensive numerical simulations for a clear summer day in southern California are performed in a compact low-rise urban environment. The effect of realistic unsteady, non-uniform thermal forcing, that is caused by solar insolation and inter-building shadowing on thermal and flow conditions are analyzed based on Algebraic Wall-Modeled Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. The urban thermal field is influenced by urban density, material properties and local weather conditions, as well as urban canyon flow. Urban canyon conditions are translated into vertical and horizontal bulk Richardson numbers indicating atmospheric instability and solar tilt with respect to the momentum forcing of the canyon vortex, respectively. The effect of roof heating is found to be critical on the vortex formation between buildings when the vertical bulk Richardson number is low. Variations of Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients (CHTCs) along building walls are studied and the street canyon ventilation performance is characterized by the mean of air exchange rate (ACH). It is found that volumetric air exchange from street canyons, as well as the distribution of heat transfer along the wall depends strongly on the three-dimensional orientation of the heated wall in relation to wind direction. For example, air removal increases by surface heating and is larger when the leeward wall is heated. In summary, we demonstrate the importance of considering complex realistic conditions on 3-dimensional thermal and momentum fields in Urban Environments.

  12. Spatially coordinated changes in intracellular rheology and extracellular force exertion during mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Quach, Nhat D.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical properties within the cell are regulated by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is linked to the extracellular environment through focal adhesion proteins that transmit force. Chemical and mechanical stimuli alter the organization of cytoskeletal actin, which results in changes in cell shape, adhesion, and differentiation. By combining particle-tracking microrheology and traction force cytometry, we can monitor the mechanical properties of the actin meshwork and determine how changes in the intracellular network contribute to force generation. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemical (differentiation factors) and mechanical (substrate rigidity) stimuli important in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation on the intracellular mechanics and traction stress generation. We found the presence of adipogenic factors resulted in stiffening of the actin meshwork regardless of substrate rigidity. In contrast, these factors increased traction stresses on hard substrates, which was associated with increased expression of contractility genes. Furthermore, MSCs cultured on hard substrates expressed both adipogenic and osteogenic markers indicative of mixed differentiation. On hard substrates, heterogeneity in the local elastic modulus-traction stress correlation was also increased in response to adipogenic factors, indicating that these mechanical properties may be reflective of differences in the level of MSC differentiation. These results suggest intracellular rheology and traction stress generation are spatially regulated and contribute insight into how single cell mechanical forces contribute to MSC differentiation.

  13. Spatially coordinated changes in intracellular rheology and extracellular force exertion during mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    McAndrews, Kathleen M; McGrail, Daniel J; Quach, Nhat D; Dawson, Michelle R

    2014-08-26

    The mechanical properties within the cell are regulated by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is linked to the extracellular environment through focal adhesion proteins that transmit force. Chemical and mechanical stimuli alter the organization of cytoskeletal actin, which results in changes in cell shape, adhesion, and differentiation. By combining particle-tracking microrheology and traction force cytometry, we can monitor the mechanical properties of the actin meshwork and determine how changes in the intracellular network contribute to force generation. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemical (differentiation factors) and mechanical (substrate rigidity) stimuli important in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation on the intracellular mechanics and traction stress generation. We found the presence of adipogenic factors resulted in stiffening of the actin meshwork regardless of substrate rigidity. In contrast, these factors increased traction stresses on hard substrates, which was associated with increased expression of contractility genes. Furthermore, MSCs cultured on hard substrates expressed both adipogenic and osteogenic markers indicative of mixed differentiation. On hard substrates, heterogeneity in the local elastic modulus-traction stress correlation was also increased in response to adipogenic factors, indicating that these mechanical properties may be reflective of differences in the level of MSC differentiation. These results suggest intracellular rheology and traction stress generation are spatially regulated and contribute insight into how single cell mechanical forces contribute to MSC differentiation.

  14. Multimodality imaging of intrauterine devices with an emphasis on the emerging role of 3-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Jeffrey S; Brindle, Kathleen A; Khati, Nadia Juliet

    2012-12-01

    The intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) is one of the most widely used reversible contraception methods throughout the world. With advancing technology, it has rapidly gained acceptance through its increased effectiveness and practicality compared with more invasive means such as laparoscopic tubal ligation. This pictorial essay will present the IUDs most commonly used today. It will illustrate both normal and abnormal positions of IUDs across all cross-sectional imaging modalities including 2-dimensional ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, with a focus on the emerging role of 3-dimensional ultrasound as the modality of choice.

  15. A 3-dimensional finite-difference method for calculating the dynamic coefficients of seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the dynamic coefficients of seals with arbitrary geometry is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations are used in conjunction with the k-e turbulence model to describe the turbulent flow. These equations are solved by a full 3-dimensional finite-difference procedure instead of the normally used perturbation analysis. The time dependence of the equations is introduced by working with a coordinate system rotating with the precession frequency of the shaft. The results of this theory are compared with coefficients calculated by a perturbation analysis and with experimental results.

  16. Incorporating a 3-dimensional printer into the management of early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Baek, Min-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Namkug; Rhim, Chae Chun; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    We used a 3-dimensional (3D) printer to create anatomical replicas of real lesions and tested its application in cervical cancer. Our study patient decided to undergo radical hysterectomy after seeing her 3D model which was then used to plan and simulate this surgery. Using 3D printers to create patient-specific 3D tumor models may aid cervical cancer patients make treatment decisions. This technology will lead to better surgical and oncological outcomes for cervical cancer patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:150-152. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Introducing a well-ordered volume porosity in 3-dimensional gold microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayela, Cédric; Lalo, Hélène; Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the present work is the introduction of a combined bottom-up and top-down approach to generate 3-dimensional gold microcantilevers, where the porosity in the volume of the free-standing microstructure is well-controlled. By combining the elaboration of a colloidal crystal, followed by electrodeposition, with a sacrificial layer process, free-standing macroporous gold cantilevers are fabricated collectively. In order to validate the proposed concept, a simple application to humidity sensing is evaluated using the devices as mass sensors. A large sensitivity of -529 ppm/%RH and low discrepancy are obtained experimentally, confirming the promising application potential of this original architecture.

  18. Brief communications: visualization of coronary arteries in rats by 3-dimensional real-time contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Fuminobu; Hirayama, Hideo; Iwata, Akiko; Toshida, Tsutomu; Masuda, Kasumi; Otani, Kentaro; Asanuma, Toshihiko; Beppu, Shintaro

    2008-05-01

    Angiogenesis is under intense investigation to advance the treatment of various ischemic diseases. Small animals, such as mice and rats, are often used for this purpose. However, evaluating the structure of coronary arteries in small animals in situ is not easy. We succeeded in visualizing the coronary artery in rats on 3-dimensional real-time contrast echocardiography using a high-frequency transducer. These methods will be applied for more convenient assessment in a new study, examining issues such as angiogenesis using rats in situ.

  19. Traction and braking force on three surfaces of agricultural tire lug

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to determine the performance of an agricultural tractor drive tire on soil and in particular, to investigate performance aspects of tire lugs. A 160/85R14 radial-ply tractor drive tire was used. Pressure sensors were mounted in the leading lug side and the traili...

  20. Comparison of nonnavigated and 3-dimensional image-based computer navigated balloon kyphoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sembrano, Jonathan N; Yson, Sharon C; Polly, David W; Ledonio, Charles Gerald T; Nuckley, David J; Santos, Edward R G

    2015-01-01

    Balloon kyphoplasty is a common treatment for osteoporotic and pathologic compression fractures. Advantages include minimal tissue disruption, quick recovery, pain relief, and in some cases prevention of progressive sagittal deformity. The benefit of image-based navigation in kyphoplasty has not been established. The goal of this study was to determine whether there is a difference between fluoroscopy-guided balloon kyphoplasty and 3-dimensional image-based navigation in terms of needle malposition rate, cement leakage rate, and radiation exposure time. The authors compared navigated and nonnavigated needle placement in 30 balloon kyphoplasty procedures (47 levels). Intraoperative 3-dimensional image-based navigation was used for needle placement in 21 cases (36 levels); conventional 2-dimensional fluoroscopy was used in the other 9 cases (11 levels). The 2 groups were compared for rates of needle malposition and cement leakage as well as radiation exposure time. Three of 11 (27%) nonnavigated cases were complicated by a malpositioned needle, and 2 of these had to be repositioned. The navigated group had a significantly lower malposition rate (1 of 36; 3%; P=.04). The overall rate of cement leakage was also similar in both groups (P=.29). Radiation exposure time was similar in both groups (navigated, 98 s/level; nonnavigated, 125 s/level; P=.10). Navigated kyphoplasty procedures did not differ significantly from nonnavigated procedures except in terms of needle malposition rate, where navigation may have decreased the need for needle repositioning.

  1. A 3-dimensional model for teaching local flaps using porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zahid; Hogg, Fiona; Graham, Ken

    2014-10-01

    The European Working Time Directive and streamlined training has led to reduced training time. Surgery, as an experience-dependent craft specialty is affected more than other medical specialties. Trainees want to maximize all training opportunities in the clinical setting, and having predeveloped basic skills acquired on a simulated model can facilitate this.Here we describe the use of a novel model to design and raise local flaps in the face and scalp regions. The model consists of mannequin heads draped with porcine skin which is skewered with pins at strategic points to give a 3-dimensional model which closely resembles a cadaveric head.The advantages of this model are that it is life size and incorporates all the relevant anatomical features, which can be drawn on if required.This model was used on a recent course, Intermediate Skills in Plastic Surgery: Flaps Around the Face, at the Royal College of Surgeons England. The trainees found that practicing on the porcine skin gave them an opportunity to master the basics of flap design and implementation.In summary, this innovative 3-dimensional training model has received high levels of satisfaction and is currently as close as we can get to cadaveric dissection without the constraints and cost of using human tissue.

  2. Simple parameter estimation for complex models — Testing evolutionary techniques on 3-dimensional biogeochemical ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattern, Jann Paul; Edwards, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Parameter estimation is an important part of numerical modeling and often required when a coupled physical-biogeochemical ocean model is first deployed. However, 3-dimensional ocean model simulations are computationally expensive and models typically contain upwards of 10 parameters suitable for estimation. Hence, manual parameter tuning can be lengthy and cumbersome. Here, we present four easy to implement and flexible parameter estimation techniques and apply them to two 3-dimensional biogeochemical models of different complexities. Based on a Monte Carlo experiment, we first develop a cost function measuring the model-observation misfit based on multiple data types. The parameter estimation techniques are then applied and yield a substantial cost reduction over ∼ 100 simulations. Based on the outcome of multiple replicate experiments, they perform on average better than random, uninformed parameter search but performance declines when more than 40 parameters are estimated together. Our results emphasize the complex cost function structure for biogeochemical parameters and highlight dependencies between different parameters as well as different cost function formulations.

  3. Automated 3-Dimensional Brain Atlas Fitting to Microelectrode Recordings from Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Luján, J. Luis; Noecker, Angela M.; Butson, Christopher R.; Cooper, Scott E.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgeries commonly rely on brain atlases and microelectrode recordings (MER) to help identify the target location for electrode implantation. We present an automated method for optimally fitting a 3-dimensional brain atlas to intraoperative MER and predicting a target DBS electrode location in stereotactic coordinates for the patient. Methods We retrospectively fit a 3-dimensional brain atlas to MER points from 10 DBS surgeries targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN). We used a constrained optimization algorithm to maximize the MER points correctly fitted (i.e., contained) within the appropriate atlas nuclei. We compared our optimization approach to conventional anterior commissure-posterior commissure (AC/PC) scaling, and to manual fits performed by four experts. A theoretical DBS electrode target location in the dorsal STN was customized to each patient as part of the fitting process and compared to the location of the clinically defined therapeutic stimulation contact. Results The human expert and computer optimization fits achieved significantly better fits than the AC/PC scaling (80, 81, and 41% of correctly fitted MER, respectively). However, the optimization fits were performed in less time than the expert fits and converged to a single solution for each patient, eliminating interexpert variance. Conclusions and Significance DBS therapeutic outcomes are directly related to electrode implantation accuracy. Our automated fitting techniques may aid in the surgical decision-making process by optimally integrating brain atlas and intraoperative neurophysiological data to provide a visual guide for target identification. PMID:19556832

  4. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Alexiou, Christoph; Trahms, Lutz; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XμCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-μCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XμCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration.

  5. Particle trajectory computation on a 3-dimensional engine inlet. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-dimensional particle trajectory computer code was developed to compute the distribution of water droplet impingement efficiency on a 3-dimensional engine inlet. The computed results provide the essential droplet impingement data required for the engine inlet anti-icing system design and analysis. The droplet trajectories are obtained by solving the trajectory equation using the fourth order Runge-Kutta and Adams predictor-corrector schemes. A compressible 3-D full potential flow code is employed to obtain a cylindrical grid definition of the flowfield on and about the engine inlet. The inlet surface is defined mathematically through a system of bi-cubic parametric patches in order to compute the droplet impingement points accurately. Analysis results of the 3-D trajectory code obtained for an axisymmetric droplet impingement problem are in good agreement with NACA experimental data. Experimental data are not yet available for the engine inlet impingement problem analyzed. Applicability of the method to solid particle impingement problems, such as engine sand ingestion, is also demonstrated.

  6. Crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations of clusters on square lattice substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yi; Zhu, Yu-Hong; Pan, Qi-Fa; Yang, Bo; Tao, Xiang-Ming; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    A Monte Carlo study on the crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations of clusters is presented. Based on the traditional cluster-cluster aggregation (CCA) simulation, a modified growth model is proposed. The clusters (including single particles and their aggregates) diffuse with diffusion step length l (1 ≤ l ≤ 7) and aggregate on a square lattice substrate. If the number of particles contained in a cluster is larger than a critical size sc, the particles at the edge of the cluster have a possibility to jump onto the upper layer, which results in the crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations. Our simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374082 and 11074215), the Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province Department of Education, China (Grant No. Y201018280), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2012QNA3010), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20100101110005).

  7. Endothelial cells assemble into a 3-dimensional prevascular network in a bone tissue engineering construct.

    PubMed

    Rouwkema, Jeroen; de Boer, Jan; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A

    2006-09-01

    To engineer tissues with clinically relevant dimensions, one must overcome the challenge of rapidly creating functional blood vessels to supply cells with oxygen and nutrients and to remove waste products. We tested the hypothesis that endothelial cells, cocultured with osteoprogenitor cells, can organize into a prevascular network in vitro. When cultured in a spheroid coculture model with human mesenchymal stem cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) form a 3-dimensional prevascular network within 10 days of in vitro culture. The formation of the prevascular network was promoted by seeding 2% or fewer HUVECs. Moreover, the addition of endothelial cells resulted in a 4-fold upregulation of the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase. The addition of mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not result in stabilization of the prevascular network. Upon implantation, the prevascular network developed further and structures including lumen could be seen regularly. However, anastomosis with the host vasculature was limited. We conclude that endothelial cells are able to form a 3-dimensional (3D) prevascular network in vitro in a bone tissue engineering setting. This finding is a strong indication that in vitro prevascularization is a promising strategy to improve implant vascularization in bone tissue engineering.

  8. Device for lengthening of a musculotendinous unit by direct continuous traction in the sheep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Retraction, atrophy and fatty infiltration are signs subsequent to chronic rotator cuff tendon tears. They are associated with an increased pennation angle and a shortening of the muscle fibers in series. These deleterious changes of the muscular architecture are not reversible with current repair techniques and are the main factors for failed rotator cuff tendon repair. Whereas fast stretching of the retracted musculotendinous unit results in proliferation of non-contractile fibrous tissue, slow stretching may lead to muscle regeneration in terms of sarcomerogenesis. To slowly stretch the retracted musculotendinous unit in a sheep model, two here described tensioning devices have been developed and mounted on the scapular spine of the sheep using an expandable threaded rod, which has been interposed between the retracted tendon end and the original insertion site at the humeral head. Traction is transmitted in line with the musculotendinous unit by sutures knotted on the expandable threaded rod. The threaded rod of the tensioner is driven within the body through a rotating axis, which enters the body on the opposite side. The tendon end, which was previously released (16 weeks prior) from its insertion site with a bone chip, was elongated with a velocity of 1 mm/day. Results After several steps of technical improvements, the tensioner proved to be capable of actively stretching the retracted and degenerated muscle back to the original length and to withstand the external forces acting on it. Conclusion This technical report describes the experimental technique for continuous elongation of the musculotendinous unit and reversion of the length of chronically shortened muscle. PMID:22551079

  9. Nano-mechanics of Tunable Adhesion using Non Covalent Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Liechti

    2012-09-08

    The objective of this program was to examine, via experiment and atomistic and continuum analysis, coordinated noncovalent bonding over a range of length scales with a view to obtaining modulated, patterned and reversible bonding at the molecular level. The first step in this project was to develop processes for depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing carboxylic acid and amine moieties on Si (111) surfaces and probe tips of an interfacial force microscope (IFM). This allowed the adhesive portion of the interactions between functionalized surfaces to be fully captured in the force-displacement response (force profiles) that are measured by the IFM. The interactionswere extracted in the form of traction-separation laws using combined molecular and continuum stress analyses. In this approach, the results of molecular dynamics analyses of SAMs subjected to simple stress states are used to inform continuum models of their stress-strain behavior. Continuum analyses of the IFM experiment were then conducted, which incorporate the stress-strain behavior of the SAMs and traction-separation relations that represent the interactions between the tip and functionalized Si surface. Agreement between predicted and measured force profiles was taken to imply that the traction-separation relations have been properly extracted. Scale up to larger contact areas was considered by forming Si/SAM/Si sandwiches and then separating them via fracture experiments. The mode 1 traction-separation relations have been extracted using fracture mechanics concepts under mode 1 and mixed-mode conditions. Interesting differences were noted between the three sets of traction-separation relations.

  10. Candidate gene analyses of 3-dimensional dentoalveolar phenotypes in subjects with malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Cole A.; Miller, Steven F.; da Fontoura, Clarissa S. G.; Wehby, George L.; Amendt, Brad A.; Holton, Nathan E.; Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Southard, Thomas E.; Moreno Uribe, Lina M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Genetic studies of malocclusion etiology have identified 4 deleterious mutations in genes, DUSP6, ARHGAP21, FGF23, and ADAMTS1 in familial Class III cases. Although these variants may have large impacts on Class III phenotypic expression, their low frequency (<1%) makes them unlikely to explain most malocclusions. Thus, much of the genetic variation underlying the dentofacial phenotypic variation associated with malocclusion remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated associations between common genetic variations in craniofacial candidate genes and 3-dimensional dentoalveolar phenotypes in patients with malocclusion. Methods Pretreatment dental casts or cone-beam computed tomographic images from 300 healthy subjects were digitized with 48 landmarks. The 3-dimensional coordinate data were submitted to a geometric morphometric approach along with principal component analysis to generate continuous phenotypes including symmetric and asymmetric components of dentoalveolar shape variation, fluctuating asymmetry, and size. The subjects were genotyped for 222 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 82 genes/loci, and phenotpye-genotype associations were tested via multivariate linear regression. Results Principal component analysis of symmetric variation identified 4 components that explained 68% of the total variance and depicted anteroposterior, vertical, and transverse dentoalveolar discrepancies. Suggestive associations (P < 0.05) were identified with PITX2, SNAI3, 11q22.2-q22.3, 4p16.1, ISL1, and FGF8. Principal component analysis for asymmetric variations identified 4 components that explained 51% of the total variations and captured left-to-right discrepancies resulting in midline deviations, unilateral crossbites, and ectopic eruptions. Suggestive associations were found with TBX1 AJUBA, SNAI3 SATB2, TP63, and 1p22.1. Fluctuating asymmetry was associated with BMP3 and LATS1. Associations for SATB2 and BMP3 with asymmetric variations remained significant

  11. 3-Dimensional Analysis of Dynamic Behavior of Bearing of Nielsen Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimura, Shinji; Heya, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Tsutomu; Mimura, Koji; Yoshikawa, Osamu

    In 1995, the great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake caused a large amount of destruction and structural failures. One example, whose mechanism is not fully clear, is the fracture of a bridge bearing of a Nielsen type bridge that does not occur under the ordinary static or dynamic loading conditions. The fracture probably resulted from very high stress due to an unexpected dynamic mechanism. In this paper, the 3-dimensional dynamic behavior of a Nielsen type bridge was analyzed by assuming a collision between the upper and the lower parts of the bearing, which might have occurred in the great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake. The numerical results show that an impact due to a relative velocity of 5˜6m/s between the upper and the lower parts of the bearing generates a stress sufficient to cause a fracture in the upper bearing. The observed features of the actual fracture surface was also simulated fairly closely.

  12. Investigation of 3-dimensional structural morphology for enhancing light trapping with control of surface haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeongsik; Shin, Myunghun; Kim, Hyeongseok; Kim, Sunbo; Le, Anh Huy Tuan; Kang, Junyoung; Kim, Yongjun; Pham, Duy Phong; Jung, Junhee; Yi, Junsin

    2017-04-01

    A comparative study of 3-dimensional textured glass morphologies with variable haze value and chemical texturing of the glass substrates was conducted to enhance light trapping in silicon (Si) thin film solar cells (TFSCs). The light trapping characteristics of periodic honeycomb structures show enhanced transmittance and haze ratio in numerical and experimental approaches. The periodic honeycomb structure of notched textures is better than a random or periodic carved structure. It has high transmittance of ∼95%, and haze ratio of ∼52.8%, and the haze property of the angular distribution function of transmittance shows wide scattering angles in the long wavelength region because of the wide spacing and aspect ratio of the texture. The numerical and experimental approaches of the 3-D texture structures in this work will be useful in developing high-performance Si TFSCs with light trapping.

  13. The program FANS-3D (finite analytic numerical simulation 3-dimensional) and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravo, Ramiro H.; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the program named FANS-3D (Finite Analytic Numerical Simulation-3 Dimensional) is presented. FANS-3D was designed to solve problems of incompressible fluid flow and combined modes of heat transfer. It solves problems with conduction and convection modes of heat transfer in laminar flow, with provisions for radiation and turbulent flows. It can solve singular or conjugate modes of heat transfer. It also solves problems in natural convection, using the Boussinesq approximation. FANS-3D was designed to solve heat transfer problems inside one, two and three dimensional geometries that can be represented by orthogonal planes in a Cartesian coordinate system. It can solve internal and external flows using appropriate boundary conditions such as symmetric, periodic and user specified.

  14. Experimental determination of thermal profiles during laser spike annealing with quantitative comparison to 3-dimensional simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Krishna; Jung, Byungki; Willemann, Michael; Thompson, Michael O.; Clancy, Paulette

    2012-05-21

    Thin film platinum resistors were used to directly measure temperature profiles during laser spike annealing (LSA) with high spatial and temporal resolution. Observed resistance changes were calibrated to absolute temperatures using the melting points of the substrate silicon and thin gold films. Both the time-dependent temperature experienced by the sample during passage of the focussed laser beam and profiles across the spatially dependent laser intensity were obtained with sub-millisecond time resolution and 50 {mu}m spatial resolution. Full 3-dimensional simulations incorporating both optical and thermal variations of material parameters were compared with these results. Accounting properly for the specific material parameters, good agreement between experiments and simulations was achieved. Future temperature measurements in complex environments will permit critical evaluation of LSA simulations methodologies.

  15. Carbohydrate Cluster Microarrays Fabricated on 3-Dimensional Dendrimeric Platforms for Functional Glycomics Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xichun; Turchi, Craig; Wang, Denong

    2009-01-01

    We reported here a novel, ready-to-use bioarray platform and methodology for construction of sensitive carbohydrate cluster microarrays. This technology utilizes a 3-dimensional (3-D) poly(amidoamine) starburst dendrimer monolayer assembled on glass surface, which is functionalized with terminal aminooxy and hydrazide groups for site-specific coupling of carbohydrates. A wide range of saccharides, including monosaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides of diverse structures, are applicable for the 3-D bioarray platform without prior chemical derivatization. The process of carbohydrate coupling is effectively accelerated by microwave radiation energy. The carbohydrate concentration required for microarray fabrication is substantially reduced using this technology. Importantly, this bioarray platform presents sugar chains in defined orientation and cluster configurations. It is, thus, uniquely useful for exploration of the structural and conformational diversities of glyco-epitope and their functional properties. PMID:19791771

  16. Surface compositional heterogeneity of (4) Vesta from Dawn FC using a 3 dimensional spectral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangjam, G.; Nathues, A.; Mengel, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Mann, P.; Cloutis, E. A.; Behrens, H.; Platz, T.; Schäfer, T.; Sierks, H.; Christensen, U.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The historic journey of the Dawn spacecraft in 2011- 2012 was a turning point in understanding asteroid (4) Vesta. The surface composition and lithology were analysed and mapped in earlier studies using Dawn imageries [1], [2]. We introduce here a 3 dimensional spectral approach to analyze and map the surface composition using Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color data. Various laboratory spectra of available HEDs and their mixtures, including new spectra measured in this work, were used. Band parameters were reviewed and modified wherever necessary to make the best use of the data. We particularly focused on carbonaceous-chondrite-bearing and olivine-bearing lithologies. An attempt has been made to distinguish glass/impact-melt lithologies.

  17. A 3-Dimensional Cockpit Display with Traffic and Terrain Information for the Small Aircraft Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Thomas, Robert; Rankin, James R.

    2004-01-01

    The report discusses the architecture and the flight test results of a 3-Dimensional Cockpit Display of Traffic and terrain Information (3D-CDTI). The presented 3D-CDTI is a perspective display format that combines existing Synthetic Vision System (SVS) research and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technology to improve the pilot's situational awareness. The goal of the 3D-CDTI is to contribute to the development of new display concepts for NASA's Small Aircraft Transportation System research program. Papers were presented at the PLANS 2002 meeting and the ION-GPS 2002 meeting. The contents of this report are derived from the results discussed in those papers.

  18. Photoprotection by pistachio bioactives in a 3-dimensional human skin equivalent tissue model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y Oliver; Smith, Avi; Liu, Yuntao; Du, Peng; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Garlick, Jonathan

    2017-01-25

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during ultraviolet (UV) light exposure can induce skin damage and aging. Antioxidants can provide protection against oxidative injury to skin via "quenching" ROS. Using a validated 3-dimensional (3D) human skin equivalent (HSE) tissue model that closely mimics human skin, we examined whether pistachio antioxidants could protect HSE against UVA-induced damage. Lutein and γ-tocopherol are the predominant lipophilic antioxidants in pistachios; treatment with these compounds prior to UVA exposure protected against morphological changes to the epithelial and connective tissue compartments of HSE. Pistachio antioxidants preserved overall skin thickness and organization, as well as fibroblast morphology, in HSE exposed to UVA irradiation. However, this protection was not substantiated by the analysis of the proliferation of keratinocytes and apoptosis of fibroblasts. Additional studies are warranted to elucidate the basis of these discordant results and extend research into the potential role of pistachio bioactives promoting skin health.

  19. Use of 3-Dimensional Printing for Preoperative Planning in the Treatment of Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Theodoropoulos, John; Abouali, Jihad

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability often results from large bony Bankart or Hill-Sachs lesions. Preoperative imaging is essential in guiding our surgical management of patients with these conditions. However, we are often limited to making an attempt to interpret a 3-dimensional (3D) structure using conventional 2-dimensional imaging. In cases in which complex anatomy or bony defects are encountered, this type of imaging is often inadequate. We used 3D printing to produce a solid 3D model of a glenohumeral joint from a young patient with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and complex Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. The 3D model from our patient was used in the preoperative planning stages of an arthroscopic Bankart repair and remplissage to determine the depth of the Hill-Sachs lesion and the degree of abduction and external rotation at which the Hill-Sachs lesion engaged. PMID:26759768

  20. Epigenetic and 3-dimensional regulation of V(D)J rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Degner-Leisso, Stephanie C; Feeney, Ann J

    2010-12-01

    V(D)J recombination is a crucial component of the adaptive immune response, allowing for the production of a diverse antigen receptor repertoire (Ig and TCR). This review will focus on how epigenetic regulation and 3-dimensional (3D) interactions may control V(D)J recombination at Ig loci. The interplay between transcription factors and post-translational modifications at the Igh, Igκ, and Igλ loci will be highlighted. Furthermore, we propose that the spatial organization and epigenetic boundaries of each Ig loci before and during V(D)J recombination may be influenced in part by the CTCF/cohesin complex. Taken together, the many epigenetic and 3D layers of control ensure that Ig loci are only rearranged at appropriate stages of B cell development.

  1. The role of the cytoskeleton in cellular force generation in 2D and 3D environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Carey, Shawn P.; Califano, Joseph P.; Smith, Brooke N.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2011-02-01

    To adhere and migrate, cells generate forces through the cytoskeleton that are transmitted to the surrounding matrix. While cellular force generation has been studied on 2D substrates, less is known about cytoskeletal-mediated traction forces of cells embedded in more in vivo-like 3D matrices. Recent studies have revealed important differences between the cytoskeletal structure, adhesion, and migration of cells in 2D and 3D. Because the cytoskeleton mediates force, we sought to directly compare the role of the cytoskeleton in modulating cell force in 2D and 3D. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with agents that perturbed actin, microtubules, or myosin, and analyzed for changes in cytoskeletal organization and force generation in both 2D and 3D. To quantify traction stresses in 2D, traction force microscopy was used; in 3D, force was assessed based on single cell-mediated collagen fibril reorganization imaged using confocal reflectance microscopy. Interestingly, even though previous studies have observed differences in cell behaviors like migration in 2D and 3D, our data indicate that forces generated on 2D substrates correlate with forces within 3D matrices. Disruption of actin, myosin or microtubules in either 2D or 3D microenvironments disrupts cell-generated force. These data suggest that despite differences in cytoskeletal organization in 2D and 3D, actin, microtubules and myosin contribute to contractility and matrix reorganization similarly in both microenvironments.

  2. Can Abdominal Hypopressive Technique Change Levator Hiatus Area?: A 3-Dimensional Ultrasound Study.

    PubMed

    Resende, Ana Paula Magalhães; Torelli, Luiza; Zanetti, Miriam Raquel Diniz; Petricelli, Carla Dellabarba; Jármy-Di Bella, Zsuzsanna IIona Katalin; Nakamura, Mary Uchiyama; Araujo Júnior, E; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the levator hiatus area (LHA) at rest and during the performance of maximal pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions, during the abdominal hypopressive technique (AHT), and during the combination of PFM contractions (PFMCs) and the AHT. The study included 17 healthy nulliparous women who had no history of pelvic floor disorders. The LHA was evaluated with the patients in the lithotomy position. After a physiotherapist instructed the patients on the proper performance of the PFM and AHT exercises, 1 gynecologist performed the 3-dimensional translabial ultrasound examinations. The LHA was measured with the patients at rest. The PFMC alone, the AHT alone or the AHT in combination with a PFMC with 30 seconds of rest between the evaluations were performed. Each measurement was performed 2 times, and the mean value was used for statistical analysis. The Wilcoxon test was used to test the differences between the 2 maneuvers. Similar values were observed when comparing the LHA of the PFM at rest (12.2 ± 2.4) cm and during the AHT (11.7 ± 2.6) cm (P = 0.227). The AHT+ PFMC (10.2 ± 1.9) cm demonstrated lower values compared with AHT alone (11.7 ± 2.6) cm (P = 0.002). When comparing the PFMC (10.4 ± 2.1) cm with the AHT + PFMC (10.2 ± 1.9) cm, no significant difference (P = 0.551) was observed. During PFMC, the constriction was 1.8 cm; during the AHT, the constriction was 0.5 cm; and during the AHT + PFMC, it was 2 cm. The LHA assessed by 3-dimensional ultrasound did not significantly change with AHT. These results support the theory that AHT does not strengthen PFM.

  3. 3-Dimensional Geologic Modeling Applied to the Structural Characterization of Geothermal Systems: Astor Pass, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett

    2013-04-16

    Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, USA, are controlled by a variety of fault intersection and fault interaction areas. Understanding the specific geometry of the structures most conducive to broad-scale geothermal circulation is crucial to both the mitigation of the costs of geothermal exploration (especially drilling) and to the identification of geothermal systems that have no surface expression (blind systems). 3-dimensional geologic modeling is a tool that can elucidate the specific stratigraphic intervals and structural geometries that host geothermal reservoirs. Astor Pass, NV USA lies just beyond the northern extent of the dextral Pyramid Lake fault zone near the boundary between two distinct structural domains, the Walker Lane and the Basin and Range, and exhibits characteristics of each setting. Both northwest-striking, left-stepping dextral faults of the Walker Lane and kinematically linked northerly striking normal faults associated with the Basin and Range are present. Previous studies at Astor Pass identified a blind geothermal system controlled by the intersection of west-northwest and north-northwest striking dextral-normal faults. Wells drilled into the southwestern quadrant of the fault intersection yielded 94°C fluids, with geothermometers suggesting a maximum reservoir temperature of 130°C. A 3-dimensional model was constructed based on detailed geologic maps and cross-sections, 2-dimensional seismic data, and petrologic analysis of the cuttings from three wells in order to further constrain the structural setting. The model reveals the specific geometry of the fault interaction area at a level of detail beyond what geologic maps and cross-sections can provide.

  4. The Effectiveness of an Interactive 3-Dimensional Computer Graphics Model for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoko; Moriguchi, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Background Medical students often have difficulty achieving a conceptual understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy, such as bone alignment, muscles, and complex movements, from 2-dimensional (2D) images. To this end, animated and interactive 3-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) can provide better visual information to users. In medical fields, research on the advantages of 3DCG in medical education is relatively new. Objective To determine the educational effectiveness of interactive 3DCG. Methods We divided 100 participants (27 men, mean (SD) age 17.9 (0.6) years, and 73 women, mean (SD) age 18.1 (1.1) years) from the Health Sciences University of Mongolia (HSUM) into 3DCG (n = 50) and textbook-only (control) (n = 50) groups. The control group used a textbook and 2D images, while the 3DCG group was trained to use the interactive 3DCG shoulder model in addition to a textbook. We conducted a questionnaire survey via an encrypted satellite network between HSUM and Tokushima University. The questionnaire was scored on a 5-point Likert scale from strongly disagree (score 1) to strongly agree (score 5). Results Interactive 3DCG was effective in undergraduate medical education. Specifically, there was a significant difference in mean (SD) scores between the 3DCG and control groups in their response to questionnaire items regarding content (4.26 (0.69) vs 3.85 (0.68), P = .001) and teaching methods (4.33 (0.65) vs 3.74 (0.79), P < .001), but no significant difference in the Web category. Participants also provided meaningful comments on the advantages of interactive 3DCG. Conclusions Interactive 3DCG materials have positive effects on medical education when properly integrated into conventional education. In particular, our results suggest that interactive 3DCG is more efficient than textbooks alone in medical education and can motivate students to understand complex anatomical structures. PMID:23611759

  5. Selection of massive bone allografts using shape-matching 3-dimensional registration

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cartiaux, Olivier; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Massive bone allografts are used when surgery causes large segmental defects. Shape-matching is the primary criterion for selection of an allograft. The current selection method, based on 2-dimensional template comparison, is inefficient for 3-dimensional complex bones. We have analyzed a 3-dimensional (3-D) registration method to match the anatomy of the allograft with that of the recipient. Methods 3-D CT-based registration was performed to match the shapes of both bones. We used the registration to align the allograft volume onto the recipient's bone. Hemipelvic allograft selection was tested in 10 virtual recipients with a panel of 10 potential allografts, including one from the recipient himself (trap graft). 4 observers were asked to visually inspect the superposition of allograft over the recipient, to classify the allografts into 4 categories according to the matching of anatomic zones, and to select the 3 best matching allografts. The results obtained using the registration method were compared with those from a previous study on the template method. Results Using the registration method, the observers systematically detected the trap graft. Selections of the 3 best matching allografts performed using registration and template methods were different. Selection of the 3 best matching allografts was improved by the registration method. Finally, reproducibility of the selection was improved when using the registration method. Interpretation 3-D CT registration provides more useful information than the template method but the final decision lies with the surgeon, who should select the optimal allograft according to his or her own preferences and the needs of the recipient. PMID:20175643

  6. Efficacy of 3-Dimensional plates over Champys miniplates in mandibular anterior fractures

    PubMed Central

    Barde, Dhananjay H; Mudhol, Anupama; Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Madan, R S; Kar, Sanjay; Ustaad, Farheen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mandibular fractures are treated surgically by either rigid or semi-rigid fixation, two techniques that reflect almost opposite concept of craniomaxillofacial osteosynthesis. The shortcomings of these fixations led to the development of 3 dimensional (3D) miniplates. This study was designed with the aim of evaluating the efficiency of 3D miniplate over Champys miniplate in anterior mandibular fractures. Materials & Methods: This study was done in 40 patients with anterior mandibular fractures. Group I consisting of 20 patients in whom 3D plates were used for fixation while in Group II consisting of other 20 patients, 4 holes straight plates were used. The efficacy of 3D miniplate over Champy’s miniplate was evaluated in terms of operating time, average pain, post operative infection, occlusion, wound dehiscence, post operative mobility and neurological deficit. Results: The mean operation time for Group II was more compared to Group I (statistically significant).There was significantly greater pain on day of surgery and at 2nd week for Group II patients but there was no significant difference between the two groups at 4th week. The post operative infection, occlusal disturbance, wound dehiscence, post operative mobility at facture site, neurological deficit was statistically insignificant (chi square test). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that fixation of anterior mandibular fractures with 3D plates provides three dimensional stability and carries low morbidity and infection rates. The only probable limitation of these 3D plates may be excessive implant material, but they seem to be easy alternative to champys miniplate. How to cite the article: Barde DH, Mudhol A, Ali FM, Madan RS, Kar S, Ustaad F. Efficacy of 3-Dimensional plates over Champys miniplates in mandibular anterior fractures. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):20-6. PMID:24653598

  7. Spontaneous resolution of idiopathic vitreomacular traction syndrome in a healthy young man

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Lv, Xiao; Wu, Mingfeng; Xu, Wei; Rong, Ao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of spontaneous resolution of idiopathic vitreomacular traction syndrome developed in a healthy young man. Method: To exam the macular region using Optical coherence tomography (OCT). Result: OCT examination revealed an incomplete posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) which remains broad vitreous adhesion at the macular area. The foveal thickness increase to 573 μm. The maximal diameter of the adhesion suggested the broad Vitreomacular traction (VMT) type. The posterior vitreous cortex was revealed as a highly reflective band. After 6 weeks without surgery, the patient reported spontaneous improvement in visual symptoms. OCT revealed a complete PVD without macular traction. The foveal contour restored and the foveal thickness decreased markedly to 213 μm. Conclusion: A comprehensive OCT evaluation of the vitreoretinal interface, including VMT types, concurrent conditions like CME and ERM, should be taken into consideration before surgery. PMID:26380009

  8. Some effects of grooved runway configurations on aircraft tire braking traction under flooded runway conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrdsong, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effect of grooved runway configurations on aircraft tire braking traction on flooded runway surfaces. The investigation was performed, utilizing size 49 x 17, type VII, aircraft tires with an inflation pressure of 170 lb per square inch at ground speeds up to approximately 120 knots. The results of this investigation indicate that when the runway is flooded, grooved surfaces provide better braking traction than an ungrooved surface and, in general, the level of braking traction was found to improve as the tire bearing pressure was increased because of an increase in the groove area of either the surface or the tire tread. Rounding the groove edges tended to degrade the tire braking capability from that developed on the same groove configuration with sharp edges. Results also indicate that braking friction coefficients for the test tires and runway surfaces decreased as ground speed was increased because of the hydroplaning effects.

  9. An Inverter Packaging Scheme for an Integrated Segmented Traction Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Gui-Jia; Tang, Lixin; Ayers, Curtis William; Wiles, Randy H

    2013-01-01

    The standard voltage source inverter (VSI), widely used in electric vehicle/hybrid electric vehicle (EV/HEV) traction drives, requires a bulky dc bus capacitor to absorb the large switching ripple currents and prevent them from shortening the battery s life. The dc bus capacitor presents a significant barrier to meeting inverter cost, volume, and weight requirements for mass production of affordable EVs/HEVs. The large ripple currents become even more problematic for the film capacitors (the capacitor technology of choice for EVs/HEVs) in high temperature environments as their ripple current handling capability decreases rapidly with rising temperatures. It is shown in previous work that segmenting the VSI based traction drive system can significantly decrease the ripple currents and thus the size of the dc bus capacitor. This paper presents an integrated packaging scheme to reduce the system cost of a segmented traction drive.

  10. The value of preliminary overhead traction in the closed management of DDH

    PubMed Central

    Murnaghan, Claire; Synder, Marek

    2006-01-01

    We aimed to discover whether there is a difference in incidence of growth disturbances of the proximal femoral epiphysis and final results in two similar groups of children with developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH) treated with (107 hips) and without (48 hips) overhead traction. The only variable between the groups was the use of preliminary traction. All children were followed up until at least the age of 14 years. Pre-reduction traction should be used among children treated non-operatively for DDH who are older than one year of age and/or have high-dislocated hips. In cases that are diagnosed late, this treatment would reduce the risk of severe growth disturbances and increase the probability of a favourable long-term outcome. PMID:16521010

  11. Effect of tangential traction and roughness on crack initiation/propagation during rolling contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soda, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    1980-01-01

    Rolling fatigue tests of 0.45 percent carbon steel rollers were carried out using a four roller type rolling contact fatigue tester. Tangential traction and surface roughness of the harder mating rollers were varied and their effect was studied. The results indicate that the fatigue life decreases when fraction is applied in the same direction as that of rolling. When the direction of fraction is reversed, the life increases over that obtained with zero traction. The roughness of harder mating roller also has a marked influence on life. The smoother the mating roller, the longer the life. Microscopic observation of specimens revealed that the initiation of cracks during the early stages of life is more strongly influenced by the surface roughness, while the propagation of these cracks in the latter stages is affected mainly by the tangential traction.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of the Anisotropy of Vocal Fold Tissue Using Shear Rheometry and Traction Testing

    PubMed Central

    Mongrain, Rosaire; Chen, Lei Xi; Mongeau, Luc

    2012-01-01

    The human vocal folds are layered structures with intrinsically anisotropic elastic properties. Most testing methods assume isotropic behavior. Biaxial testing of vocal folds is strictly difficult because the very soft tissue tends to delaminate under transverse traction loads. In the present study, a linear transversely isotropic model was used to characterize the tissue in-vitro. Shear rheometry was used in conjunction with traction testing to quantify the elasticity of porcine vocal fold tissue. Uniaxial traction testing along with optical measurements were used to obtain the longitudinal modulus. The alternate vocal fold of each animal was subjected to a test-specific sample preparation and concurrently tested using dynamic shear rheometry. The stiffness ratio (i.e., the ratio of the longitudinal modulus and the transverse modulus) varied between ~5 and ~7 at low frequencies. The proposed methodology can be applied to other soft tissues. PMID:23021593

  13. Head-Down Tilt with Balanced Traction as a Model for Simulating Spinal Acclimation to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, R. E.; Styf, J. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Fechner, K.; Haruna, Y.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts experience total body height increases of 4 to 7 cm in microgravity. Thus, stretching of the spinal cord, nerve roots, and muscular and ligamentous tissues may be responsible for the hyperreflexia, back pain, and muscular atrophy associated with exposure to microgravity. Axial compression of the spine makes 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT) an unsuitable model for spinal acclimation to microgravity. However, this axial compression may be counteracted by balanced traction consisting of 10% body weight (sin 6 deg. = 0.1) applied to the legs. Six healthy male subjects underwent 3 days each of 60 HDT with balanced traction and horizontal bed rest (HBR), with a 2 week recovery period between treatments. Total body and spine length, lumbar disc height, back pain, erector spinae intramuscular pressure, and ankle joint torque were measured before, during and after each treatment. Total body and spine (processes of L5 - C7) lengths increased significantly more during HDT with balanced traction (22 +/- 8 mm and 25 +/- 8 mm, respectively) than during HBR (16 +/- 4 mm and 14 +/- 9 mm, respectively). Back and leg pain were significantly greater during HDT with balanced traction than during HBR. The distance between the lower end plate of L4 and the upper endplate of S1, as measured by sonography, increased significantly in both treatments to the same degree (2.9 +/- 1.9 mm, HDT with balanced traction; 3.3 +/- 1.5 mm, HBR). Intramuscular pressure of the erector spinae muscles and maximal ankle joint torque were unaltered with both models. While neither model increased height to the magnitude observed in microgravity, HDT with balanced traction may be a better model for simulating the body lengthening and back pain experienced in microgravity.

  14. Energy Consumption Calculation of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor for Railway Vehicle Traction Using Equivalent Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Minoru; Kawamura, Junya; Terauchi, Nobuo

    We are developing a new high performance traction motor for railway vehicle using interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) and expecting it can reduce energy consumption. To estimate the losses and energy consumption of IPMSM, a simple motor model is needed. In this paper, We propose a simple equivalent circuit and loss model for IPMSM, the constants of which can be obtained from several simple test results. The calculation results using them show that the total loss of the IPMSM becomes about 60% of that of the induction motor when used as a traction motor for a typical commuter train.

  15. Parametric tests of a traction drive retrofitted to an automotive gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Lowenthal, S. H.; Anderson, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a test program to retrofit a high performance fixed ratio Nasvytis Multiroller Traction Drive in place of a helical gear set to a gas turbine engine are presented. Parametric tests up to a maximum engine power turbine speed of 45,500 rpm and to a power level of 11 kW were conducted. Comparisons were made to similar drives that were parametrically tested on a back-to-back test stand. The drive showed good compatibility with the gas turbine engine. Specific fuel consumption of the engine with the traction drive speed reducer installed was comparable to the original helical gearset equipped engine.

  16. Effect of combining traction and vibration on back muscles, heart rate and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhen; Zhao, Meiya; Ma, Jian; Tian, Shan; Xiang, Pin; Yao, Wei; Fan, Yubo

    2014-11-01

    Eighty-five percent of the population has experienced low back pain (LBP), which may result in decreasing muscle strength and endurance, functional capacity of the spine, and so on. Traction and vibration are commonly used to relieve the low back pain. The effect of the combing traction and vibration on back muscles, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) was investigated in this study. Thirty healthy subjects participated in 12 trials lying supine on the spine-combing bed with different tilt angle (0°, 10°, 20° and 30°) and vibration modes (along with the sagittal and coronal axis with 0 Hz, 2 Hz and 12 Hz separately). EMG was recorded during each trial. Power spectral frequency analysis was applied to evaluate muscle fatigue by the shift of median power frequency (MPF). Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated from BP. HR and PP were used to estimate the effect of the combination of traction and vibration on the cardio-vascular system. It was shown that vibration could increase HR and decrease PP. The combination of traction and vibration (2 Hz vibration along Z-axis and 12 Hz vibration along Y-axis) had no significant effect on the cardio-vascular system. The MPF of lumbar erector spinae (LES) and upper trapezius (UT) decreased significantly when the angle reached 20° under the condition of 2 Hz vibration along Z-axis compared with it of 0°. Furthermore, the MPF also decreased significantly compared with it of static mode at 20° for LES and at 30° for UT. However at 12 Hz vibration along Y-axis, the MPF had significant increase when the angle reached 20° in LES and 30° in UT compared to 0°. For LES, the MPF also had significant difference when the angle was increased from 10° to 20°. Therefore, combining 2 Hz vibration along Z-axis and traction (tilt angles that less than 20°) may to reduce muscle fatigue both for LES and UT compared with either vibration or traction alone. The combination of 12 Hz vibration along Y-axis and traction (tilt angles

  17. Multiroller traction drive speed reducer: Evaluation for automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, D. A.; Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a nominal 14:1 fixed-ratio Nasvytis multiroller traction drive retrofitted as the speed reducer in an automotive gas turbine engine. Power turbine speeds of 45,000 rpm and a drive output power of 102 kW (137 hp) were reached. The drive operated under both variable roller loading (proportional to torque) and fixed roller loading (automatic loading mechanism locked). The drive operated smoothly and efficiently as the engine speed reducer. Engine specific fuel consumption with the traction speed reducer was comparable to that with the original helical gearset.

  18. Determination of lubricant selection based on elastohydrodynamic film thickness and traction measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, T. A.; Kannel, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The project was conducted to aid in the development of an elastohydrodynamic specification for military lubricants. Experiments were conducted with a rolling disk apparatus designed to simulate a bearing or gear type contact. Measurements included lubricant film thickness, lubricant breakdown and traction for a range of loads, speeds, temperatures, and surface roughnesses. Several lubricants were used in the investigations including a traction fluid, two synthetic paraffinic lubricants and several lubricants conforming to MIL-L 7808 and 23699 specifications. Recommendations regarding an EHD specification are included.

  19. Vitrectomy for vitreopapillary traction in a nondiabetic 16-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Nagesha, C. K.; Rishi, Pukhraj; Rishi, Ekta

    2017-01-01

    Vitreopapillary traction (VPT) is an unusual clinical entity and its management and prognosis have been sparsely studied. It has been described in adults with various vitreomacular pathologies and the possible effects on visual functions. However, the role of surgical intervention in altering the course of the disease is not well understood. Hereby, we describe a case of idiopathic VPT in a 16-year-old girl who presented with decreased vision and visual field changes corresponding to the area of retinal traction. This case was managed with pars plana vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane removal that resulted in improved visual field sensitivity; thus, emphasizing the role of surgical intervention in such eyes. PMID:28298864

  20. Dynamic evaluation of a traction-drive joint for space telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, Clarence W.; Hankins, Walter W., III

    1988-01-01

    Presented is an analysis and evaluation of a prototype traction-drive joint for robotic manipulators, developed under NASA sponsorship. A dynamic model is developed using the Lagrange formulation. Controllability, observability, dynamic stability, and response characteristics of the joint to test inputs are studied. A linear quadratic regulator (LQR) is implemented on the joint model to determine a basis for evaluating the performance of the traction-drive joint under servo control. An evaluation of the results and directions for future investigations are presented.

  1. Calculation of forces on magnetized bodies using COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, John

    1987-01-01

    The methods described may be used with a high degree of confidence for calculations of magnetic traction forces normal to a surface. In this circumstance all models agree, and test cases have resulted in theoretically correct results. It is shown that the tangential forces are in practice negligible. The surface pole method is preferable to the virtual work method because of the necessity for more than one NASTRAN run in the latter case, and because distributed forces are obtained. The derivation of local forces from the Maxwell stress method involves an undesirable degree of manipulation of the problem and produces a result in contradiction of the surface pole method.

  2. Traction characteristics of high-temperature powder-lubricated ceramics (Si3N4/alpha SiC)

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, Hooshang; Dill, J.F. )

    1992-04-01

    As part of a development program for a high-temperature, dry-lubricated bearing technology and lubricant system, a high-speed high-temperature disk-on-disk tribometer was utilized and a matrix of traction data covering a range of load, speed, and temperature was obtained. The influence of dry powder lubricants, TiO2 and MoS2, on the traction coefficients between two ceramic materials, Si3N4 and SiC, was investigated. The results of this investigation are characteristic curves for the traction coefficient vs the slide/roll ratio with dry powders which are reminiscent of fluids, and the observation of dry powder lubricants' lower traction coefficients and wear. Measured tractions are found to be a strong function of powder-lubricant type, and values decrease moderately with slide-to-roll ration and load. The data show a weak sensitivity to temperature. 9 refs.

  3. The geometric clutch at 20: stripping gears or gaining traction?

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Charles B; Lesich, Kathleen A

    2015-08-01

    It has been 20 years since the geometric clutch (GC) hypothesis was first proposed. The core principle of the GC mechanism is fairly simple. When the axoneme of a eukaryotic flagellum is bent, mechanical stress generates forces transverse to the outer doublets (t-forces). These t-forces can push doublets closer together or pry them apart. The GC hypothesis asserts that changes in the inter-doublet spacing caused by t-forces are responsible for the activation and deactivation of the dynein motors, that creates the beat cycle. A series of computer models utilizing the clutch mechanism has shown that it can simulate ciliary and flagellar beating. The objective of the present review is to assess where things stand with the GC hypothesis in the clarifying light of new information. There is considerable new evidence to support the hypothesis. However, it is also clear that it is necessary to modify some of the original conceptions of the hypothesis so that it can be consistent with the results of recent experimental and ultrastructural studies. In particular, dynein deactivation by t-forces must be able to occur with dyneins that remain attached to the B-subtubule of the adjacent doublet.

  4. Stress analysis in platform-switching implants: a 3-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Júnior, Joel Ferreira Santiago; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; de Moraes, Sandra Lúcia Dantas; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the platform-switching technique on stress distribution in implant, abutment, and peri-implant tissues, through a 3-dimensional finite element study. Three 3-dimensional mandibular models were fabricated using the SolidWorks 2006 and InVesalius software. Each model was composed of a bone block with one implant 10 mm long and of different diameters (3.75 and 5.00 mm). The UCLA abutments also ranged in diameter from 5.00 mm to 4.1 mm. After obtaining the geometries, the models were transferred to the software FEMAP 10.0 for pre- and postprocessing of finite elements to generate the mesh, loading, and boundary conditions. A total load of 200 N was applied in axial (0°), oblique (45°), and lateral (90°) directions. The models were solved by the software NeiNastran 9.0 and transferred to the software FEMAP 10.0 to obtain the results that were visualized through von Mises and maximum principal stress maps. Model A (implants with 3.75 mm/abutment with 4.1 mm) exhibited the highest area of stress concentration with all loadings (axial, oblique, and lateral) for the implant and the abutment. All models presented the stress areas at the abutment level and at the implant/abutment interface. Models B (implant with 5.0 mm/abutment with 5.0 mm) and C (implant with 5.0 mm/abutment with 4.1 mm) presented minor areas of stress concentration and similar distribution pattern. For the cortical bone, low stress concentration was observed in the peri-implant region for models B and C in comparison to model A. The trabecular bone exhibited low stress that was well distributed in models B and C. Model A presented the highest stress concentration. Model B exhibited better stress distribution. There was no significant difference between the large-diameter implants (models B and C).

  5. 76 FR 2309 - Consumer Information Regulations; Fees for Use of Traction Skid Pads

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... impact on the sale price of tires would be minimal, because an increase in testing fees would likely be... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 575 RIN 2127-AK06 Consumer Information Regulations; Fees for Use of Traction Skid Pads AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration...

  6. Role of pars plana vitrectomy and membrane peel in vitreomacular traction associated with retinal vasoproliferative tumors

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Navarro, Verónica; Saktanasate, Jarin; Say, Emil Anthony T.; Chiang, Allen; Shields, Carol Lally

    2016-01-01

    To report a case of retinal vasoproliferative tumor (VPT) with secondary epiretinal membrane (ERM) formation and vitreo-macular traction managed by pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and membrane peel. A 29-year-old male was referred for management of decreased vision in the right eye (OD) for 1 week. Presenting visual acuity was 20/50 Snellen feet (ft) OD, and fundus examination showed an ERM associated with a reddish-yellow mass in the inferotemporal quadrant with overlying exudation, hemorrhage, and subretinal fluid consistent with VPT, and cryotherapy was recommended. Two months later, there was complete tumor regression, but there was decreased vision from progressive vitreomacular traction to 20/400 ft. PPV with combined ERM and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peel were performed with resolution of vitreomacular traction and improvement of visual acuity to 20/50 ft at 6 months. PPV with combined ERM and ILM peel is effective for vision loss secondary to ERM and vitreomacular traction associated with retinal VPT. PMID:27843233

  7. Low cost, compact, and high efficiency traction motor for electric and hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, Mark

    2002-10-07

    A new motor drive, the switched reluctance motor drive, has been developed for hybrid-electric vehicles. The motor drive has been designed, built and tested in the test bed at a near vehicle scale. It has been shown that the switched reluctance motor drive is more suitable for traction application than any other motor drive.

  8. Design study of a continuously variable roller cone traction CVT for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoin, D. K.; Walker, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Continuously variable ratio transmissions (CVT) featuring cone and roller traction elements and computerized controls are studied. The CVT meets or exceeds all requirements set forth in the design criteria. Further, a scalability analysis indicates the basic concept is applicable to lower and higher power units, with upward scaling for increased power being more readily accomplished.

  9. Effect of starvation on film thickness and traction under elastohydrodynamic rolling and sliding conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    Traction measurements under starved elastohydrodynamic conditions were obtained for a point-contact geometry. Simultaneous measurements of the film thickness and the location of the inlet lubricant boundary were made. Optical interferometry was used to measure film thickness. The thickness of a starved film for combined rolling and sliding conditions varies with the location of the inlet boundary in the same way as previously found for pure rolling conditions. When the fluid velocity distribution is calculated in the inlet region by a Reynolds lubrication analysis, backflow is seen to occur over a portion of the inlet region. Backflow is essential for the establishment of a flooded condition. The location of certain fluid velocity conditions within the inlet region, as suggested in the literature, does not adequately describe the onset of starvation. For the same slide-roll ratio a starved film was observed to possess greater traction than a flooded film. Traction measurements under starved conditions were also compared with those under flooded conditions for equivalent shear rates in the Hertzian region. When the shear rates within the Hertzian region were low and the film was severely starved, the measured tractions were lower than expected. This may be due to large shear stresses developed by the large pressure gradients that are generated in the inlet region when it is severely starved.

  10. 3-dimensionally integrated photo-detector for neutrino physics and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retiere, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are a promising solution for the detection of scintillation light of liquid Xenon and Argon in applications requiring minimum radioactivity content such as neutrinoless double beta decay. The nEXO experiment in particular is planning to use SiPM planes covering 5 m2 for the detection of the light emitted within 5tons of liquid Xenon. The 3-dimensionally digital integrated SiPMs (3DdSiPMs) is an emerging technology that if successful would challenge the analog SiPM technology. Indeed, by combining separate photo-detector and electronics chips within a single package, 3DdSiPM achieve excellent performances for photon counting and time stamping, while dissipating minimum power. Being mostly based on high purity silicon chips, 3DdSiPMs are also expected to achieve excellent radiopurity.The development of 3DdSiPMs for applications in liquid Xenon is expected to progress rapidly by altering the design of the first successful chip assembly developed for medical imaging, focusing on minimizing power dissipation and large area (> cm2) scaling. In this talk we will describe the 3DdSiPM concept a solution for ``light to bit conversion'' within a single package and show how it may revolutionize light detection in noble-gas liquids and beyond.

  11. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico F; Abuin, David S; Tauber, Gabriel A; Pham, Andrew T; Pearson, Chad G

    2015-12-23

    Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs.

  12. The Effect of Asymmetric flow on the 3-Dimensional Symmetric Bogus Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEE, J.; Cheong, H.; Hwang, J.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of asymmetric flow on the 3-dimensional symmetric bogus vortex called as Structure Adjustable Balanced Vortex (SABV) is investigated for 9 tropical cyclones (TCs) observed in Northwest Pacific. NCEP global reanalysis data were used as initial condition, and the high order spectral filter (HSF) were employed to separate asymmetric flow from disturbance flow as following: The first step is that the global field is decomposed into environment and disturbance field. And secondly, the disturbance field is transformed into cylindrical coordinates, and the Fourier transform is applied to the transformed data along the azimuth. Lastly, the inverse Fourier transform is carried out except for wavenumber (WN) 0 component, and it is added to SABV. To investigate the effect of asymmetric flow on the SABV, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) V3.2.1 was employed, which was set to have a single domain with 12 km resolution and YSU, WSM 6 and Kain-Fritsch schemes are used. With these methods, it was found that the track error at 48 h and 72 h was improved by about 13% and 16%, respectively, implying the asymmetric flow should be added to SABV for better performance.

  13. Vaginal High Pressure Zone Assessed by Dynamic 3-Dimensional Ultrasound Images of the Pelvic Floor

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, Sung-Ae; PRETORIUS, Dolores H.; PADDA, Bikram S.; WEINSTEIN, Milena M.; NAGER, Charles W.; den BOER, Derkina J.; MITTAL, Ravinder K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the shape and characteristics of the vaginal high pressure zone (HPZ) by imaging a compliant fluid-filled bag placed in the vaginal HPZ with the 3-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) system. Study Design Nine nulliparous asymptomatic women underwent 3D US imaging and vaginal pressure measurements. A compliant bag was placed in the vagina and filled with various volumes of water. 3D US volumes of the pelvic floor were obtained at each bag volume while the subjects were at rest and during pelvic floor contraction. Results At low volumes, the bag was collapsed for a longitudinal extent of approximately 3.3 ± 0.2 cm (length of vaginal HPZ). With increasing bag volume, there was opening of the vaginal HPZ in the lateral dimension before the anterior-posterior (AP) dimension. Pelvic floor contraction produced a decrease in the AP dimension but not the lateral dimension of the bag in the region of the vaginal HPZ. Conclusion We propose that the shape and characteristics of the vaginal HPZ are consistent with the hypothesis that the puborectalis muscle is responsible for the genesis of the vaginal HPZ. PMID:17618755

  14. Superimposition of 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography models of growing patients

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. C.; Heymann, Gavin; Cornelis, Marie A.; DeClerck, Hugo J.; Tulloch, J. F. Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to evaluate a new method for superimposition of 3-dimensional (3D) models of growing subjects. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken before and after Class III malocclusion orthopedic treatment with miniplates. Three observers independently constructed 18 3D virtual surface models from cone-beam computed tomography scans of 3 patients. Separate 3D models were constructed for soft-tissue, cranial base, maxillary, and mandibular surfaces. The anterior cranial fossa was used to register the 3D models of before and after treatment (about 1 year of follow-up). Results Three-dimensional overlays of superimposed models and 3D color-coded displacement maps allowed visual and quantitative assessment of growth and treatment changes. The range of interobserver errors for each anatomic region was 0.4 mm for the zygomatic process of maxilla, chin, condyles, posterior border of the rami, and lower border of the mandible, and 0.5 mm for the anterior maxilla soft-tissue upper lip. Conclusions Our results suggest that this method is a valid and reproducible assessment of treatment outcomes for growing subjects. This technique can be used to identify maxillary and mandibular positional changes and bone remodeling relative to the anterior cranial fossa. PMID:19577154

  15. Scaffold Free Bio-orthogonal Assembly of 3-Dimensional Cardiac Tissue via Cell Surface Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; O’Brien, Paul J.; Elahipanah, Sina; Yousaf , Muhammad N.

    2016-01-01

    There has been tremendous interest in constructing in vitro cardiac tissue for a range of fundamental studies of cardiac development and disease and as a commercial system to evaluate therapeutic drug discovery prioritization and toxicity. Although there has been progress towards studying 2-dimensional cardiac function in vitro, there remain challenging obstacles to generate rapid and efficient scaffold-free 3-dimensional multiple cell type co-culture cardiac tissue models. Herein, we develop a programmed rapid self-assembly strategy to induce specific and stable cell-cell contacts among multiple cell types found in heart tissue to generate 3D tissues through cell-surface engineering based on liposome delivery and fusion to display bio-orthogonal functional groups from cell membranes. We generate, for the first time, a scaffold free and stable self assembled 3 cell line co-culture 3D cardiac tissue model by assembling cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblast cells via a rapid inter-cell click ligation process. We compare and analyze the function of the 3D cardiac tissue chips with 2D co-culture monolayers by assessing cardiac specific markers, electromechanical cell coupling, beating rates and evaluating drug toxicity. PMID:28008983

  16. Dissection of the host-pathogen interaction in human tuberculosis using a bioengineered 3-dimensional model

    PubMed Central

    Tezera, Liku B; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Chancellor, Andrew; Reichmann, Michaela T; Shammari, Basim Al; Brace, Patience; Batty, Alex; Tocheva, Annie; Jogai, Sanjay; Marshall, Ben G; Tebruegge, Marc; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Mansour, Salah; Elkington, Paul T

    2017-01-01

    Cell biology differs between traditional cell culture and 3-dimensional (3-D) systems, and is modulated by the extracellular matrix. Experimentation in 3-D presents challenges, especially with virulent pathogens. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills more humans than any other infection and is characterised by a spatially organised immune response and extracellular matrix remodelling. We developed a 3-D system incorporating virulent mycobacteria, primary human blood mononuclear cells and collagen–alginate matrix to dissect the host-pathogen interaction. Infection in 3-D led to greater cellular survival and permitted longitudinal analysis over 21 days. Key features of human tuberculosis develop, and extracellular matrix integrity favours the host over the pathogen. We optimised multiparameter readouts to study emerging therapeutic interventions: cytokine supplementation, host-directed therapy and immunoaugmentation. Each intervention modulates the host-pathogen interaction, but has both beneficial and harmful effects. This methodology has wide applicability to investigate infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases and develop novel drug regimes and vaccination approaches. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21283.001 PMID:28063256

  17. Inter-surface interactions in a 3-dimensional topological insulator : Bi2Se3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hosub; Song, Jung-Hwan; Freeman, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    Recently much attention has focused on 3-dimensional strong topological insulators as a new quantum state of matter, such as Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3. One of their intriguing features is a topologically protected surface state whose quasiparticle dispersion shows a Dirac cone. Due to lack of backscattering and robustness against disorder and interaction, surface states have the potential to be perfect conducting channels which carry not only charge but also spin currents. Here, we present a theoretical study of electronic structures and surfaces of thin film Bi2Se3 using the highly precise FLAPW methodfootnotetext Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, Freeman, Phys. Rev. B, 24, 864 (1981). Our calculated results focus on the interaction between surface states on opposing sides of the slab. The gap opening from the inter-surface interaction can be easily explained by simple symmetry arguments considering both time-reversal and spatial inversion. For a 6 quintuple layer slab (˜6 nm), a 1.06 meV gap at the γ point survives due to the inter-surface interactions, and we discuss how to preserve the massless excitations despite this inter-surface interaction.

  18. In vitro 3-dimensional tumor model for radiosensitivity of HPV positive OSCC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Rose, Barbara; Lee, C Soon; Hong, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is increasing due to the rising prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) positive OSCC. HPV positive OSCC is associated with better outcomes than HPV negative OSCC. Our aim was to explore the possibility that this favorable prognosis is due to the enhanced radiosensitivity of HPV positive OSCC. HPV positive OSCC cell lines were generated from the primary OSCCs of 2 patients, and corresponding HPV positive cell lines generated from nodal metastases following xenografting in nude mice. Monolayer and 3 dimensional (3D) culture techniques were used to compare the radiosensitivity of HPV positive lines with that of 2 HPV negative OSCC lines. Clonogenic and protein assays were used to measure survival post radiation. Radiation induced cell cycle changes were studied using flow cytometry. In both monolayer and 3D culture, HPV positive cells exhibited a heterogeneous appearance whereas HPV negative cells tended to be homogeneous. After irradiation, HPV positive cells had a lower survival in clonogenic assays and lower total protein levels in 3D cultures than HPV negative cells. Irradiated HPV positive cells showed a high proportion of cells in G1/S phase, increased apoptosis, an increased proliferation rate, and an inability to form 3D tumor clumps. In conclusion, HPV positive OSCC cells are more radiosensitive than HPV negative OSCC cells in vitro, supporting a more radiosensitive nature of HPV positive OSCC.

  19. Polarization-independent efficiency enhancement of organic solar cells by using 3-dimensional plasmonic electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuanhua; Choy, Wallace C. H.; Ren, Xingang; Xin, Jianzhuo; Lin, Peng; Leung, Dennis C. W.

    2013-04-01

    Plasmonic back reflectors have recently become a promising strategy for realizing efficient organic solar cell (OSCs). Since plasmonic effects are strongly sensitive to light polarization, it is highly desirable to simultaneously achieve polarization-independent response and enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) by designing the nanostructured geometry of plasmonic reflector electrode. Here, through a strategic analysis of 2-dimensional grating (2D) and 3-dimensional patterns (3D), with similar periodicity as a plasmonic back reflector, we find that the OSCs with 3D pattern achieve the best PCE enhancement by 24.6%, while the OSCs with 2D pattern can offer 17.5% PCE enhancement compared to the optimized control OSCs. Importantly, compared with the 2D pattern, the 3D pattern shows a polarization independent plasmonic response, which will greatly extend its uses in photovoltaic applications. This work shows the significances of carefully selecting and designing geometry of plasmonic nanostructures in achieving high-efficient, polarization-independent plasmonic OSCs.

  20. Embedding and publishing interactive, 3-dimensional, scientific figures in Portable Document Format (PDF) files.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David G; Vidiassov, Michail; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Fluke, Christopher J; Quayle, Michelle R; McHenry, Colin R

    2013-01-01

    With the latest release of the S2PLOT graphics library, embedding interactive, 3-dimensional (3-d) scientific figures in Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) files is simple, and can be accomplished without commercial software. In this paper, we motivate the need for embedding 3-d figures in scholarly articles. We explain how 3-d figures can be created using the S2PLOT graphics library, exported to Product Representation Compact (PRC) format, and included as fully interactive, 3-d figures in PDF files using the movie15 LaTeX package. We present new examples of 3-d PDF figures, explain how they have been made, validate them, and comment on their advantages over traditional, static 2-dimensional (2-d) figures. With the judicious use of 3-d rather than 2-d figures, scientists can now publish, share and archive more useful, flexible and faithful representations of their study outcomes. The article you are reading does not have embedded 3-d figures. The full paper, with embedded 3-d figures, is recommended and is available as a supplementary download from PLoS ONE (File S2).

  1. Assessment and Planning for a Pediatric Bilateral Hand Transplant Using 3-Dimensional Modeling: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Jorge A; Gralewski, Kevin; McAndrew, Christine; Rehman, Mohamed A; Chang, Benjamin; Levin, L Scott

    2016-03-01

    Children are not typically considered for hand transplantation for various reasons, including the difficulty of finding an appropriate donor. Matching donor-recipient hands and forearms based on size is critically important. If the donor's hands are too large, the recipient may not be able to move the fingers effectively. Conversely, if the donor's hands are too small, the appearance may not be appropriate. We present an 8-year-old child evaluated for a bilateral hand transplant following bilateral amputation. The recipient forearms and model hands were modeled from computed tomography imaging studies and replicated as anatomic models with a 3-dimensional printer. We modified the scale of the printed hand to produce 3 proportions, 80%, 100% and 120%. The transplant team used the anatomical models during evaluation of a donor for appropriate match based on size. The donor's hand size matched the 100%-scale anatomical model hand and the transplant team was activated. In addition to assisting in appropriate donor selection by the transplant team, the 100%-scale anatomical model hand was used to create molds for prosthetic hands for the donor.

  2. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Domenico F.; Abuin, David S.; Tauber, Gabriel A.; Pham, Andrew T.; Pearson, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  3. Using Interior Point Method Optimization Techniques to Improve 2- and 3-Dimensional Models of Earth Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, A.; Gutierrez, A. E.; Velasco, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    2- and 3-Dimensional models obtained from the inversion of geophysical data are widely used to represent the structural composition of the Earth and to constrain independent models obtained from other geological data (e.g. core samples, seismic surveys, etc.). However, inverse modeling of gravity data presents a very unstable and ill-posed mathematical problem, given that solutions are non-unique and small changes in parameters (position and density contrast of an anomalous body) can highly impact the resulting model. Through the implementation of an interior-point method constrained optimization technique, we improve the 2-D and 3-D models of Earth structures representing known density contrasts mapping anomalous bodies in uniform regions and boundaries between layers in layered environments. The proposed techniques are applied to synthetic data and gravitational data obtained from the Rio Grande Rift and the Cooper Flat Mine region located in Sierra County, New Mexico. Specifically, we improve the 2- and 3-D Earth models by getting rid of unacceptable solutions (those that do not satisfy the required constraints or are geologically unfeasible) given the reduction of the solution space.

  4. A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kazumasa; Yongkoo, Seol

    2003-04-09

    Water fluxes in unsaturated, fractured rock involve the physical processes occurring at fracture-matrix interfaces within fracture networks. Modeling these water fluxes using a discrete fracture network model is a complicated effort. Existing preprocessors for TOUGH2 are not suitable to generate grids for fracture networks with various orientations and inclinations. There are several 3-D discrete-fracture-network simulators for flow and transport, but most of them do not capture fracture-matrix interaction. We have developed a new 3-D discrete-fracture-network mesh generator, FRACMESH, to provide TOUGH2 with information about the fracture network configuration and fracture-matrix interactions. FRACMESH transforms a discrete fracture network into a 3 dimensional uniform mesh, in which fractures are considered as elements with unique rock material properties and connected to surrounding matrix elements. Using FRACMESH, individual fractures may have uniform or random aperture distributions to consider heterogeneity. Fracture element volumes and interfacial areas are calculated from fracture geometry within individual elements. By using FRACMESH and TOUGH2, fractures with various inclinations and orientations, and fracture-matrix interaction, can be incorporated. In this paper, results of flow and transport simulations in a fractured rock block utilizing FRACMESH are presented.

  5. MAPAG: a computer program to construct 2- and 3-dimensional antigenic maps.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, R C; Retegui, L A; Roguin, L P

    1994-01-01

    The contact area between an antibody (Ab) and the antigen (Ag) is called antigenic determinant or epitope. The first step in the characterization of an Ag by using monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is to map the relative distribution of the corresponding epitopes on the Ag surface. The computer program MAPAG has been devised to automatically construct antigenic maps. MAPAG is fed with a binary matrix of experimental data indicating the ability of paired MAb to bind or not simultaneously to the Ag. The program is interactive menu-driven and allows the user an easy data handling. MAPAG utilizes iterative processes to construct and to adjust the final map, which is graphically shown as a 2- or a 3-dimensional model. Additionally, the antigenic map obtained can be optionally modified by the user or readjusted by the program. The suitability of MAPAG was illustrated by running experimental data from literature and comparing antigenic maps constructed by the program with those elaborated by the investigators without the assistance of a computer. Furthermore, since some MAb could present negative allosteric effects leading to misinterpretation of data, MAPAG has been provided with an approximate reasoning module to solve such anomalous situations. Results indicated that the program can be successfully employed as a simple, fast and reliable antigenic model-builder.

  6. Fusion of radar data to extract 3-dimensional objects LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, R.; Hensley, B.; Carande, R.; Burkhart, G.; Ledner, R.

    1997-03-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) is a very promising technology for remote mapping of 3-Dimensional objects. In particular, 3-D maps of urban areas are extremely important to a wide variety of users, both civilian and military. However, 3-D maps produced by traditional optical stereo (stereogrammetry) techniques can be quite expensive to obtain, and accurate urban maps can only be obtained with a large amount of human-intensive interpretation work. IFSAR has evolved over the last decade as a mapping technology that promises to eliminate much of the human-intensive work in producing elevation maps. However, IFSAR systems have only been robustly demonstrated in non-urban areas, and have not traditionally been able to produce data with enough detail to be of general use in urban areas. Sandia Laboratories Twin Otter IFSAR was the first mapping radar system with the proper parameter set to provide sufficiently detailed information in a large number of urban areas. The goal of this LDRD was to fuse previously unused information derived from IFSAR data in urban areas that can be used to extract accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) over wide areas without intensive human interaction.

  7. Cerebral Degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Revealed by 3-Dimensional Texture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maani, Rouzbeh; Yang, Yee-Hong; Emery, Derek; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Routine MR images do not consistently reveal pathological changes in the brain in ALS. Texture analysis, a method to quantitate voxel intensities and their patterns and interrelationships, can detect changes in images not apparent to the naked eye. Our objective was to evaluate cerebral degeneration in ALS using 3-dimensional texture analysis of MR images of the brain. Methods: In a case-control design, voxel-based texture analysis was performed on T1-weighted MR images of 20 healthy subjects and 19 patients with ALS. Four texture features, namely, autocorrelation, sum of squares variance, sum average, and sum variance were computed. Texture features were compared between the groups by statistical parametric mapping and correlated with clinical measures of disability and upper motor neuron dysfunction. Results: Texture features were different in ALS in motor regions including the precentral gyrus and corticospinal tracts. To a lesser extent, changes were also found in the thalamus, cingulate gyrus, and temporal lobe. Texture features in the precentral gyrus correlated with disease duration, and in the corticospinal tract they correlated with finger tapping speed. Conclusions: Changes in MR image textures are present in motor and non-motor regions in ALS and correlate with clinical features. Whole brain texture analysis has potential in providing biomarkers of cerebral degeneration in ALS. PMID:27064416

  8. The distribution of particles in the plane dispersed by a simple 3-dimensional diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Stockmarr, Anders

    2002-11-01

    Populations of particles dispersed in the 2-dimensional plane from a single point-source may be grouped as focus expansion patterns, with an exponentially decreasing density, and more diffuse patterns with thicker tails. Exponentially decreasing distributions are often modelled as the result of 2-dimensional diffusion processes acting to disperse the particles, while thick-tailed distributions tend to be modelled by purely descriptive distributions. Models based on the Cauchy distribution have been suggested, but these have not been related to diffusion modelling. However, the distribution of particles dispersed from a point source by a 3-dimensional Brownian motion that incorporates a constant drift, under the condition that the particle starts at a given height and is stopped when it reaches the xy plane (zero height) may be shown to result in both slim-tailed exponentially decreasing densities, and thick-tailed polynomially decreasing densities with infinite mean travel distance from the source, depending on parameter values. The drift in the third coordinate represents gravitation, while the drift in the first and second represents a (constant) wind. Conditions for the density having exponentially decreasing tails is derived in terms of gravitation and wind, with a special emphasis on applications to light-weighted particles such as fungal spores.

  9. A Novel Method of Orbital Floor Reconstruction Using Virtual Planning, 3-Dimensional Printing, and Autologous Bone.

    PubMed

    Vehmeijer, Maarten; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Liberton, Niels; Wolff, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the orbital floor are often a result of traffic accidents or interpersonal violence. To date, numerous materials and methods have been used to reconstruct the orbital floor. However, simple and cost-effective 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies for the treatment of orbital floor fractures are still sought. This study describes a simple, precise, cost-effective method of treating orbital fractures using 3D printing technologies in combination with autologous bone. Enophthalmos and diplopia developed in a 64-year-old female patient with an orbital floor fracture. A virtual 3D model of the fracture site was generated from computed tomography images of the patient. The fracture was virtually closed using spline interpolation. Furthermore, a virtual individualized mold of the defect site was created, which was manufactured using an inkjet printer. The tangible mold was subsequently used during surgery to sculpture an individualized autologous orbital floor implant. Virtual reconstruction of the orbital floor and the resulting mold enhanced the overall accuracy and efficiency of the surgical procedure. The sculptured autologous orbital floor implant showed an excellent fit in vivo. The combination of virtual planning and 3D printing offers an accurate and cost-effective treatment method for orbital floor fractures.

  10. Embedding and Publishing Interactive, 3-Dimensional, Scientific Figures in Portable Document Format (PDF) Files

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, David G.; Vidiassov, Michail; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Fluke, Christopher J.; Quayle, Michelle R.; McHenry, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    With the latest release of the S2PLOT graphics library, embedding interactive, 3-dimensional (3-d) scientific figures in Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) files is simple, and can be accomplished without commercial software. In this paper, we motivate the need for embedding 3-d figures in scholarly articles. We explain how 3-d figures can be created using the S2PLOT graphics library, exported to Product Representation Compact (PRC) format, and included as fully interactive, 3-d figures in PDF files using the movie15 LaTeX package. We present new examples of 3-d PDF figures, explain how they have been made, validate them, and comment on their advantages over traditional, static 2-dimensional (2-d) figures. With the judicious use of 3-d rather than 2-d figures, scientists can now publish, share and archive more useful, flexible and faithful representations of their study outcomes. The article you are reading does not have embedded 3-d figures. The full paper, with embedded 3-d figures, is recommended and is available as a supplementary download from PLoS ONE (File S2). PMID:24086243

  11. 3-Dimensional analysis for class III malocclusion patients with facial asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Eun-Jung; Cheon, Hae-Myung; Choi, Eun-Joo; Kwon, Kyung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between 2-dimensional (2D) cephalometric measurement and 3-dimensional (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) measurement, and to evaluate the availability of 3D analysis for asymmetry patients. Materials and Methods A total of Twenty-seven patients were evaluated for facial asymmetry by photograph and cephalometric radiograph, and CBCT. The 14 measurements values were evaluated and those for 2D and 3D were compared. The patients were classified into two groups. Patients in group 1 were evaluated for symmetry in the middle 1/3 of the face and asymmetry in the lower 1/3 of the face, and those in group 2 for asymmetry of both the middle and lower 1/3 of the face. Results In group 1, significant differences were observed in nine values out of 14 values. Values included three from anteroposterior cephalometric radiograph measurement values (cant and both body height) and six from lateral cephalometric radiographs (both ramus length, both lateral ramal inclination, and both gonial angles). In group 2, comparison between 2D and 3D showed significant difference in 10 factors. Values included four from anteroposterior cephalometric radiograph measurement values (both maxillary height, both body height) and six from lateral cephalometric radiographs (both ramus length, both lateral ramal inclination, and both gonial angles). Conclusion Information from 2D analysis was inaccurate in several measurements. Therefore, in asymmetry patients, 3D analysis is useful in diagnosis of asymmetry. PMID:24471038

  12. Casting of 3-dimensional footwear prints in snow with foam blocks.

    PubMed

    Petraco, Nicholas; Sherman, Hal; Dumitra, Aurora; Roberts, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    Commercially available foam blocks are presented as an alternative material for the casting and preservation of 3-dimensional footwear impressions located in snow. The method generates highly detailed foam casts of questioned footwear impressions. These casts can be compared to the known outsole standards made from the suspects' footwear. Modification of the commercially available foam casting blocks is simple and fast. The foam block is removed and a piece of cardboard is secured to one side of the block with painter's masking tape. The prepared foam block is then placed back into its original box, marked appropriately, closed and stored until needed. When required the foam block is carefully removed from its storage box and gently placed, foam side down, over the questioned footwear impression. Next, the crime scene technician's hands are placed on top of the cardboard and pressure is gently applied by firmly pressing down onto the impression. The foam cast is removed, dried and placed back into its original container and sealed. The resulting 3D impressions can be directly compared to the outsole of known suspected item(s) of footwear.

  13. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering for fabricating 3-dimensional heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    In addition to stem cell biology, tissue engineering is an essential research field for regenerative medicine. In contrast to cell injection, bioengineered tissue transplantation minimizes cell loss and has the potential to repair tissue defects. A popular approach is scaffold-based tissue engineering, which utilizes a biodegradable polymer scaffold for seeding cells; however, new techniques of cell sheet-based tissue engineering have been developed. Cell sheets are harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes by simply lowering the temperature. Monolayer or stacked cell sheets are transplantable directly onto damaged tissues and cell sheet transplantation has already been clinically applied. Cardiac cell sheet stacking produces pulsatile heart tissue; however, lack of vasculature limits the viable tissue thickness to 3 layers. Multistep transplantation of triple-layer cardiac cell sheets cocultured with endothelial cells has been used to form thick vascularized cardiac tissue in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro functional blood vessel formation within 3-dimensional (3D) tissues has been realized by successfully imitating in vivo conditions. Triple-layer cardiac cell sheets containing endothelial cells were layered on vascular beds and the constructs were media-perfused using novel bioreactor systems. Interestingly, cocultured endothelial cells migrate into the vascular beds and form perfusable blood vessels. An in vitro multistep procedure has also enabled the fabrication of thick, vascularized heart tissues. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering has revealed great potential to fabricate 3D cardiac tissues and should contribute to future treatment of severe heart diseases and human tissue model production.

  14. Scaffold Free Bio-orthogonal Assembly of 3-Dimensional Cardiac Tissue via Cell Surface Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; O’Brien, Paul J.; Elahipanah, Sina; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2016-12-01

    There has been tremendous interest in constructing in vitro cardiac tissue for a range of fundamental studies of cardiac development and disease and as a commercial system to evaluate therapeutic drug discovery prioritization and toxicity. Although there has been progress towards studying 2-dimensional cardiac function in vitro, there remain challenging obstacles to generate rapid and efficient scaffold-free 3-dimensional multiple cell type co-culture cardiac tissue models. Herein, we develop a programmed rapid self-assembly strategy to induce specific and stable cell-cell contacts among multiple cell types found in heart tissue to generate 3D tissues through cell-surface engineering based on liposome delivery and fusion to display bio-orthogonal functional groups from cell membranes. We generate, for the first time, a scaffold free and stable self assembled 3 cell line co-culture 3D cardiac tissue model by assembling cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblast cells via a rapid inter-cell click ligation process. We compare and analyze the function of the 3D cardiac tissue chips with 2D co-culture monolayers by assessing cardiac specific markers, electromechanical cell coupling, beating rates and evaluating drug toxicity.

  15. 3-dimensional (orthogonal) structural complexity of time-series data using low-order moment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Victor J.; O'Neill, Feidhlim T.; Dowling, Denis P.

    2012-09-01

    The recording of atmospheric pressure plasmas (APP) electro-acoustic emission data has been developed as a plasma metrology tool in the last couple of years. The industrial applications include automotive and aerospace industry for surface activation of polymers prior to bonding [1, 2, and 3]. It has been shown that as the APP jets proceeds over a treatment surface, at a various fixed heights, two contrasting acoustic signatures are produced which correspond to two very different plasma-surface entropy states (blow arc ˜ 1700 ± 100 K; and; afterglow ˜ 300-400 K) [4]. The metrology challenge is now to capture deterministic data points within data clusters. For this to be achieved new real-time data cluster measurement techniques needs to be developed [5]. The cluster information must be extracted within the allotted process time period if real-time process control is to be achieved. This abstract describes a theoretical structural complexity analysis (in terms crossing points) of 2 and 3-dimentional line-graphs that contain time-series data. In addition LabVIEW implementation of the 3-dimensional data analysis is performed. It is also shown the cluster analysis technique can be transfer to other (non-acoustic) datasets.

  16. Cellulose acetate based 3-dimensional electrospun scaffolds for skin tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Atila, Deniz; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2015-11-20

    Skin defects that are not able to regenerate by themselves are among the major problems faced. Tissue engineering approach holds promise for treating such defects. Development of tissue-mimicking-scaffolds that can promote healing process receives an increasing interest in recent years. In this study, 3-dimensional electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) pullulan (PULL) scaffolds were developed for the first time. PULL was intentionally used to obtain 3D structures with adjustable height. It was removed from the electrospun mesh to increase the porosity and biostability. Different ratios of the polymers were electrospun and analyzed with respect to degradation, porosity, and mechanical properties. It has been observed that fiber diameter, thickness and porosity of scaffolds increased with increased PULL content, on the other hand this resulted with higher degradation of scaffolds. Mechanical strength of scaffolds was improved after PULL removal suggesting their suitability as cell carriers. Cell culture studies were performed with the selected scaffold group (CA/PULL: 50/50) using mouse fibroblastic cell line (L929). In vitro cell culture tests showed that cells adhered, proliferated and populated CA/PULL (50/50) scaffolds showing that they are cytocompatible. Results suggest that uncrosslinked CA/PULL (50/50) electrospun scaffolds hold potential for skin tissue engineering applications.

  17. Scene-of-crime analysis by a 3-dimensional optical digitizer: a useful perspective for forensic science.

    PubMed

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Cattaneo, Cristina; Trebeschi, Marco; Gibelli, Daniele; Poppa, Pasquale; Porta, Davide; Maldarella, Monica; Picozzi, Massimo

    2011-09-01

    Analysis and detailed registration of the crime scene are of the utmost importance during investigations. However, this phase of activity is often affected by the risk of loss of evidence due to the limits of traditional scene of crime registration methods (ie, photos and videos). This technical note shows the utility of the application of a 3-dimensional optical digitizer on different crime scenes. This study aims in fact at verifying the importance and feasibility of contactless 3-dimensional reconstruction and modeling by optical digitization to achieve an optimal registration of the crime scene.

  18. Long-Life, Lightweight, Multi-Roller Traction Drives for Planetary Vehicle Surface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Richard C.; Fusaro, Robert L.; Dimofte, Florin

    2012-01-01

    NASA s initiative for Lunar and Martian exploration will require long lived, robust drive systems for manned vehicles that must operate in hostile environments. The operation of these mechanical drives will pose a problem because of the existing extreme operating conditions. Some of these extreme conditions include operating at a very high or very cold temperature, operating over a wide range of temperatures, operating in very dusty environments, operating in a very high radiation environment, and operating in possibly corrosive environments. Current drive systems use gears with various configurations of teeth. These gears must be lubricated with oil (or grease) and must have some sort of a lubricant resupply system. For drive systems, oil poses problems such as evaporation, becoming too viscous and eventually freezing at cold temperatures, being too thin to lubricate at high temperatures, being degraded by the radiation environment, being contaminated by the regolith (soil), and if vaporized (and not sealed), it will contaminate the regolith. Thus, it may not be advisable or even possible to use oil because of these limitations. An oil-less, compact traction vehicle drive is a drive designed for use in hostile environments like those that will be encountered on planetary surfaces. Initially, traction roller tests in vacuum were conducted to obtain traction and endurance data needed for designing the drives. From that data, a traction drive was designed that would fit into a prototype lunar rover vehicle, and this design data was used to construct several traction drives. These drives were then tested in air to determine their performance characteristics, and if any final corrections to the designs were necessary. A limitation with current speed reducer systems such as planetary gears and harmonic drives is the high-contact stresses that occur at tooth engagement and in the harmonic drive wave generator interface. These high stresses induce high wear of solid

  19. Efficacy of the technique of piezoelectric corticotomy for orthodontic traction of impacted mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhigui; Xu, Guangzhou; Yang, Chi; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Zhang, Shanyong

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to assess the efficacy of piezoelectric corticotomy for orthodontic traction of mandibular third molars close to the inferior alveolar nerve. Thirty patients with impacted third molars close to the nerve were included in the study, 15 of whom were treated with conventional orthodontic traction and 15 with piezoelectric corticotomy. We recorded duration of treatment including exposure and orthodontic traction, and time to the final extraction. Postoperative complications including trismus, swelling, and pain were also noted. Alveolar bone levels mesial and distal to the second molars were evaluated on cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images. Student's t test was used to assess the significance of differences between the groups. After orthodontic treatments all impacted third molars were successfully removed from the inferior alveolar nerve without neurological damage. The mean (SD) duration of surgical exposure in the piezoelectric corticotomy group was significantly longer than that in the conventional group (p=0.01). The mean (SD) duration of traction was 4 (2.3) months after piezoelectric corticotomy, much shorter than the 7.5 (1.3) months in the conventional group (p=0.03). There were no significant differences in postoperative complications between the groups. There was a significant increase in the distal alveolar height of second molars after treatment in both groups (p<0.01). We conclude that the use of piezoelectric corticotomy allows more efficient and faster traction of third molars with a close relation between the root and the inferior alveolar nerve, although it took longer than the traditional technique.

  20. Naegele Forceps Delivery and Association between Morbidity and the Number of Forceps Traction Applications: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Takenaka, Toshifumi; Ikeda, Nobuyuki; Yazaki, Satoshi; Sato, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To present the method of Naegele forceps delivery clinically practiced by the lead author, its success rate, and morbidity and to evaluate the relationship between morbidity and the number of forceps traction applications. Methods. Naegele forceps delivery was performed when the fetal head reached station +2 cm, the forceps were applied in the maternal pelvic application, and traction was slowly and gently performed. In the past two years, Naegele forceps delivery was attempted by the lead author in 87 cases, which were retrospectively reviewed. Results. The numbers of traction applications were one in 64.7% of cases, two in 24.7%, and three or more in 10.7%. The success rate was 100%. No severe morbidity was observed in mothers or neonates. Neonatal facial injury occurred most commonly in cases with fetal head malrotation, elevated numbers of traction applications, and maternal complications. Umbilical artery acidemia most commonly occurred in cases with nonreassuring fetal status. The significant crude odds ratio for three or more traction applications was 20 in cases with malrotation. Conclusion. Naegele forceps delivery has a high success rate, but multiple traction applications will sometimes be required, particularly in cases with malrotation. Malrotation and elevated numbers of traction applications may lead to neonatal head damage. PMID:26425369

  1. [Tension force in dynamic splints made of neoprene].

    PubMed

    Punsola-Izard, V; Rouzaud, J C; Thomas, D; Lluch; Garcia-Elias

    2001-06-01

    Dynamic splints are the most difficult ortheses to make. Unrestricted finger joint mobility is usually prevented by the size of their components. Ortheses made out of neoprene material have the advantage of being pliable and at the same time can be constructed as dynamic splints. Neoprene material elasticity allows conforming it into a tube that can be fitted over a finger, spreading uniform pressure. A traction slip can be cemented to the neoprene finger tube. With neoprene splints, lever arms are more efficient. Their tubular design applies and spreads traction and countertraction forces in all directions. Neoprene material's elasticity contributes in reducing edema formation as well as distributes forces applied to the finger over a large area. The risk of excessive pressure is the only drawback of an elastic tubular design, it may cause pain and tissue ischemia. A meticulous tailoring prevents this potential risk.

  2. Neuron Biomechanics Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  3. Numerical study of the directed polymer in a 1 + 3 dimensional random medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, C.; Garel, T.

    2006-09-01

    The directed polymer in a 1+3 dimensional random medium is known to present a disorder-induced phase transition. For a polymer of length L, the high temperature phase is characterized by a diffusive behavior for the end-point displacement R2 ˜L and by free-energy fluctuations of order ΔF(L) ˜O(1). The low-temperature phase is characterized by an anomalous wandering exponent R2/L ˜Lω and by free-energy fluctuations of order ΔF(L) ˜Lω where ω˜0.18. In this paper, we first study the scaling behavior of various properties to localize the critical temperature Tc. Our results concerning R2/L and ΔF(L) point towards 0.76 < Tc ≤T2=0.79, so our conclusion is that Tc is equal or very close to the upper bound T2 derived by Derrida and coworkers (T2 corresponds to the temperature above which the ratio bar{Z_L^2}/(bar{Z_L})^2 remains finite as L ↦ ∞). We then present histograms for the free-energy, energy and entropy over disorder samples. For T ≫Tc, the free-energy distribution is found to be Gaussian. For T ≪Tc, the free-energy distribution coincides with the ground state energy distribution, in agreement with the zero-temperature fixed point picture. Moreover the entropy fluctuations are of order ΔS ˜L1/2 and follow a Gaussian distribution, in agreement with the droplet predictions, where the free-energy term ΔF ˜Lω is a near cancellation of energy and entropy contributions of order L1/2.

  4. Development of a 3-dimensional dosimetry system for Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KyoungJun; Kwak, JungWon; Lee, DoHeui; Cho, ByungChul; Lee, SangWook; Ahn, SeungDo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of our study is to develop a new, 3-dimensional dosimetry system to verify the accuracy of dose deliveries in Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGKP) (Elekta, Norcross, GA, USA). The instrument consists of a moving head phantom, an embedded thin active layer and a CCD camera system and was designed to be mounted to LGKP. As an active material concentrically located in the hemispheric head phantom, we choose Gafchromic EBT3 films and Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor sheets for dosimetric measurements. Also, to compensate for the lack of backscatter, we located a 1-cm-thick poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) plate downstream of the active layer. The PMMA plate was transparent to scintillation light to reach the CCD with 1200 × 1200 pixels and a 5.2 µm pitch. With this system, 300 images with a 0.2-mm slice gap were acquired under each of three collimator setups, i.e. 4-mm, 8-mm, and 16-mm, respectively. The 2D projected images taken by the CCD camera were compared with the dose distributions measured by the EBT3 films under the same conditions. All 2D distributions were normalized to the maximum values derived by fitting peaks for each collimator setup. The differences in the full widths at half maximum (FWHM) of 2D profiles between CCD images and film doses were measured to be less than 0.3-mm. The scanning task for all peak regions took less than three minutes with the new instrument. So it can be utilized as a QA tool for the Gamma knife radiosurgery system instead of film dosimetry, the use of which requires much more time and many more resources.

  5. Immediate 3-dimensional ridge augmentation after extraction of periodontally hopeless tooth using chinblock graft

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ankit; Thomas, Raison; A. Baron, Tarunkumar; Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom-Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of immediate ridge augmentation to reconstruct the vertical and horizontal dimensions at extraction sites of periodontally hopeless tooth using an autogenous chin block graft. Material and Methods A total of 11 patients (7 male & 4 female) with localized advanced bone loss around single rooted teeth having hopeless prognosis and indicated for extraction were selected for the study. The teeth were atraumatically extracted and deficient sites were augmented using autogenous chin block graft. Parameters like clinically soft tissue height - width and also radiographic ridge height -width were measured before and 6 months after augmentation. Obtained results were tabulated and analysed statistically. Results After 6 months of immediate ridge augmentation, the mean gain in radiographic vertical height and horizontal width was 7.64 + 1.47 mm (P = 0.005) and 5.28 + 0.46 mm (P = 0.007) respectively which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Mean change of width gain of 0.40mm and height loss of 0.40mm of soft tissue parameters, from the baseline till completion of the study at 6 months was observed. Conclusions The present study showed predictable immediate ridge augmentation with autogenous chin block graft at periodontally compromised extraction site. It can provide adequate hard and soft tissue foundation for perfect 3-Dimensional prosthetic positioning of implant in severely deficient ridges. Key words:Immediate ridge augmentation, periondontally hopeless tooth, autogenous chin graft, dental implant. PMID:26644832

  6. Technique for comprehensive head and neck irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Walter, Alexander S.; Hoene, Ted A.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the technical and logistical complexities of matching photon and proton treatment modalities, we developed and implemented a technique of comprehensive head and neck radiation using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal proton therapy. A monoisocentric technique was used with a 30-cm snout. Cervical lymphatics were treated with 3 fields: a posterior-anterior field with a midline block and a right and a left posterior oblique field. The matchline of the 3 cervical nodal fields with the primary tumor site fields was staggered by 0.5 cm. Comparative intensity-modulated photon plans were later developed for 12 previously treated patients to provide equivalent target coverage, while matching or improving on the proton plans' sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Dosimetry to OARs was evaluated and compared by treatment modality. Comprehensive head and neck irradiation using proton therapy yielded treatment plans with significant dose avoidance of the oral cavity and midline neck structures. When compared with the generated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, the proton treatment plans yielded statistically significant reductions in the mean and integral radiation dose to the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, and the maximally spared parotid gland. There was no significant difference in mean dose to the lesser-spared parotid gland by treatment modality or in mean or integral dose to the spared submandibular glands. A technique for cervical nodal irradiation using 3D conformal proton therapy with uniform scanning was developed and clinically implemented. Use of proton therapy for cervical nodal irradiation resulted in large volume of dose avoidance to the oral cavity and low dose exposure to midline structures of the larynx and the esophagus, with lower mean and integral dose to assessed OARs when compared with competing IMRT plans.

  7. Oxidation behavior of ammonium in a 3-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinjing; Guo, Jinsong; Fang, Fang; Chen, Youpeng; Lei, Lijing; Yang, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Excess nitrogenous compounds are detrimental to natural water systems and to human health. To completely realize autohydrogenotrophic nitrogen removal, a novel 3-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactor was designed. Titanium was electroplated with ruthenium and used as the anode. Activated carbon fiber felt was used as the cathode. The reactor was separated into two chambers by a permeable membrane. The cathode chamber was filled with granular graphite and glass beads. The cathode and cathode chamber were inhabited with domesticated biofilm. In the absence of organic substances, a nitrogen removal efficiency of up to 91% was achieved at DO levels of 3.42 +/- 0.37 mg/L when the applied current density was only 0.02 mA/cm2. The oxidation of ammonium in biofilm-electrode reactors was also investigated. It was found that ammonium could be oxidized not only on the anode but also on particle electrodes in the cathode chamber of the biofilm-electrode reactor. Oxidation rates of ammonium and nitrogen removal efficiency were found to be affected by the electric current loading on the biofilm-electrode reactor. The kinetic model of ammonium at different electric currents was analyzed by a first-order reaction kinetics equation. The regression analysis implied that when the current density was less than 0.02 mA/cm2, ammonium removal was positively correlated to the current density. However, when the current density was more than 0.02 mA/cm2, the electric current became a limiting factor for the oxidation rate of ammonium and nitrogen removal efficiency.

  8. Surgical Classification of the Mandibular Deformity in Craniofacial Microsomia Using 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Jordan W.; Mitchell, Brianne T.; Wink, Jason A.; Taylor, Jesse A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Grading systems of the mandibular deformity in craniofacial microsomia (CFM) based on conventional radiographs have shown low interrater reproducibility among craniofacial surgeons. We sought to design and validate a classification based on 3-dimensional CT (3dCT) that correlates features of the deformity with surgical treatment. Methods: CFM mandibular deformities were classified as normal (T0), mild (hypoplastic, likely treated with orthodontics or orthognathic surgery; T1), moderate (vertically deficient ramus, likely treated with distraction osteogenesis; T2), or severe (ramus rudimentary or absent, with either adequate or inadequate mandibular body bone stock; T3 and T4, likely treated with costochondral graft or free fibular flap, respectively). The 3dCT face scans of CFM patients were randomized and then classified by craniofacial surgeons. Pairwise agreement and Fleiss' κ were used to assess interrater reliability. Results: The 3dCT images of 43 patients with CFM (aged 0.1–15.8 years) were reviewed by 15 craniofacial surgeons, representing an average 15.2 years of experience. Reviewers demonstrated fair interrater reliability with average pairwise agreement of 50.4 ± 9.9% (Fleiss' κ = 0.34). This represents significant improvement over the Pruzansky–Kaban classification (pairwise agreement, 39.2%; P = 0.0033.) Reviewers demonstrated substantial interrater reliability with average pairwise agreement of 83.0 ± 7.6% (κ = 0.64) distinguishing deformities requiring graft or flap reconstruction (T3 and T4) from others. Conclusion: The proposed classification, designed for the era of 3dCT, shows improved consensus with respect to stratifying the severity of mandibular deformity and type of operative management. PMID:27104097

  9. Growth and development in higher plants under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, T.; Yuda, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    Growth and development of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Golden Cross Bantam) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions were intensively studied using a 3-dimensional clinostat as a simulator of weightlessness. Epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were the most oriented toward the direction far from cotyledons. Mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings grew at random and coleoptiles curved slightly during clinostat rotation. Clinostat rotation promoted the emergence of the 3rd internodes in etiolated pea seedlings, while it significantly inhibited the growth of the 1st internodes. In maize seedlings, the growth of coleoptiles was little affected by clinostat rotation, but that of mesocotyls was suppressed, and therefore, the emergence of the leaf out of coleoptile was promoted. Clinostat rotation reduced the osmotic concentration in the 1st internodes of pea seedlings, although it has little effect on the 2nd and the 3rd internodes. Clinostat rotation also reduced the osmotic concentrations in both coleoptiles and mesocotyls of maize seedlings. Cell-wall extensibilities of the 1st and the 3rd internodes of pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were significantly lower and higher as compared with those on 1 g conditions, respectively. Cell-wall extensibility of mesocotyls in seedlings grown on the clinostat also decreased. Changes in cell wall properties seem to be well correlated to the growth of each organ in pea and maize seedlings. These results suggest that the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on earth, and that the growth responses of higher plants to microgravity conditions are regulated by both cell-wall mechanical properties and osmotic properties of stem cells.

  10. SU-E-T-104: Development of 3 Dimensional Dosimetry System for Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, K; Kwak, J; Cho, B; Lee, D; Ahn, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a new 3 dimensional dosimetry system to verify the dosimetric accuracy of Leksell Gamma Knife-Perfexion™ (LGK) (Elekta, Norcross, GA). Methods: We designed and manufactured a lightweight dosimetry instrument to be equipped with the head frame to LGK. It consists of a head phantom, a scintillator, a CCD camera and a step motor. The 10×10 cm2 sheet of Gd2O3;Tb phosphor or Gafchromic EBT3 film was located at the center of the 16 cm diameter hemispherical PMMA, the head phantom. The additional backscatter compensating material of 1 cm thick PMMA plate was placed downstream of the phosphor sheet. The backscatter plate was transparent for scintillation lights to reach the CCD camera with 1200×1200 pixels by 5.2 um pitch. With This equipment, 300 images with 0.2 mm of slice gap were acquired under three collimator setups (4mm, 8mm and 16mm), respectively. The 2D projected doses from 3D distributions were compared with the exposured film dose. Results: As all doses normalized by the maximum dose value in 16 mm setup, the relative differences between the equipment dose and film dose were 0.2% for 4mm collimator and 0.5% for 8mm. The acquisition of 300 images by the equipment took less than 3 minutes. Conclusion: The new equipment was verified to be a good substitute to radiochromic film, with which required more time and resources. Especially, the new methods was considered to provide much convenient and faster solution in the 3D dose acquisition for LGK.

  11. An integrated 3-Dimensional Genome Modeling Engine for data-driven simulation of spatial genome organization.

    PubMed

    Szałaj, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Michalski, Paul; Pietal, Michal J; Luo, Oscar J; Sadowski, Michał; Li, Xingwang; Radew, Kamen; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-12-01

    ChIA-PET is a high-throughput mapping technology that reveals long-range chromatin interactions and provides insights into the basic principles of spatial genome organization and gene regulation mediated by specific protein factors. Recently, we showed that a single ChIA-PET experiment provides information at all genomic scales of interest, from the high-resolution locations of binding sites and enriched chromatin interactions mediated by specific protein factors, to the low resolution of nonenriched interactions that reflect topological neighborhoods of higher-order chromosome folding. This multilevel nature of ChIA-PET data offers an opportunity to use multiscale 3D models to study structural-functional relationships at multiple length scales, but doing so requires a structural modeling platform. Here, we report the development of 3D-GNOME (3-Dimensional Genome Modeling Engine), a complete computational pipeline for 3D simulation using ChIA-PET data. 3D-GNOME consists of three integrated components: a graph-distance-based heat map normalization tool, a 3D modeling platform, and an interactive 3D visualization tool. Using ChIA-PET and Hi-C data derived from human B-lymphocytes, we demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D-GNOME in building 3D genome models at multiple levels, including the entire genome, individual chromosomes, and specific segments at megabase (Mb) and kilobase (kb) resolutions of single average and ensemble structures. Further incorporation of CTCF-motif orientation and high-resolution looping patterns in 3D simulation provided additional reliability of potential biologically plausible topological structures.

  12. Predicting diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Michael G; Yeung, Bertrand Z; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L S

    2014-10-28

    Nanotechnology is widely used in cancer research. Models that predict nanoparticle transport and delivery in tumors (including subcellular compartments) would be useful tools. This study tested the hypothesis that diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional (3D) systems can be predicted based on liposome-cell biointerface parameters (binding, uptake, retention) and liposome diffusivity. Liposomes comprising different amounts of cationic and fusogenic lipids (10-30mol% DOTAP or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, 1-20mol% DOPE or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, +25 to +44mV zeta potential) were studied. We (a) measured liposome-cell biointerface parameters in monolayer cultures, and (b) calculated effective diffusivity based on liposome size and spheroid composition. The resulting parameters were used to simulate the liposome concentration-depth profiles in 3D spheroids. The simulated results agreed with the experimental results for liposomes comprising 10-30mol% DOTAP and ≤10mol% DOPE, but not for liposomes with higher DOPE content. For the latter, model modifications to account for time-dependent extracellular concentration decrease and liposome size increase did not improve the predictions. The difference among low- and high-DOPE liposomes suggests concentration-dependent DOPE properties in 3D systems that were not captured in monolayers. Taken together, our earlier and present studies indicate the diffusive transport of neutral, anionic and cationic nanoparticles (polystyrene beads and liposomes, 20-135nm diameter, -49 to +44mV) in 3D spheroids, with the exception of liposomes comprising >10mol% DOPE, can be predicted based on the nanoparticle-cell biointerface and nanoparticle diffusivity. Applying the model to low-DOPE liposomes showed that changes in surface charge affected the liposome localization in intratumoral subcompartments within spheroids.

  13. Usefulness of 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection FDG PET images for the diagnosis of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jahae; Cho, Sang-Geon; Song, Minchul; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Kwon, Seong Young; Choi, Kang-Ho; Choi, Seong-Min; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Song, Ho-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare diagnostic performance and confidence of a standard visual reading and combined 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) results to discriminate between Alzheimer disease (AD)/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET brain images were obtained from 120 patients (64 AD/MCI, 38 DLB, and 18 FTD) who were clinically confirmed over 2 years follow-up. Three nuclear medicine physicians performed the diagnosis and rated diagnostic confidence twice; once by standard visual methods, and once by adding of 3D-SSP. Diagnostic performance and confidence were compared between the 2 methods. 3D-SSP showed higher sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive, and negative predictive values to discriminate different types of dementia compared with the visual method alone, except for AD/MCI specificity and FTD sensitivity. Correction of misdiagnosis after adding 3D-SSP images was greatest for AD/MCI (56%), followed by DLB (13%) and FTD (11%). Diagnostic confidence also increased in DLB (visual: 3.2; 3D-SSP: 4.1; P < 0.001), followed by AD/MCI (visual: 3.1; 3D-SSP: 3.8; P = 0.002) and FTD (visual: 3.5; 3D-SSP: 4.2; P = 0.022). Overall, 154/360 (43%) cases had a corrected misdiagnosis or improved diagnostic confidence for the correct diagnosis. The addition of 3D-SSP images to visual analysis helped to discriminate different types of dementia in FDG PET scans, by correcting misdiagnoses and enhancing diagnostic confidence in the correct diagnosis. Improvement of diagnostic accuracy and confidence by 3D-SSP images might help to determine the cause of dementia and appropriate treatment. PMID:27930593

  14. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  15. Design of biphasic polymeric 3-dimensional fiber deposited scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Moroni, L; Hendriks, J A A; Schotel, R; de Wijn, J R; van Blitterswijk, C A

    2007-02-01

    This report describes a novel system to create rapid prototyped 3-dimensional (3D) fibrous scaffolds with a shell-core fiber architecture in which the core polymer supplies the mechanical properties and the shell polymer acts as a coating providing the desired physicochemical surface properties. Poly[(ethylene oxide) terephthalate-co-poly(butylene) terephthalate] (PEOT/PBT) 3D fiber deposited (3DF) scaffolds were fabricated and examined for articular cartilage tissue regeneration. The shell polymer contained a higher molecular weight of the initial poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) segments used in the copolymerization and a higher weight percentage of the PEOT domains compared with the core polymer. The 3DF scaffolds entirely produced with the shell or with the core polymers were also considered. After 3 weeks of culture, scaffolds were homogeneously filled with cartilage tissue, as assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Although comparable amounts of entrapped chondrocytes and of extracellular matrix formation were found for all analyzed scaffolds, chondrocytes maintained their rounded shape and aggregated during the culture period on shell-core 3DF scaffolds, suggesting a proper cell differentiation into articular cartilage. This finding was also observed in the 3DF scaffolds fabricated with the shell composition only. In contrast, cells spread and attached on scaffolds made simply with the core polymer, implying a lower degree of differentiation into articular cartilaginous tissue. Furthermore, the shell-core scaffolds displayed an improved dynamic stiffness as a result of a "prestress" action of the shell polymer on the core one. In addition, the dynamic stiffness of the constructs increased compared with the stiffness of the bare scaffolds before culture. These findings suggest that shell-core 3DF PEOT/PBT scaffolds with desired mechanical and surface properties are a promising solution for improved cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. Future directions in 3-dimensional imaging and neurosurgery: stereoscopy and autostereoscopy.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Lauren A; William, Albert; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3-D) stereoscopic imaging have enabled 3-D display technologies in the operating room. We find 2 beneficial applications for the inclusion of 3-D imaging in clinical practice. The first is the real-time 3-D display in the surgical theater, which is useful for the neurosurgeon and observers. In surgery, a 3-D display can include a cutting-edge mixed-mode graphic overlay for image-guided surgery. The second application is to improve the training of residents and observers in neurosurgical techniques. This article documents the requirements of both applications for a 3-D system in the operating room and for clinical neurosurgical training, followed by a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the current and emerging 3-D display technologies. An important comparison between a new autostereoscopic display without glasses and current stereo display with glasses improves our understanding of the best applications for 3-D in neurosurgery. Today's multiview autostereoscopic display has 3 major benefits: It does not require glasses for viewing; it allows multiple views; and it improves the workflow for image-guided surgery registration and overlay tasks because of its depth-rendering format and tools. Two current limitations of the autostereoscopic display are that resolution is reduced and depth can be perceived as too shallow in some cases. Higher-resolution displays will be available soon, and the algorithms for depth inference from stereo can be improved. The stereoscopic and autostereoscopic systems from microscope cameras to displays were compared by the use of recorded and live content from surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of application of autostereoscopy in neurosurgery.

  17. New Stereoacuity Test Using a 3-Dimensional Display System in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghyun; Hong, Keehoon; Lee, Byoungho; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The previously developed 3-dimensional (3D) display stereoacuity tests were validated only at distance. We developed a new stereoacuity test using a 3D display that works both at near and distance and evaluated its validity in children with and without strabismus. Sixty children (age range, 6 to 18 years) with variable ranges of stereoacuity were included. Side-by-side randot images of 4 different simple objects (star, circle, rectangle, and triangle) with a wide range of crossed horizontal disparities (3000 to 20 arcsec) were randomly displayed on a 3D monitor with MATLAB (Matworks, Inc., Natick, MA, USA) and were presented to subjects wearing shutter glasses at 0.5 m and 3 m. The 3D image was located in front of (conventional) or behind (proposed) the background image on the 3D monitor. The results with the new 3D stereotest (conventional and proposed) were compared with those of the near and distance Randot stereotests. At near, the Bland-Altman plots of the conventional and proposed 3D stereotest did not show significant difference, both of which were poorer than the Randot test. At distance, the results of the proposed 3D stereotest were similar to the Randot test, but the conventional 3D stereotest results were better than those of the other two tests. The results of the proposed 3D stereotest and Randot stereotest were identical in 83.3% at near and 88.3% at distance. More than 95% of subjects showed concordance within 2 grades between the 2 tests at both near and distance. In conclusion, the newly proposed 3D stereotest shows good concordance with the Randot stereotests in children with and without strabismus. PMID:25693034

  18. New stereoacuity test using a 3-dimensional display system in children.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Beom; Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Jonghyun; Hong, Keehoon; Lee, Byoungho; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The previously developed 3-dimensional (3D) display stereoacuity tests were validated only at distance. We developed a new stereoacuity test using a 3D display that works both at near and distance and evaluated its validity in children with and without strabismus. Sixty children (age range, 6 to 18 years) with variable ranges of stereoacuity were included. Side-by-side randot images of 4 different simple objects (star, circle, rectangle, and triangle) with a wide range of crossed horizontal disparities (3000 to 20 arcsec) were randomly displayed on a 3D monitor with MATLAB (Matworks, Inc., Natick, MA, USA) and were presented to subjects wearing shutter glasses at 0.5 m and 3 m. The 3D image was located in front of (conventional) or behind (proposed) the background image on the 3D monitor. The results with the new 3D stereotest (conventional and proposed) were compared with those of the near and distance Randot stereotests. At near, the Bland-Altman plots of the conventional and proposed 3D stereotest did not show significant difference, both of which were poorer than the Randot test. At distance, the results of the proposed 3D stereotest were similar to the Randot test, but the conventional 3D stereotest results were better than those of the other two tests. The results of the proposed 3D stereotest and Randot stereotest were identical in 83.3% at near and 88.3% at distance. More than 95% of subjects showed concordance within 2 grades between the 2 tests at both near and distance. In conclusion, the newly proposed 3D stereotest shows good concordance with the Randot stereotests in children with and without strabismus.

  19. Realization of masticatory movement by 3-dimensional simulation of the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Lee, Jae-Gi; Won, Sung-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Cha, Jung-Yul; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Masticatory muscles are closely involved in mastication, pronunciation, and swallowing, and it is therefore important to study the specific functions and dynamics of the mandibular and masticatory muscles. However, the shortness of muscle fibers and the diversity of movement directions make it difficult to study and simplify the dynamics of mastication. The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional (3D) simulation to observe the functions and movements of each of the masticatory muscles and the mandible while chewing. To simulate the masticatory movement, computed tomographic images were taken from a single Korean volunteer (30-year-old man), and skull image data were reconstructed in 3D (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The 3D-reconstructed masticatory muscles were then attached to the 3D skull model. The masticatory movements were animated using Maya (Autodesk, San Rafael, CA) based on the mandibular motion path. During unilateral chewing, the mandible was found to move laterally toward the functional side by contracting the contralateral lateral pterygoid and ipsilateral temporalis muscles. During the initial mouth opening, only hinge movement was observed at the temporomandibular joint. During this period, the entire mandible rotated approximately 13 degrees toward the bicondylar horizontal plane. Continued movement of the mandible to full mouth opening occurred simultaneously with sliding and hinge movements, and the mandible rotated approximately 17 degrees toward the center of the mandibular ramus. The described approach can yield data for use in face animation and other simulation systems and for elucidating the functional components related to contraction and relaxation of muscles during mastication.

  20. Influence of White-Coat Hypertension on Left Ventricular Deformation 2- and 3-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Study.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare; Ivanovic, Branislava; Ilic, Irena; Celic, Vera; Kocijancic, Vesna

    2016-03-01

    We sought to compare left ventricular deformation in subjects with white-coat hypertension to normotensive and sustained hypertensive patients. This cross-sectional study included 139 untreated subjects who underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and completed 2- and 3-dimensional examination. Two-dimensional left ventricular multilayer strain analysis was also performed. White-coat hypertension was diagnosed if clinical blood pressure was elevated and 24-hour blood pressure was normal. Our results showed that left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential strains gradually decreased from normotensive controls across subjects with white-coat hypertension to sustained hypertensive group. Two- and 3-dimensional left ventricular radial strain, as well as 3-dimensional area strain, was not different between groups. Two-dimensional left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential strains of subendocardial and mid-myocardial layers gradually decreased from normotensive control to sustained hypertensive group. Longitudinal and circumferential strains of subepicardial layer did not differ between the observed groups. We concluded that white-coat hypertension significantly affects left ventricular deformation assessed by 2-dimensional traditional strain, multilayer strain, and 3-dimensional strain.

  1. Progression to macula-off tractional retinal detachment after a contralateral intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zlotcavitch, Leonid; Flynn, Harry W; Avery, Robert L; Rachitskaya, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with progression to a macula-off tractional retinal detachment in a fellow eye after a contralateral intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection. A 32-year-old diabetic man noted decreased vision in his left eye 1 week following 25 gauge pars plana vitrectomy, gas tamponade, and intraoperative injection of bevacizumab in his right eye. Left eye visual acuity decreased from 20/80 to 20/200, and macula-off tractional retinal detachment was seen on clinical exam and imaging. Progression of tractional retinal detachment associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in a fellow eye after a contralateral intraoperative intravitreal bevacizumab injection may occur.

  2. Modification of the SHABERTH bearing code to incorporate RP-1 and a discussion of the traction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Claudia M.

    1990-01-01

    Recently developed traction data for Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1), a hydrocarbon fuel of the kerosene family, was used to develop the parameters needed by the bearing code SHABERTH in order to include RP-1 as a lubricant choice. The procedure for inputting data for a new lubricant choice is reviewed, and the theoretical fluid traction model is discussed. Comparisons are made between experimental traction data and those predicted by SHABERTH for RP-1. All data needed to modify SHABERTH for use with RP-1 as a lubricant are specified.

  3. Integrated Cooling System for Induction Motor Traction Drives, CARAT Program Phase Two Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, Charles E.

    2002-12-03

    This Program is directed toward improvements in electric vehicle/hybrid electric vehicle traction systems, and in particular, the development of a low cost, highly efficient, compact traction motor-controller system targeted for high volume automotive use. Because of the complex inter-relationships between the motor and the controller, the combination of motor and controller must be considered as a system in the design and evaluation of overall cost and performance. The induction motor is ideally suited for use as a traction motor because of its basic ruggedness, low cost, and high efficiency. As one can see in Figure 1.1, the induction motor traction drive has been continually evolving through a succession of programs spanning the past fifteen years. VPT marketed an induction motor-based traction drive system, the EV2000, which proved to be a reliable, high performance system that was used in a wide range of vehicles. The EV2000 drives evolved from the Modular Electric Vehicle Program (MEVP) and has been used in vehicles ranging in size from 3,000 lb. autos and utility vans, to 32,000 lb. city transit buses. Vehicles powered by the EV2000 induction motor powertrain have accumulated over 2 million miles of service. The EV2000 induction motor system represents 1993 state-of-the-art technology, and evolved from earlier induction motor programs that drove induction motor speeds up to 15,000 rpm to reduce the motor size and cost. It was recognized that the improvements in power density and motor cost sought in the PNGV program could only be achieved through increases in motor speed. Esson’s Rule for motor power clearly states that the power obtainable from a given motor design is the product of motor speed and volume. In order to meet the CARAT Program objectives, the maximum speed goal of the induction motor designed in this Program was increased from 15,000 rpm to 20,000 rpm while maintaining the efficiency and durability demonstrated by lower speed designs done in

  4. Traction curves for the decohesion of covalent crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2017-01-01

    We study, by first principles, the energy versus separation curves for the cleavage of a family of covalent crystals with the diamond and zincblende structure. We find that there is universality in the curves for different materials which is chemistry independent but specific to the geometry of the particular cleavage plane. Since these curves do not strictly follow the universal binding energy relationship (UBER), we present a derivation of an extension to this relationship that includes non-linear force terms. This extended form of UBER allows for a flexible and practical mathematical description of decohesion curves that can be applied to the quantification of cohesive zone models.

  5. Helical buckling of actin inside filopodia generates traction.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B; Bendix, Poul M

    2015-01-06

    Cells can interact with their surroundings via filopodia, which are membrane protrusions that extend beyond the cell body. Filopodia are essential during dynamic cellular processes like motility, invasion, and cell-cell communication. Filopodia contain cross-linked actin filaments, attached to the surrounding cell membrane via protein linkers such as integrins. These actin filaments are thought to play a pivotal role in force transduction, bending, and rotation. We investigated whether, and how, actin within filopodia is responsible for filopodia dynamics by conducting simultaneous force spectroscopy and confocal imaging of F-actin in membrane protrusions. The actin shaft was observed to periodically undergo helical coiling and rotational motion, which occurred simultaneously with retrograde movement of actin inside the filopodium. The cells were found to retract beads attached to the filopodial tip, and retraction was found to correlate with rotation and coiling of the actin shaft. These results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism by which a cell can use rotation of the filopodial actin shaft to induce coiling and hence axial shortening of the filopodial actin bundle.

  6. Helical buckling of actin inside filopodia generates traction

    PubMed Central

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells can interact with their surroundings via filopodia, which are membrane protrusions that extend beyond the cell body. Filopodia are essential during dynamic cellular processes like motility, invasion, and cell–cell communication. Filopodia contain cross-linked actin filaments, attached to the surrounding cell membrane via protein linkers such as integrins. These actin filaments are thought to play a pivotal role in force transduction, bending, and rotation. We investigated whether, and how, actin within filopodia is responsible for filopodia dynamics by conducting simultaneous force spectroscopy and confocal imaging of F-actin in membrane protrusions. The actin shaft was observed to periodically undergo helical coiling and rotational motion, which occurred simultaneously with retrograde movement of actin inside the filopodium. The cells were found to retract beads attached to the filopodial tip, and retraction was found to correlate with rotation and coiling of the actin shaft. These results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism by which a cell can use rotation of the filopodial actin shaft to induce coiling and hence axial shortening of the filopodial actin bundle. PMID:25535347

  7. Acromiohumeral Distance and 3-Dimensional Scapular Position Change After Overhead Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Maenhout, Annelies; Dhooge, Famke; Van Herzeele, Maarten; Palmans, Tanneke; Cools, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Context: Muscle fatigue due to repetitive and prolonged overhead sports activity is considered an important factor contributing to impingement-related rotator cuff pathologic conditions in overhead athletes. The evidence on scapular and glenohumeral kinematic changes after fatigue is contradicting and prohibits conclusions about how shoulder muscle fatigue affects acromiohumeral distance. Objective: To investigate the effect of a fatigue protocol resembling overhead sports activity on acromiohumeral distance and 3-dimensional scapular position in overhead athletes. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Institutional laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 29 healthy recreational overhead athletes (14 men, 15 women; age = 22.23 ± 2.82 years, height = 178.3 ± 7.8 cm, mass = 71.6 ± 9.5 kg). Intervention(s) The athletes were tested before and after a shoulder muscle-fatiguing protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s) Acromiohumeral distance was measured using ultrasound, and scapular position was determined with an electromagnetic motion-tracking system. Both measurements were performed at 3 elevation positions (0°, 45°, and 60° of abduction). We used a 3-factor mixed model for data analysis. Results: After fatigue, the acromiohumeral distance increased when the upper extremity was actively positioned at 45° (Δ = 0.78 ± 0.24 mm, P = .002) or 60° (Δ = 0.58 ± 0.23 mm, P = .02) of abduction. Scapular position changed after fatigue to a more externally rotated position at 45° (Δ = 4.97° ± 1.13°, P < .001) and 60° (Δ = 4.61° ± 1.90°, P = .001) of abduction, a more upwardly rotated position at 45° (Δ = 6.10° ± 1.30°, P < .001) and 60° (Δ = 7.20° ± 1.65°, P < .001) of abduction, and a more posteriorly tilted position at 0°, 45°, and 60° of abduction (Δ = 1.98° ± 0.41°, P < .001). Conclusions: After a fatiguing protocol, we found changes in acromiohumeral distance and scapular position that corresponded with an impingement

  8. New Technique for Developing a Proton Range Compensator With Use of a 3-Dimensional Printer

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Sang Gyu; Kim, Min Kyu; Hong, Chae-Seon; Kim, Jin Sung; Han, Youngyih; Choi, Doo Ho; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: A new system for manufacturing a proton range compensator (RC) was developed by using a 3-dimensional printer (3DP). The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of the new RC manufactured by 3DP (RC{sub 3}DP) were compared with those of a conventional RC (RC{sub C}MM) manufactured by a computerized milling machine (CMM). Methods and Materials: An RC for brain tumor treatment with a scattered proton beam was calculated with a treatment planning system, and the resulting data were converted into a new format for 3DP using in-house software. The RC{sub 3}DP was printed with ultraviolet curable acrylic plastic, and an RC{sub C}MM was milled into polymethylmethacrylate using a CMM. The inner shape of both RCs was scanned by using a 3D scanner and compared with TPS data by applying composite analysis (CA; with 1-mm depth difference and 1 mm distance-to-agreement criteria) to verify their geometric accuracy. The position and distal penumbra of distal dose falloff at the central axis and field width of the dose profile at the midline depth of spread-out Bragg peak were measured for the 2 RCs to evaluate their dosimetric characteristics. Both RCs were imaged on a computed tomography scanner to evaluate uniformity of internal density. The manufacturing times for both RCs were compared to evaluate the production efficiency. Results: The pass rates for the CA test were 99.5% and 92.5% for RC{sub 3}DP and RC{sub C}MM, respectively. There was no significant difference in dosimetric characteristics and uniformity of internal density between the 2 RCs. The net fabrication times of RC{sub 3}DP and RC{sub C}MM were about 18 and 3 hours, respectively. Conclusions: The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of RC{sub 3}DP were comparable with those of the conventional RC{sub C}MM, and significant system minimization was provided.

  9. 3-Dimensional Marine CSEM Modeling by Employing TDFEM with Parallel Solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, parallel fulfillment is developed for forward modeling of the 3-Dimensional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) by using time-domain finite element method (TDFEM). Recently, a greater attention rises on research of hydrocarbon (HC) reservoir detection mechanism in the seabed. Since China has vast ocean resources, seeking hydrocarbon reservoirs become significant in the national economy. However, traditional methods of seismic exploration shown a crucial obstacle to detect hydrocarbon reservoirs in the seabed with a complex structure, due to relatively high acquisition costs and high-risking exploration. In addition, the development of EM simulations typically requires both a deep knowledge of the computational electromagnetics (CEM) and a proper use of sophisticated techniques and tools from computer science. However, the complexity of large-scale EM simulations often requires large memory because of a large amount of data, or solution time to address problems concerning matrix solvers, function transforms, optimization, etc. The objective of this paper is to present parallelized implementation of the time-domain finite element method for analysis of three-dimensional (3D) marine controlled source electromagnetic problems. Firstly, we established a three-dimensional basic background model according to the seismic data, then electromagnetic simulation of marine CSEM was carried out by using time-domain finite element method, which works on a MPI (Message Passing Interface) platform with exact orientation to allow fast detecting of hydrocarbons targets in ocean environment. To speed up the calculation process, SuperLU of an MPI (Message Passing Interface) version called SuperLU_DIST is employed in this approach. Regarding the representation of three-dimension seabed terrain with sense of reality, the region is discretized into an unstructured mesh rather than a uniform one in order to reduce the number of unknowns. Moreover, high-order Whitney

  10. Development of automatic body condition scoring using a low-cost 3-dimensional Kinect camera.

    PubMed

    Spoliansky, Roii; Edan, Yael; Parmet, Yisrael; Halachmi, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    Body condition scoring (BCS) is a farm-management tool for estimating dairy cows' energy reserves. Today, BCS is performed manually by experts. This paper presents a 3-dimensional algorithm that provides a topographical understanding of the cow's body to estimate BCS. An automatic BCS system consisting of a Kinect camera (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) triggered by a passive infrared motion detector was designed and implemented. Image processing and regression algorithms were developed and included the following steps: (1) image restoration, the removal of noise; (2) object recognition and separation, identification and separation of the cows; (3) movie and image selection, selection of movies and frames that include the relevant data; (4) image rotation, alignment of the cow parallel to the x-axis; and (5) image cropping and normalization, removal of irrelevant data, setting the image size to 150×200 pixels, and normalizing image values. All steps were performed automatically, including image selection and classification. Fourteen individual features per cow, derived from the cows' topography, were automatically extracted from the movies and from the farm's herd-management records. These features appear to be measurable in a commercial farm. Manual BCS was performed by a trained expert and compared with the output of the training set. A regression model was developed, correlating the features with the manual BCS references. Data were acquired for 4 d, resulting in a database of 422 movies of 101 cows. Movies containing cows' back ends were automatically selected (389 movies). The data were divided into a training set of 81 cows and a test set of 20 cows; both sets included the identical full range of BCS classes. Accuracy tests gave a mean absolute error of 0.26, median absolute error of 0.19, and coefficient of determination of 0.75, with 100% correct classification within 1 step and 91% correct classification within a half step for BCS classes. Results indicated

  11. Novel Multicompartment 3-Dimensional Radiochromic Radiation Dosimeters for Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiation Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Alqathami, Mamdooh; Blencowe, Anton; Yeo, Un Jin; Doran, Simon J.; Qiao, Greg; Geso, Moshi

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (AuNps), because of their high atomic number (Z), have been demonstrated to absorb low-energy X-rays preferentially, compared with tissue, and may be used to achieve localized radiation dose enhancement in tumors. The purpose of this study is to introduce the first example of a novel multicompartment radiochromic radiation dosimeter and to demonstrate its applicability for 3-dimensional (3D) dosimetry of nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A novel multicompartment phantom radiochromic dosimeter was developed. It was designed and formulated to mimic a tumor loaded with AuNps (50 nm in diameter) at a concentration of 0.5 mM, surrounded by normal tissues. The novel dosimeter is referred to as the Sensitivity Modulated Advanced Radiation Therapy (SMART) dosimeter. The dosimeters were irradiated with 100-kV and 6-MV X-ray energies. Dose enhancement produced from the interaction of X-rays with AuNps was calculated using spectrophotometric and cone-beam optical computed tomography scanning by quantitatively comparing the change in optical density and 3D datasets of the dosimetric measurements between the tissue-equivalent (TE) and TE/AuNps compartments. The interbatch and intrabatch variability and the postresponse stability of the dosimeters with AuNps were also assessed. Results: Radiation dose enhancement factors of 1.77 and 1.11 were obtained using 100-kV and 6-MV X-ray energies, respectively. The results of this study are in good agreement with previous observations; however, for the first time we provide direct experimental confirmation and 3D visualization of the radiosensitization effect of AuNps. The dosimeters with AuNps showed small (<3.5%) interbatch variability and negligible (<0.5%) intrabatch variability. Conclusions: The SMART dosimeter yields experimental insights concerning the spatial distributions and elevated dose in nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy, which cannot be performed using any of

  12. Human embryonic growth and development of the cerebellum using 3-dimensional ultrasound and virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Rousian, M; Groenenberg, I A L; Hop, W C; Koning, A H J; van der Spek, P J; Exalto, N; Steegers, E A P

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the first trimester cerebellar growth and development using 2 different measuring techniques: 3-dimensional (3D) and virtual reality (VR) ultrasound visualization. The cerebellum measurements were related to gestational age (GA) and crown-rump length (CRL). Finally, the reproducibility of both the methods was tested. In a prospective cohort study, we collected 630 first trimester, serially obtained, 3D ultrasound scans of 112 uncomplicated pregnancies between 7 + 0 and 12 + 6 weeks of GA. Only scans with high-quality images of the fossa posterior were selected for the analysis. Measurements were performed offline in the coronal plane using 3D (4D view) and VR (V-Scope) software. The VR enables the observer to use all available dimensions in a data set by visualizing the volume as a "hologram." Total cerebellar diameter, left, and right hemispheric diameter, and thickness were measured using both the techniques. All measurements were performed 3 times and means were used in repeated measurements analysis. After exclusion criteria were applied 177 (28%) 3D data sets were available for further analysis. The median GA was 10 + 0 weeks and the median CRL was 31.4 mm (range: 5.2-79.0 mm). The cerebellar parameters could be measured from 7 gestational weeks onward. The total cerebellar diameter increased from 2.2 mm at 7 weeks of GA to 13.9 mm at 12 weeks of GA using VR and from 2.2 to 13.8 mm using 3D ultrasound. The reproducibility, established in a subset of 35 data sets, resulted in intraclass correlation coefficient values ≥0.98. It can be concluded that cerebellar measurements performed by the 2 methods proved to be reproducible and comparable with each other. However, VR-using all three dimensions-provides a superior method for the visualization of the cerebellum. The constructed reference values can be used to study normal and abnormal cerebellar growth and development.

  13. First Results from a Forward, 3-Dimensional Regional Model of a Transpressional San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Miller, S. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a 3-dimensional fault interaction model, with the fault system specified by the geometry and tectonics of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system. We use the forward model for earthquake generation on interacting faults of Fitzenz and Miller [2001] that incorporates the analytical solutions of Okada [85,92], GPS-constrained tectonic loading, creep compaction and frictional dilatancy [Sleep and Blanpied, 1994, Sleep, 1995], and undrained poro-elasticity. The model fault system is centered at the Big Bend, and includes three large strike-slip faults (each discretized into multiple subfaults); 1) a 300km, right-lateral segment of the SAF to the North, 2) a 200km-long left-lateral segment of the Garlock fault to the East, and 3) a 100km-long right-lateral segment of the SAF to the South. In the initial configuration, three shallow-dipping faults are also included that correspond to the thrust belt sub-parallel to the SAF. Tectonic loading is decomposed into basal shear drag parallel to the plate boundary with a 35mm yr-1 plate velocity, and East-West compression approximated by a vertical dislocation surface applied at the far-field boundary resulting in fault-normal compression rates in the model space about 4mm yr-1. Our aim is to study the long-term seismicity characteristics, tectonic evolution, and fault interaction of this system. We find that overpressured faults through creep compaction are a necessary consequence of the tectonic loading, specifically where high normal stress acts on long straight fault segments. The optimal orientation of thrust faults is a function of the strike-slip behavior, and therefore results in a complex stress state in the elastic body. This stress state is then used to generate new fault surfaces, and preliminary results of dynamically generated faults will also be presented. Our long-term aim is to target measurable properties in or around fault zones, (e.g. pore pressures, hydrofractures, seismicity

  14. Concept for a Differential Lock and Traction Control Model in Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukul, A. K.; Hansra, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The automobile is a complex integration of electronics and mechanical components. One of the major components is the differential which is limited due to its shortcomings. The paper proposes a concept of a cost effective differential lock and traction for passenger cars to sports utility vehicles alike, employing a parallel braking mechanism coming into action based on the relative speeds of the wheels driven by the differential. The paper highlights the employment of minimum number of components unlike the already existing systems. The system was designed numerically for the traction control and differential lock for the world's cheapest car. The paper manages to come up with all the system parameters and component costing making it a cost effective system.

  15. Basilar impression in osteogenesis imperfecta: can it be treated with halo traction and posterior fusion?

    PubMed

    Noske, D P; van Royen, B J; Bron, J L; Vandertop, W P

    2006-12-01

    Basilar impression (BI) and hydrocephalus complicating osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually treated by anterior transoral decompression and posterior fixation. Nevertheless, it may be questioned if posterior fusion following axial halo traction is adequate in patients with symptomatic BI complicating OI. We report on a case with progressive symptomatic hydrocephalus and BI complicating OI that was successfully treated by halo traction followed by posterior occipitocervical fusion. However, after a symptom free interval of 2 years the patient suffered from recurrence of symptomatic hydrocephalus needing additional ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement. In conclusion, posterior fusion without additional VP shunt placement may not be effective in the long term for ameliorating symptoms and signs and halting progressive hydrocephalus in BI complicating OI.

  16. Fatigue life analysis for traction drives with application to a toroidal type geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1976-01-01

    A contact fatigue life analysis for traction drives was developed which was based on a modified Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The analysis was used to predict life for a cone-roller toroidal traction drive. A 90-percent probability of survival was assumed for the calculated life. Parametric results were presented for life and Hertz contact stress as a function of load, drive ratio, and size. A design study was also performed. The results were compared to previously published work for the dual cavity toroidal drive as applied to a typical compact passenger vehicle drive train. For a representative duty cycle condition wherein the engine delivers 29 horsepower at 2000 rpm with the vehicle moving at 48.3 km/hr (30 mph) the drive life was calculated to be 19,200 km (11 900 miles).

  17. Laboratory testing of chloride 3ET205 6 volt traction battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, J.E.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the testing performed on the Chloride 3ET205 6 volt traction batery by the INEL Battery Laboratory, to present the results and conclusions of this testing, and to make appropriate recommendations. The Chloride 3ET205 is a tubular plate lead-acid battery made in England by the Chloride Battery Company and imported into the US. The traction battery division of Chloride has been sold, although Chloride assured its customers that the 3ET205 would continue to be available for their consumption. The new owners of the factory are Tudor and Fulman of France. The joint venture company name is C. E. Ac. It is our understanding that all orders are to be sent to the factory at Salford Rd., Bolton, Lancashire, England BL5 1DD. 5 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Treatment of singultus by traction on the tongue: an eponym revised.

    PubMed

    Petroianu, Georg A

    2013-01-01

    Sir William Osler (1849-1919) is associated with a long list of contributions and eponymous entities including filaria, maneuvers, nodules, syndromes, and triads. Among the less known ones is the Oslerian pulling of the tongue for termination of obstinate hiccup (singultus). Janet Travell (1901-1977) , physician to two United States presidents, attributed the tongue-pulling maneuver to Osler. Dr. Travell cites Osler's Principles and Practice of Medicine from 1912, where mention of the remedy can be found. The therapy, however, is much older and (perhaps not surprisingly) of French origin. It can be viewed as a spin-off of attempts by Jean Laborde (1830-1903) to resuscitate the "presque morts" (almost dead) via rhythmic traction of the tongue. Lesser known physicians involved in the treatment of singultus by traction of the tongue are Jean Viaud (1862-1946) and Raphaël Lépine (1840-1919).

  19. Effect of positive pulse charge waveforms on the energy efficiency of lead-acid traction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of four different charge methods on the energy conversion efficiency of 300 ampere hour lead acid traction cells were investigated. Three of the methods were positive pulse charge waveforms; the fourth, a constant current method, was used as a baseline of comparison. The positive pulse charge waveforms were: 120 Hz full wave rectified sinusoidal; 120 Hz silicon controlled rectified; and 1 kHz square wave. The constant current charger was set at the time average pulse current of each pulse waveform, which was 150 amps. The energy efficiency does not include charger losses. The lead acid traction cells were charged to 70 percent of rated ampere hour capacity in each case. The results of charging the cells using the three different pulse charge waveforms indicate there was no significant difference in energy conversion efficiency when compared to constant current charging at the time average pulse current value.

  20. Transversely sectioned biopsies in the diagnosis of end-stage traction alopecia.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jeff C; Mirmirani, Paradi

    2013-04-15

    The pathogenesis of scarring alopecia in African American women remains poorly understood. Furthermore, the overlapping clinical and histological features present diagnostic challenges. The diagnosis of end stage traction alopecia secondary to traumatic hair styling practices can sometimes present particular challenges. We present a young African American woman with a scarring alopecia. As we describe, a scalp biopsy processed by transverse sections enabled rapid diagnosis and presented advantages over a biopsy processed with vertical sections.

  1. A study of various synthetic routes to produce a halogen-labeled traction fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Zimmer, H.

    1978-01-01

    Several synthetic routes were studied for the synthesis of the compound 1, 1, 3-trimethyl-1, 3-dicyclohexyl-2 chloropropane. This halogen-labeled fluid would be of use in the study of high traction lubricants under elastohydrodynamic lubrication conditions using infrared emission spectroscopy. The synthetic routes included: dimerization of alpha-methylstyrene, methanol addition to alpha-methylstyrene, a Wittig reaction, and an organometallic approach. Because of steric hindrance and competing reactions, none of these routes were successful.

  2. A Conforming Multigrid Method for the Pure Traction Problem of Linear Elasticity: Mixed Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chang-Ock

    1996-01-01

    A multigrid method using conforming P-1 finite element is developed for the two-dimensional pure traction boundary value problem of linear elasticity. The convergence is uniform even as the material becomes nearly incompressible. A heuristic argument for acceleration of the multigrid method is discussed as well. Numerical results with and without this acceleration as well as performance estimates on a parallel computer are included.

  3. Estimation of Nasal Tip Support Using Computer-Aided Design and 3-Dimensional Printed Models

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Eric; Maducdoc, Marlon; Manuel, Cyrus; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Palpation of the nasal tip is an essential component of the preoperative rhinoplasty examination. Measuring tip support is challenging, and the forces that correspond to ideal tip support are unknown. OBJECTIVE To identify the integrated reaction force and the minimum and ideal mechanical properties associated with nasal tip support. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three-dimensional (3-D) printed anatomic silicone nasal models were created using a computed tomographic scan and computer-aided design software. From this model, 3-D printing and casting methods were used to create 5 anatomically correct nasal models of varying constitutive Young moduli (0.042, 0.086, 0.098, 0.252, and 0.302 MPa) from silicone. Thirty rhinoplasty surgeons who attended a regional rhinoplasty course evaluated the reaction force (nasal tip recoil) of each model by palpation and selected the model that satisfied their requirements for minimum and ideal tip support. Data were collected from May 3 to 4, 2014. RESULTS Of the 30 respondents, 4 surgeons had been in practice for 1 to 5 years; 9 surgeons, 6 to 15 years; 7 surgeons, 16 to 25 years; and 10 surgeons, 26 or more years. Seventeen surgeons considered themselves in the advanced to expert skill competency levels. Logistic regression estimated the minimum threshold for the Young moduli for adequate and ideal tip support to be 0.096 and 0.154 MPa, respectively. Logistic regression estimated the thresholds for the reaction force associated with the absolute minimum and ideal requirements for good tip recoil to be 0.26 to 4.74 N and 0.37 to 7.19 N during 1- to 8-mm displacement, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study presents a method to estimate clinically relevant nasal tip reaction forces, which serve as a proxy for nasal tip support. This information will become increasingly important in computational modeling of nasal tip mechanics and ultimately will enhance surgical planning for rhinoplasty. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

  4. Case studies on local orthodontic traction by minis-implants before implant rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei; Xu, Wei-Feng; Ma, Zhi-Gui; Zhang, Shan-Yong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Dentition defect with malocclusion is a common occurrence in the clinical work. To restore proper occlusion, preprosthetic corrections of these malposed teeth are often indispensible. The use of orthodontic mini-implants as temporary anchorage devices provides a plausible treatment for those patients with local problems. The aim of this study was to present two cases using local orthodontic traction in conjunction with mini-implants to provide necessary conditions for implant rehabilitation in three dimensional space. Clinical consideration: Two cases who had dentition defect with malocclusion were included in the present study. As both of them rejected crown reduction or orthodontics treatment, local orthodontic traction by mini-implants was used to restore normal space for implant rehabilitation in three dimensions. Careful mechanics analysis and personalized mechanical device were under consideration. The results showed that the biological responses of the corrected teeth and the surrounding bony structures appeared normal and acceptable. Moreover the patients achieved an ideal local occlusion with a short treatment time. Conclusion: In conclusion local orthodontic traction by mini-implants was a less-invasive and short-term method with favorable effects and less necessary occlusal adjustments. PMID:26221389

  5. Evaluation of Surgical Strategy Based on the Intraoperative Superior Oblique Tendon Traction Test

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Miwa; Suzuki, Hiroko; Hikoya, Akiko; Sawada, Mayu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Sato, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To clarify the efficacy of a surgical strategy based on the superior oblique tendon traction test. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed between January 2002 and June 2015. During that period, a single inferior oblique muscle (IO) myectomy and a combined IO myectomy and superior oblique muscle (SO) tuck procedure were performed based on SO tendon looseness as revealed by a traction test. The surgical effects of both procedures and the number of operations were analyzed. Results Sixty-five cases were retrieved. Seventy-four surgeries were required. The IO myectomy and simultaneous groups included 48 and 17 cases, respectively. Pre-operative vertical deviation was significantly lower in the IO myectomy (11.8 prism diopters) than in the simultaneous (27.2 prism diopters; Mann–Whitney U-test, P < 0.001) group. The mean induced changes were 9.4 prism diopters and 21.6 prism diopters in the IO myectomy and simultaneous groups, respectively, and the postoperative vertical deviation was not significantly different. On average, 1.13 and 1.18 surgeries per patient were performed in the IO myectomy and simultaneous groups, respectively. Conclusion The simultaneous surgery of inferior oblique myectomy and superior oblique tuck is safe and effective for treating large angle of congenital/idiopathic superior oblique palsy with a lax superior oblique tendon, as determined by the traction test. PMID:27992486

  6. Simultaneous application of fibrous piezoresistive sensors for compression and traction detection in glass laminate composites.

    PubMed

    Nauman, Saad; Cristian, Irina; Koncar, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes further development of a novel Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) approach described in one of our previous papers. Here these sensors have been used for the first time as a Piecewise Continuous System (PCS), which means that they are not only capable of following the deformation pattern but can also detect distinctive fracture events. In order to characterize the simultaneous compression and traction response of these sensors, multilayer glass laminate composite samples were prepared for 3-point bending tests. The laminate sample consisted of five layers of plain woven glass fabrics placed one over another. The sensors were placed at two strategic locations during the lay-up process so as to follow traction and compression separately. The reinforcements were then impregnated in epoxy resin and later subjected to 3-point bending tests. An appropriate data treatment and recording device has also been developed and used for simultaneous data acquisition from the two sensors. The results obtained, under standard testing conditions have shown that our textile fibrous sensors can not only be used for simultaneous detection of compression and traction in composite parts for on-line structural health monitoring but their sensitivity and carefully chosen location inside the composite ensures that each fracture event is indicated in real time by the output signal of the sensor.

  7. Degradation-mediated cellular traction directs stem cell fate in covalently crosslinked three-dimensional hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetan, Sudhir; Guvendiren, Murat; Legant, Wesley R.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-05-01

    Although cell-matrix adhesive interactions are known to regulate stem cell differentiation, the underlying mechanisms, in particular for direct three-dimensional encapsulation within hydrogels, are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that in covalently crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is directed by the generation of degradation-mediated cellular traction, independently of cell morphology or matrix mechanics. hMSCs within HA hydrogels of equivalent elastic moduli that permit (restrict) cell-mediated degradation exhibited high (low) degrees of cell spreading and high (low) tractions, and favoured osteogenesis (adipogenesis). Moreover, switching the permissive hydrogel to a restrictive state through delayed secondary crosslinking reduced further hydrogel degradation, suppressed traction, and caused a switch from osteogenesis to adipogenesis in the absence of changes to the extended cellular morphology. Furthermore, inhibiting tension-mediated signalling in the permissive environment mirrored the effects of delayed secondary crosslinking, whereas upregulating tension induced osteogenesis even in the restrictive environment.

  8. Height increase, neuromuscular function, and back pain during 6 degrees head-down tilt with traction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J. R.; Ballard, R. E.; Fechner, K.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal lengthening and back pain are commonly experienced by astronauts exposed to microgravity. METHODS: To develop a ground-based simulation for spinal adaptation to microgravity, we investigated height increase, neuromuscular function and back pain in 6 subjects all of whom underwent two forms of bed rest for 3 d. One form consisted of 6 degrees of head-down tilt (HDT) with balanced traction, while the other was horizontal bed rest (HBR). Subjects had a 2-week recovery period in between the studies. RESULTS: Total body and spinal length increased significantly more and the subjects had significantly more back pain during HDT with balanced traction compared to HBR. The distance between the lower endplate of L4 and upper endplate of S1, as measured by ultrasonography, increased significantly in both treatments to the same degree. Intramuscular pressures in the erector spinae muscles and ankle torque measurements during plantarflexion and dorsiflexion did not change significantly during either treatment. CONCLUSION: Compared to HBR, HDT with balanced traction may be a better method to simulate changes of total body and spinal lengths, as well as back pain seen in microgravity.

  9. The wall traction induced by flowing red blood cells in model microvessels and its potential mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan; Vermot, Julien

    2013-11-01

    There is evidence in early embryonic development, even well before advective oxygen transport is important, that the presence of red bloods cells per se trigger essential steps of normal vascular development. For example, showed that sequestration of blood cells early in the development of a mouse, such that the hematocrit is reduced, suppresses normal vascular network development. Vascular development also provides a model for remodeling and angiogenesis. We consider the transient stresses associated with blood cells flowing in model microvessels of comparable diameter to those at early stages of development (6 μm to 12 μm). A detailed simulation tool is used to show that passing blood cells present a significant fluctuating traction signature on the vessel wall, well above the mean stresses. This is particularly pronounced for slow flows (<= 50 μm/s) or small diameters (<= 7 μm), for which root-mean-square wall traction fluctuations can exceed their mean. These events potentially present mechanotranduction triggers that direct development or remodeling. Attenuation of such fluctuating tractions by a viscoelastic endothelial glycocalyx layer is also considered. NSF supported.

  10. Simultaneous Application of Fibrous Piezoresistive Sensors for Compression and Traction Detection in Glass Laminate Composites

    PubMed Central

    Nauman, Saad; Cristian, Irina; Koncar, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes further development of a novel Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) approach described in one of our previous papers. Here these sensors have been used for the first time as a Piecewise Continuous System (PCS), which means that they are not only capable of following the deformation pattern but can also detect distinctive fracture events. In order to characterize the simultaneous compression and traction response of these sensors, multilayer glass laminate composite samples were prepared for 3-point bending tests. The laminate sample consisted of five layers of plain woven glass fabrics placed one over another. The sensors were placed at two strategic locations during the lay-up process so as to follow traction and compression separately. The reinforcements were then impregnated in epoxy resin and later subjected to 3-point bending tests. An appropriate data treatment and recording device has also been developed and used for simultaneous data acquisition from the two sensors. The results obtained, under standard testing conditions have shown that our textile fibrous sensors can not only be used for simultaneous detection of compression and traction in composite parts for on-line structural health monitoring but their sensitivity and carefully chosen location inside the composite ensures that each fracture event is indicated in real time by the output signal of the sensor. PMID:22163707

  11. Use of 3-dimensional computed tomography to detect a barium-masked fish bone causing esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Tsukiyama, Atsushi; Tagami, Takashi; Kim, Shiei; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating esophageal foreign bodies and detecting perforation. However, when evaluation is difficult owing to the previous use of barium as a contrast medium, 3-dimensional CT may facilitate accurate diagnosis. A 49-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of esophageal perforation. Because barium had been used as a contrast medium for an esophagram performed at a previous hospital, horizontal CT and esophageal endoscopy could not be able to identify the foreign body or characterize the lesion. However, 3-dimensional CT clearly revealed an L-shaped foreign body and its anatomical relationships in the mediastinum. Accordingly, we removed the foreign body using an upper gastrointestinal endoscope. The foreign body was the premaxillary bone of a sea bream. The patient was discharged without complications.

  12. Editorial Commentary: Single-Image Slice Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessments Do Not Predict 3-Dimensional Muscle Volume.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-01-01

    No single-image magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment-Goutallier classification, Fuchs classification, or cross-sectional area-is predictive of whole-muscle volume or fatty atrophy of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus. Rather, 3-dimensional MRI measurement of whole-muscle volume and fat-free muscle volume is required and is associated with shoulder strength, which is clinically relevant. Three-dimensional MRI may represent a new gold standard for assessment of the rotator cuff musculature using imaging and may help to predict the feasibility of repair of a rotator cuff tear as well as the postoperative outcome. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional MRI assessment of muscle volume is labor intensive and is not widely available for clinical use.

  13. Preliminary 3-Dimensional Geologic Map of the Santa Rosa Plain, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, C. A.; McPhee, D. K.; Valin, Z. C.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Jachens, R. C.; Langenheim, V. E.; Wentworth, C. M.

    2004-12-01

    We have constructed a preliminary 3-dimensional geologic map of the Santa Rosa Plain as a tool to address earthquake hazard and groundwater issues. The map allows integration of diverse datasets to produce a stratigraphic and structural architecture for the region. This framework can then be used to predict pathways of ground water flow and potential areas of enhanced or focused seismic shaking beneath the Santa Rosa Plain. The 3D map also allows us to identify relations which will require further refinement to develop a coherent 3D image of the crust. The 3D map, built using EarthVision 3D geologic mapping software, consists of three bounding components: fault surfaces, stratigraphic surfaces, and a basement upper surface. Fault surfaces are derived from geologic mapping, subsurface projection of fault dips from the surface geology and earthquake hypocenters. Stratigraphic surfaces are derived from the mapped geology, a digital elevation model and stratigraphic information from wells. A basement surface, predominantly composed of Mesozoic rocks of the Franciscan Complex, the mafic Coast Range Ophiolite and strata of the Great Valley Sequence, is derived from inversion of regional gravity measurements and constrained by well data. The preliminary 3D map of the Santa Rosa Plain area highlights two large basins (>2 km deep): the Windsor and Cotati basins. These basins are divided by a structural high associated with the W-NW-trending, NE-dipping Trenton thrust fault. The Cotati basin is further subdivided by a deeper basement ridge subparallel to the Trenton fault, which separates the basin beneath Cotati from the basin of Petaluma Valley to the southeast. Neither of the basement ridges breaks the surface, yet faults associated with the ridges could displace or truncate aquifers, provide channelways for groundwater flow between aquifers, or create zones of impermeability that disrupt the vertical and lateral continuity of groundwater flow. The complex configuration

  14. Diagnosis of mitral valve cleft using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aiyun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Pan

    2017-01-01

    Background Mitral valve cleft (MVC) is the most common cause of congenital mitral insufficiency, and MVC may occur alone or in association with other congenital heart lesions. Direct suture and valvuloplasty are the major and effective treatments for mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by MVC. Therefore, it is important to determine the location and magnitude of the pathological damage due to MVC when selecting a surgical procedure for treatment. This study explored the application value of transthoracic real-time 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography (RT-3DE) in the diagnosis of MVC. Methods From October 2012 to June 2016, 19 consecutive patients with MVC diagnosed by 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography in our hospital were selected for this study. Full-volume RT-3DE was performed on all patients. The 3D-imaging data were cropped and rotated in 3 views (horizontal, sagittal, and coronal) with 6 directions to observe the position and shape of the MVC and the spatial position between the cleft and its surrounding structures. The maximum longitudinal diameter and the maximum width of the cleft were measured. The origin of the mitral regurgitant jet and the severity of MR were evaluated, and these RT-3DE data were compared with the intraoperative findings. Results Of the 19 patients studied, 4 patients had isolated cleft mitral valve, and cleft mitral valves combined with other congenital heart lesions were detected in 15 patients. The clefts of 6 patients were located in the A2 segment, the clefts of 4 patients were located in the A1 segment, the clefts of 4 patients were located in the A3 segment, the clefts of 4 patients were located in the A2–A3 segment, and the cleft of 1 patient was located in the P2 segment. Regarding the shape of the cleft, 13 patients had V-shaped clefts, and the others had C- or S-shaped clefts. The severity of the MR at presentation was mild in 2 patients, moderate in 9 and severe in 8. Two of the patients with mild MR did not undergo surgery

  15. A Simple 3-Dimensional Printed Aid for a Corrective Palmar Opening Wedge Osteotomy of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Honigmann, Philipp; Thieringer, Florian; Steiger, Regula; Haefeli, Mathias; Schumacher, Ralf; Henning, Julia

    2016-03-01

    The reconstruction of malunited distal radius fractures is often challenging. Virtual planning techniques and guides for drilling and resection have been used for several years to achieve anatomic reconstruction. These guides have the advantage of leading to better operative results and faster surgery. Here, we describe a technique using a simple implant independent 3-dimensional printed drill guide and template to simplify the surgical reconstruction of a malunited distal radius fracture.

  16. Prenatal visualization of the pituitary gland using 2- and 3-dimensional sonography: comparison to prenatal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Katorza, Eldad; Bault, Jean-Philippe; Gilboa, Yinon; Yinon, Yoav; Hoffmann, Chen; Achiron, Reuven

    2012-10-01

    The pituitary gland is crucially important in the function of the endocrine axis. So far, antenatal depiction of the pituitary gland was possible only using magnetic resonance imaging. We describe antenatal visualization of the pituitary gland using 2- and 3-dimensional sonography. The appearance of the gland on sonography seems to be superior compares to prenatal magnetic resonance imaging. In cases with midline anomalies of the brain, face, or cranium, depiction of the pituitary gland is feasible and recommended.

  17. EPS forces in Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Angelini, Thomas; Tsai, Shih-Ming; Nixon, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria have evolved to congregate in complex communities known as biofilms. The structure that holds a biofilm together is a matrix called extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). It has been observed in previous studies that EPS up-regulation occurs when the nutrient levels fall below a threshold concentration; this increase in EPS concentration produces an osmotic pressure that forces the colony to spread outward. This osmotic pressure may drive nutrient uptake, but the stresses generated by the EPS matrix has never been measured. Here we present measurements of the forces exerted by a biofilm on its supporting substrate and on its fluid nutrients. In our experiments, we use a technique analogous to traction force microscopy to measure strain in agar nutrient substrates imposed by Bacillus subtilis biofilms. By running additional test to measure the permeability and elastic modulus of the agar, we can estimate the pressure generated by the biofilm.

  18. Effect of mandibular advancement on the natural position of the head: a preliminary study of 3-dimensional cephalometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozhen; Liu, Yanpu; Edwards, Sean P

    2013-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the potential effect of advancement by bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) on the natural position of the head by using 3-dimensional cephalomentric analysis. Seven consecutive patients who had had only BSSO advancement, and had had preoperative and 6-week postoperative cone beam computed tomography (CT) scans, were recruited to this retrospective study. Two variables, SNB and SNC2, were used to indicate the craniomandibular alignment and craniocervical inclination, respectively, in the midsagittal plane. Using 3-dimensional cephalometric analysis software, the SNB and the SNC2 were recorded in volume and measured in the midsagittal plane at 3 independent time-points. The reliability was measured and a paired t test used to assess the significance of differences between the means of SNB and SNC2 before and after operation. The 3-dimensional cephalometric measurement showed good reliability. The SNB was increased as planned in all the mandibles that were advanced, the cervical vertebrae were brought forward after BSSO, and the SNC2 was significantly increased in 6 of the 7 patients. Three-dimensional cephalometric analysis may provide an alternative way of assessing cephalometrics. After BSSO advancement, the natural position of the head changed by increasing the craniocervical inclination in an anteroposterior direction.

  19. The efficacy of a home-mechanical traction unit for patients with mild to moderate cervical osteoarthrosis: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bagheripour, Batoul; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Azadinia, Fatemeh; Amiri, Ali; Akbari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traction has been suggested to be an effective treatment for symptoms of neck disorder in patients with no contraindications. However, according to previous researches, the effectiveness of traction is controversial, particularly compared to other conservative treatments. This trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of sustained traction, using an over-the-door home cervical traction unit in combination with routine physical therapy on reducing cervical osteoarthrosis symptoms including neck pain, medication use and disability level compared to routine physical therapy alone. Methods: In this double- blinded pilot study with a pre-post test design and a control group, 20 women with mild to moderate osteoarthrosis were systematically assigned to the over-the-door home cervical traction (mean±SD age: 50.5±4.45yrs) or control groups (mean±SD age: 55.6±7.34yrs). Pain, level of disability, and drug consumption were evaluated before and after 10 sessions of intervention. Data were analyzed using parametric or non-parametric statistic including the paired-sample t-test, independent sample t-test, and Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney u test for intra and inter groups comparison based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test results. Results: Patients in both groups showed a significant decrease in pain intensity and disability level (p<0.05). Despite the greater improvement in pain levels and disability in the experimental group compared to the controls, the differences were not significant (p>0.05). No significant differences were found in terms of drugs consumption within and between the groups at the end of the treatment (p>0.05). Conclusion: The results revealed that applying sustained traction using an over-the-door home cervical traction unit was not significantly superior to the routine physical therapy and ergonomic training to manage symptoms including neck pain and disability in a small group of mild to moderate cervical osteoarthrosis patients. PMID:27493930

  20. Interplay of RhoA and mechanical forces in collective cell migration driven by leader cells.

    PubMed

    Reffay, M; Parrini, M C; Cochet-Escartin, O; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Coscoy, S; Amblard, F; Camonis, J; Silberzan, P

    2014-03-01

    The leading front of a collectively migrating epithelium often destabilizes into multicellular migration fingers where a cell initially similar to the others becomes a leader cell while its neighbours do not alter. The determinants of these leader cells include mechanical and biochemical cues, often under the control of small GTPases. However, an accurate dynamic cartography of both mechanical and biochemical activities remains to be established. Here, by mapping the mechanical traction forces exerted on the surface by MDCK migration fingers, we show that these structures are mechanical global entities with the leader cells exerting a large traction force. Moreover, the spatial distribution of RhoA differential activity at the basal plane strikingly mirrors this force cartography. We propose that RhoA controls the development of these fingers through mechanical cues: the leader cell drags the structure and the peripheral pluricellular acto-myosin cable prevents the initiation of new leader cells.

  1. Multimodal Treatment Program Comparing 2 Different Traction Approaches for Patients With Discogenic Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M.; Diab, Aliaa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate and long-term effects of a 1-year multimodal program with the addition of 2 different traction approaches on the pain, function, disability, and nerve root function in patients with discogenic cervical radiculopathy (CR). This study also attempted to identify the optimal traction angle based on the maximum recovery of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) H-reflex. Methods This randomized clinical trial with one-year follow-up included a total of 216 (101 female) patients with unilateral lower discogenic CR were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The standard care group (C) received the multimodal program (pain relief methods, muscle strengthening, and thoracic spine manipulation). The ventroflexion traction group (A) received the same multimodal program as group C, with added traditional ventroflexion traction. The novel traction group (B) received the same multimodal program as group C in addition to a flexor carpi radialis (FCR) H-reflex-based traction method. Primary outcomes were the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and secondary outcomes included neck pain, arm pain, and the amplitude and latency of the H-reflex. Patients were assessed at 3 intervals (pre-treatment, 4 weeks post-treatment, and the 1-year follow-up). Results The mixed linear model with repeated measures indicated a significant group × time effect in favor of the novel cervical traction group (B) for measures of NDI (F = 412.6, P < .0005), neck pain (F = 108.9, P < .0005), arm pain (F = 91.3, P < .0005), H- reflex amplitude (F = 207.7, P < .0005), and H-reflex latency (F = 58.9 P < .0005). We found that the extension position of cervical spine (5° extension) was the position that achieved the maximum improvement in the novel cervical traction method. Conclusions This preliminary study showed that a multimodal program with a novel cervical traction method added improved NDI, neck pain, arm pain, and the

  2. Spontaneous Ankylosis of Occiput to C2 following Closed Traction and Halo Treatment of Atlantoaxial Rotary Fixation.

    PubMed

    Krengel, Walter F; Kim, Paul H; Wiater, Brett

    2015-06-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective We report a case of spontaneous atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) presenting 9 months after onset in an 11-year-old boy. Methods This is a retrospective case report of spontaneous ankylosis of occiput to C2 following traction, manipulative reduction, and halo immobilization for refractory atlantoaxial rotatory fixation. Results The patient underwent traction followed by close manual reduction and placement of halo immobilization after 6 months of severe spontaneous-onset AARF that had been refractory to chiropractic manipulation and physical therapy. Imaging demonstrated dislocation of the left C1-C2 facet joint and remodeling changes of the C2 superior facet prior to reduction, followed by near complete reduction of the dislocation after manipulation and halo placement. Symptoms and clinical appearance were satisfactorily improved and the halo vest was removed after 3 months. At late follow-up, computed tomography demonstrated complete bony ankylosis of the occiput to C2. The patient was found to be HLA B27-positive, but he had no family history of ankylosing spondyloarthropathy or other joint symptoms. The underlying reasons for spontaneous fusion of the occiput to C2 could include the traction, HLA-B27-related spondyloarthropathy, or arthropathic changes caused by traction, reduction, the inciting insult, or immobilization. Conclusion When discussing treatment of childhood refractory AARF by traction, closed manipulation, and halo immobilization, the possibility of developing "spontaneous" ankylosis needs to be considered.

  3. Use of TOPSAR digital elevation data to determine the 3-dimensional shape of an alluvial fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    1995-01-01

    Landforms in arid regions record the interplay between tectonic forces and climate. Alluvial fans are a common landform in desert regions where the rate of uplift is greater than weathering or sedimentation. Changes in uplift rate or climatic conditions can lead to isolation of the currently forming fan surface through entrenchment and construction of another fan either further from the mountain front (decreased uplift or increased runoff) or closer to the mountain front (increased uplift or decreased runoff). Thus, many alluvial fans are made up of a mosaic of fan units of different age, some older than 1 million years. For this reason, determination of the stages of fan evolution can lead to a history of uplift and runoff. In an attempt to separate the effects of tectonic (uplift) and climatic (weathering, runoff, sedimentation) processes on the shapes of alluvial fan units, a modified conic equation developed by Troeh (1965) was fitted to TOPSAR digital topographic data for the Trail Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California. This allows parameters for the apex position, slope, and radial curvature to be compared with unit age.

  4. Normal growth and development of the lips: a 3-dimensional study from 6 years to adulthood using a geometric model

    PubMed Central

    FERRARIO, VIRGILIO F.; SFORZA, CHIARELLA; SCHMITZ, JOHANNES H.; CIUSA, VERONICA; COLOMBO, ANNA

    2000-01-01

    A 3-dimensional computerised system with landmark representation of the soft-tissue facial surface allows noninvasive and fast quantitative study of facial growth. The aims of the present investigation were (1) to provide reference data for selected dimensions of lips (linear distances and ratios, vermilion area, volume); (2) to quantify the relevant growth changes; and (3) to evaluate sex differences in growth patterns. The 3-dimensional coordinates of 6 soft-tissue landmarks on the lips were obtained by an optoelectronic instrument in a mixed longitudinal and cross-sectional study (2023 examinations in 1348 healthy subjects between 6 y of age and young adulthood). From the landmarks, several linear distances (mouth width, total vermilion height, total lip height, upper lip height), the vermilion height-to-mouth width ratio, some areas (vermilion of the upper lip, vermilion of the lower lip, total vermilion) and volumes (upper lip volume, lower lip volume, total lip volume) were calculated and averaged for age and sex. Male values were compared with female values by means of Student's t test. Within each age group all lip dimensions (distances, areas, volumes) were significantly larger in boys than in girls (P < 0.05), with some exceptions in the first age groups and coinciding with the earlier female growth spurt, whereas the vermilion height-to-mouth width ratio did not show a corresponding sexual dimorphism. Linear distances in girls had almost reached adult dimensions in the 13–14 y age group, while in boys a large increase was still to occur. The attainment of adult dimensions was faster in the upper than in the lower lip, especially in girls. The method used in the present investigation allowed the noninvasive evaluation of a large sample of nonpatient subjects, leading to the definition of 3-dimensional normative data. Data collected in the present study could represent a data base for the quantitative description of human lip morphology from childhood to

  5. Perfluorocarbon-perfused 23 gauge three-dimensional vitrectomy for complicated diabetic tractional retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Velez-Montoya, Raul; Guerrero-Naranjo, Jose Luis; Garcia-Aguirre, Gerardo; Morales-Cantón, Virgilio; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Background Perfluorocarbon liquid (PCL)-perfused vitrectomy has been shown in previous studies to be feasible, safe, and to have advantages in managing complicated cases of tractional retinal detachment. The present study had the objectives of describing the anatomical results and measuring surgical time and PCL consumption when combining PCL-perfused techniques with modern vitrectomy equipment. Methods A prospective, interventional consecutive case series was investigated. We enrolled patients with diabetic tractional retinal detachment, complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy and poor vision. A 23 gauge PCL-perfused vitrectomy was done with three-dimensional settings. During the procedure, we assessed the degree of surgical bleeding, visualization quality, and difficulty of membrane dissections. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and anatomical success were assessed at one and 3 months of follow-up. Results Twelve patients were enrolled in this study. There were no statistical significant changes in intraocular pressure and visual acuity throughout the follow-up period. Surgery was performed in a hemorrhage-free environment in almost all cases, with good visualization and low technical difficulty. The mean complete surgical time was 94.92 ± 25.03 minutes. The mean effective vitrectomy time was 22.50 ± 19.04 minutes and the mean PCL consumption was 25.08 ± 9.76 mL, with a speed of 1.11 mL/minute. Anatomical success was 67% at 3 months. Conclusion Although the technique proved to have some advantages in managing complicated cases of diabetic tractional retinal detachment, there was a high consumption of PCL. A redesign of the entire system is needed in order to decrease the amount of PCL needed for the technique. PMID:22267907

  6. Solitary SH waves in two-layered traction-free plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeran-Maigre, Irini; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    A solitary wave, resembling a soliton wave, is observed when analyzing the linear problem of polarized shear (SH) surface acoustic waves propagating in elastic orthotropic two-layered traction-free plates. The analysis is performed by applying a special complex formalism and the Modified Transfer Matrix (MTM) method. Conditions for the existence of solitary SH waves are obtained. Analytical expressions for the phase speed of the solitary wave are derived. To cite this article: I. Djeran-Maigre, S. Kuznetsov, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  7. Basilar invagination: craniocervical instability treated with cervical traction and occipitocervical fixation. Case report.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ricardo V; Neto, Eliseu B; Patriota, Gustavo C; Daniel, Jefferson W; Dumont, Paulo A S; Rotta, José M

    2007-10-01

    The upward odontoid displacement observed in basilar invagination (BI) is generally associated with a horizontal clivus and craniocervical kyphosis, conditions that exert ventral compression at the spinomedullary junction. Ventral brainstem decompression by reduction or elimination of the odontoid invagination is part of the desired treatment. The authors describe a case of BI in an adult, who was effectively treated with the easy and safe reduction of odontoid invagination via cervical traction. Normalization of kyphosis at the craniovertebral junction and the vertical position of both a previously horizontal clivus and the cerebellar tentorium demonstrated that these conditions were not part of the original malformation but instead were caused by a reducible craniovertebral instability.

  8. Vitrectomy Outcomes in Eyes with Diabetic Macular Edema and Vitreomacular Traction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema (DME) in eyes with at least moderate vision loss and vitreomacular traction. Design Prospective cohort study Participants The primary cohort included 87 eyes with DME and vitreomacular traction based on investigator’s evaluation, visual acuity 20/63–20/400, optical coherence tomography (OCT) central subfield >300 microns and no concomitant cataract extraction at the time of vitrectomy. Methods Surgery was performed according to the investigator’s usual routine. Follow-up visits were performed after 3 months, 6 months (primary endpoint) and 1 year. Main Outcome Measures Visual acuity, OCT retinal thickening and surgical complications. Results At baseline, median visual acuity in the 87 eyes was 20/100 and median OCT thickness was 491 microns. During vitrectomy, additional procedures included epiretinal membrane peeling in 61%, internal limiting membrane peeling in 54%, panretinal photocoagulation in 40% and injection of corticosteroids at the close of the procedure in 64%. At 6 months, median OCT central subfield thickness decreased by 160 microns, with 43% having central subfield thickness <250 microns and 68% having at least a 50% reduction in thickening. Visual acuity improved by 10 or more letters in 38% (95% confidence interval 28% – 49%) and deteriorated by 10 or more letters in 22% (95% confidence interval 13% – 31%). Postoperative surgical complications through 6 months included vitreous hemorrhage (5 eyes), elevated intraocular pressure requiring treatment (7 eyes), retinal detachment (3 eyes) and endophthalmitis (1 eye). Little changes in results were noted between 6 months and one year. Conclusion Following vitrectomy performed for DME and vitreomacular traction, retinal thickening was reduced in most eyes. Between 28% and 49% of eyes with characteristics similar to those included in this study are likely to have improvement of visual acuity, while between 13% and 31% are likely to have

  9. Shell tension forces propel Dictyostelium slugs forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène

    2012-12-01

    The Dictyostelium slug is an excellent model system for studying collective movements, as it is comprised of about 105 cells all moving together in the same direction. It still remains unclear how this movement occurs and what the physical mechanisms behind it are. By applying our recently developed 3D traction force microscopy, we propose a simple explanation for slug propulsion. Most of the forces are exerted by the sheath surrounding the slug. This secreted shell is under a rather uniform tension (around 50 mN m-1) and will give rise to a tissue under pressure. Finally, we propose that this pressure will naturally push the slug tip forwards if a gradient of shell mechanical properties takes place in the very anterior part of the raised tip.

  10. Studies of Cosmic Ray Modulation and Energetic Particle Propagation in Time-Dependent 3-Dimensional Heliospheric Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ming

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of this project was to perform theoretical calculations of propagation of cosmic rays and energetic particles in 3-dimensional heliospheric magnetic fields. We used Markov stochastic process simulation to achieve to this goal. We developed computation software that can be used to study particle propagation in, as two examples of heliospheric magnetic fields that have to be treated in 3 dimensions, a heliospheric magnetic field suggested by Fisk (1996) and a global heliosphere including the region beyond the termination shock. The results from our model calculations were compared with particle measurements from Ulysses, Earth-based spacecraft such as IMP-8, WIND and ACE, Voyagers and Pioneers in outer heliosphere for tests of the magnetic field models. We particularly looked for features of particle variations that can allow us to significantly distinguish the Fisk magnetic field from the conventional Parker spiral field. The computer code will eventually lead to a new generation of integrated software for solving complicated problems of particle acceleration, propagation and modulation in realistic 3-dimensional heliosphere of realistic magnetic fields and the solar wind with a single computation approach.

  11. The effect of material composition of 3-dimensional graphene oxide and self-doped polyaniline nanocomposites on DNA analytical sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Chen, Huaiyin; Yang, Ruirui; Wang, Xinxing; Nan, Fuxin; Jiao, Kui

    2015-09-01

    Until now, morphology effects of 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional graphene nanocomposites and the effect of material composition on the biosensors have been rarely reported. In this paper, the various nanocomposites based on graphene oxide and self-doped polyaniline nanofibres for studying the effect of morphology and material composition on DNA sensitivity were directly reported. The isolation and dispersion of graphene oxide were realized via intercalated self-doped polyaniline and ultrasonication, where the ultrasonication prompts the aggregates of graphite oxide to break up and self-doped polyaniline to diffuse into the stacked graphene oxide. Significant electrochemical enhancement has been observed due to the existence of self-doped polyaniline, which bridges the defects for electron transfer and, in the mean time, increases the basal spacing between graphene oxide sheets. Different morphologies can result in different ssDNA surface density, which can further influence the hybridization efficiency. Compared with 2-dimensional graphene oxide, self-doped polyaniline and other morphologies of nanocomposites, 3-dimensional graphene oxide-self-doped polyaniline nanowalls exhibited the highest surface density and hybridization efficiency. Furthermore, the fabricated biosensors presented the broad detection range with the low detection limit due to the specific surface area, a large number of electroactive species, and open accessible space supported by nanowalls.

  12. LADCP Observations of the 3-Dimensional Velocity Field Associated with Internal Waves and Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurnherr, A.; St Laurent, L.; Jacobs, S. S.; Kanzow, T.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Ledwell, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    While low-frequency processes in the ocean are primarily associated with (quasi-)horizontal, i.e. 2-dimensional, flows energetic high-frequency finescale processes, such as internal waves, hydraulic and other boundary-layer currents, are much more 3-dimensional. Due to recent advances in LADCP processing, it is now possible to derive full-depth snapshots of the 3-dimensional velocity field from standard CTD/LADCP casts. Applying the new method to data obtained in energetic regions of the ocean reveals velocity fields associated with vertical speeds ranging from a few cm/s to more than 20cm/s. Outside boundary layers, the vertical velocities are dominated by high-frequency (near-N) internal waves associated with small horizontal scales and the shapes of the corresponding vertical-velocity spectra in the finescale band are consistent with the Garrett-Munk model. In individual data sets the vertical-velocity spectral levels are correlated with coincident dissipation measurements derived from velocity microstructure, suggesting that a new finescale parameterization method for oceanic turbulence and diapycnal mixing based on LADCP-derived vertical velocities is possible. Near boundaries, there is evidence for large vertical velocities associated not just with waves, but also with seawater upwelling from beneath a fast-melting Antarctic ice shelf, with hydraulic overflow processes of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and even with very large "overturns" over the flank of a ridge in Luzon strait.;

  13. [Initial Clinical Experiences Using Ocriplasmin for the Treatment of Vitreomacular Traction with or without a Macular Hole].

    PubMed

    Lenk, J; Matthé, E; Ventzke, S; Pillunat, L E; Sandner, D

    2017-03-10

    Purpose In vitreomacular traction (VMT), there is abnormal adhesion between the vitreous cortex and the retina, especially in the fovea. Symptoms of VMT include metamorphopsia and a decrease in visual acuity. Since 2013, ocriplasmin (Jetrea®) has been approved for treatment of symptomatic vitreomacular traction with or without macular holes (≤ 400 µm). Methods We retrospectively examined twenty-three eyes of twenty-one patients who underwent intravitreal ocriplasmin treatment for symptomatic vitreomacular traction with or without macular holes. Best corrected visual acuity and central retinal thickness (CRT) were measured in advance and after ocriplasmin treatment. The numbers of resolved vitreomacular traction and closed macular holes were documented. Results Vitreomacular traction was resolved in eight of twenty-three eyes (34.8 %); in fifteen eyes (65.2 %) it was persistent and two of four macular holes were found closed. The average best corrected visual acuity was 0.39 ± 0.25 logMAR at baseline and 0.41 ± 0.24 logMAR at the first follow-up visit after injection (p = 0.613). The average CRT was 453.3 ± 172.7 µm at baseline, with a slight decrease to 412.0 ± 212 µm (p = 0.124). Conclusion Intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin appears is an experimental therapy in patients with symptomatic vitreomacular traction. Patient selection seems to be critically important for the therapeutic outcome, whereas greater age, specific VMT morphology and missing chromatopsia seem to be negative predictors.

  14. [Use of local injections of tolperisone (midocalm) in combination with tractional therapy in the treatment of vertebral static syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Ia Iu; Kutarev, R V; Shelkov, S N; Suslov, S A

    2007-01-01

    A randomized double-blind study of the efficacy of midocalm combined with tractional therapy has been carried out in 24 patients (indexed group) comparing to the tractional therapy without midocalm (the drug has been substituted with placebo) in 25 patients (comparison group). The effective number of injections was 3-6 in the indexed group and 7 in the comparison group. A quantitative assessment revealed that in the indexed group treatment efficacy was 1,56 times higher and the effect achieved sooner than in the comparison group.

  15. Traction-assisted colonic endoscopic submucosal dissection using clip and line: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yoji; Uedo, Noriya; Kato, Minoru; Hamada, Kenta; Aoi, Kenji; Tonai, Yusuke; Matsuura, Noriko; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamashina, Takeshi; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Higashino, Koji; Ishihara, Ryu; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colonic endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a challenging procedure because it is often difficult to maintain good visualization of the submucosal layer. To facilitate colonic ESD, we designed a novel traction method, namely traction-assisted colonic ESD using clip and line (TAC), and investigated its feasibility. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 23 patients with large colonic superficial lesions who had undergone TAC. The main outcome was the procedural success rate of TAC, which we defined as successful, sustained application of clip and line to the lesion until the end of the procedure. Results: The procedural success rate of TAC was 87 % (20/23). In all three unsuccessful cases, the lesions were in the proximal colon and the procedure times over 100 minutes. The overall mean procedure time was 61 min (95 % confidence interval, 18 – 172 min). We achieved en bloc resections of all lesions. There were no perforations or fatal adverse events. Conclusions: TAC is feasible and safe for colonic ESD and may improve the ease of performing this procedure. PMID:26793785

  16. Methods of the aerodynamical experiments with simulation of massflow-traction ratio of the power unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokotko, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling massflow-traction characteristics of the power unit (PU) may be of interest in the study of aerodynamic characteristics (ADC) aircraft models with full dynamic likeness, and in the study of the effect of interference PU. These studies require the use of a number of processing methods. These include: 1) The method of delivery of the high-pressure body of jets model engines on the sensitive part of the aerodynamic balance. 2) The method of estimate accuracy and reliability of measurement thrust generated by the jet device. 3) The method of implementation of the simulator SU in modeling the external contours of the nacelle, and the conditions at the inlet and outlet. 4) The method of determining the traction simulator PU. 5) The method of determining the interference effect from the work of power unit on the ADC of model. 6) The method of producing hot jets of jet engines. The paper examines implemented in ITAM methodology applied to testing in a supersonic wind tunnel T-313.

  17. Coordinated vehicle traction control based on engine torque and brake pressure under complicated road conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mingxin; Li, Liang; Li, Hongzhi; Song, Jian; Han, Zongqi

    2012-09-01

    Vehicle traction control system has been developed to enhance the traction capability and the direction stability of the driving wheels through the tyre slip ratio regulation. Under normal situations, if the tyre slip ratio exceeds a certain threshold, the slip ratio of the driving wheel is regulated by the coupled interaction of the engine torque and the active brake pressure. In order to obtain the best driving performance on a road under complicated friction conditions, the driving torque and the active brake pressure, need to be decoupled and adjusted to avoid penalisation of each other. In this paper, a coordinated cascade control method with two sliding-mode variable structure controllers is presented. In this control method, the driving wheel slip ratio is regulated by adjusting the engine torque and the wheel brake pressure. Through the sliding-mode controller, the engine torque is tuned to achieve the maximum driving acceleration and then the active brake pressure is applied to the slipped wheel for further modification of the wheel slip ratio. The advantage of this control method is that through proper regulation, the conflict between the two control inputs could be avoided. Finally, the simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. The Effects of Stretching with Lumbar Traction on VAS and Oswestry Scales of Patients with Lumbar 4–5 Herniated Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hae-sun; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stretching with lumbar traction on VAS and Oswestry scale scores of lumbar 4–5 herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. [Subjects] We recruited 20 lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. [Methods] We performed stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients during 4 weeks. The VAS and Oswestry scales were measured before and 4 weeks after the intervention. [Results] The results showed a significant decrease in VAS scale scores for stretching with lumbar traction in lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients, from 18±1.29 to 2.1±1.35. The Oswestry scale scores also decreased significantly, from 20.35±2.01 to 3.5±2.84, after stretching with lumbar traction. [Conclusion] Thus, we suggest stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. PMID:25140094

  19. Direct physical formation of anatomical structures by cell traction forces. An interview with Albert Harris by Lev Beloussov.

    PubMed

    Harris, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Albert Harris was educated at The Norfolk Academy, Norfolk, Virginia, USA (1961). He then earned a Batchelor of Arts Degree in Biology from Swarthmore College, in Pennsylvania, USA (1965), followed by a Ph.D. in Biology (1971) from Yale University, where his Dissertation Advisor was the great John Phillip Trinkaus. He held a Damon-Runyon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Research in 1970-72, under Michael Abercrombie, FRS, at the Strangeways Research Laboratory of Cambridge University, England. Then he accepted a position as Assistant Professor in the Zoology Department of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C. USA. In 1977, he was promoted to Associate Professor of Zoology, and in 1983 was promoted to Full Professor of Biology. In Oct.-Nov. 1991 he was honored to be Distinguished Visiting Professor of Zoology at the University of California at Davis.

  20. MIRD pamphlet No. 23: quantitative SPECT for patient-specific 3-dimensional dosimetry in internal radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Dewaraja, Yuni K; Frey, Eric C; Sgouros, George; Brill, A Bertrand; Roberson, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-08-01

    In internal radionuclide therapy, a growing interest in voxel-level estimates of tissue-absorbed dose has been driven by the desire to report radiobiologic quantities that account for the biologic consequences of both spatial and temporal nonuniformities in these dose estimates. This report presents an overview of 3-dimensional SPECT methods and requirements for internal dosimetry at both regional and voxel levels. Combined SPECT/CT image-based methods are emphasized, because the CT-derived anatomic information allows one to address multiple technical factors that affect SPECT quantification while facilitating the patient-specific voxel-level dosimetry calculation itself. SPECT imaging and reconstruction techniques for quantification in radionuclide therapy are not necessarily the same as those designed to optimize diagnostic imaging quality. The current overview is intended as an introduction to an upcoming series of MIRD pamphlets with detailed radionuclide-specific recommendations intended to provide best-practice SPECT quantification-based guidance for radionuclide dosimetry.

  1. Fine designing 3-dimensional ZnO nanowalls with TiO2 nanoparticles for DSSC application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkoo, Sajad Saghaye; Saievar-Iranizad, Esmaiel; Bayatloo, Elham

    2015-06-01

    In this research, we report a low-cost low-temperature hydrothermal technique for covering 3-dimensional (3-D) electrodeposited ZnO nanowall with thin layer of aggregated TiO2 nanoparticles on FTO substrate for dye-sensitized solar cell application, in a way that morphology and crystal structure of ZnO nanowalls were preserved. Comparing photovoltaic characteristics of devices with and without TiO2-coating layer, it was revealed that the 3-D ZnO/TiO2-nanostructured photoanode resulted in a 35 % cell performance improved mostly because of enhancement of short-circuit current density ( J sc) and open-circuit voltage ( V oc). The XRD pattern showed that 3-D ZnO nanowalls and TiO2 compose of wurtzite and anatase phases, respectively.

  2. Comparison of Ground-Based 3-Dimensional Lightning Mapping Observation with Satellite-Based LIS Observations in Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Hamlin, Timothy; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Goodman, Steven J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1999-01-01

    3-dimensional lightning mapping observations were obtained in central Oklahoma during June 1998, using New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). The results have been compared with observations of the discharges from space obtained by NASA's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. Excellent spatial and temporal correlations were obtained between the two sets of observations. All discharges seen by LIS were mapped by the LMA. Most of the detected optical events were associated with lightning channels that extended into the upper part of the storm. Cloud-to-ground discharges that were confined to mid- and lower-altitudes tended to be detected by LIS at the time of late-stage return strokes. Extensive illumination tended to occur in impulsive bursts toward the end or part way through intracloud discharges and appeared to be produced by energetic K-changes that typically occur at these times.

  3. The Keilson and Storer 3-dimensional (KS-3D) line shape model: applications to optical diagnostic in combustion media

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Pierre

    2008-10-22

    High-resolution infrared and Raman spectroscopies require refine spectral line shape model to account for all observed features. For instance, for gaseous mixtures of light molecules with heavy perturbers, drastic changes arise particularly in the collision regime, resulting from the inhomogeneous effects due to the radiator speed-dependence of the collisional line broadening and line shifting parameters. Following our previous work concerning the collision regime, we have developed a new line shape modelization called the Keilson and Storer 3-dimensional line shape model to lower densities, when the Doppler contribution, and the collisional confinement narrowing can be no longer neglected. The consequences for optical diagnostics, particularly for H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixtures with high pressure and high temperature are presented. The effects of collisional relaxation on the spectral line shapes are discussed.

  4. A 3-dimensional digital atlas of the ascending sensory and the descending motor systems in the pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Güntürkün, Onur; Verhoye, Marleen; De Groof, Geert; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2013-01-01

    Pigeons are classic animal models for learning, memory, and cognition. The majority of the current understanding about avian neurobiology outside of the domain of the song system has been established using pigeons. Since MRI represents an increasingly relevant tool for comparative neuroscience, a 3-dimensional MRI-based atlas of the pigeon brain becomes essential. Using multiple imaging protocols, we delineated diverse ascending sensory and descending motor systems as well as the hippocampal formation. This pigeon brain atlas can easily be used to determine the stereotactic location of identified neural structures at any angle of the head. In addition, the atlas is useful to find the optimal angle of sectioning for slice experiments, stereotactic injections and electrophysiological recordings. This pigeon brain atlas is freely available for the scientific community.

  5. New insights into the coronary artery bifurcation hypothesis-generating concepts utilizing 3-dimensional optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Vasim; Serruys, Patrick W; Heo, Jung Ho; Gogas, Bill D; Okamura, Takayuki; Gomez-Lara, Josep; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Garcìa-Garcìa, Hector M; van Geuns, Robert Jan

    2011-08-01

    Coronary artery bifurcations are a common challenging lesion subset accounting for approximately 10% to 20% of all percutaneous coronary interventions. The provisional T-stenting approach is generally recommended as the first-line management of most lesions. Carina shift is suggested to be the predominant mechanism of side-branch pinching during provisional T-stenting and has been indirectly inferred from bench work and other intravascular imaging modalities. Offline 3-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of patients studied in the first-in-man trial of the high-frequency (160 frames/s) Terumo optical frequency domain imaging system were undertaken using volume-rendering software. Through a series of 3D reconstructions, several novel hypothesis-generating concepts are presented.

  6. Influence of the implant diameter with different sizes of hexagon: analysis by 3-dimensional finite element method.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; de Moraes, Sandra Lúcia Dantas; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution in implants of regular platforms and of wide diameter with different sizes of hexagon by the 3-dimensional finite element method. We used simulated 3-dimensional models with the aid of Solidworks 2006 and Rhinoceros 4.0 software for the design of the implant and abutment and the InVesalius software for the design of the bone. Each model represented a block of bone from the mandibular molar region with an implant 10 mm in length and different diameters. Model A was an implant 3.75 mm/regular hexagon, model B was an implant 5.00 mm/regular hexagon, and model C was an implant 5.00 mm/expanded hexagon. A load of 200 N was applied in the axial, lateral, and oblique directions. At implant, applying the load (axial, lateral, and oblique), the 3 models presented stress concentration at the threads in the cervical and middle regions, and the stress was higher for model A. At the abutment, models A and B showed a similar stress distribution, concentrated at the cervical and middle third; model C showed the highest stresses. On the cortical bone, the stress was concentrated at the cervical region for the 3 models and was higher for model A. In the trabecular bone, the stresses were less intense and concentrated around the implant body, and were more intense for model A. Among the models of wide diameter (models B and C), model B (implant 5.00 mm/regular hexagon) was more favorable with regard to distribution of stresses. Model A (implant 3.75 mm/regular hexagon) showed the largest areas and the most intense stress, and model B (implant 5.00 mm/regular hexagon) showed a more favorable stress distribution. The highest stresses were observed in the application of lateral load.

  7. Global simulation of canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence with a 3 dimensional radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yang, W.; Ichii, K.

    2015-12-01

    Global simulation of canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence with a 3 dimensional radiative transfer modelHideki Kobayashi, Wei Yang, and Kazuhito IchiiDepartment of Environmental Geochemical Cycle Research, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology3173-25, Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Japan.Plant canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be observed from satellites, such as Greenhouse gases Observation Satellite (GOSAT), Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2), using Fraunhofer lines in the near infrared spectral domain [1]. SIF is used to infer photosynthetic capacity of plant canopy [2]. However, it is not well understoond how the leaf-level SIF emission contributes to the top of canopy directional SIF because SIFs observed by the satellites use the near infrared spectral domain where the multiple scatterings among leaves are not negligible. It is necessary to quantify the fraction of emission for each satellite observation angle. Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation of sunlit leaves are 100 times higher than that of shaded leaves. Thus, contribution of sunlit and shaded leaves to canopy scale directional SIF emission should also be quantified. Here, we show the results of global simulation of SIF using a 3 dimensional radiative transfer simulation with MODIS atmospheric (aerosol optical thickness) and land (land cover and leaf area index) products and a forest landscape data sets prepared for each land cover category. The results are compared with satellite-based SIF (e.g. GOME-2) and the gross primary production empirically estimated by FLUXNET and remote sensing data.

  8. Airway Wall Area Derived from 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis Differs among Lung Lobes in Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Tho, Nguyen Van; Trang, Le Thi Huyen; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Emiko; Ryujin, Yasushi; Kanda, Rie; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Goto, Kenichi; Fukunaga, Kentaro; Higami, Yuichi; Seto, Ruriko; Nagao, Taishi; Oguma, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Lan, Le Thi Tuyet; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2014-01-01

    Background It is time-consuming to obtain the square root of airway wall area of the hypothetical airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (√Aaw at Pi10), a comparable index of airway dimensions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), from all airways of the whole lungs using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis. We hypothesized that √Aaw at Pi10 differs among the five lung lobes and √Aaw at Pi10 derived from one certain lung lobe has a high level of agreement with that derived from the whole lungs in smokers. Methods Pulmonary function tests and chest volumetric CTs were performed in 157 male smokers (102 COPD, 55 non-COPD). All visible bronchial segments from the 3rd to 5th generations were segmented and measured using commercially available 3-dimensional CT analysis software. √Aaw at Pi10 of each lung lobe was estimated from all measurable bronchial segments of that lobe. Results Using a mixed-effects model, √Aaw at Pi10 differed significantly among the five lung lobes (R2 = 0.78, P<0.0001). The Bland-Altman plots show that √Aaw at Pi10 derived from the right or left upper lobe had a high level of agreement with that derived from the whole lungs, while √Aaw at Pi10 derived from the right or left lower lobe did not. Conclusion In male smokers, CT-derived airway wall area differs among the five lung lobes, and airway wall area derived from the right or left upper lobe is representative of the whole lungs. PMID:24865661

  9. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  10. Rupture dynamics along bimaterial interfaces: a parametric study of the shear-normal traction coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Antonio; Festa, Gaetano; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake ruptures often develop along faults separating materials with dissimilar elastic properties. Due to the broken symmetry, the propagation of the rupture along the bimaterial interface is driven by the coupling between interfacial sliding and normal traction perturbations. We numerically investigate in-plane rupture growth along a planar interface, under slip weakening friction, separating two dissimilar isotropic linearly elastic half-spaces, and we perform a parametric study of the classical Prakash-Clifton regularisation, for different material contrasts. In particular the mesh-dependence and the regularisation-dependence of the numerical solutions are analysed in this parameter space. When the regularisation involves a slip-rate dependent relaxation time, a characteristic sliding distance is identified below which numerical solutions no longer depend on the regularisation parameter, i.e. they are physically well-posed solutions. Such regularisation provides an adaptive high-frequency filter of the slip-induced normal traction perturbations, following the dynamic shrinking of the dissipation zone during the acceleration phase. In contrast, a regularisation involving a constant relaxation time leads to numerical solutions that always depend on the regularisation parameter since it fails in adapting to the shrinking of the process zone. Dynamic regularisation is further investigated using a non-local regularisation based on a relaxation time that depends on the dynamic length of the dissipation zone. Such reformulation is shown to provide similar results as the dynamic time scale regularisation proposed by Prakash-Clifton when the slip rate is replaced by the maximum slip rate along the sliding interface. This leads to the identification of a dissipative length scale associated with the coupling between interfacial sliding and normal traction perturbations, together with a scaling law between the maximum slip rate and the dynamic size of the process zone

  11. Evaluation of Intravitreal Ranibizumab on the Surgical Outcome for Diabetic Retinopathy With Tractional Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Yu, Chenying; Ding, Haiyuan; Shen, Liping; Lou, Dinghua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to investigate intravitreal injection of Ranibizumab on the surgical outcome for diabetic patients who had tractional retinal detachment but did not receive any preoperative retinal photocoagulation. Ninety-seven patients (97 eyes) who had diabetic retinopathy with tractional retinal detachment were enrolled to receive 23-G pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). They were assigned to an experimental group (Group I, n = 47 eyes) and a control group (Group II, n = 50 eyes). The patients in Group I were given 1 injection of intravitreal Ranibizumab (Lucentis 0.5 mg/0.05 mL) 1 week before surgery, whereas those in Group II went down to surgery directly. Follow-ups were performed for 6 months to 3 years (16 ± 6 months), and indicators observed included postoperative best-corrected visual acuity, complications, and retinal thickness in the macula measured by optical coherence tomography. In Group I, BCVA improved from logMAR 1.92 ± 0.49 to logMAR 0.81 ± 0.39 following surgery, whereas in Group II, BCVA improved from logMAR 1.91 ± 0.49 to logMAR 0.85 ± 0.41. There was significant postoperative gain in vision, but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups at postoperative follow-up visits. The mean duration of vitrectomy in Group I and Group II was (40 ± 7) minutes and (53 ± 9) minutes, respectively, with significant difference. Iatrogenic breaks were noted in 5 eyes (11%) in the experimental group and 17 eyes (34%) in the control group; the difference was significant. The retinal thickness in the macula measured by OCT was (256 ± 44) μm and (299 ± 84) μm in Group I and Group II respectively with significant difference. Besides, there were significantly more eyes in Group II that required silicone oil tamponade and postoperative retinal photocoagulation. 23-G PPV combined with intravitreal tamponade and panretinal photocoagulation still remains an effective regimen for the

  12. Spontaneous Closure of a Full-Thickness Macular Hole Associated with Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Persistent Vitreomacular Traction

    PubMed Central

    Reinherz, Benjamin J.; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy worsens the prognosis of macular holes compared to those of idiopathic etiology. While spontaneous closure of idiopathic macular holes is a well-documented phenomenon, spontaneous closure of macular holes associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy is rare. We report a case of spontaneous closure of a macular hole associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and persistent vitreomacular traction. PMID:27099607

  13. Orthodontic Management with Traction and Asymmetric Extraction for Multiple Impacted Permanent Maxillary Teeth – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiannan; Zhang, Liang; Dai, Juan; Li, Feifei; Feng, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Multiple impacted teeth are a rare eruption disturbance that increases the case complexity. In this article, we described a 13-year-old boy whose 5 permanent maxillary teeth were not erupted although their root formation was complete. The orthodontic treatment with traction and asymmetric extraction was performed to achieve a significantly improved functional and esthetic result. PMID:27857816

  14. The characteristics of the combustion process occurring under real operating conditions of traction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longwic, R.; Sander, P.

    2016-09-01

    The authors deal with the issues of the Diesel engine under dynamic conditions. The conditions of the dynamic operation of the engine have most frequently been mapped by the method of free acceleration of the engine caused by the change of the position of the fuel dose lever. The article presents the results of indication of the traction Diesel engine under real operating conditions. This allows for the use of a mobile system to indicate the AVL engine built in the vehicle in research. We analysed a number of thermodynamic parameters of the combustion process in various dynamic states, typical for the process of actual operation of the engine, such as working in start-up conditions and immediately after, working in conditions of acceleration and coasting. Formulated conclusions significantly expand the area of knowledge concerning the functioning of the internal combustion engine in dynamic conditions.

  15. A traction control strategy with an efficiency model in a distributed driving electric vehicle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Cheng, Xingqun

    2014-01-01

    Both active safety and fuel economy are important issues for vehicles. This paper focuses on a traction control strategy with an efficiency model in a distributed driving electric vehicle. In emergency situation, a sliding mode control algorithm was employed to achieve antislip control through keeping the wheels' slip ratios below 20%. For general longitudinal driving cases, an efficiency model aiming at improving the fuel economy was built through an offline optimization stream within the two-dimensional design space composed of the acceleration pedal signal and the vehicle speed. The sliding mode control strategy for the joint roads and the efficiency model for the typical drive cycles were simulated. Simulation results show that the proposed driving control approach has the potential to apply to different road surfaces. It keeps the wheels' slip ratios within the stable zone and improves the fuel economy on the premise of tracking the driver's intention.

  16. First-order system least squares for the pure traction problem in planar linear elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Manteuffel, T.; McCormick, S.; Parter, S.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will develop two first-order system least squares (FOSLS) approaches for the solution of the pure traction problem in planar linear elasticity. Both are two-stage algorithms that first solve for the gradients of displacement, then for the displacement itself. One approach, which uses L{sup 2} norms to define the FOSLS functional, is shown under certain H{sup 2} regularity assumptions to admit optimal H{sup 1}-like performance for standard finite element discretization and standard multigrid solution methods that is uniform in the Poisson ratio for all variables. The second approach, which is based on H{sup -1} norms, is shown under general assumptions to admit optimal uniform performance for displacement flux in an L{sup 2} norm and for displacement in an H{sup 1} norm. These methods do not degrade as other methods generally do when the material properties approach the incompressible limit.

  17. Traction-free vibration of layered elastic and piezoelectric rectangular parallelepipeds

    PubMed

    Heyliger

    2000-03-01

    A variational method is developed to study the traction-free vibration of layered rectangular elastic and piezoelectric parallelepipeds. The weak form of the equations of motion and the charge equation are formulated in rectangular Cartesian coordinates. Approximate solutions to these equations are sought in a form that combines piecewise linear or quadratic Lagrange basis functions through the layered dimension of the solid with continuous global polynomial or trigonometric functions in the plane. This allows for the necessary discontinuity in the shear strain and normal potential gradient across the interface between layers caused by the mismatch in material properties. Numerical results compare very well with those computed by other techniques for layered elastic and piezoelectric plates with simple support and homogeneous parallelepipeds under stress-free conditions.

  18. A Traction Control Strategy with an Efficiency Model in a Distributed Driving Electric Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Both active safety and fuel economy are important issues for vehicles. This paper focuses on a traction control strategy with an efficiency model in a distributed driving electric vehicle. In emergency situation, a sliding mode control algorithm was employed to achieve antislip control through keeping the wheels' slip ratios below 20%. For general longitudinal driving cases, an efficiency model aiming at improving the fuel economy was built through an offline optimization stream within the two-dimensional design space composed of the acceleration pedal signal and the vehicle speed. The sliding mode control strategy for the joint roads and the efficiency model for the typical drive cycles were simulated. Simulation results show that the proposed driving control approach has the potential to apply to different road surfaces. It keeps the wheels' slip ratios within the stable zone and improves the fuel economy on the premise of tracking the driver's intention. PMID:25197697

  19. Finite strain response of crimped fibers under uniaxial traction: An analytical approach applied to collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Michele; Wriggers, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials reinforced by crimped fibers intervene in a number of advanced structural applications. Accordingly, constitutive equations describing their anisotropic behavior and explicitly accounting for fiber properties are needed for modeling and design purposes. To this aim, the finite strain response of crimped beams under uniaxial traction is herein addressed by obtaining analytical relationships based on the Principle of Virtual Works. The model is applied to collagen fibers in soft biological tissues, coupling geometric nonlinearities related to fiber crimp with material nonlinearities due to nanoscale mechanisms. Several numerical applications are presented, addressing the influence of geometric and material features. Available experimental data for tendons are reproduced, integrating the proposed approach within an optimization procedure for data fitting. The obtained results highlight the effectiveness of the proposed approach in correlating fibers structure with composite material mechanics.

  20. Transurethral resection of tension-free vaginal tape under tactile traction.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Lieschen H; Cundiff, Geoffrey W

    2009-07-01

    Urethral erosion is a rare complication after the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure. Surgical management of this complication is challenging due to the potential for significant patient morbidity. A 50-year-old patient presented with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and incomplete voiding, 6 years after a TVT procedure performed for stress incontinence. An attempt at cystoscopy revealed an almost complete occlusion of the urethral lumen by a urethral erosion of the polypropylene mesh. A transurethral resection was performed under tactile traction. This procedure is a minimally invasive approach that avoids the need for a transvaginal procedure. Careful cystourethroscopy should be performed in patients presenting with new lower LUTS after TVT in order to avoid a delay in diagnosing a mesh erosion.

  1. Design considerations for attaining 200-knot test velocities at the aircraft landing loads and traction facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Stubbs, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Design studies are presented which consider the important parameters in providing 200 knot test velocities at the landing loads and traction facility. Two major components of this facility, the hydraulic jet catapult and the test carriage structure, are considered. Suitable factors are determined to correlate analytical data for characteristics of the hydraulic jet catapult with data measured from the existing catapult system. The resulting equations are used to calculate test velocities for a range of jet nozzle diameters and carriage masses with both the current 122 m and an increased 183 m catapult stroke. Using the catapult characteristics, a target design point is selected and a carriage structure is sized to meet the target point strength requirements.

  2. PM Motor Parametric Design Analyses for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Application: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2004-08-11

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Vehicle Technologies has a strong interest in making rapid progress in permanent magnet (PM) machine development. The program is directing various technology development projects that will advance the technology and lead to request for proposals (RFP) for manufacturer prototypes. This aggressive approach is possible because the technology is clearly within reach and the approach is deemed essential, based on strong market demand, escalating fuel prices, and competitive considerations. In response, this study began parallel development paths that included a literature search/review, development and utilization of multiple parametric models to determine the effects of design parameters, verification of the modeling methodology, development of an interior PM (IPM) machine baseline design, development of alternative machine baseline designs, and cost analyses for several candidate machines. This interim progress report summarizes the results of these activities as of June 2004. This report provides background and summary information for recent machine parametric studies and testing programs that demonstrate both the potential capabilities and technical limitations of brushless PM machines (axial gap and radial gap), the IPM machine, the surface-mount PM machines (interior or exterior rotor), induction machines, and switched reluctance machines. The FreedomCAR program, while acknowledging the progress made by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Delphi, Delco-Remy International, and others in these programs, has redirected efforts toward a ''short path'' to a marketable and competitive PM motor for hybrid electric vehicle traction applications. The program has developed a set of performance targets for the type of traction machine desired. The short-path approach entails a comprehensive design effort focusing on the IPM machine and meeting the performance targets. The selection of the

  3. Penile traction therapy for Peyronie’s disease—what’s the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Ipekci, Tumay

    2016-01-01

    Penile traction therapy (PTT) is a new therapeutic option for men with Peyronie’s disease (PD). However, it has a long history of use in other fields of medicine including bone, skin, skeletal muscle, and Dupuytren’s. Mechanotransduction, or gradual expansion of tissue by traction, leads to the formation of new collagen tissue by cellular proliferation. As a molecular result, continuous extension of the fibrous plaque causes significant increases in collagenase and metalloproteinases, and, ultimately, to fibrous plaque softening and extension. This hypothetical knowledge has been supported by recent well designed experimental studies. Furthermore, several clinical papers have provided promising results on the use of PTT in PD patients. It has been shown in some series that the use of PTT significantly increases flaccid and stretched penile lengths and results in significant penile curvature improvement when compared to baseline. Furthermore, the use of PTT concomitantly with either verapamil or interferon α-2b has also been shown to be an effective therapy. Additionally, the beneficial effect of PTT on penile length before or after penile surgery in men with corporal fibrosis has been described. Finally, as a minimally invasive alternative treatment option to penile augmentation surgery in men with dysmorphophobia, PTT use has shown promising results by several experts. Studies have shown that PTT provides an acceptable, minimally invasive method that can produce effective and durable lengthening of the penis in men complaining of a small/short penis. There are, however, several criticisms related to the designs of the reported studies, such as small sample size and selection bias. Well-designed studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up periods are, however, needed to establish the true benefits of PTT. PMID:27298777

  4. PM Motor Parametric Design Analyses for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Application

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2004-10-11

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Vehicle Technologies office has a strong interest in making rapid progress in permanent magnet (PM) machine development. The DOE FreedomCAR program is directing various technology development projects that will advance the technology and hopefully lead to a near-term request for proposals (RFP) for a to-be-determined level of initial production. This aggressive approach is possible because the technology is clearly within reach and the approach is deemed essential, based on strong market demand, escalating fuel prices, and competitive considerations. In response, this study began parallel development paths that included a literature search/review, development and utilization of multiple parametric models, verification of the modeling methodology, development of an interior PM (IPM) machine baseline design, development of alternative machine baseline designs, and cost analyses for several candidate machines. This report summarizes the results of these activities as of September 2004. This report provides background and summary information for recent machine parametric studies and testing programs that demonstrate both the potential capabilities and technical limitations of brushless PM machines (axial gap and radial gap), the IPM machine, the surface-mount PM machines (interior or exterior rotor), induction machines, and switched-reluctance machines. The FreedomCAR program, while acknowledging the progress made by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Delphi, Delco-Remy International, and others in these programs, has redirected efforts toward a ''short path'' to a marketable and competitive PM motor for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) traction applications. The program has developed a set of performance targets for the type of traction machine desired. The short-path approach entails a comprehensive design effort focusing on the IPM machine and meeting the performance targets

  5. Hoffmann-reflex is delayed during 6 degree head-down tilt with balanced traction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haruna, Y.; Styf, J. R.; Kahan, N.; Hargens, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased spinal height due to the lack of of axial compression on spinal structures in microgravity may stretch the spinal cord, cauda equina, nerve roots, and paraspinal tissues. HYPOTHESIS: Exposure to simulated microgravity causes dysfunction of nerve roots so that the synaptic portion of the Achilles tendon reflex is delayed. METHODS: Six healthy male subjects were randomly divided into two groups with three in each group. The subjects in the first group underwent horizontal bed rest (HBR) for three days. After a two week interval they underwent bed rest in a position of head-down tilt with balanced traction (HDT). So that each subject could serve as his own control, the second group was treated identically but in opposite order. Bilateral F waves and H-reflexes were measured daily (18:30-20:30) on all subjects placed in a prone position. RESULTS: By means of ANOVA, differences between HDT and HBR were observed only in M-latency and F-ratio, not in F-latency, central latency, and H-latency. Differences during the course of the bed rest were observed in M-latency and H-latency only. Tibial H latency was significantly lengthened in HDT group on day 2 and 3, although no significant difference between HDT and HBR was observed. CONCLUSION: The monosynaptic reflex assessed by H-reflex was delayed during 6 degree HDT with traction. The exact mechanism of this delay and whether the change was due to lengthening of the lower part of the vertebrae remain to be clarified.

  6. Transvenous Lead Extraction via the Inferior Approach Using a Gooseneck Snare versus Simple Manual Traction

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Uk; Hwang, You-Mi; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Min-Su; Choi, Hyung-Oh; Lee, Woo-Seok; Kwon, Chang-Hee; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The number of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices needing lead extraction is increasing for various reasons, including infections, vascular obstruction, and lead failure. We report our experience with transvenous extraction of pacemaker and defibrillator leads via the inferior approach of using a gooseneck snare as a first-line therapy and compare extraction using a gooseneck snare with extraction using simple manual traction. Subjects and Methods The study included 23 consecutive patients (43 leads) who underwent transvenous lead extraction using a gooseneck snare (group A) and 10 consecutive patients (17 leads) who underwent lead extraction using simple manual traction (group B). Patient characteristics, indications, and outcomes were analyzed and compared between the groups. Results The dwelling time of the leads was longer in group A (median, 121) than in group B (median, 56; p=0.000). No differences were noted in the overall procedural success rate (69.6% vs. 70%), clinical procedural success rate (82.6% vs. 90%), and lead clinical success rate (86% vs. 94.1%) between the groups. The procedural success rates according to lead type were 89.2% and 100% for pacing leads and 66.7% and 83.3% for defibrillator leads in groups A and B, respectively. Major complications were noted in 3 (mortality in 1) patients in group A and 2 patients in group B. Conclusion Transvenous extraction of pacemaker leads via an inferior approach using a gooseneck snare was both safe and effective. However, stand-alone transvenous extraction of defibrillator leads using the inferior approach was suboptimal. PMID:27014349

  7. Axial force and efficiency tests of fixed center variable speed belt drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of how the axial force varies with the centerline force at different speed ratios, speeds, and loads, and how the drive's transmission efficiency is affected by these related forces is described. The tests, intended to provide a preliminary performance and controls characterization for a variable speed belt drive continuously variable transmission (CVT), consisted of the design and construction of an experimental test rig geometrically similar to the CVT, and operation of that rig at selected speed ratios and power levels. Data are presented which show: how axial forces exerted on the driver and driven sheaves vary with the centerline force at constant values of speed ratio, speed, and output power; how the transmission efficiency varies with centerline force and how it is also a function of the V belt coefficient; and the axial forces on both sheaves as normalized functions of the traction coefficient.

  8. Force cycles and force chains.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Walker, David M; Lin, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We examine the coevolution of N cycles and force chains as part of a broader study which is designed to quantitatively characterize the role of the laterally supporting contact network to the evolution of force chains. Here, we elucidate the rheological function of these coexisting structures, especially in the lead up to failure. In analogy to force chains, we introduce the concept of force cycles: N cycles whose contacts each bear above average force. We examine their evolution around force chains in a discrete element simulation of a dense granular material under quasistatic biaxial loading. Three-force cycles are shown to be stabilizing structures that inhibit relative particle rotations and provide strong lateral support to force chains. These exhibit distinct behavior from other cycles. Their population decreases rapidly during the initial stages of the strain-hardening regime-a trend that is suddenly interrupted and reversed upon commencement of force chain buckling prior to peak shear stress. Results suggest that the three-force cycles are called upon for reinforcements to ward off failure via shear banding. Ultimately though, the resistance to buckling proves futile; buckling wins under the combined effects of dilatation and increasing compressive load. The sudden increase in three-force cycles may thus be viewed as an indicator of imminent failure via shear bands.

  9. Image-driven cardiac left ventricle segmentation for the evaluation of multiview fused real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography images.

    PubMed

    Rajpoot, Kashif; Noble, J Alison; Grau, Vicente; Szmigielski, Cezary; Becher, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) permits the acquisition and visualization of the beating heart in 3D. Despite a number of efforts to automate the left ventricle (LV) delineation from RT3DE images, this remains a challenging problem due to the poor nature of the acquired images usually containing missing anatomical information and high speckle noise. Recently, there have been efforts to improve image quality and anatomical definition by acquiring multiple single-view RT3DE images with small probe movements and fusing them together after alignment. In this work, we evaluate the quality of the multiview fused images using an image-driven semiautomatic LV segmentation method. The segmentation method is based on an edge-driven level set framework, where the edges are extracted using a local-phase inspired feature detector for low-contrast echocardiography boundaries. This totally image-driven segmentation method is applied for the evaluation of end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) single-view and multiview fused images. Experiments were conducted on 17 cases and the results show that multiview fused images have better image segmentation quality, but large failures were observed on ED (88.2%) and ES (58.8%) single-view images.

  10. Evaluation of Temperature and Stress Distribution on 2 Different Post Systems Using 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Değer, Yalçın; Adigüzel, Özkan; Özer, Senem Yiğit; Kaya, Sadullah; Polat, Zelal Seyfioğlu; Bozyel, Bejna

    2015-01-01

    Background The mouth is exposed to thermal irritation from hot and cold food and drinks. Thermal changes in the oral cavity produce expansions and contractions in tooth structures and restorative materials. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature and stress distribution on 2 different post systems using the 3-dimensional (3D) finite element method. Material/Methods The 3D finite element model shows a labio-lingual cross-sectional view of the endodontically treated upper right central incisor and supporting periodontal ligament with bone structures. Stainless steel and glass fiber post systems with different physical and thermal properties were modelled in the tooth restored with composite core and ceramic crown. We placed 100 N static vertical occlusal loading onto the center of the incisal surface of the tooth. Thermal loads of 0°C and 65°C were applied on the model for 5 s. Temperature and thermal stresses were determined on the labio-lingual section of the model at 6 different points. Results The distribution of stress, including thermal stress values, was calculated using 3D finite element analysis. The stainless steel post system produced more temperature and thermal stresses on the restorative materials, tooth structures, and posts than did the glass fiber reinforced composite posts. Conclusions Thermal changes generated stresses in the restorative materials, tooth, and supporting structures. PMID:26615495

  11. Experimental Validation of Plastic Mandible Models Produced by a “Low-Cost” 3-Dimensional Fused Deposition Modeling Printer

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Federico; Pandya, Mirali; Olszewski, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) plastic (ABS) models generated using a low-cost 3D fused deposition modelling printer. Material/Methods Two human dry mandibles were scanned with a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Accuitomo device. Preprocessing consisted of 3D reconstruction with Maxilim software and STL file repair with Netfabb software. Then, the data were used to print 2 plastic replicas with a low-cost 3D fused deposition modeling printer (Up plus 2®). Two independent observers performed the identification of 26 anatomic landmarks on the 4 mandibles (2 dry and 2 replicas) with a 3D measuring arm. Each observer repeated the identifications 20 times. The comparison between the dry and plastic mandibles was based on 13 distances: 8 distances less than 12 mm and 5 distances greater than 12 mm. Results The mean absolute difference (MAD) was 0.37 mm, and the mean dimensional error (MDE) was 3.76%. The MDE decreased to 0.93% for distances greater than 12 mm. Conclusions Plastic models generated using the low-cost 3D printer UPplus2® provide dimensional accuracies comparable to other well-established rapid prototyping technologies. Validated low-cost 3D printers could represent a step toward the better accessibility of rapid prototyping technologies in the medical field. PMID:27003456

  12. The First Observation of 3-Dimensional Motion and Twist in Sperm Flagella of the Stag Beetle Prosopocoilus inclinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Masaru; Kubo-Irie, Miyoko; Mohri, Hideo

    We discovered the 3-dimensional twist motion of sperm flagella of the stag beetle Prosopocoilus inclinates. The morphological features are discussed with experimental data obtained through various ‘imaging techniques’ including those developed in thermo-nuclear fusion research. The helical deformation length observed in the optical micrograph agreed statistically with those of transmission electron micrographs (TEM) on both ultra-thin section and negatively stained samples. This indicated that the helical twist mechanism of flagellar axoneme could be safely discussed from TEM. In order to elucidate this, we applied the newly developed Constrained Electron Beam Tomography (CEBT) technique adapted from our unique fusion plasma diagnosis. This requires basic assumptions of “the optimum deformation” and “the coherent length” as mathematical constraints. The results are the key parameters of the flagellum deformation, e.g. the helical pitch (HP) of both axoneme and mitochondrial derivatives as well as the phase slip (PS) between them. They allow the quantitative discussion on this motion.

  13. A 3-dimensional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived model to detect developmental neurotoxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoelting, Lisa; Scheinhardt, Benjamin; Bondarenko, Olesja; Schildknecht, Stefan; Kapitza, Marion; Tanavde, Vivek; Tan, Betty; Lee, Qian Yi; Mecking, Stefan; Leist, Marcel; Kadereit, Suzanne

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been shown to accumulate in organs, cross the blood-brain barrier and placenta, and have the potential to elicit developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Here, we developed a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model that allows for testing of potential developmental neurotoxicants. Early central nervous system PAX6(+) precursor cells were generated from hESCs and differentiated further within 3-D structures. The 3-D model was characterized for neural marker expression revealing robust differentiation toward neuronal precursor cells, and gene expression profiling suggested a predominantly forebrain-like development. Altered neural gene expression due to exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations of the known developmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury, indicated that the 3-D model could detect DNT. To test for specific toxicity of NPs, chemically inert polyethylene NPs (PE-NPs) were chosen. They penetrated deep into the 3-D structures and impacted gene expression at non-cytotoxic concentrations. NOTCH pathway genes such as HES5 and NOTCH1 were reduced in expression, as well as downstream neuronal precursor genes such as NEUROD1 and ASCL1. FOXG1, a patterning marker, was also reduced. As loss of function of these genes results in severe nervous system impairments in mice, our data suggest that the 3-D hESC-derived model could be used to test for Nano-DNT.

  14. Culture of murine aortic explants in 3-dimensional extracellular matrix: a novel, miniaturized assay of angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reed, May J; Karres, Nathan; Eyman, Daniel; Vernon, Robert B

    2007-05-01

    Assays of angiogenesis in vitro are critical to the study of vascular morphogenesis and to the evaluation of therapeutic compounds that promote or inhibit vascular growth. Culture of explanted aortic segments from rats or mice in a 3-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the most effective ways to generate capillary-like endothelial sprouts in vitro. We have modified the classic aortic explant model by placing the aortic segments from mice within small (5.6 mm diameter, 30 microl volume) lenticular hydrogels of type I collagen supported at the edge by nylon mesh rings. This method of culture, referred to as the "miniature ring-supported gel" (MRSG) assay, optimizes handling, cytological staining, and conventional imaging of the specimen and permits use of minimal volumes of reagents in a 96-well tissue culture format. We have used the MRSG assay to quantify the impaired angiogenic response of aged mice relative to young mice and to show that aged mice have significantly decreased sprout formation, but have similar levels of invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells into the supportive ECM. The MRSG assay, which combines low volume, physically robust gels in conjunction with mouse aortic segments, may prove to be a highly useful tool in studies of the process and control of vascular growth.

  15. A Novel 3 Dimensional Stromal-based Model for In Vitro Chemotherapy Sensitivity Testing of Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aljitawi, Omar S.; Li, Dandan; Xiao, Yinghua; Zhang, Da; Ramachandran, Karthik; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Lin, Tara L.; Kambhampati, Suman; Garimella, Rama

    2014-01-01

    The disparate responses of leukemia cells to chemotherapy in vivo, compared to in vitro, is partly related to the interactions of leukemic cells and the 3 dimensional (3D) bone marrow stromal microenvironment. We investigated the effects of chemotherapy agents on leukemic cell lines co-cultured with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hu-BM-MSC) in 3D. Comparison was made to leukemic cells treated in suspension, or grown on a hu-BM-MSC monolayer (2D conditions). We demonstrated that leukemic cells cultured in 3D were more resistant to drug-induced apoptosis compared to cells cultured in 2D or in suspension. We also demonstrated significant differences in leukemic cell response to chemotherapy using different leukemic cell lines cultured in 3D. We suggest that the differential responses to chemotherapy in 3D may be related to the expression of N-cadherin in the co-culture system. This unique model provides an opportunity to study leukemic cell responses to chemotherapy in 3D. PMID:23566162

  16. Do All Patients of Breast Carcinoma Need 3-Dimensional CT-Based Planning? A Dosimetric Study Comparing Different Breast Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Anusheel Pai, Rajeshri H.; Phurailatpam, Reena; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, D.D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Dinshaw, Ketayun A.

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of dose distribution in a single plane (i.e., 2-dimensional [2D] planning) is simple and less resource-intensive than CT-based 3-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) planning or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of the study was to determine if 2D planning could be an appropriate treatment in a subgroup of breast cancer patients based on their breast size. Twenty consecutive patients who underwent breast conservation were planned for radiotherapy. The patients were grouped in 3 different categories based on their respective chest wall separation (CWS) and the thickness of breast, as 'small,' 'medium,' and 'large.' Two more contours were taken at locations 5 cm superior and 5 cm inferior to the isocenter plane. Maximum dose recorded at specified points was compared in superior/inferior slices as compared to the central slice. The mean difference for small breast size was 1.93 (standard deviation [SD] = 1.08). For medium breas size, the mean difference was 2.98 (SD = 2.40). For the large breasts, the mean difference was 4.28 (SD = 2.69). Based on our dosimetric study, breast planning only on the single isocentric contour is an appropriate technique for patients with small breasts. However, for large- and medium-size breasts, CT-based planning and 3D planning have a definite role. These results can be especially useful for rationalizing treatment in busy oncology centers.

  17. ER:YAG laser for 3-dimensional debridement of canal systems: use of photon-induced photoacoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    DiVito, Enrico; Lloyd, Adam

    2012-11-01

    Laser-activated irrigation at subablative levels has the potential for complete tubular dentin disinfection in endodontics. In spite of the cost of the laser hardware, being able to reach the panacea of bacterial elimination and debris removal is a remarkable achievement and could be a paradigm shift in success rates for endodontic cases. Moreover, with the trend toward more conservative canal preparation and single instrumentation techniques, canal disinfection with an irrigating needle that cannot deliver sufficient volume to the canal terminus, PIPS seems likely to remove the gross canal enlargement impediment. Further investigation into smaller canal preparation sizes are ongoing. Any office that performs soft and hard tissue already understands the benefits of a laser. Adaptation of laser-activated irrigation to endodontics is a simple transition that is already understood by the hundreds of participants already trained in PIPS laser-activated irrigation. Similarly, a protocol for elimination of microbes from periodontal pockets using PIPS has the potential for selective removal of both inflamed and ulcerated epithelial tissues commonly seen in periodontal pathoses. The fact that the PIPS photoacoustic effect does not create thermal damage and will travel 3-dimensionally wherever there is fluid, makes it advantageous as a treatment modality for removing biofilms associated with periodontal pockets that are in difficult to access furcation areas and interproximal vertical defects.

  18. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels).

  19. Reflection of solar wind protons on the Martian bow shock: Investigations by means of 3-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, E.; Chanteur, G. M.; Modolo, R.; Dubinin, E.

    2012-09-01

    The reflection of solar wind protons on the Martian bow shock (BS) is investigated by means of three-dimensional simulation models. A two steps approach is adopted to allow a detailed analysis of the reflected population. Firstly, the 3-dimensional hybrid model of Modolo et al. (2005) is used to compute a stationary state of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with Mars. Secondly, the motion of test particles is followed in the electromagnetic field computed by the hybrid simulation meanwhile detection criteria defined to identify reflected protons are applied. This study demonstrates some effects of the large curvature of a planetary BS on the structure of the foreshock. Reflected protons encounter the BS in a region encompassing parts of the quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks, and exit the shock mainly from the quasi-parallel region. The energy spectrum of all reflected protons extends from 0 to almost 15keV. A virtual omnidirectional detector (VOD) is used to compute the local omnidirectional flux of reflected protons at various locations upstream of the BS. Spatial variations of this omnidirectional flux indicate the location and spatial extent of the proton foreshock and demonstrate its shift, increasing with the distance downstream, in the direction opposite to the motional electric field of the SW. Local energy spectra computed from the VOD observations demonstrate the existence of an energy gradient along the direction of the convection electric field.

  20. A (3 + 3)-dimensional "hypercubic" oxide-ionic conductor: type II Bi2O3-Nb2O5.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chris D; Schmid, Siegbert; Blanchard, Peter E R; Petříček, Vaclav; McIntyre, Garry J; Sharma, Neeraj; Maljuk, Andrey; Yaremchenko, Aleksey A; Kharton, Vladislav V; Gutmann, Matthias; Withers, Ray L

    2013-05-01

    The high-temperature cubic form of bismuth oxide, δ-Bi2O3, is the best intermediate-temperature oxide-ionic conductor known. The most elegant way of stabilizing δ-Bi2O3 to room temperature, while preserving a large part of its conductivity, is by doping with higher valent transition metals to create wide solid-solutions fields with exceedingly rare and complex (3 + 3)-dimensional incommensurately modulated "hypercubic" structures. These materials remain poorly understood because no such structure has ever been quantitatively solved and refined, due to both the complexity of the problem and a lack of adequate experimental data. We have addressed this by growing a large (centimeter scale) crystal using a novel refluxing floating-zone method, collecting high-quality single-crystal neutron diffraction data, and treating its structure together with X-ray diffraction data within the superspace symmetry formalism. The structure can be understood as an "inflated" pyrochlore, in which corner-connected NbO6 octahedral chains move smoothly apart to accommodate the solid solution. While some oxide vacancies are ordered into these chains, the rest are distributed throughout a continuous three-dimensional network of wide δ-Bi2O3-like channels, explaining the high oxide-ionic conductivity compared to commensurately modulated phases in the same pseudobinary system.

  1. MIRD Pamphlet No. 23: Quantitative SPECT for Patient-Specific 3-Dimensional Dosimetry in Internal Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George; Brill, A. Bertrand; Roberson, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In internal radionuclide therapy, a growing interest in voxel-level estimates of tissue-absorbed dose has been driven by the desire to report radiobiologic quantities that account for the biologic consequences of both spatial and temporal nonuniformities in these dose estimates. This report presents an overview of 3-dimensional SPECT methods and requirements for internal dosimetry at both regional and voxel levels. Combined SPECT/CT image-based methods are emphasized, because the CT-derived anatomic information allows one to address multiple technical factors that affect SPECT quantification while facilitating the patient-specific voxel-level dosimetry calculation itself. SPECT imaging and reconstruction techniques for quantification in radionuclide therapy are not necessarily the same as those designed to optimize diagnostic imaging quality. The current overview is intended as an introduction to an upcoming series of MIRD pamphlets with detailed radionuclide-specific recommendations intended to provide best-practice SPECT quantification–based guidance for radionuclide dosimetry. PMID:22743252

  2. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels). PMID:26818091

  3. Metal organic framework derived magnetically separable 3-dimensional hierarchical Ni@C nanocomposites: Synthesis and adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yixuan; Qiang, Tingting; Ye, Ming; Ma, Qiuyang; Fang, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Design an effective absorbent that has high surface area, and perfect recyclable is imperative for pollution elimination. Herein, we report a facile two-step strategy to fabricate magnetically separable 3-dimensional (3D) hierarchical carbon-coated nickel (Ni@C) nanocomposites by calcinating nickel based metal organic framework (Ni3(OH)2(C8H4O4)2(H2O)4). SEM and TEM images illuminate that the nanocomposites were constructed by 8 nm nickel nanoparticle encapsulated in 3D flake like carbon. The specific surface area of the obtained nanocomposites is up to 120.38 m2 g-1. Room temperature magnetic measurement indicates the nanocomposites show soft magnetism property, which endows the nanocomposites with an ideal fast magnetic separable property. The maximum adsorption capacity of the nanocomposites for rhodamine B is 84.5 mg g-1. Furthermore, the nanocomposites also exhibit a high adsorption capacity for heavy metal ions. The adsorbent can be very easily separated from the solution by using a common magnet without exterior energy. The as-prepared Ni@C nanocomposites can apply in waste water treatment on a large-scale as a new adsorbent with high efficiency and excellent recyclability.

  4. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  5. Tethyan collision forces and the stress field of the Eurasian Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warners-Ruckstuhl, Karin N.; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2013-10-01

    Resistive forces along convergent plate boundaries have a major impact on surface deformation, most visibly at collisional plate boundaries. Although quantification of these forces is key to understanding the evolution and present state of mountain belts, they remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of plate boundary structures and rheologies. In previous studies of the Eurasian Plate, we have analysed the balance of plate boundary forces, tractions resulting from lithosphere-mantle coupling, and intraplate variations in topography and density structure. This yielded a range of acceptable force distributions. In this study, we investigate to which extent the observed present-day stress field provides further constraints on the distribution of forces. We address the dynamics of the Eurasian Plate as a whole. This enables us to base our analysis on mechanical equilibrium of a tectonic plate and to evaluate all forces as part of an internally consistent set of forces driving and deforming Eurasia. We incorporate tractions from convective mantle flow modelling in a lithospheric model in which edge and lithospheric body forces are modelled explicitly and compute resulting stresses in a homogeneous elastic thin shell. Intraplate stress observations used are from the World Stress Map project. Eurasia's stress field turns out to be particularly sensitive to the distribution of collision forces on the plate's southern margin and, to a much lesser extent, to lithospheric density structure and tractions from mantle flow. Stress observations require collision forces on the India-Eurasia boundary of 7.0-10.5 TN m-1 and on the Arabia-Eurasia boundary of 1.3-2.7 TN m-1. Implication of mechanical equilibrium of the plate is that forces on the contacts with the African and Australian plates amount to 1.0-2.5 and 0-1.3 TN m-1, respectively. We use our results to assess the validity of the classical view that the mean elevation of an orogenic plateau can be taken as a measure

  6. On the Formulation of Weakly Singular Displacement/Traction Integral Equations; and Their Solution by the MLPG Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, Satya N.; Shen, Shengping

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a very simple method is used to derive the weakly singular traction boundary integral equation based on the integral relationships for displacement gradients. The concept of the MLPG method is employed to solve the integral equations, especially those arising in solid mechanics. A moving Least Squares (MLS) interpolation is selected to approximate the trial functions in this paper. Five boundary integral Solution methods are introduced: direct solution method; displacement boundary-value problem; traction boundary-value problem; mixed boundary-value problem; and boundary variational principle. Based on the local weak form of the BIE, four different nodal-based local test functions are selected, leading to four different MLPG methods for each BIE solution method. These methods combine the advantages of the MLPG method and the boundary element method.

  7. Crack-face displacements for an embedded elliptic crack in an infinite solid subjected to arbitrary tractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical expression for the crack-face displacements of an embedded elliptic crack in infinite solid subjected to arbitrary traction are obtained. The tractions on the crack faces are assumed to be expressed in a polynomial form. These displacements expressions complete the exact solution of Vijayakumar and Atluri, and Nishioki and Atluri. For the special case of an embedded crack in an infinite solid subjected to uniform pressure loading, the present displacements agree with those by Green and Sneddon. The displacement equations derived were used with the finite-element alternating method (FEAM) for the analysis of a semi-elliptic surface crack in a finite solid subjected to remote tensile loading. The maximum opening displacements obtained with FEAM are compared to those with the finite-element method with singularity elements. The maximum crack opening displacements by the two methods showed good agreement.

  8. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  9. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  10. Measuring of Traction and Speed Characteristics as Well as of Fuel Economy of a Car in Road Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivtsov, Sergey N.; Syrbakov, Andrey P.; Korchuganova, Marina A.

    2016-08-01

    This article is devoted to the identification of traction and speed characteristics as well as of fuel economy of motor vehicles in road conditions. Among common variants of measuring of the above stated values, the preference was given to the immediate gaining of factors by means of a computer-aided measuring system. There is a theoretical justification given to the suggested approach as well as methods and results allowing to provide a practically sufficient solution accuracy of the problem.

  11. Contributions of the Integrin β1 Tail to Cell Adhesive Forces

    PubMed Central

    Elloumi-Hannachi, Imen; García, José R.; Shekeran, Asha; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin receptors connect the extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton to provide essential forces and signals. To examine the contributions of the β1 integrin cytoplasmic tail to adhesive forces, we generated cell lines expressing wild-type and tail mutant β1 integrins in β1-null fibroblasts. Deletion of β1 significantly reduced cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and adhesive forces, and expression of hβ1 integrin in these cells restored adhesive functions. Cells expressing a truncated tail mutant had impaired spreading, fewer and smaller focal adhesions, reduced integrin binding to fibronectin, and lower adhesion strength and traction forces compared to hβ1-expressing cells. All these metrics were equivalent to those for β1-null cells, demonstrating that the β1 tail is essential to these adhesive functions. Expression of the constitutively-active D759A hβ1 mutant restored many of these adhesive functions in β1-null cells, although with important differences when compared to wild-type β1. Even though there were no differences in integrin-fibronectin binding and adhesion strength between hβ1- and hβ1-D759A-expressing cells, hβ1-D759A-expressing cells assembled more but smaller adhesions than hβ1-expressing cells. Importantly, hβ1-D759A-expressing cells generated lower traction forces compared to hβ1-expressing cells. These differences between hβ1- and hβ1-D759A-expressing cells suggest that regulation of integrin activation is important for fine-tuning cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and traction force generation. PMID:25460334

  12. Promotion of osteointegration under diabetic conditions by tantalum coating-based surface modification on 3-dimensional printed porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Hu, Xiaofan; Ma, Xiangyu; Ma, Zhensheng; Zhang, Yang; Lu, Yizhao; Li, Xiang; Lei, Wei; Feng, Yafei

    2016-12-01

    Clinical evidence indicates a high failure rate for titanium implants (TiI) in diabetic patients, involving the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the implant/bone interface. Tantalum coating on titanium (TaTi) has exerted better tissue integration properties than TiI, but its biological performance under diabetic conditions remains elusive. To investigate whether TaTi may ameliorate diabetes-induced implant destabilization and the underlying mechanisms, primary rabbit osteoblasts cultured on 3-dimensional printed TiI and TaTi were exposed to normal serum (NS), diabetic serum (DS), DS+NAC (a potent ROS inhibitor), and DS+SB203580 (a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor). An in vivo study was performed on diabetic sheep implanted with TiI or TaTi. Diabetes induced mitochondrial-derived ROS overproduction and caused cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, together with the activation of p38 MAPK in osteoblasts on TiI surface. Importantly, TaTi significantly attenuated ROS production and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and exerted more osseointegrative cell behavior than TiI, as shown by improved osteoblast adhesion, increased cell proliferation and differentiation and decreased apoptosis. These results were confirmed in vivo by the enhanced bone healing efficacy of TaTi. Moreover, treatment with NAC or SB203580 on TiI not only inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK but also improved cell function and alleviated apoptotic injury, whereas TaTi combined with NAC or SB203580 failed to further improve osteoblast functional recovery compared with TaTi alone. These results demonstrated that the tantalum coating markedly improved diabetes-induced impaired osteogenesis of TiI, which may be attributed to the suppression of the ROS-mediated p38 MAPK pathway.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Beg, Muhammad S.; Das, Prajnan; Meyer, Jeffrey

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  14. Chondroregulatory action of prolactin on proliferation and differentiation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells in 3-dimensional micromass cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor mRNAs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PRL concentration (10 ng/mL) increased chondrocyte viability and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher PRL concentrations ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL) decreased viability and increased apoptosis. -- Abstract: A recent investigation in lactating rats has provided evidence that the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) increases endochondral bone growth and bone elongation, presumably by accelerating apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and/or subsequent chondrogenic matrix mineralization. Herein, we demonstrated the direct chondroregulatory action of PRL on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in 3-dimensional micromass culture of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line. The results showed that ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor (PRLR) transcripts, and responded typically to PRL by downregulating PRLR expression. Exposure to a low PRL concentration of 10 ng/mL, comparable to the normal levels in male and non-pregnant female rats, increased chondrocyte viability, differentiation, proteoglycan accumulation, and mRNA expression of several chondrogenic differentiation markers, such as Sox9, ALP and Hspg2. In contrast, high PRL concentrations of Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL, comparable to the levels in pregnancy or lactation, decreased chondrocyte viability by inducing apoptosis, with no effect on chondrogenic marker expression. It could be concluded that chondrocytes directly but differentially responded to non-pregnant and pregnant/lactating levels of PRL, thus suggesting the stimulatory effect of PRL on chondrogenesis in young growing individuals, and supporting the hypothesis of hypertrophic chondrocyte apoptosis in the growth plate of lactating rats.

  15. Analysis of shape and motion of the mitral annulus in subjects with and without cardiomyopathy by echocardiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachskampf, F. A.; Chandra, S.; Gaddipatti, A.; Levine, R. A.; Weyman, A. E.; Ameling, W.; Hanrath, P.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The shape and dynamics of the mitral annulus of 10 patients without heart disease (controls), 3 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 5 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and normal systolic function were analyzed by transesophageal echocardiography and 3-dimensional reconstruction. Mitral annular orifice area, apico-basal motion of the annulus, and nonplanarity were calculated over time. Annular area was largest in end diastole and smallest in end systole. Mean areas were 11.8 +/- 2.5 cm(2) (controls), 15.2 +/- 4.2 cm(2) (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 10.2 +/- 2.4 cm(2) (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P = not significant). After correction for body surface, annuli from patients with normal left ventricular function were smaller than annuli from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (5.9 +/- 1.2 cm(2)/m(2) vs 7.7 +/- 1.0 cm(2)/m(2); P <.02). The change in area during the cardiac cycle showed significant differences: 23.8% +/- 5.1% (controls), 13.2% +/- 2.3% (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 32.4% +/- 7.6% (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P <.001). Apico-basal motion was highest in controls, followed by those with hypertrophic obstructive and dilated cardiomyopathy (1.0 +/- 0.3 cm, 0.8 +/- 0.2 cm, 0.3 +/- 0.2 cm, respectively; P <.01). Visual inspection and Fourier analysis showed a consistent pattern of anteroseptal and posterolateral elevations of the annulus toward the left atrium. In conclusion, although area changes and apico-basal motion of the mitral annulus strongly depend on left ventricular systolic function, nonplanarity is a structural feature preserved throughout the cardiac cycle in all three groups.

  16. Patient-Reported Outcomes After 3-Dimensional Conformal, Intensity-Modulated, or Proton Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Phillip J.; Paly, Jonathan J.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Sanda, Martin G.; Sandler, Howard. M.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Talcott, James A.; Coen, John J.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Shipley, William U.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies have suggested differing toxicity patterns for patients with prostate cancer who receive treatment with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or proton beam therapy (PBT). METHODS The authors reviewed patient-reported outcomes data collected prospectively using validated instruments that assessed bowel and urinary quality of life (QOL) for patients with localized prostate cancer who received 3DCRT (n = 123), IMRT (n = 153) or PBT (n = 95). Clinically meaningful differences in mean QOL scores were defined as those exceeding half the standard deviation of the baseline mean value. Changes from baseline were compared within groups at the first post-treatment follow-up (2–3 months from the start of treatment) and at 12 months and 24 months. RESULTS At the first post-treatment follow-up, patients who received 3DCRT and IMRT, but not those who received PBT, reported a clinically meaningful decrement in bowel QOL. At 12 months and 24 months, all 3 cohorts reported clinically meaningful decrements in bowel QOL. Patients who received IMRT reported clinically meaningful decrements in the domains of urinary irritation/obstruction and incontinence at the first post-treatment follow-up. At 12 months, patients who received PBT, but not those who received IMRT or 3DCRT, reported a clinically meaningful decrement in the urinary irritation/ obstruction domain. At 24 months, none of the 3 cohorts reported clinically meaningful changes in urinary QOL. CONCLUSIONS Patients who received 3DCRT, IMRT, or PBT reported distinct patterns of treatment-related QOL. Although the timing of toxicity varied between the cohorts, patients reported similar modest QOL decrements in the bowel domain and minimal QOL decrements in the urinary domains at 24 months. Prospective randomized trials are needed to further examine these differences. PMID:23436283

  17. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging System for Guidance in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R{sup 2}=0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were {<=}0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were {<=}0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were -0.34-0.48, -0.42-0.39, and -0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). Conclusions: The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS.

  18. Joint environmental assessment for western NPR-1 3-dimensional seismic project at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1124) to identify and evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed geophysical seismic survey on and adjacent to the Naval Petroleum Reserve No.1 (NPR-1), located approximately 35 miles west of Bakersfield, California. NPR-1 is jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.S.A. Production Company. The federal government owns about 78 percent of NPR-1, while Chevron owns the remaining 22 percent. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of DOE, which has contracted with Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc. (BPOI) for the operation and management of the reserve. The 3-dimensional seismic survey would take place on NPR-1 lands and on public and private lands adjacent to NPR-1. This project would involve lands owned by BLM, California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), California Energy Commission (CEC), The Nature Conservancy, the Center for Natural Lands Management, oil companies (Chevron, Texaco, and Mobil), and several private individuals. The proposed action is designed to provide seismic data for the analysis of the subsurface geology extant in western NPR-1 with the goal of better defining the commercial limits of a currently producing reservoir (Northwest Stevens) and three prospective hydrocarbon bearing zones: the {open_quotes}A Fan{close_quotes} in Section 7R, the 19R Structure in Section 19R, and the 13Z Structure in Section 13Z. Interpreting the data is expected to provide NPR-1 owners with more accurate locations of structural highs, faults, and pinchouts to maximize the recovery of the available hydrocarbon resources in western NPR-1. Completion of this project is expected to increase NPR-1 recoverable reserves, and reduce the risks and costs associated with further exploration and development in the area.

  19. A Geometric Modelling Approach to Determining the Best Sensing Coverage for 3-Dimensional Acoustic Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pashazadeh, Saeid; Sharifi, Mohsen

    2009-01-01

    Existing 3-dimensional acoustic target tracking methods that use wired/wireless networked sensor nodes to track targets based on four sensing coverage do not always compute the feasible spatio-temporal information of target objects. To investigate this discrepancy in a formal setting, we propose a geometric model of the target tracking problem alongside its equivalent geometric dual model that is easier to solve. We then study and prove some properties of dual model by exploiting its relationship with algebra. Based on these properties, we propose a four coverage axis line method based on four sensing coverage and prove that four sensing coverage always yields two dual correct answers; usually one of them is infeasible. By showing that the feasible answer can be only sometimes identified by using a simple time test method such as the one proposed by ourselves, we prove that four sensing coverage fails to always yield the feasible spatio-temporal information of a target object. We further prove that five sensing coverage always gives the feasible position of a target object under certain conditions that are discussed in this paper. We propose three extensions to four coverage axis line method, namely, five coverage extent point method, five coverage extended axis lines method, and five coverage redundant axis lines method. Computation and time complexities of all four proposed methods are equal in the worst cases as well as on average being equal to Θ(1) each. Proposed methods and proved facts about capabilities of sensing coverage degree in this paper can be used in all other methods of acoustic target tracking like Bayesian filtering methods. PMID:22423198

  20. Rectal planning risk volume correlation with acute and late toxicity in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dias, R S; Giordani, A J; Souhami, L; Segreto, R A; Segreto, H R C

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate rectum motion during 3-Dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in prostate cancer patients, to derive a planning volume at risk (PRV) and to correlate the PRV dose-volume histograms (DVH) with treatment complications.This study was conducted in two phases. Initially, the PRV was defined prospectively in 50 consecutive prostate cancer patients (Group 1) who received a radical course of 3-D CRT. Then, the obtained PRV was used in the radiotherapy planning of these same 50 patients plus another 59 prostate cancer patients (Group 2) previously treated between 2004 and 2008. All these patients' data, including the rectum and PRV DVHs, were correlated to acute and late complications, according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v4.0.The largest displacement occurred in the anterior axis. Long-term gastrointestinal (GI) complications grade ≥ 2 were seen in 9.2% of the cases. Factors that influenced acute GI reactions were: doses at 25% (p 5 0.011) and 40% (p 5 0.005) of the rectum volume and at 40% of the PRV (p 5 0.012). The dose at 25% of the rectum volume (p 5 0.033) and acute complications ≥ grade 2 (p 5 0.018) were prognostic factors for long-term complications. The PRV DVH did not correlate with late toxicity. The rectum showed a significant inter-fraction motion during 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. PRV dose correlated with acute gastrointestinal complications and may be a useful tool to predict and reduce their occurrence.

  1. Automorphosis of higher plants in space is simulated by using a 3-dimensional clinostat or by application of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    In STS-95 space experiments, etiolated pea seedlings grown under microgravity conditions in space have shown to be automorphosis. Epicotyls were almost straight but the most oriented toward the direction far from their cotyledons with ca. 45 degrees from the vertical line as compared with that on earth. In order to know the mechanism of microgravity conditions in space to induce automorphosis, we introduced simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat, resulting in the successful induction of automorphosis-like growth and development. Kinetic studies revealed that epicotyls bent at their basal region or near cotyledonary node toward the direction far from the cotyledons with about 45 degrees in both seedlings grown on 1 g and under simulated microgravity conditions on the clinostat within 48 hrs after watering. Thereafter epicotyls grew keeping this orientation under simulated microgravity conditions on the clinostat, whereas those grown on 1 g changed the growth direction to vertical direction by negative gravitropic response. Automorphosis-like growth and development was induced by the application of auxin polar transport inhibitors (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, N-(1-naphtyl)phthalamic acid, 9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylic acid), but not an anti-auxin, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid. Automorphosis-like epicotyl bending was also phenocopied by the application of inhibitors of stretch-activated channel, LaCl3 and GdCl3, and by the application of an inhibitor of protein kinase, cantharidin. These results suggest that automorphosis-like growth in epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings is due to suppression of negative gravitropic responses on 1 g, and the growth and development of etiolated pea seedlings under 1 g conditions requires for normal activities of auxin polar transport and the gravisensing system relating to calcium channels. Possible mechanisms of perception and transduction of gravity signals to induce automorphosis are discussed.

  2. Transformation of a 4-membered ring zinc phosphate SBU to a sodalite-related 3-dimensional structure through a linear chain structure.

    PubMed

    Dan, Meenakshi; Udayakumar, D; Rao, C N R

    2003-09-07

    A zero-dimensional zinc phosphate, comprising a 4-membered ring, is shown to spontaneously transform at room temperature, to a linear chain structure consisting of corner-shared 4-membered rings, the latter transforming to a 3-dimensional sodalite-related structure under mild conditions.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Visitors' Experiences and Knowledge Acquisition between a 3Dimensional Online and a Real-World Art Museum Tour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D' Alba, Adriana; Jones, Greg; Wright, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a study conducted in the fall of 2011 and the spring of 2012 which explored the use of existing 3D virtual environment technologies by bringing a selected permanent museum exhibit displayed at a museum located in central Mexico into an online 3Dimensional experience. Using mixed methods, the research study analyzed knowledge…

  4. A generalized traction integral equation for Stokes flow, with applications to near-wall particle mobility and viscous erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, William H.; Spagnolie, Saverio E.

    2017-03-01

    A double-layer integral equation for the surface tractions on a body moving in a viscous fluid is derived which allows for the incorporation of a background flow and/or the presence of a plane wall. The Lorentz reciprocal theorem is used to link the surface tractions on the body to integrals involving the background velocity and stress fields on an imaginary bounding sphere (or hemisphere for wall-bounded flows). The derivation requires the velocity and stress fields associated with numerous fundamental singularity solutions which we provide for free-space and wall-bounded domains. Two sample applications of the method are discussed: we study the tractions on an ellipsoid moving near a plane wall, which provides a more detailed understanding of the well-studied glancing and reversing trajectories in the context of particle sedimentation, and the erosion of bodies by a viscous flow, in which the surface is ablated at a rate proportional to the local viscous shear stress. Simulations and analytical estimates suggest that a spherical body in a uniform flow first reduces nearly but not exactly to the drag minimizing profile and then vanishes in finite time. The shape dynamics of an eroding body in a shear flow and near a wall are also investigated. Stagnation points on the body surface lead generically to the formation of cusps, whose number depends on the flow configuration and/or the presence of nearby boundaries.

  5. Biomechanical response of the bovine pia-arachnoid complex to normal traction loading at varying strain rates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Ma, Chunsheng; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Dong, Guang; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2007-10-01

    The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) covering the brain plays an important role in the mechanical response of the brain due to impact or inertial loading. The mechanical properties of the bovine PAC under tensile loading have been characterized previously. However, the transverse properties of this structure, such as shear and normal traction which are equally important to understanding the skull/brain interaction under traumatic loading, have not been investigated. These material properties are essential information needed to adequately define the material model of the PAC in a finite element (FE) model of human brain. The purpose of this study was to determine, experimentally, the material properties of the PAC under normal traction loading. PAC Specimens were obtained from freshly slaughtered bovine subjects from various locations. Quasi-static and dynamic tests along the radial direction were performed at four different strain rates (0.36, 2.0, 20.5, and 116.3 s(-1)) to investigate the rate and regional effects. Results suggest that the PAC under traction loading is stiffer than brain tissue, rate dependent, and can be characterized as linearly elastic until failure. However, no regional difference was observed.

  6. Direct Mechanical Force Measurements during the Migration of Dictyostelium Slugs Using Flexible Substrata

    PubMed Central

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Barentin, Catherine; Maeda, Yasuo; Sawada, Yasuji

    2005-01-01

    We use the flexible substrate method to study how and where mechanical forces are exerted during the migration of Dictyostelium slugs. This old and contentious issue has been left poorly understood so far. We are able to identify clearly separate friction forces in the tip and in the tail of the slug, traction forces mostly localized in the inner slug/surface contact area in the prespore region and large perpendicular forces directed in the outward direction at the outline of contact area. Surprisingly, the magnitude of friction and traction forces is decreasing with slug velocity indicating that these quantities are probably related to the dynamics of cell/substrate adhesion complexes. Contrary to what is always assumed in models and simulations, friction is not of fluid type (viscous drag) but rather close to solid friction. We suggest that the slime sheath confining laterally the cell mass of the slug experiences a tension that in turn is pulling out the elastic substrate in the direction tangential to the slug profile where sheath is anchored. In addition, we show in the appendix that the iterative method we developed is well adapted to study forces over large and continuous fields when the experimental error is sufficiently low and when the plane of recorded bead deformations is close enough to the elastomer surface, requirements fulfilled in this experimental study of Dictyostelium slugs. PMID:16113106

  7. An Assessment of Vitreous Degeneration in Eyes with Vitreomacular Traction and Macular Holes.

    PubMed

    Ghadiali, Quraish; Zahid, Sarwar; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Tan, Anna; Engelbert, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the stages of vitreous degeneration in patients with vitreomacular traction (VMT) and macular holes (MH). Methods. A retrospective study was performed analyzing stages of vitreous degeneration of eyes with VMT or MH using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). An analogous review was performed on a control group of eyes with contralateral posterior vitreous detachments. Thirty-four eyes with VMT/MH and 39 control eyes were reviewed. Results. Twenty-seven VMT/MH eyes and 31 control eyes were included. Eyes with VMT/MH demonstrated significantly earlier stages of vitreous degeneration when compared to the control group (p = 0.048) despite significantly greater age (p = 0.032). Conclusions. Vitreoretinal interface disease is more often associated with a formed vitreous and an intact premacular bursa. This is contrary to previous assumptions implicating degeneration of vitreous as a precipitating factor of interface disease when in conjunction with abnormal vitreomacular separation.

  8. Multiple incipient sensor faults diagnosis with application to high-speed railway traction devices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunkai; Jiang, Bin; Lu, Ningyun; Yang, Hao; Zhou, Yang

    2017-03-01

    This paper deals with the problem of incipient fault diagnosis for a class of Lipschitz nonlinear systems with sensor biases and explores further results of total measurable fault information residual (ToMFIR). Firstly, state and output transformations are introduced to transform the original system into two subsystems. The first subsystem is subject to system disturbances and free from sensor faults, while the second subsystem contains sensor faults but without any system disturbances. Sensor faults in the second subsystem are then formed as actuator faults by using a pseudo-actuator based approach. Since the effects of system disturbances on the residual are completely decoupled, multiple incipient sensor faults can be detected by constructing ToMFIR, and the fault detectability condition is then derived for discriminating the detectable incipient sensor faults. Further, a sliding-mode observers (SMOs) based fault isolation scheme is designed to guarantee accurate isolation of multiple sensor faults. Finally, simulation results conducted on a CRH2 high-speed railway traction device are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. Effect of moisture on the traction-separation behavior of cellulose nanocrystal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan

    2014-12-15

    Interfaces and stress transfer between cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) dictate the mechanical properties of hierarchical cellulose materials such as neat films and nanocomposites. An interesting question that remains is how the behavior of these interfaces changes due to environmental stimuli, most notably moisture. We present analyses on the traction-separation behavior between Iβ CNC elementary fibrils, providing insight into how the presence of a single atomic layer of water at these interfaces can drastically change the mechanical behavior. We find that molecular water at the interface between hydrophilic CNC surfaces has a negligible effect on the tensile separation adhesion energy. However, when water cannot hydrogen bond easily to the surface (i.e., hydrophobic surface), it tends to maintain hydrogen bonds with other water molecules across the interface and form a capillary bridge that serves to increase the energy required to separate the crystals. Under shear loading, water lowers the energy barriers to sliding by reducing the atomic friction and consequently the interlayer shear modulus between crystals. Our simulations indicate that these nanoscale interfaces and physical phenomena such as interfacial adhesion, interlayer shear properties, and stick-slip friction behavior can be drastically altered by the presence of water.

  10. An Assessment of Vitreous Degeneration in Eyes with Vitreomacular Traction and Macular Holes

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Sarwar; Tan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the stages of vitreous degeneration in patients with vitreomacular traction (VMT) and macular holes (MH). Methods. A retrospective study was performed analyzing stages of vitreous degeneration of eyes with VMT or MH using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). An analogous review was performed on a control group of eyes with contralateral posterior vitreous detachments. Thirty-four eyes with VMT/MH and 39 control eyes were reviewed. Results. Twenty-seven VMT/MH eyes and 31 control eyes were included. Eyes with VMT/MH demonstrated significantly earlier stages of vitreous degeneration when compared to the control group (p = 0.048) despite significantly greater age (p = 0.032). Conclusions. Vitreoretinal interface disease is more often associated with a formed vitreous and an intact premacular bursa. This is contrary to previous assumptions implicating degeneration of vitreous as a precipitating factor of interface disease when in conjunction with abnormal vitreomacular separation. PMID:28133544

  11. Clinical Investigation of the Posterior scleral contraction to Treat Macular Traction Maculopathy in Highly Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, An-Peng; Wan, Ting; Zhu, Shuang-Qian; Dong, Liang; Xue, An-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Myopic traction maculopathy (MTM) can cause vision disabilities in highly myopic eyes. This retrospective case series investigated the clinical outcomes of posterior scleral contraction (PSC) using genipin-cross-linked sclera as the material to treat MTM in highly myopic eyes. In total, 32 eyes from 29 highly myopic patients who underwent PSC for MTM were recruited. The changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and axial length were evaluated, macular reattachment and macular hole (MH) closure was assessed by optical coherence tomography, and complications were evaluated. At the final follow-up, the retina was completely reattached in 25 eyes (78.1%), essentially reattached in 4 eyes (12.5%), and partially reattached in 3 eyes (9.4%). The logMAR BCVA improved significantly from 1.18 ± 0.45 preoperatively to 0.87 ± 0.45 postoperatively (P < 0.001). The 32 eyes were further divided into the MH group (16 eyes) and the non-MH group (16 eyes) for comparison. The MH was closed in 9 eyes (56.3%). The retinal reattachment rate was 75.0% in the MH group and 81.25% in the non-MH group, and the logMAR BCVA improved significantly in both groups. The PSC using genipin-cross-linked sclera as the material can effectively treat MTM in highly myopic eyes, and significant visual improvement can be achieved with minimal complications. PMID:28220890

  12. Redesigning services for the management of vitreomacular traction and macular hole.

    PubMed

    Amoaku, W; Cackett, P; Tyagi, A; Mahmood, U; Nosek, J; Mennie, G; Rumney, N

    2014-07-01

    Vitreomacular traction (VMT) and VMT with macular hole (MH) are serious conditions, being associated with visual disturbance, for example, metamorphopsia, and diminished visual acuity (VA). Pars plana vitrectomy is the routine treatment for symptomatic VMT and VMT+MH. However, ocriplasmin has demonstrated favourable efficacy and safety in specific patient groups with VMT/MH and is now recommended as a treatment option for certain patients by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence. This means that services for managing patients with VMT/MH may need to be revised, as patients can now potentially receive treatment earlier in the course of the disease. VMT triage clinics could provide a more efficient way of managing VMT/MH patients. Patient assessment should always include high-definition optical coherence tomography, as this is the most accurate means of assessing abnormalities in the vitreoretinal (VR) interface, and an accurate measurement of best-corrected VA. It has been proposed that patients with VMT+MH be managed as a routine 6-week referral, with the complete patient journey-from initial referral to treatment-taking no longer than 6 months. It is important that patients are entered onto VR surgical lists so that there is no delay if ocriplasmin treatment is unsuccessful. Patients will need appropriate counselling about the expected outcomes and possible side effects of ocriplasmin treatment. One-year follow-up data should be collected by treatment centres in order to evaluate the new VMT service.

  13. Intergranular fracture in UO2: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt E5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior.

  14. Human dental pulp cell apoptosis: immunohistochemical study after applying orthodontic traction.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Angelova Volponi, A; Campanella, C; Guarnotta, C; Abdallah Hajj Hussein, I; Cappello, F; Gerbino, A; Jurjus, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare human dental pulp stress and programmed cell death after 3 and 6 months of orthodontic treatments by assessing the degree of apoptosis and related proteins. Human dental pulps were collected from twenty young patients orthodontically treated by Straight Wire technique. Samples were fixed, paraffin-embedded and processed for histology and immunohistochemistry using anti-heat shock protein 60 kDa (Hsp60), -caspase 3, -caspase 9, and -PCNA antibodies, as well as TUNEL reactions. Moreover, we performed immunoprecipitation for Hsp60 and caspase 3, and for Hsp60 and caspase 9, from paraffin extracted tissues. Increased levels of both caspases and Hsp60 occurred in 6-months treated samples; at the same time, we found increased levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells. Immunoprecipitation showed that Hsp60 forms a complex with both Pro-caspase 3 and Caspase 3, and this may accelerate Pro-caspase 3 activation, especially in the 6-months treated group. On the contrary, no complex between Hsp60 and Pro-caspase 9 was detected. The orthodontic tractions may be a cause of stress, apoptosis and proliferation in pulp tissue. These results suggest the need of further studies about the effects of long term orthodontic treatments on the dental pulp.

  15. Aspects of implementing constant traction boundary conditions in computational homogenization via semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javili, A.; Saeb, S.; Steinmann, P.

    2017-01-01

    In the past decades computational homogenization has proven to be a powerful strategy to compute the overall response of continua. Central to computational homogenization is the Hill-Mandel condition. The Hill-Mandel condition is fulfilled via imposing displacement boundary conditions (DBC), periodic boundary conditions (PBC) or traction boundary conditions (TBC) collectively referred to as canonical boundary conditions. While DBC and PBC are widely implemented, TBC remains poorly understood, with a few exceptions. The main issue with TBC is the singularity of the stiffness matrix due to rigid body motions. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a generic strategy to implement TBC in the context of computational homogenization at finite strains. To eliminate rigid body motions, we introduce the concept of semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions. Semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions are non-homogeneous Dirichlet-type constraints that simultaneously satisfy the Neumann-type conditions. A key feature of the proposed methodology is its applicability for both strain-driven as well as stress-driven homogenization. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated via a series of numerical examples.

  16. On the Need for Comprehensive Validation of Deformable Image Registration, Investigated With a Novel 3-Dimensional Deformable Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, Titania; Das, Shiva; Adamovics, John; Benning, Ron; Oldham, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To introduce and evaluate a novel deformable 3-dimensional (3D) dosimetry system (Presage-Def/Optical-CT) and its application toward investigating the accuracy of dose deformation in a commercial deformable image registration (DIR) package. Methods and Materials: Presage-Def is a new dosimetry material consisting of an elastic polyurethane matrix doped with radiochromic leuco dye. Radiologic and mechanical properties were characterized using standard techniques. Dose-tracking feasibility was evaluated by comparing dose distributions between dosimeters irradiated with and without 27% lateral compression. A checkerboard plan of 5-mm square fields enabled precise measurement of true deformation using 3D dosimetry. Predicted deformation was determined from a commercial DIR algorithm. Results: Presage-Def exhibited a linear dose response with sensitivity of 0.0032 ΔOD/(Gy∙cm). Mass density is 1.02 g/cm{sup 3}, and effective atomic number is within 1.5% of water over a broad (0.03-10 MeV) energy range, indicating good water-equivalence. Elastic characteristics were close to that of liver tissue, with Young's modulus of 13.5-887 kPa over a stress range of 0.233-303 kPa, and Poisson's ratio of 0.475 (SE, 0.036). The Presage-Def/Optical-CT system successfully imaged the nondeformed and deformed dose distributions, with isotropic resolution of 1 mm. Comparison with the predicted deformed 3D dose distribution identified inaccuracies in the commercial DIR algorithm. Although external contours were accurately deformed (submillimeter accuracy), volumetric dose deformation was poor. Checkerboard field positioning and dimension errors of up to 9 and 14 mm, respectively, were identified, and the 3D DIR-deformed dose γ passing rate was only γ{sub 3%/3} {sub mm} = 60.0%. Conclusions: The Presage-Def/Optical-CT system shows strong potential for comprehensive investigation of DIR algorithm accuracy. Substantial errors in a commercial DIR were found in the conditions

  17. Use of 3-Dimensional Volumetric Modeling of Adrenal Gland Size in Patients with Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, P P; Lodish, M B; Turkbey, E B; Papadakis, G Z; Stratakis, C A

    2016-04-01

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a rare type of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia leading to hypercortisolemia. Adrenal nodularity is often appreciable with computed tomography (CT); however, accurate radiologic characterization of adrenal size in PPNAD has not been studied well. We used 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric analysis to characterize and compare adrenal size in PPNAD patients, with and without Cushing's syndrome (CS). Patients diagnosed with PPNAD and their family members with known mutations in PRKAR1A were screened. CT scans were used to create 3D models of each adrenal. Criteria for biochemical diagnosis of CS included loss of diurnal variation and/or elevated midnight cortisol levels, and paradoxical increase in urinary free cortisol and/or urinary 17-hydroxysteroids after dexamethasone administration. Forty-five patients with PPNAD (24 females, 27.8±17.6 years) and 8 controls (19±3 years) were evaluated. 3D volumetric modeling of adrenal glands was performed in all. Thirty-eight patients out of 45 (84.4%) had CS. Their mean adrenal volume was 8.1 cc±4.1, 7.2 cc±4.5 (p=0.643) for non-CS, and 8.0cc±1.6 for controls. Mean values were corrected for body surface area; 4.7 cc/kg/m(2)±2.2 for CS, and 3.9 cc/kg/m(2)±1.3 for non-CS (p=0.189). Adrenal volume and midnight cortisol in both groups was positively correlated, r=0.35, p=0.03. We conclude that adrenal volume measured by 3D CT in patients with PPNAD and CS was similar to those without CS, confirming empirical CT imaging-based observations. However, the association between adrenal volume and midnight cortisol levels may be used as a marker of who among patients with PPNAD may develop CS, something that routine CT cannot do.

  18. A 3-Dimensional Model of Water-Bearing Sequences in the Dominguez Gap Region, Long Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponti, Daniel J.; Ehman, Kenneth D.; Edwards, Brian D.; Tinsley, John C.; Hildenbrand, Thomas; Hillhouse, John W.; Hanson, Randall T.; McDougall, Kristen; Powell, Charles L.; Wan, Elmira; Land, Michael; Mahan, Shannon; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.

    2007-01-01

    A 3-dimensional computer model of the Quaternary sequence stratigraphy in the Dominguez gap region of Long Beach, California has been developed to provide a robust chronostratigraphic framework for hydrologic and tectonic studies. The model consists of 13 layers within a 16.5 by 16.1 km (10.25 by 10 mile) square area and extends downward to an altitude of -900 meters (-2952.76 feet). Ten sequences of late Pliocene to Holocene age are identified and correlated within the model. Primary data to build the model comes from five reference core holes, extensive high-resolution seismic data obtained in San Pedro Bay, and logs from several hundred water and oil wells drilled in the region. The model is best constrained in the vicinity of the Dominguez gap seawater intrusion barrier where a dense network of subsurface data exist. The resultant stratigraphic framework and geologic structure differs significantly from what has been proposed in earlier studies. An important new discovery from this approach is the recognition of ongoing tectonic deformation throughout nearly all of Quaternary time that has impacted the geometry and character of the sequences. Anticlinal folding along a NW-SE trend, probably associated with Quaternary reactivation of the Wilmington anticline, has uplifted and thinned deposits along the fold crest, which intersects the Dominguez gap seawater barrier near Pacific Coast Highway. A W-NW trending fault system that approximately parallels the fold crest has also been identified. This fault progressively displaces all but the youngest sequences down to the north and serves as the southern termination of the classic Silverado aquifer. Uplift and erosion of fining-upward paralic sequences along the crest of the young fold has removed or thinned many of the fine-grained beds that serve to protect the underlying Silverado aquifer from seawater contaminated shallow groundwater. As a result of this process, the potential exists for vertical migration of

  19. The effectiveness and user perception of 3-dimensional digital human anatomy in an online undergraduate anatomy laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbelink, Amy Joanne

    2007-12-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of implementing desktop 3-dimensional (3D) stereo images of human anatomy into an undergraduate human anatomy distance laboratory. User perceptions of 2D and 3D images were gathered via questionnaire in order to determine ease of use and level of satisfaction associated with the 3D software in the online learning environment. Mayer's (2001, p. 184) principles of design were used to develop the study materials that consisted of PowerPoint presentations and AVI files accessed via Blackboard. The research design employed a mixed-methods approach. Volunteers each were administered a demographic survey and were then stratified into groups based upon pre-test scores. A total sample size of 62 pairs was available for combined data analysis. Quantitative research questions regarding the effectiveness of 2D versus the 3D treatment were analyzed using a doubly-multivariate repeated measures (Doubly-MANOVA) design. Paired test scores achieved by undergraduates on a laboratory practical of identification and spatial relationships of the bones and features of a human skull were used in the analysis. The questionnaire designed to gather user perceptions consisted of quantitative and qualitative questions. Response frequencies were analyzed for the two groups and common themes were noted. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in group means for the main effect of the treatment groups 2D and 3D and for the variables of identification and relationship with the 3D group outperforming the 2D group on both dependent variables. Effect sizes were determined to be small, 0.215 for the identification variable and 0.359 for the relationship variable. Overall, all students liked the convenience of using PowerPoint and AVI files online. The 3D group felt their PowerPoint was more realistic than did the 2D group and both groups appreciated the detailed labeling of the online images. One third of the

  20. Development and Application of a 3-Dimensional Finite Element Model for Remediation Wellfield Management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, K.; Maley, M. P.; Demir, Z.; Noyes, C.

    2001-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), which is on the Superfund National Priorities List, is implementing an extensive ground water remediation program. The environmental investigation covers an area of about 2 square miles, and is underlain by a thick sequence of heterogeneous alluvial sediments. These sediments have been subdivided into hydrostratigraphic units (HSUs) bounded by thin confining layers that were identified using a deterministic approach. LLNL currently operates a large ground water extraction system that includes 80 ground water extraction wells connected to 25 separate treatment facilities. These combined facilities treated about 308 million gallons of ground water at an average combined flow rate of 600 gpm, and removed about 270 kg of volatile organic compounds (VOC's). To better manage this large complex remediation system, a 3-dimensional, finite-element numerical model was developed using FEFLOW. The model simulated a 7 square-mile portion of the large Livermore Valley ground water basin. The quality of the input data varied from highly detailed, in the environmental investigation areas, to sparse, near some of the model domain boundaries. These different data sets had to be integrated to obtain the necessary boundary conditions and input parameters for the model. Hydraulic conductivities were averaged from measured lithologic descriptions and hydraulic test data. Boundary conditions were based on a local and regional assessment of groundwater elevation data representative of observed inflow/outflow boundaries. The model was initially calibrated to a set of 8 distinct hydrologic stress periods over 12 years. Initial flow calibration for the model was achieved using the parameter estimation tool PEST. Through successive data analysis and calibration, optimal parameters were established for each HSU and expanded to 35 hydrologic stress periods covering the entire recorded hydrologic history. VOC transport was calibrated to 9 years of